WorldWideScience

Sample records for publications intended audience

  1. Can donated media placements reach intended audiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer; Polonec, Lindsey

    2013-09-01

    Donated media placements for public service announcements (PSAs) can be difficult to secure, and may not always reach intended audiences. Strategies used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) to obtain donated media placements include producing a diverse mix of high-quality PSAs, co-branding with state and tribal health agencies, securing celebrity involvement, monitoring media trends to identify new distribution opportunities, and strategically timing the release of PSAs. To investigate open-ended recall of PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, CDC conducted 12 focus groups in three U.S. cities with men and women either nearing age 50 years, when screening is recommended to begin, or aged 50-75 years who were not in compliance with screening guidelines. In most focus groups, multiple participants recalled exposure to PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, and most of these individuals reported having seen SFL PSAs on television, in transit stations, or on the sides of public buses. Some participants reported exposure to SFL PSAs without prompting from the moderator, as they explained how they learned about the disease. Several participants reported learning key campaign messages from PSAs, including that colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 years and screening can find polyps so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Donated media placements can reach and educate mass audiences, including millions of U.S. adults who have not been screened appropriately for colorectal cancer.

  2. United States Newspaper Program. List of Intended Audience Terms for 655 Genre Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisconsin State Historical Society, Madison.

    The United States Newspaper Program (USNP) is a national, cooperative effort to locate, catalog, and preserve on microfilm newspapers published in the United States and its territories since the seventeenth century. This list of intended-audience terms was initially developed by the USNP staff at the State Historical Society of Wisconsin, but soon…

  3. Audience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Gulbrandsen, Ib Tunby

    2018-01-01

    discusses the concept audience in relation to a number of competing theoretical concepts such as ‘publics’, ‘users’, and ‘participants’. The second part outlines the historical development of audience research through three consecutive and now co-existing paradigms: the behavioural paradigm, the reception......The entry defines audiences in a digital, mediatized society as the people who, in their capacity of social actors, are attending to, negotiating the meaning of, and sometimes participating in the multimodal processes initiated or carried by institutional media. The first part of the entry...... paradigm, and the participation paradigm. The third part discusses the ways in which the audience perspective has been handled in the field of strategic communication, noting for instance how the concept of stakeholders has developed as an alternative to, or refinement of, the traditional understanding...

  4. Developing Public Health Initiatives through Understanding Motivations of the Audience at Mass-Gathering Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, Alison; Ranse, Jamie; Munn, Matthew Brendan

    2018-04-01

    This report identifies what is known about audience motivations at three different mass-gathering events: outdoor music festivals, religious events, and sporting events. In light of these motivations, the paper discusses how these can be harnessed by the event organizer and Emergency Medical Services. Lastly, motivations tell what kinds of interventions can be used to achieve an understanding of audience characteristics and the opportunity to develop tailor-made programs to maximize safety and make long-lasting public health interventions to a particular "cohort" or event population. A lot of these will depend on what the risks/hazards are with the particular populations in order to "target" them with public health interventions. Audience motivations tell the event organizer and Emergency Medical Services about the types of behaviors they should expect from the audience and how this may affect their health while at the event. Through these understandings, health promotion and event safety messages can be developed for a particular type of mass-gathering event based on the likely composition of the audience in attendance. Health promotion and providing public information should be at the core of any mass-gathering event to minimize public health risk and to provide opportunities for the promotion of healthy behaviors in the local population. Audience motivations are a key element to identify and agree on what public health information is needed for the event audience. A more developed understanding of audience behavior provides critical information for event planners, event risk managers, and Emergency Medical Services personnel to better predict and plan to minimize risk and reduce patient presentations at events. Mass-gathering event organizers and designers intend their events to be positive experiences and to have meaning for those who attend. Therefore, continual vigilance to improve public health effectiveness and efficiency can become best practice at events

  5. Know your audience: public perception of geology from anecdote to evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Hazel

    2015-04-01

    One of the basic strategies of science communication is to 'know your audience' (Nerlich et al, 2010), yet often scientists are communicating to a distant and diffuse audience that cannot be seen or directly engaged with. Both traditional written reports and emerging online media provide limited or no opportunity to engage audiences in dialogues with the communicator that can convey the public's own levels of knowledge. In those circumstances it becomes almost impossible to know your audience. For geoscientists, this decoupling from the intended audience is made more problematic when conveying new technical issues such as carbon capture and storage or deep geological disposal of radioactive waste, which are rooted in the unfamiliar subsurface (Sharma et al, 2007; Ashworth et al, 2009). Those geologists who have engaged with the public in these novel realms often have fashioned informal ways to overcome their audience's geological unfamiliarity based on the trial-and-error of personal experience, but such anecdotal lessons are rarely applicable to wider communities of practice. In recent years, however, our ad hoc intuitive ideas about how to comprehend public perceptions of geology have gained rigour from evidence-based theory (Singleton et al, 2009). This presentation highlights one example of this, using an ongoing study into the public understanding of the geological subsurface in south west England. Results from a combination of interviews and questionnaires were assessed using the established psychological technique: 'mental models' (Morgan et al, 2002). The work demonstrates how a mixed method approach can move geoscience communication beyond casual assumptions and individual rules of thumb to a more robust scientific way of thinking.

  6. Public speaking in virtual reality: Audience design and speaker experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, N.

    2016-01-01

    Whether we are talking about our research at a conference, making a speech at a friend’s wedding, or presenting a proposal in a businessmeeting,we have to speak in public from time to time. How well we deliver a presentation affects the way people think about us and our message. To deliver a well-received speech, preparation is necessary. Among various speech preparation activities, practicing with an audience is regarded as an effective way for enhancing speech performance. However, it is of...

  7. Using photographic art to connect researchers with public audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haren, J. L.; Roberts, E.; Fields, J.; Johnson, B.; Saleska, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Communication is a process by which information is exchanged between individuals. Before information can be exchanged both or al parties have to be willing to partake in the communication process. Climate change scientists are still struggling to present their message in part because the general public does not want to hear their message and in part of the personality gap between scientists and the general public (Weiler et al. 2011). This demonstrates the need for communication, through a variety of means, with the general public about who climate change researchers are and what they do, besides the message that they have to convey. This ';feeling' type - relying on personal value and impact of decisions on others- of communication, not common in the scientific community that requires facts, has been suggested to be more effective with the general public (Weiler et al. 2011). We created a multimedia exhibition, which aims to put an intimate human face on science with an approach based on the following ideas: 1) Art initiates the connection between researchers and public audiences through visual stimulation, and 2) The one-on-one experience with a researcher through audio-visual means increases public engagement with climate change science. The exhibition implements these ideas by first, building on the core artistic vision of an artist/photographer who has been accompanying us on field courses and expeditions in the Amazon basin, and second, by bringing the personal voice and stories of students and scientists to the images in which they are represented. Our approach expanded on these themes with a unique twist: we use artistic imagery and video to show the personality of researchers and the process of science. After an image has captured the attention of a visitor, they will be engaged by the intimacy of hearing the scientist explaining how they got there, what they were doing at that particular moment, and why it's relevant and important to the visitor's life

  8. Identifying like-minded audiences for global warming public engagement campaigns: an audience segmentation analysis and tool development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W Maibach

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Achieving national reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will require public support for climate and energy policies and changes in population behaviors. Audience segmentation--a process of identifying coherent groups within a population--can be used to improve the effectiveness of public engagement campaigns.In Fall 2008, we conducted a nationally representative survey of American adults (n = 2,164 to identify audience segments for global warming public engagement campaigns. By subjecting multiple measures of global warming beliefs, behaviors, policy preferences, and issue engagement to latent class analysis, we identified six distinct segments ranging in size from 7 to 33% of the population. These six segments formed a continuum, from a segment of people who were highly worried, involved and supportive of policy responses (18%, to a segment of people who were completely unconcerned and strongly opposed to policy responses (7%. Three of the segments (totaling 70% were to varying degrees concerned about global warming and supportive of policy responses, two (totaling 18% were unsupportive, and one was largely disengaged (12%, having paid little attention to the issue. Certain behaviors and policy preferences varied greatly across these audiences, while others did not. Using discriminant analysis, we subsequently developed 36-item and 15-item instruments that can be used to categorize respondents with 91% and 84% accuracy, respectively.In late 2008, Americans supported a broad range of policies and personal actions to reduce global warming, although there was wide variation among the six identified audiences. To enhance the impact of campaigns, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses seeking to engage the public can selectively target one or more of these audiences rather than address an undifferentiated general population. Our screening instruments are available to assist in that process.

  9. Identifying like-minded audiences for global warming public engagement campaigns: an audience segmentation analysis and tool development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Edward W; Leiserowitz, Anthony; Roser-Renouf, Connie; Mertz, C K

    2011-03-10

    Achieving national reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will require public support for climate and energy policies and changes in population behaviors. Audience segmentation--a process of identifying coherent groups within a population--can be used to improve the effectiveness of public engagement campaigns. In Fall 2008, we conducted a nationally representative survey of American adults (n = 2,164) to identify audience segments for global warming public engagement campaigns. By subjecting multiple measures of global warming beliefs, behaviors, policy preferences, and issue engagement to latent class analysis, we identified six distinct segments ranging in size from 7 to 33% of the population. These six segments formed a continuum, from a segment of people who were highly worried, involved and supportive of policy responses (18%), to a segment of people who were completely unconcerned and strongly opposed to policy responses (7%). Three of the segments (totaling 70%) were to varying degrees concerned about global warming and supportive of policy responses, two (totaling 18%) were unsupportive, and one was largely disengaged (12%), having paid little attention to the issue. Certain behaviors and policy preferences varied greatly across these audiences, while others did not. Using discriminant analysis, we subsequently developed 36-item and 15-item instruments that can be used to categorize respondents with 91% and 84% accuracy, respectively. In late 2008, Americans supported a broad range of policies and personal actions to reduce global warming, although there was wide variation among the six identified audiences. To enhance the impact of campaigns, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses seeking to engage the public can selectively target one or more of these audiences rather than address an undifferentiated general population. Our screening instruments are available to assist in that process.

  10. Identifying Like-Minded Audiences for Global Warming Public Engagement Campaigns: An Audience Segmentation Analysis and Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, Edward W.; Leiserowitz, Anthony; Roser-Renouf, Connie; Mertz, C. K.

    2011-01-01

    Background Achieving national reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will require public support for climate and energy policies and changes in population behaviors. Audience segmentation – a process of identifying coherent groups within a population – can be used to improve the effectiveness of public engagement campaigns. Methodology/Principal Findings In Fall 2008, we conducted a nationally representative survey of American adults (n = 2,164) to identify audience segments for global warming public engagement campaigns. By subjecting multiple measures of global warming beliefs, behaviors, policy preferences, and issue engagement to latent class analysis, we identified six distinct segments ranging in size from 7 to 33% of the population. These six segments formed a continuum, from a segment of people who were highly worried, involved and supportive of policy responses (18%), to a segment of people who were completely unconcerned and strongly opposed to policy responses (7%). Three of the segments (totaling 70%) were to varying degrees concerned about global warming and supportive of policy responses, two (totaling 18%) were unsupportive, and one was largely disengaged (12%), having paid little attention to the issue. Certain behaviors and policy preferences varied greatly across these audiences, while others did not. Using discriminant analysis, we subsequently developed 36-item and 15-item instruments that can be used to categorize respondents with 91% and 84% accuracy, respectively. Conclusions/Significance In late 2008, Americans supported a broad range of policies and personal actions to reduce global warming, although there was wide variation among the six identified audiences. To enhance the impact of campaigns, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses seeking to engage the public can selectively target one or more of these audiences rather than address an undifferentiated general population. Our screening instruments are

  11. Pervasive Public Figure Status and Local or Topical Fame in Light of Evolving Media Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunker, Matthew D.; Tobin, Charles D.

    1998-01-01

    Contributes to journalistic legal scholarship and theory by examining the development of "public figure" status in defamation law, with particular attention to public figures who may have achieved notoriety among less than a national audience. Argues that trends in media and audience fragmentation warrant extensions of current doctrine based on…

  12. A Mismatch Between Patient Education Materials About Sickle Cell Disease and the Literacy Level of Their Intended Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Elizabeth; Ng, Jared; Vitzthum, Kelly; Rudd, Rima

    2016-05-12

    Despite the first goal of the 2010 National Action Plan to Improve Health Literacy, the literacy demands of much health information exceeds the reading skills of most US adults. The objective of this study was to assess the health literacy level of publicly available patient education materials for people with sickle cell disease (SCD). We used 5 validated tools to evaluate 9 print and 4 online patient education materials: the simple measure of gobbledygook (SMOG) to assess reading grade level, the Peter Mosenthal and Irwin Kirsch readability formula (PMOSE/IKIRSCH) to assess structure and density, the Patient Education Materials Assessment Tool (PEMAT) to assess actionability (how well readers will know what to do after reading the material) and understandability, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC's) Clear Communication Index (Index) to obtain a comprehensive literacy demand score, and the Printed Cancer Education Materials for African Americans Cultural Sensitivity Assessment Tool. Materials' scores reflected high reading levels ranging from 8th grade to 12th grade, appropriate (low) structural demand, and low actionability relative to understandability. CDC suggests that an appropriate Index score should fall in or above the 90th percentile. The scores yielded by materials evaluated in this assessment ranged from the 44th to the 76th percentiles. Eight of the 13 materials scored within the acceptable range for cultural sensitivity. Reading levels of available patient education materials exceed the documented average literacy level of the US adult population. Health literacy demands should be a key consideration in the revision and development of patient education materials for people with SCD.

  13. TV FOR CHILDREN : How the Swedish Public Service Television Imagines a Child Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Pettersson, Åsa

    2013-01-01

    The study explores how the Swedish public service TV institution imagines a child audience in a societal context where the broadcasting landscape hastransformed greatly over the past thirty years and where TV is seen to  constitute both risks and benefits for children. The concept of TV for children is established to broaden the scope for studying what has been broadcast for a child audience on public service TV. The empirical material consists of both broadcasting policy documents and an ext...

  14. Evaluation of a public health newsletter intended for travel agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provost, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    Travel agents are in a key position to encourage travelers to seek consultation in travel clinics. Since the beginning of the year 2000, a newsletter specifically designed to sensitize travel agents to travel health has been published by the public health authorities and distributed to all travel agencies in Quebec. This study was undertaken to evaluate the utilization and appreciation of the newsletter by travel agents and its impact on preventive practices. During the autumn of 2001, a cross-sectional descriptive survey was carried out among travel agencies in Quebec. Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire sent by fax with a postal follow-up. A total of 252 of the 950 travel agencies contacted (27%) answered our questionnaire. In all, 78% of respondents said their agency receives the newsletter. Among these agencies, the majority of respondents considered that the subjects discussed in the newsletter are interesting (often or in general: 96%), that the subjects and preventive recommendations for travel destinations are useful in the travel agent's practice (often or in general: 89%), and generally presented in an adequate way (96%). According to the respondents, the newsletter encouraged them, often or very often, to inform travelers about travel-related health problems (70%) or to recommend a consultation in a travel clinic (63%). The impact of the newsletter on the recommendation to consult was greater among agents having more than 10 years' experience (odds ratio [OR] 3.2). When asked about the best way to send them the newsletter, only 31% identified bulk mailing, which was the current mode of distribution. Satisfaction rate with the newsletter appears to be high among respondents who receive it. However, the low response rate to the survey may indicate that as a whole, the travel agents' interest in the newsletter is mitigated. Despite the limitations of this study, the results will allow us to modify some aspects of the publication

  15. Making Publics: Mobilizing Audiences in High School Makerspaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stornaiuolo, Amy; Nichols, T. Philip

    2018-01-01

    Background/Context: Researchers, policy makers, and practitioners are paying increasing attention to the educational opportunities afforded by the maker movement--a growing public interested in do-it-yourself designing, remixing, and tinkering using physical and digital tools. While education research on "making" has often focused on…

  16. Public speaking in virtual reality : Audience design and speaker experiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, N.

    2016-01-01

    Whether we are talking about our research at a conference, making a speech at a friend’s wedding, or presenting a proposal in a businessmeeting,we have to speak in public from time to time. How well we deliver a presentation affects the way people think about us and our message. To deliver a

  17. Translating Scientific Conclusions about Risk for Public Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, T. E.

    2009-12-01

    Climate change has been aptly described as a problem of risk management, yet the scientific community has not been successful in helping the public engage in risk management effectively. Behavioral science studies demonstrate that, while the public generally accepts the reality of anthropogenic climate change today, the immanence of impacts and scale of risk and opportunities for effective mitigation are poorly understood. Helping the public overcome these misperceptions and engage in decision-making about climate risks is, perhaps, the climate communication community’s most urgent priority. Scientific writing and graphic conventions are poorly suited for communicating with non-scientists. Using examples from the IPCC 4th Assessment, this session will demonstrate how specific conventions in science writing and graph making have obscured critical information about climate risks. The session will further demonstrate how reformatting the graphical information can create an exceptionally clear picture of where humanity stands and the implications of various emissions pathways for the future. Attendees will appreciate how presentations of science results can be tailored to answer the public’s questions more effectively by highlighting useful information in accurate, yet accessible ways. Decision-makers and the public urgently need information about climate impact risks and the consequences of various emissions pathways. Yet written and graphic descriptions from the IPCC and other assessment agencies burden non-scientists with multiple temperature baselines (e.g., pre-Industrial, mid-20th century, late 20th century, today), two confusingly similar measures for the key human contribution to atmospheric composition (CO2 and CO2-eq), and multiple ways of describing probability and certainty. The public is further confounded by inconsistent graphic conventions in scientific figures, including inconsistent color-coding, labeling, axis orientation, and treatment of

  18. Heckling in Hyde Park: Verbal Audience Participation in Popular Public Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Speakers' Corner is a multicultural setting in a London park at which the general public can actively participate in popular debate. A successful 'soap-box' orator should attract and keep an audience, elicit support from the crowd and gain applause; indeed, a mastery of the crowd, the discourse...

  19. Public Communication of Science in Blogs: Recontextualizing Scientific Discourse for a Diversified Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzón, María José

    2013-01-01

    New media are having a significant impact on science communication, both on the way scientists communicate with peers and on the dissemination of science to the lay public. Science blogs, in particular, provide an open space for science communication, where a diverse audience (with different degrees of expertise) may have access to science…

  20. Designing virtual audiences for fear of public speaking training - an observation study on realistic nonverbal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Virtual Reality technology offers great possibilities for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy of fear of public speaking: Clients can be exposed to virtual fear-triggering stimuli (exposure) and are able to role-play in virtual environments, training social skills to overcome their fear. Usually, prototypical audience behavior (neutral, social and anti-social) serves as stimulus in virtual training sessions, although there is significant lack of theoretical basis on typical audience behavior. The study presented deals with the design of a realistic virtual presentation scenario. An audience (consisting of n=18 men and women) in an undergraduate seminar was observed during three frontal lecture sessions. Behavior frequency of four nonverbal dimensions (eye contact, facial expression, gesture, and posture) was rated by means of a quantitative content analysis. Results show audience behavior patterns which seem to be typical in frontal lecture contexts, like friendly and neutral face expressions. Additionally, combined and even synchronized behavioral patterns between participants who sit next to each other (like turning to the neighbor and start talking) were registered. The gathered data serve as empirical design basis for a virtual audience to be used in virtual training applications that stimulate the experiences of the participants in a realistic manner, thereby improving the experienced presence in the training application.

  1. An Experimental Test of the Roles of Audience Involvement and Message Frame in Shaping Public Reactions to Celebrity Illness Disclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrick, Jessica Gall

    2018-04-13

    Much research has investigated what happens when celebrities disclose an illness (via media) to the public. While audience involvement (i.e., identification and parasocial relationships) is often the proposed mechanism linking illness disclosures with audience behavior change, survey designs have prevented researchers from understanding if audience involvement prior to the illness disclosure actually predicts post-disclosure emotions, cognitions, and behaviors. Rooted in previous work on audience involvement as well as the Extended Parallel Process Model, the present study uses a national online experiment (N = 1,068) to test how pre-disclosure audience involvement may initiate post-disclosure effects for the message context of skin cancer. The data demonstrate that pre-disclosure audience involvement as well as the celebrity's framing of the disclosure can shape emotional responses (i.e., fear and hope), and that cognitive perceptions of the illness itself also influence behavioral intentions.

  2. Intended Use of Proceeds and the Performance of Initial Public Offerings (IPO)

    OpenAIRE

    Adanan Siti Azrina; Sani A’ieshah Abdullah; Bustamam Khair Syakira; Saidin Amilia

    2017-01-01

    Other than debt financing, Initial Public Offerings (IPO) become a common method of capital raising among firms for various purposes. Prospectus is issued on the pre-issuance of the IPO disclosing various mandatory and non-mandatory voluntary information to help the potential investors in their decision making process. Other than financial information on previous and forecasted future performance, the intended use of the IPO’s proceeds information is one of the crucial information for the sta...

  3. Communicating with public and scientific audiences: Are they really any different?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.H.; Brown, T.L.

    1991-01-01

    Efforts to communicate the results of environmental studies and involve the public in environmental decisions have increased nation-wide. Frequently, the assumption is made that communicating with the public is somehow different than communicating with scientific audiences. Our experience shows that this often is not the case. Today's multidisciplinary environmental issues pose communications problems that are the same in public as they are in scientific forums. Outreach efforts on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Nuclear Site have drawn on a broad spectrum of communications media including technical articles (open literature and symposium publications, annual and topical reports); information brochures; video productions; interactive exhibits; presentations at scientific, technical, civic and other public meetings; and, more recently, pro-active interactions with the news media and local, state and federal agencies. In addition, plans are being made for representatives of local communities to operate off-site sampling stations in Hanford's environmental monitoring network. All major environmental programs, such as the current 5-year effort to reconstruct past radiological doses to off-site human populations, are conducted with open public participation. This presentation describes Hanford's public outreach efforts, our successes and failures, and the lessons learned. For example, developing brochures and videos is of little value without also developing and implementing a detailed distribution plan. Follow-up activities are often neglected during initial planning stages but must be considered in outreach efforts

  4. Intended Use of Proceeds and the Performance of Initial Public Offerings (IPO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adanan Siti Azrina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Other than debt financing, Initial Public Offerings (IPO become a common method of capital raising among firms for various purposes. Prospectus is issued on the pre-issuance of the IPO disclosing various mandatory and non-mandatory voluntary information to help the potential investors in their decision making process. Other than financial information on previous and forecasted future performance, the intended use of the IPO’s proceeds information is one of the crucial information for the stakeholders especially the investors as they will be the financial contributor for the purposes. In one hand, the issuers may decide to issue highly priced IPO to fulfil their financial needs and other going-public motives. In the other hand, the investors willing to subscribe for the IPO to meet their investment target. The gap between the objectives of these two main stakeholders create uncertainties that may jeopardize the interest of the investors. Thus, the objective of this paper is to investigate the relationship between the intended uses of the IPO’s proceed disclosed in the prospectus and their subsequent performance of the stocks. The result of the study can provide input for the investors and other stakeholders for their decision making process to meet their respective objectives.

  5. Working with invalid boundary conditions: lessons from the field for communicating about climate change with public audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, A.

    2015-12-01

    There is an ongoing need to communicate with public audiences about climate science, current and projected impacts, the importance of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the requirement to prepare for changes that are likely unavoidable. It is essential that scientists are engaged and active in this effort. Scientists can be more effective communicators about climate change to non-scientific audiences if we recognize that some of the normal "boundary conditions" under which we operate do not need to apply. From how we are trained to how we think about our audience, there are some specific skills and practices that allow us to be more effective communicators. The author will review concepts for making our communication more effective based upon his experience from over 60 presentations about climate change to public audiences. These include expressing how your knowledge makes you feel, anticipating (and accepting) questions unconstrained by physics, respecting beliefs and values while separating them from evidence, and using the history of climate science to provide a compelling narrative. Proper attention to presentation structure (particularly an opening statement), speaking techniques for audience engagement, and effective use of presentation software are also important.

  6. Perception of Virtual Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, Mathieu; Scherer, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of evidence shows that virtual audiences are a valuable tool in the treatment of social anxiety, and recent works show that it also a useful in public-speaking training programs. However, little research has focused on how such audiences are perceived and on how the behavior of virtual audiences can be manipulated to create various types of stimuli. The authors used a crowdsourcing methodology to create a virtual audience nonverbal behavior model and, with it, created a dataset of videos with virtual audiences containing varying behaviors. Using this dataset, they investigated how virtual audiences are perceived and which factors affect this perception.

  7. Journalism Between Serving the Public and the Acclamation of Audience Taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slađana Stamenković

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid and comprehensive development of the internet, the number, quality and diversity of information available and the rate at which messages are distributed, provoking dramatic and conflicting changes in society: sprouting of new forms of technology and communication, on one hand, and the evident crisis in traditional media especially printed, on the other side. Political / social / cultural relevance as a criterion for selection information until recently, has been replaced by a new criterion, which role is to increase sales and profits, entertainment, sensation, and often banal. Such complex changes have been two important, even revolutionary consequences for journalism: first, collapsed business model in which there is a media industry as we know it and in which is funded by the advertising industry the media and journalism. Second, the media content is more often a result of the impact of commercial pressures and technological capabilities favored. Third, the profession of journalism is no longer the only, nor the privileged producer of public information. Related professions PR (public relations and citizen journalism important to determine contemporary journalism. PR industry is gradually taking a critical and controversial role in the collection and distribution of news, with the task to cover events, processes and initiatives of public interest. The rise of the PR industry, raises serious questions about the future of accurate, independent and fact-based journalism. Information age, the speed of change in the relations between the media and the public raises a number of questions: who in such circumstances raises issues for debate in the interest of the public, whether professional journalism survive, what is the effect and influence of media on segmented audiences, especially in the sensitive her part, children and young people? Answers to these questions were easier to get in during the „rule“ of traditional media, especially

  8. Wisconsin Partnerships to Educate and Engage Public Audiences on Climate Change Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S.; Rowley, P.; Crowley Conn, K.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and scale of climate change-related challenges requires more than one strategy to share meaningful information with public audiences. This presentation will discuss a few initiatives to engage the public originating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. First, a local partnership between the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) and the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC), an informal learning center with a new climate change "classroom" which recently acquired a Science on a Sphere (SOS) exhibit. Second, an informal education project funded by the NOAA Office of Education coordinated by CIMSS in partnership with the national SOS Network with the goal of helping museum docents share meaningful interpretation of real-time weather and climate data. CIMSS staff has been conducting weather and climate discussions on a Magic Planet display for several years. This "mini-SOS" is powered by a solar panel on the roof, modeling the essential Sun-Earth connection and the first principle of climate literacy. However, the convenient proximity of CIMSS and ALNC provides a perfect opportunity to test "SOS-scale" talking points posted on a weekly docent blog to the benefit of the entire SOS Network. Two other Wisconsin projects of note include the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts, a partnership between the University and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and a pilot project between CIMSS and NOAA's National Weather Service to engage storm spotters in climate mitigation and stewardship. Ideally, the synergistic benefits and lessons learned from these collaborations can inform similar efforts in order to galvanize meaningful responses to climate change.

  9. The Interaction of News and Advocate Frames: Manipulating Audience Perceptions of a Local Public Policy Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewksbury, David; Jones, Jennifer; Peske, Matthew W.; Raymond, Ashlea; Vig, William

    2000-01-01

    Presents the results of a two-wave experiment designed to examine how journalistic news frames can facilitate the communication of advocacy frames (to undergraduate students) designed to influence audience perceptions of a political issue. Discusses the implications of these results for journalism, issue advocacy, and the study of issue framing.…

  10. An Analysis of MSFC Public Affairs Television and Target Audiences with Suggestions for Future Growth and Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeyak, Gerald P.

    1996-01-01

    Because of profound changes in government and the space program, this may be an ideal time to evaluate MSFC's Public Affairs television efforts. The changes are continued downsizing of government programs; reduction in research and development; changes in the space program from periodic manned launches to a full-time presence in space with Space Station; and greater emphasis on science and communicating science information. At the same time that NASA is undergoing change, the media and society are also undergoing substantial upheaval. Twenty-five years ago, the three main over-the-air television networks (ABC, CBS and NBC) had a 93 share of the television audience. We now have four popular over-the-air networks (ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox) who maintain a 52 percent share of the television audience. Technological development, competition, and changing consumer tastes have created specialized media and audiences. This media fragmentation is part of a normal maturation cycle of use or adoption. While phases in the cycle vary in length due to many factors, the cycle has been consistent and reflects patterns of adoption. The cycle is: (1) Elite Media usage, (2) Popular or Mass Media usage, and (3) Specialized Media usage. Another factor that affects the media development and adoption cycle is the creation of new and competing mass and personal mediums. While television remains the dominant and most popular mass medium, it is declining and we see (via cable television) specialized networks catering to small audience segments. Because of changing technology and consumer behavior, we may not see a dominant mass media like television again.

  11. Task assignment No. 3. Solar audience test summary report. [Reactions of viewers to public service advertisements about solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-03

    Audience response to a public service advertisement concerning solar energy was tested. The test was designed to answer four categories of questions: (1) what information on solar energy in general is conveyed by the advertisement. What additional information is desired; (2) what is the reaction of the respondent to specific components or characteristics of the advertisment; (3) how appropriate is the use of the American Indian in conveying the message; and (4) how likely is the respondent to take further action as a result of viewing the advertisment. The rationale and methods for answering each question are discussed. (LEW)

  12. Sciencetogo.Org: Using Humor to Engage a Public Audience with the Serious Issue of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Rabkin, D.; Wilson, R.

    2014-12-01

    A team of educators, scientists, and communication experts from multiple universities as well as a Science museum will report on the impact of ScienceToGo.org, which is an Out of Home Multi-Media (OHMM) exhibit targeting adults riding a major subway system. The campaign's goal is to design, implement, and study the efficacy of an OHMM model for free choice science learning about our changing climate. Subway riders represent a diverse and captive audience with most of them spending an average of one hour a day in the subway system. Through the use of specially designed OHMM such as train placards, platform posters, and virtual resources the campaign engages a potential audience of 500,000 riders/day with opportunities to learn climate change science informally. The primary goal of the ScienceToGo.org campaign is to engage, entertain, and educate the adult subway riding community in major U.S. city about climate change as a real, relevant, and solvable local challenge. A naturalistic quasi-experimental inquiry employing a mixed methodology approach best describes our research design with half of the subway system exposed to the project signage (experimental group) and the other half not being exposed to the project signage (control group). To identify possible outcomes, data was collected in the several forms: survey, analytic data associated with website, social media, web app, focus groups, and observations. This campaign is an example of how an individual's daily routine may be enhanced with an informal science learning opportunity. We see an urgent need to improve both the public's engagement with climate change science and to the profile of climate change science in formal education settings. The campaign makes deliberate use of humor and fun to engage a public and diverse audience with the serious issue of climate change. The research that will be presented will reveal some of the strengths and weaknesses of this strategy when communicating science to a diverse

  13. Communicating with public and scientific audiences: Are they really any different?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, R.H.; Brown, T.L.

    1991-04-01

    Efforts to communicate the results of environmental studies and involve the public in environmental decisions have increased nationwide. Outreach efforts on the US Department of Energy's Hanford Nuclear Site have drawn on a broad spectrum of communications media including technical articles (open literature and symposium publications, annual and topical reports); information brochures; video productions; interactive exhibits; presentations at scientific, technical, civic and other public meetings; and, more recently, proactive interactions with the news media and local, state, and federal agencies. In addition, plans are being made for representatives of local communities to operate offsite sampling stations in Hanford's environmental monitoring network. All major environmental programs, such as the current five-year effort to reconstruct past radiological doses to offsite human populations, are conducted with open public participation. This presentation describes Hanford's public outreach efforts, our successes and failures, and the lessons learned. 9 refs., 4 figs

  14. In search of an audience...

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stremersch (Stefan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractFor an academic, finding an audience is critical. However, finding an audience is not always easy for most marketing academics. This inaugural address explores what the challenges are in finding an audience, among fellow scholars, students, public policy, industry, or society in general.

  15. Transformations of public and private knowledge: audience reception, feminism and experience of childhood sexual abuse

    OpenAIRE

    Kitzinger, Jenny

    2001-01-01

    This article examines an extraordinary cultural transformation in public and private knowledge: the discovery of child sexual abuse. It draws on interviews and focus group discussions conducted over eleven years to explore how dramatic changes in mass media coverage influenced public and personal perceptions of this issue. Focussing on the experiences of women and girls in the UK, my research highlights the media's special role, quite distinct from other cultural resources, in helping to conf...

  16. Participation and environment: The realization of environmental public audiences in the United States, Quebec and Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer de Lemos, Chelen

    2001-01-01

    This article examines three experiences accomplishment of environmental public hearings as mechanisms of society participation in discussion and decision-making concerning the environmental problems: the United States experience, the Quebec experience and the Brazil experience. The analysis focuses the most significant aspects of the citizen participation for the state environment management and effective resolution of the environmental problems

  17. Text Messaging to Communicate With Public Health Audiences: How the HIPAA Security Rule Affects Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karasz, Hilary N.; Eiden, Amy; Bogan, Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Text messaging is a powerful communication tool for public health purposes, particularly because of the potential to customize messages to meet individuals’ needs. However, using text messaging to send personal health information requires analysis of laws addressing the protection of electronic health information. The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) Security Rule is written with flexibility to account for changing technologies. In practice, however, the rule leads to uncertainty about how to make text messaging policy decisions. Text messaging to send health information can be implemented in a public health setting through 2 possible approaches: restructuring text messages to remove personal health information and retaining limited personal health information in the message but conducting a risk analysis and satisfying other requirements to meet the HIPAA Security Rule. PMID:23409902

  18. Patents and Publics: Engaging Museum Audiences with Issues of Ownership and Invention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Stark

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is all very well to note the hyperbole about patents and ‘intellectual property’ in the recent battles between technology companies such as Apple, Samsung and HTC. But how can museums productively use collection items marked with a patent beyond workaday tasks of identification and cataloguing? We argue that information on patents can enhance visitors’ critical engagement with museum displays; complex ownership claims and counter-claims in patent disputes can underpin lively narratives based around museum objects. Asking why some objects and not others were patented, and how historical consumers responded to that status of ‘patented’ enables us to look at these objects afresh. In particular we analyse the responses of public consultation groups to patenting in the medical trade, as well as the engagement of museum staff with these issues. Such consultation processes offer information that can be used to enhance museum displays with engaging narratives of ownership and invention.

  19. Communicating Ocean Acidification and Climate Change to Public Audiences Using Scientific Data, Interactive Exploration Tools, and Visual Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Rossiter, A.; Spitzer, W.

    2016-12-01

    The Exploratorium, a hands-on science museum, explores local environmental conditions of San Francisco Bay to connect audiences to the larger global implications of ocean acidification and climate change. The work is centered in the Fisher Bay Observatory at Pier 15, a glass-walled gallery sited for explorations of urban San Francisco and the Bay. Interactive exhibits, high-resolution data visualizations, and mediated activities and conversations communicate to public audiences the impacts of excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and ocean. Through a 10-year education partnership with NOAA and two environmental literacy grants funded by its Office of Education, the Exploratorium has been part of two distinct but complementary strategies to increase climate literacy beyond traditional classroom settings. We will discuss two projects that address the ways complex scientific information can be transformed into learning opportunities for the public, providing information citizens can use for decision-making in their personal lives and their communities. The Visualizing Change project developed "visual narratives" that combine scientific visualizations and other images with story telling about the science and potential solutions of climate impacts on the ocean. The narratives were designed to engage curiosity and provide the public with hopeful and useful information to stimulate solutions-oriented behavior rather than to communicate despair about climate change. Training workshops for aquarium and museum docents prepare informal educators to use the narratives and help them frame productive conversations with the pubic. The Carbon Networks project, led by the Exploratorium, uses local and Pacific Rim data to explore the current state of climate change and ocean acidification. The Exploratorium collects and displays local ocean and atmosphere data as a member of the Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System and as an observing station for NOAA's Pacific

  20. UK public perceptions of shale gas hydraulic fracturing:The role of audience, message and contextual factors on risk perceptions and policy support

    OpenAIRE

    Whitmarsh, Lorraine; Nash, Nick; Upham, Paul; Lloyd, Alyson; Verdon, James P; Kendall, J.-Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the need to understand public attitudes to energy sources, such as shale gas, and to feed these into decision-making. This study represents the first detailed UK experimental survey of public perceptions of shale gas fracking, including analysis of the effects of different messages and the relative influence of different audience, message and contextual factors on support and risk perceptions in respect of shale gas fracking. Using an online survey (N = 1457) o...

  1. Foule et public Crowd and audience. Reflections about the French theory of reception studies in the silent period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Plasseraud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La conception de la réception filmique de la théorie française, lors de la période muette, repose sur la notion de foule. Apparue au cours du xixe siècle, cette notion a donné lieu à de nombreuses appréciations, que l’on retrouve dans les textes sur le cinéma. Reprenant la conception dominante, héritée de la psychologie des foules vulgarisée par Gustave Le Bon, les cinéphobes considèrent le cinéma comme un lieu où les foules réunies soulagent ou excitent leurs bas-instincts. Les cinéphiles, en revanche, voient dans le cinéma la possibilité d’une refondation communautaire moderne où les foules retrouvent une spiritualité perdue. Pour eux, dans les salles obscures propices à une expérience hypnotique, les foules communient. C’est cette dernière conception qui est à la base de l’idée, inventée par Canudo et reprise, avec des nuances, par Delluc, Gance, Epstein ou L’Herbier, de « septième art ». Mais correspond-elle à la réalité des pratiques spectatorielles de l’époque ? Peut-on considérer le public de cinéma comme un ensemble uniforme, tel qu’il semble apparaître à travers l’idée de foule ? On peut penser que non, et que cet écart entre théorie et réalité de la réception filmique est une des raisons des difficultés du cinéma français face au cinéma américain. L’impasse théorique dans laquelle la notion de foule a entraîné la conception française de la réception filmique apparaît avec évidence à travers l’exemple de Germaine Dulac. La première parmi ses confrères français, elle exprima des réserves sur la capacité du cinéma à faire communier les foules. Elle reconnut que c’était le public dans sa diversité qui imposerait ses goûts aux fabricants de films, ce que les producteurs hollywoodiens avaient déjà assimilé.The film reception idea of French theory, in the silent period, is basically linked to the notion of crowd. This notion appeared during the19

  2. Teaching Audience Adaptation Using Connected Presentations and Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opt, Susan K.

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Introduction to Communication, Public Speaking, Persuasion, Business Communication. Objective: This activity increases students' understanding of audience adaptation and improves their ability to adapt presentations to specific audiences.

  3. Towards Broadening the Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, P. J.

    2008-06-01

    The strand Towards Broadening the Audience was intended to seed thoughtful conversations about building bridges for outreach programs across cultural barriers. Many participants spoke about progress in increasing the diversity of their outreach audiences, but it was new voices from time-honored sources that offered fundamentally new wisdom. From the religious traditions and tensions that mark the Holy Land came the simple concept of bringing unity through teaching the commonalities found in basic concepts of the observed sky. From Mayan traditions, both contemporary and ancient, came the reminder that the sky is intimately connected to all aspects of our lives. Astronomy outreach should therefore be a part of much larger family and community celebrations. Ideas such as these offer renewed hope for major advances in bringing space science outreach to much broader audiences. They tell us about the importance of learning from voices with perspectives different from our own, and of building partnerships based upon genuine cross-cultural understanding and mutual love of the sky.

  4. The importance of the selection of the audiences and the organization of media events within public awareness strategies for tissue banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2008-12-01

    The main purpose of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Public Awareness Strategies for Tissue Banks is to provide guidance on organizing and running awareness campaigns, in order to consolidate tissue banking activities. Within the IAEA Public Awareness Strategies for Tissue Banks, there are two important topics, which need to be singled out due to their importance for a successful public and professional awareness campaign. These are the selection of the audiences and the organization of media events within a Communication Strategy. The experience in the field of tissue banking in several countries has shown that interaction between the public, the professional health care staff, the media and the tissue bank personnel is essential if the activities of the banks are to be successful. It must be emphasized however, that any public and professional awareness strategy will not be successful, unless it is considered as part of an integrated system that is adopted by the concerned Government.

  5. "POLAR-PALOOZA" and "International POLAR-PALOOZA": Taking Researchers on the Road to Engage Public Audiences across America, and Around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

    2010-12-01

    POLAR-PALOOZA and its companion project, "International POLAR-PALOOZA" shared the same central premise: that polar researchers, speaking for themselves, could be powerful communicators about the science and mission of the 4th International Polar Year, and could successfully engage a wide variety of public audiences across America and around the world. Supported for the US tour by NSF and NASA, and internationally by NSF alone, the project enlisted more than forty American researchers, and 14 polar scientists from Brazil, China and Australia, to participate in events at science centers and natural history museums, universities, public libraries and schools, and also for targeted outreach to special audiences such as young female researchers in Oklahoma, or the Downtown Rotary in San Diego. Evaluations by two different ISE groups found similar results domestically and internationally. When supported by HD video clips and presenting informally in teams of 3, 4, 5 and sometimes even 6 researchers as part of a fast-paced "show," the scientists themselves were almost always rated as among the most important aspects of the program. Significant understandings about polar science and global climate change resulted, along with a positive impression of the research undertaken during IPY. This presentation at Fall AGU 2010 will present results from the Summative Evaluation of both projects, show representative video clips of the public presentations, share photographs of some of the most dramatically varied venues and candid behind-the-scenes action, and share "Lessons Learned" that can be broadly applied to the dissemination of Earth and space science research. These include: collaboration with partner institutions is never easy. (Duh.) Authentic props (such as ice cores, when not trashed by TSA) make a powerful impression on audiences, and give reality to remote places and complex science. And, most importantly, that since 85% of Americans have never met a scientist, that

  6. Intended Use of a Building in Terms of Updating the Cadastral Database and Harmonizing the Data with other Public Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buśko Małgorzata

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the original wording of the Regulation on the register of land and buildings of 2001, in the real estate cadastre there was one attribute associated with the use of a building structure - its intended use, which was applicable until the amendment to the Regulation was introduced in 2013. Then, additional attributes were added, i.e. the type of the building according to the Classification of Fixed Assets (KST, the class of the building according to the Polish Classification of Types of Constructions (PKOB and, at the same time, the main functional use and other functions of the building remained in the Regulation as well. The record data on buildings are captured for the real estate cadastre from other data sets, for example those maintained by architectural and construction authorities. At the same time, the data contained in the cadastre, after they have been entered or changed in the database, are transferred to other registers, such as tax records, or land and mortgage court registers. This study is the result of the analysis of the laws applicable to the specific units and registers. A list of discrepancies in the attributes occurring in the different registers was prepared. The practical part of the study paid particular attention to the legal bases and procedures for entering the function of a building in the real estate cadastre, which is extremely significant, as it is the attribute determining the property tax basis.

  7. Intended Use of a Building in Terms of Updating the Cadastral Database and Harmonizing the Data with other Public Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buśko, Małgorzata

    2017-06-01

    According to the original wording of the Regulation on the register of land and buildings of 2001, in the real estate cadastre there was one attribute associated with the use of a building structure - its intended use, which was applicable until the amendment to the Regulation was introduced in 2013. Then, additional attributes were added, i.e. the type of the building according to the Classification of Fixed Assets (KST), the class of the building according to the Polish Classification of Types of Constructions (PKOB) and, at the same time, the main functional use and other functions of the building remained in the Regulation as well. The record data on buildings are captured for the real estate cadastre from other data sets, for example those maintained by architectural and construction authorities. At the same time, the data contained in the cadastre, after they have been entered or changed in the database, are transferred to other registers, such as tax records, or land and mortgage court registers. This study is the result of the analysis of the laws applicable to the specific units and registers. A list of discrepancies in the attributes occurring in the different registers was prepared. The practical part of the study paid particular attention to the legal bases and procedures for entering the function of a building in the real estate cadastre, which is extremely significant, as it is the attribute determining the property tax basis.

  8. Audience information needs assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nealey, S.M.; Sutthoff, A.B.

    1988-01-01

    According to the authors public involvement is absolutely indispensable to the successful implementation of waste disposal programs, and communication is absolutely indispensable for successful public involvement. Frequent, effective, and open two-way communication is the primary mechanism through which non-technical issues can be raised, discussed and eventually resolved. Public information programs developed by the agencies responsible for waste disposal are supposed to contribute to this process, but it is the authors contention that they frequently fall short for a simple reason they are insufficiently consumer oriented. They do not adequately assess the information needs of the various publics with which they are supposed to facilitate effective communication. In the language of communication models, attention is given to the messages the agency wishes to send, but not enough attention is given to feedback from the audiences the agency is addressing. A set of audience information needs assessment methods have evolved that can go a long way toward answering these questions. Seven of these methods are described and illustrated with examples from on-going radioactive waste management programs

  9. Keeping Your Audience in Mind: Applying Audience Analysis to the Design of Interactive Score Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Rivera, Juan Diego; Katz, Irvin R.

    2014-01-01

    Score reports have one or more intended audiences: the people who use the reports to make decisions about test takers, including teachers, administrators, parents and test takers. Attention to audience when designing a score report supports assessment validity by increasing the likelihood that score users will interpret and use assessment results…

  10. World Wide Web Homepages: An Examination of Content and Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Betty; And Others

    This paper shows how the content of a World Wide Web page is selected and how an examination of the intended audience influences content. Examples from the New Mexico Tech (NMT) Library homepage show what sources are selected and what level of detail is appropriate for the intended audience. Six fundamental functions of libraries and information…

  11. Who Is Audience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeching, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Music conservatoires have generally neglected focusing on a key issue: that of audiences--their needs and wants, why they value particular music, and how music actually functions in any particular community. Yet audience is typically a musician's first contact with the "real world"; understanding audience (one's market or customers) is…

  12. Public speaking in front of an unreceptive audience increases implicit power motivation and its endocrine arousal signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemers, Uta S; Schultheiss, Oliver C; Wolf, Oliver T

    2015-05-01

    The present study explored the motivational characteristics of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST; Kirschbaum, Pirke, & Hellhammer, 1993). Seventy-two participants either completed the public-speaking component of the TSST or, as a control condition, the friendly TSST (Wiemers, Schoofs, & Wolf, 2013) and wrote picture stories both before and after treatment. Stories were coded for motivational imagery related to power, achievement, and affiliation as well as for activity inhibition, a marker of functional brain lateralization during stress. The TSST had a specific arousing effect on power motivation, but not on other motivational needs, on activity inhibition, or on story length. TSST-elicited increases in power imagery, but not in achievement or affiliation imagery, were associated with a relatively greater salivary alpha-amylase response and with a relatively lesser salivary cortisol response. These findings suggest that the TSST specifically induces power-related stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A prepared speech in front of a pre-recorded audience: subjective, physiological, and neuroendocrine responses to the Leiden Public Speaking Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, P Michiel; Bokhorst, Caroline L; Miers, Anne C; Sumter, Sindy R; Kallen, Victor L; van Pelt, Johannes; Blöte, Anke W

    2009-10-01

    This study describes a new public speaking protocol for youth. The main question asked whether a speech prepared at home and given in front of a pre-recorded audience creates a condition of social-evaluative threat. Findings showed that, on average, this task elicits a moderate stress response in a community sample of 83 12- to 15-year-old adolescents. During the speech, participants reported feeling more nervous and having higher heart rate and sweatiness of the hands than at baseline or recovery. Likewise, physiological (heart rate and skin conductance) and neuroendocrine (cortisol) activity were higher during the speech than at baseline or recovery. Additionally, an anticipation effect was observed: baseline levels were higher than recovery levels for most variables. Taking the anticipation and speech response together, a substantial cortisol response was observed for 55% of participants. The findings indicate that the Leiden Public Speaking Task might be particularly suited to investigate individual differences in sensitivity to social-evaluative situations.

  14. The American Jazz Music Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Harold

    This publication reports the findings of research carried out in recognition of the need for an in-depth analysis of the U.S. jazz music audience in order to identify and assess ways to shape the future of jazz as part of the "Survey of Public Participation in The Arts" conducted in 1982. The research problem was to learn the size,…

  15. Preliminary Study Intended for the Application of the INPRO Methodology in the area of Infrastructure (Public Acceptance) for the Case of Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heredia, R.; Puente Espel, F.

    2016-01-01

    The pronounced concern about climate change as seen in the past COP21 Conference, the increasing energy demand worldwide, and the importance of energy security are among the main issues within the pursuit of a sustainable development. In a sustainable and diverse energy portfolio, the goals focus on providing clean, carbon free, reliable and affordable electricity. Nuclear energy is one of the most efficient energy sources; considering the energy produced per amount of fuel, one of the least climate dependent sources and a clean energy source. Nuclear energy is a sustainable energy source. But the sustainability of nuclear energy systems is questioned by the public, as well as by some decision makers, mainly due to concerns related to safety, nuclear waste disposal, and the proliferation of nuclear weapons. The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO), from the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), was established to assist and guarantee that in order to meet the energy needs of the 21st century through a sustainable approach, nuclear energy is available. In this line, INPRO in close cooperation with Member States work to understand the future development of nuclear energy systems from a national, regional and global perspective, as well as to comprehend the role of innovation in technologies and institutional arrangements in support of this development. Through one of INPRO's main areas, Sustainability Assessment and Strategies, INPRO supports Member States in developing national long-range sustainable nuclear energy strategies and related deployment decision-making throughout the application of the INPRO Methodology. This paper presents a preliminary study intended for the application of the INPRO Methodology in the area of Infrastructure, Public Acceptance, for the case of Mexico. Mexico's current nuclear power programme is small; integrated by a nuclear power plant (NPP) with two reactors. In the scenario of a

  16. Reaching "an audience that you would never dream of speaking to": influential public health researchers' views on the role of news media in influencing policy and public understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; Haynes, Abby; Derrick, Gemma; Sturk, Heidi; Hall, Wayne D; St George, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    While governments and academic institutions urge researchers to engage with news media, traditional academic values of public disengagement have inhibited many from giving high priority to media activity. In this interview-based study, the authors report on the views about news media engagement and strategies used by 36 peer-voted leading Australian public health researchers in 6 fields. The authors consider their views about the role and importance of media in influencing policy, their reflections on effective or ineffective media communicators, and strategies used by these researchers about how to best retain their credibility and influence while engaging with the news media. A willingness and capacity to engage with the mass media was seen as an essential attribute of influential public health researchers.

  17. Cui narro haec ? Augustine and his Manichaean audience: A re ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Augustine and his Manichaean audience: A re-reading of the first three books of the Confessions. ... The issue of intended audience in the first three books of Augustine's Confessions is investigated in light of the presence of terms and phrases that may have had special connotations for potential Manichaean readers.

  18. Perelman's Universal Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the concept of the universal audience as the basic factor of Chaim Perelman's rhetorical theory and concludes that it is subject to the same criticism as Rousseau's general will and Kant's categorical imperative. (JMF)

  19. Audience Activity and Media Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Alan M.

    1993-01-01

    Explores a view of audience behavior that lies between the extremes of a passive audience expected to be influenced by communication messages and an active audience expected to make rational decisions about what media content to accept and reject. (RS)

  20. Engagement with physics across diverse festival audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Joseph; Stanley, Jessica; Davis, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Science shows provide a method of introducing large public audiences to physics concepts in a nonformal learning environment. While these shows have the potential to provide novel means of educational engagement, it is often difficult to measure that engagement. We present a method of producing an interactive physics show that seeks to provide effective and measurable audience engagement. We share our results from piloting this method at a leading music and arts festival as well as a science festival. This method also facilitated the collection of opinions and feedback directly from the audience which helps explore the benefits and limitations of this type of nonformal engagement in physics education.

  1. Open Interactivity: A Model for Audience Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Gould

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Artists have increasingly acknowledged the role of the audience as collaborators both in the construction of meaning (Bathes, 1977, through subjective experience (Dewey, 1934 and in contributing to the creative act by externalising the work. (Duchamp Lucy Lippard identifies 1966-72 as a period where artists turned increasingly towards the audience, representing a "dematerialization of the art object" (Lippard, 1997 through "Happenings" and "Fluxus" movements. Digital media has facilitated this trajectory, implicit in the interactive computer interface (Manovich, 2005, but interactivity per se may offer no more than a series of choices put forward by the artist (Daniels, 2011. Interactivity represents interplay between artist and audience (Dinka, 1996 and is potentially a process of audience empowerment to offer agency, defined as real and creative choice (Browning, 1964. Public screen installation "Peoples Screen" Guangzhou, linking China to Perth Australia (Sermon & Gould, 2015 offered a partnership between artist and audience to co-create content though playful narratives and active engagement in a drama that unfolds using improvisation and play. Initially visitors enjoy observing the self on the screen but audiences quickly start to interact with the environment and other participants. Immersed in play they lose a sense of the self (Callois, 2011 and enter a virtual third space where possibilities for creativity and direction of play are limitless. The self becomes an avatar where the audience can inhabit "the other" thereby exploring alternative realities through ludic play, promoting tolerance and empathy and developing collective memory.

  2. Intended Brand Associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koll, Oliver; von Wallpach, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    of actual consumer brand associations and management-intended brand associations (brand association match). The article presents results from two large-scale studies (3353 and 1201 respondents) involving one consumer goods and one service brand with multiple operationalizations of consumer response...... (attitudinal and behavioral). The results show that consumers with high brand association match show more positive brand response. However, after accounting for the valence of associations match does not add explanatory power. This outcome challenges a key foundation of brand management. The discussion......Brand managers exhibit considerable effort to define intended brand associations to anchor in consumers' minds. They follow a credo deeply rooted in branding literature: intended brand associations drive consumer response and brand equity. This article investigates the benefits of a strong overlap...

  3. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.; Ingram, L.

    2007-12-01

    Ocean observatories have already demonstrated their ability to maintain long-term time series, capture episodic events, provide context for improved shipboard sampling, and improve accessibility to a broader range of participants. Communicating Ocean Sciences, an already existing college course from COSEE-California has demonstrated its ability to teach future scientists essential communication skills. The NSF-funded Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) project has leveraged these experiences and others to demonstrate a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. The COSIA effort is one of the pathfinders for ensuring that the new scientific results from the increasing U.S. investments in ocean observatories is effectively communicated to the nation, and will serve as a model for other fields. Our presentation will describe a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. COSIA established partnerships between informal science education institutions and universities nationwide to facilitate quality outreach by scientists and the delivery of rigorous, cutting edge science by informal educators while teaching future scientists (college students) essential communication skills. The COSIA model includes scientist-educator partnerships that develop and deliver a college course that teaches communication skills through the understanding of learning theory specifically related to informal learning environments and the practice of these skills at aquariums and science centers. The goals of COSIA are to: provide a model for establishing substantive, long-term partnerships between scientists and informal science education institutions to meet their respective outreach needs; provide future scientists with experiences delivering outreach and promoting the broader impact of research; and provide diverse role models

  4. Preparing Planetary Scientists to Engage Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, C. B.; Shaner, A. J.; Hackler, A. S.

    2017-12-01

    While some planetary scientists have extensive experience sharing their science with audiences, many can benefit from guidance on giving presentations or conducting activities for students. The Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI) provides resources and trainings to support planetary scientists in their communication efforts. Trainings have included sessions for students and early career scientists at conferences (providing opportunities for them to practice their delivery and receive feedback for their poster and oral presentations), as well as separate communication workshops on how to engage various audiences. LPI has similarly begun coaching planetary scientists to help them prepare their public presentations. LPI is also helping to connect different audiences and their requests for speakers to planetary scientists. Scientists have been key contributors in developing and conducting activities in LPI education and public events. LPI is currently working with scientists to identify and redesign short planetary science activities for scientists to use with different audiences. The activities will be tied to fundamental planetary science concepts, with basic materials and simple modifications to engage different ages and audience size and background. Input from the planetary science community on these efforts is welcome. Current results and resources, as well as future opportunities will be shared.

  5. Sleeping with the enemy: Audience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marloes Mol; Annika van den Berg; Dr. Joke Hermes

    2013-01-01

    Audience studies is not the vibrant field it was in its 1980s and early 1990s heyday. Cultural studies today has a more balanced interest in production, audiences and texts. A renewed focus in audience studies on everyday meaning production, identity and relations of power could benefit from recent

  6. Language, gay pornography, and audience reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leap, William L

    2011-01-01

    Erotic imagery is an important component of gay pornographic cinema, particularly, where work of audience reception is concerned. However, to assume the audience engagement with the films is limited solely to the erotic realm is to underestimate the workings of ideological power in the context and aftermath of reception. For example, the director of the film under discussion here (Men of Israel; Lucas, 2009b) intended to present an erotic celebration of the nation-state. Yet, most viewers ignore the particulars of context in their comments about audience reception, placing the "Israeli" narrative within a broader framework, using transnational rather than film-specific criteria to guide their "reading" of the Israeli-centered narrative. This article uses as its entry point the language that viewers employ when describing their reactions to Men of Israel on a gay video club's Web site; this article shows how the work of audience reception may draw attention to a film's erotic details while invoking social and political messages that completely reframe the film's erotic narrative.

  7. Complicating Audience: A Critical Communication Pedagogy Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Joshua E.; Potter, David J.

    2018-01-01

    Courses: This activity is designed specifically for public-speaking courses, but it could be used in the general introductory communication course. It also holds potential for use in persuasion, argumentation, or strategic communication courses. Objectives: This activity helps students understand audience as a more complicated concept--one that…

  8. Audience development and its blind spot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelof, Anja Mølle

    2015-01-01

    The term ‘audience development’ addresses current dilemmas in publicly funded arts institutions. It is increasingly deployed in cultural policies and insti- tutional practices in the Nordic countries, and the article provides a critical dis- cussion of the term. The article argues that the discou...

  9. Engagement with Physics across Diverse Festival Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Joseph; Stanley, Jessica; Davis, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Science shows provide a method of introducing large public audiences to physics concepts in a nonformal learning environment. While these shows have the potential to provide novel means of educational engagement, it is often difficult to measure that engagement. We present a method of producing an interactive physics show that seeks to provide…

  10. Movies: the Audience Favorites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern screen art over its success to the use of folklore, myth, synthesis of the natural and supernatural, and a consistent orientation toward the most popular plot schemes. Their metaphorical appeal is not to the rational but to the emotional, through identification with the magic power of heroes and standardization of ideas, situations, characters and so on in compensation for dreams not realized in life, there are illusions – happy endings. In movies, TV shows, and music videos' rhythmic organization, viewers' feelings are influenced as much by the order of changing shots as by the content of productions. On the basis of the foregoing, it can be concluded that the media texts of popular culture obliged to a variety of factors for its success. These include: reliance on folklore and mythological sources, constancy metaphors, focus on consistent implementation of the most persistent plot schemes, the synthesis of the natural and the supernatural, the appeal not to rational and emotional, through the identification of (imaginary transformation in of active characters merge with the atmosphere, the aura of works, “magic power” of heroes, standardization (replication, unification, adaptation ideas, situations, characters, etc., mosaic, seriality, the compensation (of the cherished illusion, but not come true desires, the happy ending, the use of such rhythmic organization movies, TV shows, clips, where the feeling of the audience with the content of the frame affects the order of their shift; intuitive guessing subconscious audience interests, etc.

  11. Digital TV, advertising and audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo Cruz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the advertisingsegment and their relationship with the development process of the digital television. We intent to observe the new perspectives of production and consumption of media. Among other things, that involves the issues of interactivity, the exhaustion of the traditional media models, and the relationship of the new media with the audience, considering the analysis of the tripod: digital television, advertising and audience. In Brazil, with the implementation of the Brazilian System of Digital Television (SBTVD, the problem takes bigger proportions, as a consequence of the possibility to issue and track down the digital content consumed. That happens as a consequence of the consumer ability to watch the program withor without the commercial break. At the current model of television, the public is the legitimizing factor: the broadcasters issues the public a ention asan instrument to obtain pecuniary rewarding of theadvertisers. That model constitutes itself as the main funding source of the channels and networks. On the one hand, digital television represents an advantage at the quality of picture and audio, multiplying the capacity to transmit television signals and to transport new features and services. On the other hand, it seems impossible to transform this industry without some reaction. The many interests involved constitute the main cause of that scenario: the agents interested in advertising are those concerned with the role of ideology, the support of capitalism and the industrial culture. Considering all these questions, it seems almost impossible to produce deep chances,contrary to the interests involved.

  12. Physical Activity in the Mass Media: An Audience Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ben J.; Bonfiglioli, Catriona M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity's role in promoting health is highlighted in public health campaigns, news and current affairs, reality television and other programs. An investigation of audience exposure, beliefs and reactions to media portrayals of physical activity offers insights into the salience and influence of this communication. An audience reception…

  13. Audiences as citizens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2013-01-01

    This chapter traces the insights about citizenship offered by audience reception research since its inception in the 1980s, through a theoretical and analytical portrait of five historical stages of reception research about mediated citizenship: (1) hegemonic citizenship; (2) monitorial citizenship......; (3) popular citizenship; (4) participatory citizenship; and (5) ubiquitous citizenship. Maintaining a strong empirical commitment throughout, mostly to the findings of qualitative research, the chapter also reports substantially from recent and ongoing reception research into the ways in which...... the news media – and popular and entertainment media in a broader sense – may serve as resources for a political and cultural citizenship that is anchored in everyday life. The five stages of reception research, conceptualized as scientific paradigms, are modeled into a historical typology that synthesizes...

  14. Scientist Participation in Education and Public Outreach - Using Web Tools to Communicate the Scientific Process and Engage an Audience in Understanding Planetary Science: Examples with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists often speak to the public about their science and the current state of understanding of their field. While many talks (including those by this author) typically feature static plots, figures, diagrams, and the odd movie/animation/visualization (when technology allows), it is now possible, using the web to guide an audience through the thought process of how a scientist tackles certain questions. The presentation will highlight examples of web tools that effectively illustrate how datasets are used to address questions of lunar science. Why would a scientist use precious time during a talk to interact with data, in real time? Why not just show the results and move on? Through experience it is evident that illustrating how data is analyzed, even in a simple form, engages an audience, and demonstrates the thought process when interacting with data. While it is clear that scientists are unlikely to use such a tool to conduct science, it illustrates how a member of the public can engage with mission data. An example is discussed below. When discussing the geology of the Moon, there is an enormous volume of data that can be used to explain what we know (or think we know) and how we know it. For example, the QuickMap interface (http://www.actgate.com/home/quickmap.htm) enables interaction with a set of data (images, spectral data, topography, radar data) across the entire Moon (http://target.lroc.asu.edu/q3/). This webtool enables a speaker the opportunity (given adequate web connectivity) to talk about features, such as a crater, and show it from multiple perspectives (e.g., plan view, oblique, topographically exaggerated) in a logical flow. The tool enables illustration of topographic profiles, 3-D perspectives, and data overlays. Now, one might ask why doing this demonstration in real time is valuable, over a set of static slides. In some cases static slides are best, and doing any real time demos is unfeasible. However, guiding an engaged audience through

  15. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcus Species in Raw Meat Samples Intended for Human Consumption in Benin City, Nigeria: Implications for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Etinosa O; Beshiru, Abeni; Akporehe, Lucy U; Oviasogie, Faith E; Igbinosa, Owen O

    2016-09-24

    The present study was designed to characterize methicillin-resistant staphylococci from raw meat. A total of 126 meat samples were obtained from open markets between February and April, 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the disc diffusion method. Molecular profiling was conducted using 16S rRNA, mecA, nuc, and PVL gene signatures were detected by polymerase chain reaction assay. Fifty isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. were detected in 26 (52%) pork, 14 (28%) beef and 10 (20%) chicken samples. The staphylococcal isolates were identified through partial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (16S rRNA) nucleotide sequencing, and BLAST analysis of the gene sequence revealed 98%-100% staphylococcal similarity. All isolates from beef and chicken samples amplified the mecA gene, while 100% of the MRSA isolates amplified the PVL gene. The multidrug resistance profile (resistant to ≥1 antimicrobial agent in ≥3 classes of antimicrobial agents) of the staphylococcal isolates showed that 7 isolates were resistant to methicillin, penicillin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, kanamycin, amoxicillin, cloxacillin, erythromycin, vancomycin, and gentamycin. There was a significant regression effect from the multidrug-resistant profile on the number of isolates (p resistant strains within bacterial populations. The findings of the present study indicate that raw meats in the Benin metropolis were possibly contaminated with pathogenic and multi-drug resistant staphylococci strains and therefore could constitute a risk to public health communities.

  16. Translation and Audience: Edgar Allen Poe’s “The Gold-Bug”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clayton Tyler McKee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to explore how the intended audience of a translation shapes the techniques used by the translators of the same text in order to convey the same message in a different manner. Focusing on two translations of a work done by Edgar Allen Poe, this work demonstrates how the translator shapes a translation to its audience, whether it is a pedagogical purpose or a literary one. In nineteenth century France, translations of Edgar Allan Poe began appearing in newspapers and journals catching the attention of well-known authors, such as Charles Baudelaire. While many academics, such as Wallaert and Bonnefoy, have compared Baudelaire’s translations and language choice to the original works and other translators working in the intellectual arena, the translation of “The Gold-Bug” in a young women’s magazine has not been included in the conversation. Twenty-two years before Baudelaire translates “The Gold-Bug,” originally published in English in 1843, Le magasin de desmoiselles offered a version of “Le scarabée d’or” which differed greatly in style from the version Baudelaire would provide. Comparing the two versions of the story through Schleiermacher’s theory on moving the text and Nida’s theory of equivalencies demonstrates how methods of translation fit for specific audiences in terms of a text’s foreignization and domestication. Le magasin strove to educate young bourgeoisie women à l’aristocrat while Baudelaire found inspiration in Poe’s work which would influence other movements in France. These purposes led to two translations that educate readers on foreign authors also allowing a view into how audience has influenced the translation of Poe for the French public.

  17. Renewing Audience Response in Study of Medieval Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, David V.

    Although modern readers often find the interpretation of medieval literature difficult, they should be encouraged to use their imagination to resolve the dilemmas they encounter. Often, these are the same issues with which medieval audiences had to wrestle and which the poets intended to raise. W. Iser's and H. R. Jauss's principles of…

  18. Pedro Gutierrez Bueno's Textbooks: Audiences, Teaching Practices and Chemical Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jose Ramon Bertomeu; Belmar, Antonio Garcia

    2006-01-01

    Pedro Gutierrez Bueno wrote two editions of a chemistry textbook between 1788 and 1802. The paper offers a comparative view of both editions taking into account Gutierrez Bueno's biography, his intended audience and the changes related to the so-called chemical revolution. Some conclusions are at odds with common images about scientific…

  19. Cultivating Audiences: Taming, Teaching, Transforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolucci, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    Satisfying and successful school concerts require an active, empathic, and cooperative partnership between performers and audience members. As music educators work to prepare artful, dignified, and confident performers, "audiences" for these performers must be cultivated just as purposefully. Concertgoers can be motivated to consume school…

  20. Trailer-targeting a potential audience

    OpenAIRE

    Brůnová, Lada

    2013-01-01

    How can movie production companies speak to their potential audience thru movie trailers? Which means do they use and what is the public reception? How does a viewer interpret a movie trailer? What can we learn about viewers from movie trailers? This thesis is offering all the answers to questions mentioned above in two different parts - in the first part the concepts of movie trailers are introduced and explained, the second part analyses the outcomes of a research which studies the affects ...

  1. Installation of Cacouna Energy's liquefied natural gas terminal : public inquiry report; Projet d'implantation du terminal methanier Energie Cacouna : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, W.J. (comp.)

    2006-11-15

    This paper discussed the proposed construction of a liquefied natural gas (LNG) terminal 15 km northeast of Riviere-du-Loup, Quebec, in area that has strong land and marine biodiversity. The proposed project to import LNG for the North American market would involve the construction of ship docking facilities, transhipment facilities, and ground storage facilities. Quebec's environmental agency, the Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement (BAPE) examined the sustainability of the project with respect to biophysical aspects, social, economic and cultural development, as well as the environment, health, and public safety. Public hearings for the project attracted many citizens, First Nation groups and corporations with two opinions, for and against the project. Those in favour mentioned that Quebec must diversify its usual source of LNG from the west and that the project would promote competition. People at the public hearing expressed concerns for the quality of life, public health, air quality, noise pollution, visual impairment of the landscape, the security related to the operations of the terminal and navigation, public safety, recreational activities, marine mammals, fish, birds, animals, marshlands, greenhouse gas emissions, water pollution and soil pollution. This paper also outlined the state of the North-American market for LNG and its evolution; LNG supply and demand for the next twenty years; changes in gas prices; and emergency planning for the implementation of the project. BAPE recommended that the environmental monitoring and tracking be done by a project proponent. It was concluded that the proposed project would create competition with western Canada due to continually higher LNG prices, and would promote local jobs during the construction phase. 41 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs.

  2. Citizen Science and Crowdsourcing as effective STEM Education and Engagement activities for Diverse Audiences: case studies featured in THE CROWD & THE CLOUD public TV series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Abdalati, W.; Akuginow, E.

    2017-12-01

    Citizen science and crowdsourcing are relatively unfamiliar terms to the general public, including parents, children and teachers, as seen in focus groups convened by the NSF-funded THE CROWD & THE CLOUD public television series. Once aware, however, of the potential of today's citizen science—often relying on smartphones, apps and innovative sensors—both citizens and professional scientists become excited and seek to learn more. CROWD & CLOUD, premiering on PBS stations in April 2017, hosted by former NASA Chief Scientist Waleed Abdalati, and streaming at CrowdAndCloud.org, features a wide range of projects supported by NASA, NOAA, USGS, EPA and other Federal agencies. Some, such as EyesOnALZ, a startup which aims to accelerate research on Alzheimer's disease, adapt a crowdsourcing model first developed to help analyze data returned by NASA's Stardust spacecraft. Early results from its "StallCatchers" puzzle-game show both high quality data and have been shown to cut one year's worth of academic labor down to one month of effort by "the crowd." While longstanding citizen science projects such as Audubon's Christmas Bird Count (starting in 1900) have proven their worth, Smartfin—embedding sensors in surfboard fins—is taking advantage of recent technical innovations to track sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification, with their accuracy validated by the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. The NASA-supported GLOBE Observer mosquito habitat mapper project uses a $6 microscope attached to a smartphone to aid in species identification. Some projects tap adult volunteers, but many, such as USGS's Nature's Notebook, also appeal to youngsters. In Albuquerque local teens track invasive species and help refuge managers, usefully supplementing the sole salaried ranger. In the Rockaways, New York, high school students plant pollinator gardens and promote ecosystem resilience following Superstorm Sandy. This presentation will feature short videos demonstrating

  3. POLAR-PALOOZA Polar Researchers and Arctic Residents Engage, Inform and Inspire Diverse Public Audiences by sharing Polar Science and Global Connections during the International Polar Year, using a New Model of Informal Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

    2006-12-01

    (Please note that the POLAR-PALOOZA initiative described in this Abstract is-as of 9/7/2006-"pending" for possible support from NSF and NASA as part of this year's IPY solicitation. Subject to decisions expected by 9/30, this presentation would either be withdrawn, or amplified with specific participants, locations and dates.) Despite the success of well-regarded movies like "March of the Penguins", the polar regions remain a great unknown for most people. Public knowledge about the Arctic and Antarctic, and the critical role of the Poles in the entire Earth system, is nonexistent, incomplete or burdened with misperceptions. The International Polar Years of 2007-2009-and associated "I*Y" science years such as IHY, IYPE and eGY-present a unique opportunity to change this. The people who can best effect this change are those who know the Poles best, through living or working there. Based on innovative but proven models, POLAR-PALOOZA will use three complementary strategies to engage, inform and inspire large public audiences. (1) A national tour, under the working title "Stories from a Changing Planet", will include in-person presentations at science centers, museums, libraries and schools across North America, including Canada and Mexico. The presentations will be augmented by High Definition Video taped on location at the Poles, audio and video podcasts, and special education and outreach activities for targeted audiences. "Stories from a Changing Planet" will provide diverse audiences with an exciting opportunity to meet and interact directly with polar experts, and to appreciate why the Poles and the research done there are directly relevant to their lives. (2) The "HiDef Video Science Story Capture Corps" is a team of professional videographers, using the latest generation of low-cost, high-quality cameras, deployed to both Poles. They will document the work of multiple researchers and projects, rather than focusing on one topic for a single broadcast program

  4. A preliminary examination of audience-related communications issues for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, C.W.

    1991-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation doses people may have received from exposure to radioactive materials released during past operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project was initiated in response to public concerns about possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to effectively communicate to the many different concerned audiences. Accordingly, the TSP directed PNL to examine methods for communicating causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. After considering the directive and discussing it with the Communications Subcommittee of the TSP, PNL undertook a broad investigation of communications methods to consider for inclusion in the TSP's current communications program. As part of this investigation, a literature review was conducted regarding risk communications. A key finding was that, in order to successfully communicate risk-related information, a thorough understanding of the knowledge level, concerns and information needs of the intended recipients (i.e., the audience) is necessary. Hence, a preliminary audience analysis was conducted as part of the present research. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. 1 ref., 9 tabs.

  5. The advertising and children's audience

    OpenAIRE

    A.S. Teletov; T.Ye. Ivanova

    2015-01-01

    The aim of article. The article shows that today more and more citizens supply from advertising. Children's perception of the world is radically different from the adults’ perception. Modern advertising industry affects children's audience more and more. The aim of the article is to analyze the impact of advertising on children's audience with further proposals. The results of the analysis. Some social critics believe that advertising provides new information that helps to be more adaptive...

  6. Enquiry and public hearing report : Partial diversion project for the Manouane River; Rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique : Projet de derivation partielle de la riviere Manouane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufresne, S.; Lajoie, M.; Roberge, J.

    2001-09-01

    Hydro-Quebec had presented a project for the partial diversion of the Manouane river, tributary to the Peribonka River in the Lac-Saint-Jean region in Quebec, towards the Bersimis complex located in the Cote-Nord region of Quebec. On April 11, 2001, the Quebec Environment Minister requested that the Public Hearing Bureau (Bureau d'audiences publiques) examine the project and determine its environmental impact. The information and public consultation period on this project began May 7, 2001, and lasted four months. This phase involved public consultation and even an aerial visit of the site of the proposed work and the Manouane and Peribonka Rivers Basins from Lake Manouane to the Pipmuacan Reservoir. In this report, the project was described and the concerns and opinions voiced during the consultation process were summarized. The authors then examined the changes on the hydrology of the Manouane River and their consequences on the biological and human environments. Socio-economic aspects related to the project were also considered. The relevance of the project in the context of the actual energetic situation and its cost effectiveness were also studied. The commission concluded that the project was not acceptable in its present form, since the flow rate left in the river would not be sufficient to protect the current and future uses of the river and ensure the survival of the ouananiche. The commission recognized that the cost of the project places it in an advantageous position since it would meet the investment criteria for Hydro-Quebec. However, it considered that its small contribution to the overall availability of energy cannot justify the effects on the river and adversely affect the leisure and tourism industries of the area. It recommended that the project be reconsidered by Hydro-Quebec to lessen the environmental impacts. 24 refs., 12 tabs., 13 figs.

  7. Crowdfunding: How audiences promote innovation in journalism

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera-Gonzalez, Maria de los Angeles

    2014-01-01

    With the development of technology and media, the role of the audience has been changing. Thanks to the interactivity of new media, the audience is no longer just a passive receiver. Interactivity allows audiences to comment, vote, share, produce and complete the content of new media. All these new audience capabilities have led to concepts such as prosumers (consumers and producers of content). Consequently, a whole new audience role has emerged. Audiences are now directly promoters of journ...

  8. Rational Wizards: Audience Interpreters in French Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Bourdon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will tell the story of the smallgroup of people who, in France, have been in charge of the measurement and theappreciation of the audience of television, and had to invent audience research,to organize it and to communicate its results to "clients" whodepended on it much earlier than usually assumed: television managers andprofessionals, public authorities, and, last but not least, advertisers. The paper will explore both change andcontinuity. First, change: the professional origin and training of measurerschanged much over the years. In the early days, they could have an almostliterary profile. The first person in charge of the audience at the RadioTélévision Française was a teacher of philosophy. His followers had a formationin sociology and semiology. They all insisted on the fact that they were not"simply" measurers, and also worried about appreciation, quality,culture. They always figures did produce figures, but rarely only about thenumber of people present in front of the screen, mostly about satisfaction,appreciation, preferences for given genres, viewing habits. As there was onlyone channel – until 1964, with the number of TV sets rising sharply, ratings,in the modern sense, were not critical.Things started to change gradually. In 1974,the public broadcasting corporation was divided into several companies,including three competing channels. The service in charge of measuring audiencewas put under the direct authority of the Prime Minister. Audience figuresplayed a part in the distribution of resources, not only advertising but throughthe license fee sharing. However, the law also provided a clause about an indexof quality, which never functioned satisfactorily, although the service incharge of audiences put much effort into it. In 1985, around the time of deregulation,change came. From outside, this was translated into the rise of daily,detailed, fast produced figures of the audience through audimeters, thenpeoplemeters

  9. Videoethnographic approaches to audience research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildermuth, Norbert

    recordings in doing mediaethnographic audience research. Moreover, I will discuss the use and potentials of hypermedia in presenting the results of ethnographic audience research. Based on recent conceptualisations and theories of hypermodality and multimodal ethnography (Lemke, 2002; Idema, 2003; Dicks......  In my paper I will explore the methodological uses and epistemological consequences of videoethnography in audience studies. With reference to research done on young people and their media appropriations in Recife (Brazil), in December 2005, I will argue for the creative integration of video......'. Finally, considerations regarding a planned hypermediated presentation of my research project in Recife, will be related to the experiences made with video as tool of mediaethnographic investigation and analysis. How the potential of non-sequentiality enshrined in hypermedia applications can...

  10. In seach of the invisible (audiences)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartley, Jannie Møller

    The paper shows need to distinguish between: ignored audiences (invisible in the literature, in our case very young children and ) and post-communist audiences Literally or actual invisible (online lurking and unintended) audiences the unintended or lurking audiences are invisible in a two-fold way...... : both as cases of study, but also as actual audiences. a lack of historical contextualization in the studies...

  11. Food in film : a study on audience reception

    OpenAIRE

    Civelek, Ece Simin

    2012-01-01

    Ankara : The Department of Communication and Design, İhsan Doğramacı Bilkent University, 2012. Thesis (Master's) -- Bilkent University, 2012. Includes bibliographical references leaves 140-149. This study intends to analyze audience reception of foodstuff and related practices in films. In the study foodstuff and related practices are taken into consideration as a powerful semiotic system and in that respect are evaluated as an important property of filmic narration. Study e...

  12. The science of science outreach: methods to maximise audience engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kathryn; Lane, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Effective public engagement relies on a clear understanding of public audiences; their existing knowledge base and their learning preferences. Scientific content that is effective in academic spheres is not necessarily popular in the public domain. This may be due to content (e.g. beginner level to advanced terminology); presentation style (graphical, text, multimedia); audience demographic (children to adults); and entertainment value. Over the last few years, there has been a major expansion in the quantity and quality of science outreach material. For scientists, the production of outreach material, in any form, is the first giant leap to disseminating their knowledge to broader audiences. However, there is also a need to evaluate the performance of outreach material, so that its content and delivery style can be tailored and maximised for the target audience. We examine the Google Analytics data for climate science outreach website Climatica over a 12 month period in 2015. The site publishes regular posts, which take the form of short written articles, graphics, videos, or teaching resources, on all aspects of climate science. The site is publicised via social media including Twitter and Facebook. In particular, we assess website performance, in terms of website visits and post engagement. These are examined in the context of: post topic, post style, social media engagement, and the timing of post publication/advertisement. The findings of this investigation are used to explore audience preferences and mechanisms for future post development to maximise the use of this web resource.

  13. An Audience for the Aliens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This account of the making and sharing of self-authored digital videos in a Year 5 classroom focuses on the way that the children appear to be influenced by their awareness of audience. Drawing on evidence of video observation, written and moving image texts produced by the children and semi-structured interviews with them, I examine the factors…

  14. Immersive Learning: Realism, Authenticity & Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Livingstone, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    For almost 20 years the Digital Design Studio has been exploring and applying virtual reality for a wide range of industrial, commercial and educational applications. Drawing from a range of recent projects, we explore the complex relationships between realism, authenticity and audience for effective engagement and education in immersive learning.

  15. Engaging Audiences in Planetary Science Through Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, C. B.; Mason, T.; Peticolas, L. M.; Hauck, K.

    2017-12-01

    One way to share compelling stories is through visuals. The Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), in collaboration with Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) and Space Science Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley, has been working with planetary scientists to reach and engage audiences in their research through the use of visualizations. We will share how images and animations have been used in multiple mediums, including the planetarium, Science on a Sphere, the hyperwall, and within apps. Our objectives are to provide a tool that planetary scientists can use to tell their stories, as well as to increase audience awareness of and interest in planetary science. While scientists are involved in the selection of topics and the development of the visuals, LPI and partners seek to increase the planetary science community's awareness of these resources and their ability to incorporate them into their own public engagement efforts. This presentation will share our own resources and efforts, as well as the input received from scientists on how education and public engagement teams can best assist them in developing and using these resources, and disseminating them to both scientists and to informal science education venues.

  16. Transition: Intended and unintended processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellman, M.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the relationship between transition as that was intended by the international financial institutions and transition as it actually happened. Attention is paid to what has been learned by experience about stabilisation, liberalisation and privatisation. Attention is also given to the

  17. WHAT DOES LESBIAN AUDIENCE LIKE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ibiti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to identify the mechanisms that define the pleasure (taste and disgust (disgust of the lesbian audience in receiving audiovisual set in lesbian communities. After viewing two stories constructed from the series The  L Word, 25 lesbians WERE interviewed in depth. Next, we conducted a qualitative content anaLysis of the interviews. The results are discussed from the theories of Entertainment (Media Psychology.

  18. Audience Perceptions of Family Viewing Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Brian F.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Discusses a survey on Family Viewing Time designed to determine audience reactions to program content including violent and sexual content, audience perceptions of the suitability of program offerings for family viewing, and audience viewing habits with respect to Family Viewing Time. (MH)

  19. Communication of technical information to lay audiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowes, J.E.; Stamm, K.R.; Jackson, K.M.; Moore, J.

    1978-05-01

    One of the objectives of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is to provide terminal storage facilities for commercial radioactive wastes in various geologic formations at multiple locations in the United States. The activities performed under the NWTS Program will affect regional, state, and local areas, and widespread public interest in this program is expected. Since a large part of the NWTS Program deals with technical information it was considered desirable to initiate a study dealing with possible methods of effectively transmitting this technical information to the general public. This study has the objective of preparing a state-of-the-art report on the communication of technical information to lay audiences. The particular task of communicating information about the NWTS Program to the public is discussed where appropriate. The results of this study will aid the NWTS Program in presenting to the public the quite diverse technical information generated within the program so that a widespread, thorough public understanding of the NWTS Program might be achieved. An annotated bibliography is included

  20. The Imagined Audience and Privacy Concern on Facebook: Differences Between Producers and Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Jung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Facebook users share information with others by creating posts and specifying who should be able to see each post. Once a user creates a post, those who see it have the ability to copy and re-share the information. But, if the reader has a different understanding of the information in the post than the creator intended, he or she may use the information in ways that are contrary to the intentions of the original creator. This study examined whether post creators (Producers and readers (Consumers who are Facebook Friends had similar levels of privacy concern regarding how others might use the information in specific posts, and how their privacy concern about the post varied by whether the imagined audience consisted of Friends, Friends of Friends, or the general Public. The results showed that both Producers and Consumers had similar levels of privacy concern about a post shared with an imagined audience of Friends versus Friends of Friends. However, Consumers believed posts were more private than the Producers themselves did, and showed more privacy concern. This shows that post Consumers care about Producers’ privacy, perceive that they are co-owners of the information, and engage in boundary management with Producers.

  1. The Effects of Target Audience on Social Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsarhan, Hesham

    2013-01-01

    Online social bookmarking systems allow users to assign tags (i.e., keywords) to represent the content of resources. Research on the effects of target audience on social tagging suggests that taggers select different tags for themselves, their community (e.g., family, friends, colleagues), and the general public (Panke & Gaiser, 2009; Pu &…

  2. Discourse swings in understanding audiences:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, CarrieLynn D.

    Traditional discourses of the relationship between media producers and consumers have been challenged as of late in post-industrialized countries.  The blurring of established consumer/producer identities due to changes in the mediascape, forecasted for decades, has changed how both academics......’s cooptation of these consumers, conceptualizing the people who engage with their media products as a combination of the previous two, or "audience-as-pusher".  This paper is an account of this discourse swing through the description of case studies that demonstrate the utilization of interactive marketing...

  3. In search of the invisble (audiences)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaun, Anne; Hartley, Jannie Møller; Juzefovičs, Jānis

    2016-01-01

    that are literally invisible including practices of lurking in social media environments as well as unintended audiences. The literature review of research of the past ten years on invisible audiences identifies important gaps for both forms of invisible audiences. In conclusion, we suggest more extensive research...... on the diverse groups of invisible audiences on a more structural level, i.e. questions of certain social, political as well as cultural groups are rendered invisible. Furthermore we suggest that studies consider practices of invisible audiences on the micro, experiential level from the perspective of members...

  4. Communicating marine reserve science to diverse audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grorud-Colvert, Kirsten; Lester, Sarah E.; Airamé, Satie; Neeley, Elizabeth; Gaines, Steven D.

    2010-01-01

    As human impacts cause ecosystem-wide changes in the oceans, the need to protect and restore marine resources has led to increasing calls for and establishment of marine reserves. Scientific information about marine reserves has multiplied over the last decade, providing useful knowledge about this tool for resource users, managers, policy makers, and the general public. This information must be conveyed to nonscientists in a nontechnical, credible, and neutral format, but most scientists are not trained to communicate in this style or to develop effective strategies for sharing their scientific knowledge. Here, we present a case study from California, in which communicating scientific information during the process to establish marine reserves in the Channel Islands and along the California mainland coast expanded into an international communication effort. We discuss how to develop a strategy for communicating marine reserve science to diverse audiences and highlight the influence that effective science communication can have in discussions about marine management. PMID:20427745

  5. EMOTIONAL CONTAGION AND MOOD IN CROWD SERVING AS AUDIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beno Arnejcic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The global world is gradually becoming a world of separated crowds despite the artificial wire and wireless connection through television and the Internet. Crowds remain a prevailing subject of research in different social studies, and the research of changes in the psychological structure of crowds and their characteristics is still of primary interest. The main focus of the research is on the interpretation of the results of the research paper about a special separated crowd called audience. It was observed how students, constituting the crowd, perceive a crowd on video. The observation was focused on the research of emotional contagion and mood in the crowd serving as audience. While watching a mass event on a big screen, the crowd serving as audience emotionally converges with someone else, in our case with public speakers.

  6. Active audiencies and journalism: Involved citizens or motivated consumers?

    OpenAIRE

    Masip, Pere; Guallar, Javier; Peralta, Miquel; Ruiz-Caballero, Carlos; Suau, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Audience participation, in any of its forms and names (public journalism, citizen journalism, participatory journalism, UGC), appears to revitalise democracy, thanks to the opportunities for public debate opened up by information and communications technology. On the other hand, however, there are many authors who question whether interactive technologies really encourage democracy or the market, empower the citizen or strengthen the consumer. In this context, we still have little information...

  7. Active audiences and journalism: Involved citizens or motivated consumers?

    OpenAIRE

    Masip, Pere; Guallar, Javier; Peralta, Miquel; Ruiz, Carles; Suau, Jaume

    2015-01-01

    Audience participation, in any of its forms and names (public journalism, citizen journalism, participatory journalism, UGC), appears to revitalise democracy, thanks to the opportunities for public debate opened up by information and communications technology. On the other hand, however, there are many authors who question whether interactive technologies really encourage democracy or the market, empower the citizen or strengthen the consumer. In this context, we still have little information...

  8. A Taxonomy of Pre/Post Performance Behaviors for Speakers and Audiences in the Basic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Bryant Keith

    Noting that introductory public speaking and performance studies classes are often met with great anxiety and trepidation, this paper describes and categorizes the necessary student and audience behaviors at three levels of involvement: 1) pre-performance, 2) post-performance, and 3) audience participation. Teachers can show students how to apply…

  9. Defining Audience Segments for Extension Programming Using Reported Water Conservation Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Paul; Ott, Emily; Wilber, Wendy; Gouldthorpe, Jessica; Racevskis, Laila

    2013-01-01

    A tool from social marketing can help Extension agents understand distinct audience segments among their constituents. Defining targeted audiences for Extension programming is a first step to influencing behavior change among the public. An online survey was conducted using an Extension email list for urban households receiving a monthly lawn and…

  10. Among the Authentic Audience: Young Adults' Perceptions and Responses to Youth as Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchen, Amie K.

    2017-01-01

    Lifelong science learning is important for making informed decisions on science topics, and there is a need to engage broader and more diverse audiences with science. One opportunity for engagement occurs when students share science topics with a public audience. Research indicates this interaction can have benefits for students, but little is…

  11. Examining LGBTQ-Based Literature Intended for Primary and Intermediate Elementary Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, John H., III

    2018-01-01

    This content analysis research examined how lesbian, gay, bisexual, transsexual, transgender, and queer (LGBTQ) individuals and issues are represented in elementary-level trade books. The data pool included every LGBTQ-based trade book with intended audiences of primary (grades K-2) and intermediate (grades 3-5) elementary students. Trade books…

  12. Teaching audience analysis to the technical student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debs, M. B.; Brillhart, L. V.

    1981-01-01

    Teaching audience analysis, as practiced in a technical writing course for engineering students, is discussed. Audience analysis is described as the task of defining the audience for a particular piece of writing and determining those characteristics of the audience which constrain the writer and effect reception of the message. A mature technical writing style that shows the tension produced when a text is written to be read and understood is considered in terms of audience analysis. Techniques include: (1) conveying to students the concept that a reader with certain expectations exist, (2) team teaching to preserve the context of a given technical discipline, and (3) assigning a technical report that addresses a variety of readers, thus establishing the complexity of audience oriented writing.

  13. Characterizing Health Information for Different Target Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yueping; Hou, Zhen; Hou, Li; Li, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of audiences in health care: health professionals and health consumers, each have different information needs. Health monographs targeting different audiences are created by leveraging readers' background knowledge. The NCI's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries provide parallel cancer information and education resources with different target audiences. In this paper, we used targeted audience-specific cancer information PDQs to measure characteristic differences on the element level between audiences. In addition, we compared vocabulary coverage. Results show a significant difference between the professional and patient version of cancer monographs in both content organization and vocabulary. This study provides a new view to assess targeted audience-specific health information, and helps editors to improve the quality and readability of health information.

  14. "Black Magic" and "Gold Dust": The Epistemic and Political Uses of Evidence Tools in Public Health Policy Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Ellen; Smith, Katherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about the limited influence of research on decision making have prompted the development of tools intended to mediate evidence for policy audiences. This article focuses on three examples, prominent in public health: impact assessments; systematic reviews; and economic decision-making tools (cost-benefit analysis and scenario modelling).…

  15. Communicative Informatics: An Active and Creative Audience Framework of Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda M. Gallant

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Communicative informatics reflects the interactive complexity of web-based communication and a paradigm shift away from mass communication. Three discursive spheres (database and information systems, human computer interaction, and active audiences work together to control online communication openness and its consequences for post-mass media society’s public common. This has implications for communication freedom, creativity, and constraints in an information-based society. Four propositions shed light on how online audience activity is encouraged by and imperative to corporate interests; how audience creativity can create, accept, or reject messages; how the online audience is monitored; and how online rhetoric can produce or inhibit public commons. Evidence shows that social media’s corporate interests can be at odds with online privacy and citizen communication. This tension is explored with a unique focus on rhetoric, argument, and the communication between audience members and Internet-based corporate media by way of digitized communication feedback loops.

  16. Do social norms affect intended food choice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croker, H; Whitaker, K L; Cooke, L; Wardle, J

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of social norms on intended fruit and vegetable intake. A two-stage design to i) compare the perceived importance of normative influences vs cost and health on dietary choices, and ii) test the prediction that providing information on social norms will increase intended fruit and vegetable consumption in an experimental study. Home-based interviews (N=1083; 46% men, 54% women) were carried out as part of the Office for National Statistics Omnibus Survey in November 2008. The public's perception of the importance of social norms was lower (M=2.1) than the perceived importance of cost (M=2.7) or health (M=3.4) (all p'scost information; none of the interventions affected women's intentions. People have little awareness of the influence of social norms but normative information can have a demonstrable impact on dietary intentions. Health promotion might profit from emphasising how many people are attempting to adopt healthy lifestyles rather than how many have poor diets.

  17. The Imagined Audience on Social Network Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eden Litt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When people construct and share posts on social network sites like Facebook and Twitter, whom do they imagine as their audience? How do users describe this imagined audience? Do they have a sub-audience in mind (e.g., “friends who like reality television”? Do they share more broadly and abstractly (e.g., “the public”? Do such imaginings fluctuate each time a person posts? Using a mixed-methods approach involving a 2-month-long diary study of 119 diverse American adults and their 1,200 social network site posts, supplemented with follow-up interviews (N = 30, this study explores the imagined audience on social network sites. The findings reveal that even though users often interacted with large diverse audiences as they posted, they coped by envisioning either very broad abstract imagined audiences or more targeted specific imagined audiences composed of personal ties, professional ties, communal ties, and/or phantasmal ties. When people had target imagined audiences in mind, they were most often homogeneous and composed of people’s friends and family. Users’ imaginings typically fluctuated among these audience types as they posted even though the potential audience as per their posts’ privacy settings often did not change. The findings provide a list of audience types, as well as detailed descriptions, examples, and frequencies on which future research can build. With people’s online presence playing an important role for their reputations, these findings provide more insight into for whom people are managing their privacy and whom they have in mind as they share.

  18. Measuring and manipulating audiences : A personal reflection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulterman, Dick C A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the emotional reactions of audiences to a wide range of content types is an important area of research. In this article, I provide a personal reflection on various approaches to modeling, quantifying and understanding audience behavior based on a broad range of evaluation techniques.

  19. Rational Wizards: Audience Interpreters in French Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourdon, Jérôme; Méadel, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    abstractThis paper will tell the story of the smallgroup of people who, in France, have been in charge of the measurement and theappreciation of the audience of television, and had to invent audience research,to organize it and to communicate its results to "clients" whodepended on it much earlier

  20. Alcohol and tobacco advertising in black and general audience newspapers: targeting with message cues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elisia L; Caburnay, Charlene A; Rodgers, Shelly

    2011-07-01

    This study content analyzed 928 tobacco- and alcohol-related advertisements from a 3-year national sample of Black (n = 24) and general audience (n = 11) newspapers from 24 U.S. cities. The authors compared the frequency of tobacco and alcohol product and control advertising in Black versus general audience newspapers, as well as the presence of 5 message cues: model ethnicity, presence of health official, referral to resources, personal behavior mobilization, and localization. Results within health issues show that Black newspapers had more alcohol product advertising than did general audience newspapers. In contrast, Black newspapers had less alcohol and tobacco control advertising than general audience newspapers. Black newspapers' tobacco/alcohol product advertisements had more African American models than did general audience newspapers' tobacco/alcohol advertising, whereas general audience newspapers' tobacco control advertisements were significantly more likely to feature public health officials than ads in Black newspapers. Fewer message cues such as personal behavior mobilization, referral to resources, and localization were present in Black versus general audience newspapers. Results suggest that Black newspapers may have greater dependency than do general audience newspapers on these risk-related advertisements that target African American consumers. Given the current advertising environment, public health initiatives are needed to counter unhealthy alcohol product advertising messages that target vulnerable populations.

  1. Transnational television audiences and modes of engagement: studying audience engagement as a set of experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keinonen, Heidi; Jensen, Pia Majbritt; Esser, Andrea

    2018-01-01

    Audience engagement is attracting increasing attention in various academic disciplines. Recently, the industry- and technology-oriented conceptualizations of engagement have been challenged by a more audience-oriented understanding. This article aims at contributing to the development of a more...... nuanced audience-oriented approach. First, we make a theoretical argument by bringing various key theories together and, second, we present an empirical contribution by analysing audience engagement as a set of experiences. Our analysis builds on the empirical material produced by conducting two rounds...... and ritualistic engagement, ludic engagement. We also discovered that audiences at times get disengaged or opt to actively resist engagement....

  2. Personal Storytelling and Narrative as a Means for Climate Scientists to Engage and Inform Public Audiences - Illustrated by the Play '2071 - The World We'll Leave Our Grandchildren' Comissioned by the Royal Court Theatre, London and the Deutsches Schauspielhaus, Hamburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapley, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to engage greater public interest in science it is necessary to move beyond the traditional academic "information deficit" mode of communication, with its emphasis on the delivery and explantion of 'facts'. This is especially the case for topics such as climate science, which have the potential to provoke strong conscious or unconscious emotional and ideological audience reactions. The use of personalised narrative and storytelling offers a means to draw in non-experts in a way that overcomes barriers of disinterest or prejudice. The talk will address the role of climate scientists in communicating within the public square, and will use the play '2071 - The World We'll Leave Our Grandchildren" as an example of how theatre can provide an effective means of communicating complex and provocative knowledge and understanding. The play was commissioned by the Royal Court Theatre, London and the Deutshes Schauspielhaus, Hamburg. It received positive reviews and sold out at the London venue.

  3. When do Logos Talk to their Audience?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tore; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on two experiments where the ability of a new logo to reach and audience is explored. The approach is inspired by cybernetics and is based on measuring the variation of the reception of a logo seen just once. The variation is measured as the combined variation of between...... to the audience. A big variation within-subject means that the individual receives a varied, deep, and nuanced message. The ability to do this rests partly on the ability to activate competences and experiences from the past and thus making sense. The findings are that few logo elements are received by audiences...

  4. Dialogues between audience research and production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Redvall, Eva Novrup

    2017-01-01

    This article offers a historical analysis of the audience testing of television drama from The Danish Broadcasting Corporation (DR) by the in-house DR Media Research Department from the mid-1990s until 2016. The article investigates how the methods for testing have changed from more traditional...... focus groups and surveys to include biometric methods (e.g. skin conductance) to measure audience arousal. While audience testing is often primarily viewed as a quality measurement tool for executives, the article argues that testing can also be a dialogue-based tool offering creative practitioners...

  5. Characterizing and Reaching High-Risk Drinkers Using Audience Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Howard B.; Kirby, Susan D.; Donodeo, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Background Market or audience segmentation is widely used in social marketing efforts to help planners identify segments of a population to target for tailored program interventions. Market-based segments are typically defined by behaviors, attitudes, knowledge, opinions, or lifestyles. They are more helpful to health communication and marketing planning than epidemiologically-defined groups because market-based segments are similar in respect to how they behave or might react to marketing and communication efforts. However, market segmentation has rarely been used in alcohol research. As an illustration of its utility, we employed commercial data that describes the sociodemographic characteristics of high-risk drinkers as an audience segment; where they tend to live, lifestyles, interests, consumer behaviors, alcohol consumption behaviors, other health-related behaviors, and cultural values. Such information can be extremely valuable in targeting and planning public health campaigns, targeted mailings, prevention interventions and research efforts. Methods We describe the results of a segmentation analysis of those individuals who self-report consuming five or more drinks per drinking episode at least twice in the last 30-days. The study used the proprietary PRIZM™ audience segmentation database merged with Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) database. The top ten of the 66 PRIZM™ audience segments for this risky drinking pattern are described. For five of these segments we provide additional in-depth details about consumer behavior and the estimates of the market areas where these risky drinkers reside. Results The top ten audience segments (PRIZM clusters) most likely to engage in high-risk drinking are described. The cluster with the highest concentration of binge drinking behavior is referred to as the “Cyber Millenials.” This cluster is characterized as “the nation's tech-savvy singles

  6. Characterizing and reaching high-risk drinkers using audience segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Howard B; Kirby, Susan D; Donodeo, Fred

    2009-08-01

    Market or audience segmentation is widely used in social marketing efforts to help planners identify segments of a population to target for tailored program interventions. Market-based segments are typically defined by behaviors, attitudes, knowledge, opinions, or lifestyles. They are more helpful to health communication and marketing planning than epidemiologically defined groups because market-based segments are similar in respect to how they behave or might react to marketing and communication efforts. However, market segmentation has rarely been used in alcohol research. As an illustration of its utility, we employed commercial data that describes the sociodemographic characteristics of high-risk drinkers as an audience segment, including where they tend to live, lifestyles, interests, consumer behaviors, alcohol consumption behaviors, other health-related behaviors, and cultural values. Such information can be extremely valuable in targeting and planning public health campaigns, targeted mailings, prevention interventions, and research efforts. We described the results of a segmentation analysis of those individuals who self-reported to consume 5 or more drinks per drinking episode at least twice in the last 30 days. The study used the proprietary PRIZM (Claritas, Inc., San Diego, CA) audience segmentation database merged with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) database. The top 10 of the 66 PRIZM audience segments for this risky drinking pattern are described. For five of these segments we provided additional in-depth details about consumer behavior and the estimates of the market areas where these risky drinkers resided. The top 10 audience segments (PRIZM clusters) most likely to engage in high-risk drinking are described. The cluster with the highest concentration of binge-drinking behavior is referred to as the "Cyber Millenials." This cluster is characterized as "the nation's tech

  7. Creating Visual Design and Meaningful Audience Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur; Ion Wille, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the EU Interreg funded Classical Composition Music and Experience Design project, was to rethink audience experiences and develop knowledge of applied technologies connected to classical music and live concerts. The project and its main objectives was motivated by at least thee...... conditions. The most important being 1) the development in new technology creating new expectations in audiences attending cultural events, including classical concerts, 2) resent decline in audiences attending classical music and 3) a will to strengthen relations between cultural institutions, creative...... businesses and educational institutions in the Øresund region (including the city and surroundings of Malmø and Copenhagen). Therefore the project Classical Composition Music and Experience Design focused on developing new and meaningful audience experiences where live classical music meets new digital...

  8. Effective Climate Communication with Difficult Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate communication is often fraught with ideological baggage ("noise") that makes it very difficult to connect to audiences. In these cases, it is helpful to use "best practices" known from other fields of communication. Engaging audiences with authenticity, using plain language, respecting cultural and political differences, and a sprinkling of humor can go a long way toward establishing a connection. It's important to avoid common but polarizing tropes from popular media, and often quite helpful to frame climate issues in novel or unexpected ways that cut across entrenched political discourse. Emerging social science research Beyond ideology, climate change is Simple, Serious, and Solvable. Effective communication of these three key ideas can succeed when the science argument is carefully framed to avoid attack of the audience's ethical identity. Simple arguments from common sense and everyday experience are more successful than data. Serious consequences to values that resonate with the audience can be avoided by solutions that don't threaten those values.

  9. The Disappearing Audience and Reflexive Visibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Girginova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to popular opinion and some academic writing that celebrates the renewed visibility of new media audiences, this essay argues that they are increasingly going into retreat. To understand how new media audiences “disappear” from view of one another, I borrow from Brighenti’s typology of visibility and develop the idea of “reflexive visibility.” The latter describes the ability to socially orient ourselves in a digital environment through the textual and contextual cues of others—an activity that is of utmost importance not only to researchers wishing to “see” various audiences but also for audiences writ large, wishing to know themselves.

  10. The Merapi Interactive Project: Offering a Fancy Cross-Disciplinary Scientific Understanding of Merapi Volcano to a Wide Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, J.; Kerlow, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Merapi volcano is of great interest to a wide audience as it is one of the most dangerous volcanoes worldwide and a beautiful touristic spot. The scientific literature available on that volcano both in Earth and Social sciences is rich but mostly inaccessible to the public because of the scientific jargon and the restricted database access. Merapi Interactive aims at developing clear information and attractive content about Merapi for a wide audience. The project is being produced by the Art and Media Group at the Earth Observatory of Singapore, and it takes the shape of an e-book. It offers a consistent, comprehensive, and jargon-filtered synthesis of the main volcanic-risk related topics about Merapi: volcanic mechanisms, eruptive history, associated hazards and risks, the way inhabitants and scientists deal with it, and what daily life at Merapi looks like. The project provides a background to better understand volcanoes, and it points out some interactions between scientists and society. We propose two levels of interpretation: one that is understandable by 10-year old kids and above and an expert level with deeper presentations of specific topics. Thus, the Merapi Interactive project intends to provide an engaging and comprehensive interactive book that should interest kids, adults, as well as Earth Sciences undergraduates and academics. Merapi Interactive is scheduled for delivery in mid-2016.

  11. The child audience from TV professionals' viewpoints

    OpenAIRE

    Pereira, Sara

    2010-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the viewpoints of a range of television professionals regarding young audiences - how they define children, how they see this special kind of audience, including its needs and interests, and how they view the role of television in children's lives. Focusing on these ideas, our goal is to understand how they translate into decisions about the format and content of schedules, programming, production, marketing campaigns, regulation measures and also res...

  12. Journal "Kas Jauns": audience uses and gratifications

    OpenAIRE

    Mehtijeva, Jekaterina

    2012-01-01

    The goal of barchelors work „Journal "Kas Jauns": audience uses and gratifications” is to analize and define what are the main readers needs and to what extenct these needs are being satisfied. As well as to define readers habits In the theoretical part the definition of audience is provided as well, as breakdown of the main readers expectations in respect of the theory of media uses and gratification. In order to appropriately analyze the theory behind these Academic thesis the magazine "...

  13. Media brand loyalty through online audience integration?

    OpenAIRE

    Lischka, Juliane A

    2015-01-01

    This chapter discusses the question whether audience members become loyal toward a media brand when sharing, liking or commenting on online media content – or are loyal readers more inclined to write comments on online articles or to like and share them? The aim is to answer this chicken-egg causality dilemma on the audience integration-loyalty relation on a theoretical basis. Therefore, the concept of attitude-behavior consistency, the theory of reasoned action, involvement theory, uses and ...

  14. F*** Yeah Fluid Dynamics: On science outreach and appealing to broad audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Nicole

    2015-11-01

    Sharing scientific research with general audiences is important for scientists both in terms of educating the public and in pursuing funding opportunities. But it's not always apparent how to make a big splash. Over the past five years, fluid dynamics outreach blog FYFD has published more than 1300 articles and gained an audience of over 215,000 readers. The site appeals to a wide spectrum of readers in both age and field of study. This talk will utilize five years' worth of site content and reader feedback to examine what makes science appealing to general audiences and suggest methods researchers can use to shape their work's broader impact.

  15. Audience, consequence, and journal selection in toxic-exposure epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rier, David A

    2004-10-01

    Even preliminary toxic-exposure epidemiology papers can spark "media scares" and questionable reactions amongst the public. Concerns for the social consequences of publication can lead epidemiologists--despite the advantages of visible publication--to choose a more obscure outlet for potentially sensitive studies. Interviews with 61 US toxic-exposure epidemiologists indicate that investigators generally sought visible journals to transmit their work to the widest relevant audience. Yet up to 36-46% of this sample sometimes have sought or would seek to keep their research from a public who, they feared, might misuse their results. Implications for the boundaries between science and society (including evidence of hidden scientific activism and "inert" public activism) are discussed, and six hypotheses for further research are proposed.

  16. Issues related to seismic surveys in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence : public inquiry report; Les enjeux lies aux leves sismiques dans l'estuaire et le golfe du Saint-Laurent : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-08-01

    Quebec's Office of Public Inquiry on the Environment (Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement) conducted public hearings on the environmental issues associated with seismic surveys carried out in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and its estuaries for the purpose of petroleum and natural gas exploration. The inquiry focused on the effect of sound waves on aquatic ecosystems and marine organisms and the associated environmental, social and economic consequences of seismic surveys. Environmental groups, scientists, fishermen and the maritime tourist industry have been concerned with the impact of seismic surveys in the Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence since the autumn of 2002, when Hydro-Quebec publicized its 2002-2010 plan for oil and gas exploration and when Geophysical Service Inc. received a mandate from Hydro-Quebec to carry out seismic surveys in the area. This report presents 10 recommendations and 16 opinions resulting from 18 public hearings held in communities along the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Although the thousands of kilometres of seismic survey lines acquired in the Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence since 1960 do not seem to have had any visible impact on the marine environment, the Commission has taken a precautionary approach and recommends that some practices should be limited until a review of literature demonstrates that seismic surveys do not affect the ecological integrity of the St. Lawrence for fisheries or ecotourism. 16 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs., 2 appendices.

  17. To Crowdfund Research, Scientists Must Build an Audience for Their Work.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrett E K Byrnes

    Full Text Available As rates of traditional sources of scientific funding decline, scientists have become increasingly interested in crowdfunding as a means of bringing in new money for research. In fields where crowdfunding has become a major venue for fundraising such as the arts and technology, building an audience for one's work is key for successful crowdfunding. For science, to what extent does audience building, via engagement and outreach, increase a scientist's abilities to bring in money via crowdfunding? Here we report on an analysis of the #SciFund Challenge, a crowdfunding experiment in which 159 scientists attempted to crowdfund their research. Using data gathered from a survey of participants, internet metrics, and logs of project donations, we find that public engagement is the key to crowdfunding success. Building an audience or "fanbase" and actively engaging with that audience as well as seeking to broaden the reach of one's audience indirectly increases levels of funding. Audience size and effort interact to bring in more people to view a scientist's project proposal, leading to funding. We discuss how projects capable of raising levels of funds commensurate with traditional funding agencies will need to incorporate direct involvement of the public with science. We suggest that if scientists and research institutions wish to tap this new source of funds, they will need to encourage and reward activities that allow scientists to engage with the public.

  18. To Crowdfund Research, Scientists Must Build an Audience for Their Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Ranganathan, Jai; Walker, Barbara L E; Faulkes, Zen

    2014-01-01

    As rates of traditional sources of scientific funding decline, scientists have become increasingly interested in crowdfunding as a means of bringing in new money for research. In fields where crowdfunding has become a major venue for fundraising such as the arts and technology, building an audience for one's work is key for successful crowdfunding. For science, to what extent does audience building, via engagement and outreach, increase a scientist's abilities to bring in money via crowdfunding? Here we report on an analysis of the #SciFund Challenge, a crowdfunding experiment in which 159 scientists attempted to crowdfund their research. Using data gathered from a survey of participants, internet metrics, and logs of project donations, we find that public engagement is the key to crowdfunding success. Building an audience or "fanbase" and actively engaging with that audience as well as seeking to broaden the reach of one's audience indirectly increases levels of funding. Audience size and effort interact to bring in more people to view a scientist's project proposal, leading to funding. We discuss how projects capable of raising levels of funds commensurate with traditional funding agencies will need to incorporate direct involvement of the public with science. We suggest that if scientists and research institutions wish to tap this new source of funds, they will need to encourage and reward activities that allow scientists to engage with the public.

  19. Interface of Linguistic and Visual Information During Audience Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Kumiko

    2015-08-01

    Evidence suggests that speakers can take account of the addressee's needs when referring. However, what representations drive the speaker's audience design has been less clear. This study aims to go beyond previous studies by investigating the interplay between the visual and linguistic context during audience design. Speakers repeated subordinate descriptions (e.g., firefighter) given in the prior linguistic context less and used basic-level descriptions (e.g., man) more when the addressee did not hear the linguistic context than when s/he did. But crucially, this effect happened only when the referent lacked the visual attributes associated with the expressions (e.g., the referent was in plain clothes rather than in a firefighter uniform), so there was no other contextual cue available for the identification of the referent. This suggests that speakers flexibly use different contextual cues to help their addressee map the referring expression onto the intended referent. In addition, speakers used fewer pronouns when the addressee did not hear the linguistic antecedent than when s/he did. This suggests that although speakers may be egocentric during anaphoric reference (Fukumura & Van Gompel, 2012), they can cooperatively avoid pronouns when the linguistic antecedents were not shared with their addressee during initial reference. © 2014 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  20. TV Audience Measurement with Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Shawndra

    2014-06-01

    TV audience measurement involves estimating the number of viewers tuned into a TV show at any given time as well as their demographics. First introduced shortly after commercial television broadcasting began in the late 1940s, audience measurement allowed the business of television to flourish by offering networks a way to quantify the monetary value of TV audiences for advertisers, who pay for the estimated number of eyeballs watching during commercials. The first measurement techniques suffered from multiple limitations because reliable, large-scale data were costly to acquire. Yet despite these limitations, measurement standards remained largely unchanged for decades until devices such as cable boxes, video-on-demand boxes, and cell phones, as well as web apps, Internet browser clicks, web queries, and social media activity, resulted in an explosion of digitally available data. TV viewers now leave digital traces that can be used to track almost every aspect of their daily lives, allowing the potential for large-scale aggregation across data sources for individual users and groups and enabling the tracking of more people on more dimensions for more shows. Data are now more comprehensive, available in real time, and cheaper to acquire, enabling accurate and fine-grained TV audience measurement. In this article, I discuss the evolution of audience measurement and what the recent data explosion means for the TV industry and academic research.

  1. Message Design and Audience Engagement with Tobacco Prevention Posts on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A; Damiani, Rachel E

    2018-06-01

    Understanding the appropriate medium to communicate health promotion messages is vital for improving personal and societal health. As increasingly more people utilize social media for health information, public health practitioners use these platforms to engage an existing audience in health promotion messages. In this study, the relational framing theory was used as a lens for studying how message framing may influence social media audience engagement. Specifically, we assessed how posts from Tobacco Free Florida's Facebook page were framed as either dominant-submissive or affiliate-disaffiliate to an implied audience of either smokers, nonsmokers, active quitters, or a mixed audience, and the extent to which a direct call for engagement, in terms of a request to comment, like, or share the post, was used for audience engagement. A three-way interaction for the level of engagement through comments was significant, F(3217) = 7.11, p social media. Implied audiences of Tobacco Free Florida's posts included smokers, those who are trying to quit, and nonsmokers as health promotion can be targeted at the individual's health, social support infrastructure, or the well-being of the society, and implications for strategic message design and audience targeting are discussed.

  2. Audience studies 2.0: on the theory, politics and method of qualitative audience research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, J.

    2009-01-01

    Audience research, this paper suggests, is an excellent field to test the claims of Media Studies 2.0. Moreover, 2.0 claims are a good means to review qualitative audience research itself too. Working from a broad strokes analysis of the theory, politics and method of interpretative research with

  3. Flipping the Audience Script: An Activity That Integrates Research and Audience Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chris; Hannah, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a flipped classroom activity that requires students to integrate research and audience analysis. The activity uses Twitter as a data source. In the activity, students identify a sample, collect customer tweets, and analyze the language of the tweets in an effort to construct knowledge about an audience's values, needs, and…

  4. Drunker than intended: misperceptions and information treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxnes, Erling; Jensen, Lene

    2009-01-01

    by the difference between intended BAC and perceived BAC, and where the delay is not properly accounted for. If so, BAC will overshoot intended BAC. This hypothesis has not been thoroughly tested before; nor has the consequent and challenging educational problem. METHOD: High school students made drinking decisions...... information about the delay does not reduce overshoots, pre-test experience with a simulator parameterized for a mouse does. CONCLUSION: Our study warrants further studies to see if simulator training, analogies, and rules of thumb can help juveniles not to overshoot intended BAC in real drinking situations...

  5. Resource file: practical publications for energy management, edition III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    The Resource File is an in-depth bibliography of 166 practical and action-oriented energy conservation publications and materials. It is a reference tool, designed for Federal, state, and local energy managers or people who are asked to recommend how-to conservation guides to the public. Each listing describes a publication's intended audience and provides a summary of its contents. Included are operations and maintenance manuals, life-cycle costing handbooks, home insulation manuals, films on fuel-saving driving techniques, and courses devoted exclusively to home weatherization. 166 items.

  6. The design of virtual audiences: Noticeable and recognizable behavioral styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, N.; Brinkman, W.P.; Birna Van Riemsdijk, M.; Neerincx, M.

    2016-01-01

    Expressive virtual audiences are used in scientific research, psychotherapy, and training. To create an expressive virtual audience, developers need to know how specific audience behaviors are associated with certain characteristics of an audience, such as attitude, and how well people can recognize

  7. The Disappearing Audience and Reflexive Visibility

    OpenAIRE

    Katerina Girginova

    2016-01-01

    Contrary to popular opinion and some academic writing that celebrates the renewed visibility of new media audiences, this essay argues that they are increasingly going into retreat. To understand how new media audiences “disappear” from view of one another, I borrow from Brighenti’s typology of visibility and develop the idea of “reflexive visibility.” The latter describes the ability to socially orient ourselves in a digital environment through the textual and contextual cues of others—an ac...

  8. Les sciences de l’information et de la communication face à l’émergence d’internet :vers un renouveau de la construction du public. Approche théorique et méta-analyse des publics d’internet/The information and communication sciences facing the emergence of internet :towards a revival of the construction of the audience. Theoretical approach and meta-analysis of the internet audiences

    OpenAIRE

    Patriarche, Geoffroy

    2005-01-01

    Cette dissertation doctorale entend contribuer au renouveau des sciences de l’information et de la communication (SIC) et plus particulièrement de la construction du « public » dans un contexte caractérisé par une remise en question des savoirs théoriques et méthodologiques associée à l’émergence d’internet. Cette problématique est développée en trois temps. Dans un premier temps, nous effectuons une synthèse des constructions du public dans la recherche sur les médias classiques. Les mult...

  9. Marketing to Your Target Audience: How Syracuse University Public Safety Reached Its Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Every year, marketers spend millions of dollars trying to vie for the attention of that oh-so-lucrative demographic--the 18- to 24-year-old. For those people serving academic environments, this just happens to be the demographic of their entire clientele. So the challenge becomes how to grasp a slice of these attention spans distracted by…

  10. Radioelement gauges. Appliances intended for permanent installation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-08-01

    The present norm defines for radioelement gauges intended for permanent installation: a classification of instruments and beam shutter devices; recommended construction techniques which satisfy health physics requirements; monitoring and test methods; information which must appear on the instruments [fr

  11. HotTips for Speakers: 25 Surefire Ways To Engage and Captivate Any Group or Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernathy, Rob; Reardon, Mark

    From managing stage fright to keeping the audience hanging on their every word, experienced public speakers have the techniques to make every presentation memorable. This book contains a collection of 25 strategies for public speaking that have already worked for many people. Each "HotTip" (strategy) has been tested and used with…

  12. Let's Talk about Sex: Audience Research of Flemish Teenage Television Viewers and Their View on Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Elke; Biltereyst, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Teenage sexual identity is shaped within a complex cultural landscape in which the issue of protecting the "innocent" (children/teens) from sexually suggestive images is high on the public agenda. Intimate relationships and sexuality have entered the public domain and are presented on the screen, offering audiences possible roles to play…

  13. Audiences, museums and the English middle class

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Longhurst

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available The increasingly accepted way to analyse any media product is to consider production, text and audience processes. In a deceptively simple way, a television programme, for example, can be examined in the institutional, social and political context in which it is produced and with respect to the organizational framework that provides its immediate production environment. Second, its textual structures and strategies can be analysed using different approaches, such as structuralism or (in certain respects content analysis. Third, the way in which the audience understands (or decodes the text can be considered, as can the makeup of the audience, in terms of standard factors such as class, gender, age, ethnicity and so on. There are many variations on this sort of approach. This paper starts from such a premise. It suggests that in addition to the well formulated approaches to the study of the museum that focus generally on the institutional and wider social context for museums, or on specific museums and the processes that occur within them, or on the much studied strategies for display and narration of texts, the audiences for museums are also important.

  14. The Audience of One: In Weakness, Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, Thom

    1981-01-01

    Two approaches to the teaching of composition at the college level have evolved: concern with correctness and concern with expression. If the place of the audience in written communication is emphasized, it will be easier to make students see the difference between self-expression and self-indulgence. (MLW)

  15. Mirror Your Audience's Attitude: A Global Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meussling, Vonne

    Recent advertising research has suggested that to gain initial entry into and retain continual success with a targeted audience of consumers, it is wise to mirror the attitudes and desires of those consumers. This has proven effective in the United States, where companies such as Chevrolet, Levi Strauss, and Coca-Cola have successfully catered to…

  16. Conditioning audience patronage using subject matters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conditioning audience patronage using subject matters in Nollywood films: the example of 30 days in Atlanta. ... Abstract. Films are subject-based and when producers set out to communicate their viewpoints, some do it flamboyantly while others take the subtle path. Unlike live theatre before it, the possibility of a virile spiral ...

  17. Audiences for the Theory of Multiple Intelligences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Howard

    2004-01-01

    In his closing comments, Howard Gardner discusses the various audiences that have emerged over the years for the theory of multiple intelligences. Under that rubric, he places the various papers in this issue and speculates about future lines of work on MI theory.

  18. Towards Biometric Assessment of Audience Affect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng Wieland, Jakob; Larsen, Lars Bo; Laursen, Jeanette Kølbæk

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how reliable affective responses can be obtained using objective biometric measures for media audience research. We use Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) to detect sixteen respondents’ arousal levels and as an objective measure to show how self- reporting disrupts the experience...

  19. Expanding the Audience for the Performing Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Alan R.

    Becoming involved in the arts is a process that involves movement through several stages, from disinterest to active attendance at and enthusiasm for performing arts events. Since target consumers at any time will differ in their placement on this continuum, marketing programs to expand arts audiences must first identify where each target segment…

  20. Systems Analysis and Design: Know Your Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinicke, Bryan A.

    2012-01-01

    Systems analysis and design (SAD) classes are required in both Information Systems and Accounting programs, but these audiences have very different needs for these skills. This article will review the requirements for SAD within each of these disciplines and compare and contrast the different requirements for teaching systems analysis and design…

  1. Multimedia Astronomy Communication: Effectively Communicate Astronomy to the Desired Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star Cartier, Kimberly Michelle; Wright, Jason

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of our jobs as scientists is communicating our work to others. In this, the field of astronomy holds the double-edged sword of ubiquitous fascination: the topic has been of interest to nearly the entire global population at some point in their lives, yet the learning curve is steep within any subfield and rife with difficult-to-synthesize details. Compounding this issue is the ever-expanding array of methods to reach people in today's Communications Era. Each communication medium has its own strengths and weaknesses, is appropriate in different situations, and requires its own specific skillset in order to maximize its functionality. Despite this, little attention is given to training astronomers in effective communication techniques, often relying on newcomers to simply pick up the ability by mimicking others and assuming that a firm grasp on the subject matter will make up for deficiencies in communication theory. This can restrict astronomers to a narrow set of communication methods, harming both the communicators and the audience who may struggle to access the information through those media.Whether writing a research paper to academic peers or giving an astronomy talk to a pubic audience, successfully communicating a scientific message requires more than just an expert grasp on the topic. A communicator must understand the makeup and prior knowledge of the desired audience, be able to break down the salient points of the topic into pieces that audience can digest, select and maximize upon a medium to deliver the message, and frame the message in a way that hooks the audience and compels further interest. In this work we synthesize the requirements of effective astronomy communication into a few key questions that every communicator needs to answer. We then discuss some of the most common media currently used to communicate astronomy, give both effective and poor examples of utilizing these media to communicate astronomy, and provide key

  2. Methods of Speakers\\' Effects on the Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    فریبا حسینی

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Methods of Speakers' Effects on the Audience    Nasrollah Shameli *   Fariba Hosayni **     Abstract   This article is focused on four issues. The first issue is related to the speaker's external appearance including the beauty of face, the power of his voice, moves and signals by hand, the stick and eyebrow as well as the height. Such characteristics could have an important effect on the audience. The second issue is related to internal features of the speaker. These include the ethics of the preacher , his/her piety and intention on the speakers based on their personalities, habits and emotions, knowledge and culture, and speed of learning. The third issue is concerned with the appearance of the lecture. Words should be clear enough as well as being mixed with Quranic verses, poetry and proverbs. The final issue is related to the content. It is argued that the subject of the talk should be in accordance with the level of understanding of listeners as well as being new and interesting for them.   3 - A phenomenon rhetoric: It was noted in this section How to give words and phrases so that these words and phrases are clear, correct, mixed in parables, governance and Quranic verses, and appropriate their meaning.   4 - the content of Oratory : It was noted in this section to the topic of Oratory and say that the Oratory should be the theme commensurate with the minds of audiences and also should mean that agree with the case may be, then I say: that the rhetoric if the theme was innovative and new is affecting more and more on the audience.     Key words : Oratory , Preacher , Audience, Influence of speech     * Associate Professor, Department of Arabic Language and Literature, University of Isfahan E-mail: Dr-Nasrolla Shameli@Yahoo.com   * * M.A. in Arabic Language and Literature from Isfahan University E-mail: faribahosayni@yahoo.com

  3. Selling Participation to Audiences in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Huang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Media globalization is facilitated by the development of new technologies within a framework of digitization and convergence. Contemporary new media provide networks through which the mingling of media occurs, shaping a “multi-mediacy” age, and a connecting of mediated/mediating venues in a condition of “immediacy”. Additionally, the business of communication has evolved from being the “communication of business” to the “business of business”. Multi-mediacy and immediacy have generated new avenues of profit from media. The paper will draw on Chitty’s theorization on web transactional venues to discuss new ways of farming of revenue from media. Media revenues have in the past and today been drawn from licence fees, media subscriptions and advertising. Today, media networks also sell “participation” to audiences directly by charging for text message voting/gaming, or sell a range of products and services through web-venue based commerce. This paper will undertake case studies to examine the increasing trend of “direct audience payment for participation”. The case studies that will be used are (A the intervention of Chinese Service Providers in reality TV shows and (B E-commerce on the Internet. Monternet (mo[bile I]nternet and Linktone are investigated as Service Providers (SPs and the consumer-to-consumer (C2C website www.taobao.com is studied compared with Eachnet (eBay in China. The paper will also investigate the influences of “direct audience payment for participation” on the quality of media products and communication flow between media and audience and generally discuss the consequences of the “direct audience payment for participation” from the perspective of communication ethics.

  4. From grand narratives of democracy to small expectations of participation : Audiences, citizenship, and interactive tools in digital journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Chris; Witschge, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    This article critically examines the invocation of democracy in the discourse of audience participation in digital journalism. Rather than simply restate the familiar grand narratives that traditionally described journalism's function for democracy (information source, watchdog, public

  5. Gene cuisine or Frankenfood? The theory of reasoned action as an audience segmentation strategy for messages about genetically modified foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Kami J; Weiner, Judith; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2005-12-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are currently a controversial topic about which the lay public in the United States knows little. Formative research has demonstrated that the lay public is uncertain and concerned about GM foods. This study (N = 858) extends focus group research by using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) to examine attitudes and subjective norms related to GM foods as a theoretical strategy for audience segmentation. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four unique audiences based on their attitude and subjective norm toward GM foods (ambivalent-biotech, antibiotech, biotech-normer, and biotech individual). Results are discussed in terms of the theoretical and practical significance for audience segmentation.

  6. Effective Engagement of Hostile Audiences on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, A.

    2011-12-01

    In 2010 and 2011, I gave invited presentations of mainstream climate science to large conferences dismissive of climate change organized by the HEartland Institute. In this presentation I review some of the common objections raised by such audiences and outline effective strategies to rebut them in public venues or the media. Respectful engagement on a human level is much more effective than appeals from authority, scientific consensus, or numerical models. Starting from a base of agreement on basic facts helps establish a basis of trust, which is then nurtured through personal anecdotes and humor. The basic science of climate change is presented in a non-confrontational way with frequent use of examples from everyday life to explain physical principles. Although a hard core of hostile individuals may not be swayed by such an approach, my experience was that this type of engagement can be very effective with ordinary people. I strongly encourage more climate scientists to work with public audiences and the media.

  7. Education Differences in Intended and Unintended Fertility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, Kelly; England, Paula; Edgington, Sarah; Kangas, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Using a hazards framework and panel data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (1979-2004), we analyze the fertility patterns of a recent cohort of white and black women in the United States. We examine how completed fertility varies by women's education, differentiating between intended and unintended births. We find that the education…

  8. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Digital News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    of changing the socially-situated affordances of news use. Having sketched these contours, the chapter then highlights analytical challenges for understanding and conceptualizing the new interrelations between digital news content, production, and consumption, grounding this analysis with theoretical insights...... that emphasize the significance of spatiotemporal dynamics. The emphasis here is on the interrelations and mobilities of digital news audiences, based on a recognition of the productive impacts of media use while being careful to note the limitations of a paradigm shift that points solely to the possibilities...... generated by the ubiquitous presence of media in our everyday lives. Aspects of interaction and personalization beget by new media technologies certainly shape the possibilities, practices and power audiences have to choose news wherever, whenever, and however they want. However, this simultaneously...

  9. Active audiences and journalism: Involved citizens or motivated consumers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pere Masip

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience participation, in any of its forms and names (public journalism, citizen journalism, participatory journalism, UGC, appears to revitalise democracy, thanks to the opportunities for public debate opened up by information and communications technology. On the other hand, however, there are many authors who question whether interactive technologies really encourage democracy or the market, empower the citizen or strengthen the consumer. In this context, we still have little information on the motivations that drive citizens to actively participate through the mechanisms that the media make available to them on their own websites or through social networks. There is a similar lack of information on the role that users attribute to their involvement in the functioning of the media and whether it contributes to improving their democratic function. This article aims to shed some light on this subject.

  10. Imagining Rural Audiences in Remote Western Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelia Green

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1979, Australia’s then-Communication Minister Tony Staley commented that the introduction of satellite communications to the bush would “dispel the dis-tance – mental as well as geographical – between urban and regional dwellers, between the haves and the have-nots in a communication society” (Staley 1979: 2225, 2228-9. In saying this, Staley imagined a marginalised and disadvantaged audience of “have-nots”, paying for their isolation in terms of their mental dis-tance from the networked communications of the core. This paper uses ethnographic audience studies surveys and interviews (1986-9 to examine the validity of Staley’s imaginations in terms of four communication technologies: the telephone, broadcast radio, 2-way radio and the satellite. The notion of a mental difference is highly problematic for the remote audience. Inso-far as a perception of lack and of difference is accepted, it is taken to reflect the perspective and the product of the urban policy-maker. Far from accepting the “distance” promulgated from the core, remote audiences see such statements as indicating an ignorance of the complexity and sophistica-tion of communications in an environment where the stakes are higher and the options fewer. This is not to say that remote people were not keen to acquire satel-lite services – they were – it is to say that when they imagined such services it was in terms of equity and interconnections, rather than the “dispelling of distance”.

  11. Using New Media to Reach Broad Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, P. L.

    2008-06-01

    The International Year of Astronomy New Media Working Group (IYA NMWG) has a singular mission: To flood the Internet with ways to learn about astronomy, interact with astronomers and astronomy content, and socially network with astronomy. Within each of these areas, we seek to build lasting programs and partnerships that will continue beyond 2009. Our weapon of choice is New Media. It is often easiest to define New Media by what it is not. Television, radio, print and their online redistribution of content are not New Media. Many forms of New Media start as user provided content and content infrastructures that answer that individual's creative whim in a way that is adopted by a broader audience. Classic examples include Blogs and Podcasts. This media is typically distributed through content specific websites and RSS feeds, which allow syndication. RSS aggregators (iTunes has audio and video aggregation abilities) allow subscribers to have content delivered to their computers automatically when they connect to the Internet. RSS technology is also being used in such creative ways as allowing automatically updating Google-maps that show the location of someone with an intelligent GPS system, and in sharing 100 word microblogs from anyone (Twitters) through a single feed. In this poster, we outline how the IYA NMWG plans to use New Media to reach target primary audiences of astronomy enthusiasts, image lovers, and amateur astronomers, as well as secondary audiences, including: science fiction fans, online gamers, and skeptics.

  12. The Intended Image of a Place Brand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Martin; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager

    2016-01-01

    This chapter studies the counterproductive impact of a place image on the entrepreneurial activities in a rural Danish municipality. Nationally, the municipality is rated ‘very good' in terms of traditional business environment measurements. However, this stands in stark contrast to the historica......This chapter studies the counterproductive impact of a place image on the entrepreneurial activities in a rural Danish municipality. Nationally, the municipality is rated ‘very good' in terms of traditional business environment measurements. However, this stands in stark contrast...... a specific target audience e.g. entrepreneurs. The branding problem for the municipality is shown to be the conflict between the brands of history, entrepreneurial spirit, family friendly town, and tourism etc. To manage a place brand so diverse is almost impossible and it is clearly demonstrated...

  13. 1 Aquatic Theatre: Women as Performing Audience Sunday ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    audience relationship. Keywords: Aquatic theatre, women, performing audience, festival, ... "Fine and Performing Arts" in the book The Land and People of Rivers. State. .... Jefferson as saying in the New York Times that “there is something.

  14. Captivating Broad Audiences with an Internet-connected Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, K.; Elliott, L.; Gervais, F.; Juniper, K.; Owens, D.; Pirenne, B.

    2012-12-01

    NEPTUNE Canada, a network of Ocean Networks Canada and the first deep water cabled ocean observatory, began operations in December 2009. Located offshore Canada's west coast, the network streams data from passive, active, and interactive sensors positioned at five nodes along its 800 km long looped cable to the Internet. This technically advanced system includes a sophisticated data management and archiving system, which enables the collection of real-time physical, chemical, geological, and biological oceanographic data, including video, at resolutions relevant for furthering our understanding of the dynamics of the earth-ocean system. Scientists in Canada and around the world comprise the primary audience for these data, but NEPTUNE Canada is also serving these data to broader audiences including K-16 students and teachers, informal educators, citizen scientists, the press, and the public. Here we present our engagement tools, approaches, and experiences including electronic books, personal phone apps, Internet-served video, social media, mini-observatory systems, print media, live broadcasting from sea, and a citizen scientist portal.NEPTUNE Canada's ibook available on Apple's iBook store.

  15. Audience and Young Bilingual Writers: Building on Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Leah

    2017-01-01

    This study explored how an audience-focused writing curriculum mediated the literacy development of bilingual Latina/o first-grade students. Drawing on translingual theories of literacy and scholarship describing the role of audience and audience awareness in skilled writing, this study qualitatively documented and analyzed students' writing and…

  16. Watching Dallas Again 1 : Doing Retro Audience Research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gilroy, Amanda

    2014-01-01

    This essay and the audience reception projects it introduces alleviate the desperation of seeking the television audience by recourse to Ien Ang's influential book, Watching Dallas ([1982] 1985). Within the context of a unit on audience research in a master's-level course on media, two groups of

  17. Visualization Mode, Perceived Immediacy and Audience Evaluation of TV News.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksobiech, Kenneth; And Others

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of audience perceptions of videotaped versus filmed actualities on television newscasts suggested that videotaped actualities were perceived as more immediate than filmed actualities, and that audience evaluation of newscasts using videotaped actualities was higher than audience evaluation of newscasts using filmed actualities. (GT)

  18. The Motion Picture Audience: A Neglected Aspect of Film Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Bruce A.

    There has been little valid and reliable research of the motion picture audience. Specific reasons for the movie industry's own inattention to audience research include the early popularity of films and the fact that since the industry does not sell advertising it does not need to account for its audience size and preferences. Some researchers…

  19. Sleeping with the enemy: Audience studies and critical literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, J.; van den Berg, A.; Mol, M.

    2013-01-01

    Audience studies is not the vibrant field it was in its 1980s and early 1990s heyday. Cultural studies today has a more balanced interest in production, audiences and texts. A renewed focus in audience studies on everyday meaning production, identity and relations of power could benefit from recent

  20. From 'folkism' to performance: a new scenic strategy for audience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performances of plays based on 'Folkism' are not accessible to the general audience due to the kind of staging techniques used for the performances of these plays. Instead of attaining total audience integration, the audience is alienated and estranged because of a natural gulf that exists in the proscenium theatre.

  1. 76 FR 20690 - International Consortium of Orthopedic Registries; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-13

    ... is the target audience for this public workshop? Who should attend this public workshop? This workshop is open to all interested parties. The target audience is comprised of data holders, researchers...

  2. Audience Recall of AIDS PSAs among U.S. and International College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Sook; Davie, William R.

    1997-01-01

    Shows that audience recall of AIDS public service announcements (PSAs) is related to message appeal types, cultural identity, and gender. Finds that strong emotional appeals are better remembered than rational ones; U.S. viewers recalled more than international participants; and college women recalled more than college men in general, and…

  3. Changing Resistant Audience Attitudes Using Social Judgment Theory's "Anchor" Point Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Salazar, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Public Speaking, Business and Professional Communication, Persuasion, or any other skill-based oral communication course. Objectives: Students will practice the development and demonstration of persuasive arguments in this single-class social judgment theory activity to improve their ability to change resistant audience attitudes.

  4. Receptive Audiences for Climate Change Education: Understanding Attitudes and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, L. D.; Luebke, J. F.; Clayton, S.; Saunders, C. D.; Matiasek, J.; Grajal, A.

    2012-12-01

    Much effort has been devoted to finding ways to explain climate change to uninterested audiences and encourage mitigation behaviors among dismissive audiences. Most approaches have focused on conveying information about climate change processes or threats. Here we report the results of a national survey designed to characterize the readiness of zoo and aquarium visitors to engage with the issue of climate change. Two survey forms, one focused primarily on attitudes (N=3,594) and another on behaviors (N=3,588), were administered concurrently in summer 2011 at 15 Association of Zoos and Aquariums accredited institutions. The attitudes survey used Global Warming's Six Americas segmentation protocols (climatechangecommunication.org) to compare climate change attitudes of zoo and aquarium visitors with the American public (Leiserowitz et al., 2011). Our results reveal that visitors are receptive audiences for climate change education and want to do more to address climate change. Even these favorable audiences, however, perceive barriers to engaging in the issue, signifying the importance of meeting the learning needs of those who acknowledge anthropogenic climate change, and not only of climate change 'deniers.' While 39% of the general public is 'concerned' or 'alarmed' about global warming, 64% of zoo and aquarium visitors fall into these two "Six Americas" segments. Visitors also differ from the national sample in key attitudinal characteristics related to global warming. For example, nearly two-thirds believe human actions are related to global warming, versus less than one-half of the general public; and approximately 60% think global warming will harm them personally, moderately or a great deal, versus less than 30% of the general public. Moreover, 69% of visitors would like to do more to address climate change. Despite zoo and aquarium visitors' awareness of climate change and motivation to address it, survey results indicate they experience barriers to

  5. Traditions of the Sun, One Model for Expanding Audience Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.; Paglierani, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Internet is a powerful tool with which to expand audience access, bringing students, teachers and the public to places and resources they might not otherwise visit or make use of. We will present Traditions of the Sun, an experiential Web site that invites exploration of the world's ancient observatories with special emphasis on Chaco Culture National Historic Park in the Four Corners region of the US and several sites in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. Traditions of the Sun includes resources in English and Spanish along with a unique trilingual on-line book, "Traditions of the Sun, A Photographic Journal," containing explanatory text in Yucatec Maya as well. Traditions of the Sun offers rich opportunities for virtual visits to ancient sites used for solar observing while learning about current NASA research on the Sun and indigenous solar practices within a larger historical and cultural context. The site contains hundreds of photographs, historic images and rich multimedia to help tell the story of the Sun-Earth Connection. Visitors to the site can zoom in on the great Mayan cities of Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Dzibilchaltun, and Mayapan to learn about Mayan astronomy, history, culture, and science. They can also visit Chaco Canyon to watch sunrise over Pueblo Bonito on the summer solstice, take a virtual reality tour of the great kiva at Casa Rinconada or see panoramic vistas from Fajada Butte, an area which, for preservation purposes, is restricted to the public. Traditions of the Sun provides one model of how exploration and discovery can come to life for both formal and informal audiences via the Internet. Traditions of the Sun is a collaborative project between NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum, the National Park Service, Instituto National de Antropologia e Historia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and Ideum.

  6. From Grand Narratives of Democracy to Small Expectations of Participation:Audiences, citizenship, and interactive tools in digital journalism

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Chris; Witschge, Tamara

    2016-01-01

    This chapter critically examines the invocation of democracy in the discourse of audience participation in digital journalism. Rather than simply restate the familiar grand narratives that traditionally described journalism’s function for democracy (information source, watchdog, public representative, mediation for political actors), we compare and contrast conceptualisations of the audience found within these and discuss how digital technologies impact these relationships. We consider how “p...

  7. The Importance of Audience and Agency for Representation: A Case Study of an Urban Youth Media Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaraman, Linda

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Urban youths' agency to represent their realities through media has been largely unexplored in the youth development literature. In this qualitative case study of an after-school youth media program in the Bay Area, expressions of youth agency and the role of audiences are explored during the process of producing videos for public consumption. METHODOLOGY: As participant observer of 14 ethnically diverse youth participants aged between 15 and 18 years over 18 months, I documented (a) the kind of agencies participants engaged in and (b) the impact of live and imagined future audiences on youths' creative processes. Analyses of field notes, semi-structured interviews, and media projects were conducted using thematic analysis to inductively generate emerging categories. FINDINGS: Themes included an agentive sense of self-efficacy, commitment, and responsibility, as well as perceived contributions to local audiences and an emerging collective identity. The youth demonstrated their increased sense of a social or civic duty to realistically represent youth of color to familiar and unfamiliar audiences. IMPLICATIONS: This case study demonstrated how one youth media organization fostered agency through youth authorship, production, distribution, and local community dialogue. By documenting the impact of audiences from conception to public reception, this study provides valuable insight into the agentive process of publicly "performing" a commitment to complete a social change video project. CONTRIBUTION: This chapter underscores the value of performance within youth development programs and the critical component of audiences as one form of authentic assessment in order to foster individual and collective agency.

  8. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  9. Public Speaking: Managing Challenging People and Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Neil; Boughton, Leonarda

    2016-01-01

    Every public speaker has encountered, or most likely will encounter, a difficult member of the audience who disrupts their presentation. This is a source of anxiety and discomfort, not only for the presenter, but for the audience as well. Learning how to manage the disruptive audience member is an art form, just like being a good public speaker. A professional speaker knows how to handle this disruption without making the audience uncomfortable and without embarrassing the disruptor. This article discusses ways to manage the disruptive audience member and will help those of you who do public speaking to tactfully and professionally disengage someone who is ruining your program.

  10. Intermediaries for youth: a vital target audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Worldwide, youth are recognized as a key target audience for HIV/STD awareness and prevention campaigns. Rural young people, who often have less access to information and prevention tools than urban youth, may be particularly vulnerable to HIV/STD infection. Many initiatives have been organized by nongovernmental organizations, governments, churches, and other organizations to help youth. However, parents, relatives, guardians, teachers, church and youth leaders, social workers, and other adults in a position to influence youth must also be helped to undertake the role of an intermediary between youth and HIV/STD interventions and other youth-oriented programs. In training adults to openly address sexual and reproductive health issues with adolescents, adults must first be encouraged to feel comfortable about discussing such issues among themselves. Intermediaries and how to target them are discussed.

  11. The Arctic Report Card: Communicating the State of the Rapidly Changing Arctic to a Diverse Audience via the Worldwide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Richter-Menge, J.; Overland, J. E.; Soreide, N. N.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid change is occurring throughout the Arctic environmental system. The goal of the Arctic Report Card is to communicate the nature of the many changes to a diverse audience via the Worldwide Web. First published in 2006, the Arctic Report Card is a peer-reviewed publication containing clear, reliable and concise scientific information on the current state of the Arctic environment relative to observational records. Available only online, it is intended to be an authoritative source for scientists, teachers, students, decision-makers, policy-makers and the general public interested in the Arctic environment and science. The Arctic Report Card is organized into five sections: Atmosphere; Sea Ice & Ocean; Marine Ecosystem; Terrestrial Ecosystem; Terrestrial Cryosphere. Arctic Report Card 2012, the sixth annual update, comprised 20 essays on physical and biological topics prepared by an international team of 141 scientists from 15 different countries. For those who want a quick summary, the Arctic Report Card home page provides highlights of key events and findings, and a short video that is also available on YouTube. The release of the Report Card each autumn is preceded by a NOAA press release followed by a press conference, when the Web site is made public. The release of Arctic Report Card 2012 at an AGU Fall Meeting press conference on 5 December 2012 was subsequently reported by leading media organizations. The NOAA Arctic Web site, of which the Report Card is a part, is consistently at the top of Google search results for the keyword 'arctic', and the Arctic Report Card Web site tops search results for keyword "arctic report" - pragmatic indications of a Web site's importance and popularity. As another indication of the Web site's impact, in December 2012, the month when the 2012 update was released, the Arctic Report Card Web site was accessed by 19,851 unique sites in 105 countries, and 4765 Web site URLs referred to the Arctic Report Card. The 2012 Arctic

  12. Astronomy's New Messengers: A traveling exhibit to out to a young adult audience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavaglia, Marco; Hendry, Martin; Marka, Szabolcs; Reitze, David H; Riles, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory exhibit Astronomy's New Messengers: Listening to the Universe with Gravitational Waves is traveling to colleges, universities, museums and other public institutions throughout the United States. In 2010, an extended version of this exhibit will appear in a New York City venue that is accessible to a large and diverse cross section of the general public. Astronomy's New Messengers primarily communicates with an adolescent and young adult audience, potentially inspiring them into the field of science. Acknowledging that this audience is traditionally a difficult one to attract, the exhibit publicly announces itself in a charismatic fashion to reach its principal goals of broadening the community of people interested in science and encouraging interest in science among young people.

  13. Audience reaction movie trailers and the Paranormal Activity franchise

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Swanson

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the concept and growing practice of audience reaction movie trailers, specifically for films in the horror genre. Popularized by the Paranormal Activity series of films, these trailers primarily utilize green night-vision video footage of a movie theater audience reacting to the film being advertised, yet also consist of webcam recordings of screaming fans, documentary-style B-roll footage of audiences filing into preview screenings with high levels of anticipation, and...

  14. Eliciting Audience's Experience to Improve Interactive Art Installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baharin, Hanif; Morrison, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Designing with the users in mind is one of the widely accepted design practices in the Interaction Design field. On the other hand, it can be said that audience's experience is the heart of an interactive art. Since Interaction Design has shown that user's involvement in the design process can...... be beneficial, it is speculated that involving the audiences in the creative process of developing an interactive art piece can make the artist improve the art in general and the audience's experience in particular. In this paper, the experience of eliciting the experience of the audiences of an interactive art...

  15. ‘Looting killed’ the audience: Africanlanguage writing, performance, publishing and the audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Selepe

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the role played by African-language writing, performance and publishing, including critical practice, in the demise of the indigenous audience in African-language literary practice. Using implicit materialism the argument is premised on the developments wrought by the era of Modernism that has lead to a univocal writing of world history, and the era of Postmodernism that has ushered in the era of a multivocal writing of world history. The transition from oral literature to written literature will also be used to advance the argument about the subsequent exclusion of the indigenous African- language audience from literary practice. This exclusion is considered to have a direct bearing on the under-development of African societies. Finally, possible solutions will be sought by revisiting some of the causes that characterize the African language problem as a medium of communication and research.

  16. Plans should abstractly describe intended behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfleger, K.; Hayes-Roth, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Planning is the process of formulating a potential course of action. How courses of action (plans) produced by a planning module are represented and how they are used by execution-oriented modules of a complex agent to influence or dictate behavior are critical architectural issues. In contrast to the traditional model of plans as executable programs that dictate precise behaviors, we claim that autonomous agents inhabiting dynamic, unpredictable environments can make better use of plans that only abstractly describe their intended behavior. Such plans only influence or constrain behavior, rather than dictating it. This idea has been discussed in a variety of contexts, but it is seldom incorporated into working complex agents. Experiments involving instantiations of our Adaptive Intelligent Systems architecture in a variety of domains have demonstrated the generality and usefulness of the approach, even with our currently simple plan representation and mechanisms for plan following. The behavioral benefits include (1) robust improvisation of goal-directed behavior in response to dynamic situations, (2) ready exploitation of dynamically acquired knowledge or behavioral capabilities, and (3) adaptation based on dynamic aspects of coordinating diverse behaviors to achieve multiple goals. In addition to these run-time advantages, the approach has useful implications for the design and configuration of agents. Indeed, the core ideas of the approach are natural extensions of fundamental ideas in software engineering.

  17. “Let Me Tell You...”: Audience Engagement Strategies in the Campaign Speeches of Trump, Clinton, and Sanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Джастин Куам

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the 2016 campaign, presidential candidate Donald Trump surprised observers with his ability to maintain his popularity in the face of unorthodox and often offensive statements. Trump likely bolstered his electoral chances by appealing to a large segment of voters with whom other candidates failed to align themselves. To quote one news anchor, “People tried to attack Trump; it just didn’t work - voters liked him anyway”. As previous work by Miller (2002; 2004 has shown, systemic functional linguistic (SFL analysis (Halliday & Matthiessen, 2004 can illuminate particular strategies politicians employ to strengthen their arguments and exhort their audiences to join their efforts. In this paper, we employ the SFL-based Engagement framework (White, 2003; Martin & White, 2005 to examine ways in which the 2016 presidential candidates aligned themselves with their audiences. Our analysis of the speeches of Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Bernie Sanders reveals markedly different patterns of interaction with the voters in terms of ways expansive and contractive dialogic strategies are used, an intended audience is identified and thematized, and shared assumptions are made. While Trump makes his arguments in a highly constrained dialogic space, taking the agreement with the audience for granted, his opponents often employ a mix of contractive and expansive argumentative strategies and make more explicit overtures to the audiences whose perspectives they share. This study offers insights as to how each candidate identifies and addresses his or her ideological sympathizers or opponents and exhorts the former to intensify their support.

  18. Exit Noise Summer Fest: Explaining the audience in ethnographic discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukić-Krstanović Miroslava M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In Ethnology, studying festivals is a relevant activity since it could enlighten a number of complex cultural and social processes. The festivals represent public events, public ceremonies, cluster of rituals and produce many symbols, and as such, they are in fact a creative reflection of a society. In this paper, we analyze the Exit Noise Summer Fest, the biggest music festival in SE Europe. The aim of the analysis is to gain understanding of the cultural event of this kind and its protagonists, namely, the audience. Shedding a light to a music spectacle, from a standpoint of social and symbolic communication, directs to a different perspective in reading of rituals, communities zones, and semantic constructions of noise and body in the center of ritual behaviors. The research shows that the music experience and atmosphere of the celebration, though having somewhat unclear ritual borderline and zone, are compatible with the daily culture and social processes, in which the event is created and further reflects itself through various mediums.

  19. Engaging Strangeness in the Art Museum: an audience development strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Deeth

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available What is the public art museum’s role in enhancing hesitant viewers’ engagement with contemporary art, especially its more challenging and conceptual aspects? In considering this question, the notion that contemporary art is too difficult for general audiences to engage with directly is refuted. It is suggested that the capacity for viewers to make sense of contemporary art, understood as the discursive practices that have come to the fore since the 1960s, is hindered not by the art but by the art theory that hesitant viewers employ. As representational and formalist aesthetic codes remain the dominant modes of responding to art, for the art museum to become more inclusive, there needs a greater emphasis on discursive approaches to experiencing art. From an examination of claims made across disciplines that advocate discursive practice, including George Hein’s constructivist museum, Helen Illeris’s performative museum and Jacques Lacan’s psychoanalytic conversation, a strategy for the enhancement of the experience of contemporary art for the hesitant or disconnected viewer is proposed that involves reorienting the role of the public art museum from expert speaker to expert listener.

  20. A New Development in Audiovisual Translation Studies: Focus on Target Audience Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Denton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Audiovisual translation is now a well-established sub-discipline of Translation Studies (TS: a position that it has reached over the last twenty years or so. Italian scholars and professionals in the field have made a substantial contribution to this successful development, a brief overview of which will be given in the first part of this article, inevitably concentrating on dubbing in the Italian context. Special attention will be devoted to the question of target audience perception, an area where researchers in the University of Bologna at Forlì have excelled. The second part of the article applies the methodology followed by the above mentioned researchers in a case study of how Italian end users perceive the dubbed version of the British film The History Boys (2006, which contains a plethora of culture-specific verbal and visual references to the English education system. The aim of the study was to ascertain: a whether translation/adaptation allows the transmission in this admittedly constrained medium of all the intended culture-bound issues, only too well known to the source audience, and, if so, to what extent, and b whether the target audience respondents to the e-questionnaire used were aware that they were missing information. The linked, albeit controversial, issue of quality assessment will also be addressed.

  1. Media perspective - new opportunities for reaching audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haswell, Katy

    2007-08-01

    The world of media is experiencing a period of extreme and rapid change with the rise of internet television and the download generation. Many young people no longer watch standard TV. Instead, they go on-line, talking to friends and downloading pictures, videos, music clips to put on their own websites and watch/ listen to on their laptops and mobile phones. Gone are the days when TV controllers determined what you watched and when you watched it. Now the buzzword is IPTV, Internet Protocol Television, with companies such as JOOST offering hundreds of channels on a wide range of subjects, all of which you can choose to watch when and where you wish, on your high-def widescreen with stereo surround sound at home or on your mobile phone on the train. This media revolution is changing the way organisations get their message out. And it is encouraging companies such as advertising agencies to be creative about new ways of accessing audiences. The good news is that we have fresh opportunities to reach young people through internet-based media and material downloaded through tools such as games machines, as well as through the traditional media. And it is important for Europlanet to make the most of these new and exciting developments.

  2. VCR Use and the Concept of Audience Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Mark R.

    1987-01-01

    Examines the audience experience with home video cassette recorders (VCRs) from the perspective of the active audience concept. Finds the orientation of Israeli VCR owners to VCRs is selective, somewhat involved, and generally productive of gratifications. Also finds the kinds and levels of activities associated with VCR use are moderately…

  3. Audience Insights: Communicating to Teens (Aged 12-17)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    CDC's Marketing and Communication Strategy Branch (MCSB) in the National Center for Health Marketings Division of Health Communication and Marketing divides audiences into segments with similar needs, preferences, and characteristics and provides CDC programs with audience-specific information, marketing expertise, and communication planning. To…

  4. Reframing "The Italian": Questions of Audience Address in Early Cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Charlie

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes "The Italian" (1915), an early "immigrant" film, examining its problematic relation to questions of working-class and middle-class audience composition. Shows how this film reveals that the creation of narratives suitable for diverse audiences requires continuous readjustment of an adequate mode of address. (MM)

  5. Audience and the Use of Minority Languages on Twitter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Dong-Phuong; Trieschnigg, Rudolf Berend; Cornips, Leonie

    On Twitter, many users tweet in more than one language. In this study, we examine the use of two Dutch minority languages. Users can engage with different audiences and by analyzing different types of tweets, we find that characteristics of the audience influence whether a minority language is used.

  6. How Communication Goals Determine when Audience Tuning Biases Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterhoff, Gerald; Higgins, E. Tory; Kopietz, Rene; Groll, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    After tuning their message to suit their audience's attitude, communicators' own memories for the original information (e.g., a target person's behaviors) often reflect the biased view expressed in their message--producing an audience-congruent memory bias. Exploring the motivational circumstances of message production, the authors investigated…

  7. Mediated co-construction of museums and audiences on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronemann, Sigurd Trolle; Kristiansen, Erik; Drotner, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    This article asks how we should research museum communication with audiences through social media. We argue that museums and audiences co-construct one another on social media, and we explore how particular modes of communication and discursive genres serve to generate mutual online positionings...

  8. Museum Accessibility: Combining Audience Research and Staff Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levent, Nina; Reich, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses an audience-informed professional development model that combines audience research focus groups and staff training that includes interaction and direct feedback from visitors, in this case, visitors with low vision. There are two critical components to this model: one is that museums' programming decisions are informed by…

  9. Wind farm development project at Mount Copper and Miller at Murdochville : public inquiry report; Projets d'amenagement des parcs d'eoliennes des monts Copper et Miller a Murdochville : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvie, A.

    2004-03-01

    A public hearing was held at the request of the Quebec Minister of the Environment to examine the environmental and socio-economic impacts of a proposed wind farm project at Mount Copper and Mount Miller in Murdochville, Quebec. The first phase of the project involves the construction of a wind turbine array with a capacity of 9 megawatts (MW), followed by a second phase expansion to 45 MW for 2004. The final wind turbine array includes 36 turbines for a total capacity of 54 megawatts (MW). The region is well suited for wind energy projects. Energie Eolienne du Mont Miller Inc. and Northland Power Inc. intend to develop the wind farm at a cost of approximately $90 million. Hydro Quebec has agreed to purchase the electricity. The various impacts of the proposed project were examined, both from an environmental and a socio-economic perspective. The Commission determined that the wind farm would not have significant impacts and that the project is desirable. Certain conditions must be met to ensure sustainable development. In terms of ecology, the Commission would like to have a complete inventory of the bird species and a description of the corridors of migration. It would also like to see the promoters show leadership in minimizing the impacts of the project on the ecotourism activities offered in the area. 17 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig., 2 appendices.

  10. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marie, Pierre; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed...... background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L-90 of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended...

  11. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Pierre; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed...... background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L90 of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended....

  12. Audience Research for the Performing Arts: Romanian Music Festival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin G. LUCHIAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the strategic marketing tools (instruments such as segmentation and targeting for a better understanding of current and potential audiences of classical music festivals. Arts administrators need to locate and address the audience segmentation, enhancing communication with audiences of all segments. The marketing strategies for music festivals should include improving music festival branding as well as developing diverse programs and engaging with the community on multiple levels. The study incorporates a literature review of the recent sociological research dealing with the consumption of arts products and a case study approach on the fifteenth edition of Romanian Music Festival in Iași, involving an audience survey. The research can be used as a tool to inform marketing and audience development plans for the organisers of Romanian Music Festival and other arts organisations. It also contains insights that organisations might find useful in the development of an arts activity itself.

  13. Social Audience in Spain: Succesful strategies in national TV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Saavedra Llamas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research presents the concept of social audience, as a new narrative space born in the convergence of the TV audience and the user’s conversations in Twitter, and examine strategies of TV programs in Spain with higher social audience. Understand what exactly the social audience is, how does it works or what kind of metrics are made for it, becomes more necessary than ever to deepen into the uses and opportunities facing both the television media and advertisers who choose to invest in a TV space.Through the study of successful cases already implemented is to establish formulas for success that achieve a more active participation of users, transfer from social to traditional audience and the profitable inclusion of brands in this full of possibilities new communication scenario.

  14. Publicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Joan

    Publicity for preschool cooperatives is described. Publicity helps produce financial support for preschool cooperatives. It may take the form of posters, brochures, newsletters, open house, newspaper coverage, and radio and television. Word of mouth and general good will in the community are the best avenues of publicity that a cooperative nursery…

  15. Extending IPY Data to a Wider Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, M.; Bell, R. E.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    Perhaps the most significant IPY contribution to science education was the vast amount of data collected at the polar-regions on Earth systems and processes that was made immediately available to teachers and curriculum developers. Supplementing textbooks with the Internet as an education partner, allowed participating teachers to transform science education through: their use of current data as an integral component of their classroom teaching; their training of students to seek out data as evidence of Earth processes; and their instruction to students on how to validate sources and uses of data. Yet, for every teacher and student who has been part of this successful IPY outreach there are many more who have not been reached, don’t know how to include polar science into their coursework, or don’t comfortably work with data. Our experience with data education projects suggests that to reach the next round of students, teachers, educators and the wider adult population we need to translate this data so it is accessible through carefully constructed activities, simulations, and games. In addition we need to actively seek new partnership and outlet opportunities. The collected measurements tell us that our poles are warming on a human timescale. Using data to tell the story, the unambiguous signal of warming makes it accessible to a much broader audience. Our experience has shown that, for a novice population working with data, the educational effectiveness is significantly enhanced when the signal in the data is strong and the Earth processes are clear. Building upon IPY data and resources, focusing on the Earth’s changing climate, and working with partnerships developed over the last two years, Lamont has put together several new education and outreach collaborations. Our goal is to reach new audiences through: 1) Inventorying, Assessing and Planning - Through an NSF planning grant we are leveraging IPY connections and findings in a Polar Climate Education

  16. The impact of Crisis Communication on audience: A study based on plane crash

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Calvin

    2007-01-01

    Organisational crises have now become as common as having a cold. Crises negatively affect the company's reputation and share price. Maintaining a reputation has today become paramount. Therefore, post-crisis communication is absolutely essential and has to be planned carefully. Poor crisis communication would leave the audience or the public with bad impression over the company. The poor crisis communication may even extend the bad impression over the whole industry. In responding to th...

  17. The Hubble Frontier Fields: Engaging Multiple Audiences in Exploring the Cosmic Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Brandon L.; Smith, Denise A.; Summers, Frank; Ryer, Holly; Slivinski, Carolyn; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2017-06-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields is a multi-cycle program of six deep-field observations of strong-lensing galaxy clusters taken in parallel with six deep “blank fields.” The three-year long collaborative program began in late 2013 and is led by observations from NASA’s Great Observatories. The observations, now complete, allow astronomers to look deeper into the universe than ever before, and potentially uncover galaxies that are as much as 100 times fainter than what the telescopes can typically observe. The Frontier Fields science program is ideal for informing audiences about scientific advances and topics in STEM. The study of galaxy properties, statistics, optics, and Einstein’s theory of general relativity naturally leverages off of the science returns of the Frontier Fields program. As a result, the Space Telescope Science Institute’s Office of Public Outreach (OPO) has engaged multiple audiences over the past three years to follow the progress of the Frontier Fields.For over two decades, the STScI outreach program has sought to bring the wonders of the universe to the public and engage audiences in the adventure of scientific discovery. In addition, we are leveraging the reach of the new NASA’s Universe of Learning education program to bring the science of the Frontier Fields to informal education audiences. The main underpinnings of the STScI outreach program and the Universe of Learning education program are scientist-educator development teams, partnerships, and an embedded program evaluation component. OPO is leveraging the infrastructure of these education and outreach programs to bring the Frontier Fields science program to the education community and the public in a cost-effective way.This talk will feature highlights over the past three years of the program. We will highlight OPO’s strategies and infrastructure that allows for the quick delivery of groundbreaking science to the education community and public.

  18. 76 FR 17657 - Medical Device Epidemiology Network 2011: Second Annual Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-30

    ... priorities for MDEpiNet. II. Who is the target audience for this public workshop? Who should attend this public workshop? This workshop is open to all interested parties. The target audience is comprised of...

  19. Science and sociability: women as audience at the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1831-1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgitt, Rebekah; Withers, Charles W J

    2008-03-01

    This essay recovers the experiences of women at the meetings of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BAAS) from its founding in 1831 to the end of the Victorian era. It aims to add to research on women in science by reconsidering the traditional role of women as consumers rather than producers of knowledge and to that on science popularization by focusing on audience experience rather than on the aims and strategies of popularizers. The essay argues that, in various ways, the ubiquitous and visible female audience came to define the BAAS audience and "the public" for science more generally. The women who swelled the BAAS audiences were accepted as a social element within the meetings even as they were regarded critically as scientific participants. Portrayed as passive and nonscientific, women allowed the male scientific elites to distance themselves from their audiences. Arguing from diary and other evidence, we present examples that complicate existing notions of audiences for science as necessarily active.

  20. Engaging Latino audiences in informal science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfield, Susan B.

    Environment for the Americas (EFTA), a non-profit organization, developed a four-year research project to establish a baseline for Latino participation and to identify practical tools that would enable educators to overcome barriers to Latino participation in informal science education (ISE). Its national scope and broad suite of governmental and non-governmental, Latino and non-Latino partners ensured that surveys and interviews conducted in Latino communities reflected the cosmopolitan nature of the factors that influence participation in ISE programs. Information about economic and education levels, country of origin, language, length of residence in the US, and perceptions of natural areas combined with existing demographic information at six study sites and one control site provided a broader understanding of Latino communities. The project team's ability to work effectively in these communities was strengthened by the involvement of native, Spanish-speaking Latino interns in the National Park Service's Park Flight Migratory Bird Program. The project also went beyond data gathering by identifying key measures to improve participation in ISE and implementing these measures at established informal science education programs, such as International Migratory Bird Day, to determine effectiveness. The goals of Engaging Latino Audiences in Informal Science Education (ISE) were to 1) identify and reduce the barriers to Latino participation in informal science education; 2) provide effective tools to assist educators in connecting Latino families with science education, and 3) broadly disseminate these tools to agencies and organizations challenged to engage this audience in informal science education (ISE). The results answer questions and provide solutions to a challenge experienced by parks, refuges, nature centers, and other informal science education sites across the US. Key findings from this research documented low participation rates in ISE by Latinos, and that

  1. Public Diplomacy: Enabling National Security Strategy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, Russell H

    2007-01-01

    Public diplomacy seeks to promote the national interests of the United States through understanding, informing and influencing foreign audiences in accord with the 2006 National Security Strategy (NSS...

  2. New Perspectives on the Evolution of Publics: Digital Stakeholders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Rogojinaru

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The decline of the public man of the industrial era and the rise of the digital communities engage publics in new forms of expression by forming and framing networks that replace political communities. Our identity has changed as far as the public man is falling apart in this liquid era, leaving its structured power to dissipated voices of the interactive media. Networking became a political way of being. Publics’ classification differs according to their multiple usages, to their responses and overt behaviors to social stimuli, as well as on the context and situations of interaction. We intend in this essay to define digital publics or audiences as popular and to draw a theoretical perspective on their characteristics and behavior.

  3. Identifying Effective Strategies for Climate Change Education: The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) Partnership Audiences and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; Feldman, A.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Gilbes, F.; Stone, D.; Plank, L.; Reynolds, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Many past educational initiatives focused on global climate change have foundered on public skepticism and disbelief. Some key reasons for these past failures can be drawn directly from recognized best practices in STEM education - specifically, the necessity to help learners connect new knowledge with their own experiences and perspectives, and the need to create linkages with issues or concerns that are both important for and relevant to the audiences to be educated. The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) partnership has sought to follow these tenets as guiding principles in identifying critical audiences and developing new strategies for educating the public living in the low-lying coastal areas of Florida and the Caribbean on the realities, risks, and adaptation and mitigation strategies for dealing with the regional impacts of global climate change. CACCE is currently focused on three key learner audiences: a) The formal education spectrum, targeting K-12 curricula through middle school marine science courses, and student and educator audiences through coursework and participatory research strategies engaging participants in a range of climate-related investigations. b) Informal science educators and outlets, in particular aquaria and nature centers, as an avenue toward K-12 teacher professional development as well as for public education. c) Regional planning, regulatory and business professionals focused on the built environment along the coasts, many of whom require continuing education to maintain licensing and/or other professional certifications. Our current activities are focused on bringing together an effective set of educational, public- and private-sector partners to target the varied needs of these audiences in Florida and the U.S. Caribbean, and tailoring an educational plan aimed at these stakeholder audiences that starts with the regionally and topically relevant impacts of climate change, and strategies for effective adaptation and

  4. How to get an audience LIT

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Learning about CERN can be fun. The LHC Interactive Tunnel (LIT) is an immersive installation where the public can experience the thrill of the research being done at CERN. From proton collisions, to the Higgs Field and Hadron Therapy, become an actor of the process of discovery in a playful way.

  5. Audience as analyst: Dennis Potter's The Singing Detective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, W

    1997-06-01

    Author Dennis Potter has written an exceptional psychoanalytically informed television series in The Singing Detective. Potter succeeds by echewing the usual portrayal of psychoanalysis in cinema and television as a therapy which the viewer observes but instead creates, by means of the content and structure of the series, a production that forces the audience into a role of analyst. The story of the current life and the childhood of the protagonist, Philip Marlow, has depth and context which allows the audience to examine the personality of Marlow, including character pathology and traits, sexuality, fantasy, dreams, and delusions from several metapsychological viewpoints. Potter allows the audience to use the dynamic, genetic, topographic, and, most unusual in drama, structural viewpoints. The audience can experience aspects of an analyst's experience, including the process of formulating and evaluating over time analytic hypotheses and coping with emotional reactions to the material which at times has transferencelike qualities.

  6. Watching Dallas again 1: Doing retro audience research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Gilroy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay and the audience reception projects it introduces alleviate the desperation of seeking the television audience by recourse to Ien Ang's influential book, Watching Dallas ([1982] 1985. Within the context of a unit on audience research in a master's-level course on media, two groups of students explored the possibilities of remixing Ang in the present digital media landscape via informants' comments on the first season of the new series of Dallas (2012–14. Discourses of nostalgia circulate within and around the text, as well as the project itself. Retro audience research generates not only data about the affective memories and critical reflections of informants but also insights into research methods and the production of new nostalgic subjects.

  7. [Analysis of foods advertised to childhood audience on chilean television].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Hidalgo, Catalina

    2017-01-01

    To examine food advertising aimed at childhood's audience broadcast on Chilean television. Cross-sectional study. Food advertising broadcast by 4 open signal TV channels was recorded for 12 hours daily on twelve days randomly selected. Notices were classified according to food groups and level of processing. The frequency of food advertisement aimed to childhood audience was compared with those for adults. Nutrient profile of foods advertised was described. In 144 hours of recording appeared 530 food advertisement; 53.2% were aimed to childhood audience. The most advertised foods were sugary dairy (28.4%), sweetened beverages (25.5%), and sweetened cereals (17.7%). Of the foods advertised to childhood audience, 75% exceeds the criterion for free sugars. Chilean television advertises ultra-processed foods that exceed the limits of free sugars.

  8. Audience Perception of the Portrayal of Women in Television ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Audience Perception of the Portrayal of Women in Television Advertising. ... AFRREV LALIGENS: An International Journal of Language, Literature and Gender ... The survey research design was adopted, employing the questionnaire as an ...

  9. When Is Humiliation More Intense? The Role of Audience Laughter and Threats to the Self

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta H. Fischer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In personal accounts, humiliation is often reported as a very intense, painful, negative emotion. We report two scenario studies in which we explored two factors that may contribute to the intense character of humiliation: (1 unwanted, negative public exposure, and (2 a threat to central aspects of one's identity. Study 1 (N = 115 assessed emotional reactions to a public insult when an audience responded with either laughter or not and when someone from the audience offered support after the insult or no support was offered. Results showed that the intensity of humiliation increased when people laughed after the insult. However, support offered after the insult had no effect on reported humiliation. Study 2 (N = 99 focused on threats to different self-related values and showed stronger reports of humiliation when central self-related values were threatened than when less central self-related values were threatened. Study 2 also replicated the audience-effect from Study 1, but only when central self-related values were threatened and not when less central self-related values were threatened. Limitations of these studies (e.g., the use of scenarios and potential avenues for future research, such as the (long-term consequences of humiliation and humiliation in the context of social media, are discussed.

  10. Graphic Novels: A New Stress Mitigation Tool for Military Training: Developing Content for Hard-to-Reach Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Laurel; Lambert, Shari; Peeler, Russ; Lane, Becky; Borst, Carrie

    2017-05-01

    This article describes the development of two graphic novels as a new approach to mental health communication and coping strategies for the Navy and Marine Corps. The novels are intended to capture the attention of the younger target audience and provide vital teaching messages to better prepare personnel for deployment to combat zones. The novels were developed based on embedding the principles of combat and operational stress control (COSC) into realistic and relatable characters, stories, and images. Approaches used for development included (a) basing storylines on real-life service members and the situations they face in combat and their personal lives; (b) partnering with COSC experts to embed teaching points; (c) ensuring technical accuracy through research and target audience reviews of the storyboard and artwork; (d) developing characters that are representative of the target audience, with varied jobs, ages, backgrounds, and professional concerns; and (e) designing artwork in a manner sensitive to training objectives and the psychological effects on readers. Because technical accuracy, realism, and sensitivity were noted as essential components of an effective graphic novel tool, focus-group research and review of author drafts by the target audience and technical experts are strongly recommended.

  11. Creating a Library of Climate Change Education Resources for Audiences in the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J.; McNeal, K. S.; Williams, C. C.; Paz, J. O.; Cho, H. "; Nair, U. S.; Geroux, J.; Guthrie, C.; Wright, K.; Hill, J.

    2011-12-01

    origin (e.g. government agency, organization, museum, climate-related websites, etc.), will be made available to the public through the CLiPSE website, promoting accessibility of these resources to the various CLiPSE publics. The process of alignment and vetting will be discussed in this paper, along with the information and education "gaps" that exist for the specific CLiPSE audiences in the SE US.

  12. Using narratives and storytelling to communicate science with nonexpert audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Michael F

    2014-09-16

    Although storytelling often has negative connotations within science, narrative formats of communication should not be disregarded when communicating science to nonexpert audiences. Narratives offer increased comprehension, interest, and engagement. Nonexperts get most of their science information from mass media content, which is itself already biased toward narrative formats. Narratives are also intrinsically persuasive, which offers science communicators tactics for persuading otherwise resistant audiences, although such use also raises ethical considerations. Future intersections of narrative research with ongoing discussions in science communication are introduced.

  13. Troubling complicity: audience ethnography, male porn viewers and feminist critique

    OpenAIRE

    Vörös , Florian

    2015-01-01

    International audience; This article offers a self-reflexive account of an audience reception study conducted in Paris, France, examining gay, bisexual and heterosexual cisgender men's everyday (and everynight) uses of pornography. The study explores the gender dynamics at work in practices such as surfing, watching, reimagining and discussing pornography, based on in-depth interviews with 34 viewers, combined with the replication of their online sexual meanderings; this positions me as a vie...

  14. Students Prefer Audience Response System for Lecture Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph W Turban

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Student evaluation of courses is an important component of overall course evaluation. The extent of student participation in the evaluation may be related to the ease of the evaluation process. The standard evaluation format is a paper form. This study examines medical students preference of utilizing Audience Response System compared to a paper method. Methods: Following several medical school lectures, students were queried if they preferred Audience Response System versus a paper method, and if they would prefer using Audience Response System more for future course evaluations. Results: 391 students were queried. Overall response rate was 94%. Using a five point Likert scale, 299 out of 361 (82% responded they agreed, or strongly agreed with the statement “We should use ARS more. . .” When asked which format they preferred to use for evaluation, 299/367 (81% responded Audience Response System, 31 (8% preferred paper, and 37 (10% were not sure, or had no opinion (chi squared = 378.936, df2, p<0.0001. Conclusion: The medical students surveyed showed a strong preference for utilizing Audience Response System as a course evaluation modality, and desired its continued use in medical school. Audience Response System should be pursued as a lecture evaluation modality, and its use in medical school education should be encouraged.

  15. Passive Audience or Who Select Beyond Media? A Comparative Study in Communication Texts & Theories

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Mohsenian Rad; Amir Abdolreza Sepanji

    2011-01-01

    The present article is to study the characteristics and general nature of audience and is described it as "Audience phantasm" in developing countries. It firstly notes that there will be consequences such as audience distancing themselves from local and official media if policy makers and media officials' imaginations of audiences become far from related bare facts have happened in the era of global media and the nature of audiences. Knowing and analyzing the image of audiences presented in n...

  16. Assessing the operational life of flexible printed boards intended for continuous flexing applications : a case study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, David Franklin

    2011-01-01

    Through the vehicle of a case study, this paper describes in detail how the guidance found in the suite of IPC (Association Connecting Electronics Industries) publications can be applied to develop a high level of design assurance that flexible printed boards intended for continuous flexing applications will satisfy specified lifetime requirements.

  17. Online Health Monitoring using Facebook Advertisement Audience Estimates in the United States: Evaluation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejova, Yelena; Weber, Ingmar; Fernandez-Luque, Luis

    2018-03-28

    Facebook, the most popular social network with over one billion daily users, provides rich opportunities for its use in the health domain. Though much of Facebook's data are not available to outsiders, the company provides a tool for estimating the audience of Facebook advertisements, which includes aggregated information on the demographics and interests, such as weight loss or dieting, of Facebook users. This paper explores the potential uses of Facebook ad audience estimates for eHealth by studying the following: (1) for what type of health conditions prevalence estimates can be obtained via social media and (2) what type of marker interests are useful in obtaining such estimates, which can then be used for recruitment within online health interventions. The objective of this study was to understand the limitations and capabilities of using Facebook ad audience estimates for public health monitoring and as a recruitment tool for eHealth interventions. We use the Facebook Marketing application programming interface to correlate estimated sizes of audiences having health-related interests with public health data. Using several study cases, we identify both potential benefits and challenges in using this tool. We find several limitations in using Facebook ad audience estimates, for example, using placebo interest estimates to control for background level of user activity on the platform. Some Facebook interests such as plus-size clothing show encouraging levels of correlation (r=.74) across the 50 US states; however, we also sometimes find substantial correlations with the placebo interests such as r=.68 between interest in Technology and Obesity prevalence. Furthermore, we find demographic-specific peculiarities in the interests on health-related topics. Facebook's advertising platform provides aggregate data for more than 190 million US adults. We show how disease-specific marker interests can be used to model prevalence rates in a simple and intuitive manner

  18. Fashion TV and the Motivation of His Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita I. Pavlushina

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the 21st century is characterized not only by important historical events in the world, but also by the changes in value norms and priorities. Television, being the most mass and accessible means of information, reflects these changes directly or indirectly. One of the significant trends of modern media is the development of an entertainment segment, which is present on television in the form of special formats and a specialized content. It is necessary to create special conditions for the permanent demonstration of their events, symbols and samples for the development of fashion, as the reflection of public and cultural content and as the means of search for a person's identity. Television has such natural features that provide fashion industry a unique platform for the development of a global fashionable space and intercivilizational communication. Fashion-TV complements the television picture of the world, influencing the spread of fashion trends and the development of a certain culture of behavior and lifestyle among TV viewers. Fashion-TV, as the combination of specialized Fashion channels and TV projects dedicated to fashion and human beauty on Russian social, political and entertainment channels, is primarily the carrier of information about modern fashion trends in clothing that influences the change of a person social-cultural image. This article the hypothesis of modern fashion TV has a blurred target audience with pronounced gender characteristics and a developed motivation. The article presents the results of the study conducted on the basis of the Kazan Federal University for two years.

  19. Media Selection for Public TV Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallstead, William F.

    Since limited funds restrict advertising by Public Broadcasting System (PBS) stations, and since PBS serves a variety of audiences, the selection of appropriate advertising media for PBS programs is difficult. It is further complicated by conflicting research reports on the public use of the daily papers. Availability to the target audience should…

  20. Audience reaction movie trailers and the Paranormal Activity franchise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Swanson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the concept and growing practice of audience reaction movie trailers, specifically for films in the horror genre. Popularized by the Paranormal Activity series of films, these trailers primarily utilize green night-vision video footage of a movie theater audience reacting to the film being advertised, yet also consist of webcam recordings of screaming fans, documentary-style B-roll footage of audiences filing into preview screenings with high levels of anticipation, and close-up shots of spectator facial expressions, accompanied by no footage whatsoever from the film being advertised. In analyzing these audience-centric promotional paratexts, my aim is to reveal them as attempting to sell and legitimize the experiential, communal, and social qualities of the theatrical movie viewing experience while at the same time calling for increased fan investment in both physical and online spaces. Through the analysis of audience reaction trailers, this article hopes to both join and engender conversations about horror fan participation, the nature of anticipatory texts as manipulative, and the current state of horror gimmickry in the form of the promotional paratext.

  1. Mental health message appeals and audience engagement: Evidence from Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yap, Jo En; Zubcevic-Basic, Nives; Johnson, Lester W; Lodewyckx, Michaela A

    2017-09-07

    Social media platforms are increasingly used to disseminate social marketing messages about mental health and wellbeing. This study presents a range of message appeals used in social media enabled mental health promotion and stigma reduction messages. Furthermore, it examines the relationship between the type of message appeals and audience engagement. A content analysis of 65 organisation-generated YouTube videos about depression and anxiety and stigma reduction was conducted. The most utilised message appeal was Sorrow, followed by Affiliation, Ease/Convenience, Hope, Humour, Guilt/Shame, Heroic/Successful, and Fear. Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationship between the type of message appeals and audience engagement in terms of the number of likes, comments, and shares. The analysis revealed that Sorrow is the most useful message appeal for generating audience comments. However, Sorrow is negatively associated with the number of likes and shares. The results suggest that mental health promotion messages may engage a larger audience through Affiliation and Hope as they have a positive impact on the number of shares. This could, in effect, turn audiences into vocal advocates for mental health promotion and stigma reduction messages. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. The sociological investigation of the audience of the Opera of the National theater in Belgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžibulić Sabina

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Opera of the National Theater in Belgrade was founded in 1920, but it is well known that opera performances were held long before its official opening. Despite the fact that this is the sole opera house in Belgrade (and one of the only two in Serbia, as well as the fact that it did not face any strong audience fluctuation, it is unusual that no one ever tried to investigate and profile its audience. During the last decades we were witnessing the popularization of the opera via various medias, as well as development and extention of the music industry, which surely changed its social status. The aim of the investigation that is going to be presented is to discover if this social life of opera changed its audience and does it still consists of - according to stereotypes - elderly, high educated individuals of certain professions and high material standards, i.e. at which level the opera is present in the private and public sphere of their lives.

  3. [Relationship among weblog authors' target audience, contents, and types of interpersonal communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Asako; Matsumura, Naohiro; Kitayama, Satoshi

    2008-12-01

    Weblogs are one of the most popular personal websites in Japan, where entries are made in journal style and displayed in reverse chronological order. This study examined the relationship between weblog authors' target audience (i.e., orientation) and the actual situations depicted in their weblogs by combining a questionnaire survey of the authors with an analysis of their weblog content data. Based on a questionnaire survey of 736 Japanese weblog authors, their target audience was divided into four clusters: (a) general public, (b) self, (c) self and offline friends, and (d) various others. To assess the actual situations depicted in their weblogs, the amount of happy and unhappy emotional expression in their writing and the frequency of interpersonal communication (comments, bookmarks, and trackbacks) were calculated from their log data. The results suggested that weblog authors wrote different types of content and used different types of communication depending on their audience, whereas the weblog content itself still showed the diary-like characteristic of personal daily-life records.

  4. Effects of Exposure to Advertisements on Audience Impressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Sato, Mie; Kasuga, Masao; Nagao, Yoshihide; Shono, Toru; Norose, Yuka; Oku, Ritsuya; Nogami, Akira; Miyazawa, Yoshitaka

    This study investigated effects of listening and/or watching commercial-messages (CMs) on audience impressions. We carried out experiments of TV advertisements presentation in conditions of audio only, video only, and audio-video. As results, we confirmed the following two effects: image-multiple effect, that is, the audience brings to mind various images that are not directly expressed in the content, and marking-up effect, that is, the audience concentrates on some images that are directly expressed in the content. The image-multiple effect, in particular, strongly appeared under the audio only condition. Next, we investigated changes in the following seven subjective responses; usage image, experience, familiarity, exclusiveness, feeling at home, affection, and willingness to buy, after exposure to advertisements under conditions of audio only and audio-video. As a result, noting that the image-multiple effect became stronger as the evaluation scores of the responses increased.

  5. Visual Peoplemeter: A Vision-based Television Audience Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SKELIN, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Visual peoplemeter is a vision-based measurement system that objectively evaluates the attentive behavior for TV audience rating, thus offering solution to some of drawbacks of current manual logging peoplemeters. In this paper, some limitations of current audience measurement system are reviewed and a novel vision-based system aiming at passive metering of viewers is prototyped. The system uses camera mounted on a television as a sensing modality and applies advanced computer vision algorithms to detect and track a person, and to recognize attentional states. Feasibility of the system is evaluated on a secondary dataset. The results show that the proposed system can analyze viewer's attentive behavior, therefore enabling passive estimates of relevant audience measurement categories.

  6. Online Health Monitoring using Facebook Advertisement Audience Estimates in the United States: Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Ingmar; Fernandez-Luque, Luis

    2018-01-01

    Background Facebook, the most popular social network with over one billion daily users, provides rich opportunities for its use in the health domain. Though much of Facebook’s data are not available to outsiders, the company provides a tool for estimating the audience of Facebook advertisements, which includes aggregated information on the demographics and interests, such as weight loss or dieting, of Facebook users. This paper explores the potential uses of Facebook ad audience estimates for eHealth by studying the following: (1) for what type of health conditions prevalence estimates can be obtained via social media and (2) what type of marker interests are useful in obtaining such estimates, which can then be used for recruitment within online health interventions. Objective The objective of this study was to understand the limitations and capabilities of using Facebook ad audience estimates for public health monitoring and as a recruitment tool for eHealth interventions. Methods We use the Facebook Marketing application programming interface to correlate estimated sizes of audiences having health-related interests with public health data. Using several study cases, we identify both potential benefits and challenges in using this tool. Results We find several limitations in using Facebook ad audience estimates, for example, using placebo interest estimates to control for background level of user activity on the platform. Some Facebook interests such as plus-size clothing show encouraging levels of correlation (r=.74) across the 50 US states; however, we also sometimes find substantial correlations with the placebo interests such as r=.68 between interest in Technology and Obesity prevalence. Furthermore, we find demographic-specific peculiarities in the interests on health-related topics. Conclusions Facebook’s advertising platform provides aggregate data for more than 190 million US adults. We show how disease-specific marker interests can be used to model

  7. Communicating public health preparedness information to pregnant and postpartum women: an assessment of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web pages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Brianna; Felter, Elizabeth; Downes, Amia; Trauth, Jeanette

    2015-04-01

    Pregnant and postpartum women have special needs during public health emergencies but often have inadequate levels of disaster preparedness. Thus, improving maternal emergency preparedness is a public health priority. More research is needed to identify the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to how preparedness information is communicated to these women. A sample of web pages from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention intended to address the preparedness needs of pregnant and postpartum populations was examined for suitability for this audience. Five of the 7 web pages examined were considered adequate. One web page was considered not suitable and one the raters split between not suitable and adequate. None of the resources examined were considered superior. If these resources are considered some of the best available to pregnant and postpartum women, more work is needed to improve the suitability of educational resources, especially for audiences with low literacy and low incomes.

  8. AIDS education for a low literate audience in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Msimuko, A K

    1988-04-01

    A workshop funded by the USA Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH) was an effort by Zambia toward prevention and control of AIDS. The lack of educational materials about AIDS for a low-literate audience was the major problem addressed by the workshop. Other problems include the lack of collaborative effort in the development of materials on AIDS, and the lack of skills needed in the development of such materials in Zambia. 1 of the objectives of the workshop was to launch the Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia's (PPAZ) materials development project. The scope of this project includes the production of educational materials on AIDS for low-literate audiences and a counseling handbook for family planning workers. Print materials should be simply written, using words, idioms, and graphics that are familiar to the target audience. Other workshop objectives included the establishment of collaborative relationships between organizations involved in existing AIDS educational activities in Zambia, and the development of practical skills needed to produce print materials. Education was identified as the most important strategy for the prevention and control of AIDS, and PPAZ should be the executing agency of the print materials project. Audience research, using focus group techniques, focus group discussions, behavioral messages, and pretesting of messages, should be the most effective means of reaching targeted audiences. PPAZ is contracted by PATH to begin development of educational materials, and 2 committees have formed to implement the project and to establish interagency collaboration. Audience research was begun between January and March of 1988, focusing on people's beliefs, practices, and ideas about AIDS. The final phase of the project will be the printing, distribution, and use of the AIDS materials and the training of family planning field workers in the proper use of these materials.

  9. Audience responses to television news coverage of medical advances: The mediating role of audience emotions and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2015-08-01

    Exemplifying a real person in news stories has become a popular journalistic technique to describe an event or issue. With the frequent appearance of medical news reports in local television in recent years, this news presentation style is widely believed to help audiences better engage in and understand complex medical information and to influence their perceptions and judgments. In terms of television news coverage of medical advances, this study investigates how audiences respond to embedded human examples (mainly patients who experience benefits from the advances) and to overall news stories, and how such responses are related to their perception of portrayed medical advances. The experimental results indicate that news stories with a human example were more likely to intensify the audience's positive emotions than those without, which in turn influenced favorable perceptions of the described medical advance. In addition, the extent to which the audience identified with a human example (in particular, sympathy) mediated the relationship between the audience's involvement in the news story and its perception of the portrayed medical advance. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Effects of Interactivity between Audience and Urban Advertisement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Manavirad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, advertisement plays an important and impressive role in our lives and we are witnessing different works in this field. The emergence of new technologies in this field has led to the arrival of a new style of advertising with different interactivity and administrative functions. Interactive advertising is considered as one of the most up to date urban advertising. With regard to the arrival of this new style of advertising and using them in different countries, this research investigates the effectiveness of an advertisement’s interaction with the audiences in urban advertising through a descriptive/analytical approach as well as field study with regard to the type of advertising usage including commercial, promotional, educational, social etc. It is assumed that an interactive advertising confronts the audience with many challenges and makes him from a static and watching audience to an actor and explorer audience. In such advertisements, the audience enters a path with interactivity where the advertisement guides him and audience responses positively to this action; after a simple activity and in some cases, he interacts and communicates with the advertisement just by passing by it. In interactivity advertisements in urban spaces, the artist pays much attention to audience participation for challenges or performing specific activity that will lead to a result. The use of interactive advertising in various forms such as billboards, stands, and advertisements at bus stops and so on has increased in recent years, developed countries, and countries that are more familiar to technologies. These works are considered a new step in the field of urban advertising. This research selects samples of using such creative advertisements, especially in commercial areas in different countries as well as Iran. It considers the producing method, ideation, and effectiveness of each in a specific period as well as their installation and commissioning

  11. Using narratives and storytelling to communicate science with nonexpert audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlstrom, Michael F.

    2014-01-01

    Although storytelling often has negative connotations within science, narrative formats of communication should not be disregarded when communicating science to nonexpert audiences. Narratives offer increased comprehension, interest, and engagement. Nonexperts get most of their science information from mass media content, which is itself already biased toward narrative formats. Narratives are also intrinsically persuasive, which offers science communicators tactics for persuading otherwise resistant audiences, although such use also raises ethical considerations. Future intersections of narrative research with ongoing discussions in science communication are introduced. PMID:25225368

  12. The art of communicating seismology to broad audiences: the exhibition which changed the perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma-Danila, Dragos; Tataru, Dragos; Nastase, Eduard; Muntean, Alexandra; Partheniu, Raluca

    2017-04-01

    Seismology is a geoscience often perceived by uninstructed broad audiences as unreliable or inconsistent, since it cannot predict future earthquakes or warn about them effectively; this criticism disregards important achievements that seismology has offered during its more than 100 years of history - such as evidence of Earth's inner structure, knowledge regarding plate tectonics, mineral resource identification, contributions to risk mitigation, monitoring of explosions etc. Moreover, seismology is a field of study with significant advances, which make (or could make) living much safer, in areas with high seismic hazard. We mentioned "could make" since people often fail to understand an important aspect: seismology offers consistent knowledge regarding how to prepare, construct or behave - but it's up to people and authorities to implement the effective measures. In all this story, the effective communication between scientists and the general public plays a major role, making the leap from misconception to relevant impact. As scientists, we wanted to show the true meaning and purpose of seismology to all categories of people. We are in the final stage of the MOBEE (MOBile Earthquake Exhibition) Project implementation, an innovative initiative in a highly seismic country (Romania), where major Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes source have the potential to generate a significant amount of damage over large areas; however, unlike countries like Japan, the medium to long period between felt or significant events (20-40 years) is long enough to make the newer generation in Romania disregardful of the hazard, and older generations skeptical about the role of seismology. MOBEE intended to freshen up things, raise awareness and change the overall perception - through new approaches involving a blend of digital content (interactive apps, responsive and continuously updated website), 3D models achieved through new technologies (3D printing, fiber optics), non

  13. Telecommunication Support System Using Keywords and Their Relevant Information in Videoconferencing — Presentation Method for Keeping Audience's Concentration at Distance Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kikuo; Kondo, Kimio; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Saito, Fumihiko

    We developed a prototype system to support telecommunication by using keywords selected by the speaker in a videoconference. In the traditional presentation style, a speaker talks and uses audiovisual materials, and the audience at remote sites looks at these materials. Unfortunately, the audience often loses concentration and attention during the talk. To overcome this problem, we investigate a keyword presentation style, in which the speaker holds keyword cards that enable the audience to see additional information. Although keyword captions were originally intended for use in video materials for learning foreign languages, they can also be used to improve the quality of distance lectures in videoconferences. Our prototype system recognizes printed keywords in a video image at a server, and transfers the data to clients as multimedia functions such as language translation, three-dimensional (3D) model visualization, and audio reproduction. The additional information is collocated to the keyword cards in the display window, thus forming a spatial relationship between them. We conducted an experiment to investigate the properties of the keyword presentation style for an audience. The results suggest the potential of the keyword presentation style for improving the audience's concentration and attention in distance lectures by providing an environment that facilitates eye contact during videoconferencing.

  14. Intended and unintended consequences of mandatory IFRS adoption

    OpenAIRE

    Brüggemann, Ulf; Hitz, Jörg-Markus; Sellhorn, Thorsten

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses empirical evidence on the economic consequences of mandatory adoption of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) in the European Union (EU) and provides suggestions on how future research can add to our understanding of these effects. Based on the explicitly stated objectives of the EU‟s so-called „IAS Regulation‟, we distinguish between intended and unintended consequences of mandatory IFRS adoption. Empirical research on the intended consequences generally fa...

  15. Introduction : The Places and Spaces of News Audiences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This special issue on the places and spaces of news audiences presents an initial attempt to do this; to see how the everyday digital geographies of contemporary media, communication, and information flows intersect with the everywhere “lived” geographies of individuals, and how this impacts

  16. Consider Clicking In: Using Audience Response Systems to Spark Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Joshua B.

    2013-01-01

    Audience response systems, also known as clickers, hold much promise for use in the communication classroom. Yet potential benefits notwithstanding, implementing new technology in the classroom also offers challenges for faculty who must master it themselves while managing students' learning. Successful clicker implementation, like the…

  17. Audience Research in American Broadcasting: The Early Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Donald

    The basic arrangements and practices of American broadcast audience research and measurement were established during the first decade (1920-29) of the field's existence, and were motivated by commercial and competing institutional concerns within the broader context of evolving forms of imagination and expression. A review of the evidence found in…

  18. Audience Perception of Nollywood Films | Agba | Lwati: A Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The stimulus providing the drive into the writing of the article titled: audience perception of Nollywood Films in Nigeria arises as a result of the severe perceptual criticism about Nollywood Films even to the point of suggesting that the product of the industry should be of no use. Thus, this article is written after an empirical ...

  19. Tangible air: An interactive installation for visualising audience engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Röggla (Tom); C. Wang (Chen); L. Pérez Romero (Lilia); A.J. Jansen (Jack); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis article presents an end-to-end system for capturing physiological sensor data and visualising it on a real-time graphic dashboard and as part of an art installation. More specifically, it describes an event where the level of engagement of the audience was measured by means of

  20. Tangible air : An Interactive Installation for Visualising Audience Engagement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Röggla, Thomas; Wang, Chen; Perez Romero, Lilia; Jansen, Jack; Cesar Garcia, P.S.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents an end-to-end system for capturing physiological sensor data and visualising it on a real-time graphic dashboard and as part of an art installation. More specifically, it describes an event where the level of engagement of the audience was measured by means of Galvanic Skin

  1. Allies and Competitors as Enscripted Audiences in Scientific Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Susan

    A set of much examined scientific papers which specifically portray a controversial topic and also manifest ally-peer and competitor-peer enscripted audiences are those written by James Watson and Francis Crick concerning their discovery of the structure of deoxyribose nucleic acid (DNA). The theoretical perspective of an ally-peer and…

  2. Qualitative Audience Research: Toward an Integrative Approach to Reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Klaus Bruhn

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes research about the mass communication audience and describes a theoretical and methodological framework for further empirical studies. Discusses the (1) explanatory value of qualitative research; (2) social and cultural implications of the reception process, with special reference to television; and (3) applications and social relevance…

  3. Using Audience Segmentation to Tailor Residential Irrigation Water Conservation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Laura A.; Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Rumble, Joy N.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Momol, Esen

    2017-01-01

    Today's complex issues require technical expertise as well as the application of innovative social science techniques within Extension contexts. Researchers have suggested that a social science approach will play a critical role in water conservation, and people who use home landscape irrigation comprise a critical target audience for agriculture…

  4. Adolescent audience segmentation on alcohol attitudes : A further exploration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.M.; Mathijssen, J.J.P.; van Bon, M.J.H.; van Oers, J.A.M.; Garretsen, H.F.L.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In an earlier audience segmentation study, Dutch adolescents aged 12–18 years were segmented into five alcohol attitudes segments: ordinaries, high spirits, consciously sobers, ordinary sobers and socials. The current study explores several aspects of alcohol consumption and leisure

  5. Hyperboles not turning to metaphors : How to explain audience cooperativeness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hoven, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    We observe that an audience attempts to interpret the relation between a source domain and a target domain as a hyperbole before interpreting it as a metaphor. It could also first try a metaphorical reading or attempt several possible readings and successively select the relevant outcome. But it

  6. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Interim Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. John, Mark; Phillips, Michelle; Smith, Anita; Castori, Pam

    2009-01-01

    Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) is a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project consisting of seven long-term three-way partnerships between the Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) and an informal science education institution (ISEI) partnered with an institution of higher education (IHE). Together, educators from the…

  7. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Final Evaluation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Michelle; St. John, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) is a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project consisting of six three-way partnerships between the Lawrence Hall of Science (LHS) and an informal science education institution (ISEI) partnered with an institution of higher education (IHE). Together, educators from the ISEI (often…

  8. Experio: a design for novel audience participation in club settings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, B.F.K.; Giacolini, L.; Hengeveld, B.J.; Funk, M.; Frens, J.W.

    2014-01-01

    When looking at modern music club settings, especially in the area of electronic music, music is consumed in a unidirectional way – from DJ or producer to the audience – with little direct means to influence and participate. In this paper we challenge this phenomenon and aim for a new bond between

  9. Narrative Writing in Digital Formats: Interpreting the Impact of Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Joshua Fahey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital writing has enabled students to write for a variety of authentic audiences, both in and out of the classroom. As they consider audience, students shoulder a cognitive burden that they must juggle in addition to the task of composition. At the same time, writing provides students with opportunities to craft and express their identities. The ways that identity formation and cognitive load intersect may be particularly complex in digital, online writing environments, as students gain the ability to share and receive feedback from global and local audiences. In this counterbalanced experimental study, 86 seventh- and eighth-grade students responded to two narrative prompts. One prompt was written for the teacher and the other was written for the teacher and peers in an online forum. We examined student writing fluency, mechanical errors, academic word use, and setting. Students were found to be more likely to set narratives in private settings when writing for an audience that included peers. We discuss this finding from cognitive and sociocultural perspectives and how it might inform networked communication research.

  10. Audience Perception of Television Animated Cartoons as Tool for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated audience perception of television animated cartoons as tool for political communication. The specific objectives of the study were: to find out the frequency of exposure to television animated cartoons between males and females; to find out the frequency of exposure to television animated cartoons ...

  11. Scientific Criticism? A Critical Approach to the Resistive Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruddock, Andy

    1998-01-01

    Contends that critical audience research has resisted "scientific" discourses that appear positivist. States that recent research begins to show the same errors as earlier positivist style--re-emergence of debates on political economy and cultural imperialism are aimed at overturning what are seen as orthodoxies of opposition and…

  12. Audience awareness and use of Mobile Authentication Service ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Audience awareness and use of Mobile Authentication Service (MAS) in identifying fake and substandard drugs in Nigeria. ... Based on the research findings, this study therefore recommends an increased level of awareness through a multi-media approach, improved network services, as well as getting all drug ...

  13. Virtual diplomacy: an analysis of the structure of the target audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Verbytska

    2016-03-01

    communication arrives at a new – «international» – level. On the basis of the tasks performed by virtual diplomacy we can identify two groups of its recipients: definite and potential. Definite recipients of virtual diplomacy take part in technical support of diplomatic activities by means of virtual diplomacy, as they include particular people, groups of people and organizations. Identifying of the key target audiences is extremely important for conducting effective public diplomacy by means of virtual diplomacy. In the context of the establishment of the global information society the key target groups must be: Diasporas, foreign media (including bloggers, investors, influential foreign politicians and officials, virtual communities. The most active and effective policy on the work with these target audiences today is conducted by the USA.

  14. Take Me Out to the Ball Game: Science Outreach to Non-traditional Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsted, B. A.

    2010-08-01

    Science outreach often targets audiences that are already interested in science and are looking for related educational experiences for themselves or their families. The University of Wisconsin Geology Museum (UWGM) with funding from the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) is targeting unique venues and thereby new audiences who may not typically seek out science outreach events. With this goal in mind, in June, 2009 the UWGM and NAI sponsored an "Astrobiology Night at the Ballpark" at the Madison Mallards Ballpark, the local Madison, Wisconsin minor league baseball venue. At the game, 6,250 attendees were exposed to current NASA-funded astrobiology research being conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Fans were greeted at the gate by volunteers passing out a nine-card pack of extremophile trading cards, each of which featured a different extremophile group (e.g. halophiles, cryophiles, and barophiles). Next, participants could interact with project scientists, graduate students and museum staff at four exploration stations, where each station highlighted astrobiology themes (i.e. extremophiles, banded iron formation, earth's oldest rocks, earth's oldest fossils). Before the game began, the video board on the field was used to broadcast short NASA videos about recent Mars missions as well as the search for life in space. Additionally, inning breaks were used as fun opportunities to engage fans through an "Alien vs. Kids" tug-of-war as well as the distribution of Frisbees with an astrobiology timeline printed on them. Engaging the broader public at a non-science venue is a means to breaking down perceived barriers between scientists and the general public. We found Mallards fans to be receptive and ready to connect with our science themes. Tapping into a new audience also builds a larger awareness of our museum and University, expanding our impact in the community.

  15. Long-Term Audience Impacts of Live Fulldome Planetarium Lectures for Earth Science and Global Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K. C.; Champlin, D. M.; Goldsworth, D. A.; Raynolds, R. G.; Dechesne, M.

    2011-09-01

    Digital Earth visualization technologies, from ArcGIS to Google Earth, have allowed for the integration of complex, disparate data sets to produce visually rich and compelling three-dimensional models of sub-surface and surface resource distribution patterns. The rendering of these models allows the public to quickly understand complicated geospatial relationships that would otherwise take much longer to explain using traditional media. At the Denver Museum of Nature & Science (DMNS), we have used such visualization technologies, including real-time virtual reality software running in the immersive digital "fulldome" Gates Planetarium, to impact the community through topical policy presentations. DMNS public lectures have covered regional issues like water resources, as well as global topics such as earthquakes, tsunamis, and resource depletion. The Gates Planetarium allows an audience to have an immersive experience-similar to virtual reality "CAVE" environments found in academia-that would otherwise not be available to the general public. Public lectures in the dome allow audiences of over 100 people to comprehend dynamically changing geospatial datasets in an exciting and engaging fashion. Surveys and interviews show that these talks are effective in heightening visitor interest in the subjects weeks or months after the presentation. Many visitors take additional steps to learn more, while one was so inspired that she actively worked to bring the same programming to her children's school. These preliminary findings suggest that fulldome real-time visualizations can have a substantial long-term impact on an audience's engagement and interest in science topics.

  16. Toward a Political Economy of ‘Audience Labour’ in the Digital Era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brice Nixon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article contributes to a political economic theory centred on the concept of “audience labour”. First, the previous use of the concept of audience labour is briefly traced and the process of rethinking the concept as the basis of a political economic theory is begun. Second, a theory of the audience labour process is developed, drawing on previous theories of audience activities of cultural consumption as productive activities of signification and adapting Marx’s theory of the human labour process to the audience labour process. Third, a political economy of audience labour is outlined. As a theory of the basic processes through which communicative capital can control and extract value from audience labour, it describes the exploitation of audience labour and accumulation of communicative capital through distribution relationships of rent and interest. Finally, the continuing centrality of audience labour exploitation in the digital era is discussed.

  17. Shared reality in intergroup communication: Increasing the epistemic authority of an out-group audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterhoff, Gerald; Kopietz, René; Higgins, E Tory

    2017-06-01

    Communicators typically tune messages to their audience's attitude. Such audience tuning biases communicators' memory for the topic toward the audience's attitude to the extent that they create a shared reality with the audience. To investigate shared reality in intergroup communication, we first established that a reduced memory bias after tuning messages to an out-group (vs. in-group) audience is a subtle index of communicators' denial of shared reality to that out-group audience (Experiments 1a and 1b). We then examined whether the audience-tuning memory bias might emerge when the out-group audience's epistemic authority is enhanced, either by increasing epistemic expertise concerning the communication topic or by creating epistemic consensus among members of a multiperson out-group audience. In Experiment 2, when Germans communicated to a Turkish audience with an attitude about a Turkish (vs. German) target, the audience-tuning memory bias appeared. In Experiment 3, when the audience of German communicators consisted of 3 Turks who all held the same attitude toward the target, the memory bias again appeared. The association between message valence and memory valence was consistently higher when the audience's epistemic authority was high (vs. low). An integrative analysis across all studies also suggested that the memory bias increases with increasing strength of epistemic inputs (epistemic expertise, epistemic consensus, and audience-tuned message production). The findings suggest novel ways of overcoming intergroup biases in intergroup relations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Oscar Wilde’s “The Happy Prince” : The Hidden Messages and the Debate on the Target Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Bseiso, Layla

    2007-01-01

    Oscar Wilde’s fairytales have been read to children for more than a century. Nevertheless, since the time of their publication in 1888 and 1891, the target audience of The Happy Prince and Other Tales and A House of Pomegranates have been the concern of critics. Delving into the context behind the rich and colourful imagery, one can find implications of homosexuality, the Paterian aesthetic and religious connotations. According to Carol Tattersall, The Happy Prince and Other Tales successfull...

  19. Expanded carrier screening: what determines intended participation and can this be influenced by message framing and narrative information?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorwinden, Jan S; Buitenhuis, Anne H; Birnie, Erwin; Lucassen, Anneke M; Verkerk, Marian A; van Langen, Irene M; Plantinga, Mirjam; Ranchor, Adelita V

    2017-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing enabled us to create a population-based expanded carrier screening (ECS) test that simultaneously tests for 50 serious autosomal recessive diseases. Before offering this test universally, we wanted to know what factors are related to intended participation and how the general public can be informed about the test without being influenced in their intention to participate. We studied this by measuring to what extent 'message framing' and 'narrative information' can influence people's intended participation. Data were collected by means of an online survey of 504 potential users, and the factors examined were based on the Theory of Planned Behaviour and on previous research on intended participation in preconception carrier screening. Message framing was manipulated by explaining the risk of couple carriership in different ways, while narrative information was provided to only half of the respondents. The factors most positively related to intended participation were perceiving benefits of the screening, having a positive attitude towards the screening, having no religion, having an actual child wish and experiencing the choice to participate as easy. Perceived benefits and a positive attitude were most influential factors by far. Message framing and narrative information had no significant effect on intended participation, reinforcing that message framing and narrative information can help to inform the general public about ECS without influencing their intended participation. Future research should study if the importance of perceived benefits and a positive attitude can be replicated when other factors are included and when actual participation is measured instead of intended participation.

  20. Studying Rhetorical Audiences – a Call for Qualitative Reception Studies in Argumentation and Rhetoric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Elmelund Kjeldsen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In rhetoric and argumentation research studies of empirical audiences are rare. Most studies are speaker- or text focussed. However, new media and new forms of communication make it harder to distinguish between speaker and audience. The active involvement of users and audiences is more important than ever before. Therefore, this paper argues that rhetorical research should reconsider the understanding, conceptualization and examination of the rhetorical audience. From mostly understanding audiences as theoretical constructions that are examined textually and speculatively, we should give more attention to empirical explorations of actual audiences and users.

  1. Collaboration potentials in micro and macro politics of audience creativity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brites, Maria José; Chimirri, Niklas Alexander; Amaral, Inês

    2017-01-01

    In our stakeholder consultation following up on trends concerning the micro and macropolitics of audience action, we explore the potential impact of audiences’ micro-participation and connection to macro-actions. We address this issue taking into consideration intrinsic continuities and discontin...... and discontinuities between academia and the stakeholders’ perspectives. Our findings continue to emphasise the • (dis)connections between micro and macro actions • a technological appeal for action • collaboration potentials between academia and other stakeholders.......In our stakeholder consultation following up on trends concerning the micro and macropolitics of audience action, we explore the potential impact of audiences’ micro-participation and connection to macro-actions. We address this issue taking into consideration intrinsic continuities...

  2. The Audiences in View of the Changes in Cyber Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. José Ignacio Armentia Vizuete

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper in Internet have suffered in the last years a series of changes, in the way towards the acquisition of some own characteristics differentiated with regard to the printed dailys. This evolution also has had his reflex in the audiences. Today Internet isn’t an elitist product and is available for the majority of the population. Nevertheless, the way of measuring the above mentioned audiences constitutes one of the hanging questions for the cybermedia, unlike what it happens in other three big informative supports: press, radio and television, where measurements of reference for each one of the supports exist. As it is exposed in this article, we have a great disparity between the data and methods of measurement of organisms and companies like EGM, OJD, Alexa and others, on the Internet. This text is based on a research about the evolution of the cyberjournalism in Spain financed by the University of the Basque Country.

  3. Using Social Media Sentiment Analysis to Understand Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGuire, Mark; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    approach for contextually understanding social media posts. The human interaction step in ad-hoc corpus analysis is central to this methodology as it provides a means to ask critical questions of the content curated through the ad-hoc corpus directly. Results of ad-hoc corpus analysis from this critical......Social media communication is changing the opportunities for technical communicators to really understand audiences when these audiences are active about issues on social media platforms. Through applying ad-hoc corpus building processes to create word lists relevant to specific organizational...... projects, technical communicators can listen to their external users and identify areas of importance with greater accuracy. While other methods of sentiment analysis look for a solution that leads to artificial intelligence in the program, this paper identifies the present needs of a human interaction...

  4. The Affective Audience in Professional E-sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gommesen, Niels Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    This master’s thesis investigates the members of the audience in professional e-sport. Through a wide range of examples it shows that players, spectators and various nonhuman actors are nested together in assemblages. It states that human-nonhuman actors in ‘co-creation’ constitute the game play...... and consumers of the game play. My ethnographic studies draw from a multifaceted approach counting visual ethnography, participant observations and interviews of 35 dedicated spectators and fans, situated at two professional e-sports competitions, the largest digital festival in the world, Dreamhack in Sweden......, and the Intel Extreme Masters - The World Championships in Germany. I conclude that people in the audience, are sharing their experiences not only with one another, but also with the players, as they actively embody themselves in the game playing event. Throughout this work I exemplify that spectators are often...

  5. UNDERSTANDING OUR AUDIENCE: MESSAGES FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

    OpenAIRE

    Tharwat EL-Sakran

    2018-01-01

    The United Arab Emirates (UAE) is a business hub for a great number of multinational and international companies that conduct daily communication activities in English, which has made efficient and audience sensitive written communication an essential requirement in today’s workplace. With computer-mediated communication (CMC) taking over face-to-face communication, this has created an essential need for students to learn efficient and appropriate communication styles pertinent to communicati...

  6. Audience Perception of Effective Communication in Nigerian Paintings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnson Adelani Abodunrin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Artists in Nigeria perceived effective communication differently irrespective of the socio-economic status.Communication effectiveness depends largely on the understanding of the message being passed between a sender and a receiver. Painting has been used over time to express emotion and feeling to the perceiving audience. The study is audience’s perception of communication in Nigeria painting and how it varies with the socio-economic characteristics such as age, education, gender, and being professional artist or art lovers. Questionnaires were distributed and administered to examine how the status of the art audience makes or mars effective communication in painting. The inferential statistics that were employed include “chi-square test” to test the relationship between different variables. The data were taken in ordinal form using Likert’s scale, and transformed into interval data. This was done by attaching statistical weights to the responses in the order of importance which were summed up for the parametric testing. Findings show that gender factor has nothing to do with the understanding of paintings. Also, the level of education obtained by the audience does not have much to do with understanding of contemporary Nigerian painting but a better exposure to the issue concerning the stylistic development of Nigerian painting. Art practitioners must adequately be guided on stylistic trend in painting, art education should be more intensified in educational curriculum in Nigeria. The paper concludes that audience requires a better exposure to the issues concerning the stylistic development of Nigerian painting for effective communication to take place.

  7. Pascal’s wager: tracking an intended reader in the structure of the argument

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iva SVAČINOVÁ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pascal’s wager is the name of an argument in favor of belief in God presented by Blaise Pascal in §233 of Thoughts. Ian Hacking (1972 pointed out that Pascal’s text involves three different versions of the argument. This paper proceeds from this identification, but it concerns an examination of the rhetorical strategy realized by Pascal’s argumentation. The final form of Pascal’s argument is considered as a product that could be established only through a specific process of persuasion led with respect to an intended reader with a particular set of initial beliefs. The text uses insights from the pragma‑dialectical approach to argumentation, especially the concept of rhetorical effectiveness of particular choices from the topical potential. The argumentation structure of Pascal’s wager is considered to be a reflection of the anticipated course of dialogue with the reader critically testing the sustainability of Pascal’s standpoint “You should believe in God”. Based on the argumentation reconstruction of three versions of the argument, Pascal’s idea of opponent/audience is identified. A rhetorical analysis of the effects of his argumentative strategy is proposed. The analysis is based on two perspectives on Pascal’s argument: it examines the strategy implemented consistently by all arguments and the strategy of a formulation of different versions of the wager.

  8. Three Italian practitioners seeking a more popular audience for Shakespeare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Rose

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available My contribution, "Seeking a More Popular Audience for Shakespeare in Italy", starts by pinpointing the differences between Italy and the UK in the history of the staging of Shakespeare's plays and goes on to provide a brief account of the evolution of Shakespeare productions in Italy from the 1950s until the present. In the aftermath of World War Two, the so-called critical direction (regia critica introduced a very different approach to the staging of Shakespeare. Directors, such a Giorgio Strehler and Luigi Squarzina, by commissioning new Italian translations that were philologically close to the originals, put the complete plays onstage, often for the first time. In a long career at Milan's Piccolo Teatro, spanning from the late 1940s until his death in 1997, Strehler succeeded in attracting a more mixed audience for Shakespeare than ever before. In the new millennium, his aims have been taken further by more recent practitioners. The final part of the contribution focuses on three contemporary Italian directors, Marco Ghelardi, Riccardo Mallus and Massimo Navone, who seek to bring Shakespeare to more popular audiences. In a bid to energise the Bard's work, they deploy strategies, such as reducing and rewriting the play, interactive staging techniques and tend to choose site specific venues rather than regular theatres.

  9. Among the Authentic Audience: Young Adults' Perceptions and Responses to Youth as Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchen, Amie K.

    Lifelong science learning is important for making informed decisions on science topics, and there is a need to engage broader and more diverse audiences with science. One opportunity for engagement occurs when students share science topics with a public audience. Research indicates this interaction can have benefits for students, but little is known about the impact it may have on audience members’ thoughts about science. Youth are different from typical sources of science information, and may elicit different reactions. This dissertation examines the impact youth sources may have on adults’ perceptions of and responses to science topics. Young adults (N = 399) were randomly assigned to one of two scenarios. Both scenarios stated two individuals would describe research they had done about local air quality on the news. One scenario identified the individuals as local high school students, and the other as research scientists from a local institution. Dependent variables included perceptions of the warmth and competence of the presenters, expectations of the quality of the information they would share, willingness to take action based on that information, and general trust in scientists. A subset of participants (N=22) was selected for cognitive interviews and asked to explain the thoughts that influenced their survey responses. Results showed multiple reactions to the scenario. Three groups were identified in the perceptions data: one expressed trust in the presenters, one expressed skepticism, and one based their perceptions on personal experiences doing science. Participants said intertwined thoughts about trust in scientists and assumptions about the presenters’ intentions influenced perceptions, with an overall assumption that youth would have good intentions while adults might not. Participants did not appear to separate their expectations of the information from the people who would share it. However, their willingness to take action was related to the

  10. Active Match Load Circuit Intended for Testing Piezoelectric Transformers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas; Rødgaard, Martin Schøler; Andersen, Michael A. E.

    2012-01-01

    An adjustable high voltage active load circuit for voltage amplitudes above 100 volts, especially intended for resistive matching the output impedance of a piezoelectric transformer (PT) is proposed in this paper. PTs have been around for over 50 years, were C. A. Rosen is common known for his...

  11. Intending the Faculty and its Relation with the City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vande Putte, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the preparation of the idea competition 'Building for Bouwkunde' that was held in 2008. The competition intended entrants to design a replacement building for the lost building of the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology, based on the

  12. TELEMATICS APPLICATIONS REMOT: Description of the intended plasma physics demonstrator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemmerling, G.; van der Meer, E.; Ephraïm, M.; Balke, C.; Lourens, W.; Korten, M.

    2012-01-01

    This document presents the intended plasma physics demonstator in the REMOT Project. Due to the complexity of the system the demonstrator should be kept as simple as possible without sacrificing flexibility. The demonstrator should be made in such a way that it can easily be modified and expanded.

  13. Examining Students' Intended Image on Facebook: "What Were They Thinking?!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluchette, Joy; Karl, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The present article examines factors that influence why students post information on their social network profile which employers would find inappropriate. Results show that many students make a conscious attempt to portray a particular image and, as predicted, their intended image was related to whether they posted inappropriate information.…

  14. The intended and unintended effects of advertising on children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.; Valkenburg, P.M.; Valdivia, A.N.; Scharrer, E.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of advertising on children have often been divided into two general types: intended effects (e.g., children's brand awareness, preferences, and purchase requests) and unintended effects (e.g., materialistic orientations, parent-child conflicts, and unhealthy eating habits). The first

  15. Matching Intended And Actual French Curriculum Objectives In ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intended French curriculum objectives refer to four official objectives of teaching and learning French in secondary schools in Kenya as laid down in syllabuses; namely, to equip learners with basic communicative skills, give learners access to oral and written materials, facilitate further studies, and promote global peace ...

  16. How Dogs Know when Communication Is Intended for Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Juliane; Schulz, Linda; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Domestic dogs comprehend human gestural communication in a way that other animal species do not. But little is known about the specific cues they use to determine when human communication is intended for them. In a series of four studies, we confronted both adult dogs and young dog puppies with object choice tasks in which a human indicated one of…

  17. From the Moon: Bringing Space Science to Diverse Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runyon, C. J.; Hall, C.; Joyner, E.; Meyer, H. M.; M3 Science; E/PO Team

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Apollo missions held a place in the mindset of many Americans - we dared to go someplace where humans had never set foot, a place unknown and beyond our imaginations. These early NASA missions and discoveries resulted in an enhanced public understanding of the Moon. Now, with the human element so far removed from space exploration, students must rely on textbooks, TV's, and computers to build their understanding of our Moon. However, NASA educational materials about the Moon are stale and out-of-date. In addition, they do not effectively address 21st Century Skills, an essential for today's classrooms. Here, we present a three-part model for developing opportunities in lunar science education professional development that is replicable and sustainable and integrates NASA mission-derived data (e.g., Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3)/Chandrayaan-1). I) With the return of high resolution/high spatial data from M3/Chandrayaan-1, we can now better explore and understand the compositional variations on the lunar surface. Data and analysis techniques from the imaging spectrometer are incorporated into the M3 Educator's Guide: Seeing the Moon in a New Light. The guide includes an array of activities and lessons to help educators and students understand how NASA is currently exploring the Moon. The guide integrates NASA maps and data into the interactive lessons, bringing the excitement of scientific exploration and discovery into the classroom. II) Utilizing the M3 Educator's Guide as well as educational activities from more current NASA lunar missions, we offer two sustained professional development opportunities for educators to explore the Moon through interactive and creative strategies. 1) Geology of the Moon, an online course offered through Montana State University's National Teacher Enhancement Network, is a 3-credit graduate course. 2) Fly Me to the Moon, offered through the College of Charleston's Office of Professional Development in Education, is a two

  18. LAIX-score : a design framework for live audience interaction management systems

    OpenAIRE

    Kuikkaniemi, Kai

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on computer-supported live audience interaction. In conventional lectures audience interacts explicitly with the performer for example by waving hand and asking question directly or clapping hands. For decades, non digital audience response systems have enabled simple multiple option audience interaction patterns. Modern mobile personal computing devices, digital projectors, wireless networks and real time software platforms enable creation of new kinds of interaction patte...

  19. Leveraging CosmoQuest: Quantitative Analysis of Audience Interests and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Gay, P.; Bakerman, M. N.; Graziano, N.; Murph, S.; Reiheld, A.

    2017-12-01

    Online science education projects have the potential to reach larger audiences than any other form of public engagement. For this potential to be realized, educators and communicators must get their message heard above the roar of competing content - the news, memes, games, and gossip that dominate online spaces. Once heard, projects must further inspire engagement, and that engagement needs to be meaningful so that it motivates and supports learning. The CosmoQuest project, launched in 2012, has been collecting data on what factors trigger engagement, and how social media in particular can be used to learn about audiences interests, and measure what kinds of messages trigger interaction. This study examines the interplay between social media frequency and messaging, and user engagement in educational content and citizen science. It further data mines Twitter to directly measure the interests of people who follow CosmoQuest on social media. This information will allow us to effectively recruit new people from space science adjacent interests, and to effectively engage them through research validated strategies.

  20. Conflict or Caveats? Effects of Media Portrayals of Scientific Uncertainty on Audience Perceptions of New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Andrew R; Hillback, Elliott D; Brossard, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Research indicates that uncertainty in science news stories affects public assessment of risk and uncertainty. However, the form in which uncertainty is presented may also affect people's risk and uncertainty assessments. For example, a news story that features an expert discussing both what is known and what is unknown about a topic may convey a different form of scientific uncertainty than a story that features two experts who hold conflicting opinions about the status of scientific knowledge of the topic, even when both stories contain the same information about knowledge and its boundaries. This study focuses on audience uncertainty and risk perceptions regarding the emerging science of nanotechnology by manipulating whether uncertainty in a news story about potential risks is attributed to expert sources in the form of caveats (individual uncertainty) or conflicting viewpoints (collective uncertainty). Results suggest that the type of uncertainty portrayed does not impact audience feelings of uncertainty or risk perceptions directly. Rather, the presentation of the story influences risk perceptions only among those who are highly deferent to scientific authority. Implications for risk communication theory and practice are discussed. © 2015 Society for Risk Analysis.

  1. Scientists: Engage the Public!

    OpenAIRE

    Shugart, Erika C.; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scientists must communicate about science with public audiences to promote an understanding of complex issues that we face in our technologically advanced society. Some scientists may be concerned about a social stigma or ?Sagan effect? associated with participating in public communication. Recent research in the social sciences indicates that public communication by scientists is not a niche activity but is widely done and can be beneficial to a scientist?s career. There are a varie...

  2. Using Critical Communication Pedagogy to Teach Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Mare, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    Using Critical Communication Pedagogy, this semester-long service-learning approach to public speaking requires students to apply public speaking concepts to a speech they develop and deliver to a specific community audience, to examine their own biases, and to explore and evaluate various strategies for adapting to their audience.

  3. Communication of technical information to lay audiences. [National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, J.E.; Stamm, K.R.; Jackson, K.M.; Moore, J.

    1978-05-01

    One of the objectives of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is to provide terminal storage facilities for commercial radioactive wastes in various geologic formations at multiple locations in the United States. The activities performed under the NWTS Program will affect regional, state, and local areas, and widespread public interest in this program is expected. Since a large part of the NWTS Program deals with technical information it was considered desirable to initiate a study dealing with possible methods of effectively transmitting this technical information to the general public. This study has the objective of preparing a state-of-the-art report on the communication of technical information to lay audiences. The particular task of communicating information about the NWTS Program to the public is discussed where appropriate. The results of this study will aid the NWTS Program in presenting to the public the quite diverse technical information generated within the program so that a widespread, thorough public understanding of the NWTS Program might be achieved. An annotated bibliography is included.

  4. Interactive Control System, Intended Strategy, Implemented Strategy dan Emergent Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tubagus Ismail

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between management control system (MCS and strategy formation processes, namely: intended strategy, emergent strategy and impelemented strategy. The focus of MCS in this study was interactive control system. The study was based on Structural Equation Modeling (SEM as its multivariate analyses instrument. The samples were upper middle managers of manufacturing company in Banten Province, DKI Jakarta Province and West Java Province. AMOS Software 16 program is used as an additional instrument to resolve the problem in SEM modeling. The study found that interactive control system brought a positive and significant influence on Intended strategy; interactive control system brought a positive and significant influence on implemented strategy; interactive control system brought a positive and significant influence on emergent strategy. The limitation of this study is that our empirical model only used one way relationship between the process of strategy formation and interactive control system.

  5. Completed egoism and intended altruism boost healthy food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Christian; Messner, Claude; Brügger, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Based on the self-licensing literature and goal theory, we expected and found that completed (im)moral actions lead to markedly different food choices (Studies 1 & 2) than intended (im)moral actions (Study 2). In Study 1, people more often chose healthy over unhealthy food options when they recalled a completed egoistic action than when they recalled a completed altruistic action. Study 2 confirmed this finding and furthermore showed that the self-licensing effect in food choices is moderated by the action stage (completed versus intended) of the moral or immoral action. This article extends the existing self-licensing literature and opens up new perspectives for changing consumers' food consumption behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. About the linguacultural aspect of the advertisement influence on verbal consiousness of the modern youth audience (on the material of the sociolinguistics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А С Мамонтов

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article on the experimental material there are analyzed the content and the character of modern Russian publicity texts influence on the speech culture of the youth audience; considered both negative and positive features of advertisement language in linguacultural aspect and from Russian language teaching point of view.

  7. Interactive Control System, Intended Strategy, Implemented Strategy dan Emergent Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Tubagus Ismail; Darjat Sudrajat

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between management control system (MCS) and strategy formation processes, namely: intended strategy, emergent strategy and impelemented strategy. The focus of MCS in this study was interactive control system. The study was based on Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) as its multivariate analyses instrument. The samples were upper middle managers of manufacturing company in Banten Province, DKI Jakarta Province and West Java Province. AM...

  8. Device for stretching tapes or cables intended for manipulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudoin, J.-C.; Oger, Robert.

    1975-01-01

    The invention relates to a device for stretching tapes (or cables) intended for remote handling devices. Said equipment consists of a spring system continuously applying a constant tensile stress to said tapes (or cables) in view of taking up the slack in the latter. Said spring system is fastened to a supporting bar able to be rigidly connected to a member of the remote handling device [fr

  9. Device for stretching tapes or cables intended for manipulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baudoin, J C; Oger, R

    1975-03-06

    The invention relates to a device for stretching tapes (or cables) intended for remote handling devices. Said equipment consists of a spring system continuously applying a constant tensile stress to said tapes (or cables) in view of taking up the slack in the latter. Said spring system is fastened to a supporting bar able to be rigidly connected to a member of the remote handling device.

  10. The entry to Kolarac foundation: Cultural activity and music audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžibulić Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Foundation of Ilija Milosavljević Kolarac (also known as Kolarac Foundation; in Serbian: Kolarčeva zadužbina was established simultaneously with the development of the most important modern cultural institutions in Serbia in the 19th century. The quality and diversity of the program, the ability to recognize important topics in the current time, as well as preservation of the old and encouragement of new ideas in almost all domains of art and science have contributed to its unquestionable reputation throughout the region. However, there have been no significant academic attempts to approach its work analytically and, in particular, its audience. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the work of Kolarac Foundation by presenting the origin and history of the institution, followed by an analysis of the program of all its activities in the first ten seasons of the new millennium. The central part of the paper is an analysis of its cultural activity in the given period. Finally, by using empirical data, the music audence of Great Hall (Velika Dvorana of Kolarac Foundation is profiled through its basic socio-demographic characteristics and music practices. The music audience mainly consisted of women, highly educated professionals with a high material standard. The share of the oldest and those from 21 to 30 years old is the highest and, at the same time, equal. This audience is authentically fond of music, with no exceptions at all. Its members listen to music on everyday basis, and they were attending concerts in the year before the investigation. They find music to be an inevitable part of their lives, and cannot imagine emotional expression or making friendships without it. Finally, they sincerely like coming to Kolarac Foundation since they find it to be a place that has all the positive treats of a good cultural institution.

  11. Applying the principles of adult learning to the teaching of psychopharmacology: audience response systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stephen M; Davis, Richard L

    2009-08-01

    Medical presentations can be enhanced by systematically collecting audience feedback. This is readily accomplished with polling systems, called audience response systems. Several systems are now available that are small, inexpensive, and can be readily integrated into standard powerpoint presentations without the need for a technician. Use of audience response systems has several advantages. These include improving attentiveness, increasing learning, polling anonymously, tracking individual and group responses, gauging audience understanding, adding interactivity and fun, and evaluating both participant learning and instructor teaching. Tips for how to write questions for audience response systems are also included.

  12. Educational storylines in entertainment television: audience reactions toward persuasive strategies in medical dramas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asbeek Brusse, Elsbeth D; Fransen, Marieke L; Smit, Edith G

    2015-04-01

    Medical television drama series provide an important source of health information. This form of entertainment-education (E-E) can be used to influence knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward health-related issues. In the literature, E-E is generally regarded as a persuasive strategy in itself, whereas in an increasing number of E-E programs, several different persuasive strategies are used. An important question is how the audience ethically evaluates these strategies. The aim of the present study is to examine viewers' ethical judgments toward the use of three persuasive strategies in E-E: product placement, framing, and persuasion toward a controversial position. A survey among 525 viewers of 5 popular medical dramas demonstrates that viewers evaluate the use of the currently investigated attitudinal statements about potential persuasive strategies in E-E as being immoral and that viewers prefer neutral storylines. Adopting a strategy that viewers find inappropriate may interfere with the intended prosocial effects of E-E. A broader understanding of the appropriate and inappropriate uses of persuasive strategies in E-E is indispensable for effective E-E productions.

  13. Attitude and Perception of Young Audience towards Patriotism in Independence Day TV Commercials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fazlina Jaafar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitatively, this study intends to identify the attitude and perception of young audiences in Malaysia towards Independence day TV commercials from Petronas, and Maxis Berhad in celebrating the Independence Day. Firstly, respondents were exposed to three TV commercials with the same theme and purpose – to represent the spirit of patriotism. Later, these respondents were given a set of questionnaire to be filled. Data were collected using Purposive Sampling and analyzed with statistical analysis (SPSS using Descriptive analysis represented by using the value of percentages, X, and SD. Findings of this study revealed that respondents have negative attitudes towards independence day, but positive attitudes towards the patriotism showed in all TV commercials. They also showed positive perception on independence day television commercials, as high number of respondents have agreed that the concept, theme and art direction of television commercial about love and live in unity without racism will be the style of benchmark for the future style of direction towards producing television commercial for Independence Day and are considered vital to instill patriotism towards the nation.

  14. Disseminating relevant health information to underserved audiences: implications of the Digital Divide Pilot Projects*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Gary L.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: This paper examines the influence of the digital divide on disparities in health outcomes for vulnerable populations, identifying implications for medical and public libraries. Method: The paper describes the results of the Digital Divide Pilot Projects demonstration research programs funded by the National Cancer Institute to test new strategies for disseminating relevant health information to underserved and at-risk audiences. Results: The Digital Divide Pilot Projects field-tested innovative systemic strategies for helping underserved populations access and utilize relevant health information to make informed health-related decisions about seeking appropriate health care and support, resisting avoidable and significant health risks, and promoting their own health. Implications: The paper builds on the Digital Divide Pilot Projects by identifying implications for developing health communication strategies that libraries can adopt to provide digital health information to vulnerable populations. PMID:16239960

  15. Disseminating relevant health information to underserved audiences: implications of the Digital Divide Pilot Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreps, Gary L

    2005-10-01

    This paper examines the influence of the digital divide on disparities in health outcomes for vulnerable populations, identifying implications for medical and public libraries. The paper describes the results of the Digital Divide Pilot Projects demonstration research programs funded by the National Cancer Institute to test new strategies for disseminating relevant health information to underserved and at-risk audiences. The Digital Divide Pilot Projects field-tested innovative systemic strategies for helping underserved populations access and utilize relevant health information to make informed health-related decisions about seeking appropriate health care and support, resisting avoidable and significant health risks, and promoting their own health. The paper builds on the Digital Divide Pilot Projects by identifying implications for developing health communication strategies that libraries can adopt to provide digital health information to vulnerable populations.

  16. Bringing the Great American Eclipse of 2017 to Audiences across the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. A.; Mayo, L.; Cline, T. D.; Ng, C.; Stephenson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    The August 21, 2017 eclipse across America will be seen by an estimated 500 million people from northern Canada to South America as well as parts of western Europe and Africa. Through This "Great American Eclipse" NASA in partnership with Google, the American Parks Network, American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical League, and numerous other science, education, outreach, and public communications groups and organizations will develop the approaches, resources, partnerships, and technology applications necessary to bring the excitement and the science of the August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse across America to formal and informal audiences in the US and around the world. This effort will be supported by the highly visible and successful Sun Earth Days program and will be the main theme for Sun-Earth Days 2017.This presentation will discuss NASA's education and communication plans for the eclipse and will detail a number of specific programs and partnerships being leveraged to enhance our reach and impact.

  17. Keynote speaker Col. Fitch talks to employee audience at Super Safety and Health Day at KSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Capt. Dennis E. Fitch, a consultant and former pilot instructor with United Airlines, addresses an audience of KSC employees to kick off Super Safety and Health Day at KSC. Fitch related his tale of the catastrophic engine failure in UAL flight 232, which crash landed in Iowa in 1989, and the teamwork that contributed to his survival and the lives of 183 other passengers. For the second time Kennedy Space Center dedicated an entire day to safety and health. Most normal work activities were suspended to allow personnel to attend Super Safety and Health Day activities. The theme, 'Safety and Health Go Hand in Hand,' emphasized KSC's commitment to place the safety and health of the public, astronauts, employees and space-related resources first and foremost. Events also included a panel session about related issues, vendor exhibits, and safety training in work groups. The keynote address and panel session were also broadcast internally over NASA television.

  18. Media Text and Audiences: Discursive Constructions of Fandom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Popović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research findings obtained from a research project investigating media audiences and their reception of a cult-television (Cult TV text, namely Da Ali G Show. The audience research comprises 18 semi-structured interviews conducted in London (the United Kingdom and in Zagreb (Croatia aimed at establishing how fandom is discursively constructed. The analysis of the interpretive community in two distinct socio-cultural contexts showed that there were more similarities than differences overall. The practices engaged in by the interviewees mostly involved making a conscious effort to regularly watch the primary text as well as to show an interest in the future work of the author. The research showed that interviewees typically engaged in a type of ‘moderate’ fandom, whilst strong emotional attachments were seen as negative, as was intrusiveness into people’s privacy. This indicates a split between the signifier and the signified: the term ‘fan’ was readily adopted by interviewees in describing their relationship to the text; however, the meaning was negotiated and carefully constructed so as to disassociate oneself from the extreme, passionate, irrational connotation that the etymology of the term carries.

  19. Social facilitation of cognition in rhesus monkeys: audience vs. coaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie J. Reynaud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social psychology has long established that the mere presence of a conspecific, be it an active co-performer (coaction effect, or a passive spectator (audience effect changes behavior in humans. Yet, the process mediating this fundamental social influence has so far eluded us. Brain research and its nonhuman primate animal model, the rhesus macaque, could shed new light on this long debated issue. For this approach to be fruitful, however, we need to improve our patchy knowledge about social presence influence in rhesus macaques. Here, seven adults (two dyads and one triad performed a simple cognitive task consisting in touching images to obtain food treats, alone versus in presence of a co-performer or a spectator. As in humans, audience sufficed to enhance performance to the same magnitude as coaction. Effect sizes were however 4 times larger than those typically reported in humans in similar tasks. Both findings are an encouragement to pursue brain and behavior research in the rhesus macaque to help solve the riddle of social facilitation mechanisms.

  20. Making Sense of Shakespeare: a Cultural Icon for Contemporary Audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Olsson

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The works of William Shakespeare are more popular in the 21st century than ever before, Why are theatre and audiences around the globe still drawn to his work? How do they make sense of these texts in ways that resonate with their cosmopolitan, contemporary audiences? This article uses the findings of a study interviewing 35 theatre professionals in Canada, Finland and the United Kingdom to explore these issues. Theoretically and methodologically, it is a bricollage, drawing on a range of approaches including Foucault’s discourse analysis, Hobsbawm’s invented traditions and Dervin’s Sense-Making to understand participants sense-making as an affective, embodied social practice. It argues that attempting to understand the significance of a major cultural icon such as Shakespeare in contemporary cosmopolitan civil society needs to recognise the many meanings, roles and significances that surround him and that this complexity makes it unlikely that any one theoretical lens will prove adequate on its own. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5130/ccs.v5i3.3640

  1. Engaging the audience: developing presentation skills in science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Ann E

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a graduate class in presentation skills ("PClass") as a model for how a class with similar objectives, expectations and culture might be mounted for undergraduates. The required class is given for students in neuroscience and physiology programs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; I describe the class in the years I led it, from 2003-2012. The class structure centered on peer rehearsal, critiquing of PowerPoint, and chalk talks by the students; video-recording of student talks for later review by the student with the instructor; and presentation of polished talks in a formal setting. A different faculty visitor to the class each week gave the students a variety of perspectives. The students also gained insight into their own evolving skills by discussing the strengths and weaknesses of seminars given by visitors to the campus. A unique feature of the class was collaboration with a professional actor from the University's Department of Dramatic Arts, who helped the students develop techniques for keeping the attention of an audience, for speaking with confidence, and for controlling nervousness. The undergraduate campus would be expected to lend itself to this sort of interdisciplinary faculty cooperation. In addition, students worked on becoming adept at designing and presenting posters, introducing speakers graciously and taking charge of the speaker's question session, and speaking to a lay audience.

  2. Science and Faith: Discussing Astronomy Research with Religious Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2006-12-01

    An important component of our outreach as research astronomers involves interaction with the religious community. From my personal perspective, being an active research astronomer who is also a practicing Christian, I am sometimes invited to present the latest astronomical research to church audiences and other religious groups; belonging to both communities thereby provides a valuable means of contributing to the dialogue between science and religion. These opportunities can be used to explain that science and religion are not necessarily in conflict but can be considered to be quite complementary. For instance, an important aspect of religion deals with the purpose of our existence, while science is more focussed on providing physical explanations for what we observe in the world, using a well-defined scientific process. Hence, religious believers need not necessarily abandon their faith in order to accept mainstream scientific research; these address very different and complementary aspects of our existence. Recent ideas such as Intelligent Design attempt to address the scientific method, but do not address the ultimate religious question of purpose and do not contribute towards reconciling science and religion in this sense. Ultimately, every individual arrives at their own understanding of this rather complex interplay; I will present some personal reflections on general approaches for discussing mainstream astronomical research with religious audiences, aimed at helping to advance the dialogue between religion and science in general.

  3. Small Influence of Performing from Memory on Audience Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Kopiez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the influence of an actual music stand on the evaluation of a videotaped audio-visual solo instrumental performance. Previous research has provided evidence that the presence of a score or music stand (obstructing the audience's view of the performer might negatively influence the evaluation of the performance. However, due to methodological ambiguities, results in previous studies cannot be regarded as definitive. Thus, we conducted a replication study of Williamon (1999 with better control over confounding variables (e.g., varying levels of technical proficiency in different conditions. A violoncello player performed two pieces for solo instrument: once with a music stand on stage (pretending to play from score and once without. The level of technical proficiency was kept constant in both performance presentations by the use of a pre-recorded, well-rehearsed performance from memory. Audio tracks were synchronized with the performance movements in a playback paradigm. Based on the performance evaluations from a web-based experiment (N = 471 participants, we found a significant but small effect size for the main effect of performance presentation (with vs. without music stand (d = 0.23. We conclude that the audience's appreciation of a particular performance from memory might be based on factors other than the objective performance quality.

  4. Public relations effectiveness in public health institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springston, Jeffrey K; Weaver Lariscy, Ruth Ann

    2005-01-01

    This article explores public relations effectiveness in public health institutions. First, the two major elements that comprise public relations effectiveness are discussed: reputation management and stakeholder relations. The factors that define effective reputation management are examined, as are the roles of issues and crisis management in building and maintaining reputation. The article also examines the major facets of stakeholder relations, including an inventory of stakeholder linkages and key audiences, such as the media. Finally, methods of evaluating public relations effectiveness at both the program level and the institutional level are explored.

  5. Major Risks, Uncertain Outcomes: Making Ensemble Forecasts Work for Multiple Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semmens, K. A.; Montz, B.; Carr, R. H.; Maxfield, K.; Ahnert, P.; Shedd, R.; Elliott, J.

    2017-12-01

    When extreme river levels are possible in a community, effective communication of weather and hydrologic forecasts is critical to protect life and property. Residents, emergency personnel, and water resource managers need to make timely decisions about how and when to prepare. Uncertainty in forecasting is a critical component of this decision-making, but often poses a confounding factor for public and professional understanding of forecast products. In 2016 and 2017, building on previous research about the use of uncertainty forecast products, and with funding from NOAA's CSTAR program, East Carolina University and Nurture Nature Center (a non-profit organization with a focus on flooding issues, based in Easton, PA) conducted a research project to understand how various audiences use and interpret ensemble forecasts showing a range of hydrologic forecast possibilities. These audiences include community residents, emergency managers and water resource managers. The research team held focus groups in Jefferson County, WV and Frederick County, MD, to test a new suite of products from the National Weather Service's Hydrologic Ensemble Forecast System (HEFS). HEFS is an ensemble system that provides short and long-range forecasts, ranging from 6 hours to 1 year, showing uncertainty in hydrologic forecasts. The goal of the study was to assess the utility of the HEFS products, identify the barriers to proper understanding of the products, and suggest modifications to product design that could improve the understandability and accessibility for residential, emergency managers, and water resource managers. The research team worked with the Sterling, VA Weather Forecast Office and the Middle Atlantic River Forecast center to develop a weather scenario as the basis of the focus group discussions, which also included pre and post session surveys. This presentation shares the findings from those focus group discussions and surveys, including recommendations for revisions to

  6. Determinants of recurrence after intended curative resection for colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilhelmsen, Michael; Kring, Thomas; Jorgensen, Lars N

    2014-01-01

    Despite intended curative resection, colorectal cancer will recur in ∼45% of the patients. Results of meta-analyses conclude that frequent follow-up does not lead to early detection of recurrence, but improves overall survival. The present literature shows that several factors play important roles...... in development of recurrence. It is well established that emergency surgery is a major determinant of recurrence. Moreover, anastomotic leakages, postoperative bacterial infections, and blood transfusions increase the recurrence rates although the exact mechanisms still remain obscure. From pathology studies...

  7. Low Shrinkage Cement Concrete Intended for Airfield Pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Małgorzata, Linek

    2017-10-01

    The work concerns the issue of hardened concrete parameters improvement intended for airfield pavements. Factors which have direct or indirect influence on rheological deformation size were of particular interest. The aim of lab testing was to select concrete mixture ratio which would make hardened concrete less susceptible to influence of basic operating factors. Analyses included two research groups. External and internal factors were selected. They influence parameters of hardened cement concrete by increasing rheological deformations. Research referred to innovative cement concrete intended for airfield pavements. Due to construction operation, the research considered the influence of weather conditions and forced thermal loads intensifying concrete stress. Fresh concrete mixture parameters were tested and basic parameters of hardened concrete were defined (density, absorbability, compression strength, tensile strength). Influence of the following factors on rheological deformation value was also analysed. Based on obtained test results, it has been discovered that innovative concrete, made on the basis of modifier, which changes internal structure of concrete composite, has definitely lower values of rheological deformation. Observed changes of microstructure, in connection with reduced deformation values allowed to reach the conclusion regarding advantageous characteristic features of the newly designed cement concrete. Applying such concrete for airfield construction may contribute to extension of its operation without malfunction and the increase of its general service life.

  8. Frontier Scientists' project probes audience science interests with website, social media, TV broadcast, game, and pop-up book

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, E. A.

    2017-12-01

    The Frontier Scientists National Science Foundation project titled Science in Alaska: Using Multimedia to Support Science Education produced research products in several formats: videos short and long, blogs, social media, a computer game, and a pop-up book. These formats reached distinctly different audiences. Internet users, public TV viewers, gamers, schools, and parents & young children were drawn to Frontier Scientists' research in direct and indirect ways. The analytics (our big data) derived from this media broadcast has given us insight into what works, what doesn't, next steps. We have evidence for what is needed to present science as an interesting, vital, and a necessary component for the general public's daily information diet and as an important tool for scientists to publicize research and to thrive in their careers. Collaborations with scientists at several Universities, USGS, Native organizations, tourism organizations, and Alaska Museums promoted accuracy of videos and increased viewing. For example, Erin Marbarger, at Anchorage Museum, edited, and provided Spark!Lab to test parents & child's interest in the pop-up book titled: The Adventures of Apun the Arctic Fox. Without a marketing budget Frontier Scientist's minimum publicity, during the three year project, still drew an audience. Frontier Scientists was awarded Best Website 2016 by the Alaska Press Club, and won a number of awards for short videos and TV programs.

  9. Update of strategies to translate evidence from cochrane musculoskeletal group systematic reviews for use by various audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Tamara; Pardo Pardo, Jordi; Stacey, Dawn; Ghogomu, Elizabeth; Maxwell, Lara J; Welch, Vivian A; Singh, Jasvinder A; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Légaré, France; Santesso, Nancy; Toupin April, Karine; O'Connor, Annette M; Wells, George A; Winzenberg, Tania M; Johnston, Renea; Tugwell, Peter

    2014-02-01

    For rheumatology research to have a real influence on health and well-being, evidence must be tailored to inform the decisions of various audiences. The Cochrane Musculoskeletal Group (CMSG), one of 53 groups of the not-for-profit international Cochrane Collaboration, prepares, maintains, and disseminates systematic reviews of treatments for musculoskeletal diseases. While systematic reviews provided by the CMSG fill a major gap in meeting the need for high-quality evidence syntheses, our work does not end at the completion of a review. The term "knowledge translation" (KT) refers to the activities involved in bringing research evidence to various audiences in a useful form so it can be used to support decision making and improve practices. Systematic reviews give careful consideration to research methods and analysis. Because the review is often long and detailed, the clinically relevant results may not be apparent or in the optimal form for use by patients and their healthcare practitioners. This paper describes 10 formats, many of them new, for ways that evidence from Cochrane Reviews can be translated with the intention of meeting the needs of various audiences, including patients and their families, practitioners, policy makers, the press, and members of the public (the "5 Ps"). Current and future knowledge tools include summary of findings tables, patient decision aids, plain language summaries, press releases, clinical scenarios in general medical journals, frequently asked questions (Cochrane Clinical Answers), podcasts, Twitter messages, Journal Club materials, and the use of storytelling and narratives to support continuing medical education. Future plans are outlined to explore ways of improving the influence and usefulness of systematic reviews by providing results in formats suitable to our varied audiences.

  10. Assessment of Microbiology Students’ Progress With an Audience Response System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmad Chaudhry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of new approaches to teaching of large lecture courses is needed. Today’s classroom has a wide range of students including high-achieving motivated learners, students struggling to understand basic concepts, and learning-challenged students. Many of these students can be lost in large classes under the shadow of the high-achieving extroverted students who dominate classroom question-and-answer sessions. Measuring a student’s understanding and achievement of content standards becomes difficult until an assessment has been done. To close this gap, an audience response system was introduced in an introductory Principles of Microbiology course. This technology specifically addressed the goal of individualizing instruction to the needs of the students. The evaluation of this project indicated an overall positive impact on student learning.

  11. Assessment of microbiology students' progress with an audience response system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, M Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    The development of new approaches to teaching of large lecture courses is needed. Today's classroom has a wide range of students including high-achieving motivated learners, students struggling to understand basic concepts, and learning-challenged students. Many of these students can be lost in large classes under the shadow of the high-achieving extroverted students who dominate classroom question-and-answer sessions. Measuring a student's understanding and achievement of content standards becomes difficult until an assessment has been done. To close this gap, an audience response system was introduced in an introductory Principles of Microbiology course. This technology specifically addressed the goal of individualizing instruction to the needs of the students. The evaluation of this project indicated an overall positive impact on student learning.

  12. Audience response techniques for 21st century radiology education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael L

    2014-07-01

    Audience response system (ARS) provides an excellent tool for improving interactive learning in radiology residents. However, it is not the technology but the pedagogy that matters the most. It is long past time to upgrade our ARS teaching techniques to match our ARS technology. In this article, several problems with current usage of ARS are discussed and several prescriptions for improving this are presented. Simplifying the ease of use of ARS will get this useful technology into more hands. Using ARS in a bidirectional manner will give us an even better idea of how and what our students are learning. Asking questions on the fly will obviate the usual tedium of multiple-choice questions and allow us to quiz our students in a much more natural manner. It is time to move on to more innovative ARS techniques that are well adapted to radiology and its different styles of learning. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The Audience Wheel as a Technic to Create Transformative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helth, Poula

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to document how a new learning technic may create transformative learning in leadership in an organisational practice. Design/methodology/approach: The learning methods developed in the learning in practice (LIP) project include aesthetic performances...... combined with reflections. The intention has been to explore how leadership may be transformed, when leaders work as a collective of leaders. The learning methods developed and tested in the LIP project are art-informed learning methods, concepts of liminality and reflection processes carried out...... in the leaders’ organisational practice. Findings: One of the most important findings in the LIP project in relation to transformative learning is a new learning technique based on guided processes rooted in aesthetic performance combined with reflections and separation of roles as performer and audience...

  14. UNDERSTANDING OUR AUDIENCE: MESSAGES FROM CONCEPT TO COMPLETION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharwat EL-Sakran

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The United Arab Emirates (UAE is a business hub for a great number of multinational and international companies that conduct daily communication activities in English, which has made efficient and audience sensitive written communication an essential requirement in today’s workplace. With computer-mediated communication (CMC taking over face-to-face communication, this has created an essential need for students to learn efficient and appropriate communication styles pertinent to communication via emails. This study presents a pragmatic approach for teaching the how of writing appropriate and effective professional email messages. Comparisons of pre-and post-teaching email messages point to significant improvements in the quality of post teaching email messages.

  15. Intended and unintended consequences of China's zero markup drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hongmei; Miller, Grant; Zhang, Linxiu; Li, Shaoping; Rozelle, Scott

    2015-08-01

    Since economic liberalization in the late 1970s, China's health care providers have grown heavily reliant on revenue from drugs, which they both prescribe and sell. To curb abuse and to promote the availability, safety, and appropriate use of essential drugs, China introduced its national essential drug list in 2009 and implemented a zero markup policy designed to decouple provider compensation from drug prescription and sales. We collected and analyzed representative data from China's township health centers and their catchment-area populations both before and after the reform. We found large reductions in drug revenue, as intended by policy makers. However, we also found a doubling of inpatient care that appeared to be driven by supply, instead of demand. Thus, the reform had an important unintended consequence: China's health care providers have sought new, potentially inappropriate, forms of revenue. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  16. Audience in the Service of Learning: How Kids Negotiate Attention in an Online Community of Interactive Media Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Audience can serve as powerful motivation in learning--and network technologies have the potential to greatly broaden audience for the processes and products of learning. But these new opportunities for audience are accompanied by new challenges. In this paper, we examine and problematize the notion and role of audience in learning by presenting a…

  17. How Less Alienation Creates More Exploitation? Audience Labour on Social Network Sites.

    OpenAIRE

    Eran Fisher

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: The notion of audience labour has been an important contribution to Marxist political economy of the media. It revised the traditional political economy analysis, which focused on media ownership, by suggesting that media was also a site of production, constituting particular relations of production. Such analysis highlighted the active role of audience in the creation of media value as both commodities and workers, thus pointing to audience exploitation. Recently, in light of parad...

  18. Stepping into others’ shoes: a cognitive perspective on target audience orientation in written translation

    OpenAIRE

    Apfelthaler, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    This paper suggests what might allow translators to orient themselves towards their target audience in the translation process. To shed light on translators’ ability to put themselves into their target audience’s shoes, I adopt a cognitive perspective by drawing on current findings from psychology, cognitive science and neuroscience. I depart from the notion of target audience as applied to written translation. Aspects to this concept and the terminology of audience in translation studies are...

  19. Children's drawings of significant figures for a peer or an adult audience

    OpenAIRE

    Burkitt, Esther; Watling, Dawn; Murray, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed if children would present different information in their drawings of emotion eliciting stimuli when they believed that an adult or a child audience would view their drawings. Seventy-five 6-year-olds (44 boys and 31 girls) were allocated to three groups: the reference group, the child audience group and the adult audience group. All children completed a drawing session where they first drew a neutral uncharacterised figure, followed by drawings of a sad and a happy ...

  20. Wind farm development project in the regional municipality of Riviere-du-Loup. : public inquiry report; Projet d'amenagement d'un parc eolien dans la MRC de Riviere-du-Loup : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafond, F.; Beland, P.; Bernier-Bourgault, I.; Hamel-Dufour, S.; Roberge, J.; Boutin, A.L.; Dumontier, C.; Hawey, D.

    2006-09-15

    This report stated the reasons why the proposed wind turbine array for Riviere-du-Loup in Quebec was not accepted. The project promoter, Terrawinds Resources Corporation, has proposed to install 134 wind turbines, each with 1.5 MW capacity, some of which would be located on private lands in an agricultural zone. The report was based on results of a public inquiry by Quebec's Commission on environmental inquiries. The Commission concluded that the project as presented cannot go ahead. The Commission stated that the environmental impact study will have to be expanded to include the human, biophysical and socio-economic impacts of the project on the local population. In consideration of the coastal landscape, tourism and historical aspects, the Commission does not approve the development of a wind turbine array, particularly between the Saint Lawrence River and Highways 20 and 132. The Commission noted the importance of migratory birds along the Saint Lawrence River, and stated the difficulty in anticipating the mortality rate of birds using this corridor. The Commission also suggested that inventories be made for amphibians, reptiles, bats and other rare species and that measures be proposed for their protection. It was also suggested that Terrawinds Resources should evaluate and determine acceptable noise levels at their own cost. The Commission also recommended that the Quebec Ministry of Sustainable Development, Environment and Parks conduct an impact study of infrasonic vibrations together with the Quebec Ministry of Health and Social Services. The socio-economic factors associated with the project were also addressed with reference to the value of any economic activity generated by the park as well as the potential losses in other economic sectors such as the tourism industry. refs., tabs., figs.

  1. Broadcasting environmental knowledge: Open University & BBC collaborations serving massive global audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, M. A.; Smith, J.; Garrow, K. H.; Law, A.

    2013-12-01

    The UK Open University has a long history of working with broadcast media - indeed before it first formed over 40 years ago it was proposed to be a "University of the Air ". Originally the University made its own television programmes that were directly connected with teaching. They were usually recordings of academics giving lectures that were broadcast late at night. Over recent times we have moved into developing co-productions with mainstream broadcast media specifically designed to be of general educational interest to UK and worldwide audiences. These include both high impact one-off programmes such as Are we changing planet Earth?, multiple international award winning series such as Frozen Planet, and World Service radio such as Earth Reporters. These programmes have had global audiences; in some cases of tens of millions. Whilst we have only worked using clear scientific evidence and expertise, we have co-produced media which small sections of the general public could consider controversial. For example, in Are we changing planet Earth? the case was presented pre IPCC AR4 for anthropogenic climate change. The final episode of Frozen Planet "On thin ice" presented evidence of how the polar climate is changing and likely future global impacts. It created a large and occasionally hostile international media impact long before broadcast. This continued after broadcast in some media but we believe it stopped because the science presented was robust within the current literature. Based around broadcasting, we used a communication strategy based on our personal experience over the last decade along with our institutional experience going back 40 years. For example our outreach include social media, newspapers, radio and podcasts to speak about underpinning science. We use Twitter during actual broadcasts to circulate links to journal articles and provide context around the science presented on screen. Backed up by a large public outreach campaign at science fairs

  2. Siloxanes in silicone products intended for food contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Jensen, Lisbeth Krüger

    oligomers which might migrate to the food when the product is being used. DTU has proposed two action limits for low molecular weight siloxanes in food contact materials. For the sum of cyclic siloxanes D3 to D8 the limits are 12 mg/kg food for adults and 2 mg/kg food for children. For the sum of cyclic...... siloxanes D3 to D13 and linear siloxanes L3-L13 the limit is 60 mg/kg food. In 49 samples of silicone products intended for food contact from the Norwegian markets content of siloxanes has been measured. Coated paper for baking constituted 8 of the samples and in none of those samples siloxanes were found......Silicone is used in food contact materials due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. It is thermostable and flexible and is used in bakeware and kitchen utensils. Silicone is also used to coat paper to make it water and fat resistant. There is no specific regulation in EU which covers...

  3. DESIGN OF A TRANSMISSION INTENDED TO WHEELCHAIRS FOR DISABLED PEOPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionut GEONEA

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented the authors contributions on designing and evaluation of a mechanical transmission intended to be used to wheelchairs for disabled people. In most cases the wheelchairs propulsion system solution consist of two DC motors, mounted on wheels shafts directly, or by means an intermediary transmission with chains or belts. In this case the wheelchair must be equipped with a controller, generally based on a PWM technology. Proposed solution consists of a mechanical transmission based on differential gears, which uses two motors, for steering and for propulsion. For this design architecture the control solution is much simple and easy cost to design, consisting in one servo controller for two motors. Based on dimensional synthesis of transmission gears, is developed the design solution of the robotic wheelchair. The wheelchair motion simulation is studied in Adams software, for the case of traction, steering and combined motion. From Adams simulations are obtained the wheelchair motion trajectories, kinematic and dynamic parameters. Obtained results are analyzed and compared to other wheelchairs design solution, concluding that proposed design solution of this transmission can be successful used to a wheelchair experimental prototype.

  4. [Biological evaluation of a protein mixture intended for enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, J Olza; Foulquie, J Porres; Valero, G Urbano; de Victoria, E Martínez; Hernández, A Gil

    2008-01-01

    Enteral nutrition is the best way to feed or supplement the diet when gastrointestinal tract functions of patients are partially or totally preserved. Whenever total enteral nutrition is needed, it represents the only source of nutrients for patients. Thus, it is mandatory to ensure that high biological value proteins are included in enteral formulae. To assess the biological quality of a protein blend constituted by 50% potassium caseinate, 25% whey protein and 25% pea protein intended to be used in enteral nutrition products. Forty Wistar rats (20 male and 20 female), with initial body weight of 51 g, where divided into four groups and feed for 10 days with: casein (Control), experimental protein blend (Experimental), liophylized normo- and hyperproteic enteral nutrition formulae adapted to the animal nutritional requirements (Normoproteic and Hyperproteic). Protein efficiency ratio (PER), apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC), relationship between retained and absorbed nitrogen (R/A) and relationship between retained and consumed nitrogen (R/I) where calculated. Experimental and control groups had similar values for all analysed indices (PER, ADC, R/A and R/I). These indices where also similar between normo and hyperproteic groups, but lower than experimental and control groups, except in PER, where normoproteic group was either similar to control and hiperproteic group. The quality of the protein blend used in this study is high. It is a good protein source to be used in the development of new enteral nutritional products.

  5. JOURNALISTIC IDENTITY AND AUDIENCE PERCEPTIONS: Paradigm and models under construction in the African Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  6. Effect of media relations on audiences: comparing how editorials and advertising influence behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tkalac Verčič

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A notion, according to which editorials have a bigger communication influence than advertisements, is very common and quite popular in public relations. The said notion is so prevalent (among both public relations and marketing communications experts that it has led to the concept of perceived influence multipliers that point to a stronger editorial influence in comparison to advertising influence (2.5 to 8 times stronger. Based on the described assumption, the aim of this paper was to further explore how the target audience perceives editorial and advertising content. The research problem was to compare the effects of both types of content on behavior and behavioral intent (through four media – Internet, radio, newspapers and television. Respondents were divided into two groups – current users of the service that was in focus (for influence on behavior and potential users (for influence on behavioral intent. Even though current users said that editorials had a bigger influence on their behavior, this difference was not significant. On the other hand, potential users stated that the advertising content shaped their behavioral intent more than did editorials. These results once again show the assumption, according to which editorials have a stronger communication influence than advertisements, to be highly questionable.

  7. Journalistic identity and audience perceptions: paradigm and models under construction in the African Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  8. Journalistic identity and audience perceptions: paradigm and models under construction in the African Great Lakes region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  9. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and the Public Speaking Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Janet Weston; Tobler, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    From the earliest roots of rhetoric, practitioners emphasized the need for analyzing one's audience before developing a speech. Textbooks for most basic public speaking courses spend at least one chapter discussing audience analysis. Authors discuss adapting messages to various demographic, cultural, and individual differences. As a result,…

  10. Neuroscience for Content Innovation on European Public Service Broadcasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Pereira, Verónica; Martínez-Fernández, Valentín-Alejandro; Campos-Freire, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The new media landscape is characterized by the fragmentation and disaffection of the audience towards traditional television. Such a context requires innovative strategies to meet the needs of the public and connect with it. This article analyses the ability of Neuroscience to optimize the production of content adapted to audiences. For this…

  11. From Fysics to Phorestry: How do I engage diverse audiences in land-air interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. K.

    2011-12-01

    The educational component of the CAREER award "A New Direction into Near-Surface Transport for Weak-Wind Conditions in Plant Canopies" (AGS #0955444) calls for an integration of in-classroom teaching and a new field class to provide students from across the disciplines with an opportunity to explore and learn mechanisms of land-air interactions. The charge is clear, but how do I best do this? This contribution presents a concept of how to address the diverse interests and needs with backgrounds ranging from atmospheric science & engineering to botany & forestry by emphasizing the underlying physical principles of light, heat, and water exchange that are of common interest to many scientific disciplines. The idea behind the teaching technique is to let the students escape from their rather passive role in the classroom by providing opportunities for active participation and discovery through a) developing an online syllabus created by the students for the students, b) offering field excursions to expose students to the research activities funded through this award, c) helping small student teams formulate their own research questions, develop their own experimental design, and collect and evaluate measurements in the field class. In addition to discussing the concept and giving some concrete topical examples, a summary of the student feedback received to date will also be included. However, since the award is just about to enter its second year at the time of writing, a major part of this concept still awaits implementation. Seeking input from other awardees and experienced teachers and educators is therefore intended. A secondary objective of this contribution is to describe the many positive impacts on my career that are evident even after the first year by exposing my research and teaching activities to a much broader audience including the Long-Term Ecological Research community at the HJ Andrews experimental forest in Oregon.

  12. The Filipino male as a target audience in family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitug, W

    1986-01-01

    Since the official launching of the Philippine Population Program in 1970, family planning campaigns have substantially addressed themselves to women. The suggestion to devote equal, if not more, attention to men as family planning targets had been raised by Dr. Mercado as early as 1971. It was not until 1978, that the deliberate inclusion of males as a target audience in family planning became a matter of policy. The Population Center Foundation (PCF), from 1979 to 1982, carried out research projects to determine the most suitable approaches and strategies to reach Filipino men. The objectives of the PCF's Male Specific Program are: 1) to test alternative schemes in promoting male family planning methods through pilot-testing of family planning clinics for men, 2) to develop teaching materials geared toward specific segments of the male population, 3) to undertake skills training in male-specific motivational approaches for program professionals, and 4) to assess the extent of the husband's role in family planning. An important finding of 1 study was that most outreach workers were female stood in the way of the motivation process, thus hampering the campaign. While the consultative motivational skills training improved knowledge, attitudes, and skills of outreach workers with regard to vasectomy and the motivation process, there were certain predispositions that were hindering the fieldworkers' effectiveness in motivating target clients. Overall, in-depth, 1-to-1 motivation in dealing with men is needed to strengthen internalization of family planning values.

  13. Timing of malaria messages for target audience on radio airwaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batwala, Vincent; Magnussen, Pascal; Mirembe, Justine; Mulogo, Edgar; Nuwaha, Fred

    2012-08-20

    Due to the limitations of face-to-face communication to teach families how to manage, control and prevent malaria, national and local malaria programmes try to reach people through the radio. However, information regarding the timing of radio messages for the target audiences is lacking. Within a large-scale trial (Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00565071), data regarding the time at which people listen to the radio was collected from 1,628 consenting outpatients (and caregivers for minors) attending six rural government primary level health care centres in Bushenyi and Iganga districts of Uganda from February to July 2011. The majority of households, 1,099 (67.5%) owned a radio. The majority, 1,221 (86.3%), participants had heard about malaria from the radio. Some participants started listening to the radio at about 06.00 East African local time (EAT). The peak hours at which people listen to the radio are 12.00-14.00 and 18.00-23.00 local time. The median time of listening to the radio by men is 20.00 (inter-quartile range (IQR): 18.30-21.00) and women 19.30 (IQR: 13.00-20.30). Planners of malaria radio interventions need to broadcast their messages within the two peak EAT of 12.00-14.00 and 18.00-23.00.

  14. The Social Nature of Argumentative Practices: The Philosophy of Argument and Audience Reception

    OpenAIRE

    Paula Olmos

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: This article reviews Christopher W. Tindale’s The Philosophy of Argument and Audience Reception (Cambridge, 2015). Résumé: Cet article est une critique de The Philosophy of Argument and Audience Reception (Cambridge, 2015) de Christopher W. Tindale.

  15. Three Concentric Circles: Young Chinese English Learners' Perceptions of Purposeful Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jack Jinghui

    2015-01-01

    English learners have more access to communicate with different purposeful audiences across the Three Concentric Circles of English (Kachu, 1985): the Inner Circle, the Outer Circle and the Expanding Circle. However, young language learners' purposeful audience as a focus of communication has not been emphasized as much as other linguistic…

  16. Engaging the d/Deaf Audience in Museums: A Case Study at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Patrícia Roque

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses ways that museums can strengthen programming for d/Deaf audiences. Through the development and study of a tour for a d/Deaf audience conducted through signing and oral translation at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon (Portugal), the author examines issues of language, identity and inclusion. She argues that the use of…

  17. Impact of an Extension Social Media Tool Kit on Audience Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Aileen S.; Dev, Dipti; McGinnis, Colin M.; Thomas, Tyler

    2018-01-01

    Extension professionals can improve their use of social media as channels for extending programmatic efforts by maximizing target audience reach and engagement. We describe how implementation of a tool kit highlighting best practices for using social media improved Extension professionals' efforts to engage target audience members via social…

  18. Children's Drawings of Significant Figures for a Peer or an Adult Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, Esther; Watling, Dawn; Murray, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed if children would present different information in their drawings of emotion eliciting stimuli when they believed that an adult or a child audience would view their drawings. Seventy-five 6-year-olds (44 boys and 31 girls) were allocated to three groups: the reference group, the child audience group and the adult…

  19. Predictors of Horror Film Attendance and Appeal: An Analysis of the Audience for Frightening Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; Stiff, James

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes the appeal of horror films. Develops a model that finds that important factors in the horror film's appeal are the audience's desire to experience the satisfying resolutions and to see the destruction usually found in these films and the sensation-seeking personality traits of audience members for these films. (NKA)

  20. Assessing the quality of a deliberative democracy mini-public event about advanced biofuel production and development in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaff, Holly; Secko, David M

    2016-02-01

    The importance of evaluating deliberative public engagement events is well recognized, but such activities are rarely conducted for a variety of theoretical, political and practical reasons. In this article, we provide an assessment of the criteria presented in the 2008 National Research Council report on Public Participation in Environmental Assessment and Decision Making (NRC report) as explicit indicators of quality for the 2012 'Advanced Biofuels' deliberative democracy event. The National Research Council's criteria were selected to evaluate this event because they are decision oriented, are the products of an exhaustive review of similar past events, are intended specifically for environmental processes and encompass many of the criteria presented in other evaluation frameworks. It is our hope that the results of our study may encourage others to employ and assess the National Research Council's criteria as a generalizable benchmark that may justifiably be used in forthcoming deliberative events exploring different topics with different audiences. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Bollywood: nuevos contextos y nuevos públicos / Bollywood: New Contexts and New Audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Elena

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Coincidiendo con algunos espectaculares éxitos de taquilla a mediados de los 90, el pujante cine popular hindi –Bollywood, de acuerdo con la terminología que acababa entonces de acuñarse–se adentró con paso firme en una nueva era, superando una crisis de creatividad bien apreciable en la década anterior y, sobre todo, renovando fórmulas expresivas en una dirección todavía difícil de determinar, pero indudablemente más atenta al público global que al tradicional espectador local. Limando aquellas aristas formales menos susceptibles de un consumo globalizado(o, simplemente, menos del gusto de un nuevo público joven y urbano en la propia India, asumiendo ciertos riesgos en el tratamiento de problemáticas delicadas y, a la postre, renegociando creativamente la propia herencia de la tradición del cine comercial hindi producido en Mumbai (Bombay, esta sensibilidad neo-Bollywood parece haberse impuesto con fuerza en los últimos quince años, al tiempo que las viejas fórmulas de consumo dejan paso a otras nuevas y, al calor de dicho proceso, se van configurando nuevos públicos que a su vez inciden de manera determinante sobre los propios mecanismos de producción.Palabras clave: Bollywood, globalización, públicos, industria cinematográfica, multiplex.AbstractCoinciding with some spectacular box office hits in the mid-90s, the buoyant popular Hindi cinema –Bollywood in the newly created terminology– firmly went into a new era. It overcame the creativity crisis of the previous decade and, above all, renewed formulas of expression in ways still hard to define, but without any doubt more attentive to the global public than to the traditional local one. This Neo-Bollywood sensitivity has gained strength in the last fifteen years by refining formal elements less acceptable for global consumption (or simply, those that are far removed from the tastes of the young urban Indian public; by taking some risks in the treatment of more

  2. "Wealthy gay couples buying babies produced in India by poor womb-women": Audience interpretations of transnational surrogacy in TV news.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventura, Rafael; Rodríguez-Polo PhD, Xosé Ramón; Roca-Cuberes PhD, Carles

    2018-01-03

    Surrogacy is beginning to generate public debate, and the way the media approach it may have negative effects on social attitudes toward gay parenting. The news media play a key role in informing society, especially about topics such as surrogacy, of which most audiences have no direct experience. The aim of our research is to explore opinion formation of surrogacy and gay parenting by analyzing the audience interpretation of a TV news story in Spain. To do this we conducted four focus groups that were analyzed using a qualitative content analysis based on the discourse produced by the participants. The results show that the framing strategies used in the news story contribute to advocating an attitude of repudiation toward surrogacy, with an adverse sentiment also extending to homosexual couples who wish to become parents. This leads us to discuss the role of media in shaping public opinion and the resulting potential consequences in the case of surrogacy and gay parenting.

  3. Public Finance Administration. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, B. J.; Swain, John W.

    This book is intended for the nonexpert in finance who has a public administration background. It opens with a broad introduction to public finance administration and how this job is related to public budgeting, the practice of public-sector accounting, and the economic concepts of money and value. Issues surrounding public revenue, its sources,…

  4. The influence of an audience response system on knowledge retention: an application to resident education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Archana; Sparano, Dina; Ananth, Cande V

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare delivery methods of lecture material regarding contraceptive options by either traditional or interactive lecture style with the use of an audience response system with obstetrics and gynecology residents. A prospective, randomized controlled trial that included 17 obstetrics and gynecology residents was conducted. Group differences and comparison of pre/posttest scores to evaluate efficacy of lecture styles were performed with the Student t test. Each participant completed an evaluation to assess usefulness of the audience response system. Residents who received audience response system interactive lectures showed a 21% improvement between pretest and posttest scores; residents who received the standard lecture demonstrated a 2% improvement (P = .018). The evaluation survey showed that 82% of residents thought that the audience response system was a helpful learning aid. The results of this randomized controlled trial demonstrate the effectiveness of audience response system for knowledge retention, which suggests that it may be an efficient teaching tool for residency education.

  5. Experiences of faculty and students using an audience response system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Monturo, Cheryl; Conroy, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The advent of innovative technologies, such as the audience response system, provides an opportunity to engage students and enhance learning. Based on their experiences, three nursing faculty evaluated the use of an audience response system in four distinct nursing courses through the use of informal survey results. When using the audience response system, the faculty experienced an increased perception of student attentiveness and engagement, high level of class attendance, and enhanced learning. Faculty feelings were mixed concerning the burden in adapting to increased classroom time and increased preparation time. Students' perception of the value of audience response system use was mostly positive, except when responses were included as part of the grade. The majority of the students indicated that use of the audience response system enhanced learning and was a helpful learning method when used with NCLEX-style questions. Overall, faculty believed that the benefits of student engagement and enhanced learning outweighed the burdens of incorporating this new technology in the classroom.

  6. Linking intended visitation to regional economic impact models of bison and elk management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, J.; Caughlan, L.

    2004-01-01

    This article links intended National Park visitation estimates to regional economic models to calculate the employment impacts of alternative bison and elk management strategies. The survey described alternative National Elk Refuge (NER) management actions and the effects on elk and bison populations at the NER and adjacent Grand Teton National Park (GTNP). Park visitors were then asked if they would change their number of visits with each potential management action. Results indicate there would be a 10% decrease in visitation if bison populations were reduced from 600 to 400 animals and elk populations were reduced in GTNP and the NER. The related decrease in jobs in Teton counties of Wyoming and Idaho is estimated at 5.5%. Adopting a “no active management” option of never feeding elk and bison on the NER yields about one-third the current bison population (200 bison) and about half the elk population. Visitors surveyed about this management option would take about 20% fewer trips, resulting in an 11.3% decrease in employment. Linking intended visitation surveys and regional economic models represents a useful tool for natural resource planners who must present the consequences of potential actions in Environmental Impact Statements and plans to the public and decision makers prior to any action being implemented.

  7. Detecting, reporting, and analysis of priority diseases for routine public health surveillance in Liberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frimpong, Joseph Asamoah; Park, Meeyoung Mattie; Amo-Addae, Maame Pokuah; Adewuyi, Peter Adebayo; Nagbe, Thomas Knue

    2017-01-01

    An essential component of a public health surveillance system is its ability to detect priority diseases which fall within the mandate of public health officials at all levels. Early detection, reporting and response to public health events help to reduce the burden of mortality and morbidity on communities. Analysis of reliable surveillance data provides relevant information which can enable implementation of timely and appropriate public health interventions. To ensure that a resilient system is in place, the World Health Organization (WHO) has provided guidelines for detection, reporting and response to public health events in the Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) strategy. This case study provides training on detection, reporting and analysis of priority diseases for routine public health surveillance in Liberia and highlights potential errors and challenges which can hinder effective surveillance. Table-top exercises and group discussion lead participants through a simulated verification and analyses of summary case reports in the role of the District Surveillance Officer. This case study is intended for public health training in a classroom setting and can be accomplished within 2 hours 30 minutes. The target audience include residents in Frontline Epidemiology Training Programs (FETP-Frontline), Field Epidemiology and Laboratory Training Programs (FELTPs), and others who are interested in this topic.

  8. 10 years of nuclear public information for female audiences in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puska, Eija Karita

    2001-01-01

    Energy Channel distributes information on energy matters, radiation and radioactivity to decision makers and other citizen groups, especially women. The information is distributed by organising seminars, giving lectures, producing information material, guiding visits to nuclear sites and also to some extent, by giving interviews in the media. The Energy Channel was founded in spring 1990 by seven active women working in the nuclear field It has been established as a working group of the Finnish Nuclear Society (FNS). It has at present some 70 members. Approximately 40 of the members are also members of the WIN organisation. The Energy Channel markets its seminars and lectures through direct contacts and through the National Council of Women of Finland. It continues to maintain contacts with teacher organisations and political decision-makers. It organises training for the members, too. The actions of the Energy Channel are organised and realised mainly by the active core - the Co-ordination group consisting of 6-10 members of Energy Channel

  9. An Audience-Centric Approach for Museums Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Di Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to propose a visitor centric perspective that can support museums towards sustainability. The main premise of this study is due to a concept of economic and social sustainability of museums, defined as the possession of sufficient resources to maintain the existence of an organization, and achieve their goals in the future, ensuring a certain flow of visitors. A great number of museums are characterized by a low number of visits; therefore, in order to become sustainable, museums should pay attention to audience and its internal diversity. In this way, a cultural site can plan tailored strategies to increase the number of visits and re-visits and to achieve community support. For this reason it is necessary to understand the cultural needs of visitors, acquiring appropriate monitoring tools, such as qualitative and quantitative ones. Generally, quantitative analyses are more reliable and complete, even if they require a considerable number of observations for the reliability of the results. Moreover, qualitative analysis provides more in depth information, even if their data do not allow us to make generalizations. The qualitative and quantitative methods for the detection of satisfaction are usually used separately, but their integration may bring significant added value in terms of the wealth of information. This study follows the analysis of the potential of the integration of qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques customized with respect to different types of targets. The results of the experimentation performed on ethnographic museums shows a consistency of the results obtained by the two different tools that increase the capacity information of survey instruments.

  10. Health-related media use among youth audiences in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glik, Deborah; Massey, Philip; Gipson, Jessica; Dieng, Thierno; Rideau, Alexandre; Prelip, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Lower- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are experiencing rapid changes in access to and use of new internet and digital media technologies. The purpose of this study was to better understand how younger audiences are navigating traditional and newer forms of media technologies, with particular emphasis on the skills and competencies needed to obtain, evaluate and apply health-related information, also defined as health and media literacy. Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted throughout Senegal in September 2012 with youth aged 15-25. Using an iterative coding process based on grounded theory, four themes emerged related to media use for health information among Senegalese youth. They include the following: (i) media utilization; (ii) barriers and conflicts regarding media utilization; (iii) uses and gratifications and (iv) health and media literacy. Findings suggest that Senegalese youth use a heterogeneous mix of media platforms (i.e. television, radio, internet) and utilization often occurs with family members or friends. Additionally, the need for entertainment, information and connectedness inform media use, mostly concerning sexual and reproductive health information. Importantly, tensions arise as youth balance innovative and interactive technologies with traditional and conservative values, particularly concerning ethical and privacy concerns. Findings support the use of multipronged intervention approaches that leverage both new media, as well as traditional media strategies, and that also address lack of health and media literacy in this population. Implementing health-related interventions across multiple media platforms provides an opportunity to create an integrated, as opposed to a disparate, user experience. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Climate Literacy: Climate.gov Follow-Up Evaluation—A Study of the Four NOAA Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F., III; Sullivan, S. B.; Gold, A. U.; Lynds, S. E.; Kirk, K.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA Climate.gov provides science and information for a climate-smart nation. Americans' health, security, and economic well-being are closely linked to climate and weather. NOAA Climate.gov's goals are to promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to support educators in improving the nations climate literacy, and to serve people making climate-related decisions with tools and resources that help them answer specific questions.The Climate.Gov Follow-Up Study of the four NOAA Audiences (climate interested public, educators, scientists, policy-makers) built upon the previous literature review and evaluation study conducted by Mooney and Phillips in 2010 and 2012, http://tinyurl.com/ma8vo83. The CIRES Education and Outreach team at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at University of Colorado at Boulder and the NOAA Climate.gov team will present results of the new study that used the Quality of Relationship index (awareness, trust, satisfaction, usability, and control mutuality). This index was developed in the previous study and places a new emphasis on the experience of individual users from the four audiences in their regular work or home setting. This new evaluation project used mixed methods, including an online survey, usability studies, phone interviews, and web statistics, providing multiple lines of evidence from which to draw conclusion and recommendations.In the session, we will explore how the NOAA Climate.gov teams used the literature review and new CIRES research to address underlying challenges to achieving the portal's goals. The research in these studies finds that people seek information in ways that are complex and that they do so by consulting a vast array of technologies. Improved and different modes of access to information have, throughout history, been led by technological innovation, but human behavior tends to be

  12. The Illusion of Transparency and Normative Beliefs about Anxiety during Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnis, Cara C.; Mackinnon, Sean P.; MacIntyre, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Public speakers believe their nervousness is more apparent to others than is actually the case, a phenomenon known as the illusion of transparency. Study 1, in which participants delivered a public speech to an audience, provided evidence of this phenomenon. Despite this, a substantial minority of participants (36%) thought that the audience would…

  13. Techniques for Engaging the Public in Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, Christine; Shaner, Andrew; Smith Hackler, Amanda

    2017-10-01

    Public audiences are often curious about planetary science. Scientists and education and public engagement specialists can leverage this interest to build scientific literacy. This poster will highlight research-based techniques the authors have tested with a variety of audiences, and are disseminating to planetary scientists through trainings.Techniques include:Make it personal. Audiences are interested in personal stories, which can capture the excitement, joy, and challenges that planetary scientists experience in their research. Audiences can learn more about the nature of science by meeting planetary scientists and hearing personal stories about their motivations, interests, and how they conduct research.Share relevant connections. Most audiences have very limited understanding of the solar system and the features and compositions of planetary bodies, but they enjoy learning about those objects they can see at night and factors that connect to their culture or local community.Demonstrate concepts. Some concepts can be clarified with analogies, but others can be demonstrated or modeled with materials. Demonstrations that are messy, loud, or that yield surprising results are particularly good at capturing an audience’s attention, but if they don’t directly relate to the key concept, they can serve as a distraction.Give them a role. Audience participation is an important engagement technique. In a presentation, scientists can invite the audience to respond to questions, pause to share their thoughts with a neighbor, or vote on an answer. Audiences can respond physically to prompts, raising hands, pointing, or clapping, or even moving to different locations in the room.Enable the audience to conduct an activity. People learn best by doing and by teaching others; simple hands-on activities in which the audience is discovering something themselves can be extremely effective at engaging audiences.This poster will cite examples of each technique, resources that

  14. The Influence of Climate Change Efficacy Messages and Efficacy Beliefs on Intended Political Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, P Sol; Feldman, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    Using an online survey experiment with a national sample, this study examined how changing the type and valence of efficacy information in news stories discussing global climate change may impact intended political participation through the mediators of perceived internal, external, and response efficacy. Overall, the results revealed that after a single exposure to a news story, stories including positive internal efficacy content increased perceived internal efficacy, while stories including negative external efficacy content lowered perceived external efficacy. There were limited impacts of other types of efficacy content on perceived efficacy. Perceived internal, external, and response efficacy all offered unique, positive associations with intentions to engage in climate change-related political participation. The results suggest that news stories including positive internal efficacy information in particular have the potential to increase public engagement around climate change. The implications for science communication are discussed.

  15. "Plastic Pollution: Myths, Facts, and How You Can Help": Presenting a popular but poorly understood topic to broad and diverse audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    For my thesis research, I study marine debris, specifically in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, colloquially known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Marine debris in general, and the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in particular, are marine pollution issues that have captured considerable public and media attention. Especially in the late 2000s, there were significantly more popular media articles about marine debris and the Great Pacific Garbage Patch than scientific journal articles. Due to this popular attention and lag in scientific publication, there are a lot of exaggerated facts and prevalent myths about marine debris in the public consciousness today. As a graduate student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, I have been given many opportunities to speak to diverse audiences about marine debris. These groups vary in their base knowledge of the issue, from very knowledgeable, to unknowledgeable, to knowledgeable but misinformed about the issue. Over my three years in graduate school, building off a base presentation from a previous graduate student and techniques learned from the education department at Birch Aquarium, I have developed ways to correct some misinformation while not making the audience feel insulted. I correct misinformation while building up a correct base knowledge. This knowledge can be very depressing, as many modern scientific problems can be, but I end the presentation with ways in which the audience can feel empowered and can continue to educate themselves. Hopefully they leave with both knowledge and applicable lessons that they can implement into their lives.

  16. Rethinking Public Administration Professionalism in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nneka Umera-Okeke

    The mission statement of Nigerian public administration anchors on providing a ..... to incorporate into the Revised Public Service Rules and Financial ... in Africa is intended to consolidate rules for professional work ethic so that the public.

  17. Understanding maladaptive responses to rejection: Aggression with an audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBono, Amber; Layton, Rebekah L; Freeman, Nicholas; Muraven, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Logically, responding aggressively to rejection is maladaptive because one is unlikely to seek a relationship with an aggressor. We predict that when concealed, the illogical aggressive response to rejection is more likely, whereas when the rejected individuals' aggressive responses are perceived as public, the aggressive acts may be reduced. Participants were rejected by others (Experiment 1) or were either accepted or rejected during an online ball-tossing game (Experiment 2) and were then given an opportunity to aggress publicly or privately. Across experiments, when the opportunity to aggress was made public, rejected participants exhibited less aggressive behavior. When concerned about the perception of their public aggressive responses by others, rejected individuals' aggressive responses diminished compared with those whose actions were private. Crucially, this extended to aggression visible only to neutral others, suggesting that effects cannot solely be due to fear of retribution.

  18. Comparative analysis of public opinion research in the U.S. and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlakwe, Linda; DiNunzio, Lisa A.

    2004-06-01

    Bank note producers are working to thwart the threat of counterfeit notes created using high resolution, digital image processing software and color output devices such as inkjet printers, color copiers, and scanners. Genuine notes must incorporate better overt and machine-readable security features that will reduce the chance of counterfeit notes being passed. Recently, Canada and the United States introduced newly designed bank notes that are intended to enable the general public to more easily distinguish genuine notes from counterfeits. The Bank of Canada (BoC) and the U.S. Department of Treasury"s Bureau of Engraving and Printing (BEP) have conducted similar market research projects to explore target audiences' perceptions and attitudes towards currency design and security features. This paper will present a comparative analysis of the two research projects, both of which were conducted using similar methodology. The results of these research studies assist in the selection of security features for future generations of bank notes.

  19. THE ROLE AND IMPORTANCE OF “PUBLIC INFORMATION” IN POLITICAL PUBLIC RELATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Kazım Özkan ERTÜRK

    2015-01-01

    Public relations is the practice of managing a communication process that aims to build mutual goodwill and trust between organizations and their publics with the help of publicity, information and positive image building efforts. Public information is the public relations approach which aims for providing mutual goodwill and trust by sharing the organization-related information with target audience in complete openness and honesty. Public Information, firstly introduced by Ivy Ledbette...

  20. Projecting the voice: observations of audience behaviours in ICT-mediated contemporary opera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Williams, Alan E.

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines how audiences experience live opera performance and the behaviours they exhibit during live-streaming of the performance. It aims to contribute to our understanding of how audiences, who increasingly inhabit an environment saturated with digital media, respond to contemporary opera performance. Based on a comparative study of audience experiences and behaviours during a live opera performance and the streamed opera screening, we investigate whether digital mediation affects audience appreciation, and whether streaming live opera means the same thing to an audience as the unmediated performance. We firstly outline the conception, design and performance of a contemporary opera and its simultaneous streaming to nearby digital screens. Then, we report the evaluation of the project as measured by a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods during the rehearsals, the live performance and the screening. As one of the few social studies of contemporary classical music in Britain, our study of opera audience behaviours sheds light on the challenges and opportunities afforded by digital technologies for opera companies. Understanding how audiences appreciate digital operas offers practical advice on how theatres and opera companies could respond to new forms of digital activities.

  1. Astronomy and Disabled: Implementation of new technologies to communicate science to new audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Beatriz; Ortiz Gil, Amelia; Proust, Dominique

    2015-08-01

    Commission 46 proposed in 2012 the creation of an interdisciplinary WG in which astronomers work together with technicians, educators and disability specialists to develop new teaching and learning strategies devoted o generate resources of high impact among disabled populations, which are usually away from astronomy. Successful initiatives designed to research the best-practices in using new technologies to communicate science in these special audiences include the creation of models and applications, and the implementation of a data base of didactic approaches and tools. Between the achievements of this proposal, we have original development in: design of electronics, design of original software, scripts and music for Planetarium functions, design of models and their associated explanatory script, printed material in Braille and 3D, filming associated with sign language, interviews and docs recompilation and the recently project on the Sign Language Universal Encyclopedic Dictionary, based on the proposal by Proust (2009) and, which proposes the dissemination of a unique language for the deaf worldwide, associated with astronomical terms.We present, on behalf of the WG, some of the achievements, developments, successful stories of recent applications of this new approach to the science for all, thinking in the new “public of sciences”, and new challenges.

  2. Bots as a news service and its emotional connectivity with the audience. The case of Politibot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hada M. Sánchez Gonzales

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It is evident that users are permanently and ubiquitously connected to the network through their mobile devices. As a consequence, they can access to an extraordinary quantity of information. Journalism has tools that, by using artificial intelligence and instant messaging systems, send filtered and personalized information to users. These systems are the so called chat bots or conversational applications. While the big media companies are developing their own applications via Messenger or Telegram, there also exist other companies that provide this type of services. That is the case of Politibot, a service that was launched during the June 2016 election campaign in Spain and which had gained 8,400 subscribers a month later. This paper analyzes this case in order to determine the way audiences perceive and consider bots news. To do so, we apply, among other techniques, observation of Politibots publications via Telegram, survey of users and analysis of social media feedback. We aim to answer questions such as how users differentiate and value bots news, how conversation in these platforms is produced, and how to collect more reliable data from them. Results show that information quality (73.1% of answers and the emotional connection they establish with the tool (26, 8% are the main potential of these formulas, which are becoming in an opportunity for journalism.

  3. Marketing and semiotic approach on communication. Consequences on knowledge of target-audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borţun, D; Purcarea, VL

    2013-01-01

    Modern marketing puts the consumer and not the manufacturer in the center, the essence of the marketing approach being the conception, the projection and the making of the product, starting from the consumer towards the manufacturer; this resulting in the fact that the product’s marketing approach seems strikingly similar to the semiotic approach of the message. In the semiotic approach, the message is a construction of signs, which, by interacting with the receiver, produces the meaning. The transmitter (the message transmitter) becomes less important. The focus is centered to the „text" and the way this is „read", the sense being born when the „reader" negotiates the „text". The negotiation takes place when the „reader" filtrates the message through the sieve of his cultural loading. A „target public" is a group which is specific to a certain Cultural Loading, a loading which deals with linguistic, logical, psychological and symbolic structures, which get out to meet the message and „negotiates" with the structures similar to it. When we are thinking in terms of the semiotic approach, we are handling the cultural determinism of communication, using the concepts of Kuhn and Gonseth (paradigm and referential). They open a new path in the market research, in the market segmentation and knowledge of the „target audiences". PMID:23610591

  4. Marketing and semiotic approach on communication. Consequences on knowledge of target-audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borţun, D; Purcarea, V L

    2013-03-15

    Modern marketing puts the consumer and not the manufacturer in the center, the essence of the marketing approach being the conception, the projection and the making of the product, starting from the consumer towards the manufacturer; this resulting in the fact that the product's marketing approach seems strikingly similar to the semiotic approach of the message. In the semiotic approach, the message is a construction of signs, which, by interacting with the receiver, produces the meaning. The transmitter (the message transmitter) becomes less important. The focus is centered to the "text" and the way this is "read", the sense being born when the "reader" negotiates the "text". The negotiation takes place when the "reader" filtrates the message through the sieve of his cultural loading. A "target public" is a group which is specific to a certain Cultural Loading, a loading which deals with linguistic, logical, psychological and symbolic structures, which get out to meet the message and "negotiates" with the structures similar to it. When we are thinking in terms of the semiotic approach, we are handling the cultural determinism of communication, using the concepts of Kuhn and Gonseth (paradigm and referential). They open a new path in the market research, in the market segmentation and knowledge of the "target audiences".

  5. Alcohol harm reduction advertisements: a content analysis of topic, objective, emotional tone, execution and target audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstone, Kimberley; Brennan, Emily; Slater, Michael D; Dixon, Helen G; Durkin, Sarah J; Pettigrew, Simone; Wakefield, Melanie A

    2017-04-11

    Public health mass media campaigns may contribute to reducing the health and social burden attributed to alcohol consumption, but little is known about which advertising characteristics have been used, or have been effective, in alcohol harm reduction campaigns to date. As a first step towards encouraging further research to identify the impact of various advertising characteristics, this study aimed to systematically identify and examine the content of alcohol harm reduction advertisements (ads). Ads were identified through an exhaustive internet search of Google, YouTube, Vimeo, and relevant government and health agency websites. Eligible ads were: English language, produced between 2006 and 2014, not primarily focused on drink-driving or alcohol in pregnancy, and not alcohol industry funded. Systematic content analysis of all ads was performed; each ad was double-coded. In total, 110 individual ads from 72 different alcohol harm reduction campaigns were identified, with the main source countries being Australia (40%) and the United Kingdom (26%). The dominant topic for 52% of ads was short-term harms, while 10% addressed long-term harms, 18% addressed underage drinking, 17% communicated a how-to-change message, and 3% advocated for policy change. The behavioural objective of most ads was to motivate audiences to reduce their alcohol consumption (38%) or to behave responsibly and/or not get drunk when drinking (33%). Only 10% of all ads mentioned low-risk drinking guidelines. Eighty-seven percent of ads used a dramatisation execution style and 74% had a negative emotional tone. Ninety percent of ads contained messages or content that appeared to target adults, and 36% specifically targeted young adults. Some message attributes have been employed more frequently than others, suggesting several promising avenues for future audience or population-based research to compare the relative effectiveness of different characteristics of alcohol harm reduction ads. Given

  6. Alcohol harm reduction advertisements: a content analysis of topic, objective, emotional tone, execution and target audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley Dunstone

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public health mass media campaigns may contribute to reducing the health and social burden attributed to alcohol consumption, but little is known about which advertising characteristics have been used, or have been effective, in alcohol harm reduction campaigns to date. As a first step towards encouraging further research to identify the impact of various advertising characteristics, this study aimed to systematically identify and examine the content of alcohol harm reduction advertisements (ads. Method Ads were identified through an exhaustive internet search of Google, YouTube, Vimeo, and relevant government and health agency websites. Eligible ads were: English language, produced between 2006 and 2014, not primarily focused on drink-driving or alcohol in pregnancy, and not alcohol industry funded. Systematic content analysis of all ads was performed; each ad was double-coded. Results In total, 110 individual ads from 72 different alcohol harm reduction campaigns were identified, with the main source countries being Australia (40% and the United Kingdom (26%. The dominant topic for 52% of ads was short-term harms, while 10% addressed long-term harms, 18% addressed underage drinking, 17% communicated a how-to-change message, and 3% advocated for policy change. The behavioural objective of most ads was to motivate audiences to reduce their alcohol consumption (38% or to behave responsibly and/or not get drunk when drinking (33%. Only 10% of all ads mentioned low-risk drinking guidelines. Eighty-seven percent of ads used a dramatisation execution style and 74% had a negative emotional tone. Ninety percent of ads contained messages or content that appeared to target adults, and 36% specifically targeted young adults. Conclusions Some message attributes have been employed more frequently than others, suggesting several promising avenues for future audience or population-based research to compare the relative effectiveness of

  7. Bringing in the target audience in bystander social marketing materials for communities: suggestions for practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J; Stapleton, Jane G

    2011-06-01

    The Know Your Power™ social marketing campaign images model active bystander behaviors that target audience members can use in situations where sexual and relationship violence and stalking are occurring, have occurred, or have the potential to occur. In this practitioner note, we describe strategies that we have used to engage target audience members in the development of the social marketing campaign that we hope can be used by practitioners. We give examples from the development and evaluation of the Know Your Power(TM) social marketing campaign that used focus group and other types of feedback from the target audience to inform the direction of the campaign.

  8. Cool Science: Engaging Adult and K-16 Audiences in Climate Change Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    opportunity develop and evaluate a new approach to improving the level of scientific literacy among adults. Cool Science is an example of how an individual's daily routine may be enhanced with an informal science learning opportunity. This paper will report on project progress, research challenges encountered to date, and present preliminary findings. Among the results presented will be the 6 winning student artworks, analysis of teacher/student interviews, and audience attitudes and knowledge of climate change prior to the intervention. In addition, a comparison of website use before and during the implementation of the public learning campaign will be available.; Learning the Climate Change Science on the Go!

  9. Managing Children's Services in the Public Library. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasick, Adele M.

    This book examines the ways in which children's librarians can manage their services so collections and programs reach the intended audience. In the introduction to this second edition, the author considers recent changes in demographics, economics, social patterns, media and technology trends, and consequent changing emphases in managing…

  10. How the industry is marketing menthol cigarettes: the audience, the message and the medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Amanda; Ganz, Ollie; Pearson, Jennifer; Celcis, Nathalie; Vallone, Donna; Villanti, Andrea C

    2015-11-01

    Despite declines in overall US cigarette consumption, the menthol cigarette market share has increased in recent years. Advertising contributes to menthol initiation and use, but little has been done to characterise menthol cigarette advertising outside of the point of sale. Two full-service advertising firms were used to develop a library of menthol cigarette advertisements (ads) over a 9-month period (June 2012-February 2013) in the USA. The volume of ads, media channel (direct mail, print, online, email), estimated spend and households reached was summarised overall and by brand in 2013. Direct mail, email and print ads were coded for content and the target audience of print publications was examined. Over the study period, 205 menthol cigarette ads were identified with estimated expenditures exceeding US$31 million, with 70% spent on direct mail ads. Over 90% of ads promoted Camel, Marlboro and Newport menthol cigarettes. A majority (87%) of direct mail ads contained coupons or other incentives known to appeal to price-sensitive customers. Only two brands' print ads appeared during this period: Newport ads focused on themes of sociability and sexuality, and were placed in magazines targeting African-Americans and younger consumers; American Spirit print ads were placed in general interest magazines and predominantly stressed the 'natural' aspects of their brand. The tobacco industry continues to spend millions of dollars promoting menthol cigarettes through channels that preferentially target vulnerable subgroups, such as African-Americans and younger consumers. Public health campaigns to educate and combat the influence of menthol advertising are needed. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Erasmus Darwin's Deistic Dissent and Didactic Epic Poetry: Promoting Science Education to a Mixed Audience Under the Banner of Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kirsten Anne

    Erasmus Darwin's task as a Deistic Dissenter poet who wished to promote science education to a mixed audience was complex. There was mainstream concern over what Deists and Dissenters actually believed about God, their involvement in science, and, especially, how their published works, whatever the subject, might affect public morality and politics. I argue that Darwin's poetry is primarily in the genre of Lucretian didactic epic but that it also involves elements of other written traditions (literary and non-literary). I focus on English didactic poetry, the theological written traditions of Dissent and Deism, and a particular tradition of erotic satire. The genre of Lucretian didactic epic and the tradition of English didactic poetry are non-identical. In Darwin's Lucretian didactic epic, resemblances to such poems as Pope's Essay on Man challenge ideas about what kind of narrative a didactic poem in the English language can deliver. Techniques from the theological written traditions of Dissent and Deism reflect Darwin's affiliations, signal that science education fits within a larger debate about intellectual freedom, and promote tolerance for differences of opinion about nature. Mimicry of a particular tradition of erotic satire helps to downplay the address to a mixed audience while satirising some common misconceptions about poetry, botany, and women in the period. Darwin's poetry challenges ideas about what people from his community of belief meant to communicate or transmit by writing for the general public, what the general public was entitled to learn, and what poetry was able to teach. Perhaps Darwin's biggest modification of Lucretian didactic epic was that he did not tell his readers exactly what to think, but how.

  12. Batswana audience and the Thokolosi television drama controversy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In February 2006, Botswana Television (BTV) screened a commissioned television drama series entitled Thokolosi. This drama series, which deals with witchcraft, is set in a. Botswana village called Bobonong. The contents of the drama series in relation to the village attracted criticisms from the public, which culminated in a ...

  13. Millennial fandom: Television audiences in the transmedia age, by Louisa Ellen Stein [book review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Louise Dare-Edwards

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Review of Louisa Ellen Stein, Millennial fandom: Television audiences in the transmedia age. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2015, paperback, $24 (224p ISBN 978-1609383558; e-book, $24, ISBN 978-1609383565.

  14. Watching Dallas again 2: Locating viewing pleasures—An audience study of the new Dallas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel L. Raj

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This audience reception project performs a study of the first season of the new Dallas (2012–14 in terms of its lack of ironic viewing, which relegates the show to a restorative form of nostalgia.

  15. “It really is a craft” Repertoires in journalistic frontrunners’ talk on audience participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, M.; Costera Meijer, I.; van Hoof, A.M.J.; Sanders, J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of participatory journalism demonstrate that professional journalism can be resistant to change. Journalists and news organizations do wish to encourage audience contribution and digital innovation, but find it difficult to reconcile traditional journalistic values and practices with more

  16. “It really is a craft” - Repertoires in journalistic frontrunners’ talk on audience participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, M.; Costera Meijer, I.; Hoof, A. van; Sanders, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of participatory journalism demonstrate that professional journalism can be resistant to change. Journalists and news organizations do wish to encourage audience contribution and digital innovation, but find it difficult to reconcile traditional journalistic values and practices with more

  17. Youth audience segmentation strategies for smoking-prevention mass media campaigns based on message appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Brian S; Worden, John K; Bunn, Janice Yanushka; Dorwaldt, Anne L; Connolly, Scott W; Ashikaga, Takamaru

    2007-08-01

    Mass media interventions are among the strategies recommended for youth cigarette smoking prevention, but little is known about optimal methods for reaching diverse youth audiences. Grades 4 through 12 samples of youth from four states (n = 1,230) rated smoking-prevention messages in classroom settings. Similar proportions of African American, Hispanic, and White youth participated. Impact of audience characteristics on message appeal ratings was assessed to provide guidance for audience segmentation strategies. Age had a strong effect on individual message appeal. The effect of gender also was significant. Message ratings were similar among the younger racial/ethnic groups, but differences were found for older African American youth. Lower academic achievement was associated with lower appeal scores for some messages. Age should be a primary consideration in developing and delivering smoking-prevention messages to youth audiences. The unique needs of boys and girls and older African American adolescents should also be considered.

  18. A Reception Analysis on the Youth Audiences of TV Series in Marivan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Karimi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to describe the role of foreign media as the agitators of popular culture. For that with reception analysis it’s pay to describe decoding of youth audiences about this series. Globalization theory and Reception in Communication theory are formed the theoretical system of current article. The methodology in this research is qualitative one, and two techniques as in-depth interview and observation are used for data collection. The results show different people based on individual features, social and cultural backgrounds have inclination toward special characters and identify with them. This inclination so far the audience fallow the series because of his/her favorite character. Also there is a great compatibility between audience backgrounds and their receptions. A number of audience have criticized the series and point out the negative consequences on its society. However, seeing the series continue; really they prefer watching series enjoying to risks of it.

  19. The communication effects of audience situation and message framing on smoking cessation

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Dong-jenn

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the communication effects of smoking cessation by using message framing (positive messages/negative messages) and audience situation (smoker/nonsmoker and high/low self-efficacy). The study used 207 valid homogeneous subjects and a between-subject experiment method was employed for analyses. The results showed that the communication effects were influenced by the interactive effects of message framing and audience situation, and for smokers, positive messages have a more s...

  20. {SW}ARMED: Captive Portals, Mobile Devices, and Audience Participation in Multi-User Music Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Hindle, Abram

    2013-01-01

    Audience participation in computer music has long been limited byresources such as sensor technology or the material goods necessary toshare such an instrument. A recent paradigm is to take advantageof the incredible popularity of the smart-phone, a pocket sizedcomputer, and other mobile devices, to provide the audience aninterface into a computer music instrument. In this paper we discuss amethod of sharing a computer music instrument's interface with anaudience to allow them to interact via...

  1. How Less Alienation Creates More Exploitation? Audience Labour on Social Network Sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Fisher

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The notion of audience labour has been an important contribution to Marxist political economy of the media. It revised the traditional political economy analysis, which focused on media ownership, by suggesting that media was also a site of production, constituting particular relations of production. Such analysis highlighted the active role of audience in the creation of media value as both commodities and workers, thus pointing to audience exploitation. Recently, in light of paradigmatic transformations in the media environment – particularly the emergence of Web 2.0 and social network sites – there has been a renewed interest in such analysis, and a reexamination of audience exploitation. Focusing on Facebook as a case-study, this article examines audience labour on social network sites along two Marxist themes – exploitation and alienation. It argues for a historical shift in the link between exploitation and alienation of audience labour, concurrent with the shift from mass media to social media. In the mass media, the capacity for exploitation of audience labour was quite limited while the alienation that such work created was high. In contrast, social media allows for the expansion and intensification of exploitation. Simultaneously, audience labour on social media – because it involves communication and sociability – also ameliorates alienation by allowing self-expression, authenticity, and relations with others. Moreover, the article argues that the political economy of social network sites is founded on a dialectical link between exploitation and alienation: in order to be de-alienated, Facebook users must communicate and socialize, thus exacerbating their exploitation. And vice-versa, in order for Facebook to exploit the work of its users, it must contribute to their de-alienation.

  2. Using Multicriteria Analysis in Issues Concerning Adaptation of Historic Facilities for the Needs of Public Utility Buildings with a Function of a Theatre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obracaj, Piotr; Fabianowski, Dariusz

    2017-10-01

    Implementations concerning adaptation of historic facilities for public utility objects are associated with the necessity of solving many complex, often conflicting expectations of future users. This mainly concerns the function that includes construction, technology and aesthetic issues. The list of issues is completed with proper protection of historic values, different in each case. The procedure leading to obtaining the expected solution is a multicriteria procedure, usually difficult to accurately define and requiring designer’s large experience. An innovative approach has been used for the analysis, namely - the modified EA FAHP (Extent Analysis Fuzzy Analytic Hierarchy Process) Chang’s method of a multicriteria analysis for the assessment of complex functional and spatial issues. Selection of optimal spatial form of an adapted historic building intended for the multi-functional public utility facility was analysed. The assumed functional flexibility was determined in the scope of: education, conference, and chamber spectacles, such as drama, concerts, in different stage-audience layouts.

  3. Modularization and Packaging of Public Television Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, John; And Others

    This report examines the changing relationship between public television programming and program distribution methods, and considers whether there is a need to change the design and packaging of some public television programming to respond to changes in the way the audience receives its programming as interactive cable systems, videocassettes,…

  4. Predicting Audience Location on the Basis of the k-Nearest Neighbor Multilabel Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding audience location information in online social networks is important in designing recommendation systems, improving information dissemination, and so on. In this paper, we focus on predicting the location distribution of audiences on YouTube. And we transform this problem to a multilabel classification problem, while we find there exist three problems when the classical k-nearest neighbor based algorithm for multilabel classification (ML-kNN is used to predict location distribution. Firstly, the feature weights are not considered in measuring the similarity degree. Secondly, it consumes considerable computing time in finding similar items by traversing all the training set. Thirdly, the goal of ML-kNN is to find relevant labels for every sample which is different from audience location prediction. To solve these problems, we propose the methods of measuring similarity based on weight, quickly finding similar items, and ranking a specific number of labels. On the basis of these methods and the ML-kNN, the k-nearest neighbor based model for audience location prediction (AL-kNN is proposed for predicting audience location. The experiments based on massive YouTube data show that the proposed model can more accurately predict the location of YouTube video audience than the ML-kNN, MLNB, and Rank-SVM methods.

  5. Communicating with the crowd: speakers use abstract messages when addressing larger audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Priyanka D; Wakslak, Cheryl J

    2014-02-01

    Audience characteristics often shape communicators' message framing. Drawing from construal level theory, we suggest that when speaking to many individuals, communicators frame messages in terms of superordinate characteristics that focus attention on the essence of the message. On the other hand, when communicating with a single individual, communicators increasingly describe events and actions in terms of their concrete details. Using different communication tasks and measures of construal, we show that speakers communicating with many individuals, compared with 1 person, describe events more abstractly (Study 1), describe themselves as more trait-like (Study 2), and use more desirability-related persuasive messages (Study 3). Furthermore, speakers' motivation to communicate with their audience moderates their tendency to frame messages based on audience size (Studies 3 and 4). This audience-size abstraction effect is eliminated when a large audience is described as homogeneous, suggesting that people use abstract construal strategically in order to connect across a disparate group of individuals (Study 5). Finally, we show that participants' experienced fluency in communication is influenced by the match between message abstraction and audience size (Study 6).

  6. Conflict resolution: panel discussion and questions from the audience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Several questions were raised following the speakers' presentations. The question arose as to whether Congress should have let the 1986 milestone in the original Act occur, rather than drafting the Amendments Act in an effort to alleviate a potential problem. Generally, response held that allowing things to run their course would have raised pertinent issues, caused conflict, and ultimately resulted in negotiation and compromise. A question was raised about managing the transition from public involvement and participation to actual negotiations. The speakers responded that negotiation is a necessary step after informing the public. Letting people vent their frustrations is important but does not solve the problems. Controversy can result from public participation as easily as may consensus, because of value disagreements. The next step is to bargain and negotiate after the information is shared. The speakers were then asked how they felt about enforced (by state statute) mediation. All speakers responding felt that by building in mandatory mediation, the process is hurt more than helped. Mediation only works if all parties want it

  7. Public Participation in Classical Ballet: A Special Analysis of the Ballet Data Collected in the 1982 and 1985 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Carol

    The 1982 and 1985 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) produced a national audience profile for classical ballet and explored factors that predispose participation in this art form. This monograph analyzed data from these surveys in terms of: (1) audience size and composition for live ballet performances; (2) television's role in…

  8. Invoking “The Family” to Legitimize Gender- and Sexuality-Based Public Policies in the United States: A Critical Discourse Analysis of the 2012 Democratic and Republican National Party Conventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pilecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Women and sexual minorities in the United States continue to experience subordinate status, and the policy gains they have made in areas such as reproductive rights and marriage equality continue to be challenged in political discourse. We conducted a critical discourse analysis of texts from the 2012 Democratic and Republican national conventions in order to examine the extent to which ideological representations of the family were employed to legitimize public policy positions related to gender (e.g., abortion and sexuality (e.g., same-sex marriage. We analyzed two forms of text (official party platform document, transcripts of speeches with distinct intended audiences (i.e., party members, general audience. Findings revealed that an ideological representation of the traditional family ideal—featuring a heterosexual couple, their children, and asymmetric gender relations—was present within speeches given by both parties, particularly by the spouses of the presidential candidates (Michelle Obama and Ann Romney. Although this ideological representation was subsequently used within the Republican Party platform to legitimize positions against same-sex marriage and abortion, the Democratic Party platform challenged this representation of the family to instead advocate for policy positions in favor of same-sex marriage and women’s reproductive rights. We discuss this ambivalence within Democratic texts in light of the different audiences that party convention texts seek. Implications for gender- and sexuality-based policies are discussed, as well as the importance of examining political discourse across diverse forms and settings.

  9. Expert Images for All Audiences: The AstroPix Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Robert; Llamas, Jacob; Wyatt, Ryan Jason; Christensen, Lars

    2018-01-01

    The AstroPix project provides one-stop-shopping for an extensive collection of the finest astronomical imagery, sourced from some of the world’s most prominent observatories. The archive is made possible by a grassroots effort to tag publicly-released imagery using the Astronomical Visualization Metadata (AVM) standard, which captures rich contextual information for each image. While the site has been in development for many years, it is now supported under NASA’s Universe of Learning collaboration, and AstroPix has been updated and deployed to cloud services. The AVM tags provide many unique features including spectral color assignments, sky context (using AAS WorldWide Telescope APIs), and direct links to the original source material on the web. The 7,000+ assets currently include imagery provided by Chandra, ESO, GALEX, Herschel, Hubble, NuSTAR, Spitzer, and WISE. The assets are also provided for use in the planetarium community by supporting the Data2Dome (D2D) initiative. AstroPix imagery is designed to be used in a variety of unique ways that benefit formal and informal education as well as astronomers and the general public. Observatories can add their own image archives to AstroPix by tagging their assets and providing a simple XML feed, increasing the value of their data to the community at large.

  10. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Ashley A.; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2010-01-01

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey data, we find those who report the Internet as their primary source of science and technology news are diverse in age, more knowledgeable about science and nanotechnology, highly educated, male, and more diverse racially than users of other media. In a comparison of demographic data on actual visits by online users to general news and science Web sites, science sites attracted more male, non-white users from the Western region of the United States than news sites did. News sites, on the other hand, attracted those with a slightly higher level of education. Our analysis of published estimates of keyword searches on nanotechnology reveals people are turning to the Internet to search for keyword searches related to the future, health, and applications of nanotechnology. A content analysis of online content reveals health content dominates overall. Comparisons of content in different types of sites-blogs, government, and general sites-are conducted.

  11. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Ashley A., E-mail: aaanderson3@wisc.edu; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Life Sciences Communication (United States)

    2010-05-15

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey data, we find those who report the Internet as their primary source of science and technology news are diverse in age, more knowledgeable about science and nanotechnology, highly educated, male, and more diverse racially than users of other media. In a comparison of demographic data on actual visits by online users to general news and science Web sites, science sites attracted more male, non-white users from the Western region of the United States than news sites did. News sites, on the other hand, attracted those with a slightly higher level of education. Our analysis of published estimates of keyword searches on nanotechnology reveals people are turning to the Internet to search for keyword searches related to the future, health, and applications of nanotechnology. A content analysis of online content reveals health content dominates overall. Comparisons of content in different types of sites-blogs, government, and general sites-are conducted.

  12. Telling the Story of Ridge Flank Research to all Ages and Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S. K.; Brennon, R.; Hamner, K.; Kane, J.; Ringlein, J.; Strong, L. R.; Orcutt, B. N.; Fisher, A. T.; Edwards, K. J.; Cowen, J. P.; Hulme, S.; Wheat, C. G.; Scientific Team of Expedition AT18-07

    2011-12-01

    A team of six education and communication specialists took part in Expedition AT18-07 onboard the R/V Atlantis during Summer 2011 as part of Hydrogeologic, Geochemical, and Microbiological Experiments in Young Ocean Crust of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean Using Subseafloor Observatories. Fully integrating into the science party of this expedition, educators brought their diverse backgrounds (middle school science, high school physics and biology, informal science institutions, and science media/communication) to bear as they participated in shipboard operations, laboratory analyses and scientific problem-solving. Their primary role, however, was to translate the excitement and significance of these investigations for a variety of non-science audiences on shore - including museum visitors, scout groups, summer camps, summer schools and college students - and provide rich opportunities for interaction surrounding transformative science in real time. Using a satellite-based internet link, educators took advantage of web-based tools, Skype and social networking sites Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, to bring the real process of science live from the seafloor to classrooms from Washington, D.C. to Taiwan. Activities and products included: 13 live ship-to-shore video broadcasts, development of classroom activities, partnerships among scientists and educators, web-based microbiology investigations, production of videos, development of museum exhibits and programs, and a video game based on the ROV Jason. In addition, several scientists initiated independent education projects, to which the education and communication team contributed their skills, including the Adopt a Microbe from the Seafloor web site, which provided regular art and science activities about microbiology and invites active participation from shore-based groups. Results of post-expedition work with students and the public will be shared, as will pre- and post-expedition evaluation reports on the impact of

  13. The Cartoon quality in Internet. Clan TVE, Neox Kidz and Boing: entertainment platforms for young audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Sánchez-Labella Martín

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available With the advancement of technology, Internet it has become the primary means for audiovisual consumption while presenting a critical situation around the debate the quality of the content. With the emergence of DTT (Digital Terrestrial Television in Spain television networks, public and private, they have created new thematics channels focused on content for children. At the same time, with the rise of new electronic devices such as tablets and smartphones, they have moved such content to the network by creating of platforms whose programs are aimed childhood. The non-linearity and immediacy in consumption make the Internet becomes an active mean giving autonomy and freedom to access a multitude of content regardless of time and the device. In this situation the child consumers is the audience that worries both parents and educational institutions. Restless, therefore, that children do not find programs adjusted to their age. The quality concept harbors no concrete definition because of the multitude of factors and perspectives that influence it. This paper, and based on different measurement criteria set by countries like Argentina, Chile, Spain, France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, the University of Pennsylvania (USA or the ACTF (Australian Children´s Television Foundation poses as main objective to analyze the online platforms Clan RTVE, Neox Kidz and Boing of television TVE, Antena 3 and Telecinco, respectively, because they are considered spaces with audiovisual material created for children. With the intention of demonstrating that they are presented as quality environments for children who access them it will conduct a qualitative methodology. Using the content analysis technique to each of the animated titles we can say that the cartoons, as outlined above, are quality entertainment programs.

  14. What does the UK public want from academic science communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, James; Illingworth, Sam; Verran, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of public academic science communication is to engage a non-scientist with a particular field of science and/or research topic, often driven by the expertise of the academic. An e-survey was designed to provide insight into respondent's current and future engagement with science communication activities. Respondents provided a wide range of ideas and concerns as to the 'common practice' of academic science communication, and whilst they support some of these popular approaches (such as open-door events and science festivals), there are alternatives that may enable wider engagement. Suggestions of internet-based approaches and digital media were strongly encouraged, and although respondents found merits in methods such as science festivals, limitations such as geography, time and topic of interest were a barrier to engagement for some. Academics and scientists need to think carefully about how they plan their science communication activities and carry out evaluations, including considering the point of view of the public, as although defaulting to hands-on open door events at their university may seem like the expected standard, it may not be the best way to reach the intended audience.

  15. Can citizen science enhance public understanding of science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonney, Rick; Phillips, Tina B; Ballard, Heidi L; Enck, Jody W

    2016-01-01

    Over the past 20 years, thousands of citizen science projects engaging millions of participants in collecting and/or processing data have sprung up around the world. Here we review documented outcomes from four categories of citizen science projects which are defined by the nature of the activities in which their participants engage - Data Collection, Data Processing, Curriculum-based, and Community Science. We find strong evidence that scientific outcomes of citizen science are well documented, particularly for Data Collection and Data Processing projects. We find limited but growing evidence that citizen science projects achieve participant gains in knowledge about science knowledge and process, increase public awareness of the diversity of scientific research, and provide deeper meaning to participants' hobbies. We also find some evidence that citizen science can contribute positively to social well-being by influencing the questions that are being addressed and by giving people a voice in local environmental decision making. While not all citizen science projects are intended to achieve a greater degree of public understanding of science, social change, or improved science -society relationships, those projects that do require effort and resources in four main categories: (1) project design, (2) outcomes measurement, (3) engagement of new audiences, and (4) new directions for research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Challenges of communicating safety case results to different audiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hocke, Peter; Roehlig, Klaus-Juergen

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, nuclear politics and decision making are often oriented at procedures which are linked to precautionary concepts and which reflect forms of 'knowledge politics'. These precautionary concepts in most cases focus on robust societal decisions, which incorporate the principles of sustainability as a topic of public debate. The issue of high-level nuclear waste is under debate and confronted with public discourse, which integrates not only the knowledge of different stakeholders, but also accept certain forms of 'Nichtwissen' ('non-knowledge'). Interdisciplinary research has to observe these normative trends and also has to 'contextualise' these questions before interpreting its research results for giving answers with practical relevance, especially in communication with different social actors. Issues which are brought up in this field of nuclear waste management and their social context have to be analysed in two dimensions: i) the dimension of professionalism and expertise; ii) the dimension of managing controversial debates ('knowledge politics') and the preparation and implementing of robust decisions mostly by responsible governmental organisations. In this context on the one hand complex aspects of safety have to be communicated in their internal scientific logic and structure. On the other hand the different functional systems and collective actors of highly differentiated modern societies are engaged in controversial debates on advanced technologies like nuclear energy and technologies for waste disposal over long-lasting time periods. Most safety and construction issues for final disposal of high-level waste, but also of waste management in general, are debated within professional 'communities' of scientists and experts. But if their technological artefacts and their conceptual planning become issues of controversial and political debates in spheres which are outside the closed circle of high-level professionals and party politicians (who are in the

  17. Inspiring your audience to action: insights from theory and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W.; Hekkers, J.; Mott, B.

    2011-12-01

    Findings from market research sponsored by The Ocean Project, along with many other recent studies, have revealed two troubling facts: 1. Despite increased efforts to grow climate and ocean literacy among the general public, American adult's knowledge of climate and ocean health has remained stagnant in the past decade; and 2. Knowledge and level of concern about climate change show little correlation, i.e. the people who are most concerned about climate change are not the ones who know most about the science of climate change, and vice versa. If knowledge does not lead to action among the general public, what implications does this have for those of us working for conservation? How can we motivate people to act for conservation? The Ocean Project's large-scale survey of American attitudes and values vis-à-vis ocean, climate change, and related conservation issues provides answers to many such burning questions. Our research findings reveal critical insights about what, who, and how we can communicate for maximum efficacy. In particular, youth and minorities emerged as important constituencies: not only are they more environmentally aware and/or socially conscious, they are important influencers who demonstrate greater propensity to modify their behaviors and/or engage in conservation advocacy. Our presentation will discuss the implications of these findings for strategic communication for conservation action as well as present case studies from the Monterey Bay Aquarium that support these research findings and provide insights from evaluation of two significantly different interpretive approaches to communicate about climate change-a live animal exhibit and a video-based, live-narrated auditorium program.

  18. The public of media events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Morgner

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the growing importance of large-scale events and their central role in a globalised media world in relation to public reactions and public involvement. The peculiar structure of such events requires a different understanding of mass communication and its audience. Therefore, the audience is further examined with regard to its impact on and inclusion in the media itself. Consequently, questions are raised as to how the public is incorporated, the form this inclusion takes and the effect that this has on the audience’s participation.The article examines different types of semantic inclusion, with a focus on emotional reactions towards three different media events: the Titanic disaster, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and the death of Princess Diana.

  19. The impact of disclosure on donor gamete participants: donors, intended parents and offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfeld, Dorothy A

    2008-06-01

    The present review examines recent publications that provide insight into how the trend toward nonanonymity and disclosure in gamete donation impacts donors, intended parents, and their donor-conceived children. Recent findings show an increase in donor programs that offer open-identity between donors and offspring. The psychological needs of gamete donors and their attitudes toward disclosure are increasingly given consideration. Qualitative research on how parents of donor gamete offspring make decisions about disclosure reveals that even when couples initially disagree about disclosing to offspring, most ultimately come to a united disclosure decision. The literature on the impact of disclosure on donor gamete offspring has extended to include children conceived through embryo donation and children born as a result of surrogacy. The absence of genetic or gestational link between parents and their child does not have a negative impact on parent-child relationships. Parents through surrogacy tend to disclose the method of family creation to their child, whereas parents through embryo donation tend to be secretive about their child's origins. The trend toward greater openness in gamete donation has been accompanied by an increase in programs offering open-identity donation. In addition, the psychological needs of gamete donors and their attitudes toward disclosure are increasingly being given consideration. Parents of donor gamete offspring give careful thought to their disclosure decisions, and the psychological well being of donor-conceived children does not seem to be impacted by those decisions.

  20. 41 CFR 105-68.330 - What requirements must I pass down to persons at lower tiers with whom I intend to do business?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must I pass down to persons at lower tiers with whom I intend to do business? 105-68.330 Section 105-68.330... Business with Other Persons § 105-68.330 What requirements must I pass down to persons at lower tiers with...

  1. Relationships between anti-stigma programme awareness, disclosure comfort and intended help-seeking regarding a mental health problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Claire; Robinson, Emily; Evans-Lacko, Sara; Thornicroft, Graham

    2017-11-01

    Background Anti-stigma programmes should aim to increase disclosure to those who can support someone with a mental health problem and appropriate professional help-seeking. Aims We investigated associations among public awareness of England's Time to Change anti-stigma campaign and: (a) comfort envisaged in disclosing a mental health problem to family and friends; (b) comfort in disclosing to an employer; and (c) intended professional help-seeking from a general practitioner, i.e. a physician working in primary care. Method Using data from a survey of a nationally representative sample of adults, we created separate logistic regression models to test for campaign awareness and other variables as predictors of comfort in disclosure and intended help-seeking. Results We found positive relationships between campaign awareness and comfort in disclosing to family and friends (odds ratio (OR) = 1.27, 95% CI 1.14-1.43) and to a current or prospective employer (OR=1.20, 95% CI 1.06-1.35); and likelihood of help-seeking (OR=1.18 95% CI 1.03-1.36). Conclusions Awareness of an anti-stigma campaign was associated with greater comfort in disclosing a mental health problem and intended help-seeking. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  2. No, Virginia, It's Not True What They Say About Publicity's "Implied Third-Party Endorsement" Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallahan, Kirk

    1999-01-01

    Re-examines "implied third-party endorsement" as an explanation of publicity's effectiveness. Argues that any effect involves inferences by audience members who use biased processing that favors news and disfavors advertising. Suggests that the presentation of information as news is not necessarily perceived by audiences as an…

  3. "Like throwing a bowling ball at a battle ship" audience responses to Australian news stories about alcohol pricing and promotion policies: a qualitative focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Fogarty

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Policies affecting alcohol's price and promotion are effective measures to reduce harms. Yet policies targeting populations are unpopular with the public, whose views can be influenced by news framings of policy narratives. In Australia, alcohol taxation receives high news coverage, while advertising restrictions have not until recently, and narratives are highly contested for each. However, research specifically examining how audiences respond to such news stories is scant. We sought to explore audience understanding of news reports about two alcohol policy proposals. METHOD: From June to August 2012, 46 participants were recruited for 8 focus groups in age-brackets of young people aged 18-25 years, parents of young people, and adults aged 25 or older. Groups were split by education. Participants were asked their prior knowledge of alcohol policies, before watching and discussing four news stories about alcohol taxation and advertising. RESULTS: Participants were clear that alcohol poses problems, yet thought policy solutions were ineffective in a drinking culture they viewed as unamenable to change and unaffected by alcohol's price or promotion. Without knowledge of its actual effect on consumption, they cited the 2008 alcopops tax as a policy failure, blaming cheaper substitution. Participants had low knowledge of advertising restrictions, yet were concerned about underage exposure. They offered conditional support for restrictions, while doubting its effectiveness. There was marked distrust of statistics and news actors in broadcasts, yet discussions matched previous research findings. CONCLUSIONS: News coverage has resulted in strong audience understanding of alcohol related problems but framed solutions have not always provided clear messages, despite audience support for policies. Future advocacy will need to continue recent moves to address the links between alcohol's price and promotion with the drinking culture, as well

  4. “Like Throwing a Bowling Ball at a Battle Ship” Audience Responses to Australian News Stories about Alcohol Pricing and Promotion Policies: A Qualitative Focus Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, Andrea S.; Chapman, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Policies affecting alcohol’s price and promotion are effective measures to reduce harms. Yet policies targeting populations are unpopular with the public, whose views can be influenced by news framings of policy narratives. In Australia, alcohol taxation receives high news coverage, while advertising restrictions have not until recently, and narratives are highly contested for each. However, research specifically examining how audiences respond to such news stories is scant. We sought to explore audience understanding of news reports about two alcohol policy proposals. Method From June to August 2012, 46 participants were recruited for 8 focus groups in age-brackets of young people aged 18–25 years, parents of young people, and adults aged 25 or older. Groups were split by education. Participants were asked their prior knowledge of alcohol policies, before watching and discussing four news stories about alcohol taxation and advertising. Results Participants were clear that alcohol poses problems, yet thought policy solutions were ineffective in a drinking culture they viewed as unamenable to change and unaffected by alcohol’s price or promotion. Without knowledge of its actual effect on consumption, they cited the 2008 alcopops tax as a policy failure, blaming cheaper substitution. Participants had low knowledge of advertising restrictions, yet were concerned about underage exposure. They offered conditional support for restrictions, while doubting its effectiveness. There was marked distrust of statistics and news actors in broadcasts, yet discussions matched previous research findings. Conclusions News coverage has resulted in strong audience understanding of alcohol related problems but framed solutions have not always provided clear messages, despite audience support for policies. Future advocacy will need to continue recent moves to address the links between alcohol’s price and promotion with the drinking culture, as well as facilitate

  5. Mass social contact interventions and their effect on mental health related stigma and intended discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Lacko, Sara; London, Jillian; Japhet, Sarah; Rüsch, Nicolas; Flach, Clare; Corker, Elizabeth; Henderson, Claire; Thornicroft, Graham

    2012-06-28

    Stigma and discrimination associated with mental health problems is an important public health issue, and interventions aimed at reducing exposure to stigma and discrimination can improve the lives of people with mental health problems. Social contact has long been considered to be one of the most effective strategies for improving inter-group relations. For this study, we assess the impact of a population level social contact intervention among people with and without mental health problems. This study investigated the impact of social contact and whether presence of specific facilitating factors (equal status, common goals, cooperation and friendship potential): (1) improves intended stigmatising behaviour; (2) increases future willingness to disclose a mental health problem; and (3) promotes behaviours associated with anti-stigma campaign engagement. Two mass participation social contact programmes within England's Time to Change campaign were evaluated via a 2-part questionnaire. 403 participants completed initial questionnaires (70% paper, 30% online) and 83 completed follow-up questionnaires online 4-6 weeks later. This study investigated the impact of social contact and whether presence of specific facilitating factors (equal status, common goals, cooperation and friendship potential): (1) improves intended stigmatising behaviour; (2) increases future willingness to disclose a mental health problem; and (3) promotes behaviours associated with anti-stigma campaign engagement. Two mass participation social contact programmes within England's Time to Change campaign were evaluated via a 2-part questionnaire. 403 participants completed initial questionnaires (70% paper, 30% online) and 83 completed follow-up questionnaires online 4-6 weeks later. Campaign events facilitated meaningful intergroup social contact between individuals with and without mental health problems. Presence of facilitating conditions predicted improved stigma-related behavioural intentions

  6. Mass social contact interventions and their effect on mental health related stigma and intended discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans-Lacko Sara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stigma and discrimination associated with mental health problems is an important public health issue, and interventions aimed at reducing exposure to stigma and discrimination can improve the lives of people with mental health problems. Social contact has long been considered to be one of the most effective strategies for improving inter-group relations. For this study, we assess the impact of a population level social contact intervention among people with and without mental health problems. Methods This study investigated the impact of social contact and whether presence of specific facilitating factors (equal status, common goals, cooperation and friendship potential: (1 improves intended stigmatising behaviour; (2 increases future willingness to disclose a mental health problem; and (3 promotes behaviours associated with anti-stigma campaign engagement. Two mass participation social contact programmes within England’s Time to Change campaign were evaluated via a 2-part questionnaire. 403 participants completed initial questionnaires (70% paper, 30% online and 83 completed follow-up questionnaires online 4–6 weeks later. Results This study investigated the impact of social contact and whether presence of specific facilitating factors (equal status, common goals, cooperation and friendship potential: (1 improves intended stigmatising behaviour; (2 increases future willingness to disclose a mental health problem; and (3 promotes behaviours associated with anti-stigma campaign engagement. Two mass participation social contact programmes within England’s Time to Change campaign were evaluated via a 2-part questionnaire. 403 participants completed initial questionnaires (70% paper, 30% online and 83 completed follow-up questionnaires online 4–6 weeks later. Campaign events facilitated meaningful intergroup social contact between individuals with and without mental health problems. Presence of facilitating conditions

  7. Applicative Research on Psychological Demand of Audience and the TAXI for People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Caixia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether TAXI for People from Beijing traffic channel, the only special program customized for taxi driver in Beijing, knows about the psychological feature of the certain taxi group is an important factor that affects the development of program. Based on demand theory of psychology, this article uses the questionnaire method to find out the psychological feature and lifestyle of audience, and discusses the degree to the TAXI for People which meets the psychological demand of taxi driver audience by analysis on the program content. It is said from the research that the TAXI for People basically meets the psychological demand from taxi drivers. However, this program shall focus more on their basic needs and provide the opportunity for the audience to participate in the program and activity.

  8. Audiences, Journalists, and Forms of Capital in the Online Journalistic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson C. Tandoc Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study found divergence in how online journalists and student-audiences rated articles with varying popularity, as measured by audience metrics, and quality, as operationalized by winning a journalistic award. The findings revealed that while metrics and awards did not matter for young online news audiences, they were important for online journalists. But even among journalists, the importance of metrics and awards varied depending on whether the journalists were evaluating stories or their peers. For online journalists, popular stories were more newsworthy than those that were not. Awards did not influence their judgment of newsworthiness. But when evaluating the authors of the articles, online journalists rated authors of articles that won awards more favorably than authors of articles without awards. The popularity of stories did not matter in their evaluation of the authors.

  9. An Analysis of the Army Service Acquisition Review Requirements and the Perceived Effectiveness on Intended Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Selection Evaluation Market Research Metrics Competition Acquisition Schedule Consolidation Recommendation As detailed in the Chapter IIB, OSD Policy...REQUIREMENTS AND THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS ON INTENDED IMPROVEMENTS June 2016 By: Roxanne Moss Michael Vukovich Megan Weidner Advisors...ANALYSIS OF THE ARMY SERVICE ACQUISITION REVIEW REQUIREMENTS AND THE PERCEIVED EFFECTIVENESS ON INTENDED IMPROVEMENTS 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S

  10. Investigation of Social Studies Teachers' Intended Uses of Social Networks in Terms of Various Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Ismail Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine Social Studies teacher candidates' intended uses of social networks in terms of various variables. The research was carried out by using screening model of quantitative research methods. In the study, "The Social Network Intended Use Scale" was used as a data collection tool. As a result of the…

  11. 21 CFR 1040.20 - Sunlamp products and ultraviolet lamps intended for use in sunlamp products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sunlamp products and ultraviolet lamps intended... intended to be exposed to ultraviolet radiation from the product, as recommended by the manufacturer. (2... irradiation of any part of the living human body, by ultraviolet radiation with wavelengths in air between 200...

  12. A comparison of two methods to assess audience-induced changes in male mate choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlen ZIEGE, Carmen HENNIGE-SCHULZ, Frauke MUECKSCH,David BIERBACH, Ralph TIEDEMANN, Bruno STREIT, Martin PLATH

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Multidirectional communicative interactions in social networks can have a profound effect on mate choice behavior. Male Atlantic molly Poecilia mexicana exhibit weaker mating preferences when an audience male is presented. This could be a male strategy to reduce sperm competition risk: interacting more equally with different females may be advantageous because rivals might copy mate choice decisions. In line with this hypothesis, a previous study found males to show a strong audience effect when being observed while exercising mate choice, but not when the rival was presented only before the choice tests. Audience effects on mate choice decisions have been quantified in poeciliid fishes using association preference designs, but it remains unknown if patterns found from measuring association times translate into actual mating behavior. Thus, we created five audience treatments simulating different forms of perceived sperm competition risk and determined focal males’ mating preferences by scoring pre-mating (nipping and mating behavior (gonopodial thrusting. Nipping did not reflect the pattern that was found when association preferences were measured, while a very similar pattern was uncovered in thrusting behavior. The strongest response was observed when the audience could eavesdrop on the focal male’s behavior. A reduction in the strength of focal males’ preferences was also seen after the rival male had an opportunity to mate with the focal male’s preferred mate. In comparison, the reduction of mating preferences in response to an audience was greater when measuring association times than actual mating behavior. While measuring direct sexual interactions between the focal male and both stimulus females not only the male’s motivational state is reflected but also females’ behavior such as avoidance of male sexual harassment [Current Zoology 58 (1: 84–94, 2012].

  13. A comparison of two methods to assess audience-induced changes in male mate choice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madlen ZIEGE; Carmen HENNIGE-SCHULZ; Frauke MUECKSCH; David BIERBACH; Ralph TIEDEMANN; Bruno STREIT; Martin PLATH

    2012-01-01

    Multidirectional communicative interactions in social networks can have a profound effect on mate choice behavior.Male Atlantic molly Poecilia mexicana exhibit weaker mating preferences when an audience male is presented.This could be a male strategy to reduce sperm competition risk:interacting more equally with different females may be advantageous because rivals might copy mate choice decisions.In line with this hypothesis,a previous study found males to show a strong audience effect when being observed while exercising mate choice,but not when the rival was presented only before the choice tests.Audience effects on mate choice decisions have been quantified in poeciliid fishes using association preference designs,but it remains unknown if patterns found from measuring association times translate into actual mating behavior.Thus,we createl five audience treatments simulating different forms of perceived sperm competition risk and determined focal males' mating preferences by scoring pre-mating (nipping) and mating behavior (gonopodial thrusting).Nipping did not reflect the pattern that was found when association preferences were measured,while a very similar pattern was uncovered in thrusting behavior.The strongest response was observed when the audience could eavesdrop on the focal male's behavior.A reduction in the strength of focal males' preferences was also seen after the rival male had an opportunity to mate with the focal male's preferred mate.In comparison,the reduction of mating preferences in response to an audience was greater when measuring association times than actual mating behavior.While measuring direct sexual interactions between the focal male and both stimulus females not only the male's motivational state is reflected but also females' behavior such as avoidance of male sexual harassment [Current Zoology 58 (1):84-94,2012].

  14. Journalists and Audience in Bulgarian Online Media – the New Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivaylo Yoshkov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present paper analyses the changes in the traditional roles of journalists and audience in some of the most popular web sites of Bulgarian traditional media. It examines the levels of interactivity and personalization which enable the audience to create and share its own texts, recordings, news emissions, and also to set its own agenda and take part in the gatekeeping process, etc. The paper defines the status of Bulgarian “citizen journalism”, making the conclusion that the audience’s new role has some similarities with the traditional journalists’ role

  15. Research on Tele2 campaign "Meteorite". The real and the desirable perception by target audience

    OpenAIRE

    Kalve, Anita

    2010-01-01

    The theme of the Bachelor work is: ‘’Research on Tele2 campaign ‘’Meteorite’’. The real and the desirable perception by target audience.’’’’. Several subjects are described in this work, such as – communication process from a marketing perspective, integrated marketing communication, campaig planning, guerilla marketing and it’s tools. The problematics – perception of the target audience, which leads to the objective: finding out if the desirable perception which was planned...

  16. Expanding the Reach of the Interview in Audience and Reception Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathieu, David; Brites, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    This chapter discusses the interview method in relation to context, a central notion in audience studies. Through a critique of the traditional conception of the interview method as a question-answer model, the chapter suggests two different articulations of the interview method in the framework...... of a contextual inquiry: the performative and participatory models of interview. These models are presented in their original theoretical, methodological and empirical contexts and then highlighted along four methodological considerations that help position audience research towards the challenges of a contextual...

  17. Overcoming Breakdowns and Engaging the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    With strong climate science evidence readily available, why do major segments of the public remain disengaged? Decades of social science research and practical communications experience indicate that prioritizing and structuring information, choosing appropriate messengers, and adapting to audience interests and learning styles are vital, yet often ignored criteria. This session will explore key differences between communications models within the science community and effective outreach to non-scientist audiences. Here, prioritizing goals, understanding preconceptions and identifying intervention opportunities require careful examination. "Public engagement" is defined as encouraging and enabling people to make informed choices on their own behalf. Crucial barriers identified in economics, political psychology and audience segmentation research will be addressed, and recommendations for more effective engagement will emerge including: defining realistic goals, simplifying science content accurately, avoiding values conflicts that prevent learning, enlisting trusted messengers, and matching a call to action to the scale of the challenge in ways people can embrace.

  18. More effective public communication - HLW disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, J.W. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Credibility can be enhanced and communication can be made somewhat more effective by informally talking to a small group of people as opposed to speaking to large groups. The more informal the situation can be, and the approximation of a one-to-one speaker-to-audience ratio assists the audience in obtaining a feeling they are being treated equitably. This also assists the speaker in getting a feel for the chief concerns of that particular audience. The authors have also found that this same principle has worked rather well in dealing with the media. So far they have experienced fewer mistakes and fewer sensationalisms from the media personnel with which they have had the opportunity to sit down one-on-one and explain the program. The media reaches a much greater segment of the public than any of us as individuals, and an informed media can communicate much more effectively with the public than an uninformed one

  19. The African filmmaker and content of African films: a study of the perspectives of the Nigerian film audience

    OpenAIRE

    Ganivu Olalekan Akashoro

    2011-01-01

    This paper attempts to appraise African filmmaking and the content of African films from a Nigerian film audience perspective. The study specifically explores the disposition of the audience towards contemporary African filmmaking for home video and cinema entertainment as well as the content of African films. The study used a qualitative questionnaire to determine the perspectives of residents in Lagos as members of the Nigerian film audience. The study found the perception of the content of...

  20. You Are The One I Want to Communicate With! Relational Motives Driving Audience-Tuning Effects on Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Pierucci, Sabrina; Klein, Olivier; Carnaghi, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the role of relational motives in the saying-is-believing effect (Higgins & Rholes, 1978). Building on shared reality theory, we expected this effect to be most likely when communicators were motivated to get along with the audience. In the current study, participants were asked to describe an ambiguous target to an audience who either liked or disliked the target. The audience had been previously evaluated as a desirable vs. undesirable communication partner. Only participant...

  1. Public Relations Applications in Librarianship and Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erol Yılmaz

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Public relations is an indispensable management function for an organization to reach its target audiences so as to serve them better and, at the same time, to upgrade its status in society as an organization. Television, as mass communication medium, is used effectively in public relations in librarianship. Researches showed that planned public relations is not utilized in the field of librarianship in our country, and television is not made use of for this purpose.

  2. Is the Partners in Recovery program connecting with the intended population of people living with severe and persistent mental illness? What are their prioritised needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Nicola; Smith-Merry, Jennifer; Gillespie, James A; Yen, Ivy

    2017-10-01

    Objective The Partners in Recovery (PIR) program is an Australian government initiative designed to make the mental health and social care sectors work in more coordinated ways to meet the needs of those with severe and complex mental illness. Herein we reflect on demographic data collected during evaluation of PIR implementation in two Western Sydney sites. The aims of the present study were to: (1) explore whether two Sydney-based PIR programs had recruited their intended population, namely people living with severe and persistent mental illness; and (2) learn more about this relatively unknown population and their self-identified need priorities. Methods Routinely collected initial client assessment data were analysed descriptively. Results The data suggest that the two programs are engaging the intended population. The highest unmet needs identified included psychological distress, lack of daytime activities and company, poor physical health and inadequate accommodation. Some groups remain hard to connect, including people from Aboriginal and other culturally diverse communities. Conclusions The data confirm that the PIR program, at least in the two regions evaluated, is mostly reaching its intended audience. Some data were being collected inconsistently, limiting the usefulness of the data and the ability to build on PIR findings to develop ongoing support for this population. What is known about the topic? PIR is a unique national program funded to engage with and address the needs of Australians living with severe and persistent mental illness by facilitating service access. What does this paper add? This paper reports on recruitment of people living with severe and persistent mental illness, their need priorities and data collection. These are three central elements to successful roll-out of the much anticipated mental health component of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, as well as ongoing PIR operation. What are the implications for practitioners

  3. NASA Innovations in Climate Education Connects Audiences Coast-to-Coast for Climate Literacy via the NASA Digital Learning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Barnes, M. H.; Chambers, L. H.; Pippin, M. R.; Martin, A. M.; Geyer, A. J.; Leber, M.; Joyner, E.; Small, C.; Dublin, D.

    2013-12-01

    with remotely connected participants and presenters across the nation. In addition to the 19 educators who participated live, 298 watched the sessions via a webcast. A similar workshop series experienced 300% growth in 2 years indicating the potential for comparable growth of NICE events. Due to unanimous requests for more information on these and other topics, beginning Fall 2013, NICE will reach into additional educators' classrooms via the DLN to deliver continued EPD from NICE PIs and other NASA researchers. With DLN capability, hundreds of additional unique viewers have been exposed to NICE via the DLN this year. This large-scale effort allows for long term, sustained engagement of the global community. We intend to take advantage of capabilities of the DLN as we continue to scale NICE events to wider audiences. The use of distance education allows for immediate release of new information and more frequent connections, resulting in sustained engagement of participants. This presentation will explore the various successes and future opportunities for expanding the impact of climate literacy via the NASA DLN, a large-scale collaborative network.

  4. The network to review natural analogue studies and their applications to repository safety assessment and public communication (NAnet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, W.M.; Hooker, P.J. [ENVIROS Consulting ltd, 61, the Shore Leith, UK-0 EH6 6RA Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Analogue information can increase our conceptual understanding of long-term repository behaviour in support of post-closure performance assessment (PA), provide quantitative data for PA models and provide ways of communicating safety information to non-specialist audiences. These functions of analogue studies have, however, received too little attention in PA reports and safety cases. Many analogue studies have been undertaken in the last two decades costing tens of millions of euros, and these have covered a wide range of phenomena such as uranium ore deposition, natural fission reactors, natural nuclide migration, contaminant containment by clays and sediments, preservation of ancient fossil trees and buried artefacts etc. The different uses of analogues would be easier to manage if a single database of quality approved analogue information were to be created. NAnet, a Thematic Network within the 5. EURATOM FP is aiming to promote more considered applications of analogues in performance and safety assessments and in audience dialogue. NAnet intends critically to review a number of analogue studies in terms of their relevance and limitations to different repository concepts and environments and with regard to their applications in performance assessments, safety cases and communication. On the basis of these reviews, a simple digital database is being developed for the PA community which will allow PA modelers to make quicker and wider use of natural analogue information in performance and safety assessments. It is expected that some of these tools will help radioactive waste institutions to make better use of natural analogue information for communication with different audiences, including the public. (authors)

  5. Drinking Refusal Self-Efficacy and Intended Alcohol Consumption During a Mass-Attended Youth Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongenelis, Michelle I; Pettigrew, Simone; Biagioni, Nicole

    2018-04-16

    Mass-attended youth events represent a substantial public health challenge due to high levels of alcohol consumption and corresponding high rates of alcohol-related harm. Although previous research has documented the protective effect of high drinking refusal self-efficacy (DRSE) on alcohol consumption in general, there is a lack of research examining the role of DRSE in reducing consumption during mass-attended youth events and the factors associated with DRSE in these contexts. This study aimed to identify potentially modifiable factors that influence DRSE and drinking intentions to inform interventions designed to reduce alcohol-related harm during mass-attended events. Australian secondary school students (n = 586; 70% female) in their final two years of high school completed an online survey assessing their alcohol consumption intentions for Schoolies, their perceived degree of DRSE, and other individual and environmental factors. Path analysis was used to assess a mediational model examining factors associated with DRSE and alcohol consumption intentions. DRSE was found to be significantly associated with intended alcohol consumption during Schoolies. Specifically, leavers who believed they would not be able to refuse others' offers of alcoholic drinks reported significantly greater alcohol consumption intentions. Results also revealed that DRSE was enhanced in those respondents who believed there would be a variety of non-drinking activities and non-alcoholic beverages available to them during Schoolies. Results suggest the need to increase leavers' confidence in their ability to refuse unwanted alcoholic beverages and highlight the importance of providing celebration options that do not involve alcohol consumption.

  6. Intended and unintended consequences of abortion law reform: perspectives of abortion experts in Victoria, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, L A; Newton, D; Bayly, C; McNamee, K; Hardiman, A; Webster, A; Bismark, M

    2017-01-01

    In Victoria, Australia, abortion was decriminalised in October 2008, bringing the law in line with clinical practice and community attitudes. We describe how experts in abortion service provision perceived the intent and subsequent impact of the 2008 Victorian abortion law reform. Experts in abortion provision in Victoria were recruited for a qualitative semi-structured interview about the 2008 law reform and its perceived impact, until saturation was reached. Nineteen experts from a range of health care settings and geographic locations were interviewed in 2014/2015. Thematic analysis was conducted to summarise participants' views. Abortion law reform, while a positive event, was perceived to have changed little about the provision of abortion. The views of participants can be categorised into: (1) goals that law reform was intended to address and that have been achieved; (2) intent or hopes of law reform that have not been achieved; (3) unintended consequences; (4) coincidences; and (5) unfinished business. All agreed that law reform had repositioned abortion as a health rather than legal issue, had shifted the power in decision making from doctors to women, and had increased clarity and safety for doctors. However, all described outstanding concerns; limited public provision of surgical abortion; reduced access to abortion after 20 weeks; ongoing stigma; lack of a state-wide strategy for equitable abortion provision; and an unsustainable workforce. Law reform, while positive, has failed to address a number of significant issues in abortion service provision, and may have even resulted in a 'lull' in action. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  7. Move Your Audience to Action: Using YouTube to Teach Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quagliata, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    For more than 75 years, instructors have taught students to use Monroe's (1935) Motivated Sequence (MMS) when organizing speeches designed to move audiences to action. However, modern approaches to teaching the sequence are needed to help instructors remain relevant and effective. This activity advocates the use of constructivist pedagogical…

  8. Affect in social media: The role of audience and the presence of contempt in cyberbullying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocea, Mihaela

    2017-01-01

    Gervais & Fessler's Attitude-Scenario-Emotion (ASE) model is a useful tool for the detection of affect in social media. In this commentary, an addition to the model is proposed - the audience - and its role in the manifestation of affect is discussed using a cyberbullying scenario. The presence of contempt in cyberbullying is also discussed.

  9. The Effectiveness of Health Animations in Audiences With Different Health Literacy Levels : An Experimental Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, Corine S.; van Weert, Julia C. M.; Haven, Carola J.; Smit, Edith G.

    Background: Processing Web-based health information can be difficult, especially for people with low health literacy. Presenting health information in an audiovisual format, such as animation, is expected to improve understanding among low health literate audiences. Objective: The aim of this paper

  10. Audience response-systemer styrker læringsmiljøet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jacob Vad; Østergaard, Doris

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to describe the possibilities gained by using an electronic voting system (EVS), the existing evidence to determine whether an EVS affects learning proceeds, challenges in EVS and perspectives for EVS in Danish medical training. Audience Response-Systems (ARS) seem...

  11. The Impact of Audience Age and Familiarity on Children's Drawings of Themselves in Contrasting Affective States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, Esther; Watling, Dawn

    2013-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the impact of familiarity and audience age on children's self-presentation in self-drawings of happy, sad and neutral figures. Two hundred children (100 girls and 100 boys) with the average age of 8 years 2 months, ranging from 6 years 3 months to 10 years 1 month, formed two age groups and five…

  12. Using Audience Response Systems to Encourage Student Engagement and Reflection on Ethical Orientation and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheletto, Melinda J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use an audience response system (ARS) to engage students in classroom discussions concerning sensitive and controversial topics (e.g., business ethics), assess student's ethical orientation and conduct in unethical behaviors, and encourage reflection on their personal level of ethicality. Students used ARS devices…

  13. Effects of online advertising format and persuasion knowledge on audience reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tutaj, K.; van Reijmersdal, E.A.

    2012-01-01

    In an experiment (N = 99), effects of subtle and prominent online advertising formats, respectively sponsored content and banner ads, on audience reactions toward the advertisement are tested. In addition, the role of several persuasion knowledge elements such as understanding of persuasive intent

  14. Using the Front Page of "The Wall Street Journal" to Teach Document Design and Audience Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Patrick

    1989-01-01

    Explains an assignment for the audience analysis segment of a business writing course which compares the front page design of "The Wall Street Journal" with that of a local daily newspaper in order to emphasize the use of design devices in effectively writing to busy people. (SR)

  15. Still ‘Watching’ TV? The Consumption of TV Fiction by Engaged Audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Dhoest

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available There is no denying that television, as a medium and an institution, has drastically changed in the age of digitization and convergence. For audiences, this has not only opened up multiple opportunities to watch television content at other times and on other devices, but also to interact with its cross-media extensions. However, while much has been written about the new opportunities for audience engagement, we do not know much about the actual adoption of new technologies nor the motivations underlying such uses. Therefore, this paper draws on empirical audience research to address the key question: how do viewers engage with contemporary TV fiction? Through empirical audience research, using various qualitative research methods, three different aspects of the reception of cross-media TV fiction will be discussed: (1 how do viewers watch the TV episodes of contemporary TV fiction?, (2 how do viewers engage with the cross-media extensions of TV fiction?, and (3 how do viewers experience the social dimensions of contemporary TV fiction? We focus on a particular group, that of 'engaged' viewers, who are actively involved by personalizing their viewing practices, by communicating about it, by consuming cross-media elements of TV fiction, or producing TV fiction-related content. Our findings suggest that even this group does not make full use of all the available technological opportunities to personalize TV viewing, and that the classical TV text, linear viewing, and the social aspect of viewing remain of key importance.

  16. The Rise of the Anglophone in an Increasingly Multilayered, Transnational Danish Television System and Audience?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Hans-Peter; Straubhaar, Joseph D.; Hjarvard, Stig

    This paper sees globalization as the emergence of multiple logics of production, flow and audience reception, based on identity. They are very unequal or asymmetric in their reach and power, but they are also dynamic, changing along with both structural and cultural forces, as an examination...

  17. Let's Talk About Water: Film as a Resource to Engage Audiences Around Earth Science Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, E.; Hooper, R. P.; Lilienfeld, L.

    2017-12-01

    Connecting a diverse audience to science can be challenging. Scientists generally publish their findings in ways that are not easily accessible to audiences outside of the science community and translating findings for wider consumption requires a mindful balance of generalization and accuracy. In response to these communication challenges, the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science, Inc. (CUAHSI) developed the Let's Talk About Water (LTAW) program as a formula for hosting successful events for Earth Science education. The program uses film as a bridge to open a discussion between scientists and the audience. In this setting, films are powerful educational tools because they use storytelling to engage audiences emotionally, which creates relatable, teachable moments. Originally designed to bring awareness to water issues, the formula can easily be applied to increase literacy on climate change and other critical Earth Science issues facing society. This presentation will discuss the LTAW event formula and the resources that CUAHSI has available to support event organizers in the development of their own LTAW events.

  18. Who wants to know? The effect of audience on identity expression among minority group members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barreto, M; Spears, R; Ellemers, N; Shahinper, K

    Statements of social identification among ethnic minority members were examined as a function of group membership of the participants, group membership of the audience, and personal identifiability. In Study 1, Turkish migrants and Iranian refugees in the Netherlands expressed their identification

  19. Development of a Browser-Based Mobile Audience Response System for Large Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andergassen, Monika; Guerra, Victor; Ledermüller, Karl; Neumann, Gustaf

    2013-01-01

    Didactical advantages of audience response systems (ARS) have been discussed extensively ever since they have been used in classes. However, conventional ARS bear some drawbacks, such as requiring specific hardware, generating costs (text messaging based and web service fees) and creating a dependency on external hosts. In this paper we present a…

  20. The combined effects of meta-stereotypes and audience on outgroup and ingroup helping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E.; Oostenbrink, J.J.; Twilt, A.

    2014-01-01

    Salient meta-stereotypes can promote outgroup helping in a way that allows an ingroup to make a good impression. Although the presence of an audience can similarly activate impression-management concerns, their combined effects on intergroup helping have never been investigated, which was the goal

  1. Developing and delivering food systems training programs for 21st century audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Hahn

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Expectations for training programmes today are very different from expectations for training programmes in the past, because today’s audiences are not only multigenerational, but the younger generations learn in distinctly different ways from older, more traditional audiences. To meet the needs of these multigenerational audiences, the Auburn University Food Systems Institute (AUFSI has developed on-demand, online courses that offer a variety of ways for learners to interact with training materials. For example, a typical course may offer not only traditional text, but audio, video, simulations, and more. In addition, AUFSI has developed supporting educational tools such as interactive virtual tours and video games. This approach to creating courses is a response to the  different levels of experiences of the generations as well as different expectations of how materials should be delivered. In order to be effective, training materials need to be designed to appeal to this multigenerational audience. Traditionalists (born before 1946 prefer face-to-face training programmes. Baby Boomers (born 1946-1964 are more accepting of technology. Generations X (born 1965-1980, Y (born 1981- 2000 and C (born after 2000, however, expect to receive training at their convenience, to have it delivered electronically, and to be entertained as well as educated.

  2. Employee Anonymous Online Dissent: Dynamics and Ethical Challenges for Employees, Targeted Organisations, Online Outlets and Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia; Mazzei, Alessandra

    2018-01-01

    administrators, audiences and targeted organisations. This multi-actor, dialectical process encompasses actor-related tensions that may generate unethical consequences if single voices are not brought out and confronted. Appropriating a Habermasian ethical and discursive lens, we examine and disentangle three...

  3. How much importance do we give to target audiences in article writing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjat, Sima; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Gholami, Jaleh; Ashoorkhani, Mahnaz; Maleki, Katayoun; Hejrie, Soroush Mortaz; Majdzadeh, Reza

    2010-01-01

    Writing papers can be used as a means to convey a message. Knowledge transfer is also about conveying the right message to the right target audience. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of articles that had mentioned a clear message and the target audience in the abstract and the article as a whole, and also to examine their association with different determinant factors. Articles published from 2001 to 2006 that were based on clinical and health system research conducted on Iranian populations and on maternal care, diabetes and tuberculosis were searched systematically in domestic and international databases. Eventually checklists (Additional file 1) were completed for 795 articles. Overall, 98.5% of articles had a clear message, whereas 12.5% had addressed the direct target audience. Presence of a clear message in formatted abstracts were seen 3.6 times more (CI95%: 1.5-8.7) than in articles without formatted abstracts (p = 0.005). Addressing of the direct target audience was seen twice as much in health system research articles as compared to clinical studies, odds ratio was 2.3 (CI95%: 1.47-3.48, p<0.001). Creating a format for journal abstracts seems to be an effective intervention for presenting the message in articles.

  4. Comparing Four Touch-Based Interaction Techniques for an Image-Based Audience Response System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jorritsma, Wiard; Prins, Jonatan T.; van Ooijen, Peter M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the most appropriate touch-based interaction technique for I2Vote, an image-based audience response system for radiology education in which users need to accurately mark a target on a medical image. Four plausible techniques were identified: land-on, take-off,

  5. The Use of Narrative Paradigm Theory in Assessing Audience Value Conflict in Image Advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutts, Nancy B.; Barker, Randolph T.

    1999-01-01

    Presents an analysis of image advertisement developed from Narrative Paradigm Theory. Suggests that the nature of postmodern culture makes image advertising an appropriate external communication strategy for generating stake holder loyalty. Suggests that Narrative Paradigm Theory can identify potential sources of audience conflict by illuminating…

  6. A Qualitative Approach to Understanding Audience's Perceptions of Creativity in Online Advertising

    Science.gov (United States)

    McStay, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I seek to inquire upon audience's perceptions of creativity in online advertising--a heretofore poorly understood area. This paper initially outlines current academic understanding of creativity in online advertising, mainly derived from quantitative assessments. It then advances a qualitative methodology including diary-interviews…

  7. The effectiveness of health animations in audiences with different health literacy levels: An experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, C.S.; van Weert, J.C.M.; Haven, C.J.; Smit, E.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Processing Web-based health information can be difficult, especially for people with low health literacy. Presenting health information in an audiovisual format, such as animation, is expected to improve understanding among low health literate audiences. Objective: The aim of this paper

  8. Revising an Extension Education Website for Limited Resource Audiences Using Social Marketing Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Sarah L.; Martin, Peggy; Taylor, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Spend Smart Eat Smart (SSES), a unique website combining nutrition and food buying education for limited resource audiences (LRAs), was revised using social marketing theory to make it more appealing and relevant to LRAs (25-40 years). Focus groups and surveys identified the needs and preferences of LRAs. Needs were cooking, basic health, and…

  9. The Effect of Combination of Video Feedback and Audience Feedback on Social Anxiety: Preliminary Findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junwen; Mak, Rebecca; Fujita, Satoko

    2015-09-01

    Although video feedback (VF) is shown to improve appraisals of social performance in socially anxious individuals, its impact on state anxiety during a social situation is mixed. The current study investigated the effect of combined video feedback and audience feedback (AF) on self-perceptions of performance and bodily sensations as well as state anxiety pertaining to a speech task. Forty-one socially anxious students were randomly allocated to combined video feedback with audience feedback (VF + AF), video feedback only (VF), audience feedback only (AF), or a control condition. Following a 3-min speech, participants in the VF + AF, VF, and AF conditions watched the videotape of their speech with cognitive preparation in the presence of three confederates who served as audience, and/or received feedback from the confederates, while the control group watched their videotaped speech without cognitive preparation. Both VF + AF and AF conditions improved distorted appraisal of performance and bodily sensations as well as state anxiety. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. The relation between social anxiety and audience perception: Examining Clark and Wells’ (1995) model among adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöte, Anke W.; Miers, Anne C.; Heyne, David A.; Clark, David M.; Westenberg, P. Michiel

    2016-01-01

    Background Clark and Wells’ (1995; Clark, 2001) cognitive model of social anxiety proposes that socially anxious individuals have negative expectations of performance prior to a social event, focus their attention predominantly on themselves and on their negative self-evaluations during an event, and use this negative self processing to infer that other people are judging them harshly. Aims The present study tested these propositions. Method The study used a community sample of 161 adolescents aged 14-18 years. The participants gave a speech in front of a pre-recorded audience acting neutrally, and participants were aware that the projected audience was pre-recorded. Results As expected, participants with higher levels of social anxiety had more negative performance expectations, higher self-focused attention, and more negative perceptions of the audience. Negative performance expectations and self-focused attention were found to mediate the relationship between social anxiety and audience perception. Conclusion The findings support Clark and Wells’ cognitive model of social anxiety which poses that socially anxious individuals have distorted perceptions of the responses of other people because their perceptions are colored by their negative thoughts and feelings. PMID:23635882

  11. Alignment between Informal Educator Perceptions and Audience Expectations of Climate Change Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stylinski, Cathlyn; Heimlich, Joe; Palmquist, Sasha; Wasserman, Deborah; Youngs, Renae

    2017-01-01

    To understand the complexities of climate change on educator-visitor relationships, we compared educators' perceptions with audiences' expectations for informal science education institutions. Our findings suggest two disconnects: (a) a professional recognition that climate change education is related to institutional mission but a lack of…

  12. Getting the Most out of Audience Response Systems: Predicting Student Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trew, Jennifer L.; Nelsen, Jacqueline L.

    2012-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) are effective tools for improving learning outcomes and student engagement in large undergraduate classes. However, if students do not accept ARS and do not find them to be useful, ARS may be less effective. Predicting and improving student perceptions of ARS may help to ensure positive outcomes. The present study…

  13. The relation between social anxiety and audience perception: examining Clark and Wells' (1995) model among adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blöte, Anke W; Miers, Anne C; Heyne, David A; Clark, David M; Westenberg, P Michiel

    2014-09-01

    Clark and Wells' cognitive model of social anxiety proposes that socially anxious individuals have negative expectations of performance prior to a social event, focus their attention predominantly on themselves and on their negative self-evaluations during an event, and use this negative self-processing to infer that other people are judging them harshly. The present study tested these propositions. The study used a community sample of 161 adolescents aged 14-18 years. The participants gave a speech in front of a pre-recorded audience acting neutrally, and participants were aware that the projected audience was pre-recorded. As expected, participants with higher levels of social anxiety had more negative performance expectations, higher self-focused attention, and more negative perceptions of the audience. Negative performance expectations and self-focused attention were found to mediate the relationship between social anxiety and audience perception. The findings support Clark and Wells' cognitive model of social anxiety, which poses that socially anxious individuals have distorted perceptions of the responses of other people because their perceptions are coloured by their negative thoughts and feelings.

  14. Portrait of a Cult Film Audience: "The Rocky Horror Picture Show."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Bruce A.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the phenomenon of the cult film and the characteristics of the audiences of the "Rocky Horror Picture Show." Suggests that the preparation, waiting, and finally the active participation in the viewing of the film itself appear to be part of a group ritual which characterizes the cult film as an event. (JMF)

  15. Selective Exposure to Horror: An Analysis of the Audience for Frightening Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborini, Ron; Stiff, James

    A survey of 155 midwestern movie viewers was conducted to determine the factors of the selective exposure and appeal of horror films. Audience members leaving the theatre after viewing "Halloween II" were interviewed using a questionnaire that contained measures of specific reasons for liking horror films as well as measures of several…

  16. Immersion and togetherness: How live visualization of audience engagement can enhance music events

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Shirzadian (Najereh); J.A. Redi (Judith); T. Röggla (Tom); A. Panza (Alice); F.-M. Nack (Frank); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThis paper evaluates the influence of an additional visual aesthetic layer on the experience of concert goers during a live event. The additional visual layer incorporates musical features as well as bio-sensing data collected during the concert, which is coordinated by our audience

  17. Assessment of current cybersecurity practices in the public domain : cyber indications and warnings domain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

    2010-09-01

    This report assesses current public domain cyber security practices with respect to cyber indications and warnings. It describes cybersecurity industry and government activities, including cybersecurity tools, methods, practices, and international and government-wide initiatives known to be impacting current practice. Of particular note are the U.S. Government's Trusted Internet Connection (TIC) and 'Einstein' programs, which are serving to consolidate the Government's internet access points and to provide some capability to monitor and mitigate cyber attacks. Next, this report catalogs activities undertaken by various industry and government entities. In addition, it assesses the benchmarks of HPC capability and other HPC attributes that may lend themselves to assist in the solution of this problem. This report draws few conclusions, as it is intended to assess current practice in preparation for future work, however, no explicit references to HPC usage for the purpose of analyzing cyber infrastructure in near-real-time were found in the current practice. This report and a related SAND2010-4766 National Cyber Defense High Performance Computing and Analysis: Concepts, Planning and Roadmap report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

  18. Using Social Networks to Educate Seismology to Non-Science Audiences in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, O. H.; Linkimer, L.

    2013-12-01

    Costa Rica has a very high rate of seismicity with 63 damaging earthquakes in its history as a nation and 12 felt earthquakes per month on average. In Costa Rica, earthquakes are part of everyday life; hence the inhabitants are highly aware of seismic activity and geological processes. However, formal educational programs and mainstream media have not yet addressed the appropriate way of educating the public on these topics, thus myths and misconceptions are common. With the increasing influence of social networks on information diffusion, they have become a new channel to address this issue in Costa Rica. The National Seismological Network of Costa Rica (RSN) is a joint effort between the University of Costa Rica and the Costa Rican Institute of Electricity. Since 1973, the RSN studies the seismicity and volcanic activity in the country. Starting on January 2011 the RSN has an active Facebook Page, in which felt earthquakes are reported and information on Seismology, geological processes, scientific talks, and RSN activities are routinely posted. Additionally, RSN gets almost instantaneous feedback from RSN followers including people from all rural and urban areas of Costa Rica. In this study, we analyze the demographics, geographic distribution, reach of specific Facebook posts per topic, and the episodic growth of RSN followers related to specific seismic events. We observe that 70 % of the RSN users are between ages from 18 to 34. We consistently observe that certain regions of the country have more Facebook activity, although those regions are not the most populated nor have a high connectivity index. We interpret this pattern as the result of a higher awareness to geological hazards in those specific areas. We notice that educational posts are as well 'liked' as most earthquake reports. For exceptional seismic events, we observe sudden increments in the number of RSN followers in the order of tens of thousands. For example, the May 2013 Sixaola earthquake (Mw

  19. JOURNALISTIC IDENTITY AND AUDIENCE PERCEPTIONS: PARADIGM AND MODELS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN THE AFRICAN GREAT LAKES REGIÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  20. Cardiovascular risk after preeclampsia : The effect of communicating risk factors on intended healthy behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bokslag, Anouk; Kroeze, Willemieke; de Groot, Christianne J.M.; Teunissen, Pim W.

    Objective: We studied the effect of communicating cardiovascular risk factors on intended healthy behavior in women with a history of preeclampsia or uncomplicated pregnancy. Methods: Intention for healthy behavior was assessed before and after cardiovascular risk assessment. Changes were calculated

  1. Evaluating driver reactions to new vehicle technologies intended to increase safety and mobility across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Personal vehicle manufactures are introducing a wide range of new technologies that are : intended to increase the safety, comfort, and mobility of drivers of all ages. Examples range from : semi-autonomous technologies such as adaptive cruise contro...

  2. The influence of human factor on security of software intended for educational purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Valentinovich Gurov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The report considers the construction and analysis of attack tree on the software tools intended for educational purposes. This takes into account different groups of attackers. The criterion of security for such tools is introduced.

  3. Reflecting photonics: reaching new audiences through new partnerships - IYL 2015 and the Royal Horticultural Society Flower Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Matthew T.; John, Pearl V.; Standen, Deanna; Wheeler, Natalie V.; van Putten, Lieke D.; Soper, Nathan; Parsonage, Tina L.; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    The `Reflecting Photonics' show garden was exhibited at the 2015 Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) Flower Show in Tatton Park, UK, to celebrate the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies. Elks-Smith Garden Design alongside landscapers `Turf N' Earth' collaborated with researchers, marketing and outreach professionals from the University of Southampton to design, construct and exhibit a photonics-themed garden. The garden and supporting exhibition united science and art to reach new audiences - particularly family groups alongside other key influencers to the young - and showcased the world-leading research in optical fibers at the university in an accessible manner. Researchers and a publicity professional, funded by the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Photonics, developed an integrated approach to the event's public engagement and marketing. The overarching aim was to influence a positive change in the attitude of the garden visitors towards physics and photonics, with additional focus on promoting careers for women in STEM. The show garden won an RHS Gold Medal award and the coveted `People's Choice Award' for the best large garden. The project subsequently won the South East England Physics Network Public Engagement Innovation Project Award. Approximately 80,000 visitors saw the garden, with a further three million television viewers on a popular British gardening show. There were also over 75,400 Tweet impressions on social media. This paper discusses the project aims, explores the design of the garden and its relationship with the research, describes the work of the public engagement team, and outlines the impact of the event.

  4. Improving the effectiveness of communication about climate science: Insights from the "Global Warming's Six Americas" audience segmentation research project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, E.; Roser-Renouf, C.

    2011-12-01

    That the climate science community has not been entirely effective in sharing what it knows about climate change with the broader public - and with policy makers and organizations that should be considering climate change when making decisions - is obvious. Our research shows that a large majority of the American public trusts scientists (76%) and science-based agencies (e.g., 76% trust NOAA) as sources of information about climate change. Yet, despite the widespread agreement in the climate science community that the climate is changing as a result of human activity, only 64% of the public understand that the world's average temperature has been increasing (and only about half of them are sure), less than half (47%) understand that the warming is caused mostly by human activity, and only 39% understand that most scientists think global warming is happening (in fact, only 13% understand that the large majority of climate scientists think global warming is happening). Less obvious is what the climate science community should do to become more effective in sharing what it knows. In this paper, we will use evidence from our "Global Warming's Six Americas" audience segmentation research project to suggest ways that individual climate scientists -- and perhaps more importantly, ways in which climate science agencies and professional societies -- can enhance the effectiveness of their communication efforts. We will conclude by challenging members of the climate science community to identify and convey "simple, clear messages, repeated often, by a variety of trusted sources" - an approach to communication repeatedly shown to be effective by the public health community.

  5. Portion size and intended consumption. Evidence for a pre-consumption portion size effect in males?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric; te Raa, Wesselien; Hardman, Charlotte A

    2015-08-01

    Larger portions increase energy intake (the 'portion size effect'); however, the mechanisms behind this effect are unclear. Although pre-meal intentions are thought to be an important determinant of energy intake, little research has examined how much of a meal individuals intend to eat when served standard versus larger portion sizes. Three studies examined the effect of manipulating portion size on intended food consumption. In Studies 1 (spaghetti bolognese) and 2 (curry and rice) male participants were shown an image of either a standard or a larger meal and indicated how much of the meal they intended to consume. In Study 3 male and female participants were served either a standard or a larger portion of ice cream for dessert, they indicated how much they intended to consume and then ate as much of the ice cream as they desired. Regardless of being shown standard or large portion sizes, in Studies 1 and 2 participants reported that they intended to eat the majority of the meal, equating to a large difference in intended energy consumption between portion size conditions (a 'pre-consumption portion size effect'). This finding was replicated in male participants in Study 3, although females intended to eat a smaller proportion of the larger portion of ice cream, compared to the standard portion. Both male and female participants tended to eat in accordance with their pre-meal intentions and a portion size effect on actual consumption was subsequently observed in males, but not in females. The portion size effect may be observed when measuring pre-meal intended consumption in males. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Public Relations vs. Propaganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru BASTIAN

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims at presenting the characteristics, methods and aplications of two related activities – Public Relations and propaganda. Although different from the piont of wiev of purpose and results (the practice of Public Relations aims at establishing and maintaining mutual lines of communications, understanding, acceptance, and cooperation between an organization and its publics, through transparency and honesty, while propaganda insists on a message that is intended primarily to serve the interests of the messenger. in order to influence public opinion and to manipulate other people’s beliefs by any means necessary, the two activities also present quite a lot of similarities.

  7. Practical and ethical considerations for using social media in community consultation and public disclosure activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Kyle L

    2014-10-01

    Social media are becoming increasingly integrated into both the clinical and the research dimensions of emergency medicine. They can provide methods for sharing crucial information to targeted individuals or groups in a rapid fashion. As a result, investigators conducting emergency research under the exception from prospective informed consent requirements are beginning to turn to social media platforms as they engage in required community consultation and public disclosure activities before their research begins. At present, there are limited data regarding how effectively social media have been used for performing those consultation and disclosure activities. This article offers investigators four specific areas to consider before using social media in consultation and outreach efforts. First, understand the forms of outreach social media platforms can provide. Second, recognize how those outreach methods relate to the specific goals of community consultation and public disclosure. Third, consider whether or not the intended audiences of community consultation and public disclosure will be available via social media. Finally, think about how social media outreach efforts will be measured and assessed before consultation and disclosure activities are under way. © 2014 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. The other invisible hand: delivering public services through choice and competition

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Le Grand, Julian

    2007-01-01

    ... problems with public services and hence to an American audience. This has the additional benefit of showing how the book's arguments can be applied outside the British context and thereby enhancin...

  9. Evaluation of susceptibility of polymer and rubber materials intended into contact with drinking water on biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczotko, Maciej; Stankiewicz, Agnieszka; Jamsheer-Bratkowska, Małgorzata

    Plumbing materials in water distribution networks and indoor installations are constantly evolving. The application of new, more economical solutions with plastic materials eliminates the corrosion problems, however, do not fully protect the consumer against secondary microbial contamination of water intended for human consumption caused by the presence of a biofilm on the inner surface of materials applied. National Institute of Public Health - National Institute of Hygiene conducts research aimed at a comprehensive assessment of this type of materials, resulting their further marketing authorization in Poland. Evaluation and comparison of polymer and rubber materials intended to contact with water for the susceptibility to biofilm formation. Plastic materials (polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl chloride) and rubber compounds (EPDM, NBR), from different manufacturers were evaluated. The study was carried out on 37 samples, which were divided into groups according to the material of which they were made. The testing was conducted according to the method based on conditions of dynamic flow of tap water. The level of bioluminescence in swabs taken from the surface of the tested materials was investigated with a luminometer. Evaluation of plastic materials does not show major objections in terms of hygienic assessment. All materials met the evaluation criteria established for methodology used. In case of rubber compounds, a substantial part clearly exceeded the limit values, which resulted in their negative assessment and elimination of these materials from domestic market. High susceptibility to the formation of biofilm in the group of products made of rubber compounds has been demonstrated. Examined plastic materials, except for several cases, do not revealed susceptibility to biofilm formation, but application of plastics for distribution of water intended for human consumption does not fully protect water from secondary, microbiological contamination. Complete

  10. Audience Commodification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeheian, Datis

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a research project aimed at developing a business model by changing the value-creation mechanism. The essence of this change is to persuade customers to perform actions in favour of the service provider. Such actions include responding to advertising clips to unlock value....

  11. Web usage data as a means of evaluating public health messaging and outreach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hao; Brimmer, Dana J; Lin, Jin-Mann S; Tumpey, Abbigail J; Reeves, William C

    2009-12-21

    The Internet is increasingly utilized by researchers, health care providers, and the public to seek medical information. The Internet also provides a powerful tool for public health messaging. Understanding the needs of the intended audience and how they use websites is critical for website developers to provide better services to the intended users. The aim of the study was to examine the utilization of the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) website at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We evaluated (1) CFS website utilization, (2) outcomes of a CDC CFS public awareness campaign, and (3) user behavior related to public awareness campaign materials and CFS continuing medical education courses. To describe and evaluate Web utilization, we collected Web usage data over an 18-month period and extracted page views, visits, referring domains, and geographic locations. We used page views as the primary measure for the CFS awareness outreach effort. We utilized market basket analysis and Markov chain model techniques to describe user behavior related to utilization of campaign materials and continuing medical education courses. The CDC CFS website received 3,647,736 views from more than 50 countries over the 18-month period and was the 33rd most popular CDC website. States with formal CFS programs had higher visiting density, such as Washington, DC; Georgia; and New Jersey. Most visits (71%) were from Web search engines, with 16% from non-search-engine sites and 12% from visitors who had bookmarked the site. The public awareness campaign was associated with a sharp increase and subsequent quick drop in Web traffic. Following the campaign, user interest shifted from information targeting consumer basic knowledge to information for health care professionals. The market basket analysis showed that visitors preferred the 60-second radio clip public service announcement over the 30-second one. Markov chain model results revealed that most visitors took the

  12. Review : Public service motivation—practical problems, scientific evidence and the role of a research community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenabeele, Wouter; Skelcher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This review article introduces Public Money & Management's theme papers and articles on public service motivation (PSM). PSM has proven to be a promising road in creating public performance and public value and this theme brings it to an even wider audience, ensuring that policy-makers and those

  13. Educating the Public about Deep-Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, V. S.

    2010-12-01

    , earthquakes, resource concentrations, oceans, atmospheric composition and flow, possibly even life), is made possible by the specific characteristics of Earth's interior. Accepting that knowledge of Earth’s interior is important, the next task is to let the public know what we have learned about the deep Earth, and how we have developed that scientific knowledge. How do we incorporate uncertainty in this work? How do we test hypotheses? What are the current open questions about the deep Earth that we seek to address through ongoing or future scientific research? The cognitive distance between research experts and the public must be bridged -- an interpretive task that requires substantial expertise and collaboration. Reaching the ultimate audience (the general public) requires the education and active involvement of K-12+ teachers, education boards, textbook publishers and mass-media producers. Information must be packaged to suit each intended audience, at the appropriate cognitive level. The effectiveness of the education-and-outreach element of any research enterprise largely determines whether the processes and results of science are transferred successfully to the public consciousness.

  14. Public Energy Education: Issues for Discussion. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Energy Education Task Force.

    This paper was intended to stimulate discussion of energy education issues at a conference on energy issues. The discussion ranges through numerous topics at issue in energy education including public energy awareness, definition of public education, the distinction between public education and public relations, and the presentation of a model…

  15. Scientists Have Feelings, Too. We Can Connect Emotions and Intellect to Reach Big Audiences, and Then Move Them.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum, L. F.

    2016-12-01

    Most of us in the science community have been rewarded for our brainpower throughout our lives. Therefore we've learned to rely heavily on our intellectual skills, even though we're clearly much more than disembodied brainiacs. What would happen if we tried to combine our emotions and intellect to communicate with the public? Would it foster deeper connections? NASA's Earth Right Now blog author Laura Faye Tenenbaum noticed that science communication sometimes flat-lines at "Wow," as if that's the only acceptable emotion we can feel. And even though emotions such as anger, frustration disappointment, or joy are messy and uncomfortable, and even though we sometimes worry that showing too much playfulness might prevent our scientific messages from being taken seriously, we decided that writing personal and emotional science stories would be worth a try. In January 2014, Tenenbaum brought her teaching and public speaking experience and her entertainment industry communication knowledge to the Earth Right Now blog. It quickly became one of NASA's most popular, most heavily commented and most shared blogs. We found that, when we combined "feeling" and "thinking," communication thrived and we were able to reach a much wider audience. We learned that to move people, we could begin by tapping into what we were moved by. We saw how lifting the mask of the starchy, nerdy stereotype to show that scientists are real people who experience deep emotions on the job is a best practice for enhancing the public perception of science. As a case study on the effect of using emotional content in communication, the Earth Right Now blog showed not only that it's possible, it's actually beneficial to include complex and authentic emotion in solid science communication.

  16. Laughter and collective awareness: The cinema auditorium as public space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanich, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at how the collective experience of laughter in the movie theater is related to the idea of the cinema as a public space. Through the non-verbal expression of laughter the audience ‘constructs’ a public space the viewers may not have been aware of to the same degree prior to the

  17. The Limitations of Quantitative Social Science for Informing Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrim, John; de Vries, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative social science (QSS) has the potential to make an important contribution to public policy. However it also has a number of limitations. The aim of this paper is to explain these limitations to a non-specialist audience and to identify a number of ways in which QSS research could be improved to better inform public policy.

  18. Tracks: A National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network Overview

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    In this podcast, Dr. Mike McGeehin, Director of CDC's Division of Environmental Hazards and Health Effects, provides an overview of the National Environmental Public Health Tracking Network. It highlights the Tracking Network's goal, how it will improve public health, its audience, and much more.

  19. Role of an audience response system in didactic attendance and assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneking, Lisa R; Grall, Kristi H; Min, Alice; Dreifuss, Bradley; Spear Ellinwood, Karen C

    2014-06-01

    The Residency Review Committee for Emergency Medicine mandates conference participation, but tracking attendance is difficult and fraught with errors. Feedback on didactic sessions, if not collected in real time, is challenging to obtain. We assessed whether an audience response system (ARS) would (1) encourage residents to arrive on time for lectures, and (2) increase anonymous real-time audience feedback. The ARS (Poll Everywhere) provided date/time-stamped responses to polls from residents, including a question to verify attendance and questions to gather immediate, anonymous postconference evaluations. Fisher exact test was used to calculate proportions. The proportion of residents who completed evaluations prior to the institution of the ARS was 8.75, and it was 59.42 after (P didactic sessions.

  20. The motivation underlying adolescents׳ intended time-frame for driving licensure and car ownership: A socio-ecological approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdardottir, Sigrun Birna; Kaplan, Sigal; Møller, Mette

    2014-01-01

    This study focuses on the adolescents׳ intended time-frame for obtaining a driving license and purchasing a car, as the delay of these decisions will likely affect the amount of travel and transport externalities. Semi-structured interviews with 50 Danish adolescents were analyzed by means...... are car enthusiasts who associate cars with high instrumental, affective, symbolic, and relational values, have car-oriented social networks, and imagine a car-oriented lifestyle. The second group are car pragmatists, who associate cars with high instrumental and relational values, perceive car expenses...... as a barrier, and imagine a car-oriented lifestyle only in the long-term. The third group are car skeptics, who have low interest in cars and imagine a cycling-oriented future. Policy implications concern (i) promoting shared-responsibility among individuals, public bodies, communities and policy makers...