WorldWideScience

Sample records for publications intended audience

  1. Corpora of Vietnamese texts: lexical effects of intended audience and publication place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Giang; Kohnert, Kathryn; Carney, Edward

    2008-02-01

    This article has two primary aims. The first is to introduce a new Vietnamese text-based corpus. The Corpora of Vietnamese Texts (CVT; Tang, 2006a) consists of approximately 1 million words drawn from newspapers and children's literature, and is available online at www.vnspeechtherapy.com/vi/CVT. The second aim is to investigate potential differences in lexical frequency and distributional characteristics in the CVT on the basis of place of publication (Vietnam or Western countries) and intended audience: adult-directed texts (newspapers) or child-directed texts (children's literature). We found clear differences between adult- and child-directed texts, particularly in the distributional frequencies of pronouns or kinship terms, which were more frequent in children's literature. Within child- and adult-directed texts, lexical characteristics did not differ on the basis of place of publication. Implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

  2. Can donated media placements reach intended audiences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Chu, Jennifer; Polonec, Lindsey

    2013-09-01

    Donated media placements for public service announcements (PSAs) can be difficult to secure, and may not always reach intended audiences. Strategies used by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Screen for Life: National Colorectal Cancer Action Campaign (SFL) to obtain donated media placements include producing a diverse mix of high-quality PSAs, co-branding with state and tribal health agencies, securing celebrity involvement, monitoring media trends to identify new distribution opportunities, and strategically timing the release of PSAs. To investigate open-ended recall of PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, CDC conducted 12 focus groups in three U.S. cities with men and women either nearing age 50 years, when screening is recommended to begin, or aged 50-75 years who were not in compliance with screening guidelines. In most focus groups, multiple participants recalled exposure to PSAs promoting colorectal cancer screening, and most of these individuals reported having seen SFL PSAs on television, in transit stations, or on the sides of public buses. Some participants reported exposure to SFL PSAs without prompting from the moderator, as they explained how they learned about the disease. Several participants reported learning key campaign messages from PSAs, including that colorectal cancer screening should begin at age 50 years and screening can find polyps so they can be removed before becoming cancerous. Donated media placements can reach and educate mass audiences, including millions of U.S. adults who have not been screened appropriately for colorectal cancer.

  3. Innovativeness and the Public Radio Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Wenmouth, Jr.; Krugman, Dean M.

    1981-01-01

    A public radio audience was surveyed to test the hypothesis that a relationship exists between innovativeness and public radio listening. Rather than supporting the hypothesis, findings indicate that the entertainment and information elements of public radio are the primary attractions for the public radio audience. (MER)

  4. Audience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Gulbrandsen, Ib Tunby

    2018-01-01

    The entry defines audiences in a digital, mediatized society as the people who, in their capacity of social actors, are attending to, negotiating the meaning of, and sometimes participating in the multimodal processes initiated or carried by institutional media. The first part of the entry discus...

  5. An audience with … the public, the representative, the sovereign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanese Niccolo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The right of audience, in common law, is the right of a lawyer to represent a client in a court. Royalty, the Pope and some Presidents grant audiences. What does the power to grant an audience consist in? And what does it mean to demand an audience (with? Through a reading of the way in which the vocabulary of theatre, acting and audience is involved in the generation of a theory of state by Hobbes and Rousseau, this paper looks to reopen these questions as a political resource for us to re-imagine and refigure our ways of being together. Through readings of Hobbes and Rousseau, it looks at the ways in which the performance of politics creates the public, the representative and the sovereign and the ways these figures interact. It proposes an alternative role for theatre as places of affective learning and a civic ethics of playfulness, in which the auto-institution of the state as an imagined collectivity is fully assumed.

  6. Research of Public Opinion: The First Step For Building Audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valmor Rhoden

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This article show how the Research of Public Opinion itself presents required for building audiences in potential. It details, to begin with, the delimitation of public opinion concept, articulating it over the social aspects from society over the so called mediatization. After that, it’s presented and analyzed the development, application, description and analyses process’ of data obtained trough opinion research, due to the achievement from Unipampa Fm, an academic radio program, at São Borja-RS. It’s identified that the Public Opinion Research is an important assistance and source for implementation and practice of communication.

  7. The Role of Intended Audience in Determining Modality Type: A Study in Relation to the Iranian Constitution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmood Naghizadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Language, as a means of communication, offers its speakers some tools by which they can convey the meanings they intend to. One of these tools is the use of modals. Modals help the speakers to express their attitudes and opinions, regarding what is going on in a sentence. Epistemic modality deals with possibility and prediction and deontic modality concerns permission and obligation. This study aims to figure out whether Iranian constitution, as a sample of the laws set by the governments, seems likely more to convey the sense of obligation and permission to the audience(applying deontic modality,or the writers of these laws are just narrating a piece of information. For this purpose, the frequency of each modal type within Iranian constitution is evaluated and considered as an indicator of the writers' attitudes. Modal verbs, auxiliary modals and adverbs in the text of Iranian constitution are analyzed and different types and subtypes of modals are distinguished. The results have shown that in 83% of the applied modals, the spirit of permission and obligation for implementing these laws is very crucially and fully presented by the tool of deontic modality which is used for such purposes. Most of these obligations target the government and the permissions are mostly dedicated to people.

  8. The Effects of Audience Interest, Responsiveness, and Evaluation on Public Speaking Anxiety and Related Variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacIntyre, Peter D.; Thivierge, Kimly A.; MacDonald, J. Renee

    1997-01-01

    Examines potential sources of public-speaking anxiety among undergraduate students stemming from the audience. Identifies three sources of anxiety: degree of formal evaluation, level of audience interest in the topic, and audience's responsiveness to the speaker. Measures willingness to speak and expected speech quality. Finds interest,…

  9. Using photographic art to connect researchers with public audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Haren, J. L.; Roberts, E.; Fields, J.; Johnson, B.; Saleska, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    Communication is a process by which information is exchanged between individuals. Before information can be exchanged both or al parties have to be willing to partake in the communication process. Climate change scientists are still struggling to present their message in part because the general public does not want to hear their message and in part of the personality gap between scientists and the general public (Weiler et al. 2011). This demonstrates the need for communication, through a variety of means, with the general public about who climate change researchers are and what they do, besides the message that they have to convey. This ';feeling' type - relying on personal value and impact of decisions on others- of communication, not common in the scientific community that requires facts, has been suggested to be more effective with the general public (Weiler et al. 2011). We created a multimedia exhibition, which aims to put an intimate human face on science with an approach based on the following ideas: 1) Art initiates the connection between researchers and public audiences through visual stimulation, and 2) The one-on-one experience with a researcher through audio-visual means increases public engagement with climate change science. The exhibition implements these ideas by first, building on the core artistic vision of an artist/photographer who has been accompanying us on field courses and expeditions in the Amazon basin, and second, by bringing the personal voice and stories of students and scientists to the images in which they are represented. Our approach expanded on these themes with a unique twist: we use artistic imagery and video to show the personality of researchers and the process of science. After an image has captured the attention of a visitor, they will be engaged by the intimacy of hearing the scientist explaining how they got there, what they were doing at that particular moment, and why it's relevant and important to the visitor's life

  10. Identifying like-minded audiences for global warming public engagement campaigns: an audience segmentation analysis and tool development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward W Maibach

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Achieving national reductions in greenhouse gas emissions will require public support for climate and energy policies and changes in population behaviors. Audience segmentation--a process of identifying coherent groups within a population--can be used to improve the effectiveness of public engagement campaigns. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Fall 2008, we conducted a nationally representative survey of American adults (n = 2,164 to identify audience segments for global warming public engagement campaigns. By subjecting multiple measures of global warming beliefs, behaviors, policy preferences, and issue engagement to latent class analysis, we identified six distinct segments ranging in size from 7 to 33% of the population. These six segments formed a continuum, from a segment of people who were highly worried, involved and supportive of policy responses (18%, to a segment of people who were completely unconcerned and strongly opposed to policy responses (7%. Three of the segments (totaling 70% were to varying degrees concerned about global warming and supportive of policy responses, two (totaling 18% were unsupportive, and one was largely disengaged (12%, having paid little attention to the issue. Certain behaviors and policy preferences varied greatly across these audiences, while others did not. Using discriminant analysis, we subsequently developed 36-item and 15-item instruments that can be used to categorize respondents with 91% and 84% accuracy, respectively. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In late 2008, Americans supported a broad range of policies and personal actions to reduce global warming, although there was wide variation among the six identified audiences. To enhance the impact of campaigns, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and businesses seeking to engage the public can selectively target one or more of these audiences rather than address an undifferentiated general population. Our screening instruments

  11. TRANSFORMATION OF THE INTERACTION OF PUBLIC RELATIONS AND PUBLIC DIPLOMACY WITH AN AUDIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Aleksandrovna Kontsevaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the phenomenon of transformation of the interaction of public relations and public diplomacy with an audience. Since 1980-s, experts have noted strengthening of the role of public in the communication process of PR and Public Diplomacy. Analysis of the work in this direction has revealed changes in the communication world order, due to several factors, which caused the transformation. These factors are: globalization of society (active tourism, developing from the end of the ХХ century, communication without geographical boundaries allowing people to send and receive information outside the country, technological development (penetration of Internet, in particular social networks, in the communication process and changed attitude of the audience to information (also due to the widespread use of social networks, allowing open access to personal information for strangers. Experts evaluate positively the changes in public relations and public diplomacy that have occurred under the influence of transformation of their interaction with the audience. The analysis made in the article is based on the works of renowned experts in this field.

  12. Bed Bug Clearinghouse -- Publications of General Interest (to all audiences)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This information is intended to help states, communities, and consumers prevent and control bed bug infestations. These resources include prevention tips, how to identify nymphs and adults, heat treatment, safe pesticide use, and some Spanish translations.

  13. Heckling in Hyde Park: Verbal Audience Participation in Popular Public Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McIlvenny, Paul

    1996-01-01

    Speakers' Corner is a multicultural setting in a London park at which the general public can actively participate in popular debate. A successful 'soap-box' orator should attract and keep an audience, elicit support from the crowd and gain applause; indeed, a mastery of the crowd, the discourse a...

  14. Designing virtual audiences for fear of public speaking training - an observation study on realistic nonverbal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Virtual Reality technology offers great possibilities for Cognitive Behavioral Therapy of fear of public speaking: Clients can be exposed to virtual fear-triggering stimuli (exposure) and are able to role-play in virtual environments, training social skills to overcome their fear. Usually, prototypical audience behavior (neutral, social and anti-social) serves as stimulus in virtual training sessions, although there is significant lack of theoretical basis on typical audience behavior. The study presented deals with the design of a realistic virtual presentation scenario. An audience (consisting of n=18 men and women) in an undergraduate seminar was observed during three frontal lecture sessions. Behavior frequency of four nonverbal dimensions (eye contact, facial expression, gesture, and posture) was rated by means of a quantitative content analysis. Results show audience behavior patterns which seem to be typical in frontal lecture contexts, like friendly and neutral face expressions. Additionally, combined and even synchronized behavioral patterns between participants who sit next to each other (like turning to the neighbor and start talking) were registered. The gathered data serve as empirical design basis for a virtual audience to be used in virtual training applications that stimulate the experiences of the participants in a realistic manner, thereby improving the experienced presence in the training application.

  15. Writing for publication: ensuring you find the right audience for your paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Maria J

    2010-12-01

    Often overlooked by prospective authors, one of the keys to successful writing projects is to find the right audience for your writing. Early in the writing process you should identify where you wish to publish. Publications have preferred styles of presentation and, crucially, defined remits so once you've identified the place of publication, it should determine how to write and structure your piece. Selecting the right place for your writing can also save you from wasting valuable time in submitting and then having your writing rejected because it didn't meet a publication's requirements. The revised and updated aims and scope of the Health Information and Libraries Journal are presented.

  16. Audience status moderates the effects of social support and self-efficacy on cardiovascular reactivity during public speaking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmert, Clayton J; Christenfeld, Nicholas; Kulik, James A

    2002-01-01

    Exaggerated blood pressure responses to stress are implicated in the development of cardiovascular disease, and an effort has been made to identify factors associated with such responses. One situational factor that impacts cardiovascular responses to stress is the presence of other people and their behavior. Here, we manipulated the status of the audience during a stressful public speaking task to explore its impact on reactivity and its possible role in moderating the effects of the speaker's confidence and the audience's response during the speech. Sixty-four normotensive female undergraduates, classified as having high or low self-efficacy for public speaking, gave a 5-min speech to an audience that responded positively or negatively. Half of the audiences were presented as public speaking experts and half as novices. Cardiovascular reactivity was greater for low-efficacy speakers and for those receiving positive feedback. Reactivity was also greater facing an expert audience. Furthermore, the effects of both self-efficacy and audience feedback were intensified before an expert audience. To understand social support effects, we must attend not only to characteristics of the recipient but also to those of the provider.

  17. The Worldviews Network: Digital Planetariums for Engaging Public Audiences in Global Change Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, R. J.; Koontz, K.; Yu, K.; Gardiner, N.; Connolly, R.; Mcconville, D.

    2013-12-01

    Utilizing the capabilities of digital planetariums, the Denver Museum of Nature & Science, the California Academy of Sciences, NOVA/WGBH, The Elumenati, and affiliates of the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration formed the Worldviews Network. The network's mission is to place Earth in its cosmic context to encourage participants to explore connections between social & ecological issues in their backyards. Worldviews launched with informal science institution partners: the American Museum of Natural History, the Perot Museum of Nature & Science, the Journey Museum, the Bell Museum of Natural History, the University of Michigan Natural History Museum, and the National Environmental Modeling & Analysis Center. Worldviews uses immersive visualization technology to engage public audiences on issues of global environmental change at a bioregional level. An immersive planetarium show and dialogue deepens public engagement and awareness of complex human-natural system interactions. People have altered the global climate system. Our communities are increasingly vulnerable to extreme weather events. Land use decisions that people make every day put both human lives and biodiversity at risk through direct and indirect effects. The Worldviews programs demonstrate the complex linkages between Earth's physical and biological systems and their relationship to human health, agriculture, infrastructure, water resources, and energy. We have focused on critical thresholds, such as freshwater use, biodiversity loss, land use change, and anthropogenic changes to the nitrogen and phosphorus cycles. We have been guided by environmental literacy principles to help our audiences understand that humans drive current trends in coupled human-natural systems--and that humans could choose to play an important role in reversing these trends. Museum and planetarium staff members join the Worldviews Network team and external advisers to produce programs that span cosmic, global, and

  18. Constitutive Rhetoric as an Aspect of Audience Design: The Public Texts of Canadian Suffragists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Katja

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a way of using the theory of audience design--how speakers position different audience groups as main addressees, overhearers, or bystanders--for written discourse. It focuses on main addressees, that is, those audience members who are expected to participate in and respond to a speaker's utterances. The text samples are…

  19. Constitutive Rhetoric as an Aspect of Audience Design: The Public Texts of Canadian Suffragists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, Katja

    2010-01-01

    This article offers a way of using the theory of audience design--how speakers position different audience groups as main addressees, overhearers, or bystanders--for written discourse. It focuses on main addressees, that is, those audience members who are expected to participate in and respond to a speaker's utterances. The text samples are…

  20. Working with invalid boundary conditions: lessons from the field for communicating about climate change with public audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, A.

    2015-12-01

    There is an ongoing need to communicate with public audiences about climate science, current and projected impacts, the importance of reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the requirement to prepare for changes that are likely unavoidable. It is essential that scientists are engaged and active in this effort. Scientists can be more effective communicators about climate change to non-scientific audiences if we recognize that some of the normal "boundary conditions" under which we operate do not need to apply. From how we are trained to how we think about our audience, there are some specific skills and practices that allow us to be more effective communicators. The author will review concepts for making our communication more effective based upon his experience from over 60 presentations about climate change to public audiences. These include expressing how your knowledge makes you feel, anticipating (and accepting) questions unconstrained by physics, respecting beliefs and values while separating them from evidence, and using the history of climate science to provide a compelling narrative. Proper attention to presentation structure (particularly an opening statement), speaking techniques for audience engagement, and effective use of presentation software are also important.

  1. Beyond the "general public": implications of audience characteristics for promoting species conservation in the Western Ghats hotspot, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagavel, Arun; Raghavan, Rajeev; Veríssimo, Diogo

    2014-03-01

    Understanding how different audience groups perceive wildlife is crucial for the promotion of biodiversity conservation, especially given the key role of flagship species in conservation campaigns. Although the heterogeneity in preferences reinforces the need for campaigns tailored to specific target audiences, many conservation education and awareness campaigns still claim to target the "general public". Audiences can be segmented according to social, economic, and cultural criteria across which species perceptions are known to vary. Different studies have investigated the preferences of different groups towards certain wildlife species, but these are largely confined to a single conservation stakeholder group, such as tourists, local communities, or potential donors in western countries. In this study, we seek to determine from a multi-stakeholder perspective, audience characteristics that influence perceptions towards wildlife at Valparai, a fragmented plateau in the Western Ghats region of the Western Ghats-Sri Lanka Hotspot. We found that stakeholder group membership was the most important characteristic followed by gender. While some characteristics had a wide-scale effect others were restricted to a few species. Our results emphasize the need to design conservation campaigns with specific audiences in mind, instead of the very often referred to "general public".

  2. Wisconsin Partnerships to Educate and Engage Public Audiences on Climate Change Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M. E.; Ackerman, S.; Rowley, P.; Crowley Conn, K.

    2011-12-01

    The complexity and scale of climate change-related challenges requires more than one strategy to share meaningful information with public audiences. This presentation will discuss a few initiatives to engage the public originating from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. First, a local partnership between the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) and the Aldo Leopold Nature Center (ALNC), an informal learning center with a new climate change "classroom" which recently acquired a Science on a Sphere (SOS) exhibit. Second, an informal education project funded by the NOAA Office of Education coordinated by CIMSS in partnership with the national SOS Network with the goal of helping museum docents share meaningful interpretation of real-time weather and climate data. CIMSS staff has been conducting weather and climate discussions on a Magic Planet display for several years. This "mini-SOS" is powered by a solar panel on the roof, modeling the essential Sun-Earth connection and the first principle of climate literacy. However, the convenient proximity of CIMSS and ALNC provides a perfect opportunity to test "SOS-scale" talking points posted on a weekly docent blog to the benefit of the entire SOS Network. Two other Wisconsin projects of note include the Wisconsin Initiative on Climate Change Impacts, a partnership between the University and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, and a pilot project between CIMSS and NOAA's National Weather Service to engage storm spotters in climate mitigation and stewardship. Ideally, the synergistic benefits and lessons learned from these collaborations can inform similar efforts in order to galvanize meaningful responses to climate change.

  3. Task assignment No. 3. Solar audience test summary report. [Reactions of viewers to public service advertisements about solar energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-03

    Audience response to a public service advertisement concerning solar energy was tested. The test was designed to answer four categories of questions: (1) what information on solar energy in general is conveyed by the advertisement. What additional information is desired; (2) what is the reaction of the respondent to specific components or characteristics of the advertisment; (3) how appropriate is the use of the American Indian in conveying the message; and (4) how likely is the respondent to take further action as a result of viewing the advertisment. The rationale and methods for answering each question are discussed. (LEW)

  4. Sciencetogo.Org: Using Humor to Engage a Public Audience with the Serious Issue of Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D. S.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.; Rabkin, D.; Wilson, R.

    2014-12-01

    A team of educators, scientists, and communication experts from multiple universities as well as a Science museum will report on the impact of ScienceToGo.org, which is an Out of Home Multi-Media (OHMM) exhibit targeting adults riding a major subway system. The campaign's goal is to design, implement, and study the efficacy of an OHMM model for free choice science learning about our changing climate. Subway riders represent a diverse and captive audience with most of them spending an average of one hour a day in the subway system. Through the use of specially designed OHMM such as train placards, platform posters, and virtual resources the campaign engages a potential audience of 500,000 riders/day with opportunities to learn climate change science informally. The primary goal of the ScienceToGo.org campaign is to engage, entertain, and educate the adult subway riding community in major U.S. city about climate change as a real, relevant, and solvable local challenge. A naturalistic quasi-experimental inquiry employing a mixed methodology approach best describes our research design with half of the subway system exposed to the project signage (experimental group) and the other half not being exposed to the project signage (control group). To identify possible outcomes, data was collected in the several forms: survey, analytic data associated with website, social media, web app, focus groups, and observations. This campaign is an example of how an individual's daily routine may be enhanced with an informal science learning opportunity. We see an urgent need to improve both the public's engagement with climate change science and to the profile of climate change science in formal education settings. The campaign makes deliberate use of humor and fun to engage a public and diverse audience with the serious issue of climate change. The research that will be presented will reveal some of the strengths and weaknesses of this strategy when communicating science to a diverse

  5. Audience Participation in Television Websites: a case study of the public broadcasting corporations of the autonomous communities in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AYERDI, Koldobika Meso

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of Internet and the Web 2.0 have multiplied the possibilities available to the television audience for dialoguing with the medium, beyond the television screen. This is in spite of the fact that interactivity in television is not something new. Participatory forms like electronic mail, chat, SMSs, forums, virtual meetings, surveys, blogs or social networks are acquiring a special relevance. At present, these tools are being preferentially incorporated by televisions and aimed at the younger public, given its special predilection for changes and for the use of new technologies. This communication analyses the incorporation of these new forms on the basis of a case study centred on the public televisions of the autonomous communities in Spain.

  6. Teaching Tacting of Private Events Based on Public Accompaniments: Effects of Contingencies, Audience Control, and Stimulus Complexity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stocco, Corey S; Thompson, Rachel H; Hart, John M

    2014-06-01

    Our current understanding of the role of private events in the science of behavior is based largely on Skinner's natural science interpretation of private events. Skinner described public accompaniments as one source of control for a verbal community to differentially reinforce verbal behavior regarding private events. In this study, we developed an experimental analogue to study variables influencing tacting of private events. The participant had exclusive access to one set of stimuli (the private stimuli), and the experimenter attempted to teach tacts for private stimuli based on their correspondence with public stimuli accessible to both the experimenter and participant. Results of experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated that reports of private stimuli were a function of degree of public-private correspondence, reinforcement contingency, and audience control. In some cases, we encountered reports controlled exclusively by public stimuli. Results of experiment 3 showed that public control was less likely when public stimuli were more complex and the experimenter had a unique behavioral history with respect to those stimuli that was not shared by the learner. The orderly patterns of data obtained suggest that analogue arrangements might be a useful, and even necessary, starting point for experimental investigations of how private events may enter into the analysis of behavior.

  7. ROMANIAN PUBLIC SERVICE TELEVISION: THE PURSUIT OF AUDIENCE IN A MULTI-PLATFORM CONTEXT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca MITU

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The increasing use of the internet has brought new challenges for the public service television system all around the world. Despite the free access to information and the use of digital technology, the Eastern European public service television is still in a shading cone mostly because of the small scale of their broadcasting markets. Recently the Romanian Public Television is undergoing a major financial crisis that has led to the closure of one of its TV channels, namely TVR News. This article offers an overview of the Romanian Public Service Television (TVR’s multi-platform strategy and aims to address the following questions: Is the concept of public service television still relevant in Romania? What are the present challenges and what is the future of the Romanian public service television in the age of multi-platform broadcasting?

  8. In search of an audience...

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stremersch (Stefan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractFor an academic, finding an audience is critical. However, finding an audience is not always easy for most marketing academics. This inaugural address explores what the challenges are in finding an audience, among fellow scholars, students, public policy, industry, or society in general.

  9. In search of an audience...

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stremersch (Stefan)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractFor an academic, finding an audience is critical. However, finding an audience is not always easy for most marketing academics. This inaugural address explores what the challenges are in finding an audience, among fellow scholars, students, public policy, industry, or society in general.

  10. Pop-up exhibits as an outreach tool: Connecting academic and public audiences with library resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, S.; Teplitzky, S.

    2016-12-01

    Subject specialty libraries like the Earth Sciences and Map Library at UC Berkeley thrive on active user communities, but promoting awareness of resources and services can be slow and time-consuming. In Fall 2014, two new librarians there introduced a series of monthly pop-up exhibits called "Maps and More" in order to help build that community. Now in their third year, the show-and-tell sessions are designed to lure visitors into the library and spark new connections among students, researchers and librarians, and renewed engagement with library collections. The librarians surveyed participants in spring 2015 and fall 2016 to assess the impact of "Maps and More" in terms of visitors' perception of the events and awareness of library services and materials. One significant finding from the spring 2015 survey is that a quarter of respondents had never been to the Earth Sciences and Map Library before the session. The exhibits draw in participants from a range of departments, including significant numbers from Seismology, Earth and Planetary Science, Geography, as well as members of the public. Sessions held on Cal Day - the university's annual public open house with 30-40,000 public visitors - were particularly good outreach experiences. Partnerships with other units have great potential for expanding the reach of these events. The Maps and More exhibits have proven to be a successful outreach tool for raising the profile of the library collections and services and helping users understand maps as research materials.

  11. Communicating Ocean Acidification and Climate Change to Public Audiences Using Scientific Data, Interactive Exploration Tools, and Visual Narratives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M. K.; Rossiter, A.; Spitzer, W.

    2016-12-01

    The Exploratorium, a hands-on science museum, explores local environmental conditions of San Francisco Bay to connect audiences to the larger global implications of ocean acidification and climate change. The work is centered in the Fisher Bay Observatory at Pier 15, a glass-walled gallery sited for explorations of urban San Francisco and the Bay. Interactive exhibits, high-resolution data visualizations, and mediated activities and conversations communicate to public audiences the impacts of excess carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and ocean. Through a 10-year education partnership with NOAA and two environmental literacy grants funded by its Office of Education, the Exploratorium has been part of two distinct but complementary strategies to increase climate literacy beyond traditional classroom settings. We will discuss two projects that address the ways complex scientific information can be transformed into learning opportunities for the public, providing information citizens can use for decision-making in their personal lives and their communities. The Visualizing Change project developed "visual narratives" that combine scientific visualizations and other images with story telling about the science and potential solutions of climate impacts on the ocean. The narratives were designed to engage curiosity and provide the public with hopeful and useful information to stimulate solutions-oriented behavior rather than to communicate despair about climate change. Training workshops for aquarium and museum docents prepare informal educators to use the narratives and help them frame productive conversations with the pubic. The Carbon Networks project, led by the Exploratorium, uses local and Pacific Rim data to explore the current state of climate change and ocean acidification. The Exploratorium collects and displays local ocean and atmosphere data as a member of the Central and Northern California Ocean Observing System and as an observing station for NOAA's Pacific

  12. Survey of the Target Audience for the Adult Learning Program Service (ALPS), with a Review of Pertinent Research Studies. A Report to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Urban Education, New York, NY.

    To provide information on the target audience for the Adult Learning Program Service (ALPS), a television series being developed by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, interviews were conducted with a small national sample of potential viewers. The main focus of the study was an examination of the social-psychological aspects of a decision…

  13. Teaching Audience Analysis with Presidential "Victory" Speeches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching students to understand the importance of audience analysis can be challenging. In fact, many public-speaking texts suggest methods for engaging audience analysis that is not always practical or possible (e.g., polling audiences before you speak to them). One practical way of understanding audience analysis is to see it at work in the text…

  14. The CERES S'COOL Project: Dynamic NASA Earth Science Education and Public Outreach for Formal and Informal Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crecelius, S.; Chambers, L. H.; Lewis, P. M., Jr.; Harte, T.

    2014-12-01

    in S'COOL participation. The S'COOL team works to provide both formal and informal audiences with an authentic STEM experience for cloud observers of all ages. This presentation will review best practices from 17 years of Earth Science Education and Public Outreach in reference to the S'COOL Project.

  15. Teaching Audience Adaptation Using Connected Presentations and Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opt, Susan K.

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Introduction to Communication, Public Speaking, Persuasion, Business Communication. Objective: This activity increases students' understanding of audience adaptation and improves their ability to adapt presentations to specific audiences.

  16. Teaching Audience Adaptation Using Connected Presentations and Teamwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opt, Susan K.

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Introduction to Communication, Public Speaking, Persuasion, Business Communication. Objective: This activity increases students' understanding of audience adaptation and improves their ability to adapt presentations to specific audiences.

  17. Climate and Global Change: Programs and Services Reaching Public and K-12 Audiences at a National Research Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Carbone, L.; Eastburn, T.; Munoz, R.; Lu, G.; Ammann, C.

    2004-05-01

    The study of climate and global change is an important on-going focal area for scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). Programs overseen by the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Office of Education and Outreach (UCAR-EO) help to translate NCAR's scientific programs, methodologies, and technologies, and their societal benefits to over 80,000 visitors to the NCAR Mesa Laboratory each year. This is accomplished through the implementation of exhibits, guided tours, an audiotour, programs for school groups, and a teachers' guide to exhibits which is currently in development. The Climate Discovery Exhibit unveiled in July 2003 offers visitors a visually engaging and informative overview of information, graphics, artifacts, and interactives describing the Earth system's dynamic processes that contribute to and mediate climate change, the history of our planet's changing climate, and perspectives on geographic locations and societies around the world that have potential to be impacted by a changing climate. Climate Futures, an addition to this exhibit to open in the summer of 2004, will help visitors to understand why scientists seek to model the global climate system and how information about past and current climate are used to validate models and build scenarios for Earth's future climate, while clarifying the effects of natural and human-induced contributions to these predictions. UCAR-EO further strives to enhance public understanding and to dispel misconceptions about climate change by bringing scientists' explanations to visitors who learn about atmospheric sciences while on staff-guided tours and/or while using an audiotour developed in 2003 with a grant from the National Science Foundation. With advanced reservations, a limited number of visitors may experience demonstrations of climate models in the NCAR Visualization Laboratory. An instructional module for approximately 5,000 visiting school children and a teachers guide

  18. Foule et public Crowd and audience. Reflections about the French theory of reception studies in the silent period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Plasseraud

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available La conception de la réception filmique de la théorie française, lors de la période muette, repose sur la notion de foule. Apparue au cours du xixe siècle, cette notion a donné lieu à de nombreuses appréciations, que l’on retrouve dans les textes sur le cinéma. Reprenant la conception dominante, héritée de la psychologie des foules vulgarisée par Gustave Le Bon, les cinéphobes considèrent le cinéma comme un lieu où les foules réunies soulagent ou excitent leurs bas-instincts. Les cinéphiles, en revanche, voient dans le cinéma la possibilité d’une refondation communautaire moderne où les foules retrouvent une spiritualité perdue. Pour eux, dans les salles obscures propices à une expérience hypnotique, les foules communient. C’est cette dernière conception qui est à la base de l’idée, inventée par Canudo et reprise, avec des nuances, par Delluc, Gance, Epstein ou L’Herbier, de « septième art ». Mais correspond-elle à la réalité des pratiques spectatorielles de l’époque ? Peut-on considérer le public de cinéma comme un ensemble uniforme, tel qu’il semble apparaître à travers l’idée de foule ? On peut penser que non, et que cet écart entre théorie et réalité de la réception filmique est une des raisons des difficultés du cinéma français face au cinéma américain. L’impasse théorique dans laquelle la notion de foule a entraîné la conception française de la réception filmique apparaît avec évidence à travers l’exemple de Germaine Dulac. La première parmi ses confrères français, elle exprima des réserves sur la capacité du cinéma à faire communier les foules. Elle reconnut que c’était le public dans sa diversité qui imposerait ses goûts aux fabricants de films, ce que les producteurs hollywoodiens avaient déjà assimilé.The film reception idea of French theory, in the silent period, is basically linked to the notion of crowd. This notion appeared during the19

  19. The importance of the selection of the audiences and the organization of media events within public awareness strategies for tissue banks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2008-12-01

    The main purpose of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Public Awareness Strategies for Tissue Banks is to provide guidance on organizing and running awareness campaigns, in order to consolidate tissue banking activities. Within the IAEA Public Awareness Strategies for Tissue Banks, there are two important topics, which need to be singled out due to their importance for a successful public and professional awareness campaign. These are the selection of the audiences and the organization of media events within a Communication Strategy. The experience in the field of tissue banking in several countries has shown that interaction between the public, the professional health care staff, the media and the tissue bank personnel is essential if the activities of the banks are to be successful. It must be emphasized however, that any public and professional awareness strategy will not be successful, unless it is considered as part of an integrated system that is adopted by the concerned Government.

  20. Audience Commodification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khajeheian, Datis

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a research project aimed at developing a business model by changing the value-creation mechanism. The essence of this change is to persuade customers to perform actions in favour of the service provider. Such actions include responding to advertising clips to unlock value....... The business model was generated from the concept of audience commodification and is based on the idea of looking at the users as source of a tradeable asset in business-to-business markets. Here, attention and actions are the assets that users pay to access the proposed value. The research includes two phases...... of surveys and experimentation. In the first phase, the tendency and acceptance level of users towards watching advertisements to unlock value are measured. In the next phase, a platform prototype is developed to test and understand user actions towards receiving value. The sample includes 52 users...

  1. Blogging and Audience Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Diane; Shea, Andrea; Wolsey, Thomas DeVere

    2011-01-01

    Weblogs or blogging may foreground audience needs for a written work and help novice authors grow in audience awareness and elicit and use audience feedback. A case study of a second-grade classroom compared students' growing audience awareness and the ways they addressed audience needs. Analysis of student written work, students' comments to…

  2. "POLAR-PALOOZA" and "International POLAR-PALOOZA": Taking Researchers on the Road to Engage Public Audiences across America, and Around the World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

    2010-12-01

    POLAR-PALOOZA and its companion project, "International POLAR-PALOOZA" shared the same central premise: that polar researchers, speaking for themselves, could be powerful communicators about the science and mission of the 4th International Polar Year, and could successfully engage a wide variety of public audiences across America and around the world. Supported for the US tour by NSF and NASA, and internationally by NSF alone, the project enlisted more than forty American researchers, and 14 polar scientists from Brazil, China and Australia, to participate in events at science centers and natural history museums, universities, public libraries and schools, and also for targeted outreach to special audiences such as young female researchers in Oklahoma, or the Downtown Rotary in San Diego. Evaluations by two different ISE groups found similar results domestically and internationally. When supported by HD video clips and presenting informally in teams of 3, 4, 5 and sometimes even 6 researchers as part of a fast-paced "show," the scientists themselves were almost always rated as among the most important aspects of the program. Significant understandings about polar science and global climate change resulted, along with a positive impression of the research undertaken during IPY. This presentation at Fall AGU 2010 will present results from the Summative Evaluation of both projects, show representative video clips of the public presentations, share photographs of some of the most dramatically varied venues and candid behind-the-scenes action, and share "Lessons Learned" that can be broadly applied to the dissemination of Earth and space science research. These include: collaboration with partner institutions is never easy. (Duh.) Authentic props (such as ice cores, when not trashed by TSA) make a powerful impression on audiences, and give reality to remote places and complex science. And, most importantly, that since 85% of Americans have never met a scientist, that

  3. Intended Use of a Building in Terms of Updating the Cadastral Database and Harmonizing the Data with other Public Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buśko Małgorzata

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the original wording of the Regulation on the register of land and buildings of 2001, in the real estate cadastre there was one attribute associated with the use of a building structure - its intended use, which was applicable until the amendment to the Regulation was introduced in 2013. Then, additional attributes were added, i.e. the type of the building according to the Classification of Fixed Assets (KST, the class of the building according to the Polish Classification of Types of Constructions (PKOB and, at the same time, the main functional use and other functions of the building remained in the Regulation as well. The record data on buildings are captured for the real estate cadastre from other data sets, for example those maintained by architectural and construction authorities. At the same time, the data contained in the cadastre, after they have been entered or changed in the database, are transferred to other registers, such as tax records, or land and mortgage court registers. This study is the result of the analysis of the laws applicable to the specific units and registers. A list of discrepancies in the attributes occurring in the different registers was prepared. The practical part of the study paid particular attention to the legal bases and procedures for entering the function of a building in the real estate cadastre, which is extremely significant, as it is the attribute determining the property tax basis.

  4. Keeping Your Audience in Mind: Applying Audience Analysis to the Design of Interactive Score Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Rivera, Juan Diego; Katz, Irvin R.

    2014-01-01

    Score reports have one or more intended audiences: the people who use the reports to make decisions about test takers, including teachers, administrators, parents and test takers. Attention to audience when designing a score report supports assessment validity by increasing the likelihood that score users will interpret and use assessment results…

  5. Keeping Your Audience in Mind: Applying Audience Analysis to the Design of Interactive Score Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata-Rivera, Juan Diego; Katz, Irvin R.

    2014-01-01

    Score reports have one or more intended audiences: the people who use the reports to make decisions about test takers, including teachers, administrators, parents and test takers. Attention to audience when designing a score report supports assessment validity by increasing the likelihood that score users will interpret and use assessment results…

  6. World Wide Web Homepages: An Examination of Content and Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Betty; And Others

    This paper shows how the content of a World Wide Web page is selected and how an examination of the intended audience influences content. Examples from the New Mexico Tech (NMT) Library homepage show what sources are selected and what level of detail is appropriate for the intended audience. Six fundamental functions of libraries and information…

  7. Clouds, weather, climate, and modeling for K-12 and public audiences from the Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Randall, D. A.; Denning, A.; Russell, R. M.; Gardiner, L. S.; Hatheway, B.; Jones, B.; Burt, M. A.; Genyuk, J.

    2010-12-01

    The need for improving the representation of cloud processes in climate models has been one of the most important limitations of the reliability of climate-change simulations. Now in its fifth year, the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Multi-scale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP) at Colorado State University (CSU) is addressing this problem through a revolutionary new approach to representing cloud processes on their native scales, including the cloud-scale interaction processes that are active in cloud systems. CMMAP has set ambitious education and human-resource goals to share basic information about the atmosphere, clouds, weather, climate, and modeling with diverse K-12 and public audiences. This is accomplished through collaborations in resource development and dissemination between CMMAP scientists, CSU’s Little Shop of Physics (LSOP) program, and the Windows to the Universe (W2U) program at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR). Little Shop of Physics develops new hands on science activities demonstrating basic science concepts fundamental to understanding atmospheric characteristics, weather, and climate. Videos capture demonstrations of children completing these activities which are broadcast to school districts and public television programs. CMMAP and LSOP educators and scientists partner in teaching a summer professional development workshops for teachers at CSU with a semester's worth of college-level content on the basic physics of the atmosphere, weather, climate, climate modeling, and climate change, as well as dozens of LSOP inquiry-based activities suitable for use in classrooms. The W2U project complements these efforts by developing and broadly disseminating new CMMAP-related online content pages, animations, interactives, image galleries, scientists’ biographies, and LSOP videos to K-12 and public audiences. Reaching nearly 20 million users annually, W2U is highly valued as a curriculum enhancement

  8. Knowing Your Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmgren, Dallin

    1989-01-01

    Talks to English teachers about the importance of knowing their audience--the students. Encourages teachers to continue to be humanitarians even though they can not always see the good they are doing for their audience. (MG)

  9. A prepared speech in front of a pre-recorded audience: subjective, physiological, and neuroendocrine responses to the Leiden Public Speaking Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenberg, P Michiel; Bokhorst, Caroline L; Miers, Anne C; Sumter, Sindy R; Kallen, Victor L; van Pelt, Johannes; Blöte, Anke W

    2009-10-01

    This study describes a new public speaking protocol for youth. The main question asked whether a speech prepared at home and given in front of a pre-recorded audience creates a condition of social-evaluative threat. Findings showed that, on average, this task elicits a moderate stress response in a community sample of 83 12- to 15-year-old adolescents. During the speech, participants reported feeling more nervous and having higher heart rate and sweatiness of the hands than at baseline or recovery. Likewise, physiological (heart rate and skin conductance) and neuroendocrine (cortisol) activity were higher during the speech than at baseline or recovery. Additionally, an anticipation effect was observed: baseline levels were higher than recovery levels for most variables. Taking the anticipation and speech response together, a substantial cortisol response was observed for 55% of participants. The findings indicate that the Leiden Public Speaking Task might be particularly suited to investigate individual differences in sensitivity to social-evaluative situations.

  10. Public speaking in front of an unreceptive audience increases implicit power motivation and its endocrine arousal signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiemers, Uta S; Schultheiss, Oliver C; Wolf, Oliver T

    2015-05-01

    The present study explored the motivational characteristics of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST; Kirschbaum, Pirke, & Hellhammer, 1993). Seventy-two participants either completed the public-speaking component of the TSST or, as a control condition, the friendly TSST (Wiemers, Schoofs, & Wolf, 2013) and wrote picture stories both before and after treatment. Stories were coded for motivational imagery related to power, achievement, and affiliation as well as for activity inhibition, a marker of functional brain lateralization during stress. The TSST had a specific arousing effect on power motivation, but not on other motivational needs, on activity inhibition, or on story length. TSST-elicited increases in power imagery, but not in achievement or affiliation imagery, were associated with a relatively greater salivary alpha-amylase response and with a relatively lesser salivary cortisol response. These findings suggest that the TSST specifically induces power-related stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Who Is Audience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeching, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Music conservatoires have generally neglected focusing on a key issue: that of audiences--their needs and wants, why they value particular music, and how music actually functions in any particular community. Yet audience is typically a musician's first contact with the "real world"; understanding audience (one's market or customers) is…

  12. Monty Roberts’ Public Demonstrations: Preliminary Report on the Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability of Horses Undergoing Training during Live Audience Events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loni Loftus

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Effective training of horses relies on the trainer’s awareness of learning theory and equine ethology, and should be undertaken with skill and time. Some trainers, such as Monty Roberts, share their methods through the medium of public demonstrations. This paper describes the opportunistic analysis of beat-to-beat (RR intervals and heart rate variability (HRV of ten horses being used in Monty Roberts’ public demonstrations within the United Kingdom. RR and HRV was measured in the stable before training and during training. The HRV variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR, root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD, geometric means standard deviation 1 (SD1 and 2 (SD2, along with the low and high frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio were calculated. The minimum, average and maximum RR intervals were significantly lower in training (indicative of an increase in heart rate as measured in beats-per-minute than in the stable ( p = 0.0006; p = 0.01; p = 0.03. SDRR, RMSSD, SD1, SD2 and the LF/HF ratio were all significantly lower in training than in the stable ( p = 0.001; p = 0.049; p = 0.049; p = 0.001; p = 0.01. When comparing the HR and HRV of horses during Join-up ® to overall training, there were no significant differences in any variable with the exception of maximum RR which was significantly lower ( p = 0.007 during Join-up ® , indicative of short increases in physical exertion (canter associated with this training exercise. In conclusion, training of horses during public demonstrations is a low-moderate physiological, rather than psychological stressor for horses. The physiological stress responses observed within this study were comparable or less to those previously reported in the literature for horses being trained outside of public audience events. Furthermore, there is no evidence that the use of Join-up ® alters HR and HRV in a way to suggest that this training method negatively affects the psychological welfare

  13. Monty Roberts' Public Demonstrations: Preliminary Report on the Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability of Horses Undergoing Training during Live Audience Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Loni; Marks, Kelly; Jones-McVey, Rosie; Gonzales, Jose L; Fowler, Veronica L

    2016-09-09

    Effective training of horses relies on the trainer's awareness of learning theory and equine ethology, and should be undertaken with skill and time. Some trainers, such as Monty Roberts, share their methods through the medium of public demonstrations. This paper describes the opportunistic analysis of beat-to-beat (RR) intervals and heart rate variability (HRV) of ten horses being used in Monty Roberts' public demonstrations within the United Kingdom. RR and HRV was measured in the stable before training and during training. The HRV variables standard deviation of the RR interval (SDRR), root mean square of successive RR differences (RMSSD), geometric means standard deviation 1 (SD1) and 2 (SD2), along with the low and high frequency ratio (LF/HF ratio) were calculated. The minimum, average and maximum RR intervals were significantly lower in training (indicative of an increase in heart rate as measured in beats-per-minute) than in the stable ( p = 0.0006; p = 0.01; p = 0.03). SDRR, RMSSD, SD1, SD2 and the LF/HF ratio were all significantly lower in training than in the stable ( p = 0.001; p = 0.049; p = 0.049; p = 0.001; p = 0.01). When comparing the HR and HRV of horses during Join-up (®) to overall training, there were no significant differences in any variable with the exception of maximum RR which was significantly lower ( p = 0.007) during Join-up (®) , indicative of short increases in physical exertion (canter) associated with this training exercise. In conclusion, training of horses during public demonstrations is a low-moderate physiological, rather than psychological stressor for horses. The physiological stress responses observed within this study were comparable or less to those previously reported in the literature for horses being trained outside of public audience events. Furthermore, there is no evidence that the use of Join-up (®) alters HR and HRV in a way to suggest that this training method negatively affects the psychological welfare of

  14. Reaching "an audience that you would never dream of speaking to": influential public health researchers' views on the role of news media in influencing policy and public understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; Haynes, Abby; Derrick, Gemma; Sturk, Heidi; Hall, Wayne D; St George, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    While governments and academic institutions urge researchers to engage with news media, traditional academic values of public disengagement have inhibited many from giving high priority to media activity. In this interview-based study, the authors report on the views about news media engagement and strategies used by 36 peer-voted leading Australian public health researchers in 6 fields. The authors consider their views about the role and importance of media in influencing policy, their reflections on effective or ineffective media communicators, and strategies used by these researchers about how to best retain their credibility and influence while engaging with the news media. A willingness and capacity to engage with the mass media was seen as an essential attribute of influential public health researchers.

  15. Connecting with Your Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamchur, Carolyn

    1989-01-01

    A workshop model on presentation skills for teachers in the classroom is presented. The goals and techniques would apply to many teaching situations in the college classroom, as well as lectures and symposium presentations. Making a personal connection, focusing on audience, and empowering the audience are discussed. (MLW)

  16. Study on audience psychology and the guidance of public opinion in the media age%全媒体时代受众心理与舆论引导研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓廷

    2013-01-01

      在全媒体时代,媒体之间的融合和交互影响使舆论环境发生了深刻的变革。伴随着这种变革,受众心理特征也在其影响之下发生变迁。本文旨在通过对全媒体时代受众心理特征的分析进而探讨如何正确进行舆论引导的问题。%  In the age of new media, fusion and interaction between media to make public opinion environment has undergone profound changes. The psychology of audience characteristics have changed in under its influence. This paper aims to analyze the media audience psychological characteristics and then discusses how to correctly guide public opinion question.

  17. Engagement with physics across diverse festival audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Joseph; Stanley, Jessica; Davis, Nicola

    2016-07-01

    Science shows provide a method of introducing large public audiences to physics concepts in a nonformal learning environment. While these shows have the potential to provide novel means of educational engagement, it is often difficult to measure that engagement. We present a method of producing an interactive physics show that seeks to provide effective and measurable audience engagement. We share our results from piloting this method at a leading music and arts festival as well as a science festival. This method also facilitated the collection of opinions and feedback directly from the audience which helps explore the benefits and limitations of this type of nonformal engagement in physics education.

  18. Perelman's Universal Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, John W.

    1978-01-01

    Examines the concept of the universal audience as the basic factor of Chaim Perelman's rhetorical theory and concludes that it is subject to the same criticism as Rousseau's general will and Kant's categorical imperative. (JMF)

  19. Educational issues in clinical pharmacology: who are our audiences and what are their specialized needs? One specialized need: "understanding the role of veterinary medicine in public health".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathers, Claire M

    2002-07-01

    When considering educational issues and the need to update the curriculum for clinical pharmacologists for the new millennium, a number of questions must be raised. Who are our audiences? What are the specialized needs? This educational article identifies the audience, which includes those with diverse degrees such as MDs, PhDs, PharmDs, RNs, DVMs, and other non-MD prescribers working in academia, industry, clinical research organizations, and government in multifaceted disciplines requiring a knowledge base of physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry, anatomy, microbiology, pathology, medicine, and the drug development process of preclinical and clinical studies complete with protocols, pharmacokinetics, and statistics. One specialized current educational issue for clinical pharmacologists to understand is the impact of animal therapeutic and subtherapeutic use of antimicrobials on antibiotic use in human medicine.

  20. Intended Brand Associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koll, Oliver; von Wallpach, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    of actual consumer brand associations and management-intended brand associations (brand association match). The article presents results from two large-scale studies (3353 and 1201 respondents) involving one consumer goods and one service brand with multiple operationalizations of consumer response...... (attitudinal and behavioral). The results show that consumers with high brand association match show more positive brand response. However, after accounting for the valence of associations match does not add explanatory power. This outcome challenges a key foundation of brand management. The discussion......Brand managers exhibit considerable effort to define intended brand associations to anchor in consumers' minds. They follow a credo deeply rooted in branding literature: intended brand associations drive consumer response and brand equity. This article investigates the benefits of a strong overlap...

  1. Astronomy Outreach for Large and Unique Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowich, D.; Sparks, R. T.; Pompea, S. M.; Kendall, J. S.; Dugan, C.

    2013-04-01

    In this session, we discuss different approaches to reaching large audiences. In addition to star parties and astronomy events, the audiences for some of the events include music concerts or festivals, sick children and their families, minority communities, American Indian reservations, and tourist sites such as the National Mall. The goal is to bring science directly to the public—to people who attend astronomy events and to people who do not come to star parties, science museums, or science festivals. These programs allow the entire community to participate in astronomy activities to enhance the public appreciation of science. These programs attract large enthusiastic crowds often with young children participating in these family learning experiences. The public will become more informed, educated, and inspired about astronomy and will also be provided with information that will allow them to continue to learn after this outreach activity. Large and unique audiences often have common problems, and their solutions and the lessons learned will be presented. Interaction with the participants in this session will provide important community feedback used to improve astronomy outreach for large and unique audiences. New ways to expand astronomy outreach to new large audiences will be discussed.

  2. MEDIA AND THE AUDIENCE-DRIVEN DISSEMINATION OF NOTHINGNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Petra MARINESCU-NENCIU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available On the one hand, the present paper tries to figure out the premises for the nowadays twisted relationship existing between mass media and audience in times when the televisual message gets continuously adapted in order to fit the needs of a chameleonic globalized audience that contradicts the growing ratings by declaring its discontent regarding the received mediated information. Therefore, the article tries to explain why people keep watching TV and prioritize exactly the media providers that offer them the least of what they supposedly look for. On the other hand, the study intends to shed a new light over the twists that take place in the mass media realm itself. If until recently the media have been known as the best providers of instrumental information that helped the public control the surrounding environment, the lately growing interest in general information may conduct to a change of paradigm in the self-attributed functions of both new and old mass communication media.

  3. MEDIA AND THE AUDIENCE-DRIVEN DISSEMINATION OF NOTHINGNESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Petra MARINESCU-NENCIU

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available On the one hand, the present paper tries to figure out the premises for the nowadays twisted relationship existing between mass media and audience in times when the televisual message gets continuously adapted in order to fit the needs of a chameleonic globalized audience that contradicts the growing ratings by declaring its discontent regarding the received mediated information. Therefore, the article tries to explain why people keep watching TV and prioritize exactly the media providers that offer them the least of what they supposedly look for. On the other hand, the study intends to shed a new light over the twists that take place in the mass media realm itself. If until recently the media have been known as the best providers of instrumental information that helped the public control the surrounding environment, the lately growing interest in general information may conduct to a change of paradigm in the self-attributed functions of both new and old mass communication media.

  4. Facing the Audience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    and audience. Dialogic theory is applied toward an exploration of how humans make meaning (semiosis) on the basis of previous experience or knowledge. Three main Bakhtinian concepts are discussed in an attempt to gain understand theoretical understanding of the hybrid animated film: heteroglossia (multiple......This chapter explores machinima as a "hybrid animated film" or "hybrid text", with focus on the combination of machinima animation and live-action imagery. Machinima is used as an example of how "novel" or new forms of text evolve. The meaning-making processes of machinima filmmakers and audiences...... linguistic and cultural evolutions, and may even propel them. This essay concerns the dialogic theories on language and culture inspired by the Russian literary philosopher M. M. Bakhtin (1895-1975) applied to understanding machinima (realtime animation), which is seen as an example of “hybrid animated film...

  5. Capturing the Audience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Kim Christian; Kobbernagel, Christian; Peters, Chris

    that underlie established news paradigms (Peters and Witschge, 2014). This paper thus focuses on methodological challenges that impede efforts to understand such shifting audience practices on three levels: conducting longitudinal research; operationalizing cross-national studies with a genuine comparative......-in-the-life interviews, Q-sort methodology and think-aloud protocols, alongside recent Dutch and Danish data that expands upon this research. The results highlight tensions and inconsistencies in data and design that hinder meaningful research into ever-shifting audiences. We argue that in order to enable comparison......, research instruments must have a high degree of standardization. However, in order to be valid they must also be sensitive to specificities – both for the sake of being faithful to the media system of each specific country or time being compared and in order to be meaningful to the vernacular...

  6. Engagement with Physics across Diverse Festival Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Joseph; Stanley, Jessica; Davis, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Science shows provide a method of introducing large public audiences to physics concepts in a nonformal learning environment. While these shows have the potential to provide novel means of educational engagement, it is often difficult to measure that engagement. We present a method of producing an interactive physics show that seeks to provide…

  7. Language, gay pornography, and audience reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leap, William L

    2011-01-01

    Erotic imagery is an important component of gay pornographic cinema, particularly, where work of audience reception is concerned. However, to assume the audience engagement with the films is limited solely to the erotic realm is to underestimate the workings of ideological power in the context and aftermath of reception. For example, the director of the film under discussion here (Men of Israel; Lucas, 2009b) intended to present an erotic celebration of the nation-state. Yet, most viewers ignore the particulars of context in their comments about audience reception, placing the "Israeli" narrative within a broader framework, using transnational rather than film-specific criteria to guide their "reading" of the Israeli-centered narrative. This article uses as its entry point the language that viewers employ when describing their reactions to Men of Israel on a gay video club's Web site; this article shows how the work of audience reception may draw attention to a film's erotic details while invoking social and political messages that completely reframe the film's erotic narrative.

  8. Discourse swings in understanding audiences:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinhard, CarrieLynn D.

    and media professionals characterize the role of people in media engagings.  The initial conceptualization of “audience-as-commodity” was challenged by increased recognition of the audience as active consumers, or “audience-as-agent”.  Recently this recognition has led to the Hollywood media industry...

  9. Sleeping with the enemy: Audience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, Joke; Berg, Annika van den; Mol, Marloes

    2013-01-01

    Audience studies is not the vibrant field it was in its 1980s and early 1990s heyday. Cultural studies today has a more balanced interest in production, audiences and texts. A renewed focus in audience studies on everyday meaning production, identity and relations of power could benefit from recent

  10. Art and the Educated Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, James O.

    2010-01-01

    The important role audiences play in the workings of a well-ordered art world is seldom recognized. Aestheticians have little to say about audiences, and artists sometimes express disdain or even contempt for the judgment of audiences. I argue that valuable artworks are unlikely to be produced unless artists are responsive to a broad educated…

  11. Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA): Universities, Oceanographic Institutions, Science Centers and Aquariums Working Together to Improve Ocean Education and Public Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, S.; McDonnell, J.; Halversen, C.; Zimmerman, T.

    2006-12-01

    Ocean observatories have already demonstrated their ability to maintain long-term time series, capture episodic events, provide context for improved shipboard sampling, and improve accessibility to a broader range of participants. Communicating Ocean Sciences, an already existing college course (http://www.cacosee.net/collegecourse) from COSEE California has demonstrated its ability to teach future scientists essential communication skills. The NSF-funded Communicating Ocean Sciences to Informal Audiences (COSIA) project will leverage these experiences and others to demonstrate a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. The COSIA effort will be one of the pathfinders for ensuring that the new scientific results from the increasing U.S. investments in ocean observatories is effectively communicated to the nation, and will serve as a model for other fields. Our presentation will describe a long-term model for promoting effective science communication skills and techniques applicable to diverse audiences. COSIA established partnerships between informal science education institutions and universities nationwide to facilitate quality outreach by scientists and the delivery of rigorous, cutting edge science by informal educators while teaching future scientists (college students) essential communication skills. The COSIA model includes scientist-educator partnerships that develop and deliver a college course derived from COS that teaches communication skills through the understanding of learning theory specifically related to informal learning environments and the practice of these skills at aquariums and science centers. The goals of COSIA are to: provide a model for establishing substantive, long-term partnerships between scientists and informal science education institutions to meet their respective outreach needs; provide future scientists with experiences delivering outreach to informal

  12. Listening for Listeners: Two Educational Radio Stations Discover Audience Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavitsky, Alan G.

    Two pioneering public radio stations--WOSU-AM, licensed to the Ohio State University in Columbus, and WHA-AM, licensed to the University of Wisconsin in Madison--conducted audience research as early as the 1920s. The challenge for early education broadcasters became to adapt the existing audience research paradigm to their purposes, or to develop…

  13. Physical Activity in the Mass Media: An Audience Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ben J.; Bonfiglioli, Catriona M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity's role in promoting health is highlighted in public health campaigns, news and current affairs, reality television and other programs. An investigation of audience exposure, beliefs and reactions to media portrayals of physical activity offers insights into the salience and influence of this communication. An audience reception…

  14. Physical Activity in the Mass Media: An Audience Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ben J.; Bonfiglioli, Catriona M. F.

    2015-01-01

    Physical activity's role in promoting health is highlighted in public health campaigns, news and current affairs, reality television and other programs. An investigation of audience exposure, beliefs and reactions to media portrayals of physical activity offers insights into the salience and influence of this communication. An audience reception…

  15. Digital TV, advertising and audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângelo Cruz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the advertisingsegment and their relationship with the development process of the digital television. We intent to observe the new perspectives of production and consumption of media. Among other things, that involves the issues of interactivity, the exhaustion of the traditional media models, and the relationship of the new media with the audience, considering the analysis of the tripod: digital television, advertising and audience. In Brazil, with the implementation of the Brazilian System of Digital Television (SBTVD, the problem takes bigger proportions, as a consequence of the possibility to issue and track down the digital content consumed. That happens as a consequence of the consumer ability to watch the program withor without the commercial break. At the current model of television, the public is the legitimizing factor: the broadcasters issues the public a ention asan instrument to obtain pecuniary rewarding of theadvertisers. That model constitutes itself as the main funding source of the channels and networks. On the one hand, digital television represents an advantage at the quality of picture and audio, multiplying the capacity to transmit television signals and to transport new features and services. On the other hand, it seems impossible to transform this industry without some reaction. The many interests involved constitute the main cause of that scenario: the agents interested in advertising are those concerned with the role of ideology, the support of capitalism and the industrial culture. Considering all these questions, it seems almost impossible to produce deep chances,contrary to the interests involved.

  16. Scientist Participation in Education and Public Outreach - Using Web Tools to Communicate the Scientific Process and Engage an Audience in Understanding Planetary Science: Examples with Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Data (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petro, N. E.

    2013-12-01

    Scientists often speak to the public about their science and the current state of understanding of their field. While many talks (including those by this author) typically feature static plots, figures, diagrams, and the odd movie/animation/visualization (when technology allows), it is now possible, using the web to guide an audience through the thought process of how a scientist tackles certain questions. The presentation will highlight examples of web tools that effectively illustrate how datasets are used to address questions of lunar science. Why would a scientist use precious time during a talk to interact with data, in real time? Why not just show the results and move on? Through experience it is evident that illustrating how data is analyzed, even in a simple form, engages an audience, and demonstrates the thought process when interacting with data. While it is clear that scientists are unlikely to use such a tool to conduct science, it illustrates how a member of the public can engage with mission data. An example is discussed below. When discussing the geology of the Moon, there is an enormous volume of data that can be used to explain what we know (or think we know) and how we know it. For example, the QuickMap interface (http://www.actgate.com/home/quickmap.htm) enables interaction with a set of data (images, spectral data, topography, radar data) across the entire Moon (http://target.lroc.asu.edu/q3/). This webtool enables a speaker the opportunity (given adequate web connectivity) to talk about features, such as a crater, and show it from multiple perspectives (e.g., plan view, oblique, topographically exaggerated) in a logical flow. The tool enables illustration of topographic profiles, 3-D perspectives, and data overlays. Now, one might ask why doing this demonstration in real time is valuable, over a set of static slides. In some cases static slides are best, and doing any real time demos is unfeasible. However, guiding an engaged audience through

  17. Prevalence of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Other Staphylococcus Species in Raw Meat Samples Intended for Human Consumption in Benin City, Nigeria: Implications for Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Etinosa O; Beshiru, Abeni; Akporehe, Lucy U; Oviasogie, Faith E; Igbinosa, Owen O

    2016-09-24

    The present study was designed to characterize methicillin-resistant staphylococci from raw meat. A total of 126 meat samples were obtained from open markets between February and April, 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was carried out using the disc diffusion method. Molecular profiling was conducted using 16S rRNA, mecA, nuc, and PVL gene signatures were detected by polymerase chain reaction assay. Fifty isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus spp. were detected in 26 (52%) pork, 14 (28%) beef and 10 (20%) chicken samples. The staphylococcal isolates were identified through partial 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid (16S rRNA) nucleotide sequencing, and BLAST analysis of the gene sequence revealed 98%-100% staphylococcal similarity. All isolates from beef and chicken samples amplified the mecA gene, while 100% of the MRSA isolates amplified the PVL gene. The multidrug resistance profile (resistant to ≥1 antimicrobial agent in ≥3 classes of antimicrobial agents) of the staphylococcal isolates showed that 7 isolates were resistant to methicillin, penicillin, clindamycin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, kanamycin, amoxicillin, cloxacillin, erythromycin, vancomycin, and gentamycin. There was a significant regression effect from the multidrug-resistant profile on the number of isolates (p < 0.05) suggesting a consequence of the dissemination of resistant strains within bacterial populations. The findings of the present study indicate that raw meats in the Benin metropolis were possibly contaminated with pathogenic and multi-drug resistant staphylococci strains and therefore could constitute a risk to public health communities.

  18. Movies: the Audience Favorites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern screen art over its success to the use of folklore, myth, synthesis of the natural and supernatural, and a consistent orientation toward the most popular plot schemes. Their metaphorical appeal is not to the rational but to the emotional, through identification with the magic power of heroes and standardization of ideas, situations, characters and so on in compensation for dreams not realized in life, there are illusions – happy endings. In movies, TV shows, and music videos' rhythmic organization, viewers' feelings are influenced as much by the order of changing shots as by the content of productions. On the basis of the foregoing, it can be concluded that the media texts of popular culture obliged to a variety of factors for its success. These include: reliance on folklore and mythological sources, constancy metaphors, focus on consistent implementation of the most persistent plot schemes, the synthesis of the natural and the supernatural, the appeal not to rational and emotional, through the identification of (imaginary transformation in of active characters merge with the atmosphere, the aura of works, “magic power” of heroes, standardization (replication, unification, adaptation ideas, situations, characters, etc., mosaic, seriality, the compensation (of the cherished illusion, but not come true desires, the happy ending, the use of such rhythmic organization movies, TV shows, clips, where the feeling of the audience with the content of the frame affects the order of their shift; intuitive guessing subconscious audience interests, etc.

  19. PR Students Learn to Target Audiences through Computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalupa, Frank B.; Trotter, Edgar P.

    1979-01-01

    Describes an advanced course in public relations methods wherein students use an online computer terminal system to analyze up-to-date field data and to prepare realistic audience-targeted campaigns. (RL)

  20. Facing the Audience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    linguistic and cultural evolutions, and may even propel them. This essay concerns the dialogic theories on language and culture inspired by the Russian literary philosopher M. M. Bakhtin (1895-1975) applied to understanding machinima (realtime animation), which is seen as an example of “hybrid animated film......This chapter explores machinima as a "hybrid animated film" or "hybrid text", with focus on the combination of machinima animation and live-action imagery. Machinima is used as an example of how "novel" or new forms of text evolve. The meaning-making processes of machinima filmmakers and audiences...... of live action and the animated in filmmaking. The hybridity poses several theoretical challenges. On the one hand, understanding hybridity as an aspect of all texts, as any text builds on all previous texts or is intertextual. On the other hand, understanding the meaning-making process of filmmakers...

  1. Combined with selective audience psychology to promote the publicity quality of higher vocational medical colleges anduniversities, strengthen the connotation construction%结合受众选择性心理提升医学类高职院校宣传质量,强化内涵建设

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈小瑜

    2013-01-01

      受众的心理、态度、情感会影响宣传的效果,作为宣传工作者在开展宣传工作时应考虑受众到底在想什么,他们的内心活动到底有哪些特征,[1]根据这些特征来选择宣传内容、制订宣传方式,宣传才能取得良好的效果。宣传是一项系统工程,在宣传过程中,贯串着一系列战略、战术和方法问题。宣传工作者在开展工作中必须尊重宣传规律,遵循受众心理规律,讲求科学的宣传观,不断改进创新,打动受众的心,改变受众的态度,激发受众的情感,才能取得预期的宣传效果。%Psychological, emotional attitude of the audience will influence the effect of publicity, as a worker in the publicity work should consider what the audience to think about, what feature in their mind, [1] to select the propaganda content, according to these characteristics make publicity, in order to achieve good results. Publicity is a systematic engineering, in the promotion process, through a series of strategy, tactics and method. The propagandist must respect for the law in carrying out the work, follow the audience psychological rules, with the scientific concept of propaganda, constantly innovate, touch the hearts of the audience, change the audience's attitude, stimulate the audience's emotion, to achieve the expected publicity effect.

  2. The missing link: audience frames in the process model of framing effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drunen, A.S.; Vliegenthart, R.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; de Vreese, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    The process model of framing effects proposes that media frames affect public opinion via audience frames. However, there is a lack of research examining these audience frames. In this investigation we define and subsequently develop an empirical measurement of audience frames, which is applied to t

  3. 41 CFR 102-3.20 - How does this part meet the needs of its audience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the needs of its audience? 102-3.20 Section 102-3.20 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...? § 102-3.20 How does this part meet the needs of its audience? This Federal Advisory Committee Management part meets the general and specific needs of its audience by addressing the following issues...

  4. Hydroelectric development project at Thompson Falls on the Franquelin River : public inquiry report; Projet d'amenagement hydroelectrique des chutes a Thompson sur la riviere Franquelin : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-08-15

    Quebec's environmental public hearing board, the Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement (BAPE), met with the citizens in the municipality of Franquelin to hear their views on the proposed development of a hydroelectric generating station at the Thompson Falls on the Franquelin River. The hydroelectric project is being developed in collaboration with the Franquelin River Energy Society and the Group Axor Inc. It involves the construction of an 83 metre long, 8 metre high dam at the crest of the falls. The water level upstream of the dam would increase by 3 metres. The flood waters would create a water reservoir. The generating station would have a generating capacity of 8.8 MW with an annual electricity production of 33,200 MW. The promoter has also proposed the construction of bike paths and walking paths along the river. The participants at the public hearing were in general agreement with the development, although some expressed concern about fish and wildlife. However, in general they agreed that the project would be a strong economic force for the municipality with good fiscal benefits for the town. The project would also contribute to a more stable supply of potable water. If accepted, the construction would begin in 2009. refs., tabs., figs.

  5. A preliminary examination of audience-related communications issues for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, C.W.

    1991-04-01

    The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project will estimate radiation doses people may have received from exposure to radioactive materials released during past operations at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The HEDR Project was initiated in response to public concerns about possible health impacts from past releases of radioactive materials from Hanford. The TSP recognized early in the project that special mechanisms would be required to effectively communicate to the many different concerned audiences. Accordingly, the TSP directed PNL to examine methods for communicating causes and effects of uncertainties in the dose estimates. After considering the directive and discussing it with the Communications Subcommittee of the TSP, PNL undertook a broad investigation of communications methods to consider for inclusion in the TSP's current communications program. As part of this investigation, a literature review was conducted regarding risk communications. A key finding was that, in order to successfully communicate risk-related information, a thorough understanding of the knowledge level, concerns and information needs of the intended recipients (i.e., the audience) is necessary. Hence, a preliminary audience analysis was conducted as part of the present research. This report summarizes the results of this analysis. 1 ref., 9 tabs.

  6. POLAR-PALOOZA Polar Researchers and Arctic Residents Engage, Inform and Inspire Diverse Public Audiences by sharing Polar Science and Global Connections during the International Polar Year, using a New Model of Informal Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines-Stiles, G.; Akuginow, E.

    2006-12-01

    (Please note that the POLAR-PALOOZA initiative described in this Abstract is-as of 9/7/2006-"pending" for possible support from NSF and NASA as part of this year's IPY solicitation. Subject to decisions expected by 9/30, this presentation would either be withdrawn, or amplified with specific participants, locations and dates.) Despite the success of well-regarded movies like "March of the Penguins", the polar regions remain a great unknown for most people. Public knowledge about the Arctic and Antarctic, and the critical role of the Poles in the entire Earth system, is nonexistent, incomplete or burdened with misperceptions. The International Polar Years of 2007-2009-and associated "I*Y" science years such as IHY, IYPE and eGY-present a unique opportunity to change this. The people who can best effect this change are those who know the Poles best, through living or working there. Based on innovative but proven models, POLAR-PALOOZA will use three complementary strategies to engage, inform and inspire large public audiences. (1) A national tour, under the working title "Stories from a Changing Planet", will include in-person presentations at science centers, museums, libraries and schools across North America, including Canada and Mexico. The presentations will be augmented by High Definition Video taped on location at the Poles, audio and video podcasts, and special education and outreach activities for targeted audiences. "Stories from a Changing Planet" will provide diverse audiences with an exciting opportunity to meet and interact directly with polar experts, and to appreciate why the Poles and the research done there are directly relevant to their lives. (2) The "HiDef Video Science Story Capture Corps" is a team of professional videographers, using the latest generation of low-cost, high-quality cameras, deployed to both Poles. They will document the work of multiple researchers and projects, rather than focusing on one topic for a single broadcast program

  7. Social Network Analysis for the U.S. National Climate Assessment: A Tool for Improving the Transmission of Scientific Information to Public Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, J.; Frank, K.; Chen, T.

    2014-12-01

    The U.S. National Climate Assessment (NCA) is working with experts from Michigan State University to use social network analysis to analyze the NCA's outreach and engagement activities to improve upon these components for the ongoing, sustained assessment. The social network analysis diagrams the NCA's engagement with stakeholders around the country, showing how the network of stakeholders with whom the NCA engaged expanded over the course of the Third NCA. Showing the avenues for how information moves through a social system, social network analysis can be used to inform gaps in the types and locations of stakeholders engaged with, suggesting places to improve the flow of information. The social network analysis helped illuminate which stakeholders were involved in the Third NCA and which were missed, what key networks the NCA has engaged with, and to what extent these relationships have been sustained. This presentation will include examples of how the outcomes of the social network analysis can be used to better understand the engagement and outreach with a group of stakeholders, what networks in a particular group were engaged with, what the gaps were, and ways to improve in the future. It will also include suggestions for how to more effectively translate climate change information to stakeholders. This information can help inform the ongoing NCA on how to more successfully reach stakeholder groups and improve its public engagement and outreach.

  8. Emergent health risks and audience information engagement on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A

    2016-03-01

    Social media can effectively reach large audiences and serve as an indicator for the public's sentiment and engagement in situations of disease outbreaks. This study used Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Facebook posts between March 18 and October 31, 2014, surrounding the 2014 Ebola outbreak, to look at the audience engagement with online health information. The CDC submitted fewer posts about Ebola than about non-Ebola topics, but audience engagement with Ebola posts was significantly higher, and men were more interested in Ebola posts and submitted more comments per user.

  9. Multiscreen television and audience research: the case of regional channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Medina

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available TV content can be enjoyed on multiple screens not only on the TV set. This is what we called Smart or Connected TV, that is to say, an online and interactive television that enables personalized and on demand consumption through a variety of deliveries. The development of connected TV needs new audience measurement systems that allow monitoring the audience across multiple screens. Only a suitable measuring method allows to know the audience for content management and advertising sales.The firstobjective of this paper is to analyze whether the public regional public television in Spain also made this offer. We have chosen the Catalan Corporation of Audiovisual Media (CCMA and EITB, the Basque Radio and Television (EITB. Our second goal is to study the need of new audience measurement systems for this regional television and make suggestions that could help them to exploit the new sources of revenue.

  10. Peer pressure to "Fat talk": Does audience type influence how women portray their body image?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Ashley B; Martz, Denise M; Bazzini, Doris G

    2007-04-01

    "Fat talk" describes women discussing their bodies disparangingly for impression management while interacting with one another. This study examined whether college females deliberately alter their self-reported body image according to characteristics of their prospective audience. This study was a mixed experimental design with four audience conditions (private, public, female audience, male audience) as the between-subjects factor and time across trials as the within-subjects factor using college females as participants (N=100). Pre versus posttest changes on the Body Esteem Scale (BES) and the Body Weight Figure Assessment (BWFA) served as the dependent variables. It was hypothesized that body image would decrease to indicate self-derogation (fat talk) in the public audience and female audience conditions, whereas body image would increase in the male audience condition. These hypotheses were not supported using repeated measures ANOVA. Strengths and weaknesses of the study are discussed.

  11. Rational Wizards: Audience Interpreters in French Television

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Bourdon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper will tell the story of the smallgroup of people who, in France, have been in charge of the measurement and theappreciation of the audience of television, and had to invent audience research,to organize it and to communicate its results to "clients" whodepended on it much earlier than usually assumed: television managers andprofessionals, public authorities, and, last but not least, advertisers. The paper will explore both change andcontinuity. First, change: the professional origin and training of measurerschanged much over the years. In the early days, they could have an almostliterary profile. The first person in charge of the audience at the RadioTélévision Française was a teacher of philosophy. His followers had a formationin sociology and semiology. They all insisted on the fact that they were not"simply" measurers, and also worried about appreciation, quality,culture. They always figures did produce figures, but rarely only about thenumber of people present in front of the screen, mostly about satisfaction,appreciation, preferences for given genres, viewing habits. As there was onlyone channel – until 1964, with the number of TV sets rising sharply, ratings,in the modern sense, were not critical.Things started to change gradually. In 1974,the public broadcasting corporation was divided into several companies,including three competing channels. The service in charge of measuring audiencewas put under the direct authority of the Prime Minister. Audience figuresplayed a part in the distribution of resources, not only advertising but throughthe license fee sharing. However, the law also provided a clause about an indexof quality, which never functioned satisfactorily, although the service incharge of audiences put much effort into it. In 1985, around the time of deregulation,change came. From outside, this was translated into the rise of daily,detailed, fast produced figures of the audience through audimeters, thenpeoplemeters

  12. The science of science outreach: methods to maximise audience engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, Kathryn; Lane, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    Effective public engagement relies on a clear understanding of public audiences; their existing knowledge base and their learning preferences. Scientific content that is effective in academic spheres is not necessarily popular in the public domain. This may be due to content (e.g. beginner level to advanced terminology); presentation style (graphical, text, multimedia); audience demographic (children to adults); and entertainment value. Over the last few years, there has been a major expansion in the quantity and quality of science outreach material. For scientists, the production of outreach material, in any form, is the first giant leap to disseminating their knowledge to broader audiences. However, there is also a need to evaluate the performance of outreach material, so that its content and delivery style can be tailored and maximised for the target audience. We examine the Google Analytics data for climate science outreach website Climatica over a 12 month period in 2015. The site publishes regular posts, which take the form of short written articles, graphics, videos, or teaching resources, on all aspects of climate science. The site is publicised via social media including Twitter and Facebook. In particular, we assess website performance, in terms of website visits and post engagement. These are examined in the context of: post topic, post style, social media engagement, and the timing of post publication/advertisement. The findings of this investigation are used to explore audience preferences and mechanisms for future post development to maximise the use of this web resource.

  13. Videoethnographic approaches to audience research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildermuth, Norbert

      In my paper I will explore the methodological uses and epistemological consequences of videoethnography in audience studies. With reference to research done on young people and their media appropriations in Recife (Brazil), in December 2005, I will argue for the creative integration of video...... recordings in doing mediaethnographic audience research. Moreover, I will discuss the use and potentials of hypermedia in presenting the results of ethnographic audience research. Based on recent conceptualisations and theories of hypermodality and multimodal ethnography (Lemke, 2002; Idema, 2003; Dicks......'. Finally, considerations regarding a planned hypermediated presentation of my research project in Recife, will be related to the experiences made with video as tool of mediaethnographic investigation and analysis. How the potential of non-sequentiality enshrined in hypermedia applications can...

  14. Black Holes, Quasars, Blazars, and all that. . . How to explain them to a lay audience?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidani, Hamid; Mimouni, Jamal

    2011-06-01

    The popularisation of science is central to the culture of the citizen, and if astronomy make poets dream (and many others), astrophysics attracts young and old talents to science. To reveal in simple terms the stellar bestiary from the black holes to the quasars proceeds along this line. Black hole is still the object which is subject to most questions in any public talk on astronomy. How indeed does contemporary physics link the black hole, this stellar gravitational tomb, with the quasar, a galaxy gone mad? The tale is worth telling and makes indeed a beautiful story for contemporary young audience. Can it be told to our high school students with their modest scientific background? This is what we intend to do in this paper, spicing the sauce at the end with some new insights on the unified model of AGN.

  15. An Audience for the Aliens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This account of the making and sharing of self-authored digital videos in a Year 5 classroom focuses on the way that the children appear to be influenced by their awareness of audience. Drawing on evidence of video observation, written and moving image texts produced by the children and semi-structured interviews with them, I examine the factors…

  16. An Audience for the Aliens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryer, Theo

    2013-01-01

    This account of the making and sharing of self-authored digital videos in a Year 5 classroom focuses on the way that the children appear to be influenced by their awareness of audience. Drawing on evidence of video observation, written and moving image texts produced by the children and semi-structured interviews with them, I examine the factors…

  17. An Investigation of TV Audience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENNIFER LIM

    1996-01-01

    WITH 850 million viewers watching 300 million TV sets, China has the biggest TV audience in the world. Here, 72 percent of households with TVs. have more than one set. On average, urban citizens spend more than two hours watching TV every day. All the above data comes from the China Central Television Consultation Center of Information Investigation (CCTVCCII).

  18. Transition: Intended and unintended processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellman, M.

    2005-01-01

    An analysis of the relationship between transition as that was intended by the international financial institutions and transition as it actually happened. Attention is paid to what has been learned by experience about stabilisation, liberalisation and privatisation. Attention is also given to the

  19. The empirical analysis of the audience with the degree of satisfaction of "surging news" public account%"澎湃新闻"公众账号的受众使用与满意程度的实证分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛语蘩

    2015-01-01

    此篇文章运用丹尼斯·麦奎尔在受众研究中的"使用与满足"理论,对澎湃新闻的受众使用和满足程度这两个方面,进行了研究.本篇文中主要采用数据统计和采样的方法对"澎湃新闻"的受众进行了直观的分析.从而得出目前受众对新闻类APP的实际使用态度和内容需求.%This article uses Mcguire Denis in the audience research "the use and the satisfaction" theory, to the emotion news audience use and the satisfaction degree these two aspects, has carried on the research. This paper mainly uses the method of data statistics and sampling to analyze the audience of the surging news. So as to get the audience to the news APP the actual use of attitude and content needs.

  20. Modelling In-Store Consumer Behaviour Using Machine Learning and Digital Signage Audience Measurement Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ravnik, Robert; Solina, Franc; Žabkar, Vesna

    2014-01-01

    Audience adaptive digital signage is a new emerging tech- nology, where public broadcasting displays adapt their content to the audience demographic and temporal features. The collected audience measurement data can be used as a unique basis for statistical analysis of viewing patterns, interactive display applications and also for further research and observer modelling. Here, we use machine learning methods on real-world digital signage viewership data to predict consumer behav- iour in a r...

  1. The Imagined Audience and Privacy Concern on Facebook: Differences Between Producers and Consumers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumi Jung

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Facebook users share information with others by creating posts and specifying who should be able to see each post. Once a user creates a post, those who see it have the ability to copy and re-share the information. But, if the reader has a different understanding of the information in the post than the creator intended, he or she may use the information in ways that are contrary to the intentions of the original creator. This study examined whether post creators (Producers and readers (Consumers who are Facebook Friends had similar levels of privacy concern regarding how others might use the information in specific posts, and how their privacy concern about the post varied by whether the imagined audience consisted of Friends, Friends of Friends, or the general Public. The results showed that both Producers and Consumers had similar levels of privacy concern about a post shared with an imagined audience of Friends versus Friends of Friends. However, Consumers believed posts were more private than the Producers themselves did, and showed more privacy concern. This shows that post Consumers care about Producers’ privacy, perceive that they are co-owners of the information, and engage in boundary management with Producers.

  2. The Effects of Target Audience on Social Tagging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsarhan, Hesham

    2013-01-01

    Online social bookmarking systems allow users to assign tags (i.e., keywords) to represent the content of resources. Research on the effects of target audience on social tagging suggests that taggers select different tags for themselves, their community (e.g., family, friends, colleagues), and the general public (Panke & Gaiser, 2009; Pu &…

  3. Absent Audiences: Youth Identity Formation in Preparations for Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carol C.

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the use of audiences in preparation for public presentation by an urban youth organization in Camden, New Jersey (U.S.). Camden is an impoverished city with few opportunities for youth. The organization, a hybrid of youth development, technology, business, and college preparation, prepared youth for good jobs or college.…

  4. The advertising and children's audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.S. Teletov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of article. The article shows that today more and more citizens supply from advertising. Children's perception of the world is radically different from the adults’ perception. Modern advertising industry affects children's audience more and more. The aim of the article is to analyze the impact of advertising on children's audience with further proposals. The results of the analysis. Some social critics believe that advertising provides new information that helps to be more adaptive in society and to develop memory. Others think that advertising reduces mental activity, imposes ideals of beauty and effects family relationships. Modern advertising industry is increasingly effects children. It is profitable because it is easier to attract young audience who easy perceive new things, habits and tastes. Children audience hasn’t molded own lifestyle. Social activities of companies are not limited to charity. Advertising for children should not be difficult and confusing to children. Following the requirements of creation the socially responsible advertising can gain adherents not only among adults but also among children, who will become loyal to particular company and products which it produces over time. The algorithm for creating socially responsible advertising campaign for children is proposed. Authors proposed appropriate slogans for different applications. It is very difficult to predict the children’s reaction. Indifferent attitude to the creation of advertising can lead to destruction of children’s right values. Children get information from any source. Conclusions and directions of further researches should be conducted towards the need of social responsibility for creating advertising in general and advertising for particular child. Children more respond to images with audio accompaniment. Special attention should be paid to the creation of television advertising and advertisement.

  5. WHAT DOES LESBIAN AUDIENCE LIKE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ibiti

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to identify the mechanisms that define the pleasure (taste and disgust (disgust of the lesbian audience in receiving audiovisual set in lesbian communities. After viewing two stories constructed from the series The  L Word, 25 lesbians WERE interviewed in depth. Next, we conducted a qualitative content anaLysis of the interviews. The results are discussed from the theories of Entertainment (Media Psychology.

  6. Exploring Learning through Audience Interaction in Virtual Reality Dome Theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolellis, Panagiotis; Daradoumis, Thanasis

    Informal learning in public spaces like museums, science centers and planetariums is increasingly popular during the last years. Recent advancements in large-scale displays allowed contemporary technology-enhanced museums to get equipped with digital domes, some with real-time capabilities like Virtual Reality systems. By conducting extensive literature review we have come to the conclusion that little to no research has been carried out on the leaning outcomes that the combination of VR and audience interaction can provide in the immersive environments of dome theaters. Thus, we propose that audience collaboration in immersive virtual reality environments presents a promising approach to support effective learning in groups of school aged children.

  7. The impact of stage hypnosis on audience members and participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKillop, James; Jay Lynn, Steven; Meyer, Eric

    2004-07-01

    Before and after a stage-hypnosis performance, 67 audience members and 6 participants completed the Hypnotic Attitudes Questionnaire (HAQ), the Posthypnotic Experience Scale (PES), and several questions related to attitudes about performing in public. Audience members' beliefs about hypnosis (HAQ total and factor scores),experience ratings (PES factor scores: pleasantness, anger/irritability,anxiety), and responses to the performance-related questions changed in a positive direction after the performance. The participants in the show reported no significant pre- to postperformance changes. How-ever, there were indications that the on stage participants exhibited generally favorable attitudes toward hypnosis and performing before they engaged in the actual performance.

  8. Defining Audience Segments for Extension Programming Using Reported Water Conservation Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Paul; Ott, Emily; Wilber, Wendy; Gouldthorpe, Jessica; Racevskis, Laila

    2013-01-01

    A tool from social marketing can help Extension agents understand distinct audience segments among their constituents. Defining targeted audiences for Extension programming is a first step to influencing behavior change among the public. An online survey was conducted using an Extension email list for urban households receiving a monthly lawn and…

  9. EMOTIONAL CONTAGION AND MOOD IN CROWD SERVING AS AUDIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beno Arnejcic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The global world is gradually becoming a world of separated crowds despite the artificial wire and wireless connection through television and the Internet. Crowds remain a prevailing subject of research in different social studies, and the research of changes in the psychological structure of crowds and their characteristics is still of primary interest. The main focus of the research is on the interpretation of the results of the research paper about a special separated crowd called audience. It was observed how students, constituting the crowd, perceive a crowd on video. The observation was focused on the research of emotional contagion and mood in the crowd serving as audience. While watching a mass event on a big screen, the crowd serving as audience emotionally converges with someone else, in our case with public speakers.

  10. Videoethnographic approaches to audience research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wildermuth, Norbert

    and Mason, 1998; Dicks, Soyinka and Coffey, 2006) I will seek to show, by help of my own material, that the creative integration of different media may offer the reader and analyst a more adequate approximation of the richness of mediaethnographic knowledge than conventional textual presentations......  In my paper I will explore the methodological uses and epistemological consequences of videoethnography in audience studies. With reference to research done on young people and their media appropriations in Recife (Brazil), in December 2005, I will argue for the creative integration of video...

  11. Message Design and Audience Engagement with Tobacco Prevention Posts on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalova, Yulia A; Damiani, Rachel E

    2016-11-10

    Understanding the appropriate medium to communicate health promotion messages is vital for improving personal and societal health. As increasingly more people utilize social media for health information, public health practitioners use these platforms to engage an existing audience in health promotion messages. In this study, the relational framing theory was used as a lens for studying how message framing may influence social media audience engagement. Specifically, we assessed how posts from Tobacco Free Florida's Facebook page were framed as either dominant-submissive or affiliate-disaffiliate to an implied audience of either smokers, nonsmokers, active quitters, or a mixed audience, and the extent to which a direct call for engagement, in terms of a request to comment, like, or share the post, was used for audience engagement. A three-way interaction for the level of engagement through comments was significant, F(3217) = 7.11, p engagement, and varying implied audience choice played a role in audience engagement with smoking cessation posts on social media. Implied audiences of Tobacco Free Florida's posts included smokers, those who are trying to quit, and nonsmokers as health promotion can be targeted at the individual's health, social support infrastructure, or the well-being of the society, and implications for strategic message design and audience targeting are discussed.

  12. Characterizing Health Information for Different Target Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yueping; Hou, Zhen; Hou, Li; Li, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    Different groups of audiences in health care: health professionals and health consumers, each have different information needs. Health monographs targeting different audiences are created by leveraging readers' background knowledge. The NCI's Physician Data Query (PDQ®) Cancer Information Summaries provide parallel cancer information and education resources with different target audiences. In this paper, we used targeted audience-specific cancer information PDQs to measure characteristic differences on the element level between audiences. In addition, we compared vocabulary coverage. Results show a significant difference between the professional and patient version of cancer monographs in both content organization and vocabulary. This study provides a new view to assess targeted audience-specific health information, and helps editors to improve the quality and readability of health information.

  13. Teaching audience analysis to the technical student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debs, M. B.; Brillhart, L. V.

    1981-01-01

    Teaching audience analysis, as practiced in a technical writing course for engineering students, is discussed. Audience analysis is described as the task of defining the audience for a particular piece of writing and determining those characteristics of the audience which constrain the writer and effect reception of the message. A mature technical writing style that shows the tension produced when a text is written to be read and understood is considered in terms of audience analysis. Techniques include: (1) conveying to students the concept that a reader with certain expectations exist, (2) team teaching to preserve the context of a given technical discipline, and (3) assigning a technical report that addresses a variety of readers, thus establishing the complexity of audience oriented writing.

  14. Alcohol and tobacco advertising in black and general audience newspapers: targeting with message cues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elisia L; Caburnay, Charlene A; Rodgers, Shelly

    2011-07-01

    This study content analyzed 928 tobacco- and alcohol-related advertisements from a 3-year national sample of Black (n = 24) and general audience (n = 11) newspapers from 24 U.S. cities. The authors compared the frequency of tobacco and alcohol product and control advertising in Black versus general audience newspapers, as well as the presence of 5 message cues: model ethnicity, presence of health official, referral to resources, personal behavior mobilization, and localization. Results within health issues show that Black newspapers had more alcohol product advertising than did general audience newspapers. In contrast, Black newspapers had less alcohol and tobacco control advertising than general audience newspapers. Black newspapers' tobacco/alcohol product advertisements had more African American models than did general audience newspapers' tobacco/alcohol advertising, whereas general audience newspapers' tobacco control advertisements were significantly more likely to feature public health officials than ads in Black newspapers. Fewer message cues such as personal behavior mobilization, referral to resources, and localization were present in Black versus general audience newspapers. Results suggest that Black newspapers may have greater dependency than do general audience newspapers on these risk-related advertisements that target African American consumers. Given the current advertising environment, public health initiatives are needed to counter unhealthy alcohol product advertising messages that target vulnerable populations.

  15. The Imagined Audience on Social Network Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eden Litt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When people construct and share posts on social network sites like Facebook and Twitter, whom do they imagine as their audience? How do users describe this imagined audience? Do they have a sub-audience in mind (e.g., “friends who like reality television”? Do they share more broadly and abstractly (e.g., “the public”? Do such imaginings fluctuate each time a person posts? Using a mixed-methods approach involving a 2-month-long diary study of 119 diverse American adults and their 1,200 social network site posts, supplemented with follow-up interviews (N = 30, this study explores the imagined audience on social network sites. The findings reveal that even though users often interacted with large diverse audiences as they posted, they coped by envisioning either very broad abstract imagined audiences or more targeted specific imagined audiences composed of personal ties, professional ties, communal ties, and/or phantasmal ties. When people had target imagined audiences in mind, they were most often homogeneous and composed of people’s friends and family. Users’ imaginings typically fluctuated among these audience types as they posted even though the potential audience as per their posts’ privacy settings often did not change. The findings provide a list of audience types, as well as detailed descriptions, examples, and frequencies on which future research can build. With people’s online presence playing an important role for their reputations, these findings provide more insight into for whom people are managing their privacy and whom they have in mind as they share.

  16. Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence

    OpenAIRE

    Császi, Lajos

    2008-01-01

    In his paper "Towards a Cultural Framework of Audience Response and Television Violence" Lajos Császi argues that media violence is not a reification of social violence; rather, a popular ritual allowing contemporary societies to sublimate, to substitute, and to discuss aggression in the public sphere. Császi reviews the central questions of contemporary debates about television violence including Stuart Hall's thought on this topic and introduces the ideas of Elias, Geertz, Turner, Bettelhei...

  17. Personal Storytelling and Narrative as a Means for Climate Scientists to Engage and Inform Public Audiences - Illustrated by the Play '2071 - The World We'll Leave Our Grandchildren' Comissioned by the Royal Court Theatre, London and the Deutsches Schauspielhaus, Hamburg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapley, C. G.

    2015-12-01

    In order to engage greater public interest in science it is necessary to move beyond the traditional academic "information deficit" mode of communication, with its emphasis on the delivery and explantion of 'facts'. This is especially the case for topics such as climate science, which have the potential to provoke strong conscious or unconscious emotional and ideological audience reactions. The use of personalised narrative and storytelling offers a means to draw in non-experts in a way that overcomes barriers of disinterest or prejudice. The talk will address the role of climate scientists in communicating within the public square, and will use the play '2071 - The World We'll Leave Our Grandchildren" as an example of how theatre can provide an effective means of communicating complex and provocative knowledge and understanding. The play was commissioned by the Royal Court Theatre, London and the Deutshes Schauspielhaus, Hamburg. It received positive reviews and sold out at the London venue.

  18. PEMBUATAN APLIKASI AUDIENCE RESPONSE SYSTEM BERBASIS WEB DAN ANDROID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Leonardo Pisa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Audience Response Systems are widely used in various events as a media to gather information, to collect data, and to know the opinions of the general public towards particular issues, topics, news. Audience Response System can also be used to find out the client or customer satisfaction to the quality of products or services. Unfortunately most of the audience response systems that exist today are in the form of a physical (or remote device which is severely limited in use. Along with the development of technology, almost all people have a smartphone to support their daily activities. The physical remote device called a clicker can be replaced with an application or program that can be installed on smartphones, while the polls are created through the website. In this research, the Audience response system was built using Node.js, PhoneGap platform, and the WebSocket Socket.IO as Javascript library to support bi-directional data communications. Based on testing result, this application can run properly all the functionalities that have been mentioned such as login to the system, create a poll, join a poll, and give a vote. The realiability of the system is 93%..

  19. Rational Wizards: Audience Interpreters in French Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourdon, Jérôme; Méadel, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    abstractThis paper will tell the story of the smallgroup of people who, in France, have been in charge of the measurement and theappreciation of the audience of television, and had to invent audience research,to organize it and to communicate its results to "clients" whodepended on it much earlier t

  20. Rearticulating Audience Engagement: Social Media and Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moe, H.; Poell, T.; van Dijck, J.

    2016-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue on social media and television audience engagement sketches the key dimensions that affect how audiences are transformed through the development of social platforms. Building on the five contributions to the special issue, we identify three dimensions that dese

  1. Rearticulating Audience Engagement: Social Media and Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moe, H.; Poell, T.; van Dijck, J.

    2016-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue on social media and television audience engagement sketches the key dimensions that affect how audiences are transformed through the development of social platforms. Building on the five contributions to the special issue, we identify three dimensions that

  2. Attracting New Audiences through Special Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christyson, M. Jane

    1996-01-01

    Explores reasons to create special events, change existing events, or discontinue events, in the pursuit of new audiences. Describes surveys of usership at Cleveland Metroparks to identify new audiences. Effective event design and implementation requires effective advertising, which is expensive, so a discussion of fund development, branding, and…

  3. The Audience in Oral Interpretation: Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael, Ed.; Oschmann, Wendy, Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This journal issue deals with the ways in which elements of a literary text specify the manner in which an oral interpreter will present the text to an audience. After an introductory statement, four poems by a contemporary poet are presented as sample texts. Four commentators discuss the ways these poems might be interpreted to an audience, and…

  4. Rearticulating Audience Engagement: Social Media and Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Moe; T. Poell; J. van Dijck

    2015-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue on social media and television audience engagement sketches the key dimensions that affect how audiences are transformed through the development of social platforms. Building on the five contributions to the special issue, we identify three dimensions that dese

  5. Rational Wizards: Audience Interpreters in French Television

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourdon, Jérôme; Méadel, Cécile

    2013-01-01

    abstractThis paper will tell the story of the smallgroup of people who, in France, have been in charge of the measurement and theappreciation of the audience of television, and had to invent audience research,to organize it and to communicate its results to "clients" whodepended on it much earlier t

  6. Resource file: practical publications for energy management, edition III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-03-01

    The Resource File is an in-depth bibliography of 166 practical and action-oriented energy conservation publications and materials. It is a reference tool, designed for Federal, state, and local energy managers or people who are asked to recommend how-to conservation guides to the public. Each listing describes a publication's intended audience and provides a summary of its contents. Included are operations and maintenance manuals, life-cycle costing handbooks, home insulation manuals, films on fuel-saving driving techniques, and courses devoted exclusively to home weatherization. 166 items.

  7. The Merapi Interactive Project: Offering a Fancy Cross-Disciplinary Scientific Understanding of Merapi Volcano to a Wide Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, J.; Kerlow, I.

    2015-12-01

    The Merapi volcano is of great interest to a wide audience as it is one of the most dangerous volcanoes worldwide and a beautiful touristic spot. The scientific literature available on that volcano both in Earth and Social sciences is rich but mostly inaccessible to the public because of the scientific jargon and the restricted database access. Merapi Interactive aims at developing clear information and attractive content about Merapi for a wide audience. The project is being produced by the Art and Media Group at the Earth Observatory of Singapore, and it takes the shape of an e-book. It offers a consistent, comprehensive, and jargon-filtered synthesis of the main volcanic-risk related topics about Merapi: volcanic mechanisms, eruptive history, associated hazards and risks, the way inhabitants and scientists deal with it, and what daily life at Merapi looks like. The project provides a background to better understand volcanoes, and it points out some interactions between scientists and society. We propose two levels of interpretation: one that is understandable by 10-year old kids and above and an expert level with deeper presentations of specific topics. Thus, the Merapi Interactive project intends to provide an engaging and comprehensive interactive book that should interest kids, adults, as well as Earth Sciences undergraduates and academics. Merapi Interactive is scheduled for delivery in mid-2016.

  8. Characterizing and Reaching High-Risk Drinkers Using Audience Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Howard B.; Kirby, Susan D.; Donodeo, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Background Market or audience segmentation is widely used in social marketing efforts to help planners identify segments of a population to target for tailored program interventions. Market-based segments are typically defined by behaviors, attitudes, knowledge, opinions, or lifestyles. They are more helpful to health communication and marketing planning than epidemiologically-defined groups because market-based segments are similar in respect to how they behave or might react to marketing and communication efforts. However, market segmentation has rarely been used in alcohol research. As an illustration of its utility, we employed commercial data that describes the sociodemographic characteristics of high-risk drinkers as an audience segment; where they tend to live, lifestyles, interests, consumer behaviors, alcohol consumption behaviors, other health-related behaviors, and cultural values. Such information can be extremely valuable in targeting and planning public health campaigns, targeted mailings, prevention interventions and research efforts. Methods We describe the results of a segmentation analysis of those individuals who self-report consuming five or more drinks per drinking episode at least twice in the last 30-days. The study used the proprietary PRIZM™ audience segmentation database merged with Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) database. The top ten of the 66 PRIZM™ audience segments for this risky drinking pattern are described. For five of these segments we provide additional in-depth details about consumer behavior and the estimates of the market areas where these risky drinkers reside. Results The top ten audience segments (PRIZM clusters) most likely to engage in high-risk drinking are described. The cluster with the highest concentration of binge drinking behavior is referred to as the “Cyber Millenials.” This cluster is characterized as “the nation's tech-savvy singles

  9. Characterizing and reaching high-risk drinkers using audience segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Howard B; Kirby, Susan D; Donodeo, Fred

    2009-08-01

    Market or audience segmentation is widely used in social marketing efforts to help planners identify segments of a population to target for tailored program interventions. Market-based segments are typically defined by behaviors, attitudes, knowledge, opinions, or lifestyles. They are more helpful to health communication and marketing planning than epidemiologically defined groups because market-based segments are similar in respect to how they behave or might react to marketing and communication efforts. However, market segmentation has rarely been used in alcohol research. As an illustration of its utility, we employed commercial data that describes the sociodemographic characteristics of high-risk drinkers as an audience segment, including where they tend to live, lifestyles, interests, consumer behaviors, alcohol consumption behaviors, other health-related behaviors, and cultural values. Such information can be extremely valuable in targeting and planning public health campaigns, targeted mailings, prevention interventions, and research efforts. We described the results of a segmentation analysis of those individuals who self-reported to consume 5 or more drinks per drinking episode at least twice in the last 30 days. The study used the proprietary PRIZM (Claritas, Inc., San Diego, CA) audience segmentation database merged with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) database. The top 10 of the 66 PRIZM audience segments for this risky drinking pattern are described. For five of these segments we provided additional in-depth details about consumer behavior and the estimates of the market areas where these risky drinkers resided. The top 10 audience segments (PRIZM clusters) most likely to engage in high-risk drinking are described. The cluster with the highest concentration of binge-drinking behavior is referred to as the "Cyber Millenials." This cluster is characterized as "the nation's tech

  10. When do Logos Talk to their Audience?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Tore; Gabrielsen, Gorm

    2015-01-01

    This study is based on two experiments where the ability of a new logo to reach and audience is explored. The approach is inspired by cybernetics and is based on measuring the variation of the reception of a logo seen just once. The variation is measured as the combined variation of between...... to the audience. A big variation within-subject means that the individual receives a varied, deep, and nuanced message. The ability to do this rests partly on the ability to activate competences and experiences from the past and thus making sense. The findings are that few logo elements are received by audiences...

  11. Audience, consequence, and journal selection in toxic-exposure epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rier, David A

    2004-10-01

    Even preliminary toxic-exposure epidemiology papers can spark "media scares" and questionable reactions amongst the public. Concerns for the social consequences of publication can lead epidemiologists--despite the advantages of visible publication--to choose a more obscure outlet for potentially sensitive studies. Interviews with 61 US toxic-exposure epidemiologists indicate that investigators generally sought visible journals to transmit their work to the widest relevant audience. Yet up to 36-46% of this sample sometimes have sought or would seek to keep their research from a public who, they feared, might misuse their results. Implications for the boundaries between science and society (including evidence of hidden scientific activism and "inert" public activism) are discussed, and six hypotheses for further research are proposed.

  12. Issues related to seismic surveys in the Estuary and Gulf of St. Lawrence : public inquiry report; Les enjeux lies aux leves sismiques dans l'estuaire et le golfe du Saint-Laurent : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-08-01

    Quebec's Office of Public Inquiry on the Environment (Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement) conducted public hearings on the environmental issues associated with seismic surveys carried out in the Gulf of St. Lawrence and its estuaries for the purpose of petroleum and natural gas exploration. The inquiry focused on the effect of sound waves on aquatic ecosystems and marine organisms and the associated environmental, social and economic consequences of seismic surveys. Environmental groups, scientists, fishermen and the maritime tourist industry have been concerned with the impact of seismic surveys in the Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence since the autumn of 2002, when Hydro-Quebec publicized its 2002-2010 plan for oil and gas exploration and when Geophysical Service Inc. received a mandate from Hydro-Quebec to carry out seismic surveys in the area. This report presents 10 recommendations and 16 opinions resulting from 18 public hearings held in communities along the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Although the thousands of kilometres of seismic survey lines acquired in the Estuary and the Gulf of St. Lawrence since 1960 do not seem to have had any visible impact on the marine environment, the Commission has taken a precautionary approach and recommends that some practices should be limited until a review of literature demonstrates that seismic surveys do not affect the ecological integrity of the St. Lawrence for fisheries or ecotourism. 16 refs., 9 tabs., 5 figs., 2 appendices.

  13. As Conversations Unravel: A Reflection on Learning to Teach Adult Audiences Using Experience from School, Teacher, and Family Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kabir

    2016-01-01

    Teaching general adult audiences in art museums requires the teacher to consider different goals and priorities than those of school, teacher, or family programs. In this reflective essay, one gallery educator whose primary museum teaching experiences had been with the latter audiences discusses a transition to leading public tours. He describes…

  14. Effective Climate Communication with Difficult Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, S.

    2015-12-01

    Climate communication is often fraught with ideological baggage ("noise") that makes it very difficult to connect to audiences. In these cases, it is helpful to use "best practices" known from other fields of communication. Engaging audiences with authenticity, using plain language, respecting cultural and political differences, and a sprinkling of humor can go a long way toward establishing a connection. It's important to avoid common but polarizing tropes from popular media, and often quite helpful to frame climate issues in novel or unexpected ways that cut across entrenched political discourse. Emerging social science research Beyond ideology, climate change is Simple, Serious, and Solvable. Effective communication of these three key ideas can succeed when the science argument is carefully framed to avoid attack of the audience's ethical identity. Simple arguments from common sense and everyday experience are more successful than data. Serious consequences to values that resonate with the audience can be avoided by solutions that don't threaten those values.

  15. Engaging and Supporting Culturally Diverse Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, C.; Buxner, S.; Peticolas, L. M.; Mendez, B.; Acevedo, S.; Begay, D.; Higgins, M. L.; Norman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This two hour special workshop was held during the 2012 ASP conference in Tucson. There are a variety of reasons that science education needs to reach out to culturally diverse audiences. Each culture, and each individual community, has its own challenges; each brings special insight to science. What does the research say about engaging these different audiences? How can science educators attract and sustain programs with various cultures? How do the needs of our audiences vary with culture and within communities? Moderators Shupla, Sanlyn, and Peticolas invited a variety of presenters with expertise to share their experiences: Salvador Acevado, David Begay, Michelle Higgins, Bryan Mendez, and Dara Norman. During the first hour, presenters shared a variety of best practices for engaging and supporting culturally diverse audiences; in the second hour, participants and presenters discussed specific programmatic challenges and possible directions.

  16. The Disappearing Audience and Reflexive Visibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina Girginova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Contrary to popular opinion and some academic writing that celebrates the renewed visibility of new media audiences, this essay argues that they are increasingly going into retreat. To understand how new media audiences “disappear” from view of one another, I borrow from Brighenti’s typology of visibility and develop the idea of “reflexive visibility.” The latter describes the ability to socially orient ourselves in a digital environment through the textual and contextual cues of others—an activity that is of utmost importance not only to researchers wishing to “see” various audiences but also for audiences writ large, wishing to know themselves.

  17. How accessible was information about H1N1 flu? Literacy assessments of CDC guidance documents for different audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagassé, Lisa P; Rimal, Rajiv N; Smith, Katherine C; Storey, J Douglas; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Barnett, Daniel J; Omer, Saad B; Links, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the literacy level and readability of online communications about H1N1/09 influenza issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during the first month of outbreak. Documents were classified as targeting one of six audiences ranging in technical expertise. Flesch-Kincaid (FK) measure assessed literacy level for each group of documents. ANOVA models tested for differences in FK scores across target audiences and over time. Readability was assessed for documents targeting non-technical audiences using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM). Overall, there was a main-effect by audience, F(5, 82) = 29.72, P.05. A time-by-audience interaction was significant, F(10, 82) = 2.11, Ptargeting non-technical audiences were found to be text-heavy and densely-formatted. The vocabulary and writing style were found to adequately reflect audience needs. The reading level of CDC guidance documents about H1N1/09 influenza varied appropriately according to the intended audience; sub-optimal formatting and layout may have rendered some text difficult to comprehend.

  18. How accessible was information about H1N1 flu? Literacy assessments of CDC guidance documents for different audiences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa P Lagassé

    Full Text Available We assessed the literacy level and readability of online communications about H1N1/09 influenza issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC during the first month of outbreak. Documents were classified as targeting one of six audiences ranging in technical expertise. Flesch-Kincaid (FK measure assessed literacy level for each group of documents. ANOVA models tested for differences in FK scores across target audiences and over time. Readability was assessed for documents targeting non-technical audiences using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM. Overall, there was a main-effect by audience, F(5, 82 = 29.72, P.05. A time-by-audience interaction was significant, F(10, 82 = 2.11, P<.05. Documents targeting non-technical audiences were found to be text-heavy and densely-formatted. The vocabulary and writing style were found to adequately reflect audience needs. The reading level of CDC guidance documents about H1N1/09 influenza varied appropriately according to the intended audience; sub-optimal formatting and layout may have rendered some text difficult to comprehend.

  19. How Accessible Was Information about H1N1 Flu? Literacy Assessments of CDC Guidance Documents for Different Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagassé, Lisa P.; Rimal, Rajiv N.; Smith, Katherine C.; Storey, J. Douglas; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Barnett, Daniel J.; Omer, Saad B.; Links, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    We assessed the literacy level and readability of online communications about H1N1/09 influenza issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) during the first month of outbreak. Documents were classified as targeting one of six audiences ranging in technical expertise. Flesch-Kincaid (FK) measure assessed literacy level for each group of documents. ANOVA models tested for differences in FK scores across target audiences and over time. Readability was assessed for documents targeting non-technical audiences using the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM). Overall, there was a main-effect by audience, F(5, 82) = 29.72, P.05. A time-by-audience interaction was significant, F(10, 82) = 2.11, P<.05. Documents targeting non-technical audiences were found to be text-heavy and densely-formatted. The vocabulary and writing style were found to adequately reflect audience needs. The reading level of CDC guidance documents about H1N1/09 influenza varied appropriately according to the intended audience; sub-optimal formatting and layout may have rendered some text difficult to comprehend. PMID:22039401

  20. Harry Potter and the Susceptible Child Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Andersen, Kara Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Kara Lynn Andersen, in her paper "Harry Potter and the Susceptible Child Audience," argues for a rethinking of assumptions of child audiences as passive readers and viewers through an analysis of the Harry Potter phenomenon. Andersen argues that instead of categorizing children as passive and homogenous subjects of analysis, they should instead be incorporated as participants in the discourse about children's books and films. Although frequently figured as especially susceptible to the affect...

  1. To Crowdfund Research, Scientists Must Build an Audience for Their Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Jarrett E K; Ranganathan, Jai; Walker, Barbara L E; Faulkes, Zen

    2014-01-01

    As rates of traditional sources of scientific funding decline, scientists have become increasingly interested in crowdfunding as a means of bringing in new money for research. In fields where crowdfunding has become a major venue for fundraising such as the arts and technology, building an audience for one's work is key for successful crowdfunding. For science, to what extent does audience building, via engagement and outreach, increase a scientist's abilities to bring in money via crowdfunding? Here we report on an analysis of the #SciFund Challenge, a crowdfunding experiment in which 159 scientists attempted to crowdfund their research. Using data gathered from a survey of participants, internet metrics, and logs of project donations, we find that public engagement is the key to crowdfunding success. Building an audience or "fanbase" and actively engaging with that audience as well as seeking to broaden the reach of one's audience indirectly increases levels of funding. Audience size and effort interact to bring in more people to view a scientist's project proposal, leading to funding. We discuss how projects capable of raising levels of funds commensurate with traditional funding agencies will need to incorporate direct involvement of the public with science. We suggest that if scientists and research institutions wish to tap this new source of funds, they will need to encourage and reward activities that allow scientists to engage with the public.

  2. To Crowdfund Research, Scientists Must Build an Audience for Their Work.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarrett E K Byrnes

    Full Text Available As rates of traditional sources of scientific funding decline, scientists have become increasingly interested in crowdfunding as a means of bringing in new money for research. In fields where crowdfunding has become a major venue for fundraising such as the arts and technology, building an audience for one's work is key for successful crowdfunding. For science, to what extent does audience building, via engagement and outreach, increase a scientist's abilities to bring in money via crowdfunding? Here we report on an analysis of the #SciFund Challenge, a crowdfunding experiment in which 159 scientists attempted to crowdfund their research. Using data gathered from a survey of participants, internet metrics, and logs of project donations, we find that public engagement is the key to crowdfunding success. Building an audience or "fanbase" and actively engaging with that audience as well as seeking to broaden the reach of one's audience indirectly increases levels of funding. Audience size and effort interact to bring in more people to view a scientist's project proposal, leading to funding. We discuss how projects capable of raising levels of funds commensurate with traditional funding agencies will need to incorporate direct involvement of the public with science. We suggest that if scientists and research institutions wish to tap this new source of funds, they will need to encourage and reward activities that allow scientists to engage with the public.

  3. Advertising, Intended vs. unintended effects of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.A.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of television advertising on children and adolescents can be divided into two general types: intended and unintended. Intended effects are the effects that advertisers wish to achieve with their advertisements, and unintended effects include the often-undesired side effects of advertisin

  4. Predicting Intended Unethical Behavior of Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Barbara A.

    2008-01-01

    What is the likelihood that students would intend to act unethically in the work environment? The author measured business students' intended behavior for 4 hypothetical unethical situations by investigating the following determinants: belief toward the behavior, subjective norms (i.e., pressure), perceived behavioral control, perceived personal…

  5. Advertising, Intended vs. unintended effects of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.A.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of television advertising on children and adolescents can be divided into two general types: intended and unintended. Intended effects are the effects that advertisers wish to achieve with their advertisements, and unintended effects include the often-undesired side effects of

  6. Project to construct the 315 kV Chenier-Outaouais line : public inquiry report; Projet de construction d'une ligne a 315 kV, la ligne Chenier-Outaouais : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-09-15

    This paper discussed the proposed construction of a 315 kV power transmission line from the Chenier substation near Mirabel, Quebec to the Outaouais substation in Ange Gardien, Quebec. The 114 km long line will cross 14 municipalities, mostly across private properties. Three quarters of the line will cross agricultural land and the remainder will be through wooded areas. The proposed project requires 2 circuits and 6 conducting wires supported by metal pylons. Both the Chenier and Outaouais substations will require modifications to transformers, circuit switchgear and regulators. The infrastructure is expected to have a service life of 60 years. Quebec's environmental public hearing board, the Bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement (BAPE) examined the sustainability of the project with respect to environmental aspects, economic development, and public safety. The BAPE held public hearings in Montebello, Quebec to hear citizen's views regarding the project. Participants expressed concerns regarding noise, impact on wildlife, aesthetics and the health hazards of electromagnetic fields. It was concluded that the proposed line is necessary. The power failure following the ice storm in 1998 indicated that the region needs a more stable and reliable supply of electricity. This proposed project is within the objectives of Quebec's new energy strategy and will allow a higher volume of electricity exchange between Quebec and Ontario. refs., tabs., figs.

  7. Interface of Linguistic and Visual Information During Audience Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Kumiko

    2015-08-01

    Evidence suggests that speakers can take account of the addressee's needs when referring. However, what representations drive the speaker's audience design has been less clear. This study aims to go beyond previous studies by investigating the interplay between the visual and linguistic context during audience design. Speakers repeated subordinate descriptions (e.g., firefighter) given in the prior linguistic context less and used basic-level descriptions (e.g., man) more when the addressee did not hear the linguistic context than when s/he did. But crucially, this effect happened only when the referent lacked the visual attributes associated with the expressions (e.g., the referent was in plain clothes rather than in a firefighter uniform), so there was no other contextual cue available for the identification of the referent. This suggests that speakers flexibly use different contextual cues to help their addressee map the referring expression onto the intended referent. In addition, speakers used fewer pronouns when the addressee did not hear the linguistic antecedent than when s/he did. This suggests that although speakers may be egocentric during anaphoric reference (Fukumura & Van Gompel, 2012), they can cooperatively avoid pronouns when the linguistic antecedents were not shared with their addressee during initial reference.

  8. Project to construct a hydroelectric complex on the Romaine River : public inquiry report; Projet d'amenagement d'un complexe hydroelectrique sur la riviere Romaine : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-02-15

    Hydro-Quebec is proposing to build a 1,550 MW hydroelectric complex on the Romaine River, north of Havre-Saint-Pierre, Quebec. The complex would comprise a rockfill dam, a spillway, and a power plant with two generating units. The proposed development is subject to an environmental evaluation process and public consultation. Quebec's environmental public hearing board held a public hearing on the draft development of the project to hear the concerns and views of the public and stakeholders. The hearing focused on a number issues, such as reasons for the project, its location and socio-economic impacts. The cumulative environmental effects of the project were also examined. However, electric transmission lines to connect the hydroelectric project network constitute a separate environmental assessment. In its analysis, the public hearing board found that the project meets 3 objectives of Quebec's energy strategy, notably to strengthen the security of energy supply, use more energy as lever for economic development, and give more power to local communities and First Nations regarding energy development. The Board suggested that given that 4 reservoirs will be created, mitigative measures are required to protect forest birds, waterfowl, salmon and their habitat. The project will likely create many local jobs and the need for additional commercial and social services. This stimulation will provide economic opportunities in municipalities and First Nation communities. The Board concluded that the project is not likely to cause significant adverse environmental effects. However, this conclusion is conditional on the implementation of mitigation measures, compensation and monitoring provided by the developer. 24 refs., 13 tabs., 11 figs.

  9. Arctic Change Information for a Broad Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soreide, N. N.; Overland, J. E.; Calder, J.

    2002-12-01

    Demonstrable environmental changes have occurred in the Arctic over the past three decades. NOAA's Arctic Theme Page is a rich resource web site focused on high latitude studies and the Arctic, with links to widely distributed data and information focused on the Arctic. Included is a collection of essays on relevant topics by experts in Arctic research. The website has proven useful to a wide audience, including scientists, students, teachers, decision makers and the general public, as indicated through recognition by USA Today, Science magazine, etc. (http://www.arctic.noaa.gov) Working jointly with NSF and the University of Washington's Polar Science Center as part of the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, NOAA has developed a website for access to pan-Arctic time series spanning diverse data types including climate indices, atmospheric, oceanic, sea ice, terrestrial, biological and fisheries. Modest analysis functions and more detailed analysis results are provided. (http://www.unaami.noaa.gov/). This paper will describe development of an Artic Change Detection status website to provide a direct and comprehensive view of previous and ongoing change in the Arctic for a broad climate community. For example, composite metrics are developed using principal component analysis based on 86 multivariate pan-Arctic time series for seven data types. Two of these metrics can be interpreted as a regime change/trend component and an interdecadal component. Changes can also be visually observed through tracking of 28 separate biophysical indicators. Results will be presented in the form of a web site with relevant, easily understood, value-added knowledge backed by peer review from Arctic scientists and scientific journals.

  10. HotTips for Speakers: 25 Surefire Ways To Engage and Captivate Any Group or Audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abernathy, Rob; Reardon, Mark

    From managing stage fright to keeping the audience hanging on their every word, experienced public speakers have the techniques to make every presentation memorable. This book contains a collection of 25 strategies for public speaking that have already worked for many people. Each "HotTip" (strategy) has been tested and used with…

  11. Let's Talk about Sex: Audience Research of Flemish Teenage Television Viewers and Their View on Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Elke; Biltereyst, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Teenage sexual identity is shaped within a complex cultural landscape in which the issue of protecting the "innocent" (children/teens) from sexually suggestive images is high on the public agenda. Intimate relationships and sexuality have entered the public domain and are presented on the screen, offering audiences possible roles to play…

  12. 32 CFR 705.9 - Availability of motion pictures to external audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Availability of motion pictures to external... motion pictures to external audiences. (a) Public access. Navy and Marine Corps general motion pictures and motion picture projects not previously cleared for public exhibition will require clearance by...

  13. Let's Talk about Sex: Audience Research of Flemish Teenage Television Viewers and Their View on Sexuality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Damme, Elke; Biltereyst, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Teenage sexual identity is shaped within a complex cultural landscape in which the issue of protecting the "innocent" (children/teens) from sexually suggestive images is high on the public agenda. Intimate relationships and sexuality have entered the public domain and are presented on the screen, offering audiences possible roles to play…

  14. 政治对外宣传翻译探索--基于功能目的论与修辞受众的契合点%On Political Publicity-oriented C/E Translation-Based on the Integrating Points of Skopos and Rhetorical Audience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎琴

    2014-01-01

    当今,随着中国国际地位日益彰显,政治外宣材料已成为世界了解中国的重要媒介。翻译外宣材料,为使受众认同中国,塑造中国良好形象,应了解译文预期目的,关注译文受众,精心设计修辞话语。在此,以德国功能目的论与西方修辞受众思想的契合点为基础,结合具体政治外宣翻译案例,从外宣资料本身所含的政治意识、中西文化差异及汉英语言表达习惯等三个层面探究政治外宣翻译时应注意的事项。%Nowadays, political publicity materials play a more and more important role in getting the world to know China. During the translation of these materials, to build a good image and be well identified by foreign audience, the purpose and audience of the target text should all be taken into consideration. Under implications of Skopos theory and the concept of“audience” in west-ern rhetoric, the paper explores the points that translators should pay attention to during the translation from three aspects:the politi-cal consciousness, the differences between cultures and the difference between usages of language.

  15. Effect of Character-Audience Similarity on the Perceived Effectiveness of Antismoking PSAs via Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Minji; Shi, Rui; Cappella, Joseph N

    2016-10-01

    This study assesses the impact of character-audience similarity, a core aspect of tailored communication, on evaluation of antismoking public service announcements (PSAs). Smoker and persuader characters are distinguished to explore their different roles in message effectiveness. Daily adult smokers (n = 1,160) were exposed to four video PSAs randomly selected from a larger pool. Similarity scores were determined from matching in demographic (age, gender, race) and motivational factors (quitting status) between the audience and the PSA's characters. Results show that PSAs featuring distinctive smoker and/or persuader characters yielded significantly higher message engagement and perceived effectiveness (PE) than PSAs without characters. Given the presence of characters, smoker-audience similarity was positively associated with the engagement, which in turn enhanced PE. Persuader-audience similarity failed to predict increases in either engagement or PE.

  16. TV Audience Measurement with Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Shawndra

    2014-06-01

    TV audience measurement involves estimating the number of viewers tuned into a TV show at any given time as well as their demographics. First introduced shortly after commercial television broadcasting began in the late 1940s, audience measurement allowed the business of television to flourish by offering networks a way to quantify the monetary value of TV audiences for advertisers, who pay for the estimated number of eyeballs watching during commercials. The first measurement techniques suffered from multiple limitations because reliable, large-scale data were costly to acquire. Yet despite these limitations, measurement standards remained largely unchanged for decades until devices such as cable boxes, video-on-demand boxes, and cell phones, as well as web apps, Internet browser clicks, web queries, and social media activity, resulted in an explosion of digitally available data. TV viewers now leave digital traces that can be used to track almost every aspect of their daily lives, allowing the potential for large-scale aggregation across data sources for individual users and groups and enabling the tracking of more people on more dimensions for more shows. Data are now more comprehensive, available in real time, and cheaper to acquire, enabling accurate and fine-grained TV audience measurement. In this article, I discuss the evolution of audience measurement and what the recent data explosion means for the TV industry and academic research.

  17. Audience studies 2.0: on the theory, politics and method of qualitative audience research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, J.

    2009-01-01

    Audience research, this paper suggests, is an excellent field to test the claims of Media Studies 2.0. Moreover, 2.0 claims are a good means to review qualitative audience research itself too. Working from a broad strokes analysis of the theory, politics and method of interpretative research with au

  18. Flipping the Audience Script: An Activity That Integrates Research and Audience Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Chris; Hannah, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a flipped classroom activity that requires students to integrate research and audience analysis. The activity uses Twitter as a data source. In the activity, students identify a sample, collect customer tweets, and analyze the language of the tweets in an effort to construct knowledge about an audience's values, needs, and…

  19. Toward Audience Involvement: Extending Audiences of Written Physician Notes in a Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuch, Lee-Ann Kastman; Bakke, Abigail; Thomas-Pollei, Kimberly; Mackey, L. Elizabeth; Weinert, Craig

    2016-01-01

    This article explores rhetorical implications of extending the audience of written physician notes in hospital settings to include patients and/or family members (the OpenNotes program). Interviews of participating hospital patients and family members (n = 16) underscored the need for more complex understandings of audience beyond…

  20. The Active Audience? Gurus, Management Ideas and Consumer Variability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groß, C.; Heusinkveld, H.S.; Clark, T

    2015-01-01

    This study draws on an active audience perspective to develop a better understanding of mass audiences' attraction towards popular management ideas. It focuses on audience members' own experiences and, in particular, what audience activities actually play a role in shaping mass attraction, and how t

  1. Hearing or Ignoring Audience: the Dilemma of the Freshman Writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, Barbara

    Students work most productively when they feel free to move back and forth from ignoring audience to addressing it. Students should consider audience as they begin a writing task. Then they should get away from it all and simply write. If they find an audience inhibiting, they should feel free to ignore the idea of audience altogether or alter…

  2. From grand narratives of democracy to small expectations of participation : Audiences, citizenship, and interactive tools in digital journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Chris; Witschge, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    This article critically examines the invocation of democracy in the discourse of audience participation in digital journalism. Rather than simply restate the familiar grand narratives that traditionally described journalism's function for democracy (information source, watchdog, public representativ

  3. From grand narratives of democracy to small expectations of participation : Audiences, citizenship, and interactive tools in digital journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, Chris; Witschge, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    This article critically examines the invocation of democracy in the discourse of audience participation in digital journalism. Rather than simply restate the familiar grand narratives that traditionally described journalism's function for democracy (information source, watchdog, public

  4. Marketing to Your Target Audience: How Syracuse University Public Safety Reached Its Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Josh

    2008-01-01

    Every year, marketers spend millions of dollars trying to vie for the attention of that oh-so-lucrative demographic--the 18- to 24-year-old. For those people serving academic environments, this just happens to be the demographic of their entire clientele. So the challenge becomes how to grasp a slice of these attention spans distracted by…

  5. Audience Design and Social Relations in Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller-Cohen, Deborah

    2015-10-01

    This study asks two questions: (1) Do older adults modify their language based on age of the listener (audience design)? (2) Does social contact affect audience design in older adults? Older adults (n = 34; mean age = 82) engaged in an instructions task with two fictive listeners (a child and an adult) to test these questions. Results show that older adults used a greater total number of propositions and rapport-building devices and a lower type-token ratio when giving instructions to the child compared to the adult listener. Adults with more social interactions used more propositions when talking to a child. In addition, satisfaction with interactions was significantly positively related to task-tracking devices and negatively related to rapport-building devices by older adults. These results suggest that audience design and social relations are worth further study in language maintenance in older age.

  6. Gene cuisine or Frankenfood? The theory of reasoned action as an audience segmentation strategy for messages about genetically modified foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Kami J; Weiner, Judith; Parrott, Roxanne L

    2005-12-01

    Genetically modified (GM) foods are currently a controversial topic about which the lay public in the United States knows little. Formative research has demonstrated that the lay public is uncertain and concerned about GM foods. This study (N = 858) extends focus group research by using the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) to examine attitudes and subjective norms related to GM foods as a theoretical strategy for audience segmentation. A hierarchical cluster analysis revealed four unique audiences based on their attitude and subjective norm toward GM foods (ambivalent-biotech, antibiotech, biotech-normer, and biotech individual). Results are discussed in terms of the theoretical and practical significance for audience segmentation.

  7. Reaching Diverse Audiences through NOAO Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompea, Stephen M.; Sparks, R. T.; Walker, C. E.

    2009-01-01

    NOAO education programs are designed to reach diverse audiences. Examples described in this poster include the Hands-On Optics Project nationwide, an extension of the Hands-On Optics program at Boys and Girls Clubs in Arizona and in Hawaii, a professional development program for Navajo and Hopi teachers, a number of programs for the Tohono O'odham Nation, and a project collecting and reviewing Spanish language astronomy materials. Additionally NOAO is also involved in several local outreach projects for diverse and underserved audiences.

  8. Installation of the Rabaska methane terminal and associated infrastructure: public inquiry report; Projet d'implantation du terminal methanier Rabaska et des infrastructures connexes : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cosgrove, W.J. (comp.)

    2007-05-15

    In April 2004, a project was submitted to the federal and Quebec provincial authorities by Gaz Metro acting on behalf of the Rabaska Partnership to construct a methane terminal facility on the south shore of the St. Lawrence River, northeast of Levis, Quebec. The project was subject to an environmental assessment and public inquiry. Public consultations were held from October 10 to November 24, 2006, followed by a federal review panel. The second part of the public hearings allowed participants to voice their concerns and opinions on the project during 20 sessions that were held between January 29 and February 12, 2007. The construction of the liquid natural gas import facility was proposed by the Rabaska Partnership, formed by Gaz Metro, Enbridge and Gaz de France. A pipeline from the facility would distribute the LNG to the interprovincial natural gas transmission pipeline network operated by Gazoduc. The terminal would be composed of a maritime pier located approximately 500 metres from shore. This pier would be equipped to dock carriers of a capacity of 65,000 m{sup 3} and up to 160,000 m{sup 3}, with the possibility of accepting the Qflex carrier that has a capacity of 216,000 m{sup 3}. Annual supply of LNG would be estimated at 60 carriers. The construction cost for the terminal and pipeline have been estimated at a total of 840 M$. The planned in-service date for the new facility is the summer of 2010. The sustainability of the project was examined in terms of biophysical, social, economic and cultural impacts on present and future generations. The four major issues of concern were: (1) the risks related to its activities and installations, (2) energy opportunities for the province of Quebec and Ontario, (3) the potential impacts of the project on its natural environment, and (4) impacts on the surrounding landscape. The Commission was of the opinion that the project is not likely to have negative environmental impacts if the proposed measures, compensation

  9. Theater Activities for Jung Opera Audience: An Educational Urgency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elita Maule

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Numerous studies have led researchers to conclude that the socio-demographic profile of the public of classical music appears to be quite generalizable. However, the survey of the opera public, a classical music subgenre that is often associated with theater performances, appears to be much more difficult to quantify and has not yet been the subject of specific investigations (1. The drastic decrease in audience attendance, especially among young people, has led to a radical change in the management of all the opera houses in Europe (2. The research here presented has explored, through a representative sample of twenty-four Theatres in twelve different European countries, all practitioners of Opera Education, the complex interaction of personal, social and cultural factors that have led the theatres to interact with the educational system and the school curricula (3. A research on the different methods applied for teaching Opera to young people has led to attention being given especially to what is now called “Dramatic Interpretation of Music Theatre”, a method developed within Germany but now accepted by the majority of Opera Houses in Northern Europe (4. Approach: The research on educational projects for young people was made through the analysis of the web-sites of 24 theatres: 12 of these were members of Reseo, the network of partners involved in opera education that was proposed and promoted by the European Community in 1999; 12 other theatres, although belonging to other such networks were not members of Reseo. Results: (1 Opera seems to attract a rather limited public that occupies, in terms of number, the last places in the classification; the amount of people who listen to classical music is double that of those who listen to opera. (2. Educating the audience and, therefore, organizing also didactic projects for young people, has become for theaters a means to ensure their future survival. (3. The European Opera

  10. Multimedia Astronomy Communication: Effectively Communicate Astronomy to the Desired Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Star Cartier, Kimberly Michelle; Wright, Jason

    2017-01-01

    A fundamental aspect of our jobs as scientists is communicating our work to others. In this, the field of astronomy holds the double-edged sword of ubiquitous fascination: the topic has been of interest to nearly the entire global population at some point in their lives, yet the learning curve is steep within any subfield and rife with difficult-to-synthesize details. Compounding this issue is the ever-expanding array of methods to reach people in today's Communications Era. Each communication medium has its own strengths and weaknesses, is appropriate in different situations, and requires its own specific skillset in order to maximize its functionality. Despite this, little attention is given to training astronomers in effective communication techniques, often relying on newcomers to simply pick up the ability by mimicking others and assuming that a firm grasp on the subject matter will make up for deficiencies in communication theory. This can restrict astronomers to a narrow set of communication methods, harming both the communicators and the audience who may struggle to access the information through those media.Whether writing a research paper to academic peers or giving an astronomy talk to a pubic audience, successfully communicating a scientific message requires more than just an expert grasp on the topic. A communicator must understand the makeup and prior knowledge of the desired audience, be able to break down the salient points of the topic into pieces that audience can digest, select and maximize upon a medium to deliver the message, and frame the message in a way that hooks the audience and compels further interest. In this work we synthesize the requirements of effective astronomy communication into a few key questions that every communicator needs to answer. We then discuss some of the most common media currently used to communicate astronomy, give both effective and poor examples of utilizing these media to communicate astronomy, and provide key

  11. Creating Visual Design and Meaningful Audience Experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steijn, Arthur; Ion Wille, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    consider digital media and new technologies as appropriate ways to reach new audiences. However in the field of classical composition music, new technologies have more than often been applied mainly to online ticket sales, web based marketing, and social medias. The focus of our work at the School...

  12. Towards Biometric Assessment of Audience Affect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyng Wieland, Jakob; Larsen, Lars Bo; Laursen, Jeanette Kølbæk

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how reliable affective responses can be obtained using objective biometric measures for media audience research. We use Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) to detect sixteen respondents’ arousal levels and as an objective measure to show how self- reporting disrupts the experience...

  13. Audience and Revision: Middle Schoolers "Slam" Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jester, Judith

    1997-01-01

    Describes organizing a poetry "slam" (a contest in which people read their original poems and listeners cast votes for their favorites) involving 200 eighth graders from two different schools. Discusses how this experience made vivid for students the need to write for an audience and to revise. (SR)

  14. Mirror Your Audience's Attitude: A Global Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meussling, Vonne

    Recent advertising research has suggested that to gain initial entry into and retain continual success with a targeted audience of consumers, it is wise to mirror the attitudes and desires of those consumers. This has proven effective in the United States, where companies such as Chevrolet, Levi Strauss, and Coca-Cola have successfully catered to…

  15. Audience development and its blind spot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindelof, Anja Mølle

    2015-01-01

    that the discourse developing around audience development takes an organizational and institutionalized approach to performance culture that risks reducing dilemmas in performing arts institutions to a question of either marketing or social distinction. It overlooks a substantial body of knowledge of performance...... nuanced language on how performance matters....

  16. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Digital News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The changing patterns of news consumption in a digital era bring about new configurations between audiences, information, the devices upon which they consume it and the different (mobile) places and (shiftable) times where and when this is possible. This chapter highlights the need to consider th...... challenges the conventional routines and symbolic power of journalism as a place where, metaphorically, people can come together....

  17. Selling Participation to Audiences in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo Huang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Media globalization is facilitated by the development of new technologies within a framework of digitization and convergence. Contemporary new media provide networks through which the mingling of media occurs, shaping a “multi-mediacy” age, and a connecting of mediated/mediating venues in a condition of “immediacy”. Additionally, the business of communication has evolved from being the “communication of business” to the “business of business”. Multi-mediacy and immediacy have generated new avenues of profit from media. The paper will draw on Chitty’s theorization on web transactional venues to discuss new ways of farming of revenue from media. Media revenues have in the past and today been drawn from licence fees, media subscriptions and advertising. Today, media networks also sell “participation” to audiences directly by charging for text message voting/gaming, or sell a range of products and services through web-venue based commerce. This paper will undertake case studies to examine the increasing trend of “direct audience payment for participation”. The case studies that will be used are (A the intervention of Chinese Service Providers in reality TV shows and (B E-commerce on the Internet. Monternet (mo[bile I]nternet and Linktone are investigated as Service Providers (SPs and the consumer-to-consumer (C2C website www.taobao.com is studied compared with Eachnet (eBay in China. The paper will also investigate the influences of “direct audience payment for participation” on the quality of media products and communication flow between media and audience and generally discuss the consequences of the “direct audience payment for participation” from the perspective of communication ethics.

  18. Drunker than intended: misperceptions and information treatments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxnes, Erling; Jensen, Lene

    2009-01-01

    by the difference between intended BAC and perceived BAC, and where the delay is not properly accounted for. If so, BAC will overshoot intended BAC. This hypothesis has not been thoroughly tested before; nor has the consequent and challenging educational problem. METHOD: High school students made drinking decisions...... in a laboratory experiment employing a personalized BAC simulator. A questionnaire and simulations complement the experiment. RESULTS: A long stomach delay causes much larger overshoots in BAC than a short delay. Drinking behavior is in both cases well explained by one and the same feedback strategy. Written...... information about the delay does not reduce overshoots, pre-test experience with a simulator parameterized for a mouse does. CONCLUSION: Our study warrants further studies to see if simulator training, analogies, and rules of thumb can help juveniles not to overshoot intended BAC in real drinking situations...

  19. 以受众心理需求为导向的校史宣传新思路--以东北大学校史馆为例%School History Publicize New Ideas Guided by the Psychological Needs of the Audience--Take Northeastern University History Museum as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁爽; 刘东亚; 沙敏

    2014-01-01

    校史宣传具有激发师生爱国爱校情感,弘扬学校优良传统等重要意义。然而目前高校校史宣传中存在着缺乏宣传对象细分定位、宣传内容较为平淡乏味、宣传模式单一、缺少互动性等方面问题,本文从“受众心理需求”角度分析解决校史宣传问题的新思路。%School history propaganda has the significance to stimulate teachers and students' patriotic and love school emo-tion, and carry forward the fine traditions of the school. However, the collegiate school propaganda object segmentation posi-tioning the lack of publicity, promotional content more plain boring propaganda model of a single, lack of interaction and other aspects of the present article new ideas to solve problems in school history propaganda from"psychological needs of the audience"perspective.

  20. Public Speaking: Managing Challenging People and Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Neil; Boughton, Leonarda

    2016-01-01

    Every public speaker has encountered, or most likely will encounter, a difficult member of the audience who disrupts their presentation. This is a source of anxiety and discomfort, not only for the presenter, but for the audience as well. Learning how to manage the disruptive audience member is an art form, just like being a good public speaker. A professional speaker knows how to handle this disruption without making the audience uncomfortable and without embarrassing the disruptor. This article discusses ways to manage the disruptive audience member and will help those of you who do public speaking to tactfully and professionally disengage someone who is ruining your program.

  1. The Intended Image of a Place Brand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Martin; Rasmussen, Erik Stavnsager

    2016-01-01

    to the historically embedded image of the municipality. In this chapter the intended image of the municipality is compared to the image as it is perceived by newcomers. The study shows that historically embedded images of places are hard to manage and change when they involve elements with negative appeal towards...

  2. Drunker than intended: misperceptions and information treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxnes, Erling; Jensen, Lene

    2009-11-01

    Juveniles becoming overly intoxicated by alcohol is a widespread problem with consequences ranging from hangovers to deaths. We ask: could overshoots of intended levels of intoxication be triggered by misperceptions of the types found in recent studies of decision making in dynamic systems? It is well known that the dynamics of the blood alcohol concentration (BAC) is complicated by a temporary accumulation of alcohol in the stomach delaying the uptake into the blood stream. We hypothesize that juveniles use an overly simplified drinking strategy, where drinking is guided by the difference between intended BAC and perceived BAC, and where the delay is not properly accounted for. If so, BAC will overshoot intended BAC. This hypothesis has not been thoroughly tested before; nor has the consequent and challenging educational problem. High school students made drinking decisions in a laboratory experiment employing a personalized BAC simulator. A questionnaire and simulations complement the experiment. A long stomach delay causes much larger overshoots in BAC than a short delay. Drinking behavior is in both cases well explained by one and the same feedback strategy. Written information about the delay does not reduce overshoots, pre-test experience with a simulator parameterized for a mouse does. Our study warrants further studies to see if simulator training, analogies, and rules of thumb can help juveniles not to overshoot intended BAC in real drinking situations. It also implies a modification of the 'folk wisdom' of not drinking on an empty stomach.

  3. Exposing earth surface process model simulations to a large audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overeem, I.; Kettner, A. J.; Borkowski, L.; Russell, E. L.; Peddicord, H.

    2015-12-01

    The Community Surface Dynamics Modeling System (CSDMS) represents a diverse group of >1300 scientists who develop and apply numerical models to better understand the Earth's surface. CSDMS has a mandate to make the public more aware of model capabilities and therefore started sharing state-of-the-art surface process modeling results with large audiences. One platform to reach audiences outside the science community is through museum displays on 'Science on a Sphere' (SOS). Developed by NOAA, SOS is a giant globe, linked with computers and multiple projectors and can display data and animations on a sphere. CSDMS has developed and contributed model simulation datasets for the SOS system since 2014, including hydrological processes, coastal processes, and human interactions with the environment. Model simulations of a hydrological and sediment transport model (WBM-SED) illustrate global river discharge patterns. WAVEWATCH III simulations have been specifically processed to show the impacts of hurricanes on ocean waves, with focus on hurricane Katrina and super storm Sandy. A large world dataset of dams built over the last two centuries gives an impression of the profound influence of humans on water management. Given the exposure of SOS, CSDMS aims to contribute at least 2 model datasets a year, and will soon provide displays of global river sediment fluxes and changes of the sea ice free season along the Arctic coast. Over 100 facilities worldwide show these numerical model displays to an estimated 33 million people every year. Datasets storyboards, and teacher follow-up materials associated with the simulations, are developed to address common core science K-12 standards. CSDMS dataset documentation aims to make people aware of the fact that they look at numerical model results, that underlying models have inherent assumptions and simplifications, and that limitations are known. CSDMS contributions aim to familiarize large audiences with the use of numerical

  4. The Spatiotemporal Dynamics of Digital News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Chris

    2016-01-01

    The changing patterns of news consumption in a digital era bring about new configurations between audiences, information, the devices upon which they consume it and the different (mobile) places and (shiftable) times where and when this is possible. This chapter highlights the need to consider...... these interrelated changes in the media ecology if we want to grasp the newfound complexity of media consumption. Specifically, it outlines how audience engagement with news and different spatiotemporal configurations made possible by digital technology are trends that complement and reinforce one another in terms...... of changing the socially-situated affordances of news use. Having sketched these contours, the chapter then highlights analytical challenges for understanding and conceptualizing the new interrelations between digital news content, production, and consumption, grounding this analysis with theoretical insights...

  5. Changing Resistant Audience Attitudes Using Social Judgment Theory's "Anchor" Point Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Salazar, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Public Speaking, Business and Professional Communication, Persuasion, or any other skill-based oral communication course. Objectives: Students will practice the development and demonstration of persuasive arguments in this single-class social judgment theory activity to improve their ability to change resistant audience attitudes.

  6. Audience and Authority in the Professional Writing of Teacher-Authors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Anne Elrod; Anderson, Katie; Dawson, Christine; Kang, Suyoung; Rios, Elsie Olan; Olcese, Nicole; Ridgeman, Michael

    2012-01-01

    This article discusses the ways issues of audience and authority are encountered and addressed by classroom teachers who write journal articles for publication. Drawing on an interview study of K-12 classroom teachers who have published articles in NCTE's journals Language Arts, Voices from the Middle, and English Journal, we show that teachers…

  7. Changing Resistant Audience Attitudes Using Social Judgment Theory's "Anchor" Point Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Salazar, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Public Speaking, Business and Professional Communication, Persuasion, or any other skill-based oral communication course. Objectives: Students will practice the development and demonstration of persuasive arguments in this single-class social judgment theory activity to improve their ability to change resistant audience attitudes.

  8. Audiences : Defining and Researching Screen Entertainment Reception

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    This timely volume engages with one of the most important shifts in recent film studies: the turn away from text-based analysis towards the viewer. Historically, this marks a return to early interest in the effect of film on the audience by psychoanalysts and psychologists, which was overtaken by concern with the 'effects' of film, linked to calls for censorship and moral panics rather than to understanding the mental and behavioral world of the spectator. Early cinema history has revealed th...

  9. Modern museum exhibition technology revolution for audience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Today's digital revolution leads to the increasing mobile device usage, which has changed people's life and work. However, the traditional static display and graphic version is unable to meet the requirements of the modern audience, which makes museums face the challenge in the distribution of knowledge. Meanwhile, the information storm produced by big data emerged a variety of new media, such as social media, Natural User Interface, Augmented Reality, and electronic publishing. This dizzying array of tools offered opportunities for museums all over the world to become more vibrant and accessible. Museums around the world have been constant changed and improved its presentation, which provides a valuable experience for us. The new Shanghai Natural History Museum has also applied information technology on exhibition, education, research and collection. But the change does not mean a complete subversion. Because the museum audience are di- verse, such as born in a different era, have different learning habits, museums need to control the change magnitude of display technology to meet the requirements of different audience.

  10. Prior experience and its effects on audience design

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, Kerry

    2008-01-01

    PRIOR EXPERIENCE AND ITS EFFECTS ON AUDIENCE DESIGN. Abstract Objective Audience design involves tailoring utterances to suit the needs of your partner. The current experiment was interested in whether a speaker’s experience has an impact on their use of audience design as a conversational tool and whether a speaker can transfer knowledge gained in one task across to a similar task. Design Two description tasks were used to investigate audience design by recording the numbe...

  11. Captivating Broad Audiences with an Internet-connected Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, K.; Elliott, L.; Gervais, F.; Juniper, K.; Owens, D.; Pirenne, B.

    2012-12-01

    NEPTUNE Canada, a network of Ocean Networks Canada and the first deep water cabled ocean observatory, began operations in December 2009. Located offshore Canada's west coast, the network streams data from passive, active, and interactive sensors positioned at five nodes along its 800 km long looped cable to the Internet. This technically advanced system includes a sophisticated data management and archiving system, which enables the collection of real-time physical, chemical, geological, and biological oceanographic data, including video, at resolutions relevant for furthering our understanding of the dynamics of the earth-ocean system. Scientists in Canada and around the world comprise the primary audience for these data, but NEPTUNE Canada is also serving these data to broader audiences including K-16 students and teachers, informal educators, citizen scientists, the press, and the public. Here we present our engagement tools, approaches, and experiences including electronic books, personal phone apps, Internet-served video, social media, mini-observatory systems, print media, live broadcasting from sea, and a citizen scientist portal.NEPTUNE Canada's ibook available on Apple's iBook store.

  12. Physical activity in the mass media: an audience perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ben J; Bonfiglioli, Catriona M F

    2015-04-01

    Physical activity's role in promoting health is highlighted in public health campaigns, news and current affairs, reality television and other programs. An investigation of audience exposure, beliefs and reactions to media portrayals of physical activity offers insights into the salience and influence of this communication. An audience reception study was conducted involving in-depth interviews with 46 adults in New South Wales, Australia. The sample was stratified by gender, age group, area of residence and body mass index. Most respondents could only recall media coverage of physical activity with prompting. Television was the primary channel of exposure, with reality television the dominant source, followed by news programs and sports coverage. The messages most readily recalled were the health risks of inactivity, especially obesity, and the necessity of keeping active. Physical activity was regarded as a matter of personal volition, or for children, parental responsibility. Respondents believed that the media had given physical activity inadequate attention, focused too heavily on risks and not provided practical advice. In Australia, there is a need to counter the framing of physical activity by reality television, and engage the media to generate understanding of the socioecological determinants of inactivity. Physical activity campaigns should deliver positive and practical messages.

  13. Sleeping with the enemy: Audience studies and critical literacy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermes, J.; van den Berg, A.; Mol, M.

    2013-01-01

    Audience studies is not the vibrant field it was in its 1980s and early 1990s heyday. Cultural studies today has a more balanced interest in production, audiences and texts. A renewed focus in audience studies on everyday meaning production, identity and relations of power could benefit from recent

  14. Audience and Young Bilingual Writers: Building on Strengths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán, Leah

    2017-01-01

    This study explored how an audience-focused writing curriculum mediated the literacy development of bilingual Latina/o first-grade students. Drawing on translingual theories of literacy and scholarship describing the role of audience and audience awareness in skilled writing, this study qualitatively documented and analyzed students' writing and…

  15. A Sense of Audience in Young Children's Multimodal Information Books

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongmei

    2010-01-01

    Elementary children's sense of audience related to their multimodal information writing was examined. Forty-six third graders' interviews about the books that they created at the end of a science unit were analyzed to understand children's conception of audience, the connection between their sense of audience and their composing process, and their…

  16. Receptive Audiences for Climate Change Education: Understanding Attitudes and Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, L. D.; Luebke, J. F.; Clayton, S.; Saunders, C. D.; Matiasek, J.; Grajal, A.

    2012-12-01

    Much effort has been devoted to finding ways to explain climate change to uninterested audiences and encourage mitigation behaviors among dismissive audiences. Most approaches have focused on conveying information about climate change processes or threats. Here we report the results of a national survey designed to characterize the readiness of zoo and aquarium visitors to engage with the issue of climate change. Two survey forms, one focused primarily on attitudes (N=3,594) and another on behaviors (N=3,588), were administered concurrently in summer 2011 at 15 Association of Zoos and Aquariums accredited institutions. The attitudes survey used Global Warming's Six Americas segmentation protocols (climatechangecommunication.org) to compare climate change attitudes of zoo and aquarium visitors with the American public (Leiserowitz et al., 2011). Our results reveal that visitors are receptive audiences for climate change education and want to do more to address climate change. Even these favorable audiences, however, perceive barriers to engaging in the issue, signifying the importance of meeting the learning needs of those who acknowledge anthropogenic climate change, and not only of climate change 'deniers.' While 39% of the general public is 'concerned' or 'alarmed' about global warming, 64% of zoo and aquarium visitors fall into these two "Six Americas" segments. Visitors also differ from the national sample in key attitudinal characteristics related to global warming. For example, nearly two-thirds believe human actions are related to global warming, versus less than one-half of the general public; and approximately 60% think global warming will harm them personally, moderately or a great deal, versus less than 30% of the general public. Moreover, 69% of visitors would like to do more to address climate change. Despite zoo and aquarium visitors' awareness of climate change and motivation to address it, survey results indicate they experience barriers to

  17. Sun-Earth Connection EPO's with Multiple Uses and Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Russell, R.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Maute, A.; Haller, D.; Conery, C.; Bintner, G.; Kiessling, D.; Hughes, W. J.

    2005-05-01

    The three-year life of an EPO grant can be a journey guided by clear goals and enriched by collaborative and outreach opportunities connecting Space sciences to Earth sciences for both K-12 and public audiences. This point is illustrated by two EPO projects funded by NASA Sun-Earth Connection research grants to the High Altitude Observatory (HAO) at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. They are entering their final year coordinated by the Office of Education and Outreach at University Corporation for Atmospheric Research. The content focus of both projects is well aligned with HAO's research mission and the expertise of our scientists, addressing solar dynamics, space weather, and the impacts of solar events on the magnetosphere, as well as societies inhabiting Earth's surface. The first project (Gang Lu, PI) develops presentation resources, inquiry activities, and tips that will help HAO scientists be better prepared to visit K-12 classrooms. Unexpectedly, the simultaneous development of a Teachers' Guide to NCAR's new Climate Discovery exhibit, which takes an Earth system approach to climate and global change, has created a niche for this EPO resource to be revised and repurposed for a needed unit in the guide about the exhibit's graphic panels on Sun-Earth connections. The second project (Art Richmond, PI) engages two high school "Teachers in Residence" to develop resources they can utilize with their students. Excited by exceptional educational graphics and animations in the new Physics of the Aurora: Earth Systems module co-produced by HAO and the COMET Program for advanced undergraduate courses, they chose to adapt appropriate sections of the module to enrich Earth science and math concepts addressed in their 9th and 10th grade astronomy and general physics classes. Simultaneously, the Windows to the Universe web site, which continuously updates space science content and is now developing a new Space Weather section with support from the Center for

  18. Traditions of the Sun, One Model for Expanding Audience Access

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, I.; Paglierani, R.

    2006-12-01

    The Internet is a powerful tool with which to expand audience access, bringing students, teachers and the public to places and resources they might not otherwise visit or make use of. We will present Traditions of the Sun, an experiential Web site that invites exploration of the world's ancient observatories with special emphasis on Chaco Culture National Historic Park in the Four Corners region of the US and several sites in the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico. Traditions of the Sun includes resources in English and Spanish along with a unique trilingual on-line book, "Traditions of the Sun, A Photographic Journal," containing explanatory text in Yucatec Maya as well. Traditions of the Sun offers rich opportunities for virtual visits to ancient sites used for solar observing while learning about current NASA research on the Sun and indigenous solar practices within a larger historical and cultural context. The site contains hundreds of photographs, historic images and rich multimedia to help tell the story of the Sun-Earth Connection. Visitors to the site can zoom in on the great Mayan cities of Chichen Itza, Uxmal, Dzibilchaltun, and Mayapan to learn about Mayan astronomy, history, culture, and science. They can also visit Chaco Canyon to watch sunrise over Pueblo Bonito on the summer solstice, take a virtual reality tour of the great kiva at Casa Rinconada or see panoramic vistas from Fajada Butte, an area which, for preservation purposes, is restricted to the public. Traditions of the Sun provides one model of how exploration and discovery can come to life for both formal and informal audiences via the Internet. Traditions of the Sun is a collaborative project between NASA's Sun-Earth Connection Education Forum, the National Park Service, Instituto National de Antropologia e Historia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, and Ideum.

  19. The Arctic Report Card: Communicating the State of the Rapidly Changing Arctic to a Diverse Audience via the Worldwide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Richter-Menge, J.; Overland, J. E.; Soreide, N. N.

    2013-12-01

    Rapid change is occurring throughout the Arctic environmental system. The goal of the Arctic Report Card is to communicate the nature of the many changes to a diverse audience via the Worldwide Web. First published in 2006, the Arctic Report Card is a peer-reviewed publication containing clear, reliable and concise scientific information on the current state of the Arctic environment relative to observational records. Available only online, it is intended to be an authoritative source for scientists, teachers, students, decision-makers, policy-makers and the general public interested in the Arctic environment and science. The Arctic Report Card is organized into five sections: Atmosphere; Sea Ice & Ocean; Marine Ecosystem; Terrestrial Ecosystem; Terrestrial Cryosphere. Arctic Report Card 2012, the sixth annual update, comprised 20 essays on physical and biological topics prepared by an international team of 141 scientists from 15 different countries. For those who want a quick summary, the Arctic Report Card home page provides highlights of key events and findings, and a short video that is also available on YouTube. The release of the Report Card each autumn is preceded by a NOAA press release followed by a press conference, when the Web site is made public. The release of Arctic Report Card 2012 at an AGU Fall Meeting press conference on 5 December 2012 was subsequently reported by leading media organizations. The NOAA Arctic Web site, of which the Report Card is a part, is consistently at the top of Google search results for the keyword 'arctic', and the Arctic Report Card Web site tops search results for keyword "arctic report" - pragmatic indications of a Web site's importance and popularity. As another indication of the Web site's impact, in December 2012, the month when the 2012 update was released, the Arctic Report Card Web site was accessed by 19,851 unique sites in 105 countries, and 4765 Web site URLs referred to the Arctic Report Card. The 2012 Arctic

  20. [Guide for the publication of written materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia Campos, M G

    1987-01-01

    Tips for writing and editing population education or other materials and descriptions of the process of printing a text and of available types of print media are provided. Written materials should be brief and concise, and should avoid bombarding the reader with too many figures or references. Ideas of others must always be acknowledged. Adjectives and metaphors should be used in moderation. The first person and obscure words should both be avoided. Acronyms and abbreviations should be defined at their 1st use. Ideas should be presented in a logical sequence. Illustrations and tables may facilitate comprehension, but only if they are clearly presented and printed. Materials should be adapted to their audiences. In a country with the cultural, racial, and social diversity of Peru, it is impossible to refer to a general audience. Population communication which wishes to influence people must be based on a clear knowledge of the level of information, habits, linguistic practices, and other traits of the intended audience. Once the audience has been characterized, the objectives of the publication should be clearly defined. The technical characteristics of the publication are then selected. The format should be a standard size so that all the available paper can be used. The number of pages is often determined by the funds available although ideally it should be decided in accordance with the information to be presented. The color, type of lettering and spacing, paper, number of copies to be printed, and frequency of appearance are influenced by budgetary considerations, but the letter size and spacing should be generous enough to allow easy reading. The layout, style, and sections of the work must then be determined. A bulletin for example could have an editorial, a central article, reportage, an in-depth interview, correspondence, book reviews, and other regular features. The contents should be carefully checked for accuracy and grammaticality, and each step of

  1. We, John Dewey's Audience of Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Marcus Vinicius

    2016-01-01

    This article suggests that John Dewey's "Democracy and Education" does not describe education in an existing society, but it conveys a utopia, in the sense coined by Mannheim: utopian thought aims at instigating actions towards the transformation of reality, intending to attain a better world in the future. Today's readers of Dewey (his…

  2. “Let Me Tell You...”: Audience Engagement Strategies in the Campaign Speeches of Trump, Clinton, and Sanders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Джастин Куам

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Throughout the 2016 campaign, presidential candidate Donald Trump surprised observers with his ability to maintain his popularity in the face of unorthodox and often offensive statements. Trump likely bolstered his electoral chances by appealing to a large segment of voters with whom other candidates failed to align themselves. To quote one news anchor, “People tried to attack Trump; it just didn’t work - voters liked him anyway”. As previous work by Miller (2002; 2004 has shown, systemic functional linguistic (SFL analysis (Halliday & Matthiessen, 2004 can illuminate particular strategies politicians employ to strengthen their arguments and exhort their audiences to join their efforts. In this paper, we employ the SFL-based Engagement framework (White, 2003; Martin & White, 2005 to examine ways in which the 2016 presidential candidates aligned themselves with their audiences. Our analysis of the speeches of Donald Trump, Hillary Clinton, and Bernie Sanders reveals markedly different patterns of interaction with the voters in terms of ways expansive and contractive dialogic strategies are used, an intended audience is identified and thematized, and shared assumptions are made. While Trump makes his arguments in a highly constrained dialogic space, taking the agreement with the audience for granted, his opponents often employ a mix of contractive and expansive argumentative strategies and make more explicit overtures to the audiences whose perspectives they share. This study offers insights as to how each candidate identifies and addresses his or her ideological sympathizers or opponents and exhorts the former to intensify their support.

  3. Print, Newspapers and Audiences in Colonial Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Bodil Folke

    2011-01-01

    The article addresses African and Indian newspaper networks in Kenya in the late 1940s in an Indian Ocean perspective. Newspapers were important parts of a printing culture that was sustained by Indian and African nationalist politics and economic enterprise. In this period new intermediary groups...... of African and Indian entrepreneurs, activists and publicists, collaborating around newspaper production, captured fairly large and significant non-European audiences (some papers had print runs of around ten thousand) and engaged them in new ways, incorporating their aspirations, writings and points of view...... in newspapers. They depended on voluntary and political associations and anti-colonial struggles in Kenya and on links to nationalists in India and the passive resistance movement in South Africa. They sidestepped the European-dominated print culture and created an anti-colonial counter-voice. Editors insisted...

  4. The Places and Spaces of News Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    on-demand. Day-by-day, month-by-month, year-by-year, technology moves forward, impacting more than just the ways in which we get news. These fundamental shifts change what news ‘is’. This book expands our understanding of contemporary news audiences and explores how the different places and spaces......Historically, or so we would like to believe, the story of everyday life for many people included regular, definitive moments of news consumption. Journalism, in fact, was distributed around these routines: papers were delivered before breakfast, the evening news on TV buttressed the transition...... can consume journalism and engage with information – from tablets, to smartphones, online, and so forth – and the different places and moments of news consumption have multiplied as a result, to the point where news is increasingly mobile and instantaneous. It is personalized, localized and available...

  5. Privacy-Preserving Television Audience Measurement Using Smart TVs

    OpenAIRE

    Drosatos, George; Tasidou, Aimilia; Efraimidis, Pavlos,

    2012-01-01

    Part 6: Privacy Attitudes and Properties; International audience; Internet-enabled television systems, often referred to as Smart TVs, are a new development in television and home entertainment technologies. In this work, we propose a new, privacy-preserving, approach for Television Audience Measurement (TAM), utilizing the capabilities of the Smart TV technologies. We propose a novel application to calculate aggregate audience measurements using Smart TV computation capabilities and permanen...

  6. New symmetry of intended curved reaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Elizabeth B

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Movement regularities are inherently present in automated goal-directed motions of the primate's arm system. They can provide important signatures of intentional behaviours driven by sensory-motor strategies, but it remains unknown if during motor learning new regularities can be uncovered despite high variability in the temporal dynamics of the hand motions. Methods We investigated the conservation and violation of new movement regularity obtained from the hand motions traced by two untrained monkeys as they learned to reach outwardly towards spatial targets while avoiding obstacles in the dark. The regularity pertains to the transformation from postural to hand paths that aim at visual goals. Results In length-minimizing curves the area enclosed between the Euclidean straight line and the curve up to its point of maximum curvature is 1/2 of the total area. Similar trend is found if one examines the perimeter. This new movement regularity remained robust to striking changes in arm dynamics that gave rise to changes in the speed of the reach, to changes in the hand path curvature, and to changes in the arm's postural paths. The area and perimeter ratios characterizing the regularity co-varied across repeats of randomly presented targets whenever the transformation from posture to hand paths was compliant with the intended goals. To interpret this conservation and the cases in which the regularity was violated and recovered, we provide a geometric model that characterizes arm-to-hand and hand-to-arm motion paths as length minimizing curves (geodesics in a non-Euclidean space. Whenever the transformation from one space to the other is distance-metric preserving (isometric the two symmetric ratios co-vary. Otherwise, the symmetric ratios and their co-variation are violated. As predicted by the model we found empirical evidence for the violation of this movement regularity whenever the intended goals mismatched the actions. This

  7. Eliciting Audience's Experience to Improve Interactive Art Installation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baharin, Hanif; Morrison, Ann

    2006-01-01

    Designing with the users in mind is one of the widely accepted design practices in the Interaction Design field. On the other hand, it can be said that audience's experience is the heart of an interactive art. Since Interaction Design has shown that user's involvement in the design process can...... be beneficial, it is speculated that involving the audiences in the creative process of developing an interactive art piece can make the artist improve the art in general and the audience's experience in particular. In this paper, the experience of eliciting the experience of the audiences of an interactive art...

  8. Plans should abstractly describe intended behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfleger, K.; Hayes-Roth, B. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Planning is the process of formulating a potential course of action. How courses of action (plans) produced by a planning module are represented and how they are used by execution-oriented modules of a complex agent to influence or dictate behavior are critical architectural issues. In contrast to the traditional model of plans as executable programs that dictate precise behaviors, we claim that autonomous agents inhabiting dynamic, unpredictable environments can make better use of plans that only abstractly describe their intended behavior. Such plans only influence or constrain behavior, rather than dictating it. This idea has been discussed in a variety of contexts, but it is seldom incorporated into working complex agents. Experiments involving instantiations of our Adaptive Intelligent Systems architecture in a variety of domains have demonstrated the generality and usefulness of the approach, even with our currently simple plan representation and mechanisms for plan following. The behavioral benefits include (1) robust improvisation of goal-directed behavior in response to dynamic situations, (2) ready exploitation of dynamically acquired knowledge or behavioral capabilities, and (3) adaptation based on dynamic aspects of coordinating diverse behaviors to achieve multiple goals. In addition to these run-time advantages, the approach has useful implications for the design and configuration of agents. Indeed, the core ideas of the approach are natural extensions of fundamental ideas in software engineering.

  9. A New Development in Audiovisual Translation Studies: Focus on Target Audience Perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Denton

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Audiovisual translation is now a well-established sub-discipline of Translation Studies (TS: a position that it has reached over the last twenty years or so. Italian scholars and professionals in the field have made a substantial contribution to this successful development, a brief overview of which will be given in the first part of this article, inevitably concentrating on dubbing in the Italian context. Special attention will be devoted to the question of target audience perception, an area where researchers in the University of Bologna at Forlì have excelled. The second part of the article applies the methodology followed by the above mentioned researchers in a case study of how Italian end users perceive the dubbed version of the British film The History Boys (2006, which contains a plethora of culture-specific verbal and visual references to the English education system. The aim of the study was to ascertain: a whether translation/adaptation allows the transmission in this admittedly constrained medium of all the intended culture-bound issues, only too well known to the source audience, and, if so, to what extent, and b whether the target audience respondents to the e-questionnaire used were aware that they were missing information. The linked, albeit controversial, issue of quality assessment will also be addressed.

  10. Surgical pathology and the patient: a systematic review evaluating the primary audience of pathology reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossanen, Matthew; True, Lawrence D; Wright, Jonathan L; Vakar-Lopez, Funda; Lavallee, Danielle; Gore, John L

    2014-11-01

    The pathology report is a critical document that helps guide the management of patients with cancer. More and more patients read their reports, intending to participate in decisions about their care. However, a substantial subset of patients may lack the ability to comprehend this often technical and complex document. We hypothesized that most literature on pathology reports discusses reports from the perspective of other physicians and not from the perspective of patients. An expert panel of physicians developed a list of search criteria, which we used to identify articles on PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Reviews, and Google Scholar databases. Two reviewers independently evaluated all articles to identify for detailed review those that met search criteria. We identified the primary audience of the selected articles and the degree to which these articles addressed clarity of communication of pathology reports with patients. Of 801 articles identified in our search, 25 involved the formatting of pathology reports for clarity of communication. Recurrent themes in proposed improvements in reports included content standardization, variation in terminology, clarity of communication, and quality improvement. No articles discussed patients as their target audience. No study evaluated the health literacy level required of patients to comprehend pathology reports. In summary, there is a scarcity of patient-centered approaches to improve pathology reports. The literature on pathology reports does not include patients as a target audience. Limited resources are available to help patients comprehend their reports. Efforts to improve patient-centered communication are desirable to address this overlooked aspect of patient care.

  11. Wind farm development project at Mount Copper and Miller at Murdochville : public inquiry report; Projets d'amenagement des parcs d'eoliennes des monts Copper et Miller a Murdochville : rapport d'enquete et d'audience publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvie, A.

    2004-03-01

    A public hearing was held at the request of the Quebec Minister of the Environment to examine the environmental and socio-economic impacts of a proposed wind farm project at Mount Copper and Mount Miller in Murdochville, Quebec. The first phase of the project involves the construction of a wind turbine array with a capacity of 9 megawatts (MW), followed by a second phase expansion to 45 MW for 2004. The final wind turbine array includes 36 turbines for a total capacity of 54 megawatts (MW). The region is well suited for wind energy projects. Energie Eolienne du Mont Miller Inc. and Northland Power Inc. intend to develop the wind farm at a cost of approximately $90 million. Hydro Quebec has agreed to purchase the electricity. The various impacts of the proposed project were examined, both from an environmental and a socio-economic perspective. The Commission determined that the wind farm would not have significant impacts and that the project is desirable. Certain conditions must be met to ensure sustainable development. In terms of ecology, the Commission would like to have a complete inventory of the bird species and a description of the corridors of migration. It would also like to see the promoters show leadership in minimizing the impacts of the project on the ecotourism activities offered in the area. 17 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig., 2 appendices.

  12. The Hubble Frontier Fields: Engaging Multiple Audiences in Exploring the Cosmic Frontier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Brandon L.; Smith, Denise A.; Summers, Frank; Ryer, Holly; Slivinski, Carolyn; Lotz, Jennifer M.

    2017-06-01

    The Hubble Frontier Fields is a multi-cycle program of six deep-field observations of strong-lensing galaxy clusters taken in parallel with six deep “blank fields.” The three-year long collaborative program began in late 2013 and is led by observations from NASA’s Great Observatories. The observations, now complete, allow astronomers to look deeper into the universe than ever before, and potentially uncover galaxies that are as much as 100 times fainter than what the telescopes can typically observe. The Frontier Fields science program is ideal for informing audiences about scientific advances and topics in STEM. The study of galaxy properties, statistics, optics, and Einstein’s theory of general relativity naturally leverages off of the science returns of the Frontier Fields program. As a result, the Space Telescope Science Institute’s Office of Public Outreach (OPO) has engaged multiple audiences over the past three years to follow the progress of the Frontier Fields.For over two decades, the STScI outreach program has sought to bring the wonders of the universe to the public and engage audiences in the adventure of scientific discovery. In addition, we are leveraging the reach of the new NASA’s Universe of Learning education program to bring the science of the Frontier Fields to informal education audiences. The main underpinnings of the STScI outreach program and the Universe of Learning education program are scientist-educator development teams, partnerships, and an embedded program evaluation component. OPO is leveraging the infrastructure of these education and outreach programs to bring the Frontier Fields science program to the education community and the public in a cost-effective way.This talk will feature highlights over the past three years of the program. We will highlight OPO’s strategies and infrastructure that allows for the quick delivery of groundbreaking science to the education community and public.

  13. Science and sociability: women as audience at the British Association for the Advancement of Science, 1831-1901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgitt, Rebekah; Withers, Charles W J

    2008-03-01

    This essay recovers the experiences of women at the meetings of the British Association for the Advancement of Science (BAAS) from its founding in 1831 to the end of the Victorian era. It aims to add to research on women in science by reconsidering the traditional role of women as consumers rather than producers of knowledge and to that on science popularization by focusing on audience experience rather than on the aims and strategies of popularizers. The essay argues that, in various ways, the ubiquitous and visible female audience came to define the BAAS audience and "the public" for science more generally. The women who swelled the BAAS audiences were accepted as a social element within the meetings even as they were regarded critically as scientific participants. Portrayed as passive and nonscientific, women allowed the male scientific elites to distance themselves from their audiences. Arguing from diary and other evidence, we present examples that complicate existing notions of audiences for science as necessarily active.

  14. Sensing Audience Response - Beyond One Way Streaming of Live Performances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Wang (Chen); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); E. Geelhoed; I. Biscoe; P. Stenton

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractDuring a live theatre performance, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) of 15 audience members was measured simultaneously and synchronized with video footage of performers and audience. Questionnaires explored emotions evoked during the play. The research is part of an EU Framework 7 program to

  15. Audience Insights: Communicating to Teens (Aged 12-17)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2009

    2009-01-01

    CDC's Marketing and Communication Strategy Branch (MCSB) in the National Center for Health Marketings Division of Health Communication and Marketing divides audiences into segments with similar needs, preferences, and characteristics and provides CDC programs with audience-specific information, marketing expertise, and communication planning. To…

  16. How Communication Goals Determine when Audience Tuning Biases Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterhoff, Gerald; Higgins, E. Tory; Kopietz, Rene; Groll, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    After tuning their message to suit their audience's attitude, communicators' own memories for the original information (e.g., a target person's behaviors) often reflect the biased view expressed in their message--producing an audience-congruent memory bias. Exploring the motivational circumstances of message production, the authors investigated…

  17. Sensing Audience Response - Beyond One Way Streaming of Live Performances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, C.; Cesar Garcia, P.S.; Geelhoed, E.; Biscoe, I.; Stenton, P.

    2013-01-01

    During a live theatre performance, Galvanic Skin Response (GSR) of 15 audience members was measured simultaneously and synchronized with video footage of performers and audience. Questionnaires explored emotions evoked during the play. The research is part of an EU Framework 7 program to support rem

  18. Integrating Digital Response Systems within a Diversity of Agricultural Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciarappa, William; Quinn, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Extension educators have new computer-assisted tools as audience response systems (clickers) for increasing educational effectiveness and improving assessment by facilitating client input. From 2010-2012, 26 sessions involving 1093 participants in six diverse client categories demonstrated wide audience acceptance and suitability of clickers in…

  19. Museum Accessibility: Combining Audience Research and Staff Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levent, Nina; Reich, Christine

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses an audience-informed professional development model that combines audience research focus groups and staff training that includes interaction and direct feedback from visitors, in this case, visitors with low vision. There are two critical components to this model: one is that museums' programming decisions are informed by…

  20. Social Audience in Spain: Succesful strategies in national TV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Saavedra Llamas

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This research presents the concept of social audience, as a new narrative space born in the convergence of the TV audience and the user’s conversations in Twitter, and examine strategies of TV programs in Spain with higher social audience. Understand what exactly the social audience is, how does it works or what kind of metrics are made for it, becomes more necessary than ever to deepen into the uses and opportunities facing both the television media and advertisers who choose to invest in a TV space.Through the study of successful cases already implemented is to establish formulas for success that achieve a more active participation of users, transfer from social to traditional audience and the profitable inclusion of brands in this full of possibilities new communication scenario.

  1. Audience Research for the Performing Arts: Romanian Music Festival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin G. LUCHIAN

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the strategic marketing tools (instruments such as segmentation and targeting for a better understanding of current and potential audiences of classical music festivals. Arts administrators need to locate and address the audience segmentation, enhancing communication with audiences of all segments. The marketing strategies for music festivals should include improving music festival branding as well as developing diverse programs and engaging with the community on multiple levels. The study incorporates a literature review of the recent sociological research dealing with the consumption of arts products and a case study approach on the fifteenth edition of Romanian Music Festival in Iași, involving an audience survey. The research can be used as a tool to inform marketing and audience development plans for the organisers of Romanian Music Festival and other arts organisations. It also contains insights that organisations might find useful in the development of an arts activity itself.

  2. Teaching Energy to a General Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baski, Alison; Hunnicutt, Sally

    2010-02-01

    A new, interdisciplinary course entitled ``Energy!'' has been developed by faculty in the physics and chemistry departments to meet the university's science and technology general education requirement. This course now enrolls over 400 students each semester in a single lecture where faculty from both departments co-teach throughout the term. Topics include the fundamentals of energy, fossil fuels, global climate change, nuclear energy, and renewable energy sources. The students represent an impressive range of majors (science, engineering, business, humanities, etc.) and comprise freshmen to seniors. To effectively teach this diverse audience and increase classroom engagement, in-class ``clickers'' are used with guided questions to teach concepts, which are then explicitly reinforced with online LON-CAPAfootnotetextFree open-source distributed learning content management and assessment system (www.lon-capa.org) homework. This online system enables immediate feedback in a structured manner, where students can practice randomized versions of problems for homework, quizzes, and exams. The course is already in high demand after only two semesters, in part because it is particularly relevant to students given the challenging energy and climate issues facing the nation and world. )

  3. Media perspective - new opportunities for reaching audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haswell, Katy

    2007-08-01

    The world of media is experiencing a period of extreme and rapid change with the rise of internet television and the download generation. Many young people no longer watch standard TV. Instead, they go on-line, talking to friends and downloading pictures, videos, music clips to put on their own websites and watch/ listen to on their laptops and mobile phones. Gone are the days when TV controllers determined what you watched and when you watched it. Now the buzzword is IPTV, Internet Protocol Television, with companies such as JOOST offering hundreds of channels on a wide range of subjects, all of which you can choose to watch when and where you wish, on your high-def widescreen with stereo surround sound at home or on your mobile phone on the train. This media revolution is changing the way organisations get their message out. And it is encouraging companies such as advertising agencies to be creative about new ways of accessing audiences. The good news is that we have fresh opportunities to reach young people through internet-based media and material downloaded through tools such as games machines, as well as through the traditional media. And it is important for Europlanet to make the most of these new and exciting developments.

  4. Identifying Effective Strategies for Climate Change Education: The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) Partnership Audiences and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, J. G.; Feldman, A.; Muller-Karger, F. E.; Gilbes, F.; Stone, D.; Plank, L.; Reynolds, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Many past educational initiatives focused on global climate change have foundered on public skepticism and disbelief. Some key reasons for these past failures can be drawn directly from recognized best practices in STEM education - specifically, the necessity to help learners connect new knowledge with their own experiences and perspectives, and the need to create linkages with issues or concerns that are both important for and relevant to the audiences to be educated. The Coastal Areas Climate Change Education (CACCE) partnership has sought to follow these tenets as guiding principles in identifying critical audiences and developing new strategies for educating the public living in the low-lying coastal areas of Florida and the Caribbean on the realities, risks, and adaptation and mitigation strategies for dealing with the regional impacts of global climate change. CACCE is currently focused on three key learner audiences: a) The formal education spectrum, targeting K-12 curricula through middle school marine science courses, and student and educator audiences through coursework and participatory research strategies engaging participants in a range of climate-related investigations. b) Informal science educators and outlets, in particular aquaria and nature centers, as an avenue toward K-12 teacher professional development as well as for public education. c) Regional planning, regulatory and business professionals focused on the built environment along the coasts, many of whom require continuing education to maintain licensing and/or other professional certifications. Our current activities are focused on bringing together an effective set of educational, public- and private-sector partners to target the varied needs of these audiences in Florida and the U.S. Caribbean, and tailoring an educational plan aimed at these stakeholder audiences that starts with the regionally and topically relevant impacts of climate change, and strategies for effective adaptation and

  5. Media Selection for Public TV Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallstead, William F.

    Since limited funds restrict advertising by Public Broadcasting System (PBS) stations, and since PBS serves a variety of audiences, the selection of appropriate advertising media for PBS programs is difficult. It is further complicated by conflicting research reports on the public use of the daily papers. Availability to the target audience should…

  6. Timing of presentation of an audience: aggressive priming and audience effects in male displays of Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Ricardo J.; Peake, Tom M.; McGregor, Peter K.

    2003-05-28

    Studies of animal communication often underestimate the presence of individuals other than the signaller-receiver dyad. Signalling interactions often occur in the presence of non-participating individuals (audiences); the effect of these individuals upon the dynamics of interactions has been called the audience effect. Recent studies of fighting fish Betta splendens have shown that the presence of a male audience can increase aggression during interactions. However, in many of these studies males were allowed to see the audience prior to the interaction, thus such pre-exposure may have facilitated aggressive behaviour (aggressive priming). Here we present results of two experiments designed to examine the relative importance of priming and audience effects on the dynamics of aggressive interactions. Males that were pre-exposed showed higher levels of aggression during subsequent interactions regardless of the presence or absence of an audience. When only one of the interactants had been pre-exposed to the audience, the non-exposed male showed similar increases in aggressive behaviour, i.e. matching the level of aggression showed by his opponent. Taken together these results suggest that aggressive priming may have resulted in an over-estimation of the audience effect in previous studies. The results still highlight the importance of social environment in determining the dynamics and outcomes of aggressive contests.

  7. Extending IPY Data to a Wider Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turrin, M.; Bell, R. E.; Pfirman, S. L.

    2010-12-01

    Perhaps the most significant IPY contribution to science education was the vast amount of data collected at the polar-regions on Earth systems and processes that was made immediately available to teachers and curriculum developers. Supplementing textbooks with the Internet as an education partner, allowed participating teachers to transform science education through: their use of current data as an integral component of their classroom teaching; their training of students to seek out data as evidence of Earth processes; and their instruction to students on how to validate sources and uses of data. Yet, for every teacher and student who has been part of this successful IPY outreach there are many more who have not been reached, don’t know how to include polar science into their coursework, or don’t comfortably work with data. Our experience with data education projects suggests that to reach the next round of students, teachers, educators and the wider adult population we need to translate this data so it is accessible through carefully constructed activities, simulations, and games. In addition we need to actively seek new partnership and outlet opportunities. The collected measurements tell us that our poles are warming on a human timescale. Using data to tell the story, the unambiguous signal of warming makes it accessible to a much broader audience. Our experience has shown that, for a novice population working with data, the educational effectiveness is significantly enhanced when the signal in the data is strong and the Earth processes are clear. Building upon IPY data and resources, focusing on the Earth’s changing climate, and working with partnerships developed over the last two years, Lamont has put together several new education and outreach collaborations. Our goal is to reach new audiences through: 1) Inventorying, Assessing and Planning - Through an NSF planning grant we are leveraging IPY connections and findings in a Polar Climate Education

  8. Engaging Latino audiences in informal science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfield, Susan B.

    Environment for the Americas (EFTA), a non-profit organization, developed a four-year research project to establish a baseline for Latino participation and to identify practical tools that would enable educators to overcome barriers to Latino participation in informal science education (ISE). Its national scope and broad suite of governmental and non-governmental, Latino and non-Latino partners ensured that surveys and interviews conducted in Latino communities reflected the cosmopolitan nature of the factors that influence participation in ISE programs. Information about economic and education levels, country of origin, language, length of residence in the US, and perceptions of natural areas combined with existing demographic information at six study sites and one control site provided a broader understanding of Latino communities. The project team's ability to work effectively in these communities was strengthened by the involvement of native, Spanish-speaking Latino interns in the National Park Service's Park Flight Migratory Bird Program. The project also went beyond data gathering by identifying key measures to improve participation in ISE and implementing these measures at established informal science education programs, such as International Migratory Bird Day, to determine effectiveness. The goals of Engaging Latino Audiences in Informal Science Education (ISE) were to 1) identify and reduce the barriers to Latino participation in informal science education; 2) provide effective tools to assist educators in connecting Latino families with science education, and 3) broadly disseminate these tools to agencies and organizations challenged to engage this audience in informal science education (ISE). The results answer questions and provide solutions to a challenge experienced by parks, refuges, nature centers, and other informal science education sites across the US. Key findings from this research documented low participation rates in ISE by Latinos, and that

  9. Communicating public health preparedness information to pregnant and postpartum women: an assessment of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention web pages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Brianna; Felter, Elizabeth; Downes, Amia; Trauth, Jeanette

    2015-04-01

    Pregnant and postpartum women have special needs during public health emergencies but often have inadequate levels of disaster preparedness. Thus, improving maternal emergency preparedness is a public health priority. More research is needed to identify the strengths and weaknesses of various approaches to how preparedness information is communicated to these women. A sample of web pages from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention intended to address the preparedness needs of pregnant and postpartum populations was examined for suitability for this audience. Five of the 7 web pages examined were considered adequate. One web page was considered not suitable and one the raters split between not suitable and adequate. None of the resources examined were considered superior. If these resources are considered some of the best available to pregnant and postpartum women, more work is needed to improve the suitability of educational resources, especially for audiences with low literacy and low incomes.

  10. Effects of audience awareness on procedural text writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Koichi; Matsushima, Kazutoshi

    2006-08-01

    Effects of audience awareness were examined. Some participants acted as writers and the others acted as readers. Writers wrote a text describing a geometrical figure. Readers read the text and tried to draw the figure according to the description. In Exp. 1, audience awareness was manipulated among undergraduate students, 11 men and 34 women. Writers in the high audience-awareness condition spent more time planning and writing texts than writers in the low audience-awareness condition. Texts in the high audience-awareness condition consisted of more letters and sentences with descriptions elaborating the texts. In Exp. 2, prototype texts were constructed based on the results of Exp. 1. Undergraduate students, 11 men and 47 women, who read the prototype text in the high audience-awareness condition could draw the figure more accurately. In Exp. 3, effects of feedback from readers were examined. Ninth-grade students, 22 boys and 34 girls, participated as writers and 7th-grade students, 22 boys and 34 girls, participated as readers. Merely being told to attend to an audience did not improve the quality of texts written by 9th-grade students. However, feedback from the readers who were 7th-grade students was effective. Writers could revise the texts appropriately according to feedback and improve the quality of texts. In addition, the experience of revising the text according to feedback transferred to later writing. Educational implications of the results are discussed.

  11. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marie, Pierre; Brunskog, Jonas; Møller Petersen, Claus

    2012-04-01

    Noise generated by the audience during musical performances is audible and sometimes disturbing. In this study, an attempt to estimate such audience noise was carried out. From the recordings of performances in five performance spaces (four concert halls and one opera house), probability density functions of the sound pressure levels were obtained in octave bands, which were fitted with three Gaussian distribution curves. The Gaussian distribution curve with the lowest mean value corresponds to a mixture of the technical background noise and audience generated noise, which is named the mixed background noise. Finally, the audience noise distribution is extracted by energy subtraction of the technical background noise levels measured in an empty condition from the mixed background noise levels. As a single index, L(90) of the audience noise distribution is named the audience noise level. Empirical prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended.

  12. When Is Humiliation More Intense? The Role of Audience Laughter and Threats to the Self

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta H. Fischer

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In personal accounts, humiliation is often reported as a very intense, painful, negative emotion. We report two scenario studies in which we explored two factors that may contribute to the intense character of humiliation: (1 unwanted, negative public exposure, and (2 a threat to central aspects of one's identity. Study 1 (N = 115 assessed emotional reactions to a public insult when an audience responded with either laughter or not and when someone from the audience offered support after the insult or no support was offered. Results showed that the intensity of humiliation increased when people laughed after the insult. However, support offered after the insult had no effect on reported humiliation. Study 2 (N = 99 focused on threats to different self-related values and showed stronger reports of humiliation when central self-related values were threatened than when less central self-related values were threatened. Study 2 also replicated the audience-effect from Study 1, but only when central self-related values were threatened and not when less central self-related values were threatened. Limitations of these studies (e.g., the use of scenarios and potential avenues for future research, such as the (long-term consequences of humiliation and humiliation in the context of social media, are discussed.

  13. Graphic Novels: A New Stress Mitigation Tool for Military Training: Developing Content for Hard-to-Reach Audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourani, Laurel; Lambert, Shari; Peeler, Russ; Lane, Becky; Borst, Carrie

    2017-05-01

    This article describes the development of two graphic novels as a new approach to mental health communication and coping strategies for the Navy and Marine Corps. The novels are intended to capture the attention of the younger target audience and provide vital teaching messages to better prepare personnel for deployment to combat zones. The novels were developed based on embedding the principles of combat and operational stress control (COSC) into realistic and relatable characters, stories, and images. Approaches used for development included (a) basing storylines on real-life service members and the situations they face in combat and their personal lives; (b) partnering with COSC experts to embed teaching points; (c) ensuring technical accuracy through research and target audience reviews of the storyboard and artwork; (d) developing characters that are representative of the target audience, with varied jobs, ages, backgrounds, and professional concerns; and (e) designing artwork in a manner sensitive to training objectives and the psychological effects on readers. Because technical accuracy, realism, and sensitivity were noted as essential components of an effective graphic novel tool, focus-group research and review of author drafts by the target audience and technical experts are strongly recommended.

  14. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marie, Pierre; Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Noise generated by the audience during musical performances is audible and sometimes disturbing. In this study, an attempt to estimate such audience noise was carried out. From the recordings of performances in five performance spaces (four concert halls and one opera house), probability density...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended....

  15. Audience noise in concert halls during musical performances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho; Marie, Pierre; Brunskog, Jonas

    2012-01-01

    Noise generated by the audience during musical performances is audible and sometimes disturbing. In this study, an attempt to estimate such audience noise was carried out. From the recordings of performances in five performance spaces (four concert halls and one opera house), probability density...... prediction models were made using the four orchestra concert halls, revealing that the audience noise level is significantly correlated with the technical background noise level. It is therefore concluded that a relaxation of the current background noise recommendations for concert halls is not recommended...

  16. WRITING FOR A REAL AUDIENCE: A LETTER-EXCHANGE PROJECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In an EFL class, writing for a real audience can bring aboutmany inherent educational benefits. However, this is often ne-glected by many language teachers. This paper reports on the re-sults obtained from using a writing for a real audience project inan Intensive Reading course for non-English majors. Students inthis project wrote letters to their partners in the target languageand shared information with each other. The author found thatthe process of writing for a real audience can not only help stu-dents practice using the target language but also can encouragethem to overcome writing apprehension.

  17. Creating a Library of Climate Change Education Resources for Audiences in the Southeast United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, J.; McNeal, K. S.; Williams, C. C.; Paz, J. O.; Cho, H. "; Nair, U. S.; Geroux, J.; Guthrie, C.; Wright, K.; Hill, J.

    2011-12-01

    origin (e.g. government agency, organization, museum, climate-related websites, etc.), will be made available to the public through the CLiPSE website, promoting accessibility of these resources to the various CLiPSE publics. The process of alignment and vetting will be discussed in this paper, along with the information and education "gaps" that exist for the specific CLiPSE audiences in the SE US.

  18. Employee Anonymous Online Dissent: Dynamics and Ethical Challenges for Employees, Targeted Organisations, Online Outlets and Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravazzani, Silvia; Mazzei, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    ethical challenges that take into consideration the perspectives of employees, targeted organisations, online outlet administrators and audiences. The ethical challenge for employees is to disclose problems for organisational and societal changes in a safe context and supported by a large audience, while......This paper aims to enhance understanding of dissent expressive acts that employees voice via anonymous online public contexts. Based on literature on organisational dissent, anonymity and online disclosure, we first point out key dynamics of employee anonymous online dissent, and then present...... remaining accountable for them and avoiding emotion-focused and defensive disclosure. Targeted organisations need to prevent external disclosure while ensuring freedom of speech and employee privacy, and to respond effectively when overt criticism is found online. Other tensions concern online outlet...

  19. Translating health psychology into effective health communication: the american healthstyles audience segmentation project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maibach, E W; Maxfield, A; Ladin, K; Slater, M

    1996-07-01

    This article presents a health lifestyle audience segmentation analysis based primarily on social cognitive theory. Two linked mail surveys were conducted among a representative group of US adults (N = 2967). Segmentation variables included data on five health behaviors (smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, nutrition and weight control), internal personal and social/ environmental variables associated with each of the health behaviors, as well as health value, sensation- seeking, life satisfaction and age. K-means classification analysis was employed; seven health lifestyles were identified. The majority of the health lifestyles are reliable, and as a whole, all demonstrate both discriminative, construct and predictive validity. The health-lifestyle audience segments are briefly profiled, and an argument is made that health- lifestyle segmentation, more than demographic or behavioral segmentation alone, can advance the goals of public health communication.

  20. Scientific dissemination discourse a study of specialized magazines disseminating science to lay audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Moraes Gonçalves

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific Dissemination enunciations in the media are form of public discourse that integrates social, cultural, ideological and political aspects related to their spatial and temporal context. With theoretical support of Discourse Analysis the article presents distinct modes of disseminating science to the lay audience found in three magazines disseminating scientific knowledge: the Scientific American Brazil, Pesquisa Fapesp and Superinteressante. The editorial commitment of each one of these magazines to its readers is the basis of the discursive construction. The Scientific American Brazil draws on many sources for its explanations using a technical approach and close proximity to the patterns of science. The Pesquisa FAPESP magazine addresses the themes in their Brazilian context, uses Brazilian scientists as sources and adopts the journalistic reporting genre with exts by specislized journalists. Superinteressante magazine has a has a more distant commitment to science with exts free from using, instead, catch phrases, slang and types of comparison appropriate the language of its audience.

  1. SCIENTIFIC DISSEMINATION DISCOURSE A STUDY OF SPECIALIZED MAGAZINES DISSEMINATING SCIENCE TO LAY AUDIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Moraes Gonçalves

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Scientific Dissemination enunciations in the media are form of public discourse that integrates social, cultural, ideological and political aspects related to their spatial and temporal context. With theoretical support of Discourse Analysis the article presents distinct modes of disseminating science to the lay audience found in three magazines disseminating scientific knowledge: the Scientific American Brazil, Pesquisa Fapesp and Superinteressante. The editorial commitment of each one of these magazines to its readers is the basis of the discursive construction. The Scientific American Brazil draws on many sources for its explanations using a technical approach and close proximity to the patterns of science. The Pesquisa FAPESP magazine addresses the themes in their Brazilian context, uses Brazilian scientists as sources and adopts the journalistic reporting genre with exts by specislized journalists. Superinteressante magazine has a has a more distant commitment to science with exts free from using, instead, catch phrases, slang and types of comparison appropriate the language of its audience

  2. Assessing the operational life of flexible printed boards intended for continuous flexing applications : a case study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, David Franklin

    2011-01-01

    Through the vehicle of a case study, this paper describes in detail how the guidance found in the suite of IPC (Association Connecting Electronics Industries) publications can be applied to develop a high level of design assurance that flexible printed boards intended for continuous flexing applications will satisfy specified lifetime requirements.

  3. Reaching and Teaching: A Study in Audience Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Ellen M.; Welch, Diane T.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a project conducted by the Texas Agricultural Extension Service to market the Family Day Home Care Providers Program to an unknown clientele. Discusses the problems involved in identifying and reaching the target audience. (JOW)

  4. Behzat Ç. An Ankara Detective: An Audience Perception Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tülay Şeker

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was proposed to reveal how “Behzat Ç. An Ankara Detective” serial is perceived among audiences. The research was done by 11 participants and by means of deep engagements audience notions devoted to reception aesthetic were examined. It was confirmed that audiences were highly sensitive to messages. We acquired that socio-demographic variables differ from presented content in terms of resistance. While sense production related to social reality was closer to mass media reality among the youth, elder groups and educateds producted senses that did not coincide with tendency of serial. During the engagements, Behzat Ç. was characterized as a political person and the idea that certain political parties and communities were targeted became prominent. It was determined that the audience of Behzat Ç. interprets each message according to his or her intellectual and ideological framework with an active and sensitive eye.

  5. Watching Dallas again 1: Doing retro audience research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Gilroy

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay and the audience reception projects it introduces alleviate the desperation of seeking the television audience by recourse to Ien Ang's influential book, Watching Dallas ([1982] 1985. Within the context of a unit on audience research in a master's-level course on media, two groups of students explored the possibilities of remixing Ang in the present digital media landscape via informants' comments on the first season of the new series of Dallas (2012–14. Discourses of nostalgia circulate within and around the text, as well as the project itself. Retro audience research generates not only data about the affective memories and critical reflections of informants but also insights into research methods and the production of new nostalgic subjects.

  6. Audience affects decision-making in a marmoset communication network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toarmino, Camille R; Wong, Lauren; Miller, Cory T

    2017-01-01

    An audience can have a profound effect on the dynamics of communicative interactions. As a result, non-human primates often adjust their social decision-making strategies depending on the audience composition at a given time. Here we sought to test how the unique vocal behaviour of multiple audience members affected decisions to communicate. To address this issue, we developed a novel experimental paradigm in which common marmosets directly interacted with multiple 'virtual monkeys' (VMs), each of whom represented an individual marmoset with distinct vocal behaviour. This active social signalling paradigm provided subjects an opportunity to interact with and learn about the behaviour of each VM in the network and apply this knowledge in subsequent communicative decisions. We found that subjects' propensity to interact with particular VMs was determined by the behaviour of each VM in the audience and suggests that marmoset social decision-making strategies are highly adaptive to nuances of the immediate communication network.

  7. Public Relations Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor and Gamble Co., Cincinnati, OH.

    This guide was especially designed for home economists and includes 50 pages of practical ideas and examples on how to set public relations objectives, determine target audiences, work with the media, write releases' and prepare for broadcast interviews. The guide includes definitions of basic terms used in public relations, establishes guidelines…

  8. Public Relations as Strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelby, Annette N.

    Public relations as strategic communication is one possible theme for an introductory course in public relations. This perspective focuses attention on messages (their content, timing, media, and so forth) as strategic responses to the audience and the situation. It provides a defensible rationale for including certain relevant topics in the…

  9. Cui narro haec? Augustine and his Manichaean audience: A re-reading of the first three books of the Confessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annemaré Kotzé

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The issue of intended audience in the first three books of Augustine’s Confessions is investigated in light of the presence of terms and phrases that may have had special connotations for potential Manichaean readers. This is done against the background of definitions of protreptic and paraenetic, which typically revolve around audience location and communicative purpose. Although it has become commonplace to refer to the Confessions as a protreptic the work displays a number of characteristics more in line with current mainstream definitions of paraenetic, amongst other things, by assuming the stance of addressing insiders in agreement with the author’s world view. It is argued that the type of reader most receptive to the insider stance and allusion to the Old Testament on the one hand and to the Manichaean material on the other, would be a Manichaean apostate recently converted to Catholic Christianity.

  10. Narrative Writing in Digital Formats: Interpreting the Impact of Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrence Joshua Fahey; Niiya Melissa; Warschauer March

    2015-01-01

    Digital writing has enabled students to write for a variety of authentic audiences, both in and out of the classroom. As they consider audience, students shoulder a cognitive burden that they must juggle in addition to the task of composition. At the same time, writing provides students with opportunities to craft and express their identities. The ways that identity formation and cognitive load intersect may be particularly complex in digital, online writing environments, as students gain the...

  11. How to get an audience LIT

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    Learning about CERN can be fun. The LHC Interactive Tunnel (LIT) is an immersive installation where the public can experience the thrill of the research being done at CERN. From proton collisions, to the Higgs Field and Hadron Therapy, become an actor of the process of discovery in a playful way.

  12. Defining and targeting an audience for cancer-prevention messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettinghaus, E P

    1992-01-01

    The target audience for cancer-prevention messages is not the cancer patient. Cancer-prevention messages should be designed for and directed toward groups of people who have been determined to be at risk for the disease. Potential audiences may vary widely in size and nature, depending on the specific cancer, its cause, and its etiology. The prevention of specific disease, eg, lung cancer, typically demands some behavior on the part of the recipient of a cancer-prevention message. Thus, members of a target audience may be asked to stop smoking or to refrain from starting. Each potential target audience is likely to be unique and cannot always be reached with typical mass-media campaigns. Messages designed to be effective for such special audiences may be required if a significant impact on behavior is to be obtained. This article attempts to identify potential audiences for cancer-prevention messages and develops the nature of the media to be used, the sources to be employed, and the arguments to be developed in such a campaign. Characteristics (eg, sex, race, age, marital status, and socioeconomic status) are used as examples of variables that may dictate the nature of cancer-prevention campaigns.

  13. [Relationship among weblog authors' target audience, contents, and types of interpersonal communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Asako; Matsumura, Naohiro; Kitayama, Satoshi

    2008-12-01

    Weblogs are one of the most popular personal websites in Japan, where entries are made in journal style and displayed in reverse chronological order. This study examined the relationship between weblog authors' target audience (i.e., orientation) and the actual situations depicted in their weblogs by combining a questionnaire survey of the authors with an analysis of their weblog content data. Based on a questionnaire survey of 736 Japanese weblog authors, their target audience was divided into four clusters: (a) general public, (b) self, (c) self and offline friends, and (d) various others. To assess the actual situations depicted in their weblogs, the amount of happy and unhappy emotional expression in their writing and the frequency of interpersonal communication (comments, bookmarks, and trackbacks) were calculated from their log data. The results suggested that weblog authors wrote different types of content and used different types of communication depending on their audience, whereas the weblog content itself still showed the diary-like characteristic of personal daily-life records.

  14. 21 CFR 1010.20 - Electronic products intended for export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic products intended for export. 1010.20 Section 1010.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Electronic Products § 1010.20 Electronic products intended for export. The performance standards...

  15. Audience reaction movie trailers and the Paranormal Activity franchise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Swanson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the concept and growing practice of audience reaction movie trailers, specifically for films in the horror genre. Popularized by the Paranormal Activity series of films, these trailers primarily utilize green night-vision video footage of a movie theater audience reacting to the film being advertised, yet also consist of webcam recordings of screaming fans, documentary-style B-roll footage of audiences filing into preview screenings with high levels of anticipation, and close-up shots of spectator facial expressions, accompanied by no footage whatsoever from the film being advertised. In analyzing these audience-centric promotional paratexts, my aim is to reveal them as attempting to sell and legitimize the experiential, communal, and social qualities of the theatrical movie viewing experience while at the same time calling for increased fan investment in both physical and online spaces. Through the analysis of audience reaction trailers, this article hopes to both join and engender conversations about horror fan participation, the nature of anticipatory texts as manipulative, and the current state of horror gimmickry in the form of the promotional paratext.

  16. What do audiences do when they sit and listen?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Ana-Despina; Poeschl, Sandra; Doering, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Speech anxiety (SA) training may help subjects improve their skills on keeping audiences interested in the speech and on managing calm or restless audiences. Attention and lack of attention during speeches are displayed through several nonverbal cues. Such and other nonverbal behaviors can also spread throughout a group and engage whole audiences. The current study is an inquiry into the nonverbal markers of attention and lack of attention during lectures (e.g. note taking, eye gaze towards the speaker, conduct with electronic devices such as mobile phones or laptops). Additionally, the study tries to identify nonverbal behaviors that are diffused and their spatial and time diffusion characteristics. 37 university students at the Ilmenau University of Technology have been observed during a 40-minutes lecture. A quantitative content analysis is conducted to identify patterns of behaviors depicting attention and inattention. Afterwards a qualitative content analysis is carried out to identify contagious behaviors and their spreading characteristics. The findings are used to design virtual audiences (VA) whose members react to each other or display observable audience responses (OAR) and will be implemented into training scenarios for training university students against SA.

  17. Audience design through social interaction during group discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Shane L; Fay, Nicolas; Maybery, Murray

    2013-01-01

    This paper contrasts two accounts of audience design during multiparty communication: audience design as a strategic individual-level message adjustment or as a non-strategic interaction-level message adjustment. Using a non-interactive communication task, Experiment 1 showed that people distinguish between messages designed for oneself and messages designed for another person; consistent with strategic message design, messages designed for another person/s were longer (number of words) than those designed for oneself. However, audience size did not affect message length (messages designed for different sized audiences were similar in length). Using an interactive communication task Experiment 2 showed that as group size increased so too did communicative effort (number of words exchanged between interlocutors). Consistent with a non-strategic account, as group members were added more social interaction was necessary to coordinate the group's collective situation model. Experiment 3 validates and extends the production measures used in Experiment 1 and 2 using a comprehension task. Taken together, our results indicate that audience design arises as a non-strategic outcome of social interaction during group discussion.

  18. The art of communicating seismology to broad audiences: the exhibition which changed the perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toma-Danila, Dragos; Tataru, Dragos; Nastase, Eduard; Muntean, Alexandra; Partheniu, Raluca

    2017-04-01

    Seismology is a geoscience often perceived by uninstructed broad audiences as unreliable or inconsistent, since it cannot predict future earthquakes or warn about them effectively; this criticism disregards important achievements that seismology has offered during its more than 100 years of history - such as evidence of Earth's inner structure, knowledge regarding plate tectonics, mineral resource identification, contributions to risk mitigation, monitoring of explosions etc. Moreover, seismology is a field of study with significant advances, which make (or could make) living much safer, in areas with high seismic hazard. We mentioned "could make" since people often fail to understand an important aspect: seismology offers consistent knowledge regarding how to prepare, construct or behave - but it's up to people and authorities to implement the effective measures. In all this story, the effective communication between scientists and the general public plays a major role, making the leap from misconception to relevant impact. As scientists, we wanted to show the true meaning and purpose of seismology to all categories of people. We are in the final stage of the MOBEE (MOBile Earthquake Exhibition) Project implementation, an innovative initiative in a highly seismic country (Romania), where major Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes source have the potential to generate a significant amount of damage over large areas; however, unlike countries like Japan, the medium to long period between felt or significant events (20-40 years) is long enough to make the newer generation in Romania disregardful of the hazard, and older generations skeptical about the role of seismology. MOBEE intended to freshen up things, raise awareness and change the overall perception - through new approaches involving a blend of digital content (interactive apps, responsive and continuously updated website), 3D models achieved through new technologies (3D printing, fiber optics), non

  19. Telecommunication Support System Using Keywords and Their Relevant Information in Videoconferencing — Presentation Method for Keeping Audience's Concentration at Distance Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Kikuo; Kondo, Kimio; Kobayashi, Hideaki; Saito, Fumihiko

    We developed a prototype system to support telecommunication by using keywords selected by the speaker in a videoconference. In the traditional presentation style, a speaker talks and uses audiovisual materials, and the audience at remote sites looks at these materials. Unfortunately, the audience often loses concentration and attention during the talk. To overcome this problem, we investigate a keyword presentation style, in which the speaker holds keyword cards that enable the audience to see additional information. Although keyword captions were originally intended for use in video materials for learning foreign languages, they can also be used to improve the quality of distance lectures in videoconferences. Our prototype system recognizes printed keywords in a video image at a server, and transfers the data to clients as multimedia functions such as language translation, three-dimensional (3D) model visualization, and audio reproduction. The additional information is collocated to the keyword cards in the display window, thus forming a spatial relationship between them. We conducted an experiment to investigate the properties of the keyword presentation style for an audience. The results suggest the potential of the keyword presentation style for improving the audience's concentration and attention in distance lectures by providing an environment that facilitates eye contact during videoconferencing.

  20. The perspective of a pharmacoeconomic study: targeting for audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, T D; Mantovani, L G

    1997-05-01

    As with any type of research, it is crucial at the outset to consider the concerns and perspectives of the audience to which economic study results will be presented. Because the results of a pharmacoeconomic study should result in decisions that can have great impact on the use of a drug or a service, a concise objective with clearly defined and relevant measurement criteria must be provided. The study must answer the questions of the target audience in an unambiguous, understandable language. A thorough assessment of the costs involved to carry out the research must also take place early on in the study design, in order not to jeopardise the study's progress or perceived value for money. The paper discusses briefly some points to bear in mind at the study design stage regarding tailoring the focus to the target audience.

  1. Visual Peoplemeter: A Vision-based Television Audience Measurement System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SKELIN, A. K.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Visual peoplemeter is a vision-based measurement system that objectively evaluates the attentive behavior for TV audience rating, thus offering solution to some of drawbacks of current manual logging peoplemeters. In this paper, some limitations of current audience measurement system are reviewed and a novel vision-based system aiming at passive metering of viewers is prototyped. The system uses camera mounted on a television as a sensing modality and applies advanced computer vision algorithms to detect and track a person, and to recognize attentional states. Feasibility of the system is evaluated on a secondary dataset. The results show that the proposed system can analyze viewer's attentive behavior, therefore enabling passive estimates of relevant audience measurement categories.

  2. Audience preferences are predicted by temporal reliability of neural processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmochowski, Jacek P; Bezdek, Matthew A; Abelson, Brian P; Johnson, John S; Schumacher, Eric H; Parra, Lucas C

    2014-07-29

    Naturalistic stimuli evoke highly reliable brain activity across viewers. Here we record neural activity from a group of naive individuals while viewing popular, previously-broadcast television content for which the broad audience response is characterized by social media activity and audience ratings. We find that the level of inter-subject correlation in the evoked encephalographic responses predicts the expressions of interest and preference among thousands. Surprisingly, ratings of the larger audience are predicted with greater accuracy than those of the individuals from whom the neural data is obtained. An additional functional magnetic resonance imaging study employing a separate sample of subjects shows that the level of neural reliability evoked by these stimuli covaries with the amount of blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) activation in higher-order visual and auditory regions. Our findings suggest that stimuli which we judge favourably may be those to which our brains respond in a stereotypical manner shared by our peers.

  3. Audience responses to television news coverage of medical advances: The mediating role of audience emotions and identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyehyun

    2015-08-01

    Exemplifying a real person in news stories has become a popular journalistic technique to describe an event or issue. With the frequent appearance of medical news reports in local television in recent years, this news presentation style is widely believed to help audiences better engage in and understand complex medical information and to influence their perceptions and judgments. In terms of television news coverage of medical advances, this study investigates how audiences respond to embedded human examples (mainly patients who experience benefits from the advances) and to overall news stories, and how such responses are related to their perception of portrayed medical advances. The experimental results indicate that news stories with a human example were more likely to intensify the audience's positive emotions than those without, which in turn influenced favorable perceptions of the described medical advance. In addition, the extent to which the audience identified with a human example (in particular, sympathy) mediated the relationship between the audience's involvement in the news story and its perception of the portrayed medical advance.

  4. Mobile Audience Response Systems at a Continuing Medical Education Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Alexandra; Gousseau, Michael; Sommerfeld, Connor; Leitao, Darren; Gooi, Adrian

    2017-01-01

    Mobile audience response systems (mARS) are electronic systems allowing speakers to ask questions and audience members to respond anonymously and immediately on a screen which enables learners to view their peers' responses as well as their own. mARS encourages increased interaction and active learning. This study aims to examine the perceptions of audience members and speakers towards the implementation of mARS at a national medical conference. mARS was implemented at the CSO Annual Meeting in Winnipeg 2015. Eleven presenters agreed to participate in the mARS trial. Both audience and presenters received instructions. Five-point Likert questions and short answer questions were emailed to all conference attendees and the data was evaluated. Twenty-seven participants responded, 23 audience members and 4 instructors. Overall, responders indicated improved attention, involvement, engagement and recognition of audience's understanding of topics with the use of mARS. mARS was perceived as easy to use, with clear instructions, and the majority of respondents expressed an interest in using mARS in more presentations and in future national medical conferences. Most respondents preferred lectures with mARS over lectures without mARS. Some negative feedback on mARS involved dissatisfaction with how some presenters implemented mARS into the workshops. Overall mARS was perceived positively with the majority of respondents wanting mARS implemented in more national medical conferences. Future studies should look at how mARS can be used as an educational tool to help improve patient outcomes.

  5. Using Social Media Sentiment Analysis to Understand Audiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McGuire, Mark; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    projects, technical communicators can listen to their external users and identify areas of importance with greater accuracy. While other methods of sentiment analysis look for a solution that leads to artificial intelligence in the program, this paper identifies the present needs of a human interaction......Social media communication is changing the opportunities for technical communicators to really understand audiences when these audiences are active about issues on social media platforms. Through applying ad-hoc corpus building processes to create word lists relevant to specific organizational...

  6. Turning the tide: Serving science to a more-than-media audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renfrow, S. J.; Mahoney, A.; Meier, W.; Scambos, T.; Serreze, M.; Stroeve, J.

    2008-12-01

    For several years, the National Snow and Ice Data Center science team and press office staff have collaborated to produce a popular online subsite for journalists during the final weeks of the Arctic sea ice melt season. During the record-breaking 2007 melt season, something new unfolded: The general public began to compete with the media as the subsite's most vocal and constant audience. In addition, scientists across a span of disciplines contacted us to request access to the daily data that we use in our analysis. People wanted a stronger connection to the science behind the headlines. Our changing audiences and their different needs forced us to ask whether our role in communicating our scientific findings had expanded. Our pathway of communication, although innovative in its execution, was still predicated on the standard model: tell journalists about our science and hope they share it with the rest of the world. Ready or not, our role had organically expanded beyond journal articles, press releases, and breaking news. Many of our audiences were coming straight to the science without reading the news first. We needed to widen the subsite's educational purpose while not losing journalists in the process. On April 7, 2008, we launched the razed-and-reborn Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis subsite. Is the subsite meeting expectations? Within the more than 6,000-page NSIDC Web site, Arctic Sea Ice News and Analysis has ranked number one since its inception, with nearly two million page views in its first four-and-a-half months. It is the most popular entry into our Web site, and the number of visitors continues to swell. Judging by the subsite's top pages, our primary audiences are hearing the messages we've tailored to their needs. We hope the site is doing its part in turning the tide of public opinion, both to improve public understanding of science and to bring home the reality of climate change. In this presentation, we will explore the shifts in both

  7. Take Me Out to the Ball Game: Science Outreach to Non-traditional Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsted, B. A.

    2010-08-01

    Science outreach often targets audiences that are already interested in science and are looking for related educational experiences for themselves or their families. The University of Wisconsin Geology Museum (UWGM) with funding from the NASA Astrobiology Institute (NAI) is targeting unique venues and thereby new audiences who may not typically seek out science outreach events. With this goal in mind, in June, 2009 the UWGM and NAI sponsored an "Astrobiology Night at the Ballpark" at the Madison Mallards Ballpark, the local Madison, Wisconsin minor league baseball venue. At the game, 6,250 attendees were exposed to current NASA-funded astrobiology research being conducted at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Fans were greeted at the gate by volunteers passing out a nine-card pack of extremophile trading cards, each of which featured a different extremophile group (e.g. halophiles, cryophiles, and barophiles). Next, participants could interact with project scientists, graduate students and museum staff at four exploration stations, where each station highlighted astrobiology themes (i.e. extremophiles, banded iron formation, earth's oldest rocks, earth's oldest fossils). Before the game began, the video board on the field was used to broadcast short NASA videos about recent Mars missions as well as the search for life in space. Additionally, inning breaks were used as fun opportunities to engage fans through an "Alien vs. Kids" tug-of-war as well as the distribution of Frisbees with an astrobiology timeline printed on them. Engaging the broader public at a non-science venue is a means to breaking down perceived barriers between scientists and the general public. We found Mallards fans to be receptive and ready to connect with our science themes. Tapping into a new audience also builds a larger awareness of our museum and University, expanding our impact in the community.

  8. Global Warming’s Six Americas: An Audience Segmentation Analysis (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roser-Renouf, C.; Maibach, E.; Leiserowitz, A.

    2009-12-01

    One of the first rules of effective communication is to “know thy audience.” People have different psychological, cultural and political reasons for acting - or not acting - to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and climate change educators can increase their impact by taking these differences into account. In this presentation we will describe six unique audience segments within the American public that each responds to the issue in its own distinct way, and we will discuss methods of engaging each. The six audiences were identified using a nationally representative survey of American adults conducted in the fall of 2008 (N=2,164). In two waves of online data collection, the public’s climate change beliefs, attitudes, risk perceptions, values, policy preferences, conservation, and energy-efficiency behaviors were assessed. The data were subjected to latent class analysis, yielding six groups distinguishable on all the above dimensions. The Alarmed (18%) are fully convinced of the reality and seriousness of climate change and are already taking individual, consumer, and political action to address it. The Concerned (33%) - the largest of the Six Americas - are also convinced that global warming is happening and a serious problem, but have not yet engaged with the issue personally. Three other Americas - the Cautious (19%), the Disengaged (12%) and the Doubtful (11%) - represent different stages of understanding and acceptance of the problem, and none are actively involved. The final America - the Dismissive (7%) - are very sure it is not happening and are actively involved as opponents of a national effort to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Mitigating climate change will require a diversity of messages, messengers and methods that take into account these differences within the American public. The findings from this research can serve as guideposts for educators on the optimal choices for reaching and influencing target groups with varied informational needs

  9. Using Critical Communication Pedagogy to Teach Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Mare, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    Using Critical Communication Pedagogy, this semester-long service-learning approach to public speaking requires students to apply public speaking concepts to a speech they develop and deliver to a specific community audience, to examine their own biases, and to explore and evaluate various strategies for adapting to their audience.

  10. Using Critical Communication Pedagogy to Teach Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Mare, Danielle M.

    2014-01-01

    Using Critical Communication Pedagogy, this semester-long service-learning approach to public speaking requires students to apply public speaking concepts to a speech they develop and deliver to a specific community audience, to examine their own biases, and to explore and evaluate various strategies for adapting to their audience.

  11. Narrative Writing in Digital Formats: Interpreting the Impact of Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Joshua Fahey

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital writing has enabled students to write for a variety of authentic audiences, both in and out of the classroom. As they consider audience, students shoulder a cognitive burden that they must juggle in addition to the task of composition. At the same time, writing provides students with opportunities to craft and express their identities. The ways that identity formation and cognitive load intersect may be particularly complex in digital, online writing environments, as students gain the ability to share and receive feedback from global and local audiences. In this counterbalanced experimental study, 86 seventh- and eighth-grade students responded to two narrative prompts. One prompt was written for the teacher and the other was written for the teacher and peers in an online forum. We examined student writing fluency, mechanical errors, academic word use, and setting. Students were found to be more likely to set narratives in private settings when writing for an audience that included peers. We discuss this finding from cognitive and sociocultural perspectives and how it might inform networked communication research.

  12. Targeting Audiences and Content for Forest Fire Information Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Edwin H.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses opinion survey results for the purpose of improving the capabilities of forest managers to effectively communicate new fire management objectives and plans. Includes recommendations based on the analysis concerning the appropriate audiences and content to target in the design of fire information programs. (ML)

  13. Audience expectations of media accountability in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wurff, R.; Schönbach, K.

    2014-01-01

    Citizens in the Netherlands demand that news media are transparent and responsive to audiences. But above all, the population expects journalism to adopt a more professional manner of self-regulation in order to strengthen news quality. These are the main findings from a large-scale representative

  14. Audience Expectations of Media Accountability: More Professionalization of Journalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wurff, R.; Schönbach, K.

    2013-01-01

    Citizens in the Netherlands demand that news media are transparent and responsive to audiences. But above all, these citizens expect journalism to adopt a more professional manner of self-regulation in order to strengthen news quality. These are the main findings from a large-scale representative

  15. The Risk of Delivering Disturbing Messages to Zoo Family Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Maggie; Moss, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    One of the roles of the modern zoo is to provide environmental education. Zoo visitation comprises primarily family groups seeking to spend time together. There is potential for tension between message and audience expectation as zoos seek to raise awareness of the effects of irresponsible human behavior on the environment. This may unsettle…

  16. The Risk of Delivering Disturbing Messages to Zoo Family Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Maggie; Moss, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    One of the roles of the modern zoo is to provide environmental education. Zoo visitation comprises primarily family groups seeking to spend time together. There is potential for tension between message and audience expectation as zoos seek to raise awareness of the effects of irresponsible human behavior on the environment. This may unsettle…

  17. Exploring Individual Differences in Attitudes toward Audience Response Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Robin H.; Knaack, Liesel

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine individual differences in attitudes toward Audience Response Systems (ARSs) in secondary school classrooms. Specifically, the impact of gender, grade, subject area, computer comfort level, participation level, and type of use were examined in 659 students. Males had significantly more positive attitudes…

  18. Best Practices in Nutrition Education for Low-Income Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Susan; Auld, Garry; MacKinnon, Chloe; Ammerman, Alice; Hanula, Gail; Lohse, Barbara; Scott, Marci; Serrano, Elena; Tucker, Easter; Wardlaw, Mary Kay

    2014-01-01

    The Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) identified a need for a comprehensive set of best practices in nutrition education for low-income audiences for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) educational projects, including SNAP-Ed. A comprehensive list of best practices would promote consistency and efficacy in program planning,…

  19. Messages from within: Communicating with Internal Audiences Is Increasingly Important

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubbage, Alan

    2009-01-01

    Many communications offices are so busy working on external communications that they tend to neglect their internal audiences. But the reality is that in higher education, communicating effectively with students, faculty, and staff is critical to achieving an institution's overall communications goals. Having realized that reaching internal…

  20. Using Audience Segmentation to Tailor Residential Irrigation Water Conservation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Laura A.; Chaudhary, Anil Kumar; Rumble, Joy N.; Lamm, Alexa J.; Momol, Esen

    2017-01-01

    Today's complex issues require technical expertise as well as the application of innovative social science techniques within Extension contexts. Researchers have suggested that a social science approach will play a critical role in water conservation, and people who use home landscape irrigation comprise a critical target audience for agriculture…

  1. Researching the Film Audience: Purposes, Procedures, and Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Bruce A.

    Film audience research complements institutional research, verifying scholarship on the meanings films have to viewers and providing broad-based explanations of film images. Most important, such research focuses on the decision and motivation processes people use before they set foot in the movie theater, thereby helping to construct a context…

  2. Segmenting Broadcast News Audiences in the New Media Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Robert H.

    1989-01-01

    Examines the "benefit segmentation model," a marketing strategy for local news media which is capable of sorting consumers into discrete segments interested in similar salient product attributes or benefits. Concludes that benefit segmentation may provide a means by which news programmers may respond to their audience. (RS)

  3. Audience gaze while appreciating a multipart musical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Satoshi; Obata, Satoshi

    2016-11-01

    Visual information has been observed to be crucial for audience members during musical performances. The present study used an eye tracker to investigate audience members' gazes while appreciating an audiovisual musical ensemble performance, based on evidence of the dominance of musical part in auditory attention when listening to multipart music that contains different melody lines and the joint-attention theory of gaze. We presented singing performances, by a female duo. The main findings were as follows: (1) the melody part (soprano) attracted more visual attention than the accompaniment part (alto) throughout the piece, (2) joint attention emerged when the singers shifted their gazes toward their co-performer, suggesting that inter-performer gazing interactions that play a spotlight role mediated performer-audience visual interaction, and (3) musical part (melody or accompaniment) strongly influenced the total duration of gazes among audiences, while the spotlight effect of gaze was limited to just after the singers' gaze shifts. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Elementary Students' Mathematical Explanations and Attention to Audience with Screencasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    Reasoning and constructing mathematical explanations for an audience have become increasingly important activities in elementary classrooms with the implementation of reform-oriented curriculum and standards. Mobile learning tools and applications, such as screencasts, allow students to generate multimedia presentations of their solution…

  5. An expressive virtual audience with flexible behavioral styles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kang, N.; Brinkman, W.P.; Riemsdijk, M.B. van; Neerincx, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Currently, expressive virtual humans are used in psychological research, training, and psychotherapy. However, the behavior of these virtual humans is usually scripted and therefore cannot be modified freely at runtime. To address this, we created a virtual audience with parameterized behavioral sty

  6. Red Chamber Charm Classic Chinese romance wows New York audience

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nobody would expect an American audience to understand a dance performance that tries to interpret one of China’s most revered, classic and complicated works of literature. They might, however, have been amazed at the enthusiastic response of the crowd at the Rose Theater at New York City’s Lincoln Center

  7. New Scenarios for Audience Response Systems in University Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schön, Daniel; Kopf, Stephan; Klinger, Melanie; Guthier, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Mobile devices like smartphones and tablet PCs are widely used among university students and can be used for audience response systems (clicker systems) to improve teaching. Modern implementations of these systems are no longer limited to plain multiple-choice questions, but enable the lecturers to perform a variety of teaching scenarios. We…

  8. A Report on the Development of Teaching Audience-Appropriate English Speeches in a Collaborative Task-Based Framework

    OpenAIRE

    HENSLEY, Joel

    2011-01-01

    This is a report on the development of a collaborative task-based syllabus in a third-year (English) Language Communication class at a public university in Japan over the course of four consecutive semesters. The aim of this paper is to provide an examination into the methods implemented and adapted in a syllabus concerning audience-appropriate speeches in English. The author/instructor, over the course of four semesters, made incremental changes to the syllabus and class format while maintai...

  9. Public relations effectiveness in public health institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springston, Jeffrey K; Weaver Lariscy, Ruth Ann

    2005-01-01

    This article explores public relations effectiveness in public health institutions. First, the two major elements that comprise public relations effectiveness are discussed: reputation management and stakeholder relations. The factors that define effective reputation management are examined, as are the roles of issues and crisis management in building and maintaining reputation. The article also examines the major facets of stakeholder relations, including an inventory of stakeholder linkages and key audiences, such as the media. Finally, methods of evaluating public relations effectiveness at both the program level and the institutional level are explored.

  10. Okeanos Explorer 2014 Gulf of Mexico Expedition: engaging and connecting with diverse and geographically dispersed audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. W.; Elliott, K.; Lobecker, E.; McKenna, L.; Haynes, S.; Crum, E.; Gorell, F.

    2014-12-01

    From February to May 2014, NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer conducted a telepresence-enabled ocean exploration expedition addressing NOAA and National deepwater priorities in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. The community-driven expedition connected diverse and geographically dispersed audiences including scientists from industry, academia, and government, and educators, students, and the general public. Expedition planning included input from the ocean science and management community, and was executed with more than 70 scientists and students from 14 U.S. states participating from shore in real time. Training the next generation permeated operations: a mapping internship program trained undergraduate and graduate students; an ROV mentorship program trained young engineers to design, build and operate the system; and undergraduate through doctoral students around the country collaborated with expedition scientists via telepresence. Online coverage of the expedition included background materials, daily updates, and mission logs that received more than 100,000 visits by the public. Live video feeds of operations received more than 700,000 views online. Additionally, professional development workshops hosted in multiple locations throughout the spring introduced educators to the Okeanos Explorer Educational Materials Collection and the live expedition, and taught them how to use the website and education resources in their classrooms. Social media furthered the reach of the expedition to new audiences, garnered thousands of new followers and provided another medium for real-time interactions with the general public. Outreach continued through live interactions with museums and aquariums, Exploration Command Center tours, outreach conducted by partners, and media coverage in more than 190 outlets in the U.S. and Europe. Ship tours were conducted when the ship came in to port to engage local scientists, ocean managers, and educators. After the expedition, data and products were

  11. Political Parody and Public Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Parody and related forms of political humor are essential resources for sustaining democratic public culture. They do so by exposing the limits of public speech, transforming discursive demands into virtual images, setting those images before a carnivalesque audience, and celebrating social leveling while decentering all discourses within the…

  12. Political Parody and Public Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Parody and related forms of political humor are essential resources for sustaining democratic public culture. They do so by exposing the limits of public speech, transforming discursive demands into virtual images, setting those images before a carnivalesque audience, and celebrating social leveling while decentering all discourses within the…

  13. Effective Engagement of Hostile Audiences on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, S.

    2012-12-01

    Communicating effectively about climate change can be very frustrating because hostility to climate science is rooted in deeply held beliefs rather than facts. Opposition can be more effectively countered by respecting ideological objections than by aggressive insistence on acceptance of consensus evidence. When presented with a stark choice between sacred beliefs and factual evidence, social science research shows that nearly everyone will choose the latter. Rational argument from authority is often the weakest approach in such situations. Climate change is Simple, Serious, and Solvable. Effective communication of these three key ideas can succeed when the science argument is carefully framed to avoid attack of the audience's ethical identity. Simple arguments from common sense and everyday experience are more successful than data. Serious consequences to values that resonate with the audience can be avoided by solutions that don't threaten those values.

  14. Normative Aesthetics: The Ideal Audience and Art Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunaryono Basuki Ks

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Reader-Response Criticism proposes a new way of looking at literary text. One of the writers of this criticism discusses about 'literary competence' which entails the idea of 'ideal reader'. The writer proposes the idea of 'ideal audience' to work with fields of art other than literature. In an attempt to give the proper appreciation of art, norms are required, and norms in art can be arrived at using the concept of 'ideal audience'. It is a fact that norms are normally contextual, not universal, and change according to the change in the concept of art creation. Then the question is why take the trouble of forming norms if they keep changing?

  15. The Audiences in View of the Changes in Cyber Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. José Ignacio Armentia Vizuete

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Newspaper in Internet have suffered in the last years a series of changes, in the way towards the acquisition of some own characteristics differentiated with regard to the printed dailys. This evolution also has had his reflex in the audiences. Today Internet isn’t an elitist product and is available for the majority of the population. Nevertheless, the way of measuring the above mentioned audiences constitutes one of the hanging questions for the cybermedia, unlike what it happens in other three big informative supports: press, radio and television, where measurements of reference for each one of the supports exist. As it is exposed in this article, we have a great disparity between the data and methods of measurement of organisms and companies like EGM, OJD, Alexa and others, on the Internet. This text is based on a research about the evolution of the cyberjournalism in Spain financed by the University of the Basque Country.

  16. 超越平凡的DYNAUDIO AUDIENCE 52SE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    潘志强

    2003-01-01

    @@ 许多年之后,当笔者见到Dynaudio Audience 52 SE音箱时,一定会想起当初迷上书架音箱时的那些日子.丹拿的Audience 5(听众5号)作为我购买的第一款丹拿产品,正是在经历了诸多选择后的一个明智的选择.这是丹拿最廉价的音箱,但它采用的高级单元却让我从此走上了高保真、低音染、大动态的"阳关道".

  17. About the linguacultural aspect of the advertisement influence on verbal consiousness of the modern youth audience (on the material of the sociolinguistics research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А С Мамонтов

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article on the experimental material there are analyzed the content and the character of modern Russian publicity texts influence on the speech culture of the youth audience; considered both negative and positive features of advertisement language in linguacultural aspect and from Russian language teaching point of view.

  18. Risk perception of festival audience: an application of psychometric paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Ahi, Julide Ceren

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceived risk level indicated by audiences for six contemporary hazards in an open door music festival, seeing as it is an overlooked issue in the literature. In order to measure the risk perceptions of participants The Psychometric Paradigm Model was utilized together with the perceived controllability arguments of Optimism Bias Theory. The data was collected from 230 participants of Landstreff 2013 Stavanger through online survey in coope...

  19. Gender and Sexual Diversity Issues in Physics: The Audience Speaks

    CERN Document Server

    Ackerman, Nicole; Deconinck, Wouter; Falk, Michael L; Garmon, Savannah; Henry, Edward; Long, Elena

    2012-01-01

    An account is presented of the special session on "Gender and Sexual Diversity Issues in Physics" which took place at the American Physical Society March Meeting 2012. The opinions of those who attended this session were solicited via an anonymous survey, the results of which are reported here. Drawing both upon ideas put forward by the speakers and audience from the meeting, a set of recommended actions is proposed for the Physics community to become more inclusive of LGBT+ people.

  20. EMOTIONAL CONTAGION AND MOOD IN CROWD SERVING AS AUDIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The global world is gradually becoming a world of separated crowds despite the artificial wire and wireless connection through television and the Internet. Crowds remain a prevailing subject of research in different social studies, and the research of changes in the psychological structure of crowds and their characteristics is still of primary interest. The main focus of the research is on the interpretation of the results of the research paper about a special separated crowd called audience...

  1. Exploring social and cultural diversity within 'Black British Jazz' audiences

    OpenAIRE

    Wilks, Linda

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a recent study which explores the social, economic and cultural characteristics of audiences for performances by black British jazz musicians. It draws on Bourdieu’s theoretical concept of cultural capital, which links social class and educational qualification level to cultural consumption, as well as on Hall’s exploration of ‘new ethnicities’, demonstrating how the two theories are interrelated. The study uses a mixed method approach of observation, quest...

  2. Examining Students' Intended Image on Facebook: "What Were They Thinking?!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluchette, Joy; Karl, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The present article examines factors that influence why students post information on their social network profile which employers would find inappropriate. Results show that many students make a conscious attempt to portray a particular image and, as predicted, their intended image was related to whether they posted inappropriate information.…

  3. The intended and unintended effects of advertising on children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.A.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of advertising on children have often been divided into two general types: intended effects (e.g., children's brand awareness, preferences, and purchase requests) and unintended effects (e.g., materialistic orientations, parent–child conflicts, and unhealthy eating habits). The first par

  4. Intending the Faculty and its Relation with the City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vande Putte, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the preparation of the idea competition 'Building for Bouwkunde' that was held in 2008. The competition intended entrants to design a replacement building for the lost building of the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology, based on the refle

  5. The intended and unintended effects of advertising on children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.A.; Valkenburg, P.M.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of advertising on children have often been divided into two general types: intended effects (e.g., children's brand awareness, preferences, and purchase requests) and unintended effects (e.g., materialistic orientations, parent–child conflicts, and unhealthy eating habits). The first par

  6. The Intended and Unintended Consequences of International Service-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crabtree, Robbin D.

    2013-01-01

    Previous research on service-learning in international contexts tends to focus on the benefits and outcomes for students and educational institutions. This essay is intended to provoke further examination of issues related to university-community engagement in global contexts, particularly in terms of the consequences for host communities. In…

  7. The intended and unintended effects of advertising on children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.; Valkenburg, P.M.; Valdivia, A.N.; Scharrer, E.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of advertising on children have often been divided into two general types: intended effects (e.g., children's brand awareness, preferences, and purchase requests) and unintended effects (e.g., materialistic orientations, parent-child conflicts, and unhealthy eating habits). The first par

  8. How Dogs Know when Communication Is Intended for Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Juliane; Schulz, Linda; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Domestic dogs comprehend human gestural communication in a way that other animal species do not. But little is known about the specific cues they use to determine when human communication is intended for them. In a series of four studies, we confronted both adult dogs and young dog puppies with object choice tasks in which a human indicated one of…

  9. How Dogs Know when Communication Is Intended for Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Juliane; Schulz, Linda; Tomasello, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Domestic dogs comprehend human gestural communication in a way that other animal species do not. But little is known about the specific cues they use to determine when human communication is intended for them. In a series of four studies, we confronted both adult dogs and young dog puppies with object choice tasks in which a human indicated one of…

  10. The intended and unintended effects of advertising on children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijzen, M.; Valkenburg, P.M.; Valdivia, A.N.; Scharrer, E.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of advertising on children have often been divided into two general types: intended effects (e.g., children's brand awareness, preferences, and purchase requests) and unintended effects (e.g., materialistic orientations, parent-child conflicts, and unhealthy eating habits). The first par

  11. Examining Students' Intended Image on Facebook: "What Were They Thinking?!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluchette, Joy; Karl, Katherine

    2010-01-01

    The present article examines factors that influence why students post information on their social network profile which employers would find inappropriate. Results show that many students make a conscious attempt to portray a particular image and, as predicted, their intended image was related to whether they posted inappropriate information.…

  12. Intending the Faculty and its Relation with the City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vande Putte, H.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the preparation of the idea competition 'Building for Bouwkunde' that was held in 2008. The competition intended entrants to design a replacement building for the lost building of the Faculty of Architecture of the Delft University of Technology, based on the

  13. Communication of technical information to lay audiences. [National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowes, J.E.; Stamm, K.R.; Jackson, K.M.; Moore, J.

    1978-05-01

    One of the objectives of the National Waste Terminal Storage (NWTS) Program is to provide terminal storage facilities for commercial radioactive wastes in various geologic formations at multiple locations in the United States. The activities performed under the NWTS Program will affect regional, state, and local areas, and widespread public interest in this program is expected. Since a large part of the NWTS Program deals with technical information it was considered desirable to initiate a study dealing with possible methods of effectively transmitting this technical information to the general public. This study has the objective of preparing a state-of-the-art report on the communication of technical information to lay audiences. The particular task of communicating information about the NWTS Program to the public is discussed where appropriate. The results of this study will aid the NWTS Program in presenting to the public the quite diverse technical information generated within the program so that a widespread, thorough public understanding of the NWTS Program might be achieved. An annotated bibliography is included.

  14. Conflict or Caveats? Effects of Media Portrayals of Scientific Uncertainty on Audience Perceptions of New Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Andrew R; Hillback, Elliott D; Brossard, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Research indicates that uncertainty in science news stories affects public assessment of risk and uncertainty. However, the form in which uncertainty is presented may also affect people's risk and uncertainty assessments. For example, a news story that features an expert discussing both what is known and what is unknown about a topic may convey a different form of scientific uncertainty than a story that features two experts who hold conflicting opinions about the status of scientific knowledge of the topic, even when both stories contain the same information about knowledge and its boundaries. This study focuses on audience uncertainty and risk perceptions regarding the emerging science of nanotechnology by manipulating whether uncertainty in a news story about potential risks is attributed to expert sources in the form of caveats (individual uncertainty) or conflicting viewpoints (collective uncertainty). Results suggest that the type of uncertainty portrayed does not impact audience feelings of uncertainty or risk perceptions directly. Rather, the presentation of the story influences risk perceptions only among those who are highly deferent to scientific authority. Implications for risk communication theory and practice are discussed.

  15. Mechanism of sound absorption by seated audience in halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishihara, N; Hidaka, T; Beranek, L L

    2001-11-01

    Four methods are explored for predicting the reverberation times in fully occupied halls for music as related to the sound absorption by their audiences. The methods for providing audience absorptions include two that use reverberation chambers, namely, the ISO 354 method (and other similar standards) (ISO) and Kath and Kuhl's method (K & K) [Acustica 15, 127-131 (1965)], and two that use average data from halls, i.e., Beranek's method (COH) [Concert and Opera Halls: How They Sound (Acoustical Society of America, Melville, NY, 1996)], and the average audience power-per-seat absorption which in practice is multiplied by the number of seats (AA). These methods are applied to the calculation of reverberation times in six existing halls, fully occupied, and the results were compared with actual measurements. The COH method was best for predictions over the entire frequency range. The K & K method showed the highest accuracy at mid-frequencies. Both the ISO and the K & K methods yielded wide differences for the measurements in the 125- and 250-Hz bands. The AA method was as good as the COH method when the measurements for the six halls were averaged, but showed a wide spread in the predictions around the average because it does not consider the degree of upholstering of the seats. It was hypothecated by the authors that the principal reasons for the ISO and K & K discrepancies at low frequencies were (a) differences between the degree of sound diffusion in actual halls and that in reverberation chambers, and (b) lack of information on the mechanisms of absorption of sound by people seated side-by-side in rows, particularly for near-grazing incidence sound fields. First, this article explores the sound diffusivity in a reverberation chamber and in the halls using CAD models. A probability density function of the incident angles of the sound rays that impinge on the audiences is defined and was measured for each case. Using a unique method, the sound absorption

  16. Uncertain enthusiasm: the American Cancer Society, public education, and the problems of the movie, 1921-1960.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantor, David

    2007-01-01

    Historians have highlighted a growing medical enthusiasm for public health education movies in the early twentieth century. This essay suggests that there is another historiographic tale to tell, of concerns that films might undermine the public health messages they were designed to promote--concerns that threatened continued interest in movies during the Depression of the 1930s. First, focusing on cancer-education movies aimed at the general public released by the American Society for the Control of Cancer (ASCC, founded 1913), the paper argues that the organization's initial enthusiasm for movies was tempered from the late 1920s by a combination of high production costs, uncertainty as to the effectiveness of movies as public-education tools, and the hard economic situation. It was only after 1944 that motion pictures became a stable part of the propaganda efforts of the renamed American Cancer Society. This transformation followed the takeover of the Society by advertisers and businesspeople, led by Mary Lasker, who introduced business models of fund-raising and education, and made expensive communication technologies, such as movies, central to cancer control. Second, the article also traces the persistence of anxieties that movies might undermine cancer control by encouraging emotional responses that led audiences to ignore the lessons the movies were intended to encourage. But whereas such anxieties dampened ASCC enthusiasm for cancer-education movies during the hard economic times of the 1930s, they had no such effect after 1944, and attention shifted to developing techniques of controlling unwanted audience responses.

  17. An Instructional Approach for Minimizing Stage Fright: Insights from Buss' Theory of Audience Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Joseph

    Effective instructional approaches for dealing with stage fright can be developed by examining A. H. Buss's theory of audience anxiety. Buss argues that audience anxiety correlates with feelings of self-consciousness, characteristics of the audience, and the novelty of the speaking role. From his perspective, the experience of anxiety is divided…

  18. Completed egoism and intended altruism boost healthy food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weibel, Christian; Messner, Claude; Brügger, Adrian

    2014-06-01

    Based on the self-licensing literature and goal theory, we expected and found that completed (im)moral actions lead to markedly different food choices (Studies 1 & 2) than intended (im)moral actions (Study 2). In Study 1, people more often chose healthy over unhealthy food options when they recalled a completed egoistic action than when they recalled a completed altruistic action. Study 2 confirmed this finding and furthermore showed that the self-licensing effect in food choices is moderated by the action stage (completed versus intended) of the moral or immoral action. This article extends the existing self-licensing literature and opens up new perspectives for changing consumers' food consumption behavior. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Use of metakaolin in grouts intended for soil nailing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husson B.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to carry out a feasibility study to evaluate the pertinence of using metakaolin in grout intended for soil nailing. After a first step of grout optimisation based on technical and environmental constraints, an in-situ study was performed to evaluate the compatibility of metakaolin with this kind of application. This part highlights the minimum performance levels necessary if grout is to fulfil its role of transferring stresses between soil and nail.

  20. Screening tests for intended medication adherence among the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raehl, Cynthia L; Bond, C A; Woods, Tresa J; Patry, Roland A; Sleeper, Rebecca B

    2006-05-01

    Medication nonadherence is increasingly recognized as a cause of preventable adverse events, hospitalizations, and poor healthcare outcomes. While comprehensive medication adherence assessment for the elderly is likely to identify and prevent drug-related problems, it is time consuming for patient and healthcare providers alike. To identify screening tools to predict elderly patients' intended medication adherence that are suitable for primary-care settings and community pharmacies. This study evaluated 57 English-speaking persons aged 65 years and older who were from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. Intended adherence was quantified, and the relationships to demographic, medical history, socioeconomic, and literacy variables were determined. In a multivariate analysis with the composite MedTake Test (a quantitative measure of each subject's intent to adhere to prescribed oral medications) as the dependent variable, independent predictors of intended adherence included: age, car ownership in the last 10 years, receipt of food assistance in the last 10 years, number of over-the-counter (OTC) medicines, and REALM (Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine). The strongest predictor was the REALM word-recognition pronunciation test (beta = 0.666; R2 = 0.271; p pronunciation test, along with age, number of OTC drugs, and 2 socioeconomic questions, predicted the intent of seniors to correctly take their own prescribed oral medications.

  1. Applying the principles of adult learning to the teaching of psychopharmacology: audience response systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Stephen M; Davis, Richard L

    2009-08-01

    Medical presentations can be enhanced by systematically collecting audience feedback. This is readily accomplished with polling systems, called audience response systems. Several systems are now available that are small, inexpensive, and can be readily integrated into standard powerpoint presentations without the need for a technician. Use of audience response systems has several advantages. These include improving attentiveness, increasing learning, polling anonymously, tracking individual and group responses, gauging audience understanding, adding interactivity and fun, and evaluating both participant learning and instructor teaching. Tips for how to write questions for audience response systems are also included.

  2. Role-Playing in a Vaccination Debate Strengthens Student Scientific Debate Skills for Various Audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianne Souza

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Students are surrounded by strongly-held viewpoints on scientific topics and frequently discuss news reports with their classmates. We developed the vaccination debate exercise to leverage this interest and develop core higher-order cognitive skills (HOCS, including, but not limited to, the ability to critique public media or primary research sources and create arguments for defending multiple viewpoints. Students prepared to debate different sides of the topic and then randomly assumed one of the roles: “Physician” (pro-vaccine, “Activist” (anti-vaccination, or “Parent-on-the-fence” (undecided. Students reported an increase in their abilities to discuss scientific topics with diverse audiences and an increased awareness of importance of examining Internet sources for credibility.

  3. Bringing the Great American Eclipse of 2017 to Audiences across the Nation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, C. A.; Mayo, L.; Cline, T. D.; Ng, C.; Stephenson, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    The August 21, 2017 eclipse across America will be seen by an estimated 500 million people from northern Canada to South America as well as parts of western Europe and Africa. Through This "Great American Eclipse" NASA in partnership with Google, the American Parks Network, American Astronomical Society, the Astronomical League, and numerous other science, education, outreach, and public communications groups and organizations will develop the approaches, resources, partnerships, and technology applications necessary to bring the excitement and the science of the August 21st, 2017 total solar eclipse across America to formal and informal audiences in the US and around the world. This effort will be supported by the highly visible and successful Sun Earth Days program and will be the main theme for Sun-Earth Days 2017.This presentation will discuss NASA's education and communication plans for the eclipse and will detail a number of specific programs and partnerships being leveraged to enhance our reach and impact.

  4. Keynote speaker Col. Fitch talks to employee audience at Super Safety and Health Day at KSC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Capt. Dennis E. Fitch, a consultant and former pilot instructor with United Airlines, addresses an audience of KSC employees to kick off Super Safety and Health Day at KSC. Fitch related his tale of the catastrophic engine failure in UAL flight 232, which crash landed in Iowa in 1989, and the teamwork that contributed to his survival and the lives of 183 other passengers. For the second time Kennedy Space Center dedicated an entire day to safety and health. Most normal work activities were suspended to allow personnel to attend Super Safety and Health Day activities. The theme, 'Safety and Health Go Hand in Hand,' emphasized KSC's commitment to place the safety and health of the public, astronauts, employees and space-related resources first and foremost. Events also included a panel session about related issues, vendor exhibits, and safety training in work groups. The keynote address and panel session were also broadcast internally over NASA television.

  5. The entry to Kolarac foundation: Cultural activity and music audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadžibulić Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Foundation of Ilija Milosavljević Kolarac (also known as Kolarac Foundation; in Serbian: Kolarčeva zadužbina was established simultaneously with the development of the most important modern cultural institutions in Serbia in the 19th century. The quality and diversity of the program, the ability to recognize important topics in the current time, as well as preservation of the old and encouragement of new ideas in almost all domains of art and science have contributed to its unquestionable reputation throughout the region. However, there have been no significant academic attempts to approach its work analytically and, in particular, its audience. The aim of this paper is to give an overview of the work of Kolarac Foundation by presenting the origin and history of the institution, followed by an analysis of the program of all its activities in the first ten seasons of the new millennium. The central part of the paper is an analysis of its cultural activity in the given period. Finally, by using empirical data, the music audence of Great Hall (Velika Dvorana of Kolarac Foundation is profiled through its basic socio-demographic characteristics and music practices. The music audience mainly consisted of women, highly educated professionals with a high material standard. The share of the oldest and those from 21 to 30 years old is the highest and, at the same time, equal. This audience is authentically fond of music, with no exceptions at all. Its members listen to music on everyday basis, and they were attending concerts in the year before the investigation. They find music to be an inevitable part of their lives, and cannot imagine emotional expression or making friendships without it. Finally, they sincerely like coming to Kolarac Foundation since they find it to be a place that has all the positive treats of a good cultural institution.

  6. Evaluation of field triage decision scheme educational resources: audience research with emergency medical service personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmiento, Kelly; Eckstein, Daniel; Zambon, Allison

    2013-03-01

    In an effort to encourage appropriate field triage procedures, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in collaboration with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the American College of Surgeons-Committee on Trauma, convened the National Expert Panel on Field Triage to update the Field Triage Decision Scheme: The National Trauma Triage Protocol (Decision Scheme). In support of the Decision Scheme, CDC developed educational resources for emergency medical service (EMS) professionals, one of CDC's first efforts to develop and broadly disseminate educational information for the EMS community. CDC wanted to systematically collect information from the EMS community on what worked and what did not with respect to these educational materials and which materials were of most use. An evaluation was conducted to obtain feedback from EMS professionals about the Decision Scheme and use of Decision Scheme educational materials. The evaluation included a survey and a series of focus groups. Findings indicate that a segment of the Decision Scheme's intended audience is using the materials and learning from them, and they have had a positive influence on their triage practices. However, many of the individuals who participated in this research are not using the Decision Scheme and indicated that the materials have not affected their triage practices. Findings presented in this article can be used to inform development and distribution of additional Decision Scheme educational resources to ensure they reach a greater proportion of EMS professionals and to inform other education and dissemination efforts with the EMS community.

  7. Gaining trust as well as respect in communicating to motivated audiences about science topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiske, Susan T; Dupree, Cydney

    2014-09-16

    Expertise is a prerequisite for communicator credibility, entailing the knowledge and ability to be accurate. Trust also is essential to communicator credibility. Audiences view trustworthiness as the motivation to be truthful. Identifying whom to trust follows systematic principles. People decide quickly another's apparent intent: Who is friend or foe, on their side or not, or a cooperator or competitor. Those seemingly on their side are deemed warm (friendly, trustworthy). People then decide whether the other is competent to enact those intents. Perception of scientists, like other social perceptions, involves inferring both their apparent intent (warmth) and capability (competence). To illustrate, we polled adults online about typical American jobs, rated as American society views them, on warmth and competence dimensions, as well as relevant emotions. Ambivalently perceived high-competence but low-warmth, "envied" professions included lawyers, chief executive officers, engineers, accountants, scientists, and researchers. Being seen as competent but cold might not seem problematic until one recalls that communicator credibility requires not just status and expertise but also trustworthiness (warmth). Other research indicates the risk from being enviable. Turning to a case study of scientific communication, another online sample of adults described public attitudes toward climate scientists specifically. Although distrust is low, the apparent motive to gain research money is distrusted. The literature on climate science communicators agrees that the public trusts impartiality, not persuasive agendas. Overall, communicator credibility needs to address both expertise and trustworthiness. Scientists have earned audiences' respect, but not necessarily their trust. Discussing, teaching, and sharing information can earn trust to show scientists' trustworthy intentions.

  8. Culturally Relevant Pedagogy and the Public Speaking Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colvin, Janet Weston; Tobler, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    From the earliest roots of rhetoric, practitioners emphasized the need for analyzing one's audience before developing a speech. Textbooks for most basic public speaking courses spend at least one chapter discussing audience analysis. Authors discuss adapting messages to various demographic, cultural, and individual differences. As a result,…

  9. Partnering to Enhance Education and Public Engagement Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, C.; Bialeschki, D.; Buxner, S.; Felske, L.; Foxworth, S.; Graff, P.; Peticolas, L.; Shaner, A.; Hackler, A. Smith

    2016-01-01

    Collaborating with partners is a fundamental aspect of the Lunar and Planetary Institute's (LPI) educational and public engagement efforts. Such partnerships enable scientists and educators to include members of the audience in program planning and execution. Ultimately, partnerships strengthen programs by providing diverse resources, expertise, and expanding the potential audience.

  10. MAIN FEATURES OF VIDEO MEDIA FOR PRESCHOOL AUDIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia GROMOVA

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the impact of television on pre-school audience, namely on children from 0 to 6 years in the article. The author carefully analyzed the features of psychological and physical evolution of infantile (early age group (0-3 years and preschool children (3-6 ac-cording to which telecast must be created. The author analyzed program schedules of Russian TV channels with the aim to identify the availability of TV programs relevant to each preschool age group.

  11. Teaching Students how to Analyze and Adapt to Audiences

    OpenAIRE

    Seiter, John S.; Gass, R. H.

    2007-01-01

    Not long ago, one of the author's students told him, “I won't be able to make it to your class today. I have to study for a test in another course. Will I miss anything important?” The author, of course, had heard this excuse before, as many of us probably have. What made this interaction more amusing was what, by coincidence, the student was going to miss that day: a discussion on analyzing and adapting to audiences. Had she attended the class, we wonder if she would understand the negative ...

  12. From everyday communicative figurations to rigorous audience news repertoires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobbernagel, Christian; Schrøder, Kim Christian

    2016-01-01

    In the last couple of decades there has been an unprecedented explosion of news media platforms and formats, as a succession of digital and social media have joined the ranks of legacy media. We live in a ‘hybrid media system’ (Chadwick, 2013), in which people build their cross-media news reperto...... of six audience news repertoires in Denmark, also preserves the qualitative thickness of the participants’ verbal accounts of the communicative figurations of their day-in-the-life with the news media...

  13. [Audience response-systems enhance the learning environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Jacob Vad; Østergaard, Doris

    2011-11-14

    The purpose of this article was to describe the possibilities gained by using an electronic voting system (EVS), the existing evidence to determine whether an EVS affects learning proceeds, challenges in EVS and perspectives for EVS in Danish medical training. Audience Response-Systems (ARS) seem suited to enhance participants' activity and attention. The technology as such holds the potential to enhance learning outcome, but changes in the pedagogical method are needed. More studies examining the use of new wireless, mobile voting systems are required.

  14. Opening New Doors: Hands-On Participation Brings a New Audience to the Clay Studio. Wallace Studies in Building Arts Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Bob; Heywood, Tricia

    2015-01-01

    This case study examines how The Clay Studio, a ceramic-arts studio, gallery and shop in Philadelphia, attracted younger audiences to its workshops and exhibits. In 2007, the studio became concerned that its audience was getting older and few newcomers were signing up for classes or making purchases. The studio had to engage younger professionals…

  15. Assessing the quality of a deliberative democracy mini-public event about advanced biofuel production and development in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longstaff, Holly; Secko, David M

    2016-02-01

    The importance of evaluating deliberative public engagement events is well recognized, but such activities are rarely conducted for a variety of theoretical, political and practical reasons. In this article, we provide an assessment of the criteria presented in the 2008 National Research Council report on Public Participation in Environmental Assessment and Decision Making (NRC report) as explicit indicators of quality for the 2012 'Advanced Biofuels' deliberative democracy event. The National Research Council's criteria were selected to evaluate this event because they are decision oriented, are the products of an exhaustive review of similar past events, are intended specifically for environmental processes and encompass many of the criteria presented in other evaluation frameworks. It is our hope that the results of our study may encourage others to employ and assess the National Research Council's criteria as a generalizable benchmark that may justifiably be used in forthcoming deliberative events exploring different topics with different audiences.

  16. Twitter manager GO API intended for GNU Social API

    OpenAIRE

    Janiga, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    The bachelor’s thesis had two goals. The first one was to create API for GO programming language that communicates with GNU Social API. The second one was to create an application that uses the mentioned API. The main purpose of creating the application was to reduce the time spent with the login and logout of the accounts by the members in the white team. The application is intended for training purposes in JYVSECTEC project at JAMK University of Applied Sciences. JYVSECTEC sta...

  17. Social facilitation of cognition in rhesus monkeys: audience vs. coaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie J. Reynaud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social psychology has long established that the mere presence of a conspecific, be it an active co-performer (coaction effect, or a passive spectator (audience effect changes behavior in humans. Yet, the process mediating this fundamental social influence has so far eluded us. Brain research and its nonhuman primate animal model, the rhesus macaque, could shed new light on this long debated issue. For this approach to be fruitful, however, we need to improve our patchy knowledge about social presence influence in rhesus macaques. Here, seven adults (two dyads and one triad performed a simple cognitive task consisting in touching images to obtain food treats, alone versus in presence of a co-performer or a spectator. As in humans, audience sufficed to enhance performance to the same magnitude as coaction. Effect sizes were however 4 times larger than those typically reported in humans in similar tasks. Both findings are an encouragement to pursue brain and behavior research in the rhesus macaque to help solve the riddle of social facilitation mechanisms.

  18. Social Facilitation of Cognition in Rhesus Monkeys: Audience Vs. Coaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynaud, Amélie J; Guedj, Carole; Hadj-Bouziane, Fadila; Meunier, Martine; Monfardini, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    Social psychology has long established that the mere presence of a conspecific, be it an active co-performer (coaction effect), or a passive spectator (audience effect) changes behavior in humans. Yet, the process mediating this fundamental social influence has so far eluded us. Brain research and its nonhuman primate animal model, the rhesus macaque, could shed new light on this long debated issue. For this approach to be fruitful, however, we need to improve our patchy knowledge about social presence influence in rhesus macaques. Here, seven adults (two dyads and one triad) performed a simple cognitive task consisting in touching images to obtain food treats, alone vs. in presence of a co-performer or a spectator. As in humans, audience sufficed to enhance performance to the same magnitude as coaction. Effect sizes were however four times larger than those typically reported in humans in similar tasks. Both findings are an encouragement to pursue brain and behavior research in the rhesus macaque to help solve the riddle of social facilitation mechanisms.

  19. Tips for using mobile audience response systems in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gousseau M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Gousseau, Connor Sommerfeld, Adrian Gooi Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada Background: With growing evidence on the benefits of active learning, audience response systems (ARSs have been increasingly used in conferences, business, and education. With the introduction of mobile ARS as an alternative to physical clickers, there are increasing opportunities to use this tool to improve interactivity in medical education. Aim: The aim of this study is to provide strategies on using mobile ARS in medical education by discussing steps for implementation and pitfalls to avoid. Method: The tips presented reflect our commentary of the literature and our experiences using mobile ARS in medical education. Results: This article offers specific strategies for the preparation, implementation, and assessment of medical education teaching sessions using mobile ARS. Conclusion: We hope these tips will help instructors use mobile ARS as a tool to improve student interaction, teaching effectiveness, and participant enjoyment in medical education. Keywords: mobile audience response systems, active learning, medical education, ARS

  20. Media Text and Audiences: Discursive Constructions of Fandom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Popović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the research findings obtained from a research project investigating media audiences and their reception of a cult-television (Cult TV text, namely Da Ali G Show. The audience research comprises 18 semi-structured interviews conducted in London (the United Kingdom and in Zagreb (Croatia aimed at establishing how fandom is discursively constructed. The analysis of the interpretive community in two distinct socio-cultural contexts showed that there were more similarities than differences overall. The practices engaged in by the interviewees mostly involved making a conscious effort to regularly watch the primary text as well as to show an interest in the future work of the author. The research showed that interviewees typically engaged in a type of ‘moderate’ fandom, whilst strong emotional attachments were seen as negative, as was intrusiveness into people’s privacy. This indicates a split between the signifier and the signified: the term ‘fan’ was readily adopted by interviewees in describing their relationship to the text; however, the meaning was negotiated and carefully constructed so as to disassociate oneself from the extreme, passionate, irrational connotation that the etymology of the term carries.

  1. Science and Faith: Discussing Astronomy Research with Religious Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton M.

    2006-12-01

    An important component of our outreach as research astronomers involves interaction with the religious community. From my personal perspective, being an active research astronomer who is also a practicing Christian, I am sometimes invited to present the latest astronomical research to church audiences and other religious groups; belonging to both communities thereby provides a valuable means of contributing to the dialogue between science and religion. These opportunities can be used to explain that science and religion are not necessarily in conflict but can be considered to be quite complementary. For instance, an important aspect of religion deals with the purpose of our existence, while science is more focussed on providing physical explanations for what we observe in the world, using a well-defined scientific process. Hence, religious believers need not necessarily abandon their faith in order to accept mainstream scientific research; these address very different and complementary aspects of our existence. Recent ideas such as Intelligent Design attempt to address the scientific method, but do not address the ultimate religious question of purpose and do not contribute towards reconciling science and religion in this sense. Ultimately, every individual arrives at their own understanding of this rather complex interplay; I will present some personal reflections on general approaches for discussing mainstream astronomical research with religious audiences, aimed at helping to advance the dialogue between religion and science in general.

  2. Engaging the audience: developing presentation skills in science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Ann E

    2013-01-01

    This article describes a graduate class in presentation skills ("PClass") as a model for how a class with similar objectives, expectations and culture might be mounted for undergraduates. The required class is given for students in neuroscience and physiology programs at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; I describe the class in the years I led it, from 2003-2012. The class structure centered on peer rehearsal, critiquing of PowerPoint, and chalk talks by the students; video-recording of student talks for later review by the student with the instructor; and presentation of polished talks in a formal setting. A different faculty visitor to the class each week gave the students a variety of perspectives. The students also gained insight into their own evolving skills by discussing the strengths and weaknesses of seminars given by visitors to the campus. A unique feature of the class was collaboration with a professional actor from the University's Department of Dramatic Arts, who helped the students develop techniques for keeping the attention of an audience, for speaking with confidence, and for controlling nervousness. The undergraduate campus would be expected to lend itself to this sort of interdisciplinary faculty cooperation. In addition, students worked on becoming adept at designing and presenting posters, introducing speakers graciously and taking charge of the speaker's question session, and speaking to a lay audience.

  3. "A word from man to man". Interwar Venereal Disease Education Films for Military Audiences in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonah, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In the 1910s, in the wake of the glorious decade of syphilography (1900-1910), the early health education films lay the groundwork for a pragmatic approach to the containment of venereal diseases combining (early) diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis. Realizing that WWI was turning into a durable military conflict, the French Army created a Cinematographic Section (SCA) in 1915 for the purposes of war propaganda and documentation. In 1916, secretary of war Justin Godard declared syphilis a "national public danger" and initiated information campaigns in military and civilian spheres. Conferences accompanied with film screenings were organized for all new military recruits, resulting in the production of a series sex hygiene films for military audiences characterized by a short, evocative and precise documentary style, contrasting with the romantic sex hygiene films aimed at the general public. This contribution examines the cinematographic origins of the instructional films for the military, as well as their evolution up to WWII and their influence on public sex hygiene films for civilians in the interwar period in France.

  4. Exploring intended infant feeding decisions among low-income women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurka, Kelly K; Hornsby, Paige P; Drake, Emily; Mulvihill, Evan M; Kinsey, Emily N; Yitayew, Miheret S; Lauer, Claire; Corriveau, Sharon; Coleman, Valerie; Gulati, Guari; Kellams, Ann L

    2014-10-01

    Low-income women have the lowest rates of breastfeeding in the United States. Greater understanding of factors that predict intention to feed artificial breastmilk substitute is needed to inform the design and timing of interventions to promote breastfeeding among vulnerable women. This study aimed to identify demographic and reproductive characteristics and other factors associated with intent to feed artificial breastmilk substitute among low-income women. Data from 520 low-income women interviewed at 24-41 weeks of gestation during enrollment in a prenatal breastfeeding education intervention study were analyzed. Participant characteristics, reasons for feeding decision, and sources and types of information received were compared among women intending to feed only artificial breastmilk substitute and other women. Most participants (95%) had already chosen an infant feeding method at the time of interview. There were no differences in plans to return to work by feeding plan. Women reporting intention to feed only artificial breastmilk substitute were less likely to report receiving information about the benefits of breastfeeding, how to breastfeed, and pumps and were more likely to cite personal preference and convenience as reasons for their decision. Women were more likely to intend to feed artificial breastmilk substitute if they had a previous live birth or had not breastfed a child, including the most recent. These findings suggest breastfeeding promotion should target women early and include sensitive, effective ways to promote breastfeeding among women who have not previously successfully breastfed. Breastfeeding history should be elicited, and plans to pump should be supported prenatally.

  5. The Selfish Goal: Unintended Consequences of Intended Goal Pursuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargh, John A; Green, Michelle; Fitzsimons, Gráinne

    2008-10-01

    Three experiments tested the hypothesis that consciously intended goal pursuits have unintended consequences for social judgment and behavior. From evolutionary theory (Dawkins 1976/2006) and empirical evidence of a nonconscious mode of goal pursuit (Bargh, 2005) we derive the hypothesis that most human goal pursuits are open-ended in nature: Once active, goals will operate on goal-relevant content in the environment, even if that content is not the intended focus of the conscious goal. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that goals to evaluate a job applicant for either a waiter or crime reporter position also shape impressions of incidental bystanders in the situation, such that the bystander is later liked or disliked not on his own merits, but on how well his behavior matches the criteria consciously applied in evaluating the job applicant. Experiment 3 finds that a goal to help a specific target person spills over to influence actions toward incidental bystanders, but only while active. Implications of these findings for goal pursuit in everyday life are discussed.

  6. The Illusion of Transparency and Normative Beliefs about Anxiety during Public Speaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacInnis, Cara C.; Mackinnon, Sean P.; MacIntyre, Peter D.

    2010-01-01

    Public speakers believe their nervousness is more apparent to others than is actually the case, a phenomenon known as the illusion of transparency. Study 1, in which participants delivered a public speech to an audience, provided evidence of this phenomenon. Despite this, a substantial minority of participants (36%) thought that the audience would…

  7. Sex-Specific Audience Effect in the Context of Mate Choice in Zebra Finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Kniel

    Full Text Available Animals observing conspecifics during mate choice can gain additional information about potential mates. However, the presence of an observer, if detected by the observed individuals, can influence the nature of the behavior of the observed individuals, called audience effect. In zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata castanotis, domesticated males show an audience effect during mate choice. However, whether male and female descendants of the wild form show an audience effect during mate choice is unknown. Therefore, we conducted an experiment where male and female focal birds could choose between two distinctive phenotypes of the opposite sex, an artificially adorned stimulus bird with a red feather on the forehead and an unadorned stimulus bird, two times consecutively, once without an audience and once with an audience bird (same sex as test bird. Males showed an audience effect when an audience male was present and spent more time with adorned and less time with unadorned females compared to when there was no audience present. The change in time spent with the respective stimulus females was positively correlated with the time that the audience male spent in front of its cage close to the focal male. Females showed no change in mate choice when an audience female was present, but their motivation to associate with both stimulus males decreased. In a control for mate-choice consistency there was no audience in either test. Here, both focal females and focal males chose consistently without a change in choosing motivation. Our results showed that there is an audience effect on mate choice in zebra finches and that the response to a same-sex audience was sex-specific.

  8. Sex-Specific Audience Effect in the Context of Mate Choice in Zebra Finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kniel, Nina; Bender, Stefanie; Witte, Klaudia

    2016-01-01

    Animals observing conspecifics during mate choice can gain additional information about potential mates. However, the presence of an observer, if detected by the observed individuals, can influence the nature of the behavior of the observed individuals, called audience effect. In zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata castanotis), domesticated males show an audience effect during mate choice. However, whether male and female descendants of the wild form show an audience effect during mate choice is unknown. Therefore, we conducted an experiment where male and female focal birds could choose between two distinctive phenotypes of the opposite sex, an artificially adorned stimulus bird with a red feather on the forehead and an unadorned stimulus bird, two times consecutively, once without an audience and once with an audience bird (same sex as test bird). Males showed an audience effect when an audience male was present and spent more time with adorned and less time with unadorned females compared to when there was no audience present. The change in time spent with the respective stimulus females was positively correlated with the time that the audience male spent in front of its cage close to the focal male. Females showed no change in mate choice when an audience female was present, but their motivation to associate with both stimulus males decreased. In a control for mate-choice consistency there was no audience in either test. Here, both focal females and focal males chose consistently without a change in choosing motivation. Our results showed that there is an audience effect on mate choice in zebra finches and that the response to a same-sex audience was sex-specific.

  9. The role of public private partnerships in the international experience and audiences of supply side reform in the medical service system%公私伙伴关系促进医疗服务供给侧改革的国际经验及其启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽杭; 丁亚奇; 王小万

    2016-01-01

    基于公私伙伴关系( PPP)的相关理论与概念,本文从管理理念的变革,财政预算的压力,技术创新与服务模式的转变及健康服务业的发展等方面系统阐述了PPP模式在医疗服务领域的发展动力,并结合国际社会在医疗服务领域引入PPP模式的实践,总结了部分国家在改革实践中所取得的效果与存在的风险;研究发现,在医疗服务领域引入PPP模式对促进政府职能转变,缓解政府的筹资压力,特别是推进医疗服务供给侧的结构性改革,提升医疗服务系统对消费者需求的反应性,实现其“物有所值”的最大化等具有一定的促进作用与现实意义;但是,在实践中要处理好政府角色的定位,趋利行为与公益性,垄断与监管等方面的关系。相关的启示是,在深化医改的实践中要树立开放、包容、共享的创新发展理念,并进一步完善相关的政策法规,提升监督管理能力。%Based on the concept and related theory of public-private partnership ( PPP model ) , this paper re-viewed systematically the development motivation of PPP model in the field of the medical care systems reform practice, such as the transformation of public administration idea, budget pressure of the government, technological innovation and transformation of medical care service mode, and the development of health care industry. Combined with the prac-tice of the international community to introduce PPP model, summarized systematically the major effect and existing risk in some countries have made in the practice of the reform. The study found that introducing the PPP model in the field of medical service to promote the transformation of government functions, alleviates the financing pressure of the govern-ment, especially to promote the medical service supply side structural reform, improve the medical service system in re-sponse to consumer demand, to achieve its maximum

  10. Public health notices filed at Quebec's Environmental Public Hearing Board (BAPE) in relation to the implementation of a liquefied natural gas terminal and associated infrastructure in Levis; Avis de sante publique depose a la Commission du bureau d'audiences publiques sur l'environnement (BAPE) relativement au Projet d'implantation d'un terminal methanier et de ses infrastructures connexes a Levis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbour, S.; Lainesse, P. [Agence de la sante et des services sociaux de Chaudiere-Appalaches, Sainte-Marie, PQ (Canada); Lacroix, P. [Centre de sante et de services sociaux du Grand Littoral, Saint-Romuald, PQ (Canada); Auger, P.L.; Comeau, M.; Levaque, R.; Sebez, S. [Agence de la sante et des services sociaux de la Capitale-Nationale, Quebec, PQ (Canada)

    2007-01-25

    The public health directors for the Chaudieres-Appalaches and the National Capital regions expressed their opinions regarding the Rabaska liquefied natural gas project and its associated infrastructure. Their opinions were based on on a detailed examination of documents produced for the project; questions and information from initial public hearings; a survey of the population conducted in November 2006; and, previously published literature on issues related to a similar project. This document described the ethical rules that were taken into consideration regarding the management of public safety risks. The health directors placed emphasis on the justification for the project and the site chosen. They expressed that a potential risk to the security, health and well being of the population was still present. Noise pollution, air quality, and potable water quality were all subject to scrutiny. The directors would not give a favourable response regarding the project unless all issues were taken into consideration. The purpose of this document was to help close the gap regarding opposing opinions within the population on this subject. 76 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig., 8 appendices.

  11. Two Film Adaptations of Larsson’s novel The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo : A Semiotic and Audience Reception Study

    OpenAIRE

    Casprov, Alexandra Genţiana

    2012-01-01

    Stieg Larsson has reached vast audiences with his popular, page-turning crime novels, the Millennium Series. The series tells a story not just for fictional purposes, but to draw attention to what people did not see about the society that Larsson lived in. In 2009, local actors starred in a film adaptation of Larsson’s first novel, which went beyond the Swedish public. In December 2011 an English-language remake based on the same bestseller was released, starring famous Hollywood actors. Cons...

  12. The Historians of the Classical World and Their Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momigliano, Arnaldo

    1978-01-01

    This collection of historical evidence was intended to help us to understand where and on what occasions and by what kinds of people books of history were written and read. It focuses on ancient Greek and Roman society and particularly on the position of the ancient historian. (Author/RK)

  13. Audience in the Service of Learning: How Kids Negotiate Attention in an Online Community of Interactive Media Designers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Audience can serve as powerful motivation in learning--and network technologies have the potential to greatly broaden audience for the processes and products of learning. But these new opportunities for audience are accompanied by new challenges. In this paper, we examine and problematize the notion and role of audience in learning by presenting a…

  14. Audience Accommodation in Terms of Audience's Wants in English Writings%英语写作中需求方面的读者顺应

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昌奇

    2012-01-01

    写作是作者与读者的一种交流,读者在写作过程中占据极其重要的地位。写作中需求层面的读者顺应是指作者从读者入手,正确判断读者的阅读需求,通过语域方面的顺应、得体定位、价值凸显,以促进读者对话语的认同。达到有效交际的目的。%Written text is a way of communication with audience,so audience plays an im- portant role in writing. Audience accommodation in terms of audience' s want in English writ- ings means that the writer, starting from audience,rightly estimating his audience' s wants, pres- ents his ideas by ways of genre analysis, value-bursting and propriety in settings that can best facilitate his audience's identification, by which an effective communication can be achieved.

  15. A Rhetoric of Public Theology: The Religious Rhetoric and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldzwig, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Identifies a rhetoric of public theology that is specifically targeted for mass audiences in an attempt to influence religious and secular publics on public policy. Argues that such a rhetoric differs markedly from that of civil religion and displays three characteristics: expedient simplicity, existential content, and action rituals. (JD)

  16. THE ROLE AND IMPORTANCE OF “PUBLIC INFORMATION” IN POLITICAL PUBLIC RELATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazım Özkan ERTÜRK

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Public relations is the practice of managing a communication process that aims to build mutual goodwill and trust between organizations and their publics with the help of publicity, information and positive image building efforts. Public information is the public relations approach which aims for providing mutual goodwill and trust by sharing the organization-related information with target audience in complete openness and honesty. Public Information, firstly introduced by Ivy Ledbetter Lee in the United States of America during 1920’s, became prominent as a public relations model which provided an innovative viewpoint on commercial and organizational communication policies. In time, public information practices in public relations began to be utilized for building and maintaining political trust and support of target audience. In this study, application methods of public information activities as a political public relations action and their benefits provided to organization are outlined.

  17. [Compensatory self-enhancement as a strategy for the multiple audience problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasagi, Yuu; Daibo, Ikuo

    2010-04-01

    This study examined how people can handle the multiple audience problem of self-presentation (Fleming, 1994), when faced with two or more audiences while simultaneously wanting each audience to form or maintain a different impression of the presenter. In the laboratory, female participants had a brief conversation with either an opposite-sex (male) or a same-sex (female) confederate. The results showed that when no one else observed the conversation, the participants presented themselves as physically attractive to the opposite-sex more than to the same-sex audience. On the other hand, when another same-sex individual was observing the conversation, the participants presented themselves to the opposite-sex audience as less physically attractive but more socially desirable and friendly. The importance of this compensatory self-enhancement strategy in the multiple-audience situation is discussed.

  18. Intended and unintended consequences of China's zero markup drug policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Hongmei; Miller, Grant; Zhang, Linxiu; Li, Shaoping; Rozelle, Scott

    2015-08-01

    Since economic liberalization in the late 1970s, China's health care providers have grown heavily reliant on revenue from drugs, which they both prescribe and sell. To curb abuse and to promote the availability, safety, and appropriate use of essential drugs, China introduced its national essential drug list in 2009 and implemented a zero markup policy designed to decouple provider compensation from drug prescription and sales. We collected and analyzed representative data from China's township health centers and their catchment-area populations both before and after the reform. We found large reductions in drug revenue, as intended by policy makers. However, we also found a doubling of inpatient care that appeared to be driven by supply, instead of demand. Thus, the reform had an important unintended consequence: China's health care providers have sought new, potentially inappropriate, forms of revenue. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  19. Graphite Intended for Green Engineering Developed by Noncontaminant Reverse Abrasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Baca Arroyo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphite intended for green engineering was synthesized by noncontaminant reverse abrasion, which consists of graphite layers assembled with thickness controlled on SiC sandpaper as insulating substrate. Phase formation of the graphite layers was validated by X-ray diffraction studies and its finished profile by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Transport parameters of only three layers were evaluated from current-voltage curves. Mathematical functions such as derivative and modulation of a signal have been built by graphite circuits using different performance principles, compared to those used with silicon devices. The trends related to electronic engineering should be achieved with design of the graphite-based devices to facilitate their mass production in the near future.

  20. New process of silicon carbide purification intended for silicon passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbouche, M.; Zaghouani, R. Benabderrahmane; Benammar, N. E.; Aglieri, V.; Mosca, M.; Macaluso, R.; Khirouni, K.; Ezzaouia, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we report on a new, efficient and low cost process of silicon carbide (SiC) powder purification intended to be used in photovoltaic applications. This process consists on the preparation of porous silicon carbide layers followed by a photo-thermal annealing under oxygen atmosphere and chemical treatment. The effect of etching time on impurities removal efficiency was studied. Inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) results showed that the best result was achieved for an etching time of 10 min followed by gettering at 900 °C during 1 h. SiC purity is improved from 3N (99.9771%) to 4N (99.9946%). Silicon carbide thin films were deposited onto silicon substrates by pulsed laser deposition technique (PLD) using purified SiC powder as target. Significant improvement of the minority carrier lifetime was obtained encouraging the use of SiC as a passivation layer for silicon.

  1. Siloxanes in silicone products intended for food contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederberg, Tommy Licht; Jensen, Lisbeth Krüger

    Silicone is used in food contact materials due to its excellent physical and chemical properties. It is thermostable and flexible and is used in bakeware and kitchen utensils. Silicone is also used to coat paper to make it water and fat resistant. There is no specific regulation in EU which covers...... silicone as food contact materials, but in Regulation 1935/2004 on materials intended to come into contact with food it is stated that materials should be manufactured so it do not transfer their constituents to food in quantities which could endanger human health. Silicone may contain residual siloxane...... oligomers which might migrate to the food when the product is being used. DTU has proposed two action limits for low molecular weight siloxanes in food contact materials. For the sum of cyclic siloxanes D3 to D8 the limits are 12 mg/kg food for adults and 2 mg/kg food for children. For the sum of cyclic...

  2. The Audience Wheel as a Technic to Create Transformative Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helth, Poula

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to document how a new learning technic may create transformative learning in leadership in an organisational practice. Design/methodology/approach: The learning methods developed in the learning in practice (LIP) project include aesthetic performances...... combined with reflections. The intention has been to explore how leadership may be transformed, when leaders work as a collective of leaders. The learning methods developed and tested in the LIP project are art-informed learning methods, concepts of liminality and reflection processes carried out...... in the leaders’ organisational practice. Findings: One of the most important findings in the LIP project in relation to transformative learning is a new learning technique based on guided processes rooted in aesthetic performance combined with reflections and separation of roles as performer and audience...

  3. Assessment of Microbiology Students’ Progress With an Audience Response System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ahmad Chaudhry

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The development of new approaches to teaching of large lecture courses is needed. Today’s classroom has a wide range of students including high-achieving motivated learners, students struggling to understand basic concepts, and learning-challenged students. Many of these students can be lost in large classes under the shadow of the high-achieving extroverted students who dominate classroom question-and-answer sessions. Measuring a student’s understanding and achievement of content standards becomes difficult until an assessment has been done. To close this gap, an audience response system was introduced in an introductory Principles of Microbiology course. This technology specifically addressed the goal of individualizing instruction to the needs of the students. The evaluation of this project indicated an overall positive impact on student learning.

  4. Design as co-evolution of problem, solution, and audience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halstrøm, Per Liljenberg; Galle, Per

    2014-01-01

    The meaning of ‘design’ can be captured in a general way by a good definition, but even the best definition cannot provide an understanding sufficiently deep to guide the professional designer or the student of design in the intricate deliberations of doing design in practice. Therefore we explore...... design beyond the level of definitions, reviewing canonical theories about design as a professional enterprise. We find that the well-established theoretical notion of ‘co-evolution’ of problem and solution in design has its merits in regard to understanding design deliberations; but also that existing...... conceptual resources for conceiving of design in terms of such triple co-evolution. For example, many design products may be thought of as offering an audience a ‘subject position’ that hint at whom they should become. In support of the case we make for thinking in terms of constitutive rhetoric in design...

  5. Using Creative Visual Research Methods to Understand Media Audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gauntlett

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces an emerging area of qualitative media «audience» research, in which individuals are asked to produce media or visual material themselves, as a way of exploring their relationship with particular issues or dimensions of media. The process of making a creative visual artefact – as well as the artefact itself (which may be, for example, a video, drawing, collage, or imagined magazine cover – offers a reflective entry-point into an exploration of individuals» relationships with media culture. This article sets out some of the origins, rationale and philosophy underlying this methodological approach; briefly discusses two example studies (one in which children made videos to consider their relationship with the environment, and one in which young people drew pictures of celebrities as part of an examination of their aspirations and identifications with stars; and finally considers some emerging issues for further development of this method.

  6. Current practices in spatial analysis of cancer data: mapping health statistics to inform policymakers and the public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wartenberg Daniel

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To communicate population-based cancer statistics, cancer researchers have a long tradition of presenting data in a spatial representation, or map. Historically, health data were presented in printed atlases in which the map producer selected the content and format. The availability of geographic information systems (GIS with comprehensive mapping and spatial analysis capability for desktop and Internet mapping has greatly expanded the number of producers and consumers of health maps, including policymakers and the public. Because health maps, particularly ones that show elevated cancer rates, historically have raised public concerns, it is essential that these maps be designed to be accurate, clear, and interpretable for the broad range of users who may view them. This article focuses on designing maps to communicate effectively. It is based on years of research into the use of health maps for communicating among public health researchers. Results The basics for designing maps that communicate effectively are similar to the basics for any mode of communication. Tasks include deciding on the purpose, knowing the audience and its characteristics, choosing a media suitable for both the purpose and the audience, and finally testing the map design to ensure that it suits the purpose with the intended audience, and communicates accurately and effectively. Special considerations for health maps include ensuring confidentiality and reflecting the uncertainty of small area statistics. Statistical maps need to be based on sound practices and principles developed by the statistical and cartographic communities. Conclusion The biggest challenge is to ensure that maps of health statistics inform without misinforming. Advances in the sciences of cartography, statistics, and visualization of spatial data are constantly expanding the toolkit available to mapmakers to meet this challenge. Asking potential users to answer questions or to talk

  7. Focusing the EarthScope for a Broader Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Konter, B. R.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most challenging milestones of scientific research is often the translation of a technical result into a clear "teachable moment" that is accessible (and interesting!) to a broader audience. The success of this milestone can largely be measured by its effectiveness to inspire interest and enthusiasm in the non-scientist. Moreover, as 4D multimedia now dominates most aspects of our social environment, science "teaching" now also requires intervention of visualization technology and animation to portray research results in an inviting and stimulating manner. In response to these needs, a primary objective of the EarthScope Education and Outreach program is to transform technical science into teachable products for a technologically thriving generation. Following the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)'s lead in developing interactive Earth science kiosk multimedia (bundled in a free product called Active Earth), a major focus of this EarthScope CAREER project is aimed at the construction and installation of customized EarthScope-themed touch screen kiosks in local communities. These kiosks are helping to educate a broader audience about EarthScope's unique instrumentation and observations using interactive animations, games, and virtual field trips. An additional focus of this CAREER project is aimed at the development of several Earthquakes in Action teaching modules for grades 6-12, which have been successfully tested and implemented in both teacher-prep courses and an annual high school summer geosciences camp at the University of Texas at El Paso. These activities are beginning to shape a new pathway for how teachers teach and students learn about planet Earth and its fantastic EarthScope - one click (and touch) at a time.

  8. Development of audience design in children with and without ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumura, Kumiko

    2016-01-01

    We examined 2 hypotheses concerning the development of audience design by contrasting children with and without autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) in referential communication. The 2-stage hypothesis predicts that the ability to use contrastive size adjectives for ambiguity avoidance develops separately from and faster than the ability to avoid perspective-inappropriate descriptions for their addressee. The single-stage hypothesis assumes that both abilities reflect speakers' perspective-taking, and they should develop in tandem with each other. Experiment 1 found that 6- to 10-year-olds with and without ASD produced disambiguating size adjectives ("small door") equally often when the size-contrasting competitor (large door) was in the visual context shared with their addressee. When the competitor was hidden from their addressee, that is, it was part of children's privileged context, children with ASD produced more perspective-inappropriate size adjectives than those without ASD, providing support for the 2-stage model. Experiment 2 showed a similar pattern of results with 11- to 16-year-old adolescents. Compared with adults, 6- to 10-year-olds without ASD produced more perspective-inappropriate size adjectives in the privileged context, while producing fewer disambiguating size adjectives in the shared context, demonstrating more "egocentric" behaviors than adults. Importantly, whereas 11- to 16-year-olds without ASD produced disambiguating adjectives nearly as often as adults in the shared context, they produced perspective-inappropriate adjectives more than adults in the privileged context. This indicated that even in non-ASD, the ability to avoid perspective-inappropriate descriptions develops more slowly than the ability to avoid ambiguous descriptions, delaying the onset of adult-like audience design, consistent with the 2-stage hypothesis. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. The Dimensions of Performance Space – A Brief Anatomy of Space for a Moving Audience

    OpenAIRE

    Nyberg, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    This bachelor thesis work aims to identify in what ways the performance space can influence audience behaviour. The text concerns performances where the audience and the actors share the same space and where the audience is free to move in the performance space. Apart from the physical features of space, the social and temporal aspects of space are also considered in the text. The main question of the text is: how does the performance space influence the choices the spectators make when t...

  10. Participatory Agricultural Extension from the Prospective of Audience-centered Communication Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Transformation process to Audience-centered Communication Theory is introduced,as well as the basic idea of the theory in China.It is believed that using Audience-centered Communication theory can help to consolidate the theoretical basis of participatory agricultural extension.The communication essence of agricultural extension activity is studied,which is spreaders send information to farmers;then,farmers filter and process the information,transform it into their own experiences and feed back on time.Internal logical relationship between audience-centered communication and participatory agricultural extension is studied.Effects of Audience-centered Communication Theory on participatory agricultural extension are analyzed.One is that the Audience-centered Communication Theory defines the guidance and implementation basis of agricultural extension activities;the other is that bringing Audience-centered Communication Theory into agricultural extension research can help to expend the agricultural extension.Several enlightenments of the theory to participatory agricultural extension are obtained.Firstly,take audience as the orientation and focus on the needs of the audience.Secondly,advocate the participatory approach of process;and emphasize the importance of internal audience participation.Thirdly,establish two-way interaction mechanism;and make the promoters understand the implementation and performance status on time.Fourthly,develop vernacular knowledge;and better integrate the innovation and practice.

  11. Effects of a supportive or an unsupportive audience on biological and psychological responses to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Shelley E; Seeman, Teresa E; Eisenberger, Naomi I; Kozanian, Tamar A; Moore, Amy N; Moons, Wesley G

    2010-01-01

    Although social support is related to substantial benefits for health and well-being, research has uncovered qualifications to its benefits. In a test of the psychological and biological impact of an audience on responses to laboratory stress challenges, 183 participants going through the Trier Social Stress Test experienced either (a) an unsupportive audience, (b) a supportive audience, or (c) no audience. Both audience conditions produced significantly stronger cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure responses to the stress tasks, relative to the no-audience control, even though the supportive audience was rated as supportive. Contrary to hypotheses offered by several theories, these effects were not moderated by self-esteem, individual differences in psychological resources, or baseline social support. Psychological resources and baseline social support were, however, tied to more beneficial biological and psychological profiles at baseline and at recovery in some cases. It was concluded that when one must perform stressful tasks in front of an audience, evaluative concerns may outweigh the potential benefits of a supportive audience.

  12. Broadcasting environmental knowledge: Open University & BBC collaborations serving massive global audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, M. A.; Smith, J.; Garrow, K. H.; Law, A.

    2013-12-01

    The UK Open University has a long history of working with broadcast media - indeed before it first formed over 40 years ago it was proposed to be a "University of the Air ". Originally the University made its own television programmes that were directly connected with teaching. They were usually recordings of academics giving lectures that were broadcast late at night. Over recent times we have moved into developing co-productions with mainstream broadcast media specifically designed to be of general educational interest to UK and worldwide audiences. These include both high impact one-off programmes such as Are we changing planet Earth?, multiple international award winning series such as Frozen Planet, and World Service radio such as Earth Reporters. These programmes have had global audiences; in some cases of tens of millions. Whilst we have only worked using clear scientific evidence and expertise, we have co-produced media which small sections of the general public could consider controversial. For example, in Are we changing planet Earth? the case was presented pre IPCC AR4 for anthropogenic climate change. The final episode of Frozen Planet "On thin ice" presented evidence of how the polar climate is changing and likely future global impacts. It created a large and occasionally hostile international media impact long before broadcast. This continued after broadcast in some media but we believe it stopped because the science presented was robust within the current literature. Based around broadcasting, we used a communication strategy based on our personal experience over the last decade along with our institutional experience going back 40 years. For example our outreach include social media, newspapers, radio and podcasts to speak about underpinning science. We use Twitter during actual broadcasts to circulate links to journal articles and provide context around the science presented on screen. Backed up by a large public outreach campaign at science fairs

  13. 27 CFR 478.148 - Armor piercing ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... intended for sporting or industrial purposes. 478.148 Section 478.148 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and... ammunition intended for sporting or industrial purposes. The Director may exempt certain armor piercing... for any such ammunition which is primarily intended for sporting purposes or intended for...

  14. Effect of media relations on audiences: comparing how editorials and advertising influence behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Tkalac Verčič

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A notion, according to which editorials have a bigger communication influence than advertisements, is very common and quite popular in public relations. The said notion is so prevalent (among both public relations and marketing communications experts that it has led to the concept of perceived influence multipliers that point to a stronger editorial influence in comparison to advertising influence (2.5 to 8 times stronger. Based on the described assumption, the aim of this paper was to further explore how the target audience perceives editorial and advertising content. The research problem was to compare the effects of both types of content on behavior and behavioral intent (through four media – Internet, radio, newspapers and television. Respondents were divided into two groups – current users of the service that was in focus (for influence on behavior and potential users (for influence on behavioral intent. Even though current users said that editorials had a bigger influence on their behavior, this difference was not significant. On the other hand, potential users stated that the advertising content shaped their behavioral intent more than did editorials. These results once again show the assumption, according to which editorials have a stronger communication influence than advertisements, to be highly questionable.

  15. Public Understanding of Science: Science PR and Popular Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Mircea SAVA

    2011-01-01

    The present social context has imposed on science an active communication behavior with the wide audience. The process of science communication has a strong stake of Public Relations as its foundation. It can be stated that the science communication activities have become instruments of a science promotion platform, and the paradigm of Public Relations and Popular Culture served as its model for development. Creating and maintaining a positive attitude of various audiences towards science and...

  16. Public information influences sperm transfer to females in sailfin molly males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nöbel, Sabine; Witte, Klaudia

    2013-01-01

    In animals, including humans, the social environment can serve as a public information network in which individuals can gather public information about the quality of potential mates by observing conspecifics during sexual interactions. The observing individual itself is also a part of this information network. When recognized by the observed conspecifics as an audience, his/her presence could influence the sexual interaction between those individuals, because the observer might be considered as a potential mate or competitor. One of the most challenging questions in sexual selection to date is how the use of public information in the context of mate choice is linked to the fitness of individuals. Here, we could show that public information influences mate-choice behaviour in sailfin molly males, Poecilia latipinna, and influences the amount of sperm males transfer to a female partner. In the presence of an audience male, males spent less time with the previously preferred, larger of two females and significantly more time with the previously non-preferred, smaller female. When males could physically interact with a female and were faced with an audience male, three audience females or no audience, males transferred significantly more sperm to a female partner in the presence of an audience male than with female audience or no audience and spent less time courting his female partner. This is the first study showing that public information use turns into fitness investment, which is the crucial factor to understand the role of public information in the dynamic processes in sexual selection.

  17. From Fysics to Phorestry: How do I engage diverse audiences in land-air interaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. K.

    2011-12-01

    The educational component of the CAREER award "A New Direction into Near-Surface Transport for Weak-Wind Conditions in Plant Canopies" (AGS #0955444) calls for an integration of in-classroom teaching and a new field class to provide students from across the disciplines with an opportunity to explore and learn mechanisms of land-air interactions. The charge is clear, but how do I best do this? This contribution presents a concept of how to address the diverse interests and needs with backgrounds ranging from atmospheric science & engineering to botany & forestry by emphasizing the underlying physical principles of light, heat, and water exchange that are of common interest to many scientific disciplines. The idea behind the teaching technique is to let the students escape from their rather passive role in the classroom by providing opportunities for active participation and discovery through a) developing an online syllabus created by the students for the students, b) offering field excursions to expose students to the research activities funded through this award, c) helping small student teams formulate their own research questions, develop their own experimental design, and collect and evaluate measurements in the field class. In addition to discussing the concept and giving some concrete topical examples, a summary of the student feedback received to date will also be included. However, since the award is just about to enter its second year at the time of writing, a major part of this concept still awaits implementation. Seeking input from other awardees and experienced teachers and educators is therefore intended. A secondary objective of this contribution is to describe the many positive impacts on my career that are evident even after the first year by exposing my research and teaching activities to a much broader audience including the Long-Term Ecological Research community at the HJ Andrews experimental forest in Oregon.

  18. Characterization and modeling of uncertainty intended for a secured MANET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Amir Khusru Akhtar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile ad-hoc network is a chaos for decades due to its dynamic and heuristic base. It employs several forms of uncertainty such as vagueness and imprecision. Vagueness can be taken in terms of linguistic assumptions such as grading and classification for the acceptance. Imprecision on the other hand can be associated with countable or noncountable assumptions such as the weights of acceptance calculated by the members of the MANET. This paper presents “Certainty Intended Model (CIM” for a secured MANET by introducing one or more expert nodes together with the inclusion of various theories (such as monotone measure, belief, plausibility, evidence. These theories can be used for the characterization and modeling various forms of uncertainty. Further, these characterizations help in quantifying the uncertainty spectrum because, as much information about the problem is available we can transform from one theory to another. In this work we have shown how these theories and expert opinion helps to identify the setback associated with the MANET in respect of trust management and finally, enhances the security, reliability and performance of the MANET.

  19. [Biological evaluation of a protein mixture intended for enteral nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, J Olza; Foulquie, J Porres; Valero, G Urbano; de Victoria, E Martínez; Hernández, A Gil

    2008-01-01

    Enteral nutrition is the best way to feed or supplement the diet when gastrointestinal tract functions of patients are partially or totally preserved. Whenever total enteral nutrition is needed, it represents the only source of nutrients for patients. Thus, it is mandatory to ensure that high biological value proteins are included in enteral formulae. To assess the biological quality of a protein blend constituted by 50% potassium caseinate, 25% whey protein and 25% pea protein intended to be used in enteral nutrition products. Forty Wistar rats (20 male and 20 female), with initial body weight of 51 g, where divided into four groups and feed for 10 days with: casein (Control), experimental protein blend (Experimental), liophylized normo- and hyperproteic enteral nutrition formulae adapted to the animal nutritional requirements (Normoproteic and Hyperproteic). Protein efficiency ratio (PER), apparent digestibility coefficient (ADC), relationship between retained and absorbed nitrogen (R/A) and relationship between retained and consumed nitrogen (R/I) where calculated. Experimental and control groups had similar values for all analysed indices (PER, ADC, R/A and R/I). These indices where also similar between normo and hyperproteic groups, but lower than experimental and control groups, except in PER, where normoproteic group was either similar to control and hiperproteic group. The quality of the protein blend used in this study is high. It is a good protein source to be used in the development of new enteral nutritional products.

  20. Information Sources on Primetime News Programs of Entity Public Service Television Stations in B&H and Commercial NTV Hayat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarfa Hrnjić

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Sources of information used by mass media for presenting events are among the key criteria in evaluating news credibility, whether the credibility is perceived from recipients’ or professionals’ perspectives. The aim of this research is to determine the credibility of TV news in terms of professional imperatives of objectivity, whereas the majority of research on this issue centers on media credibility evaluated from the perspective of the intended audiences. Considering the fact that audience perception is strongly influenced by its (disaffinity for a specific media, particularly in B&H, we consider the analysis from the professional standards to be more objective. The goal of the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the contests emitted on primetime news programs of two public and one commercial TV stations in B&H is to determine how credible and reliable the news was as well as its overall objectivity and fairness. The results reveal that the differences were not most evident between the public and commercial TV stations, but rather between the entity televisions despite the fact that they belong to the same RTV system. Coverage of the same events on the three TV stations indicates that the reports were based primarily on one-sided and biased sources.

  1. Intended long term performances of cementitious engineered barriers for future storage and disposal facilities for radioactive wastes in Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Sociu F.; Georgescu R.; Toma R.; Barariu Gh.; Fako R.

    2013-01-01

    Considering the EU statements, Romania is engaged to endorse in the near future the IAEA relevant publications on geological repository (CNCANa), to update the Medium and Long Term National Strategy for Safe Management of Radioactive Waste and to approve the Road Map for Geological Repository Development. Currently, for example, spent fuel is wet stored for 6 years and after this period it is transported to dry storage in MACSTOR-200 (a concrete monolithic module) where it is intended to rema...

  2. "Plastic Pollution: Myths, Facts, and How You Can Help": Presenting a popular but poorly understood topic to broad and diverse audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, J. A.

    2016-02-01

    For my thesis research, I study marine debris, specifically in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre, colloquially known as the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. Marine debris in general, and the Great Pacific Garbage Patch in particular, are marine pollution issues that have captured considerable public and media attention. Especially in the late 2000s, there were significantly more popular media articles about marine debris and the Great Pacific Garbage Patch than scientific journal articles. Due to this popular attention and lag in scientific publication, there are a lot of exaggerated facts and prevalent myths about marine debris in the public consciousness today. As a graduate student at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, UCSD, I have been given many opportunities to speak to diverse audiences about marine debris. These groups vary in their base knowledge of the issue, from very knowledgeable, to unknowledgeable, to knowledgeable but misinformed about the issue. Over my three years in graduate school, building off a base presentation from a previous graduate student and techniques learned from the education department at Birch Aquarium, I have developed ways to correct some misinformation while not making the audience feel insulted. I correct misinformation while building up a correct base knowledge. This knowledge can be very depressing, as many modern scientific problems can be, but I end the presentation with ways in which the audience can feel empowered and can continue to educate themselves. Hopefully they leave with both knowledge and applicable lessons that they can implement into their lives.

  3. Audience-Oriented Writing and Peer Evaluation. SCO Cahier No. 19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijlaarsdam, G.

    To demonstrate that peer evaluation is an appropriate means of improving written composition, particularly in terms of audience and goal orientation, the use of peer evaluation as a teaching method is discussed and then the connection between peer evaluation and audience awareness is drawn. Based on observation of Dutch 17-year-old students, the…

  4. How are we connected? : Measuring Audience Galvanic Skin Response of Connected Performances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Wang (Chen); X. Zhu (Xintong); E. Geelhoed; I. Biscoe; T. Röggla (Tom); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAccurately measuring the audience response during a performance is a difficult task. This is particularly the case for connected performances. In this paper, we staged a connected performance in which a remote audience enjoyed the performance in real-time. Both objective (galvanic skin

  5. Knowing your audience affects male-male interactions in Siamese fighting fish (Betta splendens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertucci, Frédéric; Matos, Ricardo J; Dabelsteen, Torben

    2014-03-01

    Aggressive interactions between animals often occur in the presence of third parties. By observing aggressive signalling interactions, bystanders may eavesdrop and gain relevant information about conspecifics without the costs of interacting. On the other hand, interactants may also adjust their behaviour when an audience is present. This study aimed to test how knowledge about fighting ability of an audience affects aggressive interactions in male Siamese fighting fish. Subjects were positioned between two dyads of non-interacting males and allowed to observe both dyads shortly before the view to one of the dyads was blocked, and the dyads were allowed to interact. Subjects were subsequently exposed to an unknown opponent in the presence of either the winner or the loser of the seen or unseen interaction. The results suggest a complex role of the characteristic of an audience in the agonistic behaviours of a subject engaged in an interaction. The presence of a seen audience elicited more aggressive displays towards the opponent if the audience was a loser. This response was different in the presence of an unseen audience. Subjects then directed a higher aggressiveness against their opponent if the audience was a winner. These results also suggest a potentially more complex and interesting process allowing individuals to gain information about the quality and threat level of an unknown audience while it is interacting with a third party. The importance of information acquisition for an individual to adapt its behaviour and the role of communication networks in shaping social interactions are discussed.

  6. Type of frame dependence: variation in media frames affecting attitudes via audience frames

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Drunen, A.S.; Boomgaarden, H.G.; Vliegenthart, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper two suggested processes of framing theory (Scheufele, 1999) are tested: frame setting (media affecting audience frames) and the individual effects process (audience frames affecting attitudes or behavior). Media frames may affect opinions and behavior, however these effects are not dir

  7. Audience influence on EGM gambling: the protective effects of having others watch you play.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockloff, Matthew J; Greer, Nancy

    2011-09-01

    One component of social facilitation on gambling is the potential for an audience of people to observe the play of Electronic Gaming Machine (EGM) gamblers and influence their behaviour without participating directly in gambling themselves. An experiment was conducted with an audience of onlookers, purported to be students of research methods, taking notes while watching the participants play an EGM. Forty-three male and 82 female participants (N = 125), aged 18-79 (M = 49.2, SD = 15.6), played a laptop simulated 3-reel EGM using a $20 stake in three conditions: (1) alone, (2) watched by a simulated audience of six persons, or (3) watched by an audience of 26. Outcomes on the poker machine were rigged with a fixed sequence of five wins in the first 20 spins and indefinite losses thereafter. The results found smaller bet-sizes associated with larger audiences of onlookers, and this outcome is consistent with a hypothesized motivation to display more wins to the audience. Moreover, final payouts were greater in the audience conditions compared to the control, further suggesting that an audience may be a protective factor limiting player losses.

  8. Audience Matters: Teaching Issues of Race and Racism for a Predominantly Minority Student Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maybee, Julie E.

    2011-01-01

    Some of the literature about teaching issues of race and racism in classrooms has addressed matters of audience. Zeus Leonardo, for example, has argued that teachers should use the language of white domination, rather than white privilege, when teaching about race and racism because the former language presupposes a minority audience, while the…

  9. Writing an Argument to a Real Audience: Alternative Ways to Motivate Students in Writing about Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Chih

    2013-01-01

    Writing for an audience different from teachers motivates students to translate their existing knowledge into audience-appropriate language, in which students explain, elaborate, and integrate their understanding of science concepts using more than just the technical language of the subject. Several studies also have found that students can…

  10. Three Concentric Circles: Young Chinese English Learners' Perceptions of Purposeful Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jack Jinghui

    2015-01-01

    English learners have more access to communicate with different purposeful audiences across the Three Concentric Circles of English (Kachu, 1985): the Inner Circle, the Outer Circle and the Expanding Circle. However, young language learners' purposeful audience as a focus of communication has not been emphasized as much as other linguistic…

  11. Children's Drawings of Significant Figures for a Peer or an Adult Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkitt, Esther; Watling, Dawn; Murray, Lucy

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed if children would present different information in their drawings of emotion eliciting stimuli when they believed that an adult or a child audience would view their drawings. Seventy-five 6-year-olds (44 boys and 31 girls) were allocated to three groups: the reference group, the child audience group and the adult…

  12. Understanding Audience: Using Online Surveys in First-Year Writing Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutkewitte, Claire

    2009-01-01

    Although students must understand the rhetorical medium that they use to present their proposals to their fellow classmates, they must also understand how audiences shape the rhetorical medium and shape how they create texts. Surveying audience members can help students figure out the best strategies to present their proposals and, in doing so,…

  13. Engaging the d/Deaf Audience in Museums: A Case Study at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Patrícia Roque

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses ways that museums can strengthen programming for d/Deaf audiences. Through the development and study of a tour for a d/Deaf audience conducted through signing and oral translation at the Calouste Gulbenkian Museum in Lisbon (Portugal), the author examines issues of language, identity and inclusion. She argues that the use of…

  14. Virtual Focus Groups in Extension: A Useful Approach to Audience Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Laura A.

    2014-01-01

    As change agents, Extension educators may begin their program planning by identifying the audience's perceived barriers and benefits to adopting some behavior that will benefit the community. Extension professionals and researchers have used in-person focus groups to understand an audience, and they can also administer them as…

  15. Carbon Geography. The political economy of congressional support for legislation intended to mitigate greenhouse gas production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CRAGG, MICHAEL I.; ZHOU, YUYU; GURNEY, KEVIN; KAHN, MATTHEW E.

    2012-04-20

    Over the last five years, the U.S Congress has voted on several pieces of legislation intended to sharply reduce the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions. Given that climate change is a world public bad, standard economic logic would predict that the United States would -free rideII and wait for other nations to reduce their emissions. Within the Congress, there are clear patterns to who votes in favor of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a political economy analysis of the determinants of pro-greenII votes on such legislation. Conservatives consistently vote against such legislation. Controlling for a Representative’s ideology, representatives from richer districts and districts with a lower per-capita carbon dioxide footprint are more likely to vote in favor of climate change mitigation legislation. Representatives from districts where industrial emissions represent a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions are more likely to vote no.

  16. Climate Literacy: Climate.gov Follow-Up Evaluation—A Study of the Four NOAA Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F., III; Sullivan, S. B.; Gold, A. U.; Lynds, S. E.; Kirk, K.

    2014-12-01

    NOAA Climate.gov provides science and information for a climate-smart nation. Americans' health, security, and economic well-being are closely linked to climate and weather. NOAA Climate.gov's goals are to promote public understanding of climate science and climate-related events, to make our data products and services easy to access and use, to support educators in improving the nations climate literacy, and to serve people making climate-related decisions with tools and resources that help them answer specific questions.The Climate.Gov Follow-Up Study of the four NOAA Audiences (climate interested public, educators, scientists, policy-makers) built upon the previous literature review and evaluation study conducted by Mooney and Phillips in 2010 and 2012, http://tinyurl.com/ma8vo83. The CIRES Education and Outreach team at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences at University of Colorado at Boulder and the NOAA Climate.gov team will present results of the new study that used the Quality of Relationship index (awareness, trust, satisfaction, usability, and control mutuality). This index was developed in the previous study and places a new emphasis on the experience of individual users from the four audiences in their regular work or home setting. This new evaluation project used mixed methods, including an online survey, usability studies, phone interviews, and web statistics, providing multiple lines of evidence from which to draw conclusion and recommendations.In the session, we will explore how the NOAA Climate.gov teams used the literature review and new CIRES research to address underlying challenges to achieving the portal's goals. The research in these studies finds that people seek information in ways that are complex and that they do so by consulting a vast array of technologies. Improved and different modes of access to information have, throughout history, been led by technological innovation, but human behavior tends to be

  17. Experiences of faculty and students using an audience response system in the classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christine M; Monturo, Cheryl; Conroy, Katherine

    2011-07-01

    The advent of innovative technologies, such as the audience response system, provides an opportunity to engage students and enhance learning. Based on their experiences, three nursing faculty evaluated the use of an audience response system in four distinct nursing courses through the use of informal survey results. When using the audience response system, the faculty experienced an increased perception of student attentiveness and engagement, high level of class attendance, and enhanced learning. Faculty feelings were mixed concerning the burden in adapting to increased classroom time and increased preparation time. Students' perception of the value of audience response system use was mostly positive, except when responses were included as part of the grade. The majority of the students indicated that use of the audience response system enhanced learning and was a helpful learning method when used with NCLEX-style questions. Overall, faculty believed that the benefits of student engagement and enhanced learning outweighed the burdens of incorporating this new technology in the classroom.

  18. Audience effects: what can they tell us about social neuroscience, theory of mind and autism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Antonia F de C; Lind, Frida

    2016-01-01

    An audience effect arises when a person's behaviour changes because they believe someone else is watching them. Though these effects have been known about for over 110 years, the cognitive mechanisms of the audience effect and how it might vary across different populations and cultures remains unclear. In this review, we examine the hypothesis that the audience effect draws on implicit mentalising abilities. Behavioural and neuroimaging data from a number of tasks are consistent with this hypothesis. We further review data suggest that how people respond to audiences may vary over development, personality factors, cultural background and clinical diagnosis including autism and anxiety disorder. Overall, understanding and exploring the audience effect may contribute to our models of social interaction, including reputation management and mentalising.

  19. Adolescents and alcohol: an explorative audience segmentation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathijssen Jolanda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background So far, audience segmentation of adolescents with respect to alcohol has been carried out mainly on the basis of socio-demographic characteristics. In this study we examined whether it is possible to segment adolescents according to their values and attitudes towards alcohol to use as guidance for prevention programmes. Methods A random sample of 7,000 adolescents aged 12 to 18 was drawn from the Municipal Basic Administration (MBA of 29 Local Authorities in the province North-Brabant in the Netherlands. By means of an online questionnaire data were gathered on values and attitudes towards alcohol, alcohol consumption and socio-demographic characteristics. Results We were able to distinguish a total of five segments on the basis of five attitude factors. Moreover, the five segments also differed in drinking behavior independently of socio-demographic variables. Conclusions Our investigation was a first step in the search for possibilities of segmenting by factors other than socio-demographic characteristics. Further research is necessary in order to understand these results for alcohol prevention policy in concrete terms.

  20. The Filipino male as a target audience in family planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitug, W

    1986-01-01

    Since the official launching of the Philippine Population Program in 1970, family planning campaigns have substantially addressed themselves to women. The suggestion to devote equal, if not more, attention to men as family planning targets had been raised by Dr. Mercado as early as 1971. It was not until 1978, that the deliberate inclusion of males as a target audience in family planning became a matter of policy. The Population Center Foundation (PCF), from 1979 to 1982, carried out research projects to determine the most suitable approaches and strategies to reach Filipino men. The objectives of the PCF's Male Specific Program are: 1) to test alternative schemes in promoting male family planning methods through pilot-testing of family planning clinics for men, 2) to develop teaching materials geared toward specific segments of the male population, 3) to undertake skills training in male-specific motivational approaches for program professionals, and 4) to assess the extent of the husband's role in family planning. An important finding of 1 study was that most outreach workers were female stood in the way of the motivation process, thus hampering the campaign. While the consultative motivational skills training improved knowledge, attitudes, and skills of outreach workers with regard to vasectomy and the motivation process, there were certain predispositions that were hindering the fieldworkers' effectiveness in motivating target clients. Overall, in-depth, 1-to-1 motivation in dealing with men is needed to strengthen internalization of family planning values.

  1. Health-related media use among youth audiences in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glik, Deborah; Massey, Philip; Gipson, Jessica; Dieng, Thierno; Rideau, Alexandre; Prelip, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Lower- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are experiencing rapid changes in access to and use of new internet and digital media technologies. The purpose of this study was to better understand how younger audiences are navigating traditional and newer forms of media technologies, with particular emphasis on the skills and competencies needed to obtain, evaluate and apply health-related information, also defined as health and media literacy. Sixteen focus group discussions were conducted throughout Senegal in September 2012 with youth aged 15-25. Using an iterative coding process based on grounded theory, four themes emerged related to media use for health information among Senegalese youth. They include the following: (i) media utilization; (ii) barriers and conflicts regarding media utilization; (iii) uses and gratifications and (iv) health and media literacy. Findings suggest that Senegalese youth use a heterogeneous mix of media platforms (i.e. television, radio, internet) and utilization often occurs with family members or friends. Additionally, the need for entertainment, information and connectedness inform media use, mostly concerning sexual and reproductive health information. Importantly, tensions arise as youth balance innovative and interactive technologies with traditional and conservative values, particularly concerning ethical and privacy concerns. Findings support the use of multipronged intervention approaches that leverage both new media, as well as traditional media strategies, and that also address lack of health and media literacy in this population. Implementing health-related interventions across multiple media platforms provides an opportunity to create an integrated, as opposed to a disparate, user experience.

  2. Development of educational tools to connect public audiences with cranberry researchers and growers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranberry, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait., is a native fruit crop of North America and a member of the Ericaceae family. The delicious tangy cranberry is associated with health benefits due to its abundant phytochemicals, including vitamin C, manganese, and anti-oxidants. Cranberries are major cash crop...

  3. Teaching Anthropology to Students and Teachers: Reaching a Wider Audience. Publication 82-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Patricia J., Ed.; Selig, Ruth O., Ed.

    These papers, presented at a 1980 American Anthropological Association seminar, address two topics: why the teaching of anthropology should be promoted, especially at the secondary level; and how anthropologists and educators might achieve this goal. Several of the papers have been substantially revised since the symposium. The papers are…

  4. Public Participation in Classical Ballet: A Special Analysis of the Ballet Data Collected in the 1982 and 1985 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Carol

    The 1982 and 1985 Survey of Public Participation in the Arts (SPPA) produced a national audience profile for classical ballet and explored factors that predispose participation in this art form. This monograph analyzed data from these surveys in terms of: (1) audience size and composition for live ballet performances; (2) television's role in…

  5. Invoking “The Family” to Legitimize Gender- and Sexuality-Based Public Policies in the United States: A Critical Discourse Analysis of the 2012 Democratic and Republican National Party Conventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Pilecki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Women and sexual minorities in the United States continue to experience subordinate status, and the policy gains they have made in areas such as reproductive rights and marriage equality continue to be challenged in political discourse. We conducted a critical discourse analysis of texts from the 2012 Democratic and Republican national conventions in order to examine the extent to which ideological representations of the family were employed to legitimize public policy positions related to gender (e.g., abortion and sexuality (e.g., same-sex marriage. We analyzed two forms of text (official party platform document, transcripts of speeches with distinct intended audiences (i.e., party members, general audience. Findings revealed that an ideological representation of the traditional family ideal—featuring a heterosexual couple, their children, and asymmetric gender relations—was present within speeches given by both parties, particularly by the spouses of the presidential candidates (Michelle Obama and Ann Romney. Although this ideological representation was subsequently used within the Republican Party platform to legitimize positions against same-sex marriage and abortion, the Democratic Party platform challenged this representation of the family to instead advocate for policy positions in favor of same-sex marriage and women’s reproductive rights. We discuss this ambivalence within Democratic texts in light of the different audiences that party convention texts seek. Implications for gender- and sexuality-based policies are discussed, as well as the importance of examining political discourse across diverse forms and settings.

  6. What does the UK public want from academic science communication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redfern, James; Illingworth, Sam; Verran, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The overall aim of public academic science communication is to engage a non-scientist with a particular field of science and/or research topic, often driven by the expertise of the academic. An e-survey was designed to provide insight into respondent's current and future engagement with science communication activities. Respondents provided a wide range of ideas and concerns as to the 'common practice' of academic science communication, and whilst they support some of these popular approaches (such as open-door events and science festivals), there are alternatives that may enable wider engagement. Suggestions of internet-based approaches and digital media were strongly encouraged, and although respondents found merits in methods such as science festivals, limitations such as geography, time and topic of interest were a barrier to engagement for some. Academics and scientists need to think carefully about how they plan their science communication activities and carry out evaluations, including considering the point of view of the public, as although defaulting to hands-on open door events at their university may seem like the expected standard, it may not be the best way to reach the intended audience.

  7. The public of media events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Morgner

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the growing importance of large-scale events and their central role in a globalised media world in relation to public reactions and public involvement. The peculiar structure of such events requires a different understanding of mass communication and its audience. Therefore, the audience is further examined with regard to its impact on and inclusion in the media itself. Consequently, questions are raised as to how the public is incorporated, the form this inclusion takes and the effect that this has on the audience’s participation.The article examines different types of semantic inclusion, with a focus on emotional reactions towards three different media events: the Titanic disaster, the assassination of John F. Kennedy, and the death of Princess Diana.

  8. Marketing and semiotic approach on communication. Consequences on knowledge of target-audiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borţun, D; Purcarea, V L

    2013-03-15

    Modern marketing puts the consumer and not the manufacturer in the center, the essence of the marketing approach being the conception, the projection and the making of the product, starting from the consumer towards the manufacturer; this resulting in the fact that the product's marketing approach seems strikingly similar to the semiotic approach of the message. In the semiotic approach, the message is a construction of signs, which, by interacting with the receiver, produces the meaning. The transmitter (the message transmitter) becomes less important. The focus is centered to the "text" and the way this is "read", the sense being born when the "reader" negotiates the "text". The negotiation takes place when the "reader" filtrates the message through the sieve of his cultural loading. A "target public" is a group which is specific to a certain Cultural Loading, a loading which deals with linguistic, logical, psychological and symbolic structures, which get out to meet the message and "negotiates" with the structures similar to it. When we are thinking in terms of the semiotic approach, we are handling the cultural determinism of communication, using the concepts of Kuhn and Gonseth (paradigm and referential). They open a new path in the market research, in the market segmentation and knowledge of the "target audiences".

  9. The Popular Nobel Prize Award Banquet: Distanced Participation of an Interacting TV-Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Hugoson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available When chemist, inventor, and businessman Alfred Nobel died in 1896 he left a will establishing the Nobel Prize. Over the years, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony, and the following Nobel Prize Award Banquet, developed into a spectacular and well-known event that was sometimes broadcast on radio. Then, in the year 1950, it was shown on Swedish television for the first time. In the decades that followed television became part of almost each and every household, and the viewing audience could now follow the festivities as they occurred, almost as if they had been invited themselves. A playful attitude towards the event developed, consisting of banter but also of distanced participation in which people dressed up and staged their own Nobel Prize Award “banquets” in front of their television-sets. In later years this phenomenon has developed, simultaneously becoming both more elaborate and more common, and today there is a variety of privately arranged Nobel Prize Award “banquets” to be found throughout Sweden, some even including their own Nobel Prize Award Ceremonies and attending royalty. In my paper, I will present this public parallel to the highly exclusive Nobel Prize Award Banquet and touch on international counterparts to it and the humorous language that surrounds these events.

  10. Marketing and semiotic approach on communication. Consequences on knowledge of target-audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borţun, D; Purcarea, VL

    2013-01-01

    Modern marketing puts the consumer and not the manufacturer in the center, the essence of the marketing approach being the conception, the projection and the making of the product, starting from the consumer towards the manufacturer; this resulting in the fact that the product’s marketing approach seems strikingly similar to the semiotic approach of the message. In the semiotic approach, the message is a construction of signs, which, by interacting with the receiver, produces the meaning. The transmitter (the message transmitter) becomes less important. The focus is centered to the „text" and the way this is „read", the sense being born when the „reader" negotiates the „text". The negotiation takes place when the „reader" filtrates the message through the sieve of his cultural loading. A „target public" is a group which is specific to a certain Cultural Loading, a loading which deals with linguistic, logical, psychological and symbolic structures, which get out to meet the message and „negotiates" with the structures similar to it. When we are thinking in terms of the semiotic approach, we are handling the cultural determinism of communication, using the concepts of Kuhn and Gonseth (paradigm and referential). They open a new path in the market research, in the market segmentation and knowledge of the „target audiences". PMID:23610591

  11. Astronomy and Disabled: Implementation of new technologies to communicate science to new audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Beatriz; Ortiz Gil, Amelia; Proust, Dominique

    2015-08-01

    Commission 46 proposed in 2012 the creation of an interdisciplinary WG in which astronomers work together with technicians, educators and disability specialists to develop new teaching and learning strategies devoted o generate resources of high impact among disabled populations, which are usually away from astronomy. Successful initiatives designed to research the best-practices in using new technologies to communicate science in these special audiences include the creation of models and applications, and the implementation of a data base of didactic approaches and tools. Between the achievements of this proposal, we have original development in: design of electronics, design of original software, scripts and music for Planetarium functions, design of models and their associated explanatory script, printed material in Braille and 3D, filming associated with sign language, interviews and docs recompilation and the recently project on the Sign Language Universal Encyclopedic Dictionary, based on the proposal by Proust (2009) and, which proposes the dissemination of a unique language for the deaf worldwide, associated with astronomical terms.We present, on behalf of the WG, some of the achievements, developments, successful stories of recent applications of this new approach to the science for all, thinking in the new “public of sciences”, and new challenges.

  12. Preparing for Antibiotic Resistance Campaigns: A Person-Centered Approach to Audience Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel A; Quesnell, Madisen; Glick, Lydia; Hackman, Nicole; M'Ikanatha, Nkuchia M

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat to public health that calls for urgent attention. However, creating campaigns to slow the emergence and spread of drug-resistant pathogens is challenging because the goal-antibiotic stewardship-encompasses multiple behaviors. This study provided a novel approach to audience segmentation for a multifaceted goal, by using a person-centered approach to identify profiles of U.S. adults based on shared stewardship intentions. The latent class analysis identified three groups: stewards, stockers, and demanders. The findings suggest campaigns with goals aimed at encouraging stewards to follow through on their intentions, encouraging stockers to dispose of their leftover antibiotics, and convincing demanders to accept providers' evidence-based judgment when a prescription for antibiotics is not indicated. Covariate analysis showed that people who held more inaccurate beliefs about what antibiotics can treat had higher odds of being demanders and stockers instead of stewards. People with stronger health mavenism also had higher odds of being stockers instead of stewards. The covariate analysis provided theoretical insight into the strategies to pursue in campaigns targeting these 3 groups.

  13. An Audience-Centric Approach for Museums Sustainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Di Pietro

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study is to propose a visitor centric perspective that can support museums towards sustainability. The main premise of this study is due to a concept of economic and social sustainability of museums, defined as the possession of sufficient resources to maintain the existence of an organization, and achieve their goals in the future, ensuring a certain flow of visitors. A great number of museums are characterized by a low number of visits; therefore, in order to become sustainable, museums should pay attention to audience and its internal diversity. In this way, a cultural site can plan tailored strategies to increase the number of visits and re-visits and to achieve community support. For this reason it is necessary to understand the cultural needs of visitors, acquiring appropriate monitoring tools, such as qualitative and quantitative ones. Generally, quantitative analyses are more reliable and complete, even if they require a considerable number of observations for the reliability of the results. Moreover, qualitative analysis provides more in depth information, even if their data do not allow us to make generalizations. The qualitative and quantitative methods for the detection of satisfaction are usually used separately, but their integration may bring significant added value in terms of the wealth of information. This study follows the analysis of the potential of the integration of qualitative and quantitative analysis techniques customized with respect to different types of targets. The results of the experimentation performed on ethnographic museums shows a consistency of the results obtained by the two different tools that increase the capacity information of survey instruments.

  14. AUDIENCE AWARENESS IN THE WRITTEN DISCOURSE OF SUDANESE EFL UNIVERSITY LEARNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ahmed Osman Zakaria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigates the written discourse of the Sudanese EFL university learners to evaluate and assess their awareness of the audience to whom they write. The analytic descriptive approach is adopted to achieve the aims of the study. The subjects of the study consisted of 50 Sudanese EFL students drawn from Faculty of Arts at Alneelain university. Three tools were employed for data collection: a writing test, a questionnaire and an interview with the students. Results showed that the written discourse produced by Sudanese EFL students did not reveal an awareness of the audience with whom they communicate. The students did not succeed to make assumptions of what their audience already know and what they expect to find in the texts being written. They held fragmentary knowledge on the concept of audience awareness. Accordingly, the students were not able to prepare and edit texts which keep and stimulate their audience – they were not able to depend on lexical and structural variation to produce proper and effective writing. Furthermore, results indicated that students were not able to attach unity and coherence to the texts they produced. Their organizational skills were very poor. To help the students develop the concept they hold on audience awareness, writing instructors and syllabus designers need to put special emphasis on the importance of audience awareness as a factor which is essential for effective writing.

  15. Psychosocial stress evoked by a virtual audience: relation to neuroendocrine activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Owen; Matheson, Kimberly; Martinez, Alejandra; Merali, Zul; Anisman, Hymie

    2007-10-01

    A modified version of the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) was employed to determine whether exposure to a virtual audience using virtual reality (VR) technology would prompt an increase of neuroendocrine activity comparable to that prompted by a real audience. Following an anticipatory period, participants completed a speech or a speech-plus-math challenge in front of either a virtual audience, a panel of judges they were led to believe was behind a one-way mirror, or an audience comprised of confederates. An additional group that had prepared a speech was simply directed to observe the virtual audience but did not deliver the speech. Finally, a control group completed questionnaires for the duration of the experiment. Cortisol samples were obtained upon arrival to the laboratory, just before the challenge, and 15 and 30 minutes after the task. Participants also completed a measure assessing stressor appraisals of the task before and after the challenge. Anticipation of the task was associated with a modest increase of cortisol levels, and a further rise of cortisol was evident in response to the challenge. The neuroendocrine changes evoked by the virtual audience were comparable to those elicited by the imagined audience (behind the one-way mirror) but less than changes evoked by the panel of confederates. Stressor appraisals were higher post-challenge compared to those reported prior to the task; however, appraisals were similar across each group. These data suggest that VR technology may be amenable to evaluating the impact of psychosocial stressors such as the TSST.

  16. Caching in the presence of competitors: Are Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris) sensitive to audience attentiveness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Jamie; Manser, Marta B

    2016-01-01

    When social animals cache food close to their burrow, the potential for an audience member to observe the event is significantly increased. As a consequence, in order to reduce theft it may be advantageous for animals to be sensitive to certain audience cues, such as whether they are attentive or not to the cache event. In this study, observations were made on three groups of Cape ground squirrels (Xerus inauris) in their natural habitat when they cached provisioned food items. When individuals cached within 10 m of conspecifics, we recorded the attentiveness (i.e. whether any audience members were orientated towards the cacher, had direct line of site and were not engaged in other activities) and identity of audience members. Overall, there was a preference to cache when audience members were inattentive rather than attentive. Additionally, we found rank effects related to cache avoidance whereby high-ranked individuals showed less avoidance to cache when audience members were attentive compared to medium- and low-ranked individuals. We suggest this audience sensitivity may have evolved in response to the difference in competitive ability amongst the ranks in how successful individuals are at winning foraging competitions. This study demonstrates that Cape ground squirrels have the ability to not only monitor the presence or absence of conspecifics but also discriminate individuals on the basis of their attentive state.

  17. Projecting the voice: observations of audience behaviours in ICT-mediated contemporary opera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Wei; Williams, Alan E.

    2014-07-01

    This paper examines how audiences experience live opera performance and the behaviours they exhibit during live-streaming of the performance. It aims to contribute to our understanding of how audiences, who increasingly inhabit an environment saturated with digital media, respond to contemporary opera performance. Based on a comparative study of audience experiences and behaviours during a live opera performance and the streamed opera screening, we investigate whether digital mediation affects audience appreciation, and whether streaming live opera means the same thing to an audience as the unmediated performance. We firstly outline the conception, design and performance of a contemporary opera and its simultaneous streaming to nearby digital screens. Then, we report the evaluation of the project as measured by a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods during the rehearsals, the live performance and the screening. As one of the few social studies of contemporary classical music in Britain, our study of opera audience behaviours sheds light on the challenges and opportunities afforded by digital technologies for opera companies. Understanding how audiences appreciate digital operas offers practical advice on how theatres and opera companies could respond to new forms of digital activities.

  18. Cool Science: Engaging Adult and K-16 Audiences in Climate Change Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustick, D.; Lohmeier, J.; Chen, R. F.

    2012-12-01

    opportunity develop and evaluate a new approach to improving the level of scientific literacy among adults. Cool Science is an example of how an individual's daily routine may be enhanced with an informal science learning opportunity. This paper will report on project progress, research challenges encountered to date, and present preliminary findings. Among the results presented will be the 6 winning student artworks, analysis of teacher/student interviews, and audience attitudes and knowledge of climate change prior to the intervention. In addition, a comparison of website use before and during the implementation of the public learning campaign will be available.; Learning the Climate Change Science on the Go!

  19. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Ashley A.; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2010-01-01

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey ...

  20. Alcohol harm reduction advertisements: a content analysis of topic, objective, emotional tone, execution and target audience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunstone, Kimberley; Brennan, Emily; Slater, Michael D; Dixon, Helen G; Durkin, Sarah J; Pettigrew, Simone; Wakefield, Melanie A

    2017-04-11

    Public health mass media campaigns may contribute to reducing the health and social burden attributed to alcohol consumption, but little is known about which advertising characteristics have been used, or have been effective, in alcohol harm reduction campaigns to date. As a first step towards encouraging further research to identify the impact of various advertising characteristics, this study aimed to systematically identify and examine the content of alcohol harm reduction advertisements (ads). Ads were identified through an exhaustive internet search of Google, YouTube, Vimeo, and relevant government and health agency websites. Eligible ads were: English language, produced between 2006 and 2014, not primarily focused on drink-driving or alcohol in pregnancy, and not alcohol industry funded. Systematic content analysis of all ads was performed; each ad was double-coded. In total, 110 individual ads from 72 different alcohol harm reduction campaigns were identified, with the main source countries being Australia (40%) and the United Kingdom (26%). The dominant topic for 52% of ads was short-term harms, while 10% addressed long-term harms, 18% addressed underage drinking, 17% communicated a how-to-change message, and 3% advocated for policy change. The behavioural objective of most ads was to motivate audiences to reduce their alcohol consumption (38%) or to behave responsibly and/or not get drunk when drinking (33%). Only 10% of all ads mentioned low-risk drinking guidelines. Eighty-seven percent of ads used a dramatisation execution style and 74% had a negative emotional tone. Ninety percent of ads contained messages or content that appeared to target adults, and 36% specifically targeted young adults. Some message attributes have been employed more frequently than others, suggesting several promising avenues for future audience or population-based research to compare the relative effectiveness of different characteristics of alcohol harm reduction ads. Given

  1. [Inventing the audience in the 18(th) century. Art and its use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugère, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    18(th) century philosophers analyzed art through the aesthetic experience of the audience. By contrast, Adam Smith was interested in the moral judgment that an impartial audience may formulate. How can art and morality, the beautiful and the good, be combined into one analytical framework? Art and morality convey non-transcendental values that are intrinsic to human experience. With the aesthetic experience of the audience, art is used, and ultimately depends on the ways that humans relate to works or art and to the beautiful.

  2. Bringing in the target audience in bystander social marketing materials for communities: suggestions for practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Sharyn J; Stapleton, Jane G

    2011-06-01

    The Know Your Power™ social marketing campaign images model active bystander behaviors that target audience members can use in situations where sexual and relationship violence and stalking are occurring, have occurred, or have the potential to occur. In this practitioner note, we describe strategies that we have used to engage target audience members in the development of the social marketing campaign that we hope can be used by practitioners. We give examples from the development and evaluation of the Know Your Power(TM) social marketing campaign that used focus group and other types of feedback from the target audience to inform the direction of the campaign.

  3. Establishing versus preserving impressions: Predicting success in the multiple audience problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Austin Lee; Cottrell, Catherine A

    2015-12-01

    People sometimes seek to convey discrepant impressions of themselves to different audiences simultaneously. Research suggests people are generally successful in this "multiple audience problem." Adding to previous research, the current research sought to examine factors that may limit this success by measuring social anxiety and placing participants into situations requiring them to either establish or preserve multiple impressions simultaneously. In general, participants were more successful when preserving previously conveyed impressions than when establishing impressions for the first time. In contrast, social anxiety did not affect multiple audience success. In all, this research offers valuable insight into potential challenges that people face in many social situations.

  4. The Diasporic Audience and the Moral Rhetoric in the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLAE PERPELEA

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a critical review of how media news tells stories of moralsuffering related to the new Romanian diaspora (emerged after the EU enlargement.These “news stories” invite the individual spectators to become public actors of a“community of news”. The author argues that due to the fact that the hosting of ethiccontroversies in the media has been turned into a show, a perverse effect of narcissisticmorals has become increasingly conspicuous: the regress of public indignation from theprotest-like attitude towards a voyeuristic and mundane, seemingly affected, stance.

  5. Interacting with audiences social influences on the production of scientific writing

    CERN Document Server

    Blakeslee, Ann M

    2000-01-01

    This volume examines how scientists learn about and then address their audiences, studying scientific rhetoric in actual practice. For scholars and students in scientific and technical writing, rhetoric, studies of science, and related areas.

  6. Millennial fandom: Television audiences in the transmedia age, by Louisa Ellen Stein [book review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Louise Dare-Edwards

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Review of Louisa Ellen Stein, Millennial fandom: Television audiences in the transmedia age. Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2015, paperback, $24 (224p ISBN 978-1609383558; e-book, $24, ISBN 978-1609383565.

  7. “It really is a craft” Repertoires in journalistic frontrunners’ talk on audience participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, M.; Costera Meijer, I.; Hoof, van A.M.J.; Sanders, J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of participatory journalism demonstrate that professional journalism can be resistant to change. Journalists and news organizations do wish to encourage audience contribution and digital innovation, but find it difficult to reconcile traditional journalistic values and practices with more

  8. 'It really is a craft' - Repertoires in journalistic frontrunners' talk on audience participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, M.; Costera Meijer, I.; Hoof, A. van; Sanders, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of participatory journalism demonstrate that professional journalism can be resistant to change. Journalists and news organizations do wish to encourage audience contribution and digital innovation, but find it difficult to reconcile traditional journalistic values and practices with more

  9. Cultural Mythology Analysisof Media texts in the Classroom at the Student Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The author of this article presents the cultural mythology analysis of media texts: identification and analysis of mythologizing (including in the framework of the so-called folk sources - fairy tales, urban legends, etc. plot, those types of characters, etc. in media texts. In particular, the audience (for example, students offered by critical analysis to answer the question why so many entertainment media texts so popular with a mass audience? The author thinks that the media texts relating to the mass / popular culture, have success with the audience is not due to the fact that they supposedly only target people with low aesthetic taste, subject to psychological pressure, easy to believing the lie, etc., but because their authors respect and learning needs of the audience, including - information, compensatory, hedonistic, recreational, moral, aesthetic, etc.

  10. 'It really is a craft' - Repertoires in journalistic frontrunners' talk on audience participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, M.; Costera Meijer, I.; Hoof, A. van; Sanders, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of participatory journalism demonstrate that professional journalism can be resistant to change. Journalists and news organizations do wish to encourage audience contribution and digital innovation, but find it difficult to reconcile traditional journalistic values and practices with more pa

  11. “It really is a craft” Repertoires in journalistic frontrunners’ talk on audience participation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borger, M.; Costera Meijer, I.; Hoof, van A.M.J.; Sanders, J.

    2013-01-01

    Studies of participatory journalism demonstrate that professional journalism can be resistant to change. Journalists and news organizations do wish to encourage audience contribution and digital innovation, but find it difficult to reconcile traditional journalistic values and practices with more pa

  12. Audience Reaction as a Determinant of the Speaker's Self-Persuasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alan E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Paper tests effects of audience feedback on speaker attitudes; subjects who received sincere feedback showed greater change in the direction of their speech than did those who received insincere feedback. (Author)

  13. Give Me a Like: How HIV/AIDS Nonprofit Organizations Can Engage Their Audience on Facebook.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Chao; Lin, Yi-Pin; Saxton, Gregory D

    2016-12-01

    With the rapid proliferation and adoption of social media among healthcare professionals and organizations, social media-based HIV/AIDS intervention programs have become increasingly popular. However, the question of the effectiveness of the HIV/AIDS messages disseminated on social media has received scant attention in the literature. The current study applies content analysis to examine the relationship between Facebook messaging strategies employed by 110 HIV/AIDS nonprofit organizations and audience reactions in the form of liking, commenting, and sharing behavior. The results reveal that HIV/AIDS nonprofit organizations often use informational messages as one-way communication with their audience instead of dialogic interactions. Some specific types of messages, such as medication-focused messages, engender better audience engagement; in contrast, event-related messages and call-to-action messages appear to translate into lower corresponding audience reactions. The findings provide guidance to HIV/AIDS organizations in developing effective social media communication strategies.

  14. Comparing demographic, health status and psychosocial strategies of audience segmentation to promote physical activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boslaugh, Sarah E; Kreuter, Matthew W; Nicholson, Robert A; Naleid, Kimberly

    2005-01-01

    .... This study compares the results of audience segmentation for physical activity that is based on either demographic, health status or psychosocial variables alone, or a combination of all three types of variables...

  15. The audience effect in adolescence depends on who's looking over your shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Laura K; Bazargani, Narges; Kilford, Emma J; Dumontheil, Iroise; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2015-08-01

    Adolescents have been shown to be particularly sensitive to peer influence. However, the data supporting these findings have been mostly limited to the impact of peers on risk-taking behaviours. Here, we investigated the influence of peers on performance of a high-level cognitive task (relational reasoning) during adolescence. We further assessed whether this effect on performance was dependent on the identity of the audience, either a friend (peer) or the experimenter (non-peer). We tested 24 younger adolescent (10.6-14.2 years), 20 older adolescent (14.9-17.8 years) and 20 adult (21.8-34.9 years) female participants. The presence of an audience affected adolescent, but not adult, relational reasoning performance. This audience effect on adolescent performance was influenced by the participants' age, task difficulty and the identity of the audience. These findings may have implications for education, where adolescents often do classwork or homework in the presence of others.

  16. [Museums and their archives: in search of sources for researching audiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köptcke, Luciana Sepúlveda; Pereira, Marcele Regina Nogueira

    2010-01-01

    The article explores to what extent historical archives at museums may serve as documental sources in developing audience research. It analyzes the process by which we construct our knowledge of the relation between museums and their different visitors and also contextualizes the emergence of 'audience' as a category and object of study by the social sciences. The article presents Luciana Sepúlveda Köptcke and Marcelle Pereira's Guia de fontes primárias: o Museu Nacional - seu público no século XIX e no início do XX (Guide of primary sources: the National Museum - its audience in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries), a valuable research tool that can enhance the significance of documental fonds and reveal the nature and import assigned to different audiences by these institutions.

  17. Drought and reservoirs: intended benefits and unintended consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Baldassarre, Giuliano; AghaKouchak, Amir; Rangecroft, Sally; Wanders, Niko; Kuil, Linda; Veldkamp, Ted; van Loon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Socioeconomic drought can be broadly defined as a condition whereby water demand cannot be satisfied by water supply. Here we posit that while reservoirs often alleviate socioeconomic drought, they can lead to unintended consequences in the medium-long term. Losses caused by socioeconomic drought tend to trigger public pressure for action, which can result in the introduction or expansion of reservoirs to store more water during high flow conditions, and release it during low flow conditions. In the short term, increasing reservoir storage is often beneficial because frequency, magnitude, and duration of drought can be significantly reduced. Yet, it is important to note that reservoirs may fail in mitigating major, prolonged drought, because reservoir storage is unavoidably limited. In the medium-long term, two main dynamics tend to emerge, which often generate unintended consequences. The first one, termed here as "supply-demand cycle", is when increasing water supply triggers additional development and thus generates higher demand, which then offsets the benefit of reservoirs as a water supply source. This is a self-reinforcing feedback, or vicious cycle, as the occurrence of a new socioeconomic drought will then likely trigger further expansion of reservoir storage to, again, increase water supply. A second dynamic, termed here as "reservoir effect" (after White's "levee effect"), is when extended periods of abundant water supply, secured by reservoirs, generate a decline of coping capacities through increased competition for water and reduced shocks to the system, which in turn increases the vulnerability of the system to socio-economic drought. In other words, while a frequent experience of water shortages can help keep high levels of preparedness, some elements of system's resilience can be lost when minor-to-moderate events are avoided. As a result, the development of reservoirs can generate a shift from frequent socioeconomic drought conditions to rare

  18. Creating learner-centered classrooms: use of an audience response system in pediatric dentistry education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey T

    2005-03-01

    Research suggests that the exclusive use of lecture in the classroom hinders student learning. The advent of compact electronic wireless audience response systems has allowed for increased student participation in the classroom. Such technology is utilized in medical education. This article describes the use of an audience response system in a "quiz bowl" format to facilitate and improve the comprehension of student dentists in core concepts in pulp therapy for the pediatric patient.

  19. Public Use Management Plan James River National Wildlife Refuge 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Public Use Plan for James River National Wildlife Refuge is intended to identify public use issues, objectives, and appropriate strategies for managing public...

  20. Predicting Audience Location on the Basis of the k-Nearest Neighbor Multilabel Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haitao Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding audience location information in online social networks is important in designing recommendation systems, improving information dissemination, and so on. In this paper, we focus on predicting the location distribution of audiences on YouTube. And we transform this problem to a multilabel classification problem, while we find there exist three problems when the classical k-nearest neighbor based algorithm for multilabel classification (ML-kNN is used to predict location distribution. Firstly, the feature weights are not considered in measuring the similarity degree. Secondly, it consumes considerable computing time in finding similar items by traversing all the training set. Thirdly, the goal of ML-kNN is to find relevant labels for every sample which is different from audience location prediction. To solve these problems, we propose the methods of measuring similarity based on weight, quickly finding similar items, and ranking a specific number of labels. On the basis of these methods and the ML-kNN, the k-nearest neighbor based model for audience location prediction (AL-kNN is proposed for predicting audience location. The experiments based on massive YouTube data show that the proposed model can more accurately predict the location of YouTube video audience than the ML-kNN, MLNB, and Rank-SVM methods.

  1. Assessment of current cybersecurity practices in the public domain : cyber indications and warnings domain.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamlet, Jason R.; Keliiaa, Curtis M.

    2010-09-01

    This report assesses current public domain cyber security practices with respect to cyber indications and warnings. It describes cybersecurity industry and government activities, including cybersecurity tools, methods, practices, and international and government-wide initiatives known to be impacting current practice. Of particular note are the U.S. Government's Trusted Internet Connection (TIC) and 'Einstein' programs, which are serving to consolidate the Government's internet access points and to provide some capability to monitor and mitigate cyber attacks. Next, this report catalogs activities undertaken by various industry and government entities. In addition, it assesses the benchmarks of HPC capability and other HPC attributes that may lend themselves to assist in the solution of this problem. This report draws few conclusions, as it is intended to assess current practice in preparation for future work, however, no explicit references to HPC usage for the purpose of analyzing cyber infrastructure in near-real-time were found in the current practice. This report and a related SAND2010-4766 National Cyber Defense High Performance Computing and Analysis: Concepts, Planning and Roadmap report are intended to provoke discussion throughout a broad audience about developing a cohesive HPC centric solution to wide-area cybersecurity problems.

  2. Using Target Audience Analysis to Aid Strategic Level Decisionmaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    continuum of wrong activities being undertaken. In Iraq and Afghanistan, he saw how big public relations and marketing companies cost the U.S...triumphalism—the belief that western, liberal, democratic free market econ- omies were the answer to all ills. Yet across Eastern Europe, the Maghreb, the...Pakhtunkhwa; the city of Peshawar and dis- tricts south of the city, including travel on the Pesha- war to Chitral road via the Lowari Pass; northern and

  3. I Focalize, You Focalize, We All Focalize Together: Audience Participation in Persepolis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizzie Nixon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Abstract (E: This article combines theories of cognition and empathy with focalization theory to examine how and why different forms of audience engagement in fictional worlds are cued. The article argues that critics should examine the differences between engagement that encourages audiences to apply their own frames to the world presented and type engagement cued by means of point-of-view shots and close-ups of facial expressions.

    Abstract (F: Cet article combine les théories de la cognition et de l’empathie avec la théorie de la focalisation afin d’analyser comment et pourquoi certaines œuvres construisent la manière dont le public est invité à s’investir dans des mondes fictionnels. Il défend l

  4. Public Policy Agenda, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for the association's members and other interested organizations as well as federal and state policymakers.…

  5. Public Policy Agenda, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for federal and state policymakers, the association's members, and other interested organizations and…

  6. Public Policy Agenda, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. This paper is intended to serve as a point of reference for the association's members and other interested organizations, as well as federal and state policymakers.…

  7. Public Policy Agenda, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for federal and state policymakers, the association's members, and other interested organizations and…

  8. Public Policy Agenda, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The 2010 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. This paper is intended to serve as a point of reference for the association's members and other interested organizations, as well as federal and state policymakers.…

  9. Public Policy Agenda, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The 2007 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for federal and state policymakers, the association's members, and other interested organizations and…

  10. Public Policy Agenda, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The 2009 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for the association's members and other interested organizations as well as federal and state policymakers.…

  11. Public Policy Agenda, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of State Colleges and Universities, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 Public Policy Agenda summarizes the American Association of State Colleges and Universities' (AASCU's) principles and priorities in key areas of higher education policy. The document is intended to serve as a point of reference for federal and state policymakers, the association's members, and other interested organizations and…

  12. Telling the Story of Ridge Flank Research to all Ages and Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S. K.; Brennon, R.; Hamner, K.; Kane, J.; Ringlein, J.; Strong, L. R.; Orcutt, B. N.; Fisher, A. T.; Edwards, K. J.; Cowen, J. P.; Hulme, S.; Wheat, C. G.; Scientific Team of Expedition AT18-07

    2011-12-01

    A team of six education and communication specialists took part in Expedition AT18-07 onboard the R/V Atlantis during Summer 2011 as part of Hydrogeologic, Geochemical, and Microbiological Experiments in Young Ocean Crust of the Northeastern Pacific Ocean Using Subseafloor Observatories. Fully integrating into the science party of this expedition, educators brought their diverse backgrounds (middle school science, high school physics and biology, informal science institutions, and science media/communication) to bear as they participated in shipboard operations, laboratory analyses and scientific problem-solving. Their primary role, however, was to translate the excitement and significance of these investigations for a variety of non-science audiences on shore - including museum visitors, scout groups, summer camps, summer schools and college students - and provide rich opportunities for interaction surrounding transformative science in real time. Using a satellite-based internet link, educators took advantage of web-based tools, Skype and social networking sites Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, to bring the real process of science live from the seafloor to classrooms from Washington, D.C. to Taiwan. Activities and products included: 13 live ship-to-shore video broadcasts, development of classroom activities, partnerships among scientists and educators, web-based microbiology investigations, production of videos, development of museum exhibits and programs, and a video game based on the ROV Jason. In addition, several scientists initiated independent education projects, to which the education and communication team contributed their skills, including the Adopt a Microbe from the Seafloor web site, which provided regular art and science activities about microbiology and invites active participation from shore-based groups. Results of post-expedition work with students and the public will be shared, as will pre- and post-expedition evaluation reports on the impact of

  13. Selecting a Topic in Public Speaking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘玉霞

    2013-01-01

    The first step in speechmaking is choosing a topic, which will decide the success of the speech. In the paper, we are go⁃ing to discuss how to select a topic in public speaking, and we’ll mainly talk about the following: the speaker, the occasion and the audience, selecting a topic, specific methods for choosing a topic and available topics.

  14. Rhetorical Analysis of Non-Public Discourse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharf, Barbara F.

    In arguing for a functional rather than contextual definition of rhetoric, this paper explains that an addressed audience and not a public setting is what makes the concept of "rhetorical quality" meaningful. The paper then notes that the defining characteristics of rhetorical quality are goal orientation and strategy, and it reasons that…

  15. Practical and ethical considerations for using social media in community consultation and public disclosure activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Kyle L

    2014-10-01

    Social media are becoming increasingly integrated into both the clinical and the research dimensions of emergency medicine. They can provide methods for sharing crucial information to targeted individuals or groups in a rapid fashion. As a result, investigators conducting emergency research under the exception from prospective informed consent requirements are beginning to turn to social media platforms as they engage in required community consultation and public disclosure activities before their research begins. At present, there are limited data regarding how effectively social media have been used for performing those consultation and disclosure activities. This article offers investigators four specific areas to consider before using social media in consultation and outreach efforts. First, understand the forms of outreach social media platforms can provide. Second, recognize how those outreach methods relate to the specific goals of community consultation and public disclosure. Third, consider whether or not the intended audiences of community consultation and public disclosure will be available via social media. Finally, think about how social media outreach efforts will be measured and assessed before consultation and disclosure activities are under way.

  16. Public Energy Education: Issues for Discussion. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Energy Education Task Force.

    This paper was intended to stimulate discussion of energy education issues at a conference on energy issues. The discussion ranges through numerous topics at issue in energy education including public energy awareness, definition of public education, the distinction between public education and public relations, and the presentation of a model…

  17. "Like throwing a bowling ball at a battle ship" audience responses to Australian news stories about alcohol pricing and promotion policies: a qualitative focus group study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea S Fogarty

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Policies affecting alcohol's price and promotion are effective measures to reduce harms. Yet policies targeting populations are unpopular with the public, whose views can be influenced by news framings of policy narratives. In Australia, alcohol taxation receives high news coverage, while advertising restrictions have not until recently, and narratives are highly contested for each. However, research specifically examining how audiences respond to such news stories is scant. We sought to explore audience understanding of news reports about two alcohol policy proposals. METHOD: From June to August 2012, 46 participants were recruited for 8 focus groups in age-brackets of young people aged 18-25 years, parents of young people, and adults aged 25 or older. Groups were split by education. Participants were asked their prior knowledge of alcohol policies, before watching and discussing four news stories about alcohol taxation and advertising. RESULTS: Participants were clear that alcohol poses problems, yet thought policy solutions were ineffective in a drinking culture they viewed as unamenable to change and unaffected by alcohol's price or promotion. Without knowledge of its actual effect on consumption, they cited the 2008 alcopops tax as a policy failure, blaming cheaper substitution. Participants had low knowledge of advertising restrictions, yet were concerned about underage exposure. They offered conditional support for restrictions, while doubting its effectiveness. There was marked distrust of statistics and news actors in broadcasts, yet discussions matched previous research findings. CONCLUSIONS: News coverage has resulted in strong audience understanding of alcohol related problems but framed solutions have not always provided clear messages, despite audience support for policies. Future advocacy will need to continue recent moves to address the links between alcohol's price and promotion with the drinking culture, as well

  18. Review : Public service motivation—practical problems, scientific evidence and the role of a research community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenabeele, Wouter; Skelcher, Chris

    2015-01-01

    This review article introduces Public Money & Management's theme papers and articles on public service motivation (PSM). PSM has proven to be a promising road in creating public performance and public value and this theme brings it to an even wider audience, ensuring that policy-makers and those res

  19. Philosophy in the Public Interest: An Interview with Martha C. Nussbaum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Margaret A.

    2002-01-01

    Presents a wide-ranging interview with one of America's most prominent philosophers, whose reputation is due not only to her productivity, but to her willingness to speak to broad audiences on topics of public importance. (EV)

  20. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ashley A.; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A.

    2010-05-01

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey data, we find those who report the Internet as their primary source of science and technology news are diverse in age, more knowledgeable about science and nanotechnology, highly educated, male, and more diverse racially than users of other media. In a comparison of demographic data on actual visits by online users to general news and science Web sites, science sites attracted more male, non-white users from the Western region of the United States than news sites did. News sites, on the other hand, attracted those with a slightly higher level of education. Our analysis of published estimates of keyword searches on nanotechnology reveals people are turning to the Internet to search for keyword searches related to the future, health, and applications of nanotechnology. A content analysis of online content reveals health content dominates overall. Comparisons of content in different types of sites—blogs, government, and general sites—are conducted.

  1. The changing information environment for nanotechnology: online audiences and content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ashley A; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A

    2010-05-01

    The shift toward online communication in all realms, from print newspapers to broadcast television, has implications for how the general public consumes information about nanotechnology. The goal of this study is threefold: to investigate who is using online sources for information and news about science and nanotechnology, to examine what the general public is searching for online with regards to nanotechnology, and to analyze what they find in online content of nanotechnology. Using survey data, we find those who report the Internet as their primary source of science and technology news are diverse in age, more knowledgeable about science and nanotechnology, highly educated, male, and more diverse racially than users of other media. In a comparison of demographic data on actual visits by online users to general news and science Web sites, science sites attracted more male, non-white users from the Western region of the United States than news sites did. News sites, on the other hand, attracted those with a slightly higher level of education. Our analysis of published estimates of keyword searches on nanotechnology reveals people are turning to the Internet to search for keyword searches related to the future, health, and applications of nanotechnology. A content analysis of online content reveals health content dominates overall. Comparisons of content in different types of sites-blogs, government, and general sites-are conducted. ELECTRONIC SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIAL: The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s11051-010-9860-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

  2. Educating the Public about Deep-Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, V. S.

    2010-12-01

    , earthquakes, resource concentrations, oceans, atmospheric composition and flow, possibly even life), is made possible by the specific characteristics of Earth's interior. Accepting that knowledge of Earth’s interior is important, the next task is to let the public know what we have learned about the deep Earth, and how we have developed that scientific knowledge. How do we incorporate uncertainty in this work? How do we test hypotheses? What are the current open questions about the deep Earth that we seek to address through ongoing or future scientific research? The cognitive distance between research experts and the public must be bridged -- an interpretive task that requires substantial expertise and collaboration. Reaching the ultimate audience (the general public) requires the education and active involvement of K-12+ teachers, education boards, textbook publishers and mass-media producers. Information must be packaged to suit each intended audience, at the appropriate cognitive level. The effectiveness of the education-and-outreach element of any research enterprise largely determines whether the processes and results of science are transferred successfully to the public consciousness.

  3. Mass social contact interventions and their effect on mental health related stigma and intended discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans-Lacko, Sara; London, Jillian; Japhet, Sarah; Rüsch, Nicolas; Flach, Clare; Corker, Elizabeth; Henderson, Claire; Thornicroft, Graham

    2012-06-28

    Stigma and discrimination associated with mental health problems is an important public health issue, and interventions aimed at reducing exposure to stigma and discrimination can improve the lives of people with mental health problems. Social contact has long been considered to be one of the most effective strategies for improving inter-group relations. For this study, we assess the impact of a population level social contact intervention among people with and without mental health problems. This study investigated the impact of social contact and whether presence of specific facilitating factors (equal status, common goals, cooperation and friendship potential): (1) improves intended stigmatising behaviour; (2) increases future willingness to disclose a mental health problem; and (3) promotes behaviours associated with anti-stigma campaign engagement. Two mass participation social contact programmes within England's Time to Change campaign were evaluated via a 2-part questionnaire. 403 participants completed initial questionnaires (70% paper, 30% online) and 83 completed follow-up questionnaires online 4-6 weeks later. This study investigated the impact of social contact and whether presence of specific facilitating factors (equal status, common goals, cooperation and friendship potential): (1) improves intended stigmatising behaviour; (2) increases future willingness to disclose a mental health problem; and (3) promotes behaviours associated with anti-stigma campaign engagement. Two mass participation social contact programmes within England's Time to Change campaign were evaluated via a 2-part questionnaire. 403 participants completed initial questionnaires (70% paper, 30% online) and 83 completed follow-up questionnaires online 4-6 weeks later. Campaign events facilitated meaningful intergroup social contact between individuals with and without mental health problems. Presence of facilitating conditions predicted improved stigma-related behavioural intentions

  4. Mass social contact interventions and their effect on mental health related stigma and intended discrimination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evans-Lacko Sara

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stigma and discrimination associated with mental health problems is an important public health issue, and interventions aimed at reducing exposure to stigma and discrimination can improve the lives of people with mental health problems. Social contact has long been considered to be one of the most effective strategies for improving inter-group relations. For this study, we assess the impact of a population level social contact intervention among people with and without mental health problems. Methods This study investigated the impact of social contact and whether presence of specific facilitating factors (equal status, common goals, cooperation and friendship potential: (1 improves intended stigmatising behaviour; (2 increases future willingness to disclose a mental health problem; and (3 promotes behaviours associated with anti-stigma campaign engagement. Two mass participation social contact programmes within England’s Time to Change campaign were evaluated via a 2-part questionnaire. 403 participants completed initial questionnaires (70% paper, 30% online and 83 completed follow-up questionnaires online 4–6 weeks later. Results This study investigated the impact of social contact and whether presence of specific facilitating factors (equal status, common goals, cooperation and friendship potential: (1 improves intended stigmatising behaviour; (2 increases future willingness to disclose a mental health problem; and (3 promotes behaviours associated with anti-stigma campaign engagement. Two mass participation social contact programmes within England’s Time to Change campaign were evaluated via a 2-part questionnaire. 403 participants completed initial questionnaires (70% paper, 30% online and 83 completed follow-up questionnaires online 4–6 weeks later. Campaign events facilitated meaningful intergroup social contact between individuals with and without mental health problems. Presence of facilitating conditions

  5. “Dive into the Movie” Audience-Driven Immersive Experience in the Story

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Shigeo

    “Dive into the Movie (DIM)” is a name of project to aim to realize a world innovative entertainment system which can provide an immersion experience into the story by giving a chance to audience to share an impression with his family or friends by watching a movie in which all audience can participate in the story as movie casts. To realize this system, several techniques to model and capture the personal characteristics instantly in face, body, gesture, hair and voice by combining computer graphics, computer vision and speech signal processing technique. Anyway, all of the modeling, casting, character synthesis, rendering and compositing processes have to be performed on real-time without any operator. In this paper, first a novel entertainment system, Future Cast System (FCS), is introduced which can create DIM movie with audience's participation by replacing the original roles' face in a pre-created CG movie with audiences' own highly realistic 3D CG faces. Then the effects of DIM movie on audience experience are evaluated subjectively. The result suggests that most of the participants are seeking for higher realism, impression and satisfaction by replacing not only face part but also body, hair and voice. The first experimental trial demonstration of FCS was performed at the Mitsui-Toshiba pavilion of the 2005 World Exposition in Aichi Japan. Then, 1,640,000 people have experienced this event during 6 months of exhibition and FCS became one of the most popular events at Expo. 2005.

  6. Audience effects on the neural correlates of relational reasoning in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumontheil, Iroise; Wolf, Laura K; Blakemore, Sarah-Jayne

    2016-07-01

    Adolescents are particularly sensitive to peer influence. This may partly be due to an increased salience of peers during adolescence. We investigated the effect of being observed by a peer on a cognitively challenging task, relational reasoning, which requires the evaluation and integration of multiple mental representations. Relational reasoning tasks engage a fronto-parietal network including the inferior parietal cortex, pre-supplementary motor area, dorsolateral and rostrolateral prefrontal cortices. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), peer audience effects on activation in this fronto-parietal network were compared in a group of 19 female mid-adolescents (aged 14-16 years) and 14 female adults (aged 23-28 years). Adolescent and adult relational reasoning accuracy was influenced by a peer audience as a function of task difficulty: the presence of a peer audience led to decreased accuracy in the complex, relational integration condition in both groups of participants. The fMRI results demonstrated that a peer audience differentially modulated activation in regions of the fronto-parietal network in adolescents and adults. Activation was increased in adolescents in the presence of a peer audience, while this was not the case in adults.

  7. Intending Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Project name:Jintan tire production base project (the first-phase project) Construction site:Jintan Economic Development Zone, Jiangsu Province Construction unit:Zhongce Rubber (Jintan) Co., Ltd. Total investment:RMB 2.42 billion yuan Project description:It is planned to cover an area of 3,000 mu. In the first phase, it will cover an area of 520.43 mu with designed staff of 4,500 people. It will mix 150,000 tons of rubber and produce 10 million u- nits of high-performance semi-steel-wire saloon car and light truck radial tires, 500,000 units of OTR tires and 100,000 tons of carbon black per year.

  8. Intending Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Project name: 90,000t/a BR device and auxiliary projects Construction unit: Sinopec Beijing Yanshan Petrochemical Company Total investment: 2.257 billion yuan Project description: It will cover an area of 14. lha.

  9. Museum Monsters and Victorious Viruses: Improving Public Understanding of Emerging Biomedical Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Judy; Jee, Benjamin; Matuk, Camilla; McQuillan, Julia; Spiegel, Amy N; Uttal, David

    2015-07-01

    Although microbes directly impact everyone's health, most people have limited knowledge about them. In this article, we describe a museum and media public education campaign aimed at helping diverse audiences better understand emerging knowledge about microbes and infectious disease. Funded primarily by the Science Education Partnership (SEPA) program of the National Institutes of Health, this campaign involved crosscutting programs designed to extend impacts throughout a broad public audience.

  10. GESTURING TO AN EMPTY THEATRE? Author, Text and Audience in the Fiction of Fatou Diome and Aïssatou Diamanka‐Besland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosia Beer

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Fatou Diome and Aïssatou Diamanka‐Besland are Senegalese women migrant novelists who have addressed the theme of irregular migration between Senegal and France in their literature. The authors, who live in France, write within the context of increased irregular migration and its associated dangers. They also write during a time of increased, and often hyperbolic, public and official discourses surrounding the extent of irregular migration. The authors’ treatment of the theme of migration raises questions concerning the relationship between the Senegalese novelist, her text and her audience. It also raises questions regarding the unique and complex positioning of the migrant writer.

  11. Inspiring your audience to action: insights from theory and practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, W.; Hekkers, J.; Mott, B.

    2011-12-01

    Findings from market research sponsored by The Ocean Project, along with many other recent studies, have revealed two troubling facts: 1. Despite increased efforts to grow climate and ocean literacy among the general public, American adult's knowledge of climate and ocean health has remained stagnant in the past decade; and 2. Knowledge and level of concern about climate change show little correlation, i.e. the people who are most concerned about climate change are not the ones who know most about the science of climate change, and vice versa. If knowledge does not lead to action among the general public, what implications does this have for those of us working for conservation? How can we motivate people to act for conservation? The Ocean Project's large-scale survey of American attitudes and values vis-à-vis ocean, climate change, and related conservation issues provides answers to many such burning questions. Our research findings reveal critical insights about what, who, and how we can communicate for maximum efficacy. In particular, youth and minorities emerged as important constituencies: not only are they more environmentally aware and/or socially conscious, they are important influencers who demonstrate greater propensity to modify their behaviors and/or engage in conservation advocacy. Our presentation will discuss the implications of these findings for strategic communication for conservation action as well as present case studies from the Monterey Bay Aquarium that support these research findings and provide insights from evaluation of two significantly different interpretive approaches to communicate about climate change-a live animal exhibit and a video-based, live-narrated auditorium program.

  12. 21 CFR 1010.5 - Exemptions for products intended for United States Government use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exemptions for products intended for United States Government use. 1010.5 Section 1010.5 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... General Provisions § 1010.5 Exemptions for products intended for United States Government use....

  13. Investigation of Social Studies Teachers' Intended Uses of Social Networks in Terms of Various Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akgün, Ismail Hakan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to determine Social Studies teacher candidates' intended uses of social networks in terms of various variables. The research was carried out by using screening model of quantitative research methods. In the study, "The Social Network Intended Use Scale" was used as a data collection tool. As a result of the…

  14. Physical Medicine Devices; Reclassification of Iontophoresis Device Intended for Any Other Purposes. Final order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-26

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final order to reclassify iontophoresis devices intended for any other purposes, which are preamendments class III devices (regulated under product code EGJ), into class II (special controls) and to amend the device identification to clarify that devices intended to deliver specific drugs are not considered part of this regulatory classification.

  15. Adaptation in Tourist Publicity Translation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谭娟

    2013-01-01

    This paper attempts to provide a preliminary study of adaptation adopted in the translation of tourist publicity and ex-plore the main reasons behind the adaptive techniques on the basis of functionalist theories of translation. It is found that cultural blanks, different linguistic conventions and also the intended functions of tourist publicity may all contribute to adaptation in translation.

  16. The Persuasive Power of you in Public Speeches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王芳芳

    2013-01-01

    One of the features of the public speech is to move and persuade the audience into accepting the speaker’s viewpoints. This article focuses on investigating how a purposeful choice of pronoun you in a specific context can help the achievements of persuasive power in public speeches.

  17. The Limitations of Quantitative Social Science for Informing Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrim, John; de Vries, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative social science (QSS) has the potential to make an important contribution to public policy. However it also has a number of limitations. The aim of this paper is to explain these limitations to a non-specialist audience and to identify a number of ways in which QSS research could be improved to better inform public policy.

  18. The Limitations of Quantitative Social Science for Informing Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrim, John; de Vries, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative social science (QSS) has the potential to make an important contribution to public policy. However it also has a number of limitations. The aim of this paper is to explain these limitations to a non-specialist audience and to identify a number of ways in which QSS research could be improved to better inform public policy.

  19. Laughter and collective awareness: The cinema auditorium as public space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanich, Julian

    2014-01-01

    This article looks at how the collective experience of laughter in the movie theater is related to the idea of the cinema as a public space. Through the non-verbal expression of laughter the audience ‘constructs’ a public space the viewers may not have been aware of to the same degree prior to the c

  20. Intended motion estimation using fuzzy Kalman filtering for UAV image stabilization with large drifting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Tiantian; Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Sijie; Wang, Lu

    2015-03-01

    Videos from a small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) are always unstable because of the wobble of the vehicle and the impact of surroundings, especially when the motion has a large drifting. Electronic image stabilization aims at removing the unwanted wobble and obtaining the stable video. Then estimation of intended motion, which represents the tendency of global motion, becomes the key to image stabilization. It is usually impossible for general methods of intended motion estimation to obtain stable intended motion remaining as much information of video images and getting a path as much close to the real flying path at the same time. This paper proposed a fuzzy Kalman filtering method to estimate the intended motion to solve these problems. Comparing with traditional methods, the fuzzy Kalman filtering method can achieve better effect to estimate the intended motion.

  1. Applicative Research on Psychological Demand of Audience and the TAXI for People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Caixia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Whether TAXI for People from Beijing traffic channel, the only special program customized for taxi driver in Beijing, knows about the psychological feature of the certain taxi group is an important factor that affects the development of program. Based on demand theory of psychology, this article uses the questionnaire method to find out the psychological feature and lifestyle of audience, and discusses the degree to the TAXI for People which meets the psychological demand of taxi driver audience by analysis on the program content. It is said from the research that the TAXI for People basically meets the psychological demand from taxi drivers. However, this program shall focus more on their basic needs and provide the opportunity for the audience to participate in the program and activity.

  2. Audiences, Journalists, and Forms of Capital in the Online Journalistic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson C. Tandoc Jr.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study found divergence in how online journalists and student-audiences rated articles with varying popularity, as measured by audience metrics, and quality, as operationalized by winning a journalistic award. The findings revealed that while metrics and awards did not matter for young online news audiences, they were important for online journalists. But even among journalists, the importance of metrics and awards varied depending on whether the journalists were evaluating stories or their peers. For online journalists, popular stories were more newsworthy than those that were not. Awards did not influence their judgment of newsworthiness. But when evaluating the authors of the articles, online journalists rated authors of articles that won awards more favorably than authors of articles without awards. The popularity of stories did not matter in their evaluation of the authors.

  3. Risk communication as an operation meant to produce and share audiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Korbas-Magal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, Luhmann's system theory is used as a theoretical framework for analysing the way risk communicators view their social functions. Narrated experiences from risk communicators in practice facilitate an understanding of risk communication as both an external irritation to society and part of the mass communication system. They also aid in clarifying how perceptions of audiences are reflected in the risk-communication strategies. The analysis is based on qualitative data collected from in-depth interviews conducted with 22 risk communicators (scientific professionals, spokespeople and journalists in Israel. Thematic areas reflected in interviewees' reported strategies embody their perception of audiences. Those themes include: the reduction of complexities; coding and sorting of information; autopoiesis (realisation/non-realisation of the risk; rationality; inherent paradoxes; and schema formation. In sum, the findings suggest that risk communicators play a major role in defining, creating and producing audiences for the mass communication system.

  4. Defining obesity: second-level agenda setting attributes in black newspapers and general audience newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunmin; Len-Ríos, María E

    2014-01-01

    This content analysis study examines how obesity is depicted in general-audience and Black newspaper stories (N=391) through the lens of second-level agenda setting theory. The results reveal that both Black newspapers and general-audience newspapers generally ascribe individual causes for obesity. While both types of newspapers largely neglected to mention solutions for the problem, Black newspapers were more likely than general-audience newspapers to suggest both individual and societal solutions for treating obesity. For Black newspapers, these solutions more often included community interventions. In addition, Black newspapers more often used a negative tone in stories and more frequently mentioned ethnic and racial minorities as at-risk groups.

  5. Playing to an audience: the social environment influences aggression and victory displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, Lauren P; Bertram, Susan M

    2013-08-23

    Animal behaviour studies have begun to incorporate the influence of the social environment, providing new opportunities for studying signal strategies and evolution. We examined how the presence and sex of an audience influenced aggression and victory display behaviour in field-captured and laboratory-reared field crickets (Gryllus veletis). Audience type, rearing environment and their interaction were important predictors in all model sets. Thus, audience type may impose different costs and benefits for competing males depending on whether they are socially experienced or not. Our results suggest that field-captured winners, in particular, dynamically adjust their contest behaviour to potentially gain a reproductive benefit via female eavesdropping and may deter future aggression from rivals by advertising their aggressiveness and victories.

  6. Online Communication And PR in Romanian Public Administration. The Case Study of Public Institutions From Transylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Cristina BALABAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available New technologies such as Internet and new media introduce new challenges for public communication. Private companies from Romania use in a very creative way the new tools of Web 2.0, such as social media. In the Romanian public sector, especially in the public administration there are important steps taken towards a modern communication. Based on the example of over 40 city halls, city councils, prefectures and county councils from Transylvania, the present paper analyzes the use of new media tools in public communication by applying content analysis and in-depth interviews with the PR representatives in those institutions in two stages, 2011 and 2015. The most important advantages of online communication in public administration are high speed, cost reduction, reaching young audiences, etc. Nevertheless, there are also critical voices that express possible risks such as exclusion of audience groups that have no online media literacy.

  7. Modulation of the brain activity in outcome evaluation by the presence of an audience: An electrophysiological investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tengxiang; Feng, Xue; Gu, Ruolei; Broster, Lucas S; Feng, Chunliang; Wang, Lili; Guan, Qing; Luo, Yue-Jia

    2015-07-30

    The audience effect refers to the phenomenon that one׳s performance on a task is affected by the presence of others. Here we investigated how the audience effect modulates the neurocognitive signatures underlying people׳s evaluation of their own task performance/outcome. Participants in our study played a gambling game in two social contexts: an "audience" condition and an "alone" condition. The presence of others modulated the feedback-related negativity (FRN), which might reflect enhanced motivational significance or increased reward processing when participants were watched compared to when they were alone. We also observed increased P300 responses to outcome feedback in the audience condition, presumably reflecting more elaborative and sustained evaluation of outcomes in the audience than alone context. This audience effect on the evaluative processes complements previous observations on the social nature of outcome evaluation and extends a traditional topic in social psychology to the neuroscientific field.

  8. Dynamic Threshold Public-Key Encryption

    OpenAIRE

    Delerablée, Cécile; Pointcheval, David

    2008-01-01

    The original publication is available at www.springerlink.com; International audience; This paper deals with threshold public-key encryption which allows a pool of players to decrypt a ciphertext if a given threshold of authorized players cooperate. We generalize this primitive to the dynamic setting, where any user can dynamically join the system, as a possible recipient; the sender can dynamically choose the authorized set of recipients, for each ciphertext; and the sender can dynamically s...

  9. A comparison of two methods to assess audience-induced changes in male mate choice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madlen ZIEGE, Carmen HENNIGE-SCHULZ, Frauke MUECKSCH,David BIERBACH, Ralph TIEDEMANN, Bruno STREIT, Martin PLATH

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Multidirectional communicative interactions in social networks can have a profound effect on mate choice behavior. Male Atlantic molly Poecilia mexicana exhibit weaker mating preferences when an audience male is presented. This could be a male strategy to reduce sperm competition risk: interacting more equally with different females may be advantageous because rivals might copy mate choice decisions. In line with this hypothesis, a previous study found males to show a strong audience effect when being observed while exercising mate choice, but not when the rival was presented only before the choice tests. Audience effects on mate choice decisions have been quantified in poeciliid fishes using association preference designs, but it remains unknown if patterns found from measuring association times translate into actual mating behavior. Thus, we created five audience treatments simulating different forms of perceived sperm competition risk and determined focal males’ mating preferences by scoring pre-mating (nipping and mating behavior (gonopodial thrusting. Nipping did not reflect the pattern that was found when association preferences were measured, while a very similar pattern was uncovered in thrusting behavior. The strongest response was observed when the audience could eavesdrop on the focal male’s behavior. A reduction in the strength of focal males’ preferences was also seen after the rival male had an opportunity to mate with the focal male’s preferred mate. In comparison, the reduction of mating preferences in response to an audience was greater when measuring association times than actual mating behavior. While measuring direct sexual interactions between the focal male and both stimulus females not only the male’s motivational state is reflected but also females’ behavior such as avoidance of male sexual harassment [Current Zoology 58 (1: 84–94, 2012].

  10. A comparison of two methods to assess audience-induced changes in male mate choice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Madlen ZIEGE; Carmen HENNIGE-SCHULZ; Frauke MUECKSCH; David BIERBACH; Ralph TIEDEMANN; Bruno STREIT; Martin PLATH

    2012-01-01

    Multidirectional communicative interactions in social networks can have a profound effect on mate choice behavior.Male Atlantic molly Poecilia mexicana exhibit weaker mating preferences when an audience male is presented.This could be a male strategy to reduce sperm competition risk:interacting more equally with different females may be advantageous because rivals might copy mate choice decisions.In line with this hypothesis,a previous study found males to show a strong audience effect when being observed while exercising mate choice,but not when the rival was presented only before the choice tests.Audience effects on mate choice decisions have been quantified in poeciliid fishes using association preference designs,but it remains unknown if patterns found from measuring association times translate into actual mating behavior.Thus,we createl five audience treatments simulating different forms of perceived sperm competition risk and determined focal males' mating preferences by scoring pre-mating (nipping) and mating behavior (gonopodial thrusting).Nipping did not reflect the pattern that was found when association preferences were measured,while a very similar pattern was uncovered in thrusting behavior.The strongest response was observed when the audience could eavesdrop on the focal male's behavior.A reduction in the strength of focal males' preferences was also seen after the rival male had an opportunity to mate with the focal male's preferred mate.In comparison,the reduction of mating preferences in response to an audience was greater when measuring association times than actual mating behavior.While measuring direct sexual interactions between the focal male and both stimulus females not only the male's motivational state is reflected but also females' behavior such as avoidance of male sexual harassment [Current Zoology 58 (1):84-94,2012].

  11. Publicity and public relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosha, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses approaches to using publicity and public relations to meet the goals of the NASA Space Grant College. Methods universities and colleges can use to publicize space activities are presented.

  12. Targeting anti-smoking messages: does audience race matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp-Taylor, Shannah; Fryer, Craig S; Shadel, William G

    2012-07-01

    This study examined whether an adolescent's self-identified race moderates the perceived effectiveness of anti-smoking messages. A sample of 94 never smoking adolescents (59% African-American; 41% European-American) participated in this two-part study. First, they rated the persuasive strength of a series of five decontextualized anti-smoking messages (i.e., messages delivered in text format). Second, they were exposed to five sets of anti-smoking public service announcements (PSAs; viewed as TV advertisements) that had embedded in them the five anti-smoking messages used in the first part of the study and rated their smoking refusal self-efficacy after each one. Although race moderated participants' ratings of the decontextualized messages, there were no significant moderating effects of race when those messages were embedded in PSAs. The results of this study support the notion that anti-smoking PSAs should not be targeted to adolescent racial background, but suggests that decontextualized anti-smoking messages may be more effective if targeted to adolescent race.

  13. LTE for public safety

    CERN Document Server

    Liebhart, Rainer; Wong, Curt; Merkel , Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the book is to educate government agencies, operators, vendors and other regulatory institutions how LTE can be deployed to serve public safety market and offer regulatory / public safety features. It is written in such a way that it can be understood by both technical and non-technical personnel with just introductory knowledge in wireless communication. Some sections and chapters about public safety services offered by LTE network are intended to be understood by anyone with no knowledge in wireless communication.

  14. Public debt management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Gaber

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper generally describes the segment of public debt management or especially the structure of public debt. It focuses on different kinds of risks which present potential danger for the public debt explosion. It intends to explain the government goal for borrowing money at lowest rate and sustain the fiscal stability. Also, it explains some practical issues regarding this topic for Republic of Macedonia for the period from 2009-2011. In the process of research were implemented several qualitative methods.

  15. NASA Innovations in Climate Education Connects Audiences Coast-to-Coast for Climate Literacy via the NASA Digital Learning Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Barnes, M. H.; Chambers, L. H.; Pippin, M. R.; Martin, A. M.; Geyer, A. J.; Leber, M.; Joyner, E.; Small, C.; Dublin, D.

    2013-12-01

    with remotely connected participants and presenters across the nation. In addition to the 19 educators who participated live, 298 watched the sessions via a webcast. A similar workshop series experienced 300% growth in 2 years indicating the potential for comparable growth of NICE events. Due to unanimous requests for more information on these and other topics, beginning Fall 2013, NICE will reach into additional educators' classrooms via the DLN to deliver continued EPD from NICE PIs and other NASA researchers. With DLN capability, hundreds of additional unique viewers have been exposed to NICE via the DLN this year. This large-scale effort allows for long term, sustained engagement of the global community. We intend to take advantage of capabilities of the DLN as we continue to scale NICE events to wider audiences. The use of distance education allows for immediate release of new information and more frequent connections, resulting in sustained engagement of participants. This presentation will explore the various successes and future opportunities for expanding the impact of climate literacy via the NASA DLN, a large-scale collaborative network.

  16. JOURNALISTIC IDENTITY AND AUDIENCE PERCEPTIONS: PARADIGM AND MODELS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN THE AFRICAN GREAT LAKES REGIÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Soleil Frère

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on a research conducted in three African countries (Burundi, Rwanda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo, focusing on the recent evolution of the journalistic profession and the way journalists are perceived today and represented by members of the audience polled in five localities of the region. In the last twenty years, journalism has been deeply transformed, following the liberalization of the media sector, on one hand, and the murderous civil wars which marked the three countries on the other hand. New formats and new roles have appeared for the media, as well as new professional standards for journalists (codes of ethics, regulations from regulatory authorities, journalists education and training curricula, professional associations, often encouraged by foreign donors and international NGOs. This paper aims at showing that, behind these changes, a new « journalistic paradigm » has taken shape, a consequence of both internal dynamics within the profession and external assignments (imposed by the State and the evolution of the market, and also of new demands emanating from the public. In an unstable political, economic and security context, the changes of the journalistic paradigm have transfigured media content, as well as the perception by the local public of the role that journalists have to play in society, and of what the citizens may expect from them, in a region where democracy is still widely under construction.

  17. Public speaking: creating presentations that are awe inspiring not yawn producing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVan, Marsheila; Baum, Neil

    2013-01-01

    Many physicians want to be good platform speakers; however, few of us have the background and training necessary to be an outstanding public speaker. Yes, we all have slide decks and PowerPoint programs provided to us so that we can turn our backs to the audience and read the verbiage on the slides. But does that technique generate useful information to the audience? Or if speaking to a lay audience, does that kind of talk make the audience members get out their cell phones and call the office to make an appointment in our practice? Probably not. This article will provide suggestions that will enhance your speaking and presentation skills. This, in turn, will make you a darling of the pharma industry and encourage potential patients in your audience to become patients in your practice.

  18. 78 FR 66840 - Revocation of Certain Requirements Pertaining to Caps Intended for Use With Toy Guns and Toy Guns...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-07

    ... Guns and Toy Guns Not Intended for Use With Caps AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission. ACTION...-producing toys. Existing CPSC regulations pertaining to caps intended for use with toy guns refer to... intended for use with toy guns and toy guns not intended for use with caps. The final rule is...

  19. Reflecting photonics: reaching new audiences through new partnerships - IYL 2015 and the Royal Horticultural Society Flower Show

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Matthew T.; John, Pearl V.; Standen, Deanna; Wheeler, Natalie V.; van Putten, Lieke D.; Soper, Nathan; Parsonage, Tina L.; Wong, Nicholas H. L.; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2016-09-01

    The `Reflecting Photonics' show garden was exhibited at the 2015 Royal Horticultural Society (RHS) Flower Show in Tatton Park, UK, to celebrate the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies. Elks-Smith Garden Design alongside landscapers `Turf N' Earth' collaborated with researchers, marketing and outreach professionals from the University of Southampton to design, construct and exhibit a photonics-themed garden. The garden and supporting exhibition united science and art to reach new audiences - particularly family groups alongside other key influencers to the young - and showcased the world-leading research in optical fibers at the university in an accessible manner. Researchers and a publicity professional, funded by the EPSRC Centre for Innovative Manufacturing in Photonics, developed an integrated approach to the event's public engagement and marketing. The overarching aim was to influence a positive change in the attitude of the garden visitors towards physics and photonics, with additional focus on promoting careers for women in STEM. The show garden won an RHS Gold Medal award and the coveted `People's Choice Award' for the best large garden. The project subsequently won the South East England Physics Network Public Engagement Innovation Project Award. Approximately 80,000 visitors saw the garden, with a further three million television viewers on a popular British gardening show. There were also over 75,400 Tweet impressions on social media. This paper discusses the project aims, explores the design of the garden and its relationship with the research, describes the work of the public engagement team, and outlines the impact of the event.

  20. Using Social Networks to Educate Seismology to Non-Science Audiences in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lücke, O. H.; Linkimer, L.

    2013-12-01

    Costa Rica has a very high rate of seismicity with 63 damaging earthquakes in its history as a nation and 12 felt earthquakes per month on average. In Costa Rica, earthquakes are part of everyday life; hence the inhabitants are highly aware of seismic activity and geological processes. However, formal educational programs and mainstream media have not yet addressed the appropriate way of educating the public on these topics, thus myths and misconceptions are common. With the increasing influence of social networks on information diffusion, they have become a new channel to address this issue in Costa Rica. The National Seismological Network of Costa Rica (RSN) is a joint effort between the University of Costa Rica and the Costa Rican Institute of Electricity. Since 1973, the RSN studies the seismicity and volcanic activity in the country. Starting on January 2011 the RSN has an active Facebook Page, in which felt earthquakes are reported and information on Seismology, geological processes, scientific talks, and RSN activities are routinely posted. Additionally, RSN gets almost instantaneous feedback from RSN followers including people from all rural and urban areas of Costa Rica. In this study, we analyze the demographics, geographic distribution, reach of specific Facebook posts per topic, and the episodic growth of RSN followers related to specific seismic events. We observe that 70 % of the RSN users are between ages from 18 to 34. We consistently observe that certain regions of the country have more Facebook activity, although those regions are not the most populated nor have a high connectivity index. We interpret this pattern as the result of a higher awareness to geological hazards in those specific areas. We notice that educational posts are as well 'liked' as most earthquake reports. For exceptional seismic events, we observe sudden increments in the number of RSN followers in the order of tens of thousands. For example, the May 2013 Sixaola earthquake (Mw