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Sample records for publication complete citations

  1. Citation analysis of faculty publication: beyond Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, K L

    1995-10-01

    When evaluated for promotion or tenure, faculty members are increasingly judged more on the quality than on the quantity of their scholarly publications. As a result, they want help from librarians in locating all citations to their published works for documentation in their curriculum vitae. Citation analysis using Science Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index provides a logical starting point in measuring quality, but the limitations of these sources leave a void in coverage of citations to an author's work. This article discusses alternative and additional methods of locating citations to published works.

  2. Rescaling citations of publications in physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radicchi, Filippo; Castellano, Claudio

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the citation distributions of all papers published in Physical Review journals between 1985 and 2009. The average number of citations received by papers published in a given year and in a given field is computed. Large variations are found, showing that it is not fair to compare citation numbers across fields and years. However, when a rescaling procedure by the average is used, it is possible to compare impartially articles across years and fields. We make the rescaling factors available for use by the readers. We also show that rescaling citation numbers by the number of publication authors has strong effects and should therefore be taken into account when assessing the bibliometric performance of researchers.

  3. Rescaling citations of publications in Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Radicchi, Filippo

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the citation distributions of all papers published in Physical Review journals between 1985 and 2009. The average number of citations received by papers published in a given year and in a given field is computed. Large variations are found, showing that it is not fair to compare citation numbers across fields and years. However, when a rescaling procedure by the average is used, it is possible to compare impartially articles across years and fields. We make the rescaling factors available, for use by the readers. We also show that rescaling citation numbers by the number of publication authors has strong effects and should therefore be taken into account when assessing the bibliometric performance of researchers.

  4. Predicting the long-term citation impact of recent publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegehuis, Clara; Litvak, Nelly; Waltman, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental problem in citation analysis is the prediction of the long-term citation impact of recent publications. We propose a model to predict a probability distribution for the future number of citations of a publication. Two predictors are used: The impact factor of the journal in which a pub

  5. Predicting the long-term citation impact of recent publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegehuis, Clara; Litvak, Nelli; Waltman, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental problem in citation analysis is the prediction of the long-term citation impact of recent publications. We propose a model to predict a probability distribution for the future number of citations of a publication. Two predictors are used: The impact factor of the journal in which a pub

  6. Predicting the long-term citation impact of recent publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stegehuis, Clara; Litvak, Nelli; Waltman, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental problem in citation analysis is the prediction of the long-term citation impact of recent publications. We propose a model to predict a probability distribution for the future number of citations of a publication. Two predictors are used: the impact factor of the journal in which a pub

  7. The citation merit of scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Juan A; Ortuño-Ortín, Ignacio; Ruiz-Castillo, Javier

    2012-01-01

    We propose a new method to assess the merit of any set of scientific papers in a given field based on the citations they receive. Given a field and a citation impact indicator, such as the mean citation or the [Formula: see text]-index, the merit of a given set of [Formula: see text] articles is identified with the probability that a randomly drawn set of [Formula: see text] articles from a given pool of articles in that field has a lower citation impact according to the indicator in question. The method allows for comparisons between sets of articles of different sizes and fields. Using a dataset acquired from Thomson Scientific that contains the articles published in the periodical literature in the period 1998-2007, we show that the novel approach yields rankings of research units different from those obtained by a direct application of the mean citation or the [Formula: see text]-index.

  8. A method for the automated, reliable retrieval of publication-citation records.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek Ruths

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Publication records and citation indices often are used to evaluate academic performance. For this reason, obtaining or computing them accurately is important. This can be difficult, largely due to a lack of complete knowledge of an individual's publication list and/or lack of time available to manually obtain or construct the publication-citation record. While online publication search engines have somewhat addressed these problems, using raw search results can yield inaccurate estimates of publication-citation records and citation indices. METHODOLOGY: In this paper, we present a new, automated method that produces estimates of an individual's publication-citation record from an individual's name and a set of domain-specific vocabulary that may occur in the individual's publication titles. Because this vocabulary can be harvested directly from a research web page or online (partial publication list, our method delivers an easy way to obtain estimates of a publication-citation record and the relevant citation indices. Our method works by applying a series of stringent name and content filters to the raw publication search results returned by an online publication search engine. In this paper, our method is run using Google Scholar, but the underlying filters can be easily applied to any existing publication search engine. When compared against a manually constructed data set of individuals and their publication-citation records, our method provides significant improvements over raw search results. The estimated publication-citation records returned by our method have an average sensitivity of 98% and specificity of 72% (in contrast to raw search result specificity of less than 10%. When citation indices are computed using these records, the estimated indices are within of the true value 10%, compared to raw search results which have overestimates of, on average, 75%. CONCLUSIONS: These results confirm that our method provides

  9. The citation wake of publications detects nobel laureates' papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosik, David F; Bornholdt, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    For several decades, a leading paradigm of how to quantitatively assess scientific research has been the analysis of the aggregated citation information in a set of scientific publications. Although the representation of this information as a citation network has already been coined in the 1960s, it needed the systematic indexing of scientific literature to allow for impact metrics that actually made use of this network as a whole, improving on the then prevailing metrics that were almost exclusively based on the number of direct citations. However, besides focusing on the assignment of credit, the paper citation network can also be studied in terms of the proliferation of scientific ideas. Here we introduce a simple measure based on the shortest-paths in the paper's in-component or, simply speaking, on the shape and size of the wake of a paper within the citation network. Applied to a citation network containing Physical Review publications from more than a century, our approach is able to detect seminal articles which have introduced concepts of obvious importance to the further development of physics. We observe a large fraction of papers co-authored by Nobel Prize laureates in physics among the top-ranked publications.

  10. Nanotechnology publications and citations by leading countries and blocs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youtie, Jan, E-mail: jan.youtie@innovate.gatech.ed [Enterprise Innovation Institute, Georgia Institute of Technology (United States); Shapira, Philip, E-mail: pshapira@gatech.ed [Georgia Institute of Technology, School of Public Policy (United States); Porter, Alan L., E-mail: aporter@isye.gatech.ed [Georgia Institute of Technology, Technology Policy and Assessment Center, School of Public Policy (United States)

    2008-08-15

    This article examines the relative positions with respect to nanotechnology research publications of the European Union (EU), the United States (US), Japan, Germany, China, and three Asian Tiger nations (South Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan). The analysis uses a dataset of nanotechnology publication records for the time period 1990 through 2006 (part year) extracted from the Science Citation Index obtained through the Web of Science and was developed through a two-stage modularized Boolean approach. The results show that although the EU and the US have the highest number of nanotechnology publications, China and other Asian countries are increasing their publications rapidly, taking an ever-larger proportion of the total. When viewed in terms of the quality-based measure of citations, Asian nanotechnology researchers also show growth in recent years. However, by such citation measures, the US still maintains a strongly dominant position, followed by the EU.

  11. Nanotechnology publications and citations by leading countries and blocs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youtie, Jan; Shapira, Philip; Porter, Alan L.

    2008-08-01

    This article examines the relative positions with respect to nanotechnology research publications of the European Union (EU), the United States (US), Japan, Germany, China, and three Asian Tiger nations (South Korea, Singapore, and Taiwan). The analysis uses a dataset of nanotechnology publication records for the time period 1990 through 2006 (part year) extracted from the Science Citation Index obtained through the Web of Science and was developed through a two-stage modularized Boolean approach. The results show that although the EU and the US have the highest number of nanotechnology publications, China and other Asian countries are increasing their publications rapidly, taking an ever-larger proportion of the total. When viewed in terms of the quality-based measure of citations, Asian nanotechnology researchers also show growth in recent years. However, by such citation measures, the US still maintains a strongly dominant position, followed by the EU.

  12. The citation wake of publications detects Nobel laureates' papers

    CERN Document Server

    Klosik, David F

    2013-01-01

    For several decades, a leading paradigm of how to quantitatively assess scientific research has been the analysis of the aggregated citation information in a set of scientific publications. Although the representation of this information as a citation network has already been coined in the 1960s, it needed the systematic indexing of scientific literature to allow for impact metrics that actually made use of this network as a whole improving on the then prevailing metrics that were almost exclusively based on the number of direct citations. However, besides focusing on the assignment of credit, the paper citation network can also be studied in terms of the proliferation of scientific ideas. Here we introduce a simple measure based on the shortest-paths in the paper's in-component or, simply speaking, on the shape and size of the wake of a paper within the citation network. Applied to a citation network containing Physical Review publications from more than a century, our approach is able to detect seminal arti...

  13. The publication-citation matrix and its derived quantities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    We give an overview of the main data of a publication-citation matrix. We show how impact factors are defined,and,in particular,point out the difference between the synchronous and the diachronous impact factor. The advantages and disadvantages of using both as tools in re-search evaluation are discussed.

  14. Counting publications and citations: Is more always better?

    CERN Document Server

    Waltman, Ludo; Wouters, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Is more always better? We address this question in the context of bibliometric indices that aim to assess the scientific impact of individual researchers by counting their number of highly cited publications. We propose a simple model in which the number of citations of a publication depends not only on the scientific impact of the publication but also on other 'random' factors. Our model indicates that more need not always be better. It turns out that the most influential researchers may have a systematically lower performance, in terms of highly cited publications, than some of their less influential colleagues. The model also suggests an improved way of counting highly cited publications.

  15. Citation measures in stereotactic radiosurgery: publication across a discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondziolka, Douglas

    2011-01-01

    It is possible to judge the impact of scientific research by the number of citations a publication has received. We identified the most cited works in the field of stereotactic radiosurgery to study the evolution of this field from the perspective of publication. A Web of Science search was performed for articles that included the word 'radiosurgery' in the title. We studied the reports with >100 citations. A total of 5,532 published works were available for study between 1951 and 2010. Eighty-five articles had ≥ 100 citations, and these were published in 19 separate journals. The majority were published in the International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology and Physics, the Journal of Neurosurgery and Neurosurgery. The most common topics included brain metastasis management (n = 20), arteriovenous malformations (n = 17), vestibular schwannomas (n = 9), technologies (n = 9), meningiomas (n = 8) and dose response/radiobiology (n = 6). Fifty-seven percent of the articles were published in the last 10 years. The first radiosurgery report by Leksell (1951) initiated the field. The 1980s were a period of new technology development followed in the 1990s by introductory articles on specific indications that consisted mainly of retrospective case series. More sophisticated higher level evidence reports were published in the last decade. The most significant works in radiosurgery include initial technology descriptions, multicenter studies with large numbers of patients, randomized clinical trials and reports that provide dose prescription guidelines. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Publication Speed, Reporting Metrics, and Citation Impact of Cardiovascular Trials Supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David; Cooper-Arnold, Katharine; Lauer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously demonstrated that cardiovascular (CV) trials funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) were more likely to be published in a timely manner and receive high raw citation counts if they focused on clinical endpoints. We did not examine the metrics of trial reports, and our citation measures were limited by failure to account for topic-related citation behaviors. Methods and Results Of 244 CV trials completed between 2000 and 2011, we identified 184 whose main results were published by August 20, 2014. One investigator who was blinded to rapidity of publication and citation data read each publication and characterized it according to modified Delphi criteria. There were 46 trials (25%) that had Delphi scores of 8 or 9 (of a possible 9); these trials published faster (median time from trial completion to publication, 12.6 [interquartile range {IQR}, 6.7 to 23.3] vs. 21.8 [IQR, 12.1 to 34.9] months; Pcitation impact (median citation percentile for topic and date of publication, with 0 best and 100 worst, 1.92 [IQR, 0.64 to 7.83] vs. 8.41 [IQR, 1.80 to 24.75]; P=0.002). By random forest regression, we found that the 3 most important predictors of normalized citation percentile values were total costs, intention-to-treat analyses (as a modified Delphi quality measure), and focus on clinical (not surrogate) endpoints. Conclusions NHLBI CV trials were more likely to publish results quickly and yield higher topic-normalized citation impact if they reported results according to well-defined metrics, along with focus on clinical endpoints. PMID:26231845

  17. Level of evidence and citation index in current neurosurgical publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothoerl, Ralf D; Klier, Joerg; Woertgen, Chris; Brawanski, A

    2003-10-01

    Systematic clinical reviews or meta-analyses offer scientifically valid sources of clinical information. They provide information in a concise form and can contribute to clinical quality management. Such studies, however, are only able to reflect the quality of the articles reviewed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality of the neurosurgical literature according to evidence-based medicine (EBM) standards. We reviewed all articles published in 1999 in three major neurosurgical journals. These articles were subdivided according to the level of evidence (LOE) scale (from 0 to V), article type, and citation index. Nine hundred eighty-two articles were published in these journals in 1999. Of these, 346 (35%) were clinical studies, 287 (29%) case reports, 153 (16%) experimental studies, 122 (13%) technical reports, and 74 ( 8%) other types. Subdivision according to LOE was: Ia 0.3%, Ib 2.5%, IIa 0.2%, IIb 4.3%, IIc 9.5%, IIIa 0.1%, IIIb 3.9%, IV 22.4%, and V 1.6%. Fifty-five percent of all published studies were case reports, experimental studies, technical reports, or others and thus could not be subdivided according to the EBM standards. The number of articles published with high LOE seems to be rather low in 1999. If these data reflect overall publication practice, it seems unclear whether enough articles with high LOE are published to propose scientifically sound clinical treatment suggestions according to EBM standards.

  18. Bibliometric Approach to Research Assessment: Publication Count, Citation Count, & Author Rank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang, Kiduk

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigated how bibliometric indicators such as publication count and citation count affect the assessment of research performance by computing various bibliometric scores of the works of Korean LIS faculty members and comparing the rankings by those scores. For the study data, we used the publication and citation data of 159 tenure-track faculty members of Library and Information Science departments in 34 Korean universities. The study results showed correlation between publication count and citation count for authors with many publications but the opposite evidence for authors with few publications. The study results suggest that as authors publish more and more work, citations to their work tend to increase along with publication count. However, for junior faculty members who have not yet accumulated enough publications, citations to their work are of great importance in assessing their research performance. The study data also showed that there are marked differences in the magnitude of citations between papers published in Korean journals and papers published in international journals.

  19. Quantitative Evaluation of Gender Bias in Astronomical Publications from Citation Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Caplar, Neven; Birrer, Simon

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the role of first (leading) author gender on the number of citations that a paper receives, on the publishing frequency and on the self-citing tendency. We consider a complete sample of over 200,000 publications from 1950 to 2015 from five major astronomy journals. We determine the gender of the first author for over 70% of all publications. The fraction of papers which have a female first author has increased from less than 5% in the 1960s to about 25% today. We find that the increase of the fraction of papers authored by females is slowest in the most prestigious journals such as Science and Nature. Furthermore, female authors write 19$\\pm$7% fewer papers in seven years following their first paper than their male colleagues. At all times papers with male first authors receive more citations than papers with female first authors. This difference has been decreasing with time and amounts to $\\sim$6% measured over the last 30 years. To account for the fact that the properties of female and male firs...

  20. What is generated and what is used: a description of public health research output and citation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Luke; Milat, Andrew J; Lecathelinais, Christophe; Sanson-Fisher, Rob W; Carey, Mariko L; Bryant, Jamie; Waller, Amy; Wiggers, John; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Lin Yoong, Sze

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this short report was to describe the output and citation rates of public health. Data-based publications and literature reviews from the year 2008, and their 5-year citation rates were extracted from 10 randomly selected public health journals. In total, 86.2% of publications were descriptive/epidemiological studies, 56.8% used cross-sectional (56.8%) designs and 77.8% were classified as research translation stage 2. Reviews and publications describing randomized controlled trials were the most highly cited, but were infrequently published. Strategies to address the discordance between public health research output and research citation may improve the impact of public health research.

  1. Productivity and impact of astronomical facilities: A statistical study of publications and citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, V.; Ceja, J. A.

    2007-11-01

    In calendar years 2001 and 2002, 20 journals of astronomy and astrophysics published 7768 papers that reported or analyzed observations at wavelengths from meter radio to ultrahigh energy gamma rays. In the three calendar years after publication, these papers were cited more than 97 000 times, according to the Science Citation Index/Web of Science data base (the most complete, we believe, available), for an average rate of 4.19 citations per paper per year. We slice these data up several ways, by subject matter, wavelength band, and the telescopes (etc.) used. Most of the results will not surprise: There are hot topics (cosmology, exoplanets) and not so hot topics (binary stars, planetary nebulae). Papers reporting space-based data are cited a bit more often and radio papers a bit less often than optical papers, but multi-wavelength studies do the best. The total number of telescopes involved is surprisingly large, about 330 optical and infrared (mostly ground based but including HST), 109 radio (including COBE and VSOP satellites), and 90 space based (including satellites, interplanetary probes, things carried on rockets, balloons, the Shuttle, and so forth). The superstar telescopes are (mostly) the ones you would expect, though having the most papers does not always go with largest ratios of citations per paper. HST produces the largest number of optical papers, but SDSS the most highly-cited ones, while the VLA is responsible for the largest number of radio papers and the most highly cited (apart from balloon-borne CMB observatories), and among things that fly, the most recent tend to dominate both paper and citation numbers. If you have to choose, it is probably better to opt for a small telescope on a well-supported site than a larger one with less support, and service to the community, in the form of catalogues and mission definitions, is rewarded, at least in citation counts, if not always in other ways. A few comparisons are made with other studies. The

  2. [The citation analysis of the publications in Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine, 2000-2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Xiang-zheng; Xue, Ai-hua; You, Su-ning; Liu, Qun; Zhou, Pei-zhen

    2008-06-01

    To carry out the citation analysis of publications in Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine (CJPM) among the preventive medicine authors and analyze the impact of this magazine in preventive medicine domain. Using Chinese scientific periodical literature evaluation and statistical analysis system (V1.0), the citation status of all CJPM publications in 2000-2005 was analyzed, the analysis covered 21 columns, including the review, editorial and original article, the data were collected up to November, 2007. From 2000 to 2005, CJPM had more than 30 columns and carried 1196 articles and 92. 89% (1111/1196) articles were from 21 main columns. During 2003 to 2005, the impact factors of CJPM were 0. 897, 1.011 and 0. 891 respectively. Among 21 main columns, the citation frequency of six columns including original article, editorial, review, courses, discussion and case report were higher than 80%. In five columns (original article, editorial, report, review and academic trends), the average citation frequency of individual articles was more than 4 times. The citation frequency of 20 authors was higher than 20 times and these authors were from medical schools, teaching hospitals, centers of diseases control and the research institutes. The individual citation frequency of 17 articles was more than 20 times and the individual citation frequency of three articles was more than 50 times. 34.9% of the citations of the 2000-2005 CJPM articles were from the top 20 journals, and the self-citation rate was 4. 85%. The publications in Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine are most frequently cited, which indicated that those publications have high quality, this journal has a great effect in preventive medicine field of China.

  3. Personal Publications Lists Serve as a Reliable Calibration Parameter to Compare Coverage in Academic Citation Databases with Scientific Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Hughes

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Hilbert, F., Barth, J., Gremm, J., Gros, D., Haiter, J., Henkel, M., Reinhardt, W., & Stock, W.G. (2015. Coverage of academic citation databases compared with coverage of scientific social media: personal publication lists as calibration parameters. Online Information Review 39(2: 255-264. http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/OIR-07-2014-0159 Objective – The purpose of this study was to explore coverage rates of information science publications in academic citation databases and scientific social media using a new method of personal publication lists as a calibration parameter. The research questions were: How many publications are covered in different databases, which has the best coverage, and what institutions are represented and how does the language of the publication play a role? Design – Bibliometric analysis. Setting – Academic citation databases (Web of Science, Scopus, Google Scholar and scientific social media (Mendeley, CiteULike, Bibsonomy. Subjects – 1,017 library and information science publications produced by 76 information scientists at 5 German-speaking universities in Germany and Austria. Methods – Only documents which were published between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2012 were included. In that time the 76 information scientists had produced 1,017 documents. The information scientists confirmed that their publication lists were complete and these served as the calibration parameter for the study. The citations from the publication lists were searched in three academic databases: Google Scholar, Web of Science (WoS, and Scopus; as well as three social media citation sites: Mendeley, CiteULike, and BibSonomy and the results were compared. The publications were searched for by author name and words from the title. Main results – None of the databases investigated had 100% coverage. In the academic databases, Google Scholar had the highest amount of coverage with an average of 63%, Scopus an average of 31%, and

  4. Lens or Prism? Patent Citations as a Measure of Knowledge Flows from Public Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, Michael; Cohen, Wesley M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper assesses the validity and accuracy of firms’ backward patent citations as a measure of knowledge flows from public research by employing a newly constructed dataset that matches patents to survey data at the level of the R&D lab. Using survey-based measures of the dimensions of knowledge flows, we identify sources of systematic measurement error associated with backward citations to both patent and nonpatent references. We find that patent citations reflect the codified knowledge flows from public research, but they appear to miss knowledge flows that are more private and contract-based in nature, as well as those used in firm basic research. We also find that firms’ patenting and citing strategies affect patent citations, making citations less indicative of knowledge flows. In addition, an illustrative analysis examining the magnitude and direction of measurement error bias suggests that measuring knowledge flows with patent citations can lead to substantial underestimation of the effect of public research on firms’ innovative performance. Throughout our analyses we find that nonpatent references (e.g., journals, conferences, etc.), not the more commonly used patent references, are a better measure of knowledge originating from public research. PMID:24470690

  5. Publication productivity and citation analysis of the Medical Journal of Malaysia: 2004 - 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanni, S A; Zainab, A N

    2012-02-01

    We analysed 580 articles (original articles only) published in Medical Journal of Malaysia between 2004 and 2008, the resources referenced by the articles and the citations and impact received. Our aim was to examine article and author productivity, the age of references used and impact of the journal. Publication data was obtained from MyAIS database and Google Scholar provided the citation data. From the 580 articles analyzed, contributors mainly come from the hospitals, universities and clinics. Contributions from foreign authors are low. The useful lives of references cited were between 3 to 11 years. ISI derived Impact factor for MJM ranged between 0.378 to 0.616. Journal self-citation is low. Out of the 580 sampled articles, 76.8% have been cited at least once over the 5 years and the ratio of total publications to citations is 1: 2.6.

  6. Turkish Publications in Science Citation Index and Citation Index-Expanded Indexed Journals in the Field of Anaesthesiology: A Bibliographic Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbilgin, Şule; Hancı, Volkan

    2017-02-01

    Our study aimed to assess Turkish publications in Science Citation Index (SCI) and Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-E) indexed journals in the field of 'anaesthesiology'. Journals related to 'anaesthesiology' in the Science Citation Index-Expanded database of 'Thomson Reuter Web of Science' were searched. The search engine of Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science (WoS) was used in the advanced mode by typing 'IS=ISSN number' to identify publications in the journal. By typing 'IS=ISSN number AND CU=Turkey', Turkish papers on anaesthesiology were found. If Turkish and non-Turkish authors had collaborated, the article was included in the search when the corresponding author had provided a Turkey-based address. The catalogue information and statistics were used to determine Turkish publications as the percentage of total publications and the annual mean number of Turkish publications. In WoS, 'SU=anesthesiology' was used to determine the number, country, year and topic distributions of publications from 1975 to date and within the last 10 years. The citation numbers and h-indices were determined based on the country for publications within the last 10 years. From 1975 to the early 2000s Turkey was 20(th) in the list of countries with highest number of publications on anaesthesiology, however in the last 10 years Turkey moved up to 18(th) place. Its mean citation number has been 4.64, and it remains the 2(nd) lowest country pertaining to citations among the 22 countries with the most number of publications. According to the percentage of publications in the field of anaesthesiology, the journals with highest rate of Turkish publications were Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia, European Journal of Anaesthesiology and Journal of Anesthesia. In the field of anaesthesiology, the highest number of articles from Turkey was published in Revista Brasileira de Anestesiologia, European Journal of Anaesthesiology and Journal of Anesthesia. The mean

  7. First version of a categorization of arguments for counting methods for publication and citation indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gauffriau, Marianne

    2016-01-01

    in four groups which can be used to describe and discuss how bibliometric studies with publication and citation indicators argue for counting methods. The first group focuses on arguments related to what an indicator measures, the next group on avoiding double counting of publications and/or citations......Due to the increasing number of authors per publication, a change in counting method for a publication or citation indicator will often change the result of the indicator. Therefore it is important to know why a specific counting method has been applied. I have analyzed arguments for counting...... methods in a sample of 13 recent bibliometric studies and compared the result with discussions of arguments for counting methods in three older studies. Based on the arguments in the studies I formed argument categories which were grouped based on the underlying logics of the arguments. It resulted...

  8. Externalities and article citations: experience of a national public health journal (Gaceta Sanitaria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Álvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Domínguez-Berjón, M Felicitas; Fernández, Esteve; García, Ana M; Borrell, Carme

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to analyze the determinants of citations such as publication year, article type, article topic, article selected for a press release, number of articles previously published by the corresponding author, and publication language in a Spanish journal of public health. Observational study including all articles published in Gaceta Sanitaria during 2007-2011. We retrieved the number of citations from the ISI Web of Knowledge database in June 2013 and also information on other variables such as number of articles published by the corresponding author in the previous 5 years (searched through PubMed), selection for a press release, publication language, article type and topic, and others. We included 542 articles. Of these, 62.5% were cited in the period considered. We observed an increased odds ratio of citations for articles selected for a press release and also with the number of articles published previously by the corresponding author. Articles published in English do not seem to increase their citations. Certain externalities such as number of articles published by the corresponding author and being selected for a press release seem to influence the number of citations in national journals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clustering scientific publications based on citation relations: A systematic comparison of different methods

    CERN Document Server

    Šubelj, Lovro; Waltman, Ludo

    2015-01-01

    Clustering methods are applied regularly in the bibliometric literature to identify research areas or scientific fields. These methods are for instance used to group publications into clusters based on their relations in a citation network. In the network science literature, many clustering methods, often referred to as graph partitioning or community detection techniques, have been developed. Focusing on the problem of clustering the publications in a citation network, we present a systematic comparison of the performance of a large number of these clustering methods. Using a number of different citation networks, some of them relatively small and others very large, we extensively study the statistical properties of the results provided by different methods. In addition, we also carry out an expert-based assessment of the results produced by different methods. The expert-based assessment focuses on publications in the field of scientometrics. Our findings seem to indicate that there is a trade-off between di...

  10. DOIs for Data: Progress in Data Citation and Publication in the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaghan, S.; Murphy, F.; Tedds, J.; Allan, R.

    2012-12-01

    Identifiers for data are the bedrock on which data citation and publication rests. These, in their turn, are widely proposed as methods for encouraging researchers to share their datasets, and at the same time receive academic credit for their efforts in producing them. However, neither data citation nor publication can be properly achieved without a method of identifying clearly what is, and what isn't, part of the dataset. Once a dataset becomes part of the scientific record (either through formal data publication or through being cited) then issues such as dataset stability and permanence become vital to address. In the geosciences, several projects in the UK are concentrating on issues of dataset identification, citation and publication. The UK's Natural Environment Research Council's (NERC) Science Information Strategy data citation and publication project is addressing the issue of identifiers for data, stability, transparency, and credit for data producers through data citation. At a data publication level, 2012 has seen the launch of the new Wiley title Geoscience Data Journal and the PREPARDE (Peer Review for Publication & Accreditation of Research Data in the Earth sciences) project, both aiming to encourage data publication by addressing issues such as data paper submission workflows and the scientific peer-review of data. All of these initiatives work with a range of partners including academic institutions, learned societies, data centers and commercial publishers, both nationally and internationally, with a cross-project aim of developing the mechanisms so data can be identified, cited and published with confidence. This involves investigating barriers and drivers to data publishing and sharing, peer review, and re-use of geoscientific datasets, and specifically such topics as dataset requirements for citation, workflows for dataset ingestion into data centers and publishers, procedures and policies for editors, reviewers and authors of data

  11. Citation Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Tove Faber; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2017-01-01

    Citation frequencies are commonly interpreted as measures of quality or impact. Yet, the true nature of citations and their proper interpretation have been the center of a long, but still unresolved discussion in Bibliometrics. A comparison of 67,578 pairs of studies on the same healthcare topic......, with the same publication age (1–15 years) reveals that when one of the studies is being selected for citation, it has on average received about three times as many citations as the other study. However, the average citation-gap between selected or deselected studies narrows slightly over time, which fits...

  12. Identifying Evidence for Public Health Guidance: A Comparison of Citation Searching with Web of Science and Google Scholar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, Paul; Ainsworth, Nicola; Kettle, Rachel; Morgan, Antony

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To examine how effectively forwards citation searching with Web of Science (WOS) or Google Scholar (GS) identified evidence to support public health guidance published by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. Method: Forwards citation searching was performed using GS on a base set of 46 publications and replicated using WOS.…

  13. A bibliographic review of public health dissemination and implementation research output and citation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Luke; Milat, Andrew J; Lecathelinais, Christophe; Skelton, Eliza; Clinton-McHarg, Tara; Williams, Christopher; Wiggers, John; Chai, Li Kheng; Yoong, Sze Lin

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the research output and citation rates (academic impact) of public health dissemination and implementation research according to research design and study type. A cross sectional bibliographic study was undertaken in 2013. All original data-based studies and review articles focusing on dissemination and implementation research that had been published in 10 randomly selected public health journals in 2008 were audited. The electronic database 'Scopus' was used to calculate 5-year citation rates for all included publications. Of the 1648 publications examined, 216 were original data-based research or literature reviews focusing on dissemination and implementation research. Of these 72% were classified as descriptive/epidemiological, 26% were intervention and just 1.9% were measurement research. Cross-sectional studies were the most common study design (47%). Reviews, randomized trials, non-randomized trials and decision/cost-effectiveness studies each represented between 6 and 10% of all output. Systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials and cohort studies were the most frequently cited study designs. The study suggests that publications that had the greatest academic impact (highest citation rates) made up only a small proportion of overall public health dissemination and implementation research output.

  14. Content and Citation Analyses of "Public Relations Review."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Linda P.; Lin, Li-Yun

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes 161 cited and 177 uncited articles published in "Public Relations Review" (1975-93) to determine if 3 independent variables--research methods, type of statistics, and topics--influenced whether or not articles were cited in other research articles. Finds significant differences between quantitative and qualitative research methods but not…

  15. Inspection Citations

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Disclosure of reporting citations provide the public with a rationale for the Agency’s enforcement actions and will also help to inform public and industry...

  16. Clustering Scientific Publications Based on Citation Relations: A Systematic Comparison of Different Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šubelj, Lovro; van Eck, Nees Jan; Waltman, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    Clustering methods are applied regularly in the bibliometric literature to identify research areas or scientific fields. These methods are for instance used to group publications into clusters based on their relations in a citation network. In the network science literature, many clustering methods, often referred to as graph partitioning or community detection techniques, have been developed. Focusing on the problem of clustering the publications in a citation network, we present a systematic comparison of the performance of a large number of these clustering methods. Using a number of different citation networks, some of them relatively small and others very large, we extensively study the statistical properties of the results provided by different methods. In addition, we also carry out an expert-based assessment of the results produced by different methods. The expert-based assessment focuses on publications in the field of scientometrics. Our findings seem to indicate that there is a trade-off between different properties that may be considered desirable for a good clustering of publications. Overall, map equation methods appear to perform best in our analysis, suggesting that these methods deserve more attention from the bibliometric community.

  17. Publication Trends and Citation Impact of Tribology Research in India: A Scientometric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendran, P.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes India's contribution to world tribology research during the period 2001-2012 based on SCOPUS records. India's global publication share, annual output, and its citation impact of Indian contribution, partner countries, leading contributors, leading institutes, and highly cited papers were analyzed. Additionally, a cloud technique is used to map frequently used single words in titles. It is observed that India ranks in the $7^{th}$ position with a global publication share of 3.83% and an annual average growth rate of 25.58% during the period 2001-2012. The citation impact of India's contribution is 6.05 which decreased from 12.74 during 2001-2006 to 4.62 during 2007-2012. 17.4% of India's total research output was published with international collaboration.

  18. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaio, Gianfranco Di; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of citation success among authors who have recently published their work in economic history journals. Besides offering clues about how to improve one's scientific impact, our citation analysis also sheds light on the state of the field of economic history....... Consistent with our expectations, we find that full professors, authors appointed at economics and history departments, and authors working in Anglo-Saxon and German countries are more likely to receive citations than other scholars. Long and co-authored articles are also a factor for citation success. We...... find similar patterns when assessing the same authors' citation success in economics journals. As a novel feature, we demonstrate that the diffusion of research — publication of working papers, as well as conference and workshop presentations — has a first-order positive impact on the citation rate....

  19. An approach for the condensed presentation of intuitive citation impact metrics which remain reliable with very few publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, D.; Tippett, Ch.; Côté, G.; Roberge, G.; Archambault, E.

    2016-07-01

    An approach for presenting citation data in a condensed and intuitive manner which will allow for their reliable interpretation by policy analysts even in cases where the number of peer-reviewed publications produced by a given entity remains small is presented. The approach is described using country level data in Agronomy & Agriculture (2004–2013), an area of specialisation for many developing countries with a small output size. Four citation impact metrics, and a synthesis graph that we call the distributional micro-charts of relative citation counts, are considered in building our “preferred” presentation layout. These metrics include two indicators that have long been used by Science-Metrix in its bibliometric reports, the Average of Relative Citations (ARC) and the percentage of publications in the 10% most cited publications in the database (HCP), as well as two newer metrics, the Median of Relative Citations (MRC) and the Relative Integration Score (RIS). The findings reveal that the proposed approach combining the MRC and HCP with the distributional micro-charts effectively allows to better qualify the citation impact of entities in terms of central location, density of the upper citation tail and overall distribution than Science-Metrix former approach based on the ARC and HCP. This is especially true of cases with small population sizes where a strong presence of outliers (denoted by strong HCP scores) can have a significant effect on the central location of the citation data when estimated with an average. (Author)

  20. Costa Rica publications in the Science Citation Index Expanded: a bibliometric analysis for 1981-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monge-Nájera, Julián; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2012-12-01

    Despite of its small size, the Central American country of Costa Rica is internationally recognized as one of the world leaders in conservation and as the Central American leader in science. There have been no recent studies on the country's scientific production. The objective of this study was to analyze the Costa Rican scientific output as represented in the Science Citation Index Expanded. All documents with "Costa Rica" in the address field from 1981 to 2010 were included (total 6 801 publications). Articles (79%) were more frequent than other types of publication and were mostly in English (83%). Revista de Biología Tropical published the most articles (17%), followed by Toxicon and Turrialba (2.5%). The New England Journal of Medicine had the highest impact factor (53.484) with nine articles. Of 5 343 articles with known institutional address, 63%were internationally collaborative articles (most with the USA) with h index 91 and citation per publication 18. A total of 81% of all articles were inter-institutionally collaborative articles, led by the Universidad de Costa Rica. This reflects research and education agreements among these countries. Universidad de Costa Rica ranked top one in inter-institutionally collaborative articles, the rank of the total inter-institutionally collaborative articles, and the rank of first author articles and corresponding author articles. Studied subjects and journals in our sample are in agreement with dominant science fields and journals in Costa Rica. Articles with the highest citation were published in New England Journal of Medicine. The largest citation of medical articles reflects the general interest and wider readership of this subject. All corresponding and first authors of the high impact articles were not from Costa Rica. In conclusion, the scientific output of Costa Rican authors is strong in the areas related to conservation but the impact is higher for biomedical articles, and Costa Rican authors need to

  1. Costa Rica Publications in the Science Citation Index Expanded:: A bibliometric analysis for 1981-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Monge-Nájera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite of its small size, the Central American country of Costa Rica is internationally recognized as one of the world leaders in conservation and as the Central American leader in science. There have been no recent studies on the country’s scientific production. The objective of this study was to analyze the Costa Rican scientific output as represented in the Science Citation Index Expanded. All documents with “Costa Rica” in the address field from 1981 to 2010 were included (total 6 801 publications. Articles (79% were more frequent than other types of publication and were mostly in English (83%. Revista de Biología Tropical published the most articles (17%, followed by Toxicon and Turrialba (2.5%. The New England Journal of Medicine had the highest impact factor (53.484 with nine articles. Of 5 343 articles with known institutional address, 63%were internationally collaborative articles (most with the USA with h index 91 and citation per publication 18. A total of 81% of all articles were inter-institutionally collaborative articles, led by the Universidad de Costa Rica. This reflects research and education agreements among these countries. Universidad de Costa Rica ranked top one in inter-institutionally collaborative articles, the rank of the total inter-institutionally collaborative articles, and the rank of first author articles and corresponding author articles. Studied subjects and journals in our sample are in agreement with dominant science fields and journals in Costa Rica. Articles with the highest citation were published in New England Journal of Medicine. The largest citation of medical articles reflects the general interest and wider readership of this subject. All corresponding and first authors of the high impact articles were not from Costa Rica. In conclusion, the scientific output of Costa Rican authors is strong in the areas related to conservation but the impact is higher for biomedical articles, and Costa Rican

  2. Publication Metrics of Dental Journals - What is the Role of Self Citations in Determining the Impact Factor of Journals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, Satheesh; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2015-09-01

    The objectives of the present study are to examine the publication metrics of dental journals and to delineate the role of self citations in determining the impact factor of journals. The Journal Citation Reports database was used. All dental journals that had an impact factor assigned for year 2013 were selected. The outcomes were Impact Factor (IF), Eigenfactor™ (EF), article influence score (AIS), and proportion of self-citations to total citations. Independent variables were geographic region of journal and ranking of journal (based on IF). Non-parametric tests were used to examine the associations between outcomes and independent variables. During the year 2013, 82 journals in dentistry had an IF. Mean IF was 1.489 and mean IF without including self-citations was 1.231. Mean EF scores and AIS were .00458 and .5141 respectively. Mean percentage of self cites to total citations for all dental journals was 12.24%. Higher ranking journals were associated with significantly higher EF and AIS. Journals published in USA/Canada or Europe were associated with higher IF and EF compared to those published in other regions. There were no differences in percentages of self citations to total citations either across journal rankings or geographic region. Top ranking journals tend to have higher IFs due to higher EF and AIS rather than by self-citations. Self-citations increase the impact factors of dental journals by 21%. There was no geographic influence in the percentage of self-citations to total citations thus indicating a healthy dental scientific publishing environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Citation of non-English peer review publications – some Chinese examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fung Isaac CH

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Articles published in English language journals with citations of non-English peer reviewed materials are not very common today. However, as epidemiologists are becoming more aware of data and information being readily available and accessible in the non-English literature, the question of whether non-English materials can be cited in English language journals and if so, how should they be cited, has become an increasingly important issue. Bringing together personal insights from the author's familiarity with both the English and Chinese language epidemiological literature and results from a survey on the use of citations of non-English peer reviewed materials across a sample of epidemiology and public health journals, this commentary discusses the different ways authors cite non-English articles in different English language journals and the different methods used by journals to handle non-Latin scripts (e.g. transliteration. This commentary will be useful to both epidemiologists and editors alike.

  4. Citation of non-English peer review publications--some Chinese examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Isaac C H

    2008-09-30

    Articles published in English language journals with citations of non-English peer reviewed materials are not very common today. However, as epidemiologists are becoming more aware of data and information being readily available and accessible in the non-English literature, the question of whether non-English materials can be cited in English language journals and if so, how should they be cited, has become an increasingly important issue. Bringing together personal insights from the author's familiarity with both the English and Chinese language epidemiological literature and results from a survey on the use of citations of non-English peer reviewed materials across a sample of epidemiology and public health journals, this commentary discusses the different ways authors cite non-English articles in different English language journals and the different methods used by journals to handle non-Latin scripts (e.g. transliteration). This commentary will be useful to both epidemiologists and editors alike.

  5. Publication patterns and citation analysis of APJTM during 2008 and June 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Yan; Tan, Bei-Jia; Zou, Zhou; Zhang, Ming-Ming; Song, Rui-Pu; Qu, Shun-Hai; Li, Jing

    2014-08-01

    To draw on data about publication patterns and citation indicators of Asian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine (APJTM) during 2008 and June 2014 in order to know about the current state of the journal. Data used in this study were collected based on publications in APJTM from 2008 to June, 2014. Information including publication issue, type of manuscript, country/region of Corresponding author, funded research paper, and international collaboration were aggregated and analyzed with Excel software. Citation indicators including total cites, average cites of each manuscript, h-index, and impact factors were primarily drawn from Web of Science™ database on June 15, 2014 and changes over the past six and half years were interpreted. The top 10 most cited papers in Web of Science™ database were also analyzed. Number of all submissions has arisen from less than 200 in 2008 to over 1 500 in 2013, manuscript acceptance rate has decreased to be less than 14.00% indicating its improvement in quality over this period of time. Out of the 1 115 publiations, 23.77% were fruits of funded projects or produced by funded co-authors, 87.08% of all publications in APJTM were submited by authors from 10 most contributed countries. During the studied period, each published manuscript in the journal has received an average of 1.05 cites, and at least 10 publications has been cited for more 10 times. Detailed analysis shows APJTM has made great progress over the past six and half years, but authors' originating countries are still disproportionate. Efforts should be made to improve its citation indicators. Copyright © 2014 Hainan Medical College. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Publication patterns and citation analysis ofAPJTM during 2008 and June 2014

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Lei; Bei-Jia Tan; Zhou Zou; Ming-Ming Zhang; Rui-Pu Song; Shun-Hai Qu; Jing Li

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To draw on data about publication patterns and citation indicators ofAsian Pacific Journal of Tropical Medicine(APJTM) during2008 andJune2014 in order to know about the current state of the journal.Methods:Data used in this study were collected based on publications inAPJTM from2008 toJune,2014.Information including publication issue, type of manuscript, country/region of corresponding author, funded research paper, and international collaboration were aggregated and analyzed withExcel software.Citation indicators including total cites, average cites of each manuscript, h-index, and impact factors were primarily drawn fromWeb ofScienceTM database onJune15,2014 and changes over the past six and half years were interpreted.The top10 most cited papers inWeb ofScienceTM database were also analyzed. Results:Number of all submissions has arisen from less than200 in2008 to over1500 in2013, manuscript acceptance rate has decreased to be less than14.00% indicating its improvement in quality over this period of time.Out of the1115 publiations,23.77% were fruits of funded projects or produced by funded co-authors,87.08% of all publications inAPJTM were submited by authors from10 most contributed countries.During the studied period, each published manuscript in the journal has received an average of1.05 cites, and at least10 publications has been cited for more 10 times.Conclusion:Detailed analysis showsAPJTM has made great progress over the past six and half years, but authors’ originating countries are still disproportionate.Efforts should be made to improve its citation indicators.

  7. Quantitative evaluation of gender bias in astronomical publications from citation counts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplar, Neven; Tacchella, Sandro; Birrer, Simon

    2017-06-01

    Numerous studies across different research fields have shown that both male and female referees consistently give higher scores to work done by men than to identical work done by women 1,2,3 . In addition, women are under-represented in prestigious publications and authorship positions 4,5 and women receive ~10% fewer citations 6,7 . In astronomy, similar biases have been measured in conference participation 8,9 and success rates for telescope proposals 10,11 . Even though the number of doctorate degrees awarded to women is constantly increasing, women still tend to be under-represented in faculty positions 12 . Spurred by these findings, we measure the role of gender in the number of citations that papers receive in astronomy. To account for the fact that the properties of papers written by men and women differ intrinsically, we use a random forest algorithm to control for the non-gender-specific properties of these papers. Here we show that papers authored by women receive 10.4 ± 0.9% fewer citations than would be expected if the papers with the same non-gender-specific properties were written by men.

  8. Persistent Identifiers in the Publication and Citation of Scientific Data - Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klump, J.; Brase, J.; Diepenbroek, M.; Grobe, H.; Hildenbrand, B.; Hoeck, H.; Lautenschlager, M.; Sens, I.

    2008-12-01

    In the last decade data driven research has become a third pillar of scientific work alongside with theoretical reasoning and experiment. Greatly increased computing power and storage, together with web services and other electronic resources have facilitated a quantum leap in new research based on the analysis of great amounts of data. However, traditional scientific communication only slowly changes to new media other than an emulation of paper. This leaves many data inaccessible and, in the long run exposes valuable data to the risk of loss. To improve access to data and to create incentives for scientists to make their data accessible, a group of German data centres initiated the project "Publication and Citation of Scientific Data" (STD-DOI) which was funded by the German Science Foundation DFG for the periods 2003-2005 and 2006-2008. In this project the German National Library for Science and Technology (TIB Hannover), together with the German Research Centre for Geoscience (GFZ Potsdam), Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) Bremerhaven, University of Bremen, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, and the DLR German Remote Sensing Data Center set up the first system to assign DOIs to data sets and for their publication. A prerequisite for data to be made available is a proper citation. This means that all fields mandatory for a bibliographic citation are included. In addition, a mechanism is needed that ensures that the location of the referenced data on the internet can be resolved at any time. In the past, this was a problematic issue because URLs are short-lived, many becoming invalid after only a few months. Data publication on the internet therefore needs a system of reliable pointers to a web publication to make these publications citeable. To achieve this persistence of identifiers for their conventional publications many scientific publishers use Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). The identifier is resolved through

  9. 40 CFR 152.94 - Citation of a public literature study or study generated at government expense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Citation of a public literature study... literature study or study generated at government expense. (a) An applicant may demonstrate compliance for a... the public literature. (2) A valid study generated by, or at the expense of, any government...

  10. Productivity and impact of astronomical facilities: Three years of publications and citation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trimble, V.; Ceja, J. A.

    2008-07-01

    In calendar years 2001 to 2003, 20 journals of astronomy and astrophysics published 11 831 papers that reported or analyzed observations at wavelengths from meter radio to ultrahigh energy gamma rays. These were cited 161 556 times in the three calendar years following publication, according to the Science Citation Index/Web of Science, for an average of 13.66 citations per paper or 4.55 citations per paper per year. We examine these numbers as a function of subject matter, wavelength bands, journals, and individual telescopes used and explore a small subset of possible temporal trends, anomalies, and sources of uncertainty, including blockbuster journals, papers and facilities. Many of the results resemble qualitative expectations. There are hot topics (cosmology, exoplanets) and not so hot topics (binary stars, planetary nebulae). Papers reporting data from space are cited a bit more often, and ground-based radio papers a bit less often, than optical papers, while multi-wavelength ones do noticeably better than average. The total number of telescopes involved is surprisingly large, approximately 350 optical and infrared (mostly ground-based but including HST because of its long life), 144 radio facilities on about 100 sites (including WMAP and COBE and a few balloon-borne CMB experiments), and 105 space-based detectors (including satellites, interplanetary probes, things carried on rockets, balloons, the Shuttle, and so forth). The outstanding telescopes are generally both stable with time and predictable. HST and the VLA are responsible for the largest number of optical and radio papers respectively, but the most frequently cited optical papers come from SDSS (by a wide margin), Keck, and the AAT, while the JCMT, Parkes and (especially) CMB observatories lead the radio brigade. Among things that fly, leadership changes more quickly, as missions are launched, vigorously exploited, and turned off, sometimes achieving geostationary, suboceanic orbits. If you have a

  11. Making Data a First Class Scientific Output: Data Citation and Publication by NERC’s Environmental Data Centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Callaghan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The NERC Science Information Strategy Data Citation and Publication project aims to develop and formalise a method for formally citing and publishing the datasets stored in its environmental data centres. It is believed that this will act as an incentive for scientists, who often invest a great deal of effort in creating datasets, to submit their data to a suitable data repository where it can properly be archived and curated. Data citation and publication will also provide a mechanism for data producers to receive credit for their work, thereby encouraging them to share their data more freely.

  12. Proposal for a data publication and citation framework when sharing biomedical research resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shan; Ganzinger, Matthias; Hurdle, John F; Knaup, Petra

    2013-01-01

    Research data and biospecimen repositories are valuable resources for biomedical investigators. Sharing these resources has great potential benefits including efficient use of resources, avoiding duplicate experiments, gathering adequate sample sizes, and promoting collaboration. However, concerns from data producers about difficulties of getting proper acknowledgement for their data contributions are increasingly becoming obstacles for efficient and large-scale data sharing in reality. In this research project we analyzed the inadequacy of current policy-based solution for promoting data sharing. The recommendations in this paper emphasize data publication and citation. This project aims to promote the acknowledgement of data contributors with realizable informatics tools that augment informal policy-level strategies, and do so in a way that promotes data sharing.

  13. Publish (in English) or perish: The effect on citation rate of using languages other than English in scientific publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bitetti, Mario S; Ferreras, Julián A

    2017-02-01

    There is a tendency for non-native English scientists to publish exclusively in English, assuming that this will make their articles more visible and cited. We tested this hypothesis by comparing the effect of language on the number of citations of articles published in six natural sciences journals from five countries that publish papers in either English or other languages. We analyzed the effect of language (English vs non-English), paper length, and year of publication on the number of citations. The articles published in English have a higher number of citations than those published in other languages, when the effect of journal, year of publication, and paper length are statistically controlled. This may result because English articles are accessible to a larger audience, but other factors need to be explored. Universities and scientific institutions should be aware of this situation and improve the teaching of English, especially in the natural sciences.

  14. Visibility and Citation Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ale Ebrahim, Nader; Salehi, Hadi; Embi, Mohamed Amin; Habibi Tanha, Farid

    2014-01-01

    The number of publications is the first criteria for assessing a researcher output. However, the main measurement for author productivity is the number of citations, and citations are typically related to the paper's visibility. In this paper, the relationship between article visibility and the number of citations is investigated. A case study of two researchers who are using publication marketing tools confirmed that the article visibility will greatly improve the citation impact. Some st...

  15. Visibility and Citation Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Ale Ebrahim, Nader

    2014-01-01

    The number of publications is the first criteria for assessing a researcher output. However, the main measurement for author productivity is the number of citations, and citations are typically related to the paper's visibility. In this paper, the relationship between article visibility and the number of citations is investigated. A case study of two researchers who are using publication marketing tools confirmed that the article visibility will greatly improve the citation impact. Some s...

  16. Visibility and Citation Impact

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Amin Embi; Seyed Mohammad Motahar; Nader Ale Ebrahim نادر آل ابراهیم; Hossein gholizadeh; hossein gholizadeh

    2017-01-01

    The number of publications is the first criteria for assessing a researcher output. However, the main measurement for author productivity is the number of citations, and citations are typically related to the paper's visibility. In this paper, the relationship between article visibility and the number of citations is investigated. A case study of two researchers who are using publication marketing tools confirmed that the article visibility will greatly improve the citation impact. Some strat...

  17. The rate of growth in scientific publication and the decline in coverage provided by Science Citation Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Peder Olesen; von Ins, Markus

    2010-09-01

    The growth rate of scientific publication has been studied from 1907 to 2007 using available data from a number of literature databases, including Science Citation Index (SCI) and Social Sciences Citation Index (SSCI). Traditional scientific publishing, that is publication in peer-reviewed journals, is still increasing although there are big differences between fields. There are no indications that the growth rate has decreased in the last 50 years. At the same time publication using new channels, for example conference proceedings, open archives and home pages, is growing fast. The growth rate for SCI up to 2007 is smaller than for comparable databases. This means that SCI was covering a decreasing part of the traditional scientific literature. There are also clear indications that the coverage by SCI is especially low in some of the scientific areas with the highest growth rate, including computer science and engineering sciences. The role of conference proceedings, open access archives and publications published on the net is increasing, especially in scientific fields with high growth rates, but this has only partially been reflected in the databases. The new publication channels challenge the use of the big databases in measurements of scientific productivity or output and of the growth rate of science. Because of the declining coverage and this challenge it is problematic that SCI has been used and is used as the dominant source for science indicators based on publication and citation numbers. The limited data available for social sciences show that the growth rate in SSCI was remarkably low and indicate that the coverage by SSCI was declining over time. National Science Indicators from Thomson Reuters is based solely on SCI, SSCI and Arts and Humanities Citation Index (AHCI). Therefore the declining coverage of the citation databases problematizes the use of this source.

  18. Data2Paper: A stakeholder-driven solution to data publication and citation challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Fiona; Jefferies, Neil; Ingraham, Thomas; Murray, Hollydawn; Ranganathan, Anusha

    2017-04-01

    Data, and especially open data, are valuable to the community but can also be valuable to the researcher. Data papers are a clear and open way to publicize and contextualize your data in a way that is citable and aids both reproducibility and efficiency in scholarly endeavour. However, this is not yet a format that is well understood or proliferating amongst the mainstream research community. Part of the Jisc Data Spring Initiative, a team of stakeholders (publishers, data repository managers, coders) have been developing a simple 'one-click' process where data, metadata and methods detail are transferred from a data repository (via a SWORD-based API and a cloud-based helper app based on the Fedora/Hydra platform) to a relevant publisher platform for publication as a data paper. Relying on automated processes: using ORCIDs to authenticate and pre-populate article templates and building on the DOI infrastructure to encourage provenance and citation, the app seeks to drive the deposit of data in repositories and encourage the growth of data papers by simplifying the process through the removal of redundant metadata entry and streamlining publisher submissions into a single consistent workflow. This poster will explain the underlying rationale and evidence gathering, development, partnerships, governance and other progress that this project has so far achieved. It will outline some key learning opportunities, challenges and drivers and explore the next steps.

  19. A complete public archive for the Einstein IPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfand, David J.

    1995-01-01

    This report documents progress made in the period 24 Sept. 1993 - 23 Sept. 1995 on the project described in our proposal 'A Complete Public Archive for the Einstein IPC' which was approved under the Astrophysics Data Program in 1992. We have completed most of the principal objectives of the original proposal; a NFE was recently approved so that costs for publications in press can be covered and we can complete the public record for the Einstein IPC database.

  20. Costa Rica Publications in the Science Citation Index Expanded:: A bibliometric analysis for 1981-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Monge-Nájera

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite of its small size, the Central American country of Costa Rica is internationally recognized as one of the world leaders in conservation and as the Central American leader in science. There have been no recent studies on the country’s scientific production. The objective of this study was to analyze the Costa Rican scientific output as represented in the Science Citation Index Expanded. All documents with “Costa Rica” in the address field from 1981 to 2010 were included (total 6 801 publications. Articles (79% were more frequent than other types of publication and were mostly in English (83%. Revista de Biología Tropical published the most articles (17%, followed by Toxicon and Turrialba (2.5%. The New England Journal of Medicine had the highest impact factor (53.484 with nine articles. Of 5 343 articles with known institutional address, 63%were internationally collaborative articles (most with the USA with h index 91 and citation per publication 18. A total of 81% of all articles were inter-institutionally collaborative articles, led by the Universidad de Costa Rica. This reflects research and education agreements among these countries. Universidad de Costa Rica ranked top one in inter-institutionally collaborative articles, the rank of the total inter-institutionally collaborative articles, and the rank of first author articles and corresponding author articles. Studied subjects and journals in our sample are in agreement with dominant science fields and journals in Costa Rica. Articles with the highest citation were published in New England Journal of Medicine. The largest citation of medical articles reflects the general interest and wider readership of this subject. All corresponding and first authors of the high impact articles were not from Costa Rica. In conclusion, the scientific output of Costa Rican authors is strong in the areas related to conservation but the impact is higher for biomedical articles, and Costa Rican

  1. The assessment of science: the relative merits of post-publication review, the impact factor, and the number of citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyre-Walker, Adam; Stoletzki, Nina

    2013-10-01

    The assessment of scientific publications is an integral part of the scientific process. Here we investigate three methods of assessing the merit of a scientific paper: subjective post-publication peer review, the number of citations gained by a paper, and the impact factor of the journal in which the article was published. We investigate these methods using two datasets in which subjective post-publication assessments of scientific publications have been made by experts. We find that there are moderate, but statistically significant, correlations between assessor scores, when two assessors have rated the same paper, and between assessor score and the number of citations a paper accrues. However, we show that assessor score depends strongly on the journal in which the paper is published, and that assessors tend to over-rate papers published in journals with high impact factors. If we control for this bias, we find that the correlation between assessor scores and between assessor score and the number of citations is weak, suggesting that scientists have little ability to judge either the intrinsic merit of a paper or its likely impact. We also show that the number of citations a paper receives is an extremely error-prone measure of scientific merit. Finally, we argue that the impact factor is likely to be a poor measure of merit, since it depends on subjective assessment. We conclude that the three measures of scientific merit considered here are poor; in particular subjective assessments are an error-prone, biased, and expensive method by which to assess merit. We argue that the impact factor may be the most satisfactory of the methods we have considered, since it is a form of pre-publication review. However, we emphasise that it is likely to be a very error-prone measure of merit that is qualitative, not quantitative.

  2. Online Research Output Submission System as a mechanism to influence publication citations: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reetha Nundulall

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Higher Education Institutions (HEIs need to ensure that the education provided meets the student’s and employer’s requirements, for today and the future. However, in addition to the challenges of teaching and learning, internationalisation, globalisation and world university rankings are rearing their heads thus increasing the demands made on many HEIs.Objective: One of the ways in which HEIs can make their mark is through world university rankings. This may be achieved by exposing more information on new and innovative research knowledge to the broader community in the global market via research publications that attract citations on open access platforms, hence influencing the university’s ranking. For this purpose and intent, a ‘simple’ and ‘easy-to-use’ online web tool was developed at a HEI. The aim was to have research publications submitted via the Online Research Output Submission System (OROSS tool, screened and deposited in the institution’s open access database.Method: Training was provided to the relevant participants and a survey was conducted to ascertain the participants’ perceptions about the utilisation of the OROSS tool and the training provided.Conclusion: This article reflects on the pilot phase of a longitudinal study. Results of an evaluation conducted by the researcher of the OROSS application from a user perspective (process are highlighted. In general, users rated OROSS favourably in terms of it being a useful, simple and easy-to-use web-based tool. The findings of this study may assist University of Johannesburg’s executive management in deciding the fate of the OROSS tool for future use.

  3. CWTS crown indicator measures citation impact of a research group's publication oeuvre

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The article "Caveats for the journal and field normalizations in the CWTS (`Leiden') evaluations of research performance", published by Tobias Opthof and Loet Leydesdorff (arXiv:1002.2769) deals with a subject as important as the application of so called field normalized indicators of citation impact in the assessment of research performance of individual researchers and research groups. Field normalization aims to account for differences in citation practices across scientific-scholarly subj...

  4. [Scientific publications of Costa Rica in Science Citation Index bibliometric analysis of the period 1999-2001].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomonte, Bruno; Ainsworth, Shirley

    2002-01-01

    This study analyzed the publications of authors from Costa Rican institutions that were included in the Science Citation Index (SCI) during 1999-2001. Out of the 722 references detected, distributed in 328 journals, 90.7% corresponded to original research articles. The total productivity figures showed a moderately increasing trend, both in absolute and population-adjusted terms, in concordance with previous data recorded for the period 1980-1998. The contribution of Revista de Biología Tropical to these figures corresponded to 10.0%, 8.9%, and 19.1%, for the years 1999, 2000, and 2001, respectively. The subject distribution of articles followed a similar pattern to that described for 1980-1998, with a predominance of biomedical (33.3%) and biological (27.5%) sciences, followed by agronomical (15.5%) sciences, chemistry (13.6%), physics (5.0%), geological sciences (3.6%), and mathematics (1.5%). Citation analyses for individual publications (up to July 15, 2002) revealed that only 45.2% of the articles had been cited at least once. The ten most cited references were analyzed, varying from 26 to 114 citations. The average citation per article was 2.60, and the average number of authors per article was 2.92. In agreement with data from 1980-1998, the University of Costa Rica appeared as the institution with highest productivity of SCI publications during 1999-2001, with a contribution of 50.0%. The percentage of publications performed without the participation of foreign co-authors showed a change in its decreasing trend of 1980-1998, stabilizing near the range of 25-30% during the period 1999-2001.

  5. Correlation between journal self-citation with impact factor for the scientific publications in humanities published between 2001 and 2007 based on Persian journal citation report generated by Islamic Science Citation database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Mehrad

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available   The present study investigate the correlation between journal citations with impact factor in the humanities scientific journals published for the 2001-2007 period based on the Persian journal citation reports generated by Islamic Science Citation (ISC database. Citation analysis method was used. Findings demonstrated that there is a significant link between impact factor and journal self-citation (r=0.606, s =0.0000. In other words, journals with low impact factors have fewer self-citations, i.e. self-citation has a positive impact on the journal impact factor. There is a negative correlation between impact factor and number of articles in humanities in the period studied. The impact factor does not increase with increase in the number of articles. There is significant correlation between the number of article published and number of self-citation. The higher the number of articles, the higher would be the number of self-citation in the journal. Findings indicated that the rate of journal self-citation in humanities had been downward for the period studied. When screening journals for self-citations, 108 journals had their ranks reduced while 204 journals had their ranking increased. The ranking in 32 journals remained unchanged.

  6. Publication boost in Web of Science journals and its effect on citation distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Šubelj, Lovro

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we show that the dramatic increase in the number of research articles indexed in the Web of Science database impacts the commonly observed distributions of citations within these articles. First, we document that the growing number of physics articles in recent years is due to existing journals publishing more and more papers rather than more new journals coming into being as it happens in computer science. And second, even though the references from the more recent papers generally cover a longer time span, the newer papers are cited more frequently than the older ones if the uneven paper growth is not corrected for. Nevertheless, despite this change in the distribution of citations, the citation behavior of scientists does not seem to have changed.

  7. Citation graph based ranking in Invenio

    CERN Document Server

    Marian, Ludmila; Rajman, Martin; Vesely, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Invenio is the web-based integrated digital library system developed at CERN. Within this framework, we present four types of ranking models based on the citation graph that complement the simple approach based on citation counts: time-dependent citation counts, a relevancy ranking which extends the PageRank model, a time-dependent ranking which combines the freshness of citations with PageRank and a ranking that takes into consideration the external citations. We present our analysis and results obtained on two main data sets: Inspire and CERN Document Server. Our main contributions are: (i) a study of the currently available ranking methods based on the citation graph; (ii) the development of new ranking methods that correct some of the identified limitations of the current methods such as treating all citations of equal importance, not taking time into account or considering the citation graph complete; (iii) a detailed study of the key parameters for these ranking methods. (The original publication is ava...

  8. AGU Publications Continue to Rank High in 2012 Journal Citation Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Mary

    2013-07-01

    AGU journals continue to rank high in the 2012 Journal Citation Reports® (JCR), which was released by Thomson Reuters on 19 June. The impact factor of several AGU journals increased significantly, continuing their trend of the previous 5 years, while others remained consistent with the previous year's ranking.

  9. CITEX: A new citation index to measure the relative importance of authors and papers in scientific publications

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, Arindam

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the performance of researchers and measuring the impact of papers written by scientists is the main objective of citation analysis. Various indices and metrics have been proposed for this. In this paper, we propose a new citation index CITEX, which gives normalized scores to authors and papers to determine their rankings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first citation index which simultaneously assigns scores to both authors and papers. Using these scores, we can get an objective measure of the reputation of an author and the impact of a paper. We model this problem as an iterative computation on a publication graph, whose vertices are authors and papers, and whose edges indicate which author has written which paper. We prove that this iterative computation converges in the limit, by using a powerful theorem from linear algebra. We run this algorithm on several examples, and find that the author and paper scores match closely with what is suggested by our intuition. The algorithm is theor...

  10. CWTS crown indicator measures citation impact of a research group's publication oeuvre

    CERN Document Server

    Moed, Henk F

    2010-01-01

    The article "Caveats for the journal and field normalizations in the CWTS (`Leiden') evaluations of research performance", published by Tobias Opthof and Loet Leydesdorff (arXiv:1002.2769) deals with a subject as important as the application of so called field normalized indicators of citation impact in the assessment of research performance of individual researchers and research groups. Field normalization aims to account for differences in citation practices across scientific-scholarly subject fields. As the primary author of the papers presenting the "Leiden" indicators and of many reports and articles reporting on the outcomes of assessments actually using these measures, I comment on the 3 main issues addressed in the paper by Opthof and Leydesdorff.

  11. Internationality of Publications, Co-Authorship, References and Citations in Brazilian Evolutionary Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirce Maria Santin

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The international dimensions of contemporary science have significantly impacted production and use patterns of scientific knowledge, which, in turn, requires new insights of librarians, publishers and academic institutions. Despite the recognized importance of internationality in science, studies on the internationalization of scientific output are still limited and dedicated exclusively to analyzing of its diffusion and international collaboration. This study analyzes the national/international character of articles, international collaboration, references and citations of Brazilian scientific output in Evolutionary Biology in order to understand the contribution to the internationalization of science in Brazil. Analyses are based on data from the Science Citation Index of Web of Science and include 1450 articles, 60,454 references and 18,059 citing documents. Results reveal similar internationality patterns, with 99.6% of articles published in foreign journals, 90.5% international references, and 88.5% international citations. Despite recording the lowest value among the indicators (51.9%, international collaboration surpasses the national and international average and is an important characteristic in the field in Brazil, contributing to increasing the number of references and the impact of articles. Evolutionary Biology is considered a predominantly international field, whose internationality patterns increase the audience for the studies and provide greater visibility for Brazilian science.

  12. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted

  13. Does size matter? An investigation of how department size and other organizational variables influence on publication productivity and citation impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksnes, D.W.; Rørstad, K.; Piro, F.N.

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigate whether university department size is important in determining publication productivity and citation impact. Drawing on a unique dataset containing a variety of different variables at department levels, we are able to provide a richer picture of the research performance than what typically has been the case in many previous studies. In addition to analyzing the basic question of how size relates to scientific performance, we address whether the funding profile of the departments plays a role, whether the scientific performance is influenced by the composition of the academic personnel (in terms of gender, academic positions, recruiting personnel and the share of doctoral degree holders). The study shows that virtually no size effect can be identified and highly productive and highly cited units are found among both small, medium and large departments. For none of the organizational variables we are able to identify statistically significant relationships in respect to research performance at an overall level. We conclude that the productivity and citation differences at the level of departments cannot generally be explained by the selected variables for department size, funding structure and the composition of scientific personnel. (Author)

  14. How to improve the prediction based on citation impact percentiles for years shortly after the publication date?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bornmann, L.; Leydesdorff, L.; Wang, J.

    2014-01-01

    The findings of Bornmann, Leydesdorff, and Wang (2013b) revealed that the consideration of journal impact improves the prediction of long-term citation impact. This paper further explores the possibility of improving citation impact measurements on the base of a short citation window by the consider

  15. Missing Citations, Bulking Biographies, and Unethical Collaboration: Types of Cheating among Public Relations Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Giselle A.

    2013-01-01

    Students cheat. For the field of public relations, which continually struggles for credibility, the issue of student cheating should be paramount, as the unethical students of today become tomorrow's practitioners. Through a survey of 170 public relations majors, this study examined the importance students place on the Public Relations Society of…

  16. Missing Citations, Bulking Biographies, and Unethical Collaboration: Types of Cheating among Public Relations Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, Giselle A.

    2013-01-01

    Students cheat. For the field of public relations, which continually struggles for credibility, the issue of student cheating should be paramount, as the unethical students of today become tomorrow's practitioners. Through a survey of 170 public relations majors, this study examined the importance students place on the Public Relations Society of…

  17. Cisplatin for small cell lung cancer: Associated publications in Science Citation Index Expanded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan; Nakazawa, Kensuke; Sato, Shinya; Tamura, Tomohiro; Kurishima, Koichi; Satoh, Hiroaki

    2013-02-01

    This study was conducted to explore a bibliometric approach to quantitatively assess current research trends in cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for small cell lung cancer (SCLC), using related literature in the Science Citation Index Expanded database from 1992 to 2011. Articles were analyzed by the scientific output and research performances of countries and institutions. The distribution of key words in the article title and author-selected keywords were used to evaluate research trends. It was observed that the number of articles devoted to cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC did not increase with time. The USA and Japan were the top two countries with the highest number of articles devoted to cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC. In both countries, the number of articles did not increase with time, and a decreasing trend was identified in the USA over the last 10 years. This study demonstrates trends in cisplatin-containing chemotherapy for SCLC. The clinical application of novel drugs is required for successful SCLC treatment.

  18. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Manage-

  19. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez.M

  20. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5th Ed.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.

  1. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez,M.,Kadiyska,Y.,&Suciu,D.,et al.SilkRoute:A framework for publishing

  2. Public, environmental, and occupational health research activity in Arab countries: bibliometric, citation, and collaboration analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sawalha, Ansam F

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze quantity, assess quality, and investigate international collaboration in research from Arab countries in the field of public, environmental and occupational health. Original scientific articles and reviews published from the 22 Arab countries in the category "public, environmental & occupational health" during the study period (1900 - 2012) were screened using the ISI Web of Science database. The total number of original and review research articles published in the category of "public, environmental & occupational health" from Arab countries was 4673. Main area of research was tropical medicine (1862; 39.85%). Egypt with 1200 documents (25.86%) ranked first in quantity and ranked first in quality of publications (h-index = 51). The study identified 2036 (43.57%) documents with international collaboration. Arab countries actively collaborated with authors in Western Europe (22.91%) and North America (21.04%). Most of the documents (79.9%) were published in public health related journals while 21% of the documents were published in journals pertaining to prevention medicine, environmental, occupational health and epidemiology. Research in public, environmental and occupational health in Arab countries is in the rise. Public health research was dominant while environmental and occupation health research was relatively low. International collaboration was a good tool for increasing research quantity and quality.

  3. On the level of coverage and citation of publications by mechanicians of the national academy of sciences of Ukraine in the Scopus database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guz, A. N.; Rushchitsky, J. J.

    2009-11-01

    The paper analyzes the level of coverage and citation of publications by mechanicians of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine (NASU) in the Scopus database. Two groups of mechanicians are considered. One group includes 66 doctors of sciences of the S. P. Timoshenko Institute of Mechanics as representatives of the oldest institute of the NASU. The other group includes 34 members (academicians and corresponding members) of the Division of Mechanics of the NASU as representatives of the authoritative community of mechanicians in Ukraine. The results are presented for each scientist in the form of two indices—the total number of publications accessible in the database as the level of coverage of the scientist's publications in this database and the h-index as the citation level of these publications. This paper may be considered to continue the papers [6-12] published in Prikladnaya Mekhanika (International Applied Mechanics) in 2005-2009

  4. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:

  5. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet

  6. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet

  7. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:

  8. Atıf Analizi: Hacettepe Üniversitesi Kütüphanecilik Bölümü Tezlerinde Atıf yapılan Kaynaklar / Citation Analysis: Sources Cited in Dissertations Completed at Hacettepe University Department of Librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Al

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Bibliometrics deals with the quantitative analysis of some distinct characteristics (i.e. authorship, subject, publication information, and cited sources of publications or documents. The process of scientific communication in various fields can be investigated using bibliometric data obtained in such studies. This paper analyzes the bibliometric features of 100 master’s and doctoral dissertations completed at the Department of Library Science of Hacettepe University between 1974 and 2002. An average dissertation was 171 pages long and contained 70 citations. Doctoral dissertations were twice as long as master’s dissertations (275 pages as opposed to 142 pages. Similarly, the average number of citations in a doctoral dissertation was 2.5 times higher than that of a master’s dissertation. Monographs received half of all citations (7019 while journals did 42%, dissertations and electronic publications 3% each, and “other” documents such as unpublished manuscripts 2%. The Türk Kütüphaneciliği (the journal Turkish Librarianship, Resmî Gazete (Official Gazette, College & Research Libraries, Library Trends, Library Journal, Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Unesco Bulletin for Libraries were among the most frequently cited journals. Articles that appeared in the top four and top 38 journals received 32% and 67% of all citations, respectively. The distribution of citations to foreign journals fits the Bradford’s Law of Scattering. The mean half-life of sources cited in dissertations was 9 years. Sources cited in master’s dissertations were younger than those of doctoral dissertations. The great majority of cited resources in dissertations had single authorship. Findings obtained in this study can be used to evaluate the library collections as well as to develop a core journals list in librarianship.

  9. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    affects citations. In regard to author-specific characteristics, male authors, full professors and authors working economics or history departments, and authors employed in Anglo-Saxon countries, are more likely to get cited than others. As a ‘shortcut' to citation success, we find that research diffusion......This study analyses determinants of citation success among authors publishing in economic history journals. Bibliometric features, like article length and number of authors, are positively correlated with the citation rate up to a certain point. Remarkably, publishing in top-ranked journals hardly...

  10. Completely anonymous multi-recipient signcryption scheme with public verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Liaojun; Li, Huixian; Gao, Lu; Wang, Yumin

    2013-01-01

    Most of the existing multi-recipient signcryption schemes do not take the anonymity of recipients into consideration because the list of the identities of all recipients must be included in the ciphertext as a necessary element for decryption. Although the signer's anonymity has been taken into account in several alternative schemes, these schemes often suffer from the cross-comparison attack and joint conspiracy attack. That is to say, there are few schemes that can achieve complete anonymity for both the signer and the recipient. However, in many practical applications, such as network conference, both the signer's and the recipient's anonymity should be considered carefully. Motivated by these concerns, we propose a novel multi-recipient signcryption scheme with complete anonymity. The new scheme can achieve both the signer's and the recipient's anonymity at the same time. Each recipient can easily judge whether the received ciphertext is from an authorized source, but cannot determine the real identity of the sender, and at the same time, each participant can easily check decryption permission, but cannot determine the identity of any other recipient. The scheme also provides a public verification method which enables anyone to publicly verify the validity of the ciphertext. Analyses show that the proposed scheme is more efficient in terms of computation complexity and ciphertext length and possesses more advantages than existing schemes, which makes it suitable for practical applications. The proposed scheme could be used for network conferences, paid-TV or DVD broadcasting applications to solve the secure communication problem without violating the privacy of each participant.

  11. Completely anonymous multi-recipient signcryption scheme with public verification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liaojun Pang

    Full Text Available Most of the existing multi-recipient signcryption schemes do not take the anonymity of recipients into consideration because the list of the identities of all recipients must be included in the ciphertext as a necessary element for decryption. Although the signer's anonymity has been taken into account in several alternative schemes, these schemes often suffer from the cross-comparison attack and joint conspiracy attack. That is to say, there are few schemes that can achieve complete anonymity for both the signer and the recipient. However, in many practical applications, such as network conference, both the signer's and the recipient's anonymity should be considered carefully. Motivated by these concerns, we propose a novel multi-recipient signcryption scheme with complete anonymity. The new scheme can achieve both the signer's and the recipient's anonymity at the same time. Each recipient can easily judge whether the received ciphertext is from an authorized source, but cannot determine the real identity of the sender, and at the same time, each participant can easily check decryption permission, but cannot determine the identity of any other recipient. The scheme also provides a public verification method which enables anyone to publicly verify the validity of the ciphertext. Analyses show that the proposed scheme is more efficient in terms of computation complexity and ciphertext length and possesses more advantages than existing schemes, which makes it suitable for practical applications. The proposed scheme could be used for network conferences, paid-TV or DVD broadcasting applications to solve the secure communication problem without violating the privacy of each participant.

  12. Transitive Reduction of Citation Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Clough, James R; Loach, Tamar V; Evans, Tim S

    2013-01-01

    Citation networks form directed acyclic graphs. The transitive reduction of such a DAG removes all edges in the graph that are implied by transitivity, but retains the causal structure of the original network. We investigate how the degree distribution, clustering coefficients and relationship between time of publication and degree (representing citation count) are changed under transitive reduction. We show that models which accurately reproduce the degree distribution of a citation network before transitive reduction may not do so afterwards and hence suggest that these models fail to accurately capture the causal structure of the network. We also investigate how the citation count of individual papers is changed and suggest that information about the types of citations a paper receives can be inferred from the number of citations which are retained after transitive reduction. These methods are tested on citation networks from the hep-th and hep-ph sections of the arXiv repository, and all data has been mad...

  13. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    This study analyses determinants of citation success among authors publishing in economic history journals. Bibliometric features, like article length and number of authors, are positively correlated with the citation rate up to a certain point. Remarkably, publishing in top-ranked journals hardl...

  14. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaio, Gianfranco Di; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of citation success among authors who have recently published their work in economic history journals. Besides offering clues about how to improve one's scientific impact, our citation analysis also sheds light on the state of the field of economic history. Co...

  15. Citation Behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Tove Faber; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2016-01-01

    Citation frequencies are commonly interpreted as measures of quality or impact. Yet, the true nature of citations and their proper interpretation have been the center of a long, but still unresolved discussion in Bibliometrics. A comparison of 67,578 pairs of studies on the same healthcare topic,...

  16. Data Publication: Addressing the Issues of Provenance, Attribution, Citation, and Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, L. M.; Chandler, C. L.; Lowry, R. K.; Urban, E. R.; Moncoiffe, G.; Pissierssens, P.; Norton, C.

    2010-12-01

    technology. We will report on the successful implementation of the e-repository model for publication of data associated with the pilot projects and summarize the strategies for meeting the cultural and technical challenges.

  17. Collection, Curation, Citation at Source: Publication@Source 10 Years On

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy Frey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Southampton chemical information group had its genesis in 2001, when we began an e-Science pilot project to investigate structure-property mapping, combinatorial chemistry, and the Grid. CombeChem instigated a range of activities that have since been underway for more than ten years, in many ways matching the expansion of interest in using the Web as a vehicle for collection, curation, dissemination, reuse, and exploitation of scientific data and information. Chemistry has frequently provided the exemplar case studies, notably for the series of projects – funded by Jisc and EPSRC – that investigated the issues associated with the long-term preservation of data to support the scholarly knowledge cycle, such as the eBank UK project. Rapid developments in Internet access and mobile technology have significantly influenced the way researchers view connectivity, data standards, and the increasing importance and power of semantics and the Semantic Web. These technical advances interact strongly with the social dimension and have led to a reconsideration of the responsibilities of researchers for the quality of their research and for satisfying the requirements of modern stakeholders. Such obligations have given rise to discussions about Open Access and Open Data, creating a range of alternatives that are now technically feasible but need to be socially acceptable. Business plans are changing too, but in a strange contradiction, desire can run ahead of what is possible, sensible, and affordable, while lagging behind in imagination of what would be technically possible and potentially game-changing! Taking the chemical sciences as our example and focusing on the curation of research data, we explore from our perspective, ten years back and ten years forward, how far we have been able to re-imagine the data/information value pathway from bench to publication. We assess not only the major advances and changes that have been achieved, but also

  18. Characterizing and modeling citation dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Eom, Young-Ho; 10.1371/journal.pone.0024926

    2011-01-01

    Citation distributions are crucial for the analysis and modeling of the activity of scientists. We investigated bibliometric data of papers published in journals of the American Physical Society, searching for the type of function which best describes the observed citation distributions. We used the goodness of fit with Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics for three classes of functions: log-normal, simple power law and shifted power law. The shifted power law turns out to be the most reliable hypothesis for all citation networks we derived, which correspond to different time spans. We find that citation dynamics is characterized by bursts, usually occurring within a few years since publication of a paper, and the burst size spans several orders of magnitude. We also investigated the microscopic mechanisms for the evolution of citation networks, by proposing a linear preferential attachment with time dependent initial attractiveness. The model successfully reproduces the empirical citation distributions and accounts...

  19. A citation-based, author- and age-normalized, logarithmic index for evaluation of individual researchers independently of publication counts [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey V. Belikov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of citation metrics for evaluation of individual researchers has dramatically increased over the last decade. However, currently existing indices either are based on misleading premises or are cumbersome to implement. This leads to poor assessment of researchers and creates dangerous trends in science, such as overproduction of low quality articles. Here we propose an index (namely, the L-index that does not depend on the number of publications, accounts for different co-author contributions and age of publications, and scales from 0.0 to 9.9. Moreover, it can be calculated with the help of freely available software.

  20. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez,M.,Kadiyska,Y.,&Suciu,D.,et al.SilkRoute:A framework for publishing relational data in XML.ACM Transactions on Database Systems,2002,27(4):438-493.

  1. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez,M.,Kadiyska,Y.,&Suciu,D.,et al.SilkRoute:A framework for publishing relational data in XML.ACM Transactions on Database Systems,2002,27(4):438-493.

  2. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association(5thEd.,2001)and GB/T 7714-2005.The citation of printed word should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article1 Goodrum,A.A.,McCain,K.W.,&Lawrence,S.,et al.Scholarly publishing in the Internet age:A citation analysis of computer science literature.Information Processing and Management,2001,37:661-675.2 Fernandez,M.,Kadiyska,Y.,&Suciu,D.,et al.SilkRoute:A framework for publishing relational data in XML.ACM Transactions on Database Systems,2002,27(4):438-493.

  3. Diet History Questionnaire: Suggested Citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  4. Crossing the Finish Line: Completing College at America's Public Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, William G.; Chingos, Matthew M.; McPherson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The United States has long been a model for accessible, affordable education, as exemplified by the country's public universities. And yet less than 60 percent of the students entering American universities today are graduating. Why is this happening, and what can be done? "Crossing the Finish Line" provides the most detailed exploration…

  5. 77 FR 11575 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Grand Rapids Public Museum has completed an... Rapids Public Museum. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to the...

  6. 78 FR 11678 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Grand Rapids Public Museum, Grand Rapids, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Grand Rapids Public Museum has completed an... Grand Rapids Public Museum. Repatriation of the human remains and associated funerary objects to...

  7. Cahit Arf: Exploring his scientific influence using social network analysis, author co-citation maps and single publication h index1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasar Tonta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cahit Arf (1910-1997, a famous Turkish scientist whose picture is depicted in one of the Turkish banknotes, is a well-known figure in mathematics with his discoveries named after him (e.g., Arf invariant, Arf rings, the Hasse-Arf theorem. Although Arf may not be considered as a prolific scientist in terms of number of papers (he authored a total of 23 papers, his influence on mathematics and related disciplines was profound. As he was active before, during, and after World War II, Arf′s contributions are not properly listed in citation indexes, and thus did not generate many citations even though several papers with "Arf" in their titles appeared in literature. This paper traces influence of Arf in scientific world using citation analysis techniques first. It reviews scientific impact of Arf by analyzing both; the papers authored by Arf and papers whose titles or keywords containing various combinations of "Arf invariant," "Arf rings," and so on. The paper then goes on to study Arf′s contributions using social network analysis (SNA and author co-citation analysis (ACA techniques. CiteSpace and pennant diagrams are used to explore scientific impact of Arf by mapping his cited references derived from Thomson Reuters′ Web of Science (WoS database. The direct and indirect influences of Arf′s highly cited paper on Arf invariant are assessed through ACA and single publication h index, respectively. The paper ends with a discussion of whether data analysis techniques used in this study can be useful to study scientific impact of researchers retrospectively.

  8. Improving Software Citation and Credit

    CERN Document Server

    Allen, Alice; DuPrie, Kimberly; Mink, Jessica; Nemiroff, Robert; Robitaille, Thomas; Shamir, Lior; Shortridge, Keith; Taylor, Mark; Teuben, Peter; Wallin, John

    2015-01-01

    The past year has seen movement on several fronts for improving software citation, including the Center for Open Science's Transparency and Openness Promotion (TOP) Guidelines, the Software Publishing Special Interest Group that was started at January's AAS meeting in Seattle at the request of that organization's Working Group on Astronomical Software, a Sloan-sponsored meeting at GitHub in San Francisco to begin work on a cohesive research software citation-enabling platform, the work of Force11 to "transform and improve" research communication, and WSSSPE's ongoing efforts that include software publication, citation, credit, and sustainability. Brief reports on these efforts were shared at the BoF, after which participants discussed ideas for improving software citation, generating a list of recommendations to the community of software authors, journal publishers, ADS, and research authors. The discussion, recommendations, and feedback will help form recommendations for software citation to those publishers...

  9. 引用文獻分析與引用動機研究 Citation Analysis and Citation Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-yueh Tsay

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available 無Citation analysis has been an important area of informetrics (or bibliometrics for severai decades. It mainly deals with the study of the relationship between citing and cited documents. A number of studies have been done to explore citation analysis and its applications. These studies have different opinions about the nature and the complexities of the citing process. Theories of citation have been debated for decades and can never be complete. By reviewing many empirical studies, this article describes the development and critique of citation analysis. especially focuses on the citation classifications, citation functions, citation concepts and citation motivations.

  10. A reverse engineering approach to the suppression of citation biases reveals universal properties of citation distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Radicchi, Filippo; 10.1371/journal.pone.0033833

    2012-01-01

    The large amount of information contained in bibliographic databases has recently boosted the use of citations, and other indicators based on citation numbers, as tools for the quantitative assessment of scientific research. Citations counts are often interpreted as proxies for the scientific influence of papers, journals, scholars, and institutions. However, a rigorous and scientifically grounded methodology for a correct use of citation counts is still missing. In particular, cross-disciplinary comparisons in terms of raw citation counts systematically favors scientific disciplines with higher citation and publication rates. Here we perform an exhaustive study of the citation patterns of millions of papers, and derive a simple transformation of citation counts able to suppress the disproportionate citation counts among scientific domains. We find that the transformation is well described by a power-law function, and that the parameter values of the transformation are typical features of each scientific disc...

  11. Science and Technology Citation Analysis is Citation Normalization Realistic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Integrating Text Mining and Bibliometrics for Research User Profiling. Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology. 52:13... Bibliometrics : The Use of Publication and Citation Analysis in the Evaluation of Scientific Activity (monograph). NSF C-637. National Science Foundation...Zirkle, 1954]. However, the origins of citation analysis as a widespread bibliometrics tool can be traced to the mid-1950s, with Garfield’s proposal

  12. From Excessive Journal Self-Cites to Citation Stacking: Analysis of Journal Self-Citation Kinetics in Search for Journals, Which Boost Their Scientometric Indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneberg, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Bibliometric indicators increasingly affect careers, funding, and reputation of individuals, their institutions and journals themselves. In contrast to author self-citations, little is known about kinetics of journal self-citations. Here we hypothesized that they may show a generalizable pattern within particular research fields or across multiple fields. We thus analyzed self-cites to 60 journals from three research fields (multidisciplinary sciences, parasitology, and information science). We also hypothesized that the kinetics of journal self-citations and citations received from other journals of the same publisher may differ from foreign citations. We analyzed the journals published the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Nature Publishing Group, and Editura Academiei Române. We found that although the kinetics of journal self-cites is generally faster compared to foreign cites, it shows some field-specific characteristics. Particularly in information science journals, the initial increase in a share of journal self-citations during post-publication year 0 was completely absent. Self-promoting journal self-citations of top-tier journals have rather indirect but negligible direct effects on bibliometric indicators, affecting just the immediacy index and marginally increasing the impact factor itself as long as the affected journals are well established in their fields. In contrast, other forms of journal self-citations and citation stacking may severely affect the impact factor, or other citation-based indices. We identified here a network consisting of three Romanian physics journals Proceedings of the Romanian Academy, Series A, Romanian Journal of Physics, and Romanian Reports in Physics, which displayed low to moderate ratio of journal self-citations, but which multiplied recently their impact factors, and were mutually responsible for 55.9%, 64.7% and 63.3% of citations within the impact factor calculation window to the three journals

  13. From Excessive Journal Self-Cites to Citation Stacking: Analysis of Journal Self-Citation Kinetics in Search for Journals, Which Boost Their Scientometric Indicators.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Heneberg

    Full Text Available Bibliometric indicators increasingly affect careers, funding, and reputation of individuals, their institutions and journals themselves. In contrast to author self-citations, little is known about kinetics of journal self-citations. Here we hypothesized that they may show a generalizable pattern within particular research fields or across multiple fields. We thus analyzed self-cites to 60 journals from three research fields (multidisciplinary sciences, parasitology, and information science. We also hypothesized that the kinetics of journal self-citations and citations received from other journals of the same publisher may differ from foreign citations. We analyzed the journals published the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Nature Publishing Group, and Editura Academiei Române. We found that although the kinetics of journal self-cites is generally faster compared to foreign cites, it shows some field-specific characteristics. Particularly in information science journals, the initial increase in a share of journal self-citations during post-publication year 0 was completely absent. Self-promoting journal self-citations of top-tier journals have rather indirect but negligible direct effects on bibliometric indicators, affecting just the immediacy index and marginally increasing the impact factor itself as long as the affected journals are well established in their fields. In contrast, other forms of journal self-citations and citation stacking may severely affect the impact factor, or other citation-based indices. We identified here a network consisting of three Romanian physics journals Proceedings of the Romanian Academy, Series A, Romanian Journal of Physics, and Romanian Reports in Physics, which displayed low to moderate ratio of journal self-citations, but which multiplied recently their impact factors, and were mutually responsible for 55.9%, 64.7% and 63.3% of citations within the impact factor calculation window to the

  14. The Association between Four Citation Metrics and Peer Rankings of Research Influence of Australian Researchers in Six Fields of Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Gemma Elizabeth; Haynes, Abby; Chapman, Simon; Hall, Wayne D.

    2011-01-01

    Doubt about the relevance, appropriateness and transparency of peer review has promoted the use of citation metrics as a viable adjunct or alternative in the assessment of research impact. It is also commonly acknowledged that research metrics will not replace peer review unless they are shown to correspond with the assessment of peers. This paper evaluates the relationship between researchers' influence as evaluated by their peers and various citation metrics representing different aspects of research output in 6 fields of public health in Australia. For four fields, the results showed a modest positive correlation between different research metrics and peer assessments of research influence. However, for two fields, tobacco and injury, negative or no correlations were found. This suggests a peer understanding of research influence within these fields differed from visibility in the mainstream, peer-reviewed scientific literature. This research therefore recommends the use of both peer review and metrics in a combined approach in assessing research influence. Future research evaluation frameworks intent on incorporating metrics should first analyse each field closely to determine what measures of research influence are valued highly by members of that research community. This will aid the development of comprehensive and relevant frameworks with which to fairly and transparently distribute research funds or approve promotion applications. PMID:21494691

  15. The association between four citation metrics and peer rankings of research influence of Australian researchers in six fields of public health.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Elizabeth Derrick

    Full Text Available Doubt about the relevance, appropriateness and transparency of peer review has promoted the use of citation metrics as a viable adjunct or alternative in the assessment of research impact. It is also commonly acknowledged that research metrics will not replace peer review unless they are shown to correspond with the assessment of peers. This paper evaluates the relationship between researchers' influence as evaluated by their peers and various citation metrics representing different aspects of research output in 6 fields of public health in Australia. For four fields, the results showed a modest positive correlation between different research metrics and peer assessments of research influence. However, for two fields, tobacco and injury, negative or no correlations were found. This suggests a peer understanding of research influence within these fields differed from visibility in the mainstream, peer-reviewed scientific literature. This research therefore recommends the use of both peer review and metrics in a combined approach in assessing research influence. Future research evaluation frameworks intent on incorporating metrics should first analyse each field closely to determine what measures of research influence are valued highly by members of that research community. This will aid the development of comprehensive and relevant frameworks with which to fairly and transparently distribute research funds or approve promotion applications.

  16. Characterizing and modeling citation dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Ho Eom

    Full Text Available Citation distributions are crucial for the analysis and modeling of the activity of scientists. We investigated bibliometric data of papers published in journals of the American Physical Society, searching for the type of function which best describes the observed citation distributions. We used the goodness of fit with Kolmogorov-Smirnov statistics for three classes of functions: log-normal, simple power law and shifted power law. The shifted power law turns out to be the most reliable hypothesis for all citation networks we derived, which correspond to different time spans. We find that citation dynamics is characterized by bursts, usually occurring within a few years since publication of a paper, and the burst size spans several orders of magnitude. We also investigated the microscopic mechanisms for the evolution of citation networks, by proposing a linear preferential attachment with time dependent initial attractiveness. The model successfully reproduces the empirical citation distributions and accounts for the presence of citation bursts as well.

  17. Universality of citation distributions for academic institutions and journals

    CERN Document Server

    Chatterjee, Arnab; Chakrabarti, Bikas K

    2016-01-01

    Citations measure the importance of a publication, and may serve as a proxy for its popularity and quality of its contents. Here we study the distributions of citations to publications from individual academic institutions for a single year. The average number of citations have large variations between different institutions across the world, but the probability distributions of citations for individual institutions can be rescaled to a common form by scaling the citations by the average number of citations for that institution. We find this feature to be universal for a broad selection of institutions irrespective of the average number of citations per article. A similar analysis for citations to publications in a particular journal in a single year reveals that there are at least two distinct classes of journals across disciplines, depending on the form of the distribution function. We observe that a group of journals with high impact factor and average citations that are distinct from the majority of the j...

  18. Citation classics in trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, Joanne Emma; Sugrue, Michael

    2005-02-01

    The evolution of trauma may be analyzed by review of articles most frequently cited by scientific articles worldwide. This study identified the "trauma classics" by reviewing the most-cited articles ever published in The Journal of Trauma. The Science Citation Index of the Institute for Scientific Information was searched for the 50 most-cited articles in The Journal of Trauma. Of the 12,672 articles published since 1961, 80 were cited over 100 times and 17 over 200 times. The most-cited article was by Baker, a hallmark publication on injury scoring published in 1974. Feeding postinjury, bacterial translocation, and multiple organ failure were common themes. Overall, 32% involved gastrointestinal topics and 18% involved injury scoring, with institutions in the United States publishing 80% of the articles. This study identified the trauma classics from the last 42 years of The Journal of Trauma. Citation analysis has recognized limitations but gives a fascinating insight into the evolution of trauma care.

  19. Aberration of the Citation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Multiple inherent biases related to different citation practices (for e.g., self-citations, negative citations, wrong citations, multi-authorship-biased citations, honorary citations, circumstantial citations, discriminatory citations, selective and arbitrary citations, etc.) make citation-based bibliometrics strongly flawed and defective measures. A paper can be highly cited for a while (for e.g., under circumstantial or transitional knowledge), but years later it may appear that its findings, paradigms, or theories were untrue or invalid anymore. By contrast, a paper may remain shelved or overlooked for years or decades, but new studies or discoveries may actualize its subject at any moment. As citation-based metrics are transformed into "commercial activities," the "citation credit" should be considered on a commercial basis too, in the sense that "citation credit" should be shared out as a "citation dividend" by shareholders (coauthors) averagely or proportionally to their contributions but not fully appropriated by each of them. At equal numbers of citations, the greater number of authors, the lower "citation credit" should be and vice versa. Overlooking the presence of distorted and subjective citation practices makes many people and administrators "obsessed" with the number of citations to such an extent to run after "highly cited" authors and to create specialized citation databases for commercial purposes. Citation-based bibliometrics, however, are unreliable and unscientific measures; citation counts do not mean that a more cited work is of a higher quality or accuracy than a less cited work because citations do not measure the quality or accuracy. Citations do not mean that a highly cited author or journal is more commendable than a less cited author or journal. Citations are not more than countable numbers: no more, no less.

  20. The Distribution of the Asymptotic Number of Citations to Sets of Publications by a Researcher or From an Academic Department Are Consistent With a Discrete Lognormal Model

    CERN Document Server

    Moreira, João A G; Amaral, Luís A Nunes

    2015-01-01

    How to quantify the impact of a researcher's or an institution's body of work is a matter of increasing importance to scientists, funding agencies, and hiring committees. The use of bibliometric indicators, such as the h-index or the Journal Impact Factor, have become widespread despite their known limitations. We argue that most existing bibliometric indicators are inconsistent, biased, and, worst of all, susceptible to manipulation. Here, we pursue a principled approach to the development of an indicator to quantify the scientific impact of both individual researchers and research institutions grounded on the functional form of the distribution of the asymptotic number of citations. We validate our approach using the publication records of 1,283 researchers from seven scientific and engineering disciplines and the chemistry departments at the 106 U.S. research institutions classified as "very high research activity". Our approach has three distinct advantages. First, it accurately captures the overall scien...

  1. Beyond a complete failure: The impact of partial capacity reductions on public transport network vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cats, O.; Jenelius, E.

    2015-01-01

    Disruptions often result with partial capacity reduction without resulting with a complete breakdown. This study aims to move beyond the analysis of complete failure by investigating the impacts of partial capacity reduction on public transport network performance. We analyse the relation between th

  2. Eastern gas shales bibliography selected annotations: gas, oil, uranium, etc. Citations in bituminous shales worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, V.S. (comp.)

    1980-06-01

    This bibliography contains 2702 citations, most of which are annotated. They are arranged by author in numerical order with a geographical index following the listing. The work is international in scope and covers the early geological literature, continuing through 1979 with a few 1980 citations in Addendum II. Addendum I contains a listing of the reports, well logs and symposiums of the Unconventional Gas Recovery Program (UGR) through August 1979. There is an author-subject index for these publications following the listing. The second part of Addendum I is a listing of the UGR maps which also has a subject-author index following the map listing. Addendum II includes several important new titles on the Devonian shale as well as a few older citations which were not found until after the bibliography had been numbered and essentially completed. A geographic index for these citations follows this listing.

  3. The Intellectual Structure of Research on Educational Technology in Science Education (ETiSE): A Co-Citation Network Analysis of Publications in Selected Journals (2008-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kai-Yu; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the intellectual structure of the research on educational technology in science education (ETiSE) within the most recent years (2008-2013). Based on the criteria for educational technology research and the citation threshold for educational co-citation analysis, a total of 137 relevant ETiSE papers…

  4. Teaching Physiology with Citation Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemm, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    Explains use of the Citation Index in writing term papers by assigning an older publication as a starting point in a literature search. By reading the original research report and following its subsequent use by other researchers, the student discovers the impact of the original research. (CS)

  5. A reverse engineering approach to the suppression of citation biases reveals universal properties of citation distributions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Radicchi

    Full Text Available The large amount of information contained in bibliographic databases has recently boosted the use of citations, and other indicators based on citation numbers, as tools for the quantitative assessment of scientific research. Citations counts are often interpreted as proxies for the scientific influence of papers, journals, scholars, and institutions. However, a rigorous and scientifically grounded methodology for a correct use of citation counts is still missing. In particular, cross-disciplinary comparisons in terms of raw citation counts systematically favors scientific disciplines with higher citation and publication rates. Here we perform an exhaustive study of the citation patterns of millions of papers, and derive a simple transformation of citation counts able to suppress the disproportionate citation counts among scientific domains. We find that the transformation is well described by a power-law function, and that the parameter values of the transformation are typical features of each scientific discipline. Universal properties of citation patterns descend therefore from the fact that citation distributions for papers in a specific field are all part of the same family of univariate distributions.

  6. Completing a PhD by Publication: A Review of Australian Policy and Implications for Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Denise

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing impetus for higher-degree-by-research students to publish during candidature. Research performance, including higher degree completions and publication output, commonly determines university funding, and doctorates with publishing experience are better positioned for a career in softening academic labour markets. The PhD by…

  7. Gender Differences in Synchronous and Diachronous Self-citations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghiasi, G.; Lariviere, V.; Sugimoto, C.

    2016-07-01

    Citation rates are increasingly used as a currency of science, providing a basis to reward a scientist. Self-citations, an inevitable part of scholarly communication, may contribute to the inflation of citation counts and impose a considerable impact on research evaluation and academic career advancements. Self-citations are classified into two types in this study: synchronous self-citations (self-citations an author gives) and diachronous self-citations (selfcitations an author receives). The main objective of this paper is to provide a comprehensive gendered analysis of synchronous and diachronous self-citations across all scientific disciplines. For this purpose, citation data of 12,725,171 articles published in 2008-2014 are extracted from Web of Science and are further scrutinized for articles of each gender. The findings reveal that men receive citations from their own papers at a higher rate than their women counterparts. They also tend to give more citations to their own publications. Gender gap in citation impact decreases when first-author’s diachronous citations are eliminated in the impact analysis. However, the gap does not vary when all-authors’ diachronous citations are excluded. The results of this research is important for effective gender-related policy-making in the science and technology arena. (Author)

  8. Harmonic allocation of authorship credit: source-level correction of bibliometric bias assures accurate publication and citation analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils T Hagen

    Full Text Available Authorship credit for multi-authored scientific publications is routinely allocated either by issuing full publication credit repeatedly to all coauthors, or by dividing one credit equally among all coauthors. The ensuing inflationary and equalizing biases distort derived bibliometric measures of merit by systematically benefiting secondary authors at the expense of primary authors. Here I show how harmonic counting, which allocates credit according to authorship rank and the number of coauthors, provides simultaneous source-level correction for both biases as well as accommodating further decoding of byline information. I also demonstrate large and erratic effects of counting bias on the original h-index, and show how the harmonic version of the h-index provides unbiased bibliometric ranking of scientific merit while retaining the original's essential simplicity, transparency and intended fairness. Harmonic decoding of byline information resolves the conundrum of authorship credit allocation by providing a simple recipe for source-level correction of inflationary and equalizing bias. Harmonic counting could also offer unrivalled accuracy in automated assessments of scientific productivity, impact and achievement.

  9. CiteGraph: a citation network system for MEDLINE articles and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qing; Yu, Hong

    2013-01-01

    This paper details the development and implementation of CiteGraph, a system for constructing large-scale citation and co-authorship networks from full-text biomedical articles. CiteGraph represents articles and authors by uniquely identified nodes, and connects those nodes through citation and co-authorship relations. CiteGraph network encompasses over 1.65 million full-text articles and 6.35 million citations by 1.37 million unique authors from the Elsevier full-text articles. Our evaluation shows 98% 99% F1-score for mapping a citation to the corresponding article and identifying MEDLINE articles. We further analyzed the characteristics of CiteGraph and found that they are consistent with assumptions made using small-scale bibliometric analysis. We also developed several novel network-based methods for analyzing publication, citation and collaboration patterns. This is the first work to develop a completely automated system for the creation of a large-scale citation network in the biomedical domain, and also to introduce novel findings in researcher publication histories. CiteGraph can be a useful resource to both the biomedical community, and bibliometric research.

  10. The Normalization of Citation Counts Based on Classification Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Barth

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available If we want to assess whether the paper in question has had a particularly high or low citation impact compared to other papers, the standard practice in bibliometrics is to normalize citations in respect of the subject category and publication year. A number of proposals for an improved procedure in the normalization of citation impact have been put forward in recent years. Against the background of these proposals, this study describes an ideal solution for the normalization of citation impact: in a first step, the reference set for the publication in question is collated by means of a classification scheme, where every publication is associated with a single principal research field or subfield entry (e.g., via Chemical Abstracts sections and a publication year. In a second step, percentiles of citation counts are calculated for this set and used to assign the normalized citation impact score to the publications (and also to the publication in question.

  11. The normalization of citation counts based on classification systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bornmann, Lutz; Barth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    If we want to assess whether the paper in question has had a particularly high or low citation impact compared to other papers, the standard practice in bibliometrics is to normalize citations in respect of the subject category and publication year. A number of proposals for an improved procedure in the normalization of citation impact have been put forward in recent years. Against the background of these proposals this study describes an ideal solution for the normalization of citation impact: in a first step, the reference set for the publication in question is collated by means of a classification scheme, where every publication is associated with a single principal research field or subfield entry (e. g. via Chemical Abstracts sections) and a publication year. In a second step, percentiles of citation counts are calculated for this set and used to assign the normalized citation impact score to the publications (and also to the publication in question).

  12. Analysis of trends in publications and citations of papers on nuclear science and technology field in Korea: Focusing on the Scopus Data Base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Young Choon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The data on the top 20 journals in the Science Citation Index(Expanded) for 10 years from 2005 to 2014 indicated the first and second positions for Korean papers were occupied by the Korean journals, which implied the need for globalization of target journals to publish Korean papers. Further study is required for comparative analysis of the factors impacting on the number of papers and citations, which is the criteria for quality evaluation of papers, in other area than the Nuclear Energy and Engineering to which this study was limited. As the media for research process and results, papers play an important role in the evaluation of research projects. While the traditional methods for evaluation of research results have been focused on quantity aspects, the implication of quality aspect is increasingly recognized. Most national labs have begun to shift from quantity to quality in their criteria for overall evaluation of research results. It is therefore desired to maximize the quality level of the research papers for which the trends in citation as quality indicator could be analyzed as well as the quantity aspect. This paper looks at the trends in the number of citation and papers as the indicators of quality and quantify, as drawn from Scopus Data Base. It also suggest top 5 Science Citation Index(Expanded) journals in terms of increase rate in both number of papers and citations. The purpose is to compare them with top 20 Science Citation Index(Expanded) journals in which Korea Atomic Energy Research researchers have published their papers in the past 10 years from 2005 to 2014 were submitted. This paper looked at the trends in the number of papers and citations as an indicator of quality of the research papers in the area of Nuclear Energy and Engineering which is in fact a limitation to the key subject area, not covering the whole nuclear science and technology.

  13. Honorary authorship epidemic in scholarly publications? How the current use of citation-based evaluative metrics make (pseudo)honorary authors from honest contributors of every multi-author article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Jozsef

    2013-08-01

    The current use of citation-based metrics to evaluate the research output of individual researchers is highly discriminatory because they are uniformly applied to authors of single-author articles as well as contributors of multi-author papers. In the latter case, these quantitative measures are counted, as if each contributor were the single author of the full article. In this way, each and every contributor is assigned the full impact-factor score and all the citations that the article has received. This has a multiplication effect on each contributor's citation-based evaluative metrics of multi-author articles, because the more contributors an article has, the more undeserved credit is assigned to each of them. In this paper, I argue that this unfair system could be made fairer by requesting the contributors of multi-author articles to describe the nature of their contribution, and to assign a numerical value to their degree of relative contribution. In this way, we could create a contribution-specific index of each contributor for each citation metric. This would be a strong disincentive against honorary authorship and publication cartels, because it would transform the current win-win strategy of accepting honorary authors in the byline into a zero-sum game for each contributor.

  14. Public Opinion Regarding Financial Incentives to Engage in Advance Care Planning and Complete Advance Directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auriemma, Catherine L; Chen, Lucy; Olorunnisola, Michael; Delman, Aaron; Nguyen, Christina A; Cooney, Elizabeth; Gabler, Nicole B; Halpern, Scott D

    2017-09-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) recently instituted physician reimbursements for advance care planning (ACP) discussions with patients. To measure public support for similar programs. Cross-sectional online and in-person surveys. English-speaking adults recruited at public parks in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from July to August 2013 and online through survey sampling international Web-based recruitment platform in July 2015. Participants indicated support for 6 programs designed to increase advance directive (AD) completion or ACP discussion using 5-point Likert scales. Participants also indicated how much money (US$0-US$1000) was appropriate to incentivize such behaviors, compared to smoking cessation or colonoscopy screening. We recruited 883 participants: 503 online and 380 in-person. The status quo of no systematic approach to motivate AD completion was supported by 67.0% of participants (63.9%-70.1%). The most popular programs were paying patients to complete ADs (58.0%; 54.5%-61.2%) and requiring patients to complete ADs or declination forms for health insurance (54.1%; 50.8%-57.4%). Participants more commonly supported paying patients to complete ADs than paying physicians whose patients complete ADs (22.6%; 19.8%-25.4%) or paying physicians who document ACP discussions (19.1%; 16.5%-21.7%; both P < .001). Participants supported smaller payments for AD completion and ACP than for obtaining screening colonoscopies or stopping smoking. Americans view payments for AD completion or ACP more skeptically than for other health behaviors and prefer that such payments go to patients rather than physicians. The current CMS policy of reimbursing physicians for ACP conversations with patients was the least preferred of the programs evaluated.

  15. Author self-citation in the general medicine literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhaya V Kulkarni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Author self-citation contributes to the overall citation count of an article and the impact factor of the journal in which it appears. Little is known, however, about the extent of self-citation in the general clinical medicine literature. The objective of this study was to determine the extent and temporal pattern of author self-citation and the article characteristics associated with author self-citation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a retrospective cohort study of articles published in three high impact general medical journals (JAMA, Lancet, and New England Journal of Medicine between October 1, 1999 and March 31, 2000. We retrieved the number and percentage of author self-citations received by the article since publication, as of June 2008, from the Scopus citation database. Several article characteristics were extracted by two blinded, independent reviewers for each article in the cohort and analyzed in multivariable linear regression analyses. Since publication, author self-citations accounted for 6.5% (95% confidence interval 6.3-6.7% of all citations received by the 328 articles in our sample. Self-citation peaked in 2002, declining annually thereafter. Studies with more authors, in cardiovascular medicine or infectious disease, and with smaller sample size were associated with more author self-citations and higher percentage of author self-citation (all p≤0.01. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Approximately 1 in 15 citations of articles in high-profile general medicine journals are author self-citations. Self-citation peaks within about 2 years of publication and disproportionately affects impact factor. Studies most vulnerable to this effect are those with more authors, small sample size, and in cardiovascular medicine or infectious disease.

  16. Three options for citation tracking: Google Scholar, Scopus and Web of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkalbasi, Nisa; Bauer, Kathleen; Glover, Janis; Wang, Lei

    2006-06-29

    most for condensed matter physics. This study did not identify any one of these three resources as the answer to all citation tracking needs. Scopus showed strength in providing citing literature for current (2003) oncology articles, while Web of Science produced more citing material for 2003 and 1993 condensed matter physics, and 1993 oncology articles. All three tools returned some unique material. Our data indicate that the question of which tool provides the most complete set of citing literature may depend on the subject and publication year of a given article.

  17. Time and Citation Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Clough, James R

    2015-01-01

    Citation networks emerge from a number of different social systems, such as academia (from published papers), business (through patents) and law (through legal judgements). A citation represents a transfer of information, and so studying the structure of the citation network will help us understand how knowledge is passed on. What distinguishes citation networks from other networks is time; documents can only cite older documents. We propose that existing network measures do not take account of the strong constraint imposed by time. We will illustrate our approach with two types of causally aware analysis. We apply our methods to the citation networks formed by academic papers on the arXiv, to US patents and to US Supreme Court judgements. We show that our tools can reveal that citation networks which appear to have very similar structure by standard network measures turn out to have significantly different properties. We interpret our results as indicating that many papers in a bibliography were not directly...

  18. Software citation principles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arfon M. Smith

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Software is a critical part of modern research and yet there is little support across the scholarly ecosystem for its acknowledgement and citation. Inspired by the activities of the FORCE11 working group focused on data citation, this document summarizes the recommendations of the FORCE11 Software Citation Working Group and its activities between June 2015 and April 2016. Based on a review of existing community practices, the goal of the working group was to produce a consolidated set of citation principles that may encourage broad adoption of a consistent policy for software citation across disciplines and venues. Our work is presented here as a set of software citation principles, a discussion of the motivations for developing the principles, reviews of existing community practice, and a discussion of the requirements these principles would place upon different stakeholders. Working examples and possible technical solutions for how these principles can be implemented will be discussed in a separate paper.

  19. Time to publication among completed diagnostic accuracy studies: associated with reported accuracy estimates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniël A. Korevaar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous evaluations have documented that studies evaluating the effectiveness of therapeutic interventions are not always reported, and that those with statistically significant results are published more rapidly than those without. This can lead to reporting bias in systematic reviews and other literature syntheses. We evaluated whether diagnostic accuracy studies that report promising results about the performance of medical tests are also published more rapidly. Methods We obtained all primary diagnostic accuracy studies included in meta-analyses of Medline-indexed systematic reviews that were published between September 2011 and January 2012. For each primary study, we extracted estimates of diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity, specificity, Youden’s index, the completion date of participant recruitment, and the publication date. We calculated the time from completion to publication and assessed associations with reported accuracy estimates. Results Forty-nine systematic reviews were identified, containing 92 meta-analyses and 924 unique primary studies, of which 756 could be included. Study completion dates were missing for 285 (38 % of these. Median time from completion to publication in the remaining 471 studies was 24 months (IQR 16 to 35. Primary studies that reported higher estimates of sensitivity (Spearman’s rho = −0.14; p = 0.003, specificity (rho = −0.17; p < 0.001, and Youden’s index (rho = −0.22; p < 0.001 had significantly shorter times to publication. When comparing time to publication in studies reporting accuracy estimates above versus below the median, the median number of months was 23 versus 25 for sensitivity (p = 0.046, 22 versus 27 for specificity (p = 0.001, and 22 versus 27 for Youden’s index (p < 0.001. These differential time lags remained significant in multivariable Cox regression analyses with adjustment for other study characteristics, with

  20. Sharing data increases citations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drachen, Thea Marie; Ellegaard, Ole; Larsen, Asger Væring

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents some indications to the existence of a citation advantage related to sharing data using astrophysics as a case. Through bibliometric analyses we find a citation advantage for astrophysical papers in core journals. The advantage arises as indexed papers are associated with data...... by bibliographical links, and consists of papers receiving on average significantly more citations per paper per year, than do papers not associated with links to data....

  1. Analyzing the Cost-Effectiveness of Instruction Expenditures towards High School Completion among Oahu's Public School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Larson S. W. M.

    2011-01-01

    The following study attempted to ascertain the instructional cost-effectiveness of public high school teachers towards high school completion through a financially based econometric analysis. Essentially, public high school instruction expenditures and completer data were collected from 2000 to 2007 and bivariate interaction analyzed through a…

  2. Abstracts--Citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Mental Health, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Provides abstracts and citations of journal articles and reports dealing with aspects of mental health. Topics include absenteeism, alcoholism, drug abuse, leisure, disadvantaged, job satisfaction, and others. (SB)

  3. On the evolution and utility of annual citation indices

    CERN Document Server

    Khaleque, Abdul; Sen, Parongama

    2014-01-01

    We study the statistics of citations made to the top ranked indexed journals for Science and Social Science databases in the Journal Citation Reports using different measures. Total annual citation and impact factor, as well as a third measure called the annual citation rate are used to make the detailed analysis. We observe that the distribution of the annual citation rate has an universal feature - it shows a maximum at the rate scaled by half the average, irrespective of how the journals are ranked, and even across Science and Social Science journals, and fits well to log-Gumbel distribution. Correlations between different quantities are studied and a comparative analysis of the three measures is presented. The newly introduced annual citation rate factor helps in understanding the effect of scaling the number of citation by the total number of publications. The effect of the impact factor on authors contributing to the journals as well as on editorial policies is also discussed.

  4. Citation patterns and trends of systematic reviews about mindfulness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Alberto; Fazia, Teresa; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Morandi, Gabriella

    2017-08-01

    We performed a citation analysis of the literature about mindfulness aimed at describing the most significant topics and the impact of more relevant papers. We classified 128 systematic reviews about mindfulness-based intervention retrieved in Scopus according to their object, the population included and the type of mindfulness proposed. The citation counting was reported. The cumulative citation numbers per chronological years and article life were analyzed thorough a linear regression model. 1) We observed a general increase in the number of reviews published from 2003 to 2016; 2) two reviews collected the 33% of the overall citations; 3) citation counting for clinical and mixed population collected the 90% of total citations; 4) clinical reviews had higher cumulative citation per publication/year growth. As mindfulness research advances, higher attention should be given to the mechanisms by which mindfulness interventions work so as to provide fruitful insights for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. How to Sift Citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker-Gibson, Necia

    1995-01-01

    To help college teachers assist students in approaching reference materials to obtain citations, basic points that students should identify within citations are specified, and useful classroom techniques and materials are suggested. Common errors in search strategies are also noted. Some suggestions are made for selection of indexes for searching.…

  6. Researchers' perceptions of citations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aksnes, Dag W.; Rip, Arie

    2009-01-01

    This paper looks at how citations are perceived among scientists. Based on a questionnaire survey it traces the repertoire of views and experiences about citations that could be found among Norwegian scientists that had published highly cited papers. Their views circle around three issues: the

  7. Coauthorship and citation in scientific publishing

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Travis; Karrer, Brian; Newman, M E J

    2013-01-01

    A large number of published studies have examined the properties of either networks of citation among scientific papers or networks of coauthorship among scientists. Here, using an extensive data set covering more than a century of physics papers published in the Physical Review, we study a hybrid coauthorship/citation network that combines the two, which we analyze to gain insight into the correlations and interactions between authorship and citation. Among other things, we investigate the extent to which individuals tend to cite themselves or their collaborators more than others, the extent to which they cite themselves or their collaborators more quickly after publication, and the extent to which they tend to return the favor of a citation from another scientist.

  8. Citations and Team Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2017-02-01

    I explore whether small or large teams produce the most important astronomical results, on average, using citation counts as our metric. I present evidence that citation counts indicate the importance of papers. For the 1343 papers published in A&A, ApJ, and MNRAS in 2012 January-February, I considered 4.5 years worth of citations. In each journal, there are larger citation counts for papers from large teams than from small teams by a factor of about 2. To check whether the results from 2012 were unusual, I collected data from 2013 for A&A and found it to be the same as that for 2012. Could the preponderance of papers by large teams be due to self-citations (i.e., citing and cited papers sharing one or more authors)? To answer this, I looked at 136 papers with one to 266 authors and discovered a linear relation that ranges from a 12.7% self-citation rate for single-author papers to a 45.9% self-citation rate for papers with 100 authors. Correcting for these factors is not enough to explain the predominance of the papers with large teams. Then I computed citations per author. While large teams average more citations than small ones by a factor of 2, individuals on small teams average more citations than individuals on large teams by a factor of 6. The papers by large teams often have far more data, but those by small teams tend to discuss basic physical processes.

  9. A bibliometric analysis of occupational therapy publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Gutman, Sharon A; Ho, Yuh-Shan; Fong, Kenneth N K

    2018-01-01

    Bibliometrics involves the statistical analysis of the publications in a specific discipline or subject area. A bibliometric analysis of the occupational therapy refereed literature is needed. A bibliometric analysis was completed of the occupational therapy literature from 1991-2014, indexed in the Science Citation Index-Expanded or the Social Sciences Citation Index. Publications were searched by title, abstract, keywords, and KeyWords Plus. Total number of article citations, citations per journal, and contributions per country, individual authors, and institution were calculated. 5,315 occupational therapy articles were published in 821 journals. It appears that there is a citation window of an approximate 10-year period between the time of publication and the peak number of citations an article receives. The top three most highly cited articles were published in Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology, JAMA, and Lancet. AJOT, BJOT and AOTJ published the largest number of occupational therapy articles with the United States, Australia, and Canada producing the highest number of publications. McMaster University, the University of Queensland, and the University of Toronto were the institutions that published the largest number of occupational therapy journal articles. The occupational therapy literature is growing and the frequency of article citation is increasing.

  10. Spatial evolutionary public goods game on complete graph and dense complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinho; Chae, Huiseung; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2015-03-23

    We study the spatial evolutionary public goods game (SEPGG) with voluntary or optional participation on a complete graph (CG) and on dense networks. Based on analyses of the SEPGG rate equation on finite CG, we find that SEPGG has two stable states depending on the value of multiplication factor r, illustrating how the "tragedy of the commons" and "an anomalous state without any active participants" occurs in real-life situations. When r is low (). We also derive the exact scaling relation for r*. All of the results are confirmed by numerical simulation. Furthermore, we find that a cooperator-dominant state emerges when the number of participants or the mean degree, 〈k〉, decreases. We also investigate the scaling dependence of the emergence of cooperation on r and 〈k〉. These results show how "tragedy of the commons" disappears when cooperation between egoistic individuals without any additional socioeconomic punishment increases.

  11. Semi-automatic Citation Correction with Lemon8-XML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MJ Suhonos

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Lemon8-XML software application, developed by the Public Knowledge Project (PKP, provides an open-source, computer-assisted interface for reliable citation structuring and validation. Lemon8-XML combines citation parsing algorithms with freely-available online indexes such as PubMed, WorldCat, and OAIster. Fully-automated markup of entire bibliographies may be a genuine possibility using this approach. Automated markup of citations would increase bibliographic accuracy while reducing copyediting demands.

  12. Research citation analysis of nursing academics in Canada: identifying success indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Thomas F; Crooks, Dauna; Plohman, James; Kepron, Emma

    2010-11-01

    This article is a report of a citation analysis of research publications by Canadian nursing academics. Citation analysis can yield objective criteria for assessing the value of published research and is becoming increasingly popular as an academic evaluation tool in universities around the world. Citation analysis is useful for examining the research performance of academic researchers and identifying leaders among them. The journal publication records of 737 nursing academics at 33 Canadian universities and schools of nursing were subject to citation analysis using the Scopus database. Three primary types of analysis were performed for each individual: number of citations for each journal publication, summative citation count of all published papers and the Scopus h-index. Preliminary citation analysis was conducted from June to July 2009, with the final analysis performed on 2 October 2009 following e-mail verification of publication lists. The top 20 nursing academics for each of five citation categories are presented: the number of career citations for all publications, number of career citations for first-authored publications, most highly cited first-authored publications, the Scopus h-index for all publications and the Scopus h-index for first-authored publications. Citation analysis metrics are useful for evaluating the research performance of academic researchers in nursing. Institutions are encouraged to protect the research time of successful and promising nursing academics, and to dedicate funds to enhance the research programmes of underperforming academic nursing groups. © 2010 The Authors. Journal of Advanced Nursing © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain. PMID:26958274

  14. Citation Sentiment Analysis in Clinical Trial Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Zhang, Yaoyun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Jingqi; Dong, Xiao; Xu, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In scientific writing, positive credits and negative criticisms can often be seen in the text mentioning the cited papers, providing useful information about whether a study can be reproduced or not. In this study, we focus on citation sentiment analysis, which aims to determine the sentiment polarity that the citation context carries towards the cited paper. A citation sentiment corpus was annotated first on clinical trial papers. The effectiveness of n-gram and sentiment lexicon features, and problem-specified structure features for citation sentiment analysis were then examined using the annotated corpus. The combined features from the word n-grams, the sentiment lexicons and the structure information achieved the highest Micro F-score of 0.860 and Macro-F score of 0.719, indicating that it is feasible to use machine learning methods for citation sentiment analysis in biomedical publications. A comprehensive comparison between citation sentiment analysis of clinical trial papers and other general domains were conducted, which additionally highlights the unique challenges within this domain.

  15. Citations in supplementary material

    OpenAIRE

    Weiss, Manfred S.; Einspahr, Howard; Edward N. Baker; Dauter, Zbigniew; Kaysser-Pyzalla, Anke R.; Kostorz, Gernot; Larsen, Sine

    2010-01-01

    The problem of undercounting of citations that are published only in supplementary material is studied for the journals Nature, Science, Cell and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (USA).

  16. Non-Traffic Citations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Non-traffic citations (NTCs, also known as "summary offenses") document low-level criminal offenses where a law enforcement officer or other authorized official...

  17. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows GB/T 7714—2005.The citation should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article Sun,Y.,Li,B.,&Qu,J.F.Design and implementation of library intelligent IM reference robot.New Technology of Library and Information Service(in Chinese),2011,205:88–92.

  18. Reference Citation Format

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2014-01-01

    <正>The format for citations in text and for bibliographic references follows GB/T 7714—2005.The citation should be ordered in number as it appears in the text of the submitted article.For journal article Sun,Y.,Li,B.,&Qu,J.F.Design and implementation of library intelligent IM reference robot.New Technology of Library and Information Service(in Chinese),

  19. 中华预防医学杂志2000-2005年载文被引情况分析%The citation analysis of the publications in Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine,2000-2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕相征; 薛爱华; 游苏宁; 刘群; 周佩珍

    2008-01-01

    目的 了解预防医学专业领域内作者对中华预防医学杂志载文的借鉴和吸收情况,分析该杂志在预防医学领域内的影响程度.方法 利用(V1.0),在"被引文献来源"项中输入"中华预防医学杂志",检索2000-2005年各年度被引用情况,用EXCEL进行统计分析,统计范围包括专论、述评、论著等21个栏目,统计数据截至2007年11月.结果 2000-2005年期间,中华预防医学杂志开设了30多个栏目.载文约1196篇,主要的21个栏目载文1111篇,占92.89%.2003-2005年中华预防医学杂志影响因子分别为0.897、1.011、0.891.在21个主要栏目中,被引率超过80%的栏目有论著、述评、讲座、专论、问题讨论、案例报道等6个栏目,单篇平均被引频次在4.0以上的栏目有论著、述评、论著摘要、专论、学术动态等5个栏目.共有20位作者被引频次在20次以上,这些作者分别来自医学院校、教学医院、疾病预防控制中心和科研机构.共有17篇文章被引频次超过20次,其中有3篇被引频次超过了50次,引用该刊2000-2005年载文频次前20位的期刊占总引用频次的34.9%,该刊的自引率为4.85%.结论 该刊被引率较高,说明载文质量高,在我国预防医学领域具有较强的的影响力.%Objective To carry out the citation analysis of publications in Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine(CJPM)among the preventive medicine authors and analyze the impact of this magazine in preventive medicine domain.Methods Using Chinese scientific periodical literature evaluation and statistical analysis system(V1.0),the citation status of all CJPM publications in 2000--2005 Was analyzed.the analysis covered 21 columns,including the review,editoral and original article,the data were collected up to November,20cr7.Results From 2000 to 2005,CJPM had more than 30 columns and can5ed 1196 articles and 92.89%(1111/1196)articles were from 2l main columns.During 2003 to 2005,theimpact factors of CJPM

  20. Borrowed Authority: The American Catholic Bishops' Argument by Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keefe, Meaghan M.

    2015-01-01

    Rhetorical use of citation is a means of indirectly reaffirming authority while avoiding the appearance of argument. It is therefore an especially useful strategy for people and institutions with compromised public images. This article compares the American Catholic bishops' written citational patterns in the United States Conference of Catholic…

  1. Searching the Social Sciences Citation Index on BRS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janke, Richard V.

    1980-01-01

    Concentrates on describing and illustrating by example the unique BRS features of the online Social Sciences Citation Index. Appendices provide a key to the BRS/SSCI citation elements, BRS standardized language codes, publication type codes, author's classification of BRS/SSCI subject category codes, search examples, and database specifications.…

  2. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and Nobel Prizes

    CERN Document Server

    Mazloumian, Amin; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo; 10.1371/journal.pone.0018975

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their...

  3. Twitter Predicts Citation Rates of Ecological Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, Brandon K; Midway, Stephen R; Sackett, Dana; Lynch, Abigail; Cooney, Patrick B

    2016-01-01

    The relationship between traditional metrics of research impact (e.g., number of citations) and alternative metrics (altmetrics) such as Twitter activity are of great interest, but remain imprecisely quantified. We used generalized linear mixed modeling to estimate the relative effects of Twitter activity, journal impact factor, and time since publication on Web of Science citation rates of 1,599 primary research articles from 20 ecology journals published from 2012-2014. We found a strong positive relationship between Twitter activity (i.e., the number of unique tweets about an article) and number of citations. Twitter activity was a more important predictor of citation rates than 5-year journal impact factor. Moreover, Twitter activity was not driven by journal impact factor; the 'highest-impact' journals were not necessarily the most discussed online. The effect of Twitter activity was only about a fifth as strong as time since publication; accounting for this confounding factor was critical for estimating the true effects of Twitter use. Articles in impactful journals can become heavily cited, but articles in journals with lower impact factors can generate considerable Twitter activity and also become heavily cited. Authors may benefit from establishing a strong social media presence, but should not expect research to become highly cited solely through social media promotion. Our research demonstrates that altmetrics and traditional metrics can be closely related, but not identical. We suggest that both altmetrics and traditional citation rates can be useful metrics of research impact.

  4. Field Guides in Academe: A Citation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Dianne

    2006-01-01

    Field guides are common in libraries but are generally not considered scholarly. This study examines citations to fifty field guides to determine how they were used in scholarly publications, finding that field guides are frequently cited as a source of data on the ranges, habits, and descriptions of plants and animals.

  5. School Public Relations: The Complete Book. A Source Book of Proven PR Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, B. Rodney; Ross, Virginia M., Ed.

    School public relations is a planned and systematic management function relying on a comprehensive, two-way communication process involving both internal and external publics with a goal of stimulating a better understanding of the role, objectives, accomplishments, and needs of the organization. The function of school public relations is, first,…

  6. Latin American and Caribbean Countries in the Global Quest for World Class Academic Recognition: An Analysis of Publications in Scopus and the Science Citation Index between 1990 and 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Enrique Delgado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The article investigates global participation in academic research productivity through the growth of publications from Latin America and the Caribbean (LA&C in two of the most prestigious bibliographic indexes, Scopus and the Science Citation Index (SCI. Data were obtained from the SCImago Journal and Country Rank and the Iberian-American and Inter-American Network of Science and Technology Indicators databases. Tables were created for the number of citable documents in Scopus, the publications in SCI, and the comparative indicators of the number of publications in SCI from LA&C countries adjusted for number of researchers, full-time researchers, inhabitants, and national research and development (R&D expenditure. The countries with the highest number of publications since 1990 SCI and 1996 Scopus were Brazil, Mexico, Argentina, and Chile. Colombia shows the largest growth in research productivity over the periods studied and became in 2010 the country with the fifth highest number of publications in both indexes. Comparative indicators adjusted for numbers of researchers, population and national R&D expenditures do not show clear differences in performance across countries. The article concludes with suggestions for the need to provide greater contextual analysis and including other bibliographic indexes and databases in order to have a fuller understanding of the reasons for particular levels of research productivity across LA&C countries.

  7. PRAGMATIC ASPECT OF CITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Sergeevna SIRENKO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the research of the prag-matic aspect of citation in fictional text from the in-tertextual point of view. The theory of intertextuality was formed in the works of M.Bakhtin and devel-oped by Y. Kristeva after the analysis of the works of post-modern writers. So allusion and citation began to be investigated not from the philology point of view only but from the linguistics as well. The pur-pose of the article is to investigate the pragmatic aspect of citation which includes also the investiga-tion of its pragmatic functions. Different views on the citation classification are also mentioned in the article as it is an actual problem in modern linguis-tics. Novels by British writer J. Fforde are the mate-rial for the investigation article because they pos-sess a big amount of intertextual inclusion in the text in general and citation in particular.

  8. The New Generation of Citation Indexing in the Age of Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxiong; Cabrera, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    As the Web is becoming a powerful new medium in scientific publication and scholarly communication, citation indexing has found a new application in the digital environment. The authors reviewed the new developments in Web-based citation indexing and conducted a case study in three major citation search tools, "Web of Science", "Scopus" and…

  9. The New Generation of Citation Indexing in the Age of Digital Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mengxiong; Cabrera, Peggy

    2008-01-01

    As the Web is becoming a powerful new medium in scientific publication and scholarly communication, citation indexing has found a new application in the digital environment. The authors reviewed the new developments in Web-based citation indexing and conducted a case study in three major citation search tools, "Web of Science", "Scopus" and…

  10. Data Identifiers, Versioning, and Micro-citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, M. A.; Duerr, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    Data citation, especially using Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs), is an increasingly accepted scientific practice. For example, the AGU Council asserts that data "publications" should "be credited and cited like the products of any other scientific activity," and Thomson Reuters has recently announced a data citation index built from DOIs assigned to data sets. Correspondingly, formal guidelines for how to cite a data set (using DOIs or similar identifiers/locators) have recently emerged, notably those from the international DataCite consortium, the UK Digital Curation Centre, and the US Federation of Earth Science Information Partners. These different data citation guidelines are largely congruent. They agree on the basic practice and elements of data citation, especially for relatively static, whole data collections. There is less agreement on some of the more subtle nuances of data citation. They define different methods for handling different data set versions, especially for the very dynamic, growing data sets that are common in Earth Sciences. They also differ in how people should cite specific, arbitrarily large elements, "passages," or subsets of a larger data collection, i.e., the precise data records actually used in a study. This detailed "micro-citation", and careful reference to exact versions of data are essential to ensure scientific reproducibility. Identifiers such as DOIs are necessary but not sufficient for the precise, detailed, references necessary. Careful practice must be coupled with the use of curated identifiers. In this paper we review the pros and cons of different approaches to versioning and micro-citation. We suggest a workable solution for most existing Earth science data and suggest a more rigorous path forward for the future.

  11. Scientific citations in Wikipedia

    CERN Document Server

    Nielsen, Finn Aarup

    2007-01-01

    The Internet-based encyclopaedia Wikipedia has grown to become one of the most visited web-sites on the Internet. However, critics have questioned the quality of entries, and an empirical study has shown Wikipedia to contain errors in a 2005 sample of science entries. Biased coverage and lack of sources are among the "Wikipedia risks". The present work describes a simple assessment of these aspects by examining the outbound links from Wikipedia articles to articles in scientific journals with a comparison against journal statistics from Journal Citation Reports such as impact factors. The results show an increasing use of structured citation markup and good agreement with the citation pattern seen in the scientific literature though with a slight tendency to cite articles in high-impact journals such as Nature and Science. These results increase confidence in Wikipedia as an good information organizer for science in general.

  12. Citation classics in epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryann Wilson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The impact of a scientific article is proportional to the citations it has received. In this study, we set out to identify the most cited works in epileptology in order to evaluate research trends in this field. METHODS: According to the Web of Science database, articles with more than 400 citations qualify as "citation classics". We conducted a literature search on the ISI Web of Science bibliometric database for scientific articles relevant to epilepsy. RESULTS: We retrieved 67 highly cited articles (400 or more citations, which were published in 31 journals: 17 clinical studies, 42 laboratory studies, 5 reviews and 3 classification articles. Clinical studies consisted of epidemiological analyses (n=3, studies on the clinical phenomenology of epilepsy (n=5 – including behavioral and prognostic aspects – and articles focusing on pharmacological (n=6 and non-pharmacological (n=3 treatment. The laboratory studies dealt with genetics (n=6, animal models (n=27, and neurobiology (n=9 – including both neurophysiology and neuropathology studies. The majority (61% of citation classics on epilepsy were published after 1986, possibly reflecting the expansion of research interest in laboratory studies driven by the development of new methodologies, specifically in the fields of genetics and animal models. Consequently, clinical studies were highly cited both before and after the mid 80s, whilst laboratory researches became widely cited after 1990. CONCLUSIONS: Our study indicates that the main drivers of scientific impact in the field of epileptology have increasingly become genetic and neurobiological studies, along with research on animal models of epilepsy. These articles are able to gain the highest numbers of citations in the time span of a few years and suggest potential directions for future research.

  13. Universal hierarchical behavior of citation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Mones, Enys; Vicsek, Tamás

    2014-01-01

    Many of the essential features of the evolution of scientific research are imprinted in the structure of citation networks. Connections in these networks imply information about the transfer of knowledge among papers, or in other words, edges describe the impact of papers on other publications. This inherent meaning of the edges infers that citation networks can exhibit hierarchical features, that is typical of networks based on decision-making. In this paper, we investigate the hierarchical structure of citation networks consisting of papers in the same field. We find that the majority of the networks follow a universal trend towards a highly hierarchical state, and i) the various fields display differences only concerning their phase in life (distance from the "birth" of a field) or ii) the characteristic time according to which they are approaching the stationary state. We also show by a simple argument that the alterations in the behavior are related to and can be understood by the degree of specializatio...

  14. Suggested Citations for the DHQ II & Diet*Calc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Use of the Diet History Questionnaire and Diet*Calc Analysis Software for publication purposes should contain a citation which includes version information for the software, questionnaire, and nutrient database.

  15. Beyond citations: Scholars' visibility on the social Web

    CERN Document Server

    Bar-Ilan, Judit; Peters, Isabella; Priem, Jason; Shema, Hadas; Terliesner, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Traditionally, scholarly impact and visibility have been measured by counting publications and citations in the scholarly literature. However, increasingly scholars are also visible on the Web, establishing presences in a growing variety of social ecosystems. But how wide and established is this presence, and how do measures of social Web impact relate to their more traditional counterparts? To answer this, we sampled 57 presenters from the 2010 Leiden STI Conference, gathering publication and citations counts as well as data from the presenters' Web "footprints." We found Web presence widespread and diverse: 84% of scholars had homepages, 70% were on LinkedIn, 23% had public Google Scholar profiles, and 16% were on Twitter. For sampled scholars' publications, social reference manager bookmarks were compared to Scopus and Web of Science citations; we found that Mendeley covers more than 80% of sampled articles, and that Mendeley bookmarks are significantly correlated (r=.45) to Scopus citation counts.

  16. Toward a complete dataset of drug-drug interaction information from publicly available sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvaz, Serkan; Horn, John; Hassanzadeh, Oktie; Zhu, Qian; Stan, Johann; Tatonetti, Nicholas P; Vilar, Santiago; Brochhausen, Mathias; Samwald, Matthias; Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Dumontier, Michel; Boyce, Richard D

    2015-06-01

    Although potential drug-drug interactions (PDDIs) are a significant source of preventable drug-related harm, there is currently no single complete source of PDDI information. In the current study, all publically available sources of PDDI information that could be identified using a comprehensive and broad search were combined into a single dataset. The combined dataset merged fourteen different sources including 5 clinically-oriented information sources, 4 Natural Language Processing (NLP) Corpora, and 5 Bioinformatics/Pharmacovigilance information sources. As a comprehensive PDDI source, the merged dataset might benefit the pharmacovigilance text mining community by making it possible to compare the representativeness of NLP corpora for PDDI text extraction tasks, and specifying elements that can be useful for future PDDI extraction purposes. An analysis of the overlap between and across the data sources showed that there was little overlap. Even comprehensive PDDI lists such as DrugBank, KEGG, and the NDF-RT had less than 50% overlap with each other. Moreover, all of the comprehensive lists had incomplete coverage of two data sources that focus on PDDIs of interest in most clinical settings. Based on this information, we think that systems that provide access to the comprehensive lists, such as APIs into RxNorm, should be careful to inform users that the lists may be incomplete with respect to PDDIs that drug experts suggest clinicians be aware of. In spite of the low degree of overlap, several dozen cases were identified where PDDI information provided in drug product labeling might be augmented by the merged dataset. Moreover, the combined dataset was also shown to improve the performance of an existing PDDI NLP pipeline and a recently published PDDI pharmacovigilance protocol. Future work will focus on improvement of the methods for mapping between PDDI information sources, identifying methods to improve the use of the merged dataset in PDDI NLP algorithms

  17. Environmental health citation patterns: mapping the literature 2008–2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethlefsen, Melissa L

    2013-01-01

    Objective: This research seeks to understand the publication types and ages cited most often in environmental health literature and the most commonly cited journal titles. Methods: From the 43,896 items cited in Environmental Health Perspectives and the Journal of Environmental Health during 2008–2010, 2 random samples were drawn: First, 1,042 items representing all citations were analyzed with respect to publication type, age, and Internet link. Second, the cited journal name and citation age were recorded for 1,038 items culled from only citations to journal articles. All journal titles were classified into Bradford zones and assigned subject disciplines. Results: Journal articles (n = 891, 85.5%) were the most heavily cited publication type. Cited items' publication years ranged from 1951 to 2010. Close to half (49.1%) of all cited items were published 5 or fewer years previous. Sixteen journal titles (3.9%) accounted for 32.5% of all cited journal articles. The 3 most common subject disciplines—“Public, Environmental & Occupational Health,” “Environmental Sciences,” and “Toxicology”—accounted for 21.6% of all unique journal titles and 45.3% of all citations. Conclusions: Environmental health citation patterns differ from other public health disciplines in terms of cited publication types, cited journals, and age of citations. PMID:23405046

  18. Environmental health citation patterns: mapping the literature 2008-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rethlefsen, Melissa L; Aldrich, Alison M

    2013-01-01

    This research seeks to understand the publication types and ages cited most often in environmental health literature and the most commonly cited journal titles. From the 43,896 items cited in Environmental Health Perspectives and the Journal of Environmental Health during 2008-2010, 2 random samples were drawn: First, 1,042 items representing all citations were analyzed with respect to publication type, age, and Internet link. Second, the cited journal name and citation age were recorded for 1,038 items culled from only citations to journal articles. All journal titles were classified into Bradford zones and assigned subject disciplines. Journal articles (n = 891, 85.5%) were the most heavily cited publication type. Cited items' publication years ranged from 1951 to 2010. Close to half (49.1%) of all cited items were published 5 or fewer years previous. Sixteen journal titles (3.9%) accounted for 32.5% of all cited journal articles. The 3 most common subject disciplines-"Public, Environmental & Occupational Health," "Environmental Sciences," and "Toxicology"-accounted for 21.6% of all unique journal titles and 45.3% of all citations. Environmental health citation patterns differ from other public health disciplines in terms of cited publication types, cited journals, and age of citations.

  19. Citation analysis of Canadian psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Thomas F; Crooks, Dauna; Plohman, James; Kepron, Emma

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to conduct a historical review of psycho-oncology and supportive care research in Canada using citation analysis and to review the clinical impact of the research conducted by the most highly cited researchers. The lifetime journal publication records of 109 psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers in Canada were subject to citation analysis using the Scopus database, based on citations since 1996 of articles deemed relevant to psychosocial oncology and supportive care, excluding self-citations. Three primary types of analysis were performed for each individual: the number of citations for each journal publication, a summative citation count of all published articles, and the Scopus h-index. The top 20 psycho-oncology/supportive care researchers for each of five citation categories are presented: the number of citations for all publications; the number of citations for first-authored publications; the most highly cited first-authored publications; the Scopus h-index for all publications; and the Scopus h-index for first-authored publications. The three most highly cited Canadian psycho-oncology researchers are Dr. Kerry Courneya (University of Alberta), Dr. Lesley Degner, (University of Manitoba), and Dr. Harvey Chochinov (University of Manitoba). Citation analysis is useful for examining the research performance of psycho-oncology and supportive care researchers and identifying leaders among them.

  20. Statistical regularities in the rank-citation profile of scientists

    CERN Document Server

    Petersen, Alexander M; Succi, Sauro

    2011-01-01

    Recent "science of science" research shows common regularities in the publication patterns of scientific papers across time and discipline. Here we analyze the complete publication careers of 300 scientists and find remarkable regularity in the functional form of the rank-citation profile c_{i}(r) for each scientist i =1...300. We find that the rank-ordered citation distribution c_{i}(r) can be approximated by a discrete generalized beta distribution (DGBD) over the entire range of ranks r, which allows for the characterization and comparison of c_{i}(r) using a common framework. The functional form of the DGBD has two scaling exponents, beta_i and gamma_i, which determine the scaling behavior of c_{i}(r) for both small and large rank r. The crossover between two scaling regimes suggests a complex reinforcement or positive-feedback relation between the impact of a scientist's most famous papers and the impact of his/her other papers. Moreover, since two scientists with equivalent Hirsch h-index values may hav...

  1. The dynamics of patent citations

    OpenAIRE

    Marco, Alan C.

    2006-01-01

    The use of patent citations as a measure of patent "quality" increased dramatically in recent years. I estimate the hazard of patent citation, and find evidence of unobserved heterogeneity. Hazard estimation provides a means to separate patent quality from citation "inflation."

  2. Complete data lifecycles and citizen science integration via The Public Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, A.; Dosemagen, S.; Warren, J.

    2012-04-01

    The collection, communication, and sharing of data relating to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill proved to be a case study in the lack of data transparency and poor collaboration on a variety of levels. British Petroleum and the government worked together to keep the public out of the spill area while collecting over 31,000 water and sediment samples from the Gulf of Mexico after the initial explosion in April, 2010. Although thousands of images were immediately collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the US Geological Survey, some of those raw data sets still remain inaccessible, are in difficult to use formats, or have been modified for public release. The lack of sharing of information by federal agencies and BP was particularly frustrating given the use of publicly funded resources. Discrepancies between information posted on federal and state websites and conditions in the field were apparent and a key factor in the poor relations between authorities and local residents. The conditions under which data is collected, the affiliation of the authors, and the intended use, vastly impacts how well we trust those data. The solution, we believe, is for local communities to produce their own high-quality data through collaboration with organizations such as The Public Laboratory for Open Technology and Science. The Public Laboratory community worked with Gulf Coast residents in the field to document the effects of oil on shorelines with do-it-yourself aerial photography. For less than 100 in parts, we used helium balloons and kites to send cameras to over a thousand feet, and stitched the resulting images into high-resolution maps using our free, open-source software. Over a hundred volunteers hit the beaches to take tens of thousands of photos, depicting slicks, oiled wetlands, and the birds, fish, and plants threatened by the disaster. Our efforts resulted in the largest repository of publicly archived oil spill data to date and it is

  3. On the framing of patent citations and academic paper citations in reflecting knowledge linkage:A discussion of the discrepancy of their divergent value-orientations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Rui; MENG; Liansheng

    2010-01-01

    It has been widely recognized that academic paper citations will reflect scientific knowledge linkage.Patent citations are similar to academic paper citations in many aspects:Citation frequency distribution is often skewed;citation frequency varies from one subject field to another and authors’/inventors’preference for citing relevant literature is usually confined to their own native language.However,regardless of these seemingly similarities,the patent citation is unique and special.It is constructed by incorporating information providers from multiple sources,such as from examiners,inventors,attorneys and/or the public.It is driven by a value-orientation for the monopolization of market production under regulations of Patent Laws.It is also practiced under the sway of an industrial culture embedded with a notion of"creative destruction".In view of the contextual complexities of patent citations,simply applying the data criteria and citation behavior analysis of academic paper citations to that of patentbibliometrics for the purpose of reflecting knowledge linkage is both conceptually and technically illogical and unreasonable.This paper attempts to delve into the issue of the currently misconceived assertions and practice about"transplanting"the methodology of academic paper citations en masse indiscriminately into the practice of patent citations.It is hoped that such a study would yield improved result stemming from the practice of patent citations for reflecting knowledge linkage in the future.

  4. From Attention to Citation, What and How Does Altmetrics Work?

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xianwen; Fang, Zhichao; Mao, Wenli

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly and social impacts of scientific publications could be measured by various metrics. In this study, the relationship between various metrics of 63,805 PLOS research articles are studied. Generally, article views correlate well with citation, however, different types of article view have different levels of correlation with citation, when pdf download correlates the citation most significantly. It's necessary for publishers and journals to provide detailed and comprehensive article metrics. Although the low correlation between social attention and citation is confirmed by this study and previous studies, more than ever, we find that social attention is highly correlated with article view, especially the browser html view. Social attention is the important source that bringing network traffic to browser html view and may lead to citation subsequently. High altmetric score has the potential role in promoting the long-term academic impact of articles, when a conceptual model is proposed to interpret the ...

  5. Citation Networks of Communication Journals, 1977-1985: Cliques and Positions, Citations Made and Citations Received.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Ronald E.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Analyzes the citation pattern among all communication journals covered by the first nine years of the "Journal Citation Reports" volume of the "Social Sciences Citation Index" (1977-1985). Notes that the communication field exhibits clustering and inbreeding, consisting of cliques of interpersonal journals, mass media journals,…

  6. Robustness and discriminatory strength of citation-based journal indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Peter; Christensen, Anette Luther

    AIM: A plethora of journal indicators exists, and are used e.g. in national assessment exercises as part of the basis for university funding. Recent studies report as many as 39 indicators of which the major part are citation based. While studies have shown these citation-based journal indicators...... to correlate, it is assumed that some indicators may be better at discriminating “good” from “bad” journals, and it is consequently assumed that some indicators are more robust than other. This study aims at describing these attributes for a selection of the most promising and/or most used citation......-based journal indicators. METHODS: We use Bayes' theorem to illustrate the connection between journal indicators and the underlying citations. This method is closely related to that of Lehmann, Jackson & Lautrup (2006). This is a work in progress. MATERIALS: Complete citation data from Web of Science for select...

  7. Data Citation Services in the High-Energy Physics Community

    CERN Document Server

    Herterich, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    A paradigm change in scholarly communication is underway. Supporting Open Science, an effort to make scientific research data accessible to all interested parties by openly publishing research and encouraging others to do the same thereby making it easier to communicate scientific knowledge, is a part of the change that has become increasingly important for (digital) libraries. Digital libraries are able to play a significant role in enabling Open Science by facilitating data sharing, discovery and re-use. Because data citation is often mentioned as one incentive for data sharing, enabling data citation is a crucial feature of research data services. In this article we present a case study of data citation services for the High-Energy Physics (HEP) community using digital library technology. Our example shows how the concept of data citation is implemented for the complete research workflow, covering data production, publishing, citation and tracking of data reuse. We also describe challenges faced and distil...

  8. Measures of health sciences journal use: a comparison of vendor, link-resolver, and local citation statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Sandra L; Blecic, Deborah D; Martin, Kristin

    2013-04-01

    Libraries require efficient and reliable methods to assess journal use. Vendors provide complete counts of articles retrieved from their platforms. However, if a journal is available on multiple platforms, several sets of statistics must be merged. Link-resolver reports merge data from all platforms into one report but only record partial use because users can access library subscriptions from other paths. Citation data are limited to publication use. Vendor, link-resolver, and local citation data were examined to determine correlation. Because link-resolver statistics are easy to obtain, the study library especially wanted to know if they correlate highly with the other measures. Vendor, link-resolver, and local citation statistics for the study institution were gathered for health sciences journals. Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients were calculated. There was a high positive correlation between all three data sets, with vendor data commonly showing the highest use. However, a small percentage of titles showed anomalous results. Link-resolver data correlate well with vendor and citation data, but due to anomalies, low link-resolver data would best be used to suggest titles for further evaluation using vendor data. Citation data may not be needed as it correlates highly with other measures.

  9. Measures of health sciences journal use: a comparison of vendor, link-resolver, and local citation statistics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Groote, Sandra L.; Blecic, Deborah D.; Martin, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Libraries require efficient and reliable methods to assess journal use. Vendors provide complete counts of articles retrieved from their platforms. However, if a journal is available on multiple platforms, several sets of statistics must be merged. Link-resolver reports merge data from all platforms into one report but only record partial use because users can access library subscriptions from other paths. Citation data are limited to publication use. Vendor, link-resolver, and local citation data were examined to determine correlation. Because link-resolver statistics are easy to obtain, the study library especially wanted to know if they correlate highly with the other measures. Methods: Vendor, link-resolver, and local citation statistics for the study institution were gathered for health sciences journals. Spearman rank-order correlation coefficients were calculated. Results: There was a high positive correlation between all three data sets, with vendor data commonly showing the highest use. However, a small percentage of titles showed anomalous results. Discussion and Conclusions: Link-resolver data correlate well with vendor and citation data, but due to anomalies, low link-resolver data would best be used to suggest titles for further evaluation using vendor data. Citation data may not be needed as it correlates highly with other measures. PMID:23646026

  10. 75 FR 36673 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Public Museum of West Michigan, Grand Rapids, MI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... inadvertently discovered during construction for a subdivision by property owner Gar-Mar Inc. In 1968, Gar-Mar... a construction project and subsequently excavated by the Grand Rapids Public Museum. No known.... Bonner. Museum documentation indicates the remains were inadvertently discovered during excavation of a...

  11. Prior Learning Assessment Portfolio Completion: Improved Outcomes at a Public Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Dianna Z.; Ikard, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Prior learning assessment (PLA) is the process of evaluating learning, regardless of when or where the learning occurred, and, if the learning is at the college level, awarding college credit to the possessor of that learning. This article provides an overview of the PLA program at a large public U.S. institution and presents the findings of the…

  12. Leading Indicators: Increasing Statewide Bachelor's Degree Completion Rates at 4-Year Public Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Jeffrey Cody

    2014-01-01

    For the United States to maintain national and global economic stability, colleges must graduate more students. Four-year completion rates have declined and less than one-third of full-time, degree-seeking students graduate in 4 years. Some researchers and policymakers have suggested "leading indicators" to track postsecondary…

  13. 引文失范研究%Research on Citation Anomie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赖方忠

    2013-01-01

    The citation anomie refers that a writer runs against various standards and requirements of the academic community (industry association, organization, or academic research management authority), which are made by the relevant parties according to the laws of the academic development and being con-ducive to academic accumulation and innovation. The types of citation anomie include: unsophisticated, in-complete, unsmooth, ambiguous; excessive and ill-formed. The reason for the citation anomie lies in the lack of scientific citation norms, the absence of ethics, the distortion of education, the referrer's own defects and also the "utilitarian" publishers. To avoid citation anomie, we should establish the citation ethics sys-tem, strengthen publicity and learning, enhance citation knowledge dissemination and increase the citation check (including the notes and references).%引文失范是引用者违背学术共同体(行业协会、组织或学术研究管理机关)根据学术发展规律参与制定的有利于学术积累和创新的关于文献引用(引证)的各种准则和相关要求。引文失范的类型主要有:引而不精、引而不全、引而不通、引而不著、多引少著、引著不矩。引文失范的原因在于引文规范的缺失、科研伦理的缺位、引文教育的失真、引用者自身的缺陷以及出版单位的“功利”追逐。力戒引文失范,应建立引文伦理规范制度、加强引文伦理规范制度的宣传与学习、强化引文知识的宣传普及、增加对引文(含注释及参考文献)的校验。

  14. Statistical regularities in the rank-citation profile of individual scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alexander; Stanley, H. Eugene; Succi, Sauro

    2011-03-01

    Citation counts and paper tallies are ubiquitous in the achievement ratings of individual scientists. As a result, there have been many recent studies which propose measures for scientific impact (e.g. the h -index) and the distribution of impact measures among scientists. However, being just a single number, the h -index cannot account for the full impact information contained in an author's set of publications. Alternative ``single-number'' indices are also frequently proposed, but they too suffer from the shortfalls of not being comprehensive. In this talk I will discuss an alternative approach, which is to analyze the fundamental properties of the entire rank-citation profile (from which all single-value indices are derived). Using the complete publication careers of 200 highly-cited physicists and 100 Assistant professors, I will demonstrate remarkable statistical regularity in the functional form of the rank-citation profile ci (r) for each physicist i = 1 . . . 300 . We find that ci (r) can be approximated by a discrete generalized beta distribution over the entire range of ranks r , which allows for the characterization and comparison of ci (r) using a common framework. Since two scientists can have equivalent hi values while having different ci (r) , our results demonstrate the utility of a scaling parameter, βi , in conjunction with hi , to quantify a scientist's publication impact.

  15. Data Citation Policies of Data Providers within the scope of Longitudinal Studies in Life Course Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhold, A.; Rittberger, M.; Mahrholz, N.

    2016-07-01

    In this article, a small-scale case study analyzing the nature of data citation policies within the scope of longitudinal studies in life course research is presented. The sample consists of eight data providers from Europe, North-America and Australia and was evaluated with regard to eight criteria which potentially affect data citation behavior of researchers in the field, for example the wording of data citation obligations or sanctions for not citing research data in accordance to given requirements. The study demonstrates that research data providers follow a wide range of approaches to data citation, especially in terms of data citation location within a publication as well as disposal obligations for data-related publications. However, this diversity might lead to inconsistency in data citation behaviour and also to a general lack of comparability of data citation quantity and quality as relevant factors in research evaluation. (Author)

  16. Citation Rate Predictors in the Plastic Surgery Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Joseph; Calotta, Nicholas; Doshi, Ankur; Soni, Ashwin; Milton, Jacqueline; May, James W; Tufaro, Anthony P

    The purpose of this study is to determine and characterize the scientific and nonscientific factors that influence the rate of article citation in the field of plastic surgery. Cross-sectional study. We reviewed all entries in Annals of Plastic Surgery and Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive, and Aesthetic Surgery from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2007; and Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2008. All scientific articles were analyzed and several article characteristics were extracted. The number of citations at 5 years was collected as the outcome variable. A multivariable analysis was performed to determine which variables were associated with higher citations rates. A total of 2456 articles were identified of which only 908 fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Most studies were publications in the fields of reconstructive (26.3%) or pediatric/craniofacial (17.6%) surgery. The median number of citations 5 years from publication was 8. In the multivariable analysis, factors associated with higher citations rates were subspecialty field (p = 0.0003), disclosed conflict of interest (p = 0.04), number of authors (p = 0.04), and journal (p = 0.02). We have found that higher level of evidence (or other study methodology factors) is not associated with higher citation rates. Instead, conflict of interest, subspecialty topic, journal, and number of authors are strong predictors of high citation rates in plastic surgery. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 15 CFR 200.106 - Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., interagency reports, and papers in the journals and books of professional organizations, technological... services are published in each issue of the bimonthly “NIST Journal of Research” 2 and the NIST monthly magazine, “Dimensions/NIST” 2. Complete citations to NIST publications, along with information...

  18. Can scientific journals be classified based on their citation profiles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed-Amir Marashi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Classification of scientific publications is of great importance in biomedical research evaluation. However, accurate classification of research publications is challenging and normally is performed in a rather subjective way. In the present paper, we propose to classify biomedical publications into superfamilies, by analysing their citation profiles, i.e. the location of citations in the structure of citing articles. Such a classification may help authors to find the appropriate biomedical journal for publication, may make journal comparisons more rational, and may even help planners to better track the consequences of their policies on biomedical research.

  19. Data Sharing Effect on Article Citation Rate in Paleoceanography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    The validation of scientific results requires reproducible methods and data. Often, however, data sets supporting research articles are not openly accessible and interlinked. This analysis tests whether open sharing and linking of supporting data through the PANGAEA° data library measurably increases the citation rate of articles published between 1993 and 2010 in the journal Paleoceanography as reported in the Thomson Reuters Web of Science database. The 12.85% (171) of articles with publicly available supporting data sets received 19.94% (8,056) of the aggregate citations (40,409). Publicly available data were thus significantly (p=0.007, 95% confidence interval) associated with about 35% more citations per article than the average of all articles sampled over the 18-year study period (1,331), and the increase is fairly consistent over time (14 of 18 years). This relationship between openly available, curated data and increased citation rate may incentivize researchers to share their data.

  20. [Urology and Sexology in Berlin 1880-1933: Original citations for the establishment of this frontier of urology - protagonists as reflected in their publications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Friedrich H; Fangerau, Heiner

    2016-02-01

    The connections between urology and sexology are often not obvious today. At the end of the 19th century both specialties developed in parallel especially in Berlin and had a fruitful relationship. Urologic journals and books were an ideal forum for publication especially for sexologists.

  1. Assessing citation networks for dissemination and implementation research frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolarus, Ted A; Lehmann, Todd; Tabak, Rachel G; Harris, Jenine; Lecy, Jesse; Sales, Anne E

    2017-07-28

    A recent review of frameworks used in dissemination and implementation (D&I) science described 61 judged to be related either to dissemination, implementation, or both. The current use of these frameworks and their contributions to D&I science more broadly has yet to be reviewed. For these reasons, our objective was to determine the role of these frameworks in the development of D&I science. We used the Web of Science™ Core Collection and Google Scholar™ to conduct a citation network analysis for the key frameworks described in a recent systematic review of D&I frameworks (Am J Prev Med 43(3):337-350, 2012). From January to August 2016, we collected framework data including title, reference, publication year, and citations per year and conducted descriptive and main path network analyses to identify those most important in holding the current citation network for D&I frameworks together. The source article contained 119 cited references, with 50 published articles and 11 documents identified as a primary framework reference. The average citations per year for the 61 frameworks reviewed ranged from 0.7 to 103.3 among articles published from 1985 to 2012. Citation rates from all frameworks are reported with citation network analyses for the framework review article and ten highly cited framework seed articles. The main path for the D&I framework citation network is presented. We examined citation rates and the main paths through the citation network to delineate the current landscape of D&I framework research, and opportunities for advancing framework development and use. Dissemination and implementation researchers and practitioners may consider frequency of framework citation and our network findings when planning implementation efforts to build upon this foundation and promote systematic advances in D&I science.

  2. Robustness and discriminatory strength of citation-based journal indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Peter; Christensen, Anette Luther

    to correlate, it is assumed that some indicators may be better at discriminating “good” from “bad” journals, and it is consequently assumed that some indicators are more robust than other. This study aims at describing these attributes for a selection of the most promising and/or most used citation......-based journal indicators. METHODS: We use Bayes' theorem to illustrate the connection between journal indicators and the underlying citations. This method is closely related to that of Lehmann, Jackson & Lautrup (2006). This is a work in progress. MATERIALS: Complete citation data from Web of Science for select...... subject categories. As this is a work in progress, subject and indicator selection is not yet complete, nor is data acquisition. RESULTS: Examplar data may be seen in figure 1, displaying the robustness of the journal impact factor for describing citations. REFERENCES: Lehmann, S., Jackson, A.D., Lautrup...

  3. Data Citation in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourcle, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Many observatories maintain bibliographies to document their impact and justify their continued funding[1], an effort that requires humans to discover and curate links between the scientific papers and the data that was used as evidence. The "Best Practices for Creating a Telescope Bibliography", endorsed by IAU C5 WG Libraries, recommends full text searching and human examination of each paper.[2] These efforts do not scale well.It is unlikely that articles published in journals from other disciples would be found. This is particularly a problem for solar physics, as solar data has applicability in astrophysics, space weather, and even the earth sciences.As our scientists are not on the editorial boards of the journals from other disciplines, we can't ensure proper attribution to allow these relationships to be discovered via full text searching.To better deal with tracking cross-discipline data usage, a number of groups have come up with guidelines and principles for data citation. In 2012, the National Academy's Board on Research Data and Information released the report "For Attribution-Developing Data Attribution and Citation Practices and Standards" [3] and it was followed last year by the CODATA-ICSTI report "Out of Cite, Out of Mind".[4]Participants from a number of groups synthesized a single set of principles for data citation that could be endorsed by all groups involved in research.[5] Implementing these principles can help to improve the scientific ecosystem by giving proper attribution to all contributors to data, improving transparency and reproducability, and making data more easily reusable to both astronomers and other researchers.We will present the Joint Declaration of Data Citation Principles, discuss the implications of them for astronomical data, and recommend steps towards implementation.References:[1] Accomazzi, et.al, 2012. http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8448E..0KA[2] Bishop, Grothkopf & Lagerstrom, 2012. http://iau-commission5

  4. An evaluation of impacts in "Nanoscience & nanotechnology:" Steps towards standards for citation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.

    2013-01-01

    One is inclined to conceptualize impact in terms of citations per publication, and thus as an average. However, citation distributions are skewed, and the average has the disadvantage that the number of publications is used in the denominator. Using hundred percentiles, one can integrate the normali

  5. Caveats for the use of citation indicators in research and journal evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leydesdorff, L.

    2008-01-01

    Aging of publications, percentage of self-citations, and impact vary from journal to journal within fields of science. The assumption that citation and publication practices are homogenous within specialties and fields of science is invalid. Furthermore, the delineation of fields and among specialti

  6. Restricting the h-index to a citation time window: A case study of a timed Hirsch index

    CERN Document Server

    Schreiber, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The h-index has been shown to increase in many cases mostly because of citations to rather old publications. This inertia can be circumvented by restricting the evaluation to a citation time window. Here I report results of an empirical study analyzing the evolution of the thus defined timed h-index in dependence on the length of the citation time window.

  7. Outsourcing and benchmarking in a rural public hospital: does economic theory provide the complete answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S H

    2003-01-01

    The ideology and pronouncements of the Australian Government in introducing 'competitive neutrality' to the public sector has improved efficiency and resource usage. In the health sector, the Human Services Department directed that non-clinical and clinical areas be market tested through benchmarking services against the private sector, with the possibility of outsourcing. These services included car parking, computing, laundry, engineering, cleaning, catering, medical imaging (radiology), pathology, pharmacy, allied health and general practice. Managers, when they choose between outsourcing, and internal servicing and production, would thus ideally base their decision on economic principles. Williamson's transaction cost theory studies the governance mechanisms that can be used to achieve economic efficiency and proposes that the optimal organisation structure is that which minimises transaction costs or the costs of exchange. Williamson proposes that four variables will affect such costs, namely: (i) frequency of exchange; (ii) asset specificity; (iii) environmental uncertainty; and (iv) threat of opportunism. This paper provides evidence from a rural public hospital and examines whether Williamson's transaction cost theory is applicable. Case study research operates within the interpretivism paradigm and is used in this research to uncover why the outsourcing decision was made. Such research aims to study real-life experiences by examining the way people think and act and, in contrast to positivism, allows the interviewer to participate to better understand the details and features of the experiences. In the present research, individual interviews were conducted with managers of the hospital and owners and staff of the vendor organisations using semi- and unstructured questions to ascertain the extent of, and processes used in, outsourcing specific functional areas, and areas that were not outsourced. Pathology, radiology, dental technician services and lawn

  8. Self-citation rate and impact factor in ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimouni, Michael; Segal, Ori

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the self-citation rate (SCR) of ophthalmology journals, determine its possible effect on a journal's impact factor (IF) and compare the SCR of subspecialty journals versus general ophthalmology journals. A retrospective consecutive study of ophthalmology journals listed in the Journal Citations Report (JCR) 2013. We retrieved these parameters from each journal's report: IF, total citations, self-citations, SCR and IF without self-citations (corrected IF). A significant correlation was detected between the number of self-citations and publications (R(2) = 86.3, p = 0.000). Subspecialty journals had a significantly higher SCR than general journals (p = 0.017). No significant difference was found in terms of IF and corrected IF between general and subspecialty journals (p = 0.260 and p = 0.108, respectively). No significant correlation between IF and SCR was detected (p = 0.099). The corrected IF was inversely correlated with SCR (R(2) = -32.6, p = 0.013). An inverse correlation was detected between SCR and IF in the 29 ophthalmology journals with the lowest IF (R(2) = -57.3, p = 0.001). Unlike other fields of medicine, the IF of an ophthalmology journal does not correlate with its SCR. Self-citation is found more often in journals with a low corrected IF and is inversely correlated with IF in the bottom half. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Encouraging data citation and discovery with the Data Citation Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Force, Megan M.; Robinson, Nigel J.

    2014-10-01

    An overview of the Data Citation Index is provided. Thomson Reuters developed this resource in response to a stated desire among members of the research community for increased attribution of non-traditional scholarly output. Launched in October of 2012 on the Web of science research platform, its aims include linking published research articles to their underlying data sets and tracking the citation of the data, as well as encouraging bibliographic citation of data. Cross-disciplinary search capabilities in the Index enable new possibilities for data discovery and synthesis. Data repositories are evaluated with respect to various selection criteria, with particular attention to their relevance to scientific and scholarly research. Index content reflects current data deposition practices. As data citation standards and practices continue to move toward widespread formalization and adoption, the initiative seeks to address issues of data citation, reuse, and author credit in a developing climate.

  10. EndNote and Reference Manager Citation formats compared to "instructions to authors" in top medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Frances A; Gall, Carole

    2006-01-01

    The study compared citation format in EndNote version 7 and Reference Manager version 11 with the citation format for references found in the instructions to authors from the most significant medical literature. The resulting information should be very useful to those who depend on citation management software to format and organize their references for publication in medicine, and librarians and others who teach the use of citation management software.

  11. Fame and obsolescence: Disentangling growth and aging dynamics of patent citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, K. W.; Governale, M.; Jaffe, A. B.; Zülicke, U.

    2017-04-01

    We present an analysis of citations accrued over time by patents granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office in 1998. In contrast to previous studies, a disaggregation by technology category is performed, and exogenously caused citation-number growth is controlled for. Our approach reveals an intrinsic citation rate that clearly separates into an—in the long run, exponentially time-dependent—aging function and a completely time-independent preferential-attachment-type growth kernel. For the general case of such a separable citation rate, we obtain the time-dependent citation distribution analytically in a form that is valid for any functional form of its aging and growth parts. Good agreement between theory and long-time characteristics of patent-citation data establishes our work as a useful framework for addressing still open questions about knowledge-propagation dynamics, such as the observed excess of citations at short times.

  12. Bibliographical References from ERIC Citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Trudy W.; Bowlby, Sylva M.

    The educational document and journal citations found in the ERIC (Educational Resources Information Center) system are explained and the proper translation into standard bibliographic form is given for the usual and irregular cases. Section 1 explains the meaning of each part of an ERIC citation and, in parallel fashion, the parts and order of a…

  13. Completion publication of abstracts presented at the scientific meetings of the Pan-African Pediatric Surgical Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasir, Abdulrasheed A; Ameh, Emmanuel A; Poenaru, Dan

    2013-01-01

    The expected knowledge translation from discovery into practice occurs when presentations from major scientific meetings are published in peer-reviewed literature. The purpose of this study was to determine the extent of complete publication of peer-reviewed articles arising from presentations at the biennial meetings of the Pan-African Pediatric Surgical Association (PAPSA). All the abstracts accepted for presentation at the biennial meeting of PAPSA between 2006 and 2010 were identified from the conference abstract booklets and published abstracts in the African Journal of Paediatric Surgery. The presentations were searched for publication in Medline/PubMed, Google Scholar, and African Journal OnLine through October 2012, using key words from the abstract title and names of authors listed in the abstracts. A total of 164 abstracts were accepted for presentation, consisting of 118 (72%) oral/podium presentations and 46 (28%) poster presentations. One hundred and thirty-three abstracts (81.1%) came from African countries and 31 (18.9%) from outside Africa. Overall, 49 (29.9%) abstracts resulted in full-text publications in 20 peer-reviewed journals. Thirty-eight of the publications were from Africa (representing 28.6% of abstracts from Africa) and 11 from outside Africa (33.3% of abstracts from outside Africa). The median time to publication was 15 months [interquartile range (IQR) 5-26 months]. The publication rate was statistically significantly correlated to the year of publication (P = 0.016) and the use of comparative statistics in the study (P = 0.005), but not to the study design, study subjects, or institution. The majority of the studies were published in the African Journal of Paediatric Surgery and Pediatric Surgery International (14 and 11 of the 49 reports, respectively). The H-index for international abstracts (median 35, IQR 35-76) was significantly higher than that of African abstracts (14, 3-35) (P = 0.002). Only a third of abstracts presented at

  14. A Falsification of the Citation Impediment in the Taxonomic Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Florian M.; Pautasso, Marco; Zettel, Herbert; Moder, Karl; Arthofer, Wolfgang; Schlick-Steiner, Birgit C.

    2015-01-01

    Current science evaluation still relies on citation performance, despite criticisms of purely bibliometric research assessments. Biological taxonomy suffers from a drain of knowledge and manpower, with poor citation performance commonly held as one reason for this impediment. But is there really such a citation impediment in taxonomy? We compared the citation numbers of 306 taxonomic and 2291 non-taxonomic research articles (2009–2012) on mosses, orchids, ciliates, ants, and snakes, using Web of Science (WoS) and correcting for journal visibility. For three of the five taxa, significant differences were absent in citation numbers between taxonomic and non-taxonomic papers. This was also true for all taxa combined, although taxonomic papers received more citations than non-taxonomic ones. Our results show that, contrary to common belief, taxonomic contributions do not generally reduce a journal's citation performance and might even increase it. The scope of many journals rarely featuring taxonomy would allow editors to encourage a larger number of taxonomic submissions. Moreover, between 1993 and 2012, taxonomic publications accumulated faster than those from all biological fields. However, less than half of the taxonomic studies were published in journals in WoS. Thus, editors of highly visible journals inviting taxonomic contributions could benefit from taxonomy's strong momentum. The taxonomic output could increase even more than at its current growth rate if: (i) taxonomists currently publishing on other topics returned to taxonomy and (ii) non-taxonomists identifying the need for taxonomic acts started publishing these, possibly in collaboration with taxonomists. Finally, considering the high number of taxonomic papers attracted by the journal Zootaxa, we expect that the taxonomic community would indeed use increased chances of publishing in WoS indexed journals. We conclude that taxonomy's standing in the present citation-focused scientific landscape could

  15. The scientific impact of nations: journal placement and citation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Matthew J; Weinberger, Cody; Bruna, Emilio M; Allesina, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    International collaboration is becoming increasingly important for the advancement of science. To gain a more precise understanding of how factors such as international collaboration influence publication success, we divide publication success into two categories: journal placement and citation performance. Analyzing all papers published between 1996 and 2012 in eight disciplines, we find that those with more countries in their affiliations performed better in both categories. Furthermore, specific countries vary in their effects both individually and in combination. Finally, we look at the relationship between national output (in papers published) and input (in citations received) over the 17 years, expanding upon prior depictions by also plotting an expected proportion of citations based on Journal Placement. Discrepancies between this expectation and the realized proportion of citations illuminate trends in performance, such as the decline of the Global North in response to rapidly developing countries, especially China. Yet, most countries' show little to no discrepancy, meaning that, in most cases, citation proportion can be predicted by Journal Placement alone. This reveals an extreme asymmetry between the opinions of a few reviewers and the degree to which paper acceptance and citation rates influence career advancement.

  16. The scientific impact of nations: journal placement and citation performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Smith

    Full Text Available International collaboration is becoming increasingly important for the advancement of science. To gain a more precise understanding of how factors such as international collaboration influence publication success, we divide publication success into two categories: journal placement and citation performance. Analyzing all papers published between 1996 and 2012 in eight disciplines, we find that those with more countries in their affiliations performed better in both categories. Furthermore, specific countries vary in their effects both individually and in combination. Finally, we look at the relationship between national output (in papers published and input (in citations received over the 17 years, expanding upon prior depictions by also plotting an expected proportion of citations based on Journal Placement. Discrepancies between this expectation and the realized proportion of citations illuminate trends in performance, such as the decline of the Global North in response to rapidly developing countries, especially China. Yet, most countries' show little to no discrepancy, meaning that, in most cases, citation proportion can be predicted by Journal Placement alone. This reveals an extreme asymmetry between the opinions of a few reviewers and the degree to which paper acceptance and citation rates influence career advancement.

  17. Book citations: influence of epidemiologic thought in the academic community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porta Miquel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Whilst their 'death' has often been certified, books remain highly important to most professions and academic disciplines. Analyses of citations received by epidemiologic texts may complement other views on epidemiology. The objective was to assess the number of citations received by some books of epidemiology and public health, as a first step towards studying the influence of epidemiological thought and thinking in academia. For this purpose, Institute for Scientific Information/ Thomson Scientific - Web of Science/ Web of Knowledgedatabase was consulted, in May 2006. The book by Rothman & Greenland appeared to have received the highest number of citations overall (over 8,000 and per year. The books by Kleinbaum et al, and by Breslow & Day received around 5,000 citations. In terms of citations per year the book by Sackett et al ranks 3rd, and the one by Rose, 4th of those included in this preliminary study. Other books which were influential in the classrooms collected comparatively less citations. Results offer a rich picture of the academic influences and trends of epidemiologic methods and reasoning on public health, clinical medicine and the other health, life and social sciences. They may contribute to assess epidemiologists' efforts to demarcate epidemiology and to assert epistemic authority, and to analyze some historical influences of economic, social and political forces on epidemiological research.

  18. Applying weighted PageRank to author citation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ding, Ying

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to identify whether different weighted PageRank algorithms can be applied to author citation networks to measure the popularity and prestige of a scholar from a citation perspective. Information Retrieval (IR) was selected as a test field and data from 1956-2008 were collected from Web of Science (WOS). Weighted PageRank with citation and publication as weighted vectors were calculated on author citation networks. The results indicate that both popularity rank and prestige rank were highly correlated with the weighted PageRank. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was conducted to detect relationships among these different measures. For capturing prize winners within the IR field, prestige rank outperformed all the other measures.

  19. Citation bias of hepato-biliary randomized clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaergard, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2002-01-01

    -1996. From each trial, we extracted the statistical significance of the primary study outcome (positive or negative), the disease area, and methodological quality (randomization and double blinding). The number of citations during two calendar years after publication was obtained from Science Citation Index......The objective of this study was to assess whether trials with a positive (i.e., statistically significant) outcome are cited more often than negative trials. We reviewed 530 randomized clinical trials on hepato-biliary diseases published in 11 English-language journals indexed in MEDLINE from 1985....... There was a significant positive association between a statistically significant study outcome and the citation frequency (beta, 0.55, 95% confidence interval, 0.39-0.72). The disease area and adequate generation of the allocation sequence were also significant predictors of the citation frequency. We concluded...

  20. Comprehensive bibliographic coverage of the social sciences and humanities in a citation index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivertsen, Gunnar; Larsen, Birger

    2012-01-01

    A well-designed and comprehensive citation index for the social sciences and humanities has many potential uses, but has yet to be realised. Significant parts of the scholarly production in these areas are not published in international journals, but in national scholarly journals, in book chapters...... or in monographs. The potential for covering these literatures more comprehensively can now be investigated empirically using a complete publication output data set from the higher education sector of an entire country (Norway). We find that while the international journals in the social sciences and humanities...... are promising for a more comprehensive coverage of the social sciences and humanities....

  1. Towards the discovery of citation cartels in citation networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iztok Fister

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this perspective, our goal is to present and elucidate a thus far largely overlooked problem that is arising in scientific publishing, namely the identification and discovery of citation cartels in citation networks. Taking from the well-known definition of a community in the realm of network science, namely that people within a community share significantly more links with each other as they do outside of this community, we propose that citation cartels are defined as groups of authors that cite each other disproportionately more than they do other groups of authors that work on the same subject. Evidently, the identification of citation cartels is somewhat different, although similar to the identification of communities in networks. We systematically expose the problem, provide theoretical examples, and outline an algorithmic guide on how to approach the subject.

  2. Towards the discovery of citation cartels in citation networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fister, Iztok; Fister, Iztok; Perc, Matjaž

    2016-12-01

    In this perspective, our goal is to present and elucidate a thus far largely overlooked problem that is arising in scientific publishing, namely the identification and discovery of citation cartels in citation networks. Taking from the well-known definition of a community in the realm of network science, namely that people within a community share significantly more links with each other as they do outside of this community, we propose that citation cartels are defined as groups of authors that cite each other disproportionately more than they do other groups of authors that work on the same subject. Evidently, the identification of citation cartels is somewhat different, although similar to the identification of communities in networks. We systematically expose the problem, provide theoretical examples, and outline an algorithmic guide on how to approach the subject.

  3. Semantic Web for Reliable Citation Analysis in Scholarly Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben Tous

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of the impact of scholarly artifacts is constrained by current unreliable practices in cross-referencing, citation discovering, and citation indexing and analysis, which have not kept pace with the technological advances that are occurring in several areas like knowledge management and security. Because citation analysis has become the primary component in scholarly impact factor calculation, and considering the relevance of this metric within both the scholarly publishing value chain and (especially important the professional curriculum evaluation of scholarly professionals, we defend that current practices need to be revised. This paper describes a reference architecture that aims to provide openness and reliability to the citation-tracking lifecycle. The solution relies on the use of digitally signed semantic metadata in the different stages of the scholarly publishing workflow in such a manner that authors, publishers, repositories, and citation-analysis systems will have access to independent reliable evidences that are resistant to forgery, impersonation, and repudiation. As far as we know, this is the first paper to combine Semantic Web technologies and public-key cryptography to achieve reliable citation analysis in scholarly publishing

  4. Citation Type Analysis on Humanity Literature of Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yueh Tsay

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Using informetrics and citation analysis, the present study explores and compares characteristics and types of citations in the humanity journal articles that published in Taiwan. Research articles published in 2011, from top humanity journals, assessed by the Institute of Humanities and Social Sciences, National Science Council in Taiwan, were collected and analyzed. The analysis was done by structure of journal article and location of citations. In addition to citations appearing in the text, the phenomena of citation type will be compared and discussed in the latter part. The results of this study revealed articles of literature, history, philosophy and arts were mostly argumentative, while linguistic articles tended to comply with IMRAD (Introduction, Methods and Materials, Results,And Discussion formats. Introducing primary materials from original works, humanity scholars tended to cite for factual descriptions or to support authors’ perspectives. Secondary materials, such as later studies on the original works by other scholars, were seen the most in the disciplines of linguistics while the least in that of history. In general, the distribution of citation types is similar between articles in domestic and foreign journals; merely minor differences occurred among disciplines. While citing characteristics and information needs of humanities scholars revealed in this study may contribute to collection development of libraries or refinement of information services to researchers, suggestions based on analysis of research results may also serve as reference for standardization of writing and publication of journal articles in Taiwan. Aiming at further exploration of citations, this study is expected to provide a better understanding of the nature of citations and to serve as a foundation for future empirical studies.

  5. Citation Analysis of Library Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosy Jan

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Citation analysis of all the journal articles published in the Library Trends from 1994-2007 is carried out. 593 articles are published in the journal during 14 years. Highest number (52 of articles is published in 2004. The Journal contained 15662 references for the study period of which 13783 are p-citations and 1879 are e-citations. Every issue published approx. 11 articles and each article has an average of 23.2 p-references and 3.1 e-citations. It was found that 44.51 % print books are consulted by the authors and 0% e-books are accessed. Authors have consulted 44.04% p-journals as against 11.82% e-journals. Figures shows that 88.14% other web references are used in the articles reference. Female contribution (52.34% accounts more than male contribution (47.66%.

  6. Citation Environment of Angewandte Chemie

    CERN Document Server

    Bornmann, Lutz; Marx, Werner

    2009-01-01

    Recently, aggregated journal-journal citation networks were made accessible from the perspective of each journal included in the Science Citation Index see (http://www.leydesdorff.net/). The local matrices can be used to inspect the relevant citation environment of a journal using statistical analysis and visualization techniques from social network analysis. The inspection gives an answer to the question what the local impact of this and other journals in the environment is. In this study the citation environment of Angewandte Chemie was analysed. Angewandte Chemie is one of the prime chemistry journals in the world. Its environment was compared with that of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. The results of the environment analyses give a detailed insight into the field-embeddedness of Angewandte Chemie. The impacts of the German and international editions of this journal are compared.

  7. The highly-cited Electrocardiogram-related articles in science citation index expanded: characteristics and hotspots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xianglin; Gu, Jiaojiao; Yan, Hong; Xu, Zhi; Ren, Bing; Yang, Yaming; Yang, Xiaodong; Chen, Qi; Tan, Shaohua

    2014-01-01

    We used bibliometric analysis methodology in the expanded Science Citation Index to identify highly-cited electrocardiogram (ECG)-related articles with total citations (TC2012) exceeding 100 from the publication year to 2012. Web of Science search tools were used to identify the highly-cited articles. The aspects analyzed for highly cited publications included effect of time on citation analysis, journals and Web of Science categories, number of authors per publication, originating institutions and countries, total citation and total citation per year life cycles of articles (C2012) and research hotspots. Results showed that a total of 467 electrocardiogram-related publications were regarded as the highly-cited publications. TC2012 ranged from 101 to 2879, with 215 as the average number of citations. No highly-cited publications have emerged yet during the first two years of the present 2010 Decade. All 11 countries and institutions originating highly-cited ECG-related publications were developed countries, USA in 9 of them. Four subject categories were identified as hotspots by total citations TC2012 and C2012: atrial fibrillation, long QT syndrome, angina and myocardial infarction, and risk factor analysis and health evaluation.

  8. An analysis of scholarly productivity in United States academic anaesthesiologists by citation bibliometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, P S; Hudetz, J A

    2011-10-01

    The h-index is used to evaluate scholarly productivity in academic medicine, but has not been extensively used in anaesthesia. We analysed the publications, citations, citations per publication and h-index from 1996 to date using the Scopus(®) database for 1630 (1120 men, 510 women) for faculty members from 24 randomly selected US academic anaesthesiology departments The median (interquartile range [range]) h-index of US academic anaesthesiologists was 1 [0-5 (0-44)] with 3 [0-18 (0-398)] total publications, 24 [0-187 (0-8515)] total citations, and 5 [0-14 (0-252)] citations per publication. Faculty members in departments with National Institutes of Health funding were more productive than colleagues in departments with little or no government funding. The h-index increased significantly between successive academic ranks concomitant with increases in the number of publications and total citations. Men had higher median h-index than women concomitant with more publications and citations, but the number of citations per publication was similar between groups. Our results suggest that h-index is a reasonable indicator of scholarly productivity in anaesthesia. The results may help comparisons of academic productivity across countries and may be used to assess whether new initiatives designed to reverse recent declines in academic anaesthetic are working. You can respond to this article at http://www.anaesthesiacorrespondence.com.

  9. Citation Analysis with Mark-and-Recapture

    CERN Document Server

    Loe, Chuan Wen

    2015-01-01

    Mark-and-Recapture is a methodology from Population Biology to estimate the number of a species without counting every individual. This is done by multiple samplings of the species using traps and discounting the instances that were caught repeated. In this paper we show that this methodology is applicable for citation analysis as it is also not feasible to count all the relevant publications of a research topic. In addition this estimation also allows us to propose a stopping rule for researchers to decide how far one should extend their search for relevant literature.

  10. Citations to Australian Astronomy: 5 and 10 Year Benchmarks

    CERN Document Server

    Kenyon, Katherine H; Tu, Jiachin; Zhang, Albert; Graham, Alister W

    2012-01-01

    Expanding upon Pimbblet's informative 2011 analysis of career h-indices for members of the Astronomical Society of Australia, we provide additional citation metrics which are geared to a) quantifying the current performance of b) all professional astronomers in Australia. We have trawled the staff web-pages of Australian Universities, Observatories and Research Organisations hosting professional astronomers, and identified 383 PhD-qualified, research-active, astronomers in the nation - 131 of these are not members of the Astronomical Society of Australia. Using the SAO/NASA Astrophysics Data System, we provide the three following common metrics based on publications in the first decade of the 21st century (2001-2010): h-index, author-normalised citation count and lead-author citation count. We additionally present a somewhat more inclusive analysis, applicable for many early-career researchers, that is based on publications from 2006--2010. Histograms and percentiles, plus top-performer lists, are presented f...

  11. Citation analysis of scientific categories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patience, Gregory S; Patience, Christian A; Blais, Bruno; Bertrand, Francois

    2017-05-01

    Databases catalogue the corpus of research literature into scientific categories and report classes of bibliometric data such as the number of citations to articles, the number of authors, journals, funding agencies, institutes, references, etc. The number of articles and citations in a category are gauges of productivity and scientific impact but a quantitative basis to compare researchers between categories is limited. Here, we compile a list of bibliometric indicators for 236 science categories and citation rates of the 500 most cited articles of each category. The number of citations per paper vary by several orders of magnitude and are highest in multidisciplinary sciences, general internal medicine, and biochemistry and lowest in literature, poetry, and dance. A regression model demonstrates that citation rates to the top articles in each category increase with the square root of the number of articles in a category and decrease proportionately with the age of the references: articles in categories that cite recent research are also cited more frequently. The citation rate correlates positively with the number of funding agencies that finance the research. The category h-index correlates with the average number of cites to the top 500 ranked articles of each category ([Formula: see text]). Furthermore, only a few journals publish the top 500 cited articles in each category: four journals publish 60% ([Formula: see text]) of these and ten publish 81% ([Formula: see text]).

  12. Information Use in History Research: A Citation Analysis of Master's Level Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the need for quantitative investigation into students' use of information resources in historical research. It reports the results of a citation analysis of more than 3,000 citations from master's level history theses submitted between 1998 and 2008 at a mid-sized public university. The study's results support the hypotheses…

  13. Information Use in History Research: A Citation Analysis of Master's Level Theses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherriff, Graham

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the need for quantitative investigation into students' use of information resources in historical research. It reports the results of a citation analysis of more than 3,000 citations from master's level history theses submitted between 1998 and 2008 at a mid-sized public university. The study's results support the hypotheses…

  14. Evidence-based editing: factors influencing the number of citations in a national journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruano-Ravina, Alberto; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos

    2012-09-01

    Citations received by papers published within a journal serve to increase its bibliometric impact. The objective of this paper was to assess the influence of publication language, article type, number of authors, and year of publication on the citations received by papers published in Gaceta Sanitaria, a Spanish-language journal of public health. The information sources were the journal website and the Web of Knowledge, of the Institute of Scientific Information. The period analyzed was from 2007 to 2010. We included original articles, brief original articles, and reviews published within that period. We extracted manually information regarding the variables analyzed and we also differentiated among total citations and self-citations. We constructed logistic regression models to analyze the probability of a Gaceta Sanitaria paper to be cited or not, taking into account the aforementioned independent variables. We also analyzed the probability of receiving citations from non-Spanish authors. Two hundred forty papers fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The included papers received a total of 287 citations, which became 202 when excluding self-citations. The only variable influencing the probability of being cited was the publication year. After excluding never cited papers, time since publication and review papers had the highest probabilities of being cited. Papers in English and review articles had a higher probability of citation from non-Spanish authors. Publication language has no influence on the citations received by a national, non-English journal. Reviews in English have the highest probability of citation from abroad. Editors should decide how to manage this information when deciding policies to raise the bibliometric impact factor of their journals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Citation classics in pediatric orthopaedics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Ranjit A; Dhawale, Arjun A; Zavaglia, Bogard C; Slobogean, Bronwyn L; Mulpuri, Kishore

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles with at least 100 citations published in all orthopaedic journals and to examine their characteristics. All journals dedicated to orthopaedics and its subspecialties were selected from the Journal Citation Report 2001 under the subject category "orthopedics." Articles cited 100 times or more were identified using the database of the Science Citation Index Expanded (SCI-EXPANDED, 1900 to present). The articles were ranked in a comprehensive list. Two authors independently reviewed the full text of each article and applied the inclusion and exclusion criteria to the list of articles. The 2 lists were then compared. All disagreements were resolved by consensus with input from the senior author. The final list of pediatric orthopaedic articles was then compiled. There were a total of 49 journals under the search category "orthopedics." Five journals were excluded as they were non-English journals. The remaining 44 journals were screened for articles with at least 100 citations. A total of 135 clinical pediatric orthopaedic articles cited at least 100 times were included. The most cited article was cited 692 times. The mean number of citations per article was 159 (95% confidence interval, 145-173). All the articles were published between 1949 and 2001, with 1980 and 1989 producing the most citation classics (34). The majority (90) originated from the United States, followed by the United Kingdom (12) and Canada (11). Scoliosis/kyphosis was the most common topic with 26 papers. The second most common subject was hip disorders (24). Therapeutic studies were the most common study type (71). Ninety-seven papers were assigned a 4 for level of evidence. The list of citation classics in pediatric orthopaedic articles is useful for several reasons. It identifies important contributions to the field of pediatric orthopaedics and their originators; it facilitates the understanding and discourse

  16. Cyber-Bullying in School Settings: A Research Citation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Research on the topic of cyber-bullying has proliferated over the past decade, particularly on its impact on school-aged children. Thus, it would be of interest to examine the scope and extent of research interest in the topic in scholarly publications. This paper reports on a reference citation analysis of the database PsycINFO, using…

  17. An empirical study to order citation statistics between subject fields

    CERN Document Server

    van Zyl, J Martin

    2012-01-01

    An empirical study is conducted to compare citations per publication, statistics and observed Hirsch indexes between subject fields using summary statistics of countries. No distributional assumptions are made and ratios are calculated. These ratios can be used to make approximate comparisons between researchers of different subject fields with respect to the Hirsch index.

  18. Data reuse and the open data citation advantage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piwowar, Heather A; Vision, Todd J

    2013-01-01

    Background. Attribution to the original contributor upon reuse of published data is important both as a reward for data creators and to document the provenance of research findings. Previous studies have found that papers with publicly available datasets receive a higher number of citations than similar studies without available data. However, few previous analyses have had the statistical power to control for the many variables known to predict citation rate, which has led to uncertain estimates of the "citation benefit". Furthermore, little is known about patterns in data reuse over time and across datasets. Method and Results. Here, we look at citation rates while controlling for many known citation predictors and investigate the variability of data reuse. In a multivariate regression on 10,555 studies that created gene expression microarray data, we found that studies that made data available in a public repository received 9% (95% confidence interval: 5% to 13%) more citations than similar studies for which the data was not made available. Date of publication, journal impact factor, open access status, number of authors, first and last author publication history, corresponding author country, institution citation history, and study topic were included as covariates. The citation benefit varied with date of dataset deposition: a citation benefit was most clear for papers published in 2004 and 2005, at about 30%. Authors published most papers using their own datasets within two years of their first publication on the dataset, whereas data reuse papers published by third-party investigators continued to accumulate for at least six years. To study patterns of data reuse directly, we compiled 9,724 instances of third party data reuse via mention of GEO or ArrayExpress accession numbers in the full text of papers. The level of third-party data use was high: for 100 datasets deposited in year 0, we estimated that 40 papers in PubMed reused a dataset by year 2, 100 by

  19. Data reuse and the open data citation advantage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. Piwowar

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Attribution to the original contributor upon reuse of published data is important both as a reward for data creators and to document the provenance of research findings. Previous studies have found that papers with publicly available datasets receive a higher number of citations than similar studies without available data. However, few previous analyses have had the statistical power to control for the many variables known to predict citation rate, which has led to uncertain estimates of the “citation benefit”. Furthermore, little is known about patterns in data reuse over time and across datasets. Method and Results. Here, we look at citation rates while controlling for many known citation predictors and investigate the variability of data reuse. In a multivariate regression on 10,555 studies that created gene expression microarray data, we found that studies that made data available in a public repository received 9% (95% confidence interval: 5% to 13% more citations than similar studies for which the data was not made available. Date of publication, journal impact factor, open access status, number of authors, first and last author publication history, corresponding author country, institution citation history, and study topic were included as covariates. The citation benefit varied with date of dataset deposition: a citation benefit was most clear for papers published in 2004 and 2005, at about 30%. Authors published most papers using their own datasets within two years of their first publication on the dataset, whereas data reuse papers published by third-party investigators continued to accumulate for at least six years. To study patterns of data reuse directly, we compiled 9,724 instances of third party data reuse via mention of GEO or ArrayExpress accession numbers in the full text of papers. The level of third-party data use was high: for 100 datasets deposited in year 0, we estimated that 40 papers in PubMed reused a

  20. High-ranked social science journal articles can be identified from early citation information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David I Stern

    Full Text Available Do citations accumulate too slowly in the social sciences to be used to assess the quality of recent articles? I investigate whether this is the case using citation data for all articles in economics and political science published in 2006 and indexed in the Web of Science. I find that citations in the first two years after publication explain more than half of the variation in cumulative citations received over a longer period. Journal impact factors improve the correlation between the predicted and actual future ranks of journal articles when using citation data from 2006 alone but the effect declines sharply thereafter. Finally, more than half of the papers in the top 20% in 2012 were already in the top 20% in the year of publication (2006.

  1. The citation-based indicator and combined impact indicator - New options for measuring impact

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Metrics based on percentile ranks (PRs) for measuring scholarly impact involves complex treatment because of various defects such as overvaluing or devaluing an object caused by percentile ranking schemes, ignoring precise citation variation among those ranked next to each other, and inconsistency caused by additional papers or citations. These defects are especially obvious in a small-sized dataset. To avoid the complicated treatment of PRs based metrics, we propose two new indicators - the citation-based indicator (CBI) and the combined impact indicator (CII). Document types of publications are taken into account. With the two indicators, one would no more be bothered by complex issues encountered by PRs based indicators. For a small-sized dataset with less than 100 papers, special calculation is no more needed. The CBI is based solely on citation counts and the CII measures the integrate contributions of publications and citations. Both virtual and empirical data are used so as to compare the effect of rel...

  2. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-05-04

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract.

  3. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Mazloumian

    Full Text Available Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract.

  4. [Citation patterns in Portuguese and Brazilian biomedical journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Sílvia Costa; Santos, Tiago S; Lopes, Pedro Faria; Fernandez-Llimos, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Bibliographic references of scientific articles are the source for calculating impact indexes frequently used for the assignment of funding to research projects. Different citation patterns may result in measurement bias of these impact indexes. To analyze citation patterns of Brazilian and Portuguese biomedical journals regarding the geographic origin of the sources cited. As part of the v+biomed project, a convenience sample of 11 biomedical journals, 4 Portuguese and 7 Brazilian, was gathered including the following subject categories: General and Internal Medicine, Public Health, Gynecology and Obstetrics, and Surgery. All the references from all the articles published in all the issues (except supplements) in 2009 and 2010 were retrieved. The type of source cited and its geographic origin were analyzed. A total of 102 issues from the 11 journals, containing 1430 articles, with a total of 32782 references were analyzed. No differences were found regarding the number of authors, pages or references between articles from Brazilian and Portuguese journals. Brazilian journals presented higher prevalence of English language and cited significantly more journals from their own country (30.1%) comparing to Portuguese journals (5.4%). Additionally, a lower citation rate to journals from the other country analyzed was evident in Brazilian (0.1%) when compared to Portuguese (3.2%) journals, as well as a higher self-citation of Brazilian journals (Brazil - 5.6%, Portugal - 2.1%). A different citation pattern between Portuguese and Brazilian biomedical journals was found, consisting of a higher citation rate from Brazilian to other Brazilian journals and to themselves. This differential in citation patterns may have implications on impact indexes determination which warrant further investigation.

  5. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  6. News from the Library : Citation counts: Web of Science @ CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2010-01-01

    The online information resources available to the CERN Community have recently increased by an additional database: Web of Science. WoS is a collection of several databases, among them the Science Citation Index, the Conference Proceedings Index and the Journal Citation Reports. The first two products allow you to perform subject, author and title searches, and most importantly you can obtain a list of papers citing a specific article, or navigate to the articles cited by the same article. Besides the retrieval and navigation features, analytical tools allow you to produce statistics and graphs describing the impact of a publication. Finally, the Journal Citation Reports database provides you with the well known – and often disputed – Impact Factor. Access to Web of Science: http://library.web.cern.ch/library/Library/wos.html Please provide feedback to library.desk@cern.ch.

  7. Citation analysis in research evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Moed, Henk F

    2005-01-01

    This book is written for members of the scholarly research community, and for persons involved in research evaluation and research policy. More specifically, it is directed towards the following four main groups of readers: - All scientists and scholars who have been or will be subjected to a quantitative assessment of research performance using citation analysis. - Research policy makers and managers who wish to become conversant with the basic features of citation analysis, and about its potentialities and limitations. - Members of peer review committees and other evaluators, who consider th

  8. Coauthorship and citation patterns in the Physical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Travis; Ball, Brian; Karrer, Brian; Newman, M E J

    2013-07-01

    A large number of published studies have examined the properties of either networks of citation among scientific papers or networks of coauthorship among scientists. Here we study an extensive data set covering more than a century of physics papers published in the Physical Review, which allows us to construct both citation and coauthorship networks for the same set of papers. We analyze these networks to gain insight into temporal changes in citation and collaboration over the long time period of the data, as well as correlations and interactions between the two. Among other things, we investigate the change over time in the number of publishing authors, the number of papers they publish, and the number of others with whom they collaborate, changes in the typical number of citations made and received, the extent to which individuals tend to cite themselves or their collaborators more than others, the extent to which they cite themselves or their collaborators more quickly after publication, and the extent to which they tend to return the favor of a citation from another scientist.

  9. 100 classic papers of interventional radiology: A citation analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthew; T; Crockett; Ronan; FJ; Browne; Peter; J; Mac; Mahon; Leo; Lawler

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To define the 100 citation classic papers of interventional radiology.METHODS: Using the database of Journal Citation Reports the 40 highest impact factor radiology journals were chosen. From these journals the 100 most cited interventional radiology papers were chosen and analysed.RESULTS: The top paper received 2497 citations and the 100 th paper 200 citations. The average number of citations was 320. Dates of publication ranged from 1953- 2005. Most papers originated in the United States(n = 67) followed by Italy(n = 20) and France(n = 10). Harvard University(n = 18) and Osped Civile(n = 11) were the most prolific institutions. Ten journals produced all of the top 100 papers with "Radiology" and "AJR" making up the majority. SN Goldberg and T Livraghi were the most prolific authors. Nearly two thirds of the papers(n = 61) were published after 1990.CONCLUSION: This analysis identifies many of the landmark interventional radiology papers and provides a fascinating insight into the changing discourse within the field. It also identifies topics, authors and institutions which have impacted greatly on the specialty.

  10. Coauthorship and citation patterns in the Physical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Travis; Ball, Brian; Karrer, Brian; Newman, M. E. J.

    2013-07-01

    A large number of published studies have examined the properties of either networks of citation among scientific papers or networks of coauthorship among scientists. Here we study an extensive data set covering more than a century of physics papers published in the Physical Review, which allows us to construct both citation and coauthorship networks for the same set of papers. We analyze these networks to gain insight into temporal changes in citation and collaboration over the long time period of the data, as well as correlations and interactions between the two. Among other things, we investigate the change over time in the number of publishing authors, the number of papers they publish, and the number of others with whom they collaborate, changes in the typical number of citations made and received, the extent to which individuals tend to cite themselves or their collaborators more than others, the extent to which they cite themselves or their collaborators more quickly after publication, and the extent to which they tend to return the favor of a citation from another scientist.

  11. Characteristics associated with citation rate of the medical literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhaya V Kulkarni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The citation rate for articles is viewed as a measure of their importance and impact; however, little is known about what features of articles are associated with higher citation rate. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a cohort study of all original articles, regardless of study methodology, published in the Lancet, JAMA, and New England Journal of Medicine, from October 1, 1999 to March 31, 2000. We identified 328 articles. Two blinded, independent reviewers extracted, in duplicate, nine variables from each article, which were analyzed in both univariable and multivariable linear least-squares regression models for their association with the annual rate of citations received by the article since publication. A two-way interaction between industry funding and an industry-favoring result was tested and found to be significant (p = 0.02. In our adjusted analysis, the presence of industry funding and an industry-favoring result was associated with an increase in annual citation rate of 25.7 (95% confidence interval, 8.5 to 42.8 compared to the absence of both industry funding and industry-favoring results. Higher annual rates of citation were also associated with articles dealing with cardiovascular medicine (13.3 more; 95% confidence interval, 3.9 to 22.3 and oncology (12.6 more; 95% confidence interval, 1.2 to 24.0, articles with group authorship (11.1 more; 95% confidence interval, 2.7 to 19.5, larger sample size and journal of publication. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Large trials, with group authorship, industry-funded, with industry-favoring results, in oncology or cardiology were associated with greater subsequent citations.

  12. ANALYSIS OF CITATION NETWORKS

    OpenAIRE

    Valmarska, Anita

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis we explore the problem of detection of research subdisciplines of a chosen science, based only on the data about citing papers from a chosen batch of papers relevant to the selected science. We directed our attention to the field of Psychology. It is an interesting scientific discipline, with variety of research topics and numerous scientific publications throughout the years. Due to lack of freely accessible centralized database of psychological papers and their relevant c...

  13. Citation Styles For Internet Resources : A Webliography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A Webliography collects resources about citation Styles For internet resources, it divided by the styles: Chicago University style, MLA style, APA style, ISO style, and some articles about internet resources citation.

  14. Universality of Performance Indicators based on Citation and Reference Counts

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, T S; Kaube, B S

    2011-01-01

    We find evidence for the universality of two relative bibliometric indicators of the quality of individual scientific publications taken from different data sets. One of these is a new index that considers both citation and reference counts. We demonstrate this universality for relatively well cited publications from a single institute, grouped by year of publication and by faculty or by department. We show similar behaviour in publications submitted to the arXiv e-print archive, grouped by year of submission and by sub-archive. We also find this distribution is well fitted by a lognormal with a variance of around 1.3 which is consistent with the results of Radicchi, Fortunato, and Castellano. Our work demonstrates that comparisons can be made between publications from different disciplines and publication dates, regardless of their citation count and without expensive access to the whole world-wide citation graph. Further, it shows that averages of the logarithm of such relative bibliometric indices deal wit...

  15. Nuclear reactor decommissioning. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning nuclear power and research reactor decommissioning and decontamination plans, costs, and safety standards. References discuss the design and evaluation of protective confinement, entombment, and dismantling systems. Topics include decommissioning regulations and rules, public and occupational radiation exposure estimates, comparative evaluation, and reactor performance under high neutron flux conditions. Waste packaging and disposal, environmental compliance, and public opinion are examined. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Citation Indicators of Japanese Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiqi, Zhang; Yamazaki, Shigeaki

    1998-01-01

    Evaluates Japanese journals--128 indexed in the 1994 "Journal Citation Reports"--in bibliometric parameters such as impact factors (IFs), mean IFs from citing and cited journals, and self-citing and self-cited rates. Results: only 15 journals, with a wide variation of self-citing and self-cited rates, have obtained a current impact…

  17. Opera Literature: A Citation Count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Shelia

    This study examines the needs of scholars who study opera, including what materials they use, how often they cite foreign language materials, and what kinds of operas are studied most frequently. A citation analysis was performed on "Cambridge Opera Journal,""Opera Quarterly," and "Opera Journal." Results are…

  18. Gold, Silver and Bronze Citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School & University, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Presents the gold, silver, and bronze winners of a competition, which judged the most outstanding learning environments at educational institutions nationwide. Jurors spent two days reviewing projects, focusing on concepts and ideas that made them exceptional. For each citation, the article offers information on the firm, client, total area, total…

  19. Citation analysis and the motives for citing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primož Južnič

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for an adequate citation theory is becoming an important theme in bibliometrics. It is important, when usingbibliometrical methods such as citation analysis, that librarians do not perform only routine searches, but also offer their users more useful data. The text, otherwise part of a broader study, is dealing with a special aspect of citation, namely motives. Understanding the motives, authors have by citing other people's work, is often the key for explaining the results of citation analysis.

  20. Citations for Data in Refereed Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruf, C. S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of data in refereed journal publications has always been an integral part of the reporting of experimental research results. As data sets have become larger, more formalized, and more widely distributed for use by analysts and modelers, the value of proper citations of that data has grown. This is especially the case with datasets produced by spaceborne remote sensing instruments, for which highly structured documentation, calibration procedures, and version and configuration controls exist. The data sets are also often widely used by modelers and analysts who are not directly involved with the sensor technology, engineering, or calibration but who report their research results in the refereed literature. In general, standardized policies do not exist with the journals for the ways in which these data can and should be cited. In this talk, some common protocols used by the major space agencies for the documentation of spaceborne remote sensing data sets will be reviewed, suggestion will be made regarding how those protocols might be adapted and used for the citation of the data sets in the refereed literature, and possible pitfalls and complications that might be encountered will be considered.

  1. Kinesiology Faculty Citations across Academic Rank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Citations to research reports are used as a measure for the influence of a scholar's research line when seeking promotion, grants, and awards. The current study documented the distributions of citations to kinesiology scholars of various academic ranks. Google Scholar Citations was searched for user profiles using five research interest areas…

  2. Finding Chemical Information through Citation Index Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Allan L.

    1999-08-01

    The concept of indexing the scientific literature through cited references (citation indexing) is explained and reviewed. Both print and electronic products based on citation indexing are discussed, and examples of searching the latter are included. Citation indexing is also useful in mapping the scientific literature itself and in assessing the contributions of individual scientists.

  3. Citation as Persuasion in Research Articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sarah; Hawes, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    A study of the use of citations (references to the work of previous researchers) in articles reporting research focuses on the writer's motivation in using them. It is suggested that citation is a rhetorical element that contributes considerably to the persuasive tone of the article, and that citations are introduced primarily to support or be…

  4. Writing references and using citation management software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sungur, Mukadder Orhan; Seyhan, Tülay Özkan

    2013-09-01

    The correct citation of references is obligatory to gain scientific credibility, to honor the original ideas of previous authors and to avoid plagiarism. Currently, researchers can easily find, cite and store references using citation management software. In this review, two popular citation management software programs (EndNote and Mendeley) are summarized.

  5. Citation Analysis and Discourse Analysis Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Howard D.

    2004-01-01

    John Swales's 1986 article "Citation analysis and discourse analysis" was written by a discourse analyst to introduce citation research from other fields, mainly sociology of science, to his own discipline. Here, I introduce applied linguists and discourse analysts to citation studies from information science, a complementary tradition not…

  6. Kinesiology Faculty Citations across Academic Rank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudson, Duane

    2015-01-01

    Citations to research reports are used as a measure for the influence of a scholar's research line when seeking promotion, grants, and awards. The current study documented the distributions of citations to kinesiology scholars of various academic ranks. Google Scholar Citations was searched for user profiles using five research interest areas…

  7. They Come but Do They Finish? Program Completion for Honors Students at a Major Public University, 1998-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodstein, Lynne; Szarek Patricia

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the option of enrolling in honors programs and colleges at major public universities has increasingly become an alternative to elite private and public institutions for some of the brightest and most academically-talented high school graduates. To attract these high-achieving students, universities may offer applicants incentives…

  8. Exploiting citation networks for large-scale author name disambiguation

    CERN Document Server

    Schulz, Christian; Petersen, Alexander M; Penner, Orion; Helbing, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm and validation method for disambiguating author names in very large bibliographic data sets and apply it to the full Web of Science (WoS) citation index. Our algorithm relies only upon on the author and citation graphs available for the whole period covered by the WoS. A pair-wise publication similarity metric, which is based on common co-authors, self-citations, shared references and citations, is established to perform a two-step agglomerative clustering that first connects linked papers and then merges similar clusters. This parameterized model is optimized towards an h-index based recall, which favors the inclusion of well-cited publications, and a name-initials-based precision using WoS metadata and cross-referenced Google Scholar profiles. Despite the use of limited metadata, we reach a recall of 87% and a precision of 88% with a preference for researchers with high $h$-index values. 47 million articles of WoS can be disambiguated on a single machine in less than a day. We d...

  9. Association of study quality with completeness of reporting: have completeness of reporting and quality of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in major radiology journals changed since publication of the PRISMA statement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunis, Adam S; McInnes, Matthew D F; Hanna, Ramez; Esmail, Kaisra

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate whether completeness of reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses in major radiology journals has changed since publication of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) statement; a secondary objective is to evaluate whether completeness of reporting (ie, PRISMA) is associated with study quality (ie, Assessing the Methodological Quality of Systematic Reviews [AMSTAR]). Systematic reviews and meta-analyses published in major radiology journals between January 2007 and December 2011 were identified by searching MEDLINE with the modified Montori method. Studies were reviewed independently by two investigators and assessed for adherence to the AMSTAR and PRISMA checklists. The average results were analyzed to assess for change in mean score before and after PRISMA publication and to assess results over time; a Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated to assess for any association between PRISMA and AMSTAR results. Included were 130 studies from 11 journals. Average PRISMA and AMSTAR results were 21.8 of 27 and 7.2 of 11, respectively. The average result was higher after publication of PRISMA, and PRISMA-reported items were 22.6 of 27 after publication of PRISMA versus 20.9 of 27 before publication of PRISMA; AMSTAR results were 7.7 of 11 after publication of PRISMA versus 6.7 of 11 before publication of PRISMA. There was a strong positive correlation (r = 0.86) between the PRISMA and AMSTAR results. There was high variability between journals. Radiology had the highest PRISMA reported items (24.7 of 27), and American Journal of Neuroradiology had the lowest (19.6 of 27). Two major areas for improvement include study protocol registration and assessment of risk of bias across studies (ie, publication bias). In major radiology journal studies, there was modest improvement in completeness of reporting of systematic reviews and meta-analyses, assessed by PRISMA, which was strongly associated with higher study

  10. Classic articles in Psychology in the Science Citation Index Expanded: A bibliometric analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yuh-Shan; Hartley, James

    2016-11-01

    Who today are the most highly cited psychologists listed in the Web of Science? This paper reports answers to this question by using the Science Citation Index Expanded to find out. This index covers over 280,350 documents in the Psychology category of the Web of Science from 1900 to 2013 and lists the most highly cited papers published between 1927 and 2012. For example, in 2013, an article published by Jacob Cohen in 1992 obtained (1) the highest ranking with 1,068 citations, (2) the highest for total citations per year, and (3) was ranked 3rd for the total number of citations since publication by 2013. New technology thus provides a seismic shift in the ways that we can obtain and analyse data like these. Indeed, the results for the top 10 articles indicate that practical and methodological papers now receive more citations than the more theoretical papers usually found in earlier surveys.

  11. An Evaluation of Impacts in "Nanoscience & nanotechnology:" Steps towards standards for citation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2011-01-01

    One is inclined to conceptualize impact in terms of citations per publication, and thus as an average. However, citation distributions are skewed, and the average has the disadvantage that the number of publications is used in the denominator. Using hundred percentiles, one can integrate the normalized citation curve and develop an indicator that can be compared across document sets because percentile ranks are defined at the article level. I apply this indicator to the set of 58 journals in the ISI Subject Category of "Nanoscience & nanotechnology," and rank journals, countries, cities, and institutes using non-parametric statistics. The significance levels of results can thus be indicated. The results are first compared with the ISI-Impact Factors, but this Integrated Impact Indicator (I3) can be used with any set downloaded from the (Social) Science Citation Index. The software is made publicly available at the Internet. Visualization techniques are also specified for evaluation by positioning institut...

  12. An evaluation of impacts in "Nanoscience & nanotechnology": steps towards standards for citation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2013-01-01

    One is inclined to conceptualize impact in terms of citations per publication, and thus as an average. However, citation distributions are skewed, and the average has the disadvantage that the number of publications is used in the denominator. Using hundred percentiles, one can integrate the normalized citation curve and develop an indicator that can be compared across document sets because percentile ranks are defined at the article level. I apply this indicator to the set of 58 journals in the WoS Subject Category of "Nanoscience & nanotechnology," and rank journals, countries, cities, and institutes using non-parametric statistics. The significance levels of results can thus be indicated. The results are first compared with the ISI-impact factors, but this Integrated Impact Indicator (I3) can be used with any set downloaded from the (Social) Science Citation Index. The software is made publicly available at the Internet. Visualization techniques are also specified for evaluation by positioning institutes on Google Map overlays.

  13. A Phenomenological Study: Factors that Influence Spanish Speaking English Language Learners' Ability to Complete High School in a Public School District in the State of Wisconsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porro, Daniela M.

    2010-01-01

    The researcher is a native Nicaraguan who has similar cultural background and language as the students and parents who participated in this study. The purpose of this study was to identify some of the factors that influence Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners' ability to complete high school in a public school district in the State of…

  14. Cultural and Technological Issues and Solutions for Geodynamics Software Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heien, E. M.; Hwang, L.; Fish, A. E.; Smith, M.; Dumit, J.; Kellogg, L. H.

    2014-12-01

    Computational software and custom-written codes play a key role in scientific research and teaching, providing tools to perform data analysis and forward modeling through numerical computation. However, development of these codes is often hampered by the fact that there is no well-defined way for the authors to receive credit or professional recognition for their work through the standard methods of scientific publication and subsequent citation of the work. This in turn may discourage researchers from publishing their codes or making them easier for other scientists to use. We investigate the issues involved in citing software in a scientific context, and introduce features that should be components of a citation infrastructure, particularly oriented towards the codes and scientific culture in the area of geodynamics research. The codes used in geodynamics are primarily specialized numerical modeling codes for continuum mechanics problems; they may be developed by individual researchers, teams of researchers, geophysicists in collaboration with computational scientists and applied mathematicians, or by coordinated community efforts such as the Computational Infrastructure for Geodynamics. Some but not all geodynamics codes are open-source. These characteristics are common to many areas of geophysical software development and use. We provide background on the problem of software citation and discuss some of the barriers preventing adoption of such citations, including social/cultural barriers, insufficient technological support infrastructure, and an overall lack of agreement about what a software citation should consist of. We suggest solutions in an initial effort to create a system to support citation of software and promotion of scientific software development.

  15. [In Process Citation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubé, Geneviève; Terradas, Miguel M; Arsenault, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is a severe psychopathology related to great personal and family distress, which aetiology goes back to childhood. Empirical data supports a certain temporal stability of personality traits from childhood to adolescence and adulthood. Several authors argue that it is possible to identify in children and adolescents personality traits that could be associated with the characteristics of BPD observed in adulthood. However, only few instruments have been developed to assess child and adolescent traits associated with BPD. This article aims to present the results of the first validity study of the French version of the Borderline Personality Features Scale for Children (BPFS-C).Method The French version of the instrument, which has been developed using translation/back-translation was administered to 262 children, aged 9 to 12 years old (M = 10.52; ÉT = 0.96), attending regular schools in Quebec (55.70% were girls). Forty-three bilingual children (M = 10.65, SD = 0.98; 60.50% were girls) completed the two versions of the questionnaire (English and French), on a one-week interval. In addition, 23 English-speaking children from Quebec (M = 10.42, SD = 1.12) completed the original version of the questionnaire.Results The first validity study of the French version of the instrument shows a very satisfactory internal consistency. The correlations between the English and French versions of the instrument are significant. The principal component analysis revealed a four component model that have similarities with the four subscales of the English version, but differs in the distribution of items originally belonging to the subscale Identity problems of the BPFS-C.Conclusions The results of the first validity study of the French version of the instrument are promising. However, further research is needed in order to demonstrate the temporal stability as well as the construct validity of this measure. The instrument

  16. Implementation of Data Citations and Persistent Identifiers at the ORNL DAAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, R. B.; Santhana Vannan, S.; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; McMurry, B. F.; Kidder, J. H.; Shanafield, H. A.; Palanisamy, G.

    2013-12-01

    As research in Earth Science becomes more data intensive, a critical requirement of data archives is that data needs to be easily discovered, accessed, and used. One approach to improving data discovery and access is through data citations coupled with Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). Beginning in 1998, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC) has issued data product citations that have been accepted and used in AGU and other peer-reviewed journals. Citation elements established by the ORNL DAAC are similar to those used for journal articles (authors, titles, information to locate, and version), and beginning in 2007 included a DOI that is persistent, actionable, specific, and complete. The citation approach used at the DAAC also allows for referring to specific subsets of the data, by including within the citation the temporal and spatial portions of the data actually used. Citations allow others to find data and reproduce the results of the research article, and also use those data to test new hypotheses, design new sample collections, or construct or evaluate models. In addition to enhancing discovery and access of the data used in a research article, the citation gives credit to data generators, data centers and their funders, and, through citation indices, determine the scientific impact of a data set. The ORNL DAAC has developed a database that links research articles and their use of ORNL DAAC data products. The database allows determination of who, in which journal, and how the data have been used, in a manner analogous to author citation indices. The ORNL DAAC has been an initial contributor to the Thomson Reuters Data Citation Index. In addition, research data products deposited at the ORNL DAAC are linked using DOIs to relevant articles in Elsevier journals available on ScienceDirect. The ultimate goal of this implementation is that citations to data products become a routine part of the scientific process.

  17. Contribution of Case Reports to Brain Metastases Research: Systematic Review and Analysis of Pattern of Citation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Carsten; Pawinski, Adam; Dalhaug, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    Research activity related to different aspects of prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment of brain metastases has increased during recent years. One of the major databases (Scopus) contains 942 scientific articles that were published during the 5-year time period 2006–2010. Of these, 195 (21%) reported on single patient cases and 12 (1%) were reports of 2 cases. Little is known about their influence on advancement of the field or scientific merits. Do brain metastases case reports attract attention and provide stimuli for further research or do they go largely unrecognized? Different measures of impact, visibility and quality of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For the present evaluation, article citation rate was chosen. The median number of citations overall and stratified by year of publication was 0, except for the year 2006 when it was 2. As compared to other articles, case reports remained more often without citation (preports with 10 or more citations (n = 6) reported on newly introduced anticancer drugs, which commonly are prescribed to treat extracranial metastases, and the responses observed in single patients with brain metastases. Average annual numbers of citations were also calculated. The articles with most citations per year were the same six case reports mentioned above (the only ones that obtained more than 2.0 citations per year). Citations appeared to gradually increase during the first two years after publication but remained on a generally low or modest level. It cannot be excluded that case reports without citation provide interesting information to some clinicians or researchers. Apparently, case reports describing unexpected therapeutic success gain more attention, at least in terms of citation, than others. PMID:22470554

  18. [In Process Citation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krafft, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Analysing all the surviving reports and mentions of the supposed unicorn discovered in the year 1663 near Quedlinburg, this paper replies to the question: "Who reconstructed the skeleton of the unicorn from a find of bones, O. von Guericke or G. W. Leibniz?" and diagnoses that neither of them did so. The author of the first report with a figure was Johannes Meyer, astronomer and treasurer of the Abbes Superior of Quedlinburg; and his German text had been translated by both partly in different ways (Guericke's Experimenta nova, printed in 1672 and used by Leibniz; Leibniz's Protogaea, first printed posthumously in 1749). Discovery, excavation, salvage and reconstruction of the unicorn were ascribed to Guericke only by Othenio Abel (for the first time in 1918 and thereafter on many occasions) without indicating any source for that. His story of the supposed discovery since then has been embellished with a lot of imagination further and further. However, Leibniz himself wrote in his Protogaea, that a figure of the unicorn skeleton (which Guericke does not reproduce) had been sent to him together with a report (by J. Meyer from Quedlinburg); and this figure he and his engraver Nicholas Seeländer 'corrected' and completed in accordance with their own imagination of a unicorn's build in 1716 to illustrate the Protogaea (M. B. Valentini printed a copy of Meyer's original in 1704).

  19. Study on the Promotion in the Citation of the Nuclear Engineering and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Young Choon; Yoo, J. B.; Yi, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The Korean journal published in English, Nuclear Engineering and Technology (here under NET) has been enlisted in the global citation database SCI E(Science Citation Index Expanded) of Thomson Reuters (past ISI), beginning with NET vol.39 No.1 (Feb. 2007). As of July 2009, the citation index of NET as reported by JCR (Journal Citation Report) based on the cumulative data from ISI (Institute for Scientific Information) reached to 0.991. This index ranks on 12{sup th} among the 33 journals in the area of nuclear science and technology in the science and technology covered by JCR, meaning fairly high impact factor. The following year 2010, however, witnessed the JCR figure dropping down to 0.465. The reason behind such drastic fall would be the decreased citation and in a lesser extent self-citation in 2010, in comparison with 2009, despite the increased number of paper publication. This study attempts to give an analysis as of the end of 2011 on the NET citation frequency in SCI Source Journal and the citation frequency by KAERI authors, together with the nationalities of NET authors and SCI journals that refer to NET most. Based on the analysis, the paper suggests some ways to promoting the position of NET as a journal in the international nuclear sector

  20. Citations for Randomized Controlled Trials in Sepsis Literature: The Halo Effect Caused by Journal Impact Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng; Poucke, Sven Van

    2017-01-01

    Citations for randomized controlled trials (RCT) are important for the dissemination of study results. However, predictors of citations for RCTs have not been investigated. The study aimed to investigate the predictors of citations for RCTs in sepsis literature. RCTs that investigated the efficacy of treatment strategies on clinical outcomes in sepsis patients were included, and publication dates were restricted to the period from 2000 to 2016. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane handbook for systematic reviews and interventions. A multivariable linear regression model was built to investigate the independent variables associated with total citations. In total, 160 RCTs met our inclusion criteria and were included for analysis. The median of total citations was 28.5 (IQR: 6-76). The journal impact factor (IF) for articles was 6.312 (IQR: 3.143-7.214). The dependent variable was transformed by the square root to improve normality and meet the assumption of homoscedasticity. The journal IF (coefficient: 0.2; 95% CI: 0.16, 0.25) was independently associated with total citations. Large samples were associated with more total citations (coefficient: 0.0026; 95% CI: 0.0013, 0.0039). The study demonstrated that the journal IF was a major determinant of the RCT's total citation number.

  1. [In Process Citation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen Saral, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the risk taking behaviour of a particular group of SMEs, those established and run by liberal professionals. There is limited evidence on the economic behaviuor of liberal professionals despite the fact that they comprise a significant proportion of the SMEs in their national economies. The main objective of this research is therefore to extend research of behavioral economics theory and models to explain the economic behaviour of liberal professionals. In order to study this behaviour, I chose dentists to represent liberal professionals. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to self-employed members of the Swiss Dental Association. Dentists revealed risk-seeking behaviour when they responded to a hypothetical lottery and an insurance question. When asked about their willingness to take risk in general, a large proportion came through as moderate risk seekers. The study identifies gender, “cultural” differences and type of ownership as factors that affect risk attitudes. Female dentists perceive themselves as more risk-averse than males, but when actual risk preferences are measured this difference disappears. Dentists from the “Latin” regions of Switzerland are more likely to real risk aversion than those in the German region. Sole owners are more likely to be risk-seeking in the domain of losses than dentists in partnerships. Type of ownership is sensitive to gender and “cultural” differences. Partnerships are more common among females and dentists in the “Latin” region. The findings of this study have implications for public policy makers, management training and development companies, insurance companies, and umbrella organisations for liberal professionals.

  2. Comparisons of citations in Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar for articles published in general medical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Abhaya V; Aziz, Brittany; Shams, Iffat; Busse, Jason W

    2009-09-09

    Until recently, Web of Science was the only database available to track citation counts for published articles. Other databases are now available, but their relative performance has not been established. To compare the citation count profiles of articles published in general medical journals among the citation databases of Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Cohort study of 328 articles published in JAMA, Lancet, or the New England Journal of Medicine between October 1, 1999, and March 31, 2000. Total citation counts for each article up to June 2008 were retrieved from Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Article characteristics were analyzed in linear regression models to determine interaction with the databases. Number of citations received by an article since publication and article characteristics associated with citation in databases. Google Scholar and Scopus retrieved more citations per article with a median of 160 (interquartile range [IQR], 83 to 324) and 149 (IQR, 78 to 289), respectively, than Web of Science (median, 122; IQR, 66 to 241) (P Scopus retrieved more citations from non-English-language sources (median, 10.2% vs 4.1%) and reviews (30.8% vs 18.2%), and fewer citations from articles (57.2% vs 70.5%), editorials (2.1% vs 5.9%), and letters (0.8% vs 2.6%) (all P Scopus, and Google Scholar produced quantitatively and qualitatively different citation counts for articles published in 3 general medical journals.

  3. Gauging the impact of Forensic Science International: Genetics--Citation metrics for top articles in the journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Chris

    2014-07-01

    Using the Thomson Reuters' Web of Knowledge bibliometric tool enables the analysis of citation patterns for the articles published in FSI: Genetics since it was launched. This brief survey identifies the most cited articles published by the journal since its inception and amongst these, the most impactful original research articles: those showing the highest citation rates per year since their publication.

  4. [In Process Citation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieri, Andreas; Kamber, Matthias; Sterchi, Martin; Mullis, Primus E

    2014-04-01

    (EPO and an anabolic drug respectively) on information provided by customs officers. Both athletes were banned from competition for two years. Legal basis: Of importance to all the physicians looking after athletes is to know the actual legal basis: The international law basis of the Swiss fight against doping are the Council of Europe Convention against Doping of 16 November 1989 and the International Convention against Doping in Sport of the General Conference of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) of 19 October 2005. The basis in public law of the Swiss fight against doping is the Federal Act on the Promotion of Gymnastics and Sport of 17 March 1972. Article 11e, paragraph 1 states that "national sport organisations, the relevant umbrella bodies and bodies responsible for sporting events that are supported in the framework of this act […] are required to ensure that the necessary doping controls are carried out in their area of responsibility". Article 11 f, paragraph 1 of the Federal Act also states that "whoever produces, introduces, transfers, sells, prescribes or provides substances for doping purposes or who uses methods for doping purposes for third persons will be liable to a prison sentence or to a fine of up to 100'000 francs". The civil law basis of the Swiss fight against doping consists of the norms established by various actors in the sporting world. These actors are in most cases clubs, associations and foundations in accordance with the stipulations of the Swiss civil code. The Swiss Olympic Association's revised Doping Statute was approved by the Sports Parliament on 15 November 2008. The statute implements the code of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in Switzerland. In the introduction it defines the anti-doping agencies in our country: Antidoping Switzerland and the Disciplinary Chamber for Doping Offences of the Swiss Olympic Association. The revised Statute entered into force on 1 January 2009

  5. Dioxins: Toxicity and health risks. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicology of dioxins and the health risks associated with dioxin exposure. Articles include mortality and physiological studies of major dioxin contamination, including the Seveso and Love Canal incidents. The biochemistry of dioxin poisoning, environmental impacts, sources of dioxin pollution, metabolism of dioxins by microorganisms, and carcinogenicity are considered. The citations also examine occupational exposure, and risk assessment of exposure of the general public to dioxin. References to Agent Orange exposure during the Vietnam War are cited. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  6. The e-index, complementing the h-index for excess citations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ting Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The h-index has already been used by major citation databases to evaluate the academic performance of individual scientists. Although effective and simple, the h-index suffers from some drawbacks that limit its use in accurately and fairly comparing the scientific output of different researchers. These drawbacks include information loss and low resolution: the former refers to the fact that in addition to h(2 citations for papers in the h-core, excess citations are completely ignored, whereas the latter means that it is common for a group of researchers to have an identical h-index. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To solve these problems, I here propose the e-index, where e(2 represents the ignored excess citations, in addition to the h(2 citations for h-core papers. Citation information can be completely depicted by using the h-index together with the e-index, which are independent of each other. Some other h-type indices, such as a and R, are h-dependent, have information redundancy with h, and therefore, when used together with h, mask the real differences in excess citations of different researchers. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although simple, the e-index is a necessary h-index complement, especially for evaluating highly cited scientists or for precisely comparing the scientific output of a group of scientists having an identical h-index.

  7. Research assessments by synchronic and diachronic citation impact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iribarren-Maestro, Isabel; Ingwersen, Peter; Larsen, Birger

    2009-01-01

      Synchronic and diachronic indicators are used to measure the impact of a set of publications from Carlos III University of Madrid (UC3M), in order to verify if UC3M papers contribute to enhancing the impact and visibility of the journals in which they were published. Both Diachronic Journal Imp...... the information provided by Journal Citation Reports (JCR), to reach a fuller understanding of all the data analyzed....

  8. Citation context and impact of 'sleeping beauties' in paediatric research

    OpenAIRE

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter; del Torso, Stefano; Blažun, Helena

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: ‘Sleeping beauties’, i.e. publications that are not cited for a long while, present interesting findings in science. This study analysed the citation trends of sleeping beauties in paediatric research. Methods: The study used bibliometric software to analyse the papers citing sleeping beauties in paediatric research, to understand the context in which paediatric sleeping beauties were finally cited and the impact of these sleeping beauties on paediatric research. Results: ...

  9. A complete process for production of flexible large area polymer solar cells entirely using screen printing-First public demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krebs, Frederik C; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Norrman, Kion;

    2009-01-01

    , complete processing in air using commonly available screen printing, and finally, simple mechanical encapsulation using a flexible packaging material and electrical contacting post-production using crimped contacts. We detail the production of more than 2000 modules in one production run and show...

  10. Currencies of Science: discussing disciplinary “exchange rates” for citations and Mendeley readership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costas, R.; Perianes-Rodriguez, A.; Ruiz-Castillo, J.

    2016-07-01

    In 1998 Garfield stated that “[t]he Mertonian description of normal science describes citations as the currency of science. Scientists make payments, in the form of citations, to their preceptors”. The idea of citations as a currency of science was also discussed by Wouters (1999) who suggested that the “role of the citation might also be compared with that of money, especially if the evaluative use of scientometrics is taken into account. Whenever the value of an article is expressed in its citation frequency, the citation is probably the most important unit of a ‘currency of science’”. Thus, citations have been seen as currency able to reward scientists for their work and scientific merit, being an integral part, together with authorship and acknowledgements, of the so-called “reward triangle” (Cronin & Weaver, 1995)2. This role of citations as main currency in evaluative scientometrics has gone unchallenged until recently. The emergence of new ways of measuring the reception of scientific publications by different audiences in the form of the so-called “altmetrics” (Haustein, et al. 2015a; Priem, et al. 2010) probably represents the most important attempt of expanding the system of currencies of science. However, research on altmetrics suggest that there are critical differences with citations: in coverage (Thelwall, et al. 2013), main characteristics (Haustein, et al., 2015), correlations (Costas, et al. 2015b; Haustein, et al. 2014), and interpretation (Haustein et al., 2016). These results essentially highlight the limited potential of most of these metrics as realistic alternatives to citations. (Author)

  11. Universality of citation distributions: Toward an objective measure of scientific impact

    OpenAIRE

    Radicchi, Filippo; Fortunato, Santo; Castellano, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We study the distributions of citations received by a single publication within several disciplines, spanning broad areas of science. We show that the probability that an article is cited c times has large variations between different disciplines, but all distributions are rescaled on a universal curve when the relative indicator cf = c/c0 is considered, where c0 is the average number of citations per article for the discipline. In addition we show that the same universal behavior occurs when...

  12. Universality of citation distributions: towards an objective measure of scientific impact

    OpenAIRE

    Radicchi, Filippo; Fortunato, Santo; Castellano, Claudio

    2008-01-01

    We study the distributions of citations received by a single publication within several disciplines, spanning broad areas of science. We show that the probability that an article is cited $c$ times has large variations between different disciplines, but all distributions are rescaled on a universal curve when the relative indicator $c_f=c/c_0$ is considered, where $c_0$ is the average number of citations per article for the discipline. In addition we show that the same universal behavior occu...

  13. Measuring contextual citation impact of scientific journals

    CERN Document Server

    Moed, Henk F

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores a new indicator of journal citation impact, denoted as source normalized impact per paper (SNIP). It measures a journal's contextual citation impact, taking into account characteristics of its properly defined subject field, especially the frequency at which authors cite other papers in their reference lists, the rapidity of maturing of citation impact, and the extent to which a database used for the assessment covers the field's literature. It further develops Eugene Garfield's notions of a field's 'citation potential' defined as the average length of references lists in a field and determining the probability of being cited, and the need in fair performance assessments to correct for differences between subject fields. A journal's subject field is defined as the set of papers citing that journal. SNIP is defined as the ratio of the journal's citation count per paper and the citation potential in its subject field. It aims to allow direct comparison of sources in different subject fields....

  14. The feature of papers and citation analysis of eleven journals in tropical medicine indexed by Science Citation Index Expanded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Yang

    2005-11-01

    To determine the features of papers, authors, and citation of eleven journals in tropical medicine indexed by Science Citation Index Expanded, the database of the Institute for Scientific Information, we analyzed original articles, editorials, reviews, corrections, letters, biographies, and news published in these journals. The results show that these journals covered 107 countries or regions on six continents. The average number of reference was 23.05, with 87.89% of the references from periodicals. The Price Index was 31.43% and the self-citing rate was 7.02%. The references in the first 20 journals ranked by the amount of citation accounted for 36.71% of the total citations. Brazil, United States, India, and England are more advanced in tropical medicine research. The conclusion is that these journals covered most research done in these countries or regions. Most researches were done by cooperation of the researchers, but many of the publications used outdated articles and should include newer information.

  15. Online Citation and Reference Management Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Anup-Kumar

    2015-01-01

    This Unit is on online citation and reference management tools. The tools discussed are Mendeley, CiteULike, Zotero, Google Scholar Library, and EndNote Basic. The features of all the management tools have been discussed with figures, tables, and text boxes. This Unit discusses in details aspects of different Online Citation and Reference Management Tools. Published in the Open Access for Researchers > Module 4: Research Evaluation Metrics > Unit 4: Online Citation and Reference Management T...

  16. Do citation systems represent theories of truth?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Van der Veer Martens

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article suggests that the citation can be viewed not only as a "concept symbol" but also as a "boundary object". The scientific, legal, and patent citation systems in America are examined at the micro, meso, and macro levels in order to understand how they function as commodified theories of truth in contemporary knowledge representation. This approach also offers a meta-theoretical overview of existing citation research efforts in science, law, and technology that may be of interdisciplinary interest.

  17. Mapping Citation Patterns of Book Chapters in the Book Citation Index

    CERN Document Server

    Torres-Salinas, Daniel; Robinson-Garcia, Nicolas; Fdez-Valdivia, J; García, J A; 10.1016/j.joi.2013.01.004

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide the reader with a visual representation of relationships among the impact of book chapters indexed in the Book Citation Index using information gain values and published by different academic publishers in specific disciplines. The impact of book chapters can be characterized statistically by citations histograms. For instance, we can compute the probability of occurrence of book chapters with a number of citations in different intervals for each academic publisher. We predict the similarity between two citation histograms based on the amount of relative information between such characterizations. We observe that the citation patterns of book chapters follow a Lotkaian distribution. This paper describes the structure of the Book Citation Index using 'heliocentric clockwise maps' which allow the reader not only to determine the grade of similarity of a given academic publisher indexed in the Book Citation Index with a specific discipline according to their citation distribution, but al...

  18. Is collaboration among scientists related to the citation impact of papers because their quality increases with collaboration? An analysis based on data from F1000Prime and normalized citation scores

    CERN Document Server

    Bornmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the relationship of collaboration among scientists and the citation impact of papers have been frequently investigated. Most of the studies show that the two variables are closely related: an increasing collaboration activity (measured in terms of number of authors, number of affiliations, and number of countries) is associated with an increased citation impact. However, it is not clear whether the increased citation impact is based on the higher quality of papers which profit from more than one scientist giving expert input or other (citation-specific) factors. Thus, the current study addresses this question by using two comprehensive datasets with publications (in the biomedical area) including quality assessments by experts (F1000Prime member scores) and citation data for the publications. The study is based on nearly 10,000 papers. Robust regression models are used to investigate the relationship between number of authors, number of affiliations, and number of countries, respectively, and...

  19. Ranking national research systems by citation indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksnes, Dag W.; Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Gunnarsson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical analysis of two different methodologies for calculating national citation indicators: whole counts and fractionalised counts. The aim of our study is to investigate the effect on relative citation indicators when citations to documents are fractionalised among...... the authoring countries. We have performed two analyses: a time series analysis of one country and a cross-sectional analysis of 23 countries. The results show that all countries’ relative citation indicators are lower when fractionalised counting is used. Further, the difference between whole...

  20. [Self-citations: the stepchildren of scientometrics?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, András

    2016-08-01

    Self-references, self-citations are considered by some as the sign of vanity, and deemed to be omitted from scientometrics analyses. In fact, self-citations reveal information in the study of scientific communications that is different but not less valuable than citations received from others. In the practice of self-citation severe ethical issues may emerge that can be bandled by the co-operation of the authors, editors and publishers. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(32), 1289-1293.

  1. Retracted Publications Within Radiology Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Andrew B

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize trends related to retracted publications within radiology journals. PubMed was queried to identify all articles with the publication type "retracted publication" or "notification of retraction." Articles published within radiology journals were identified using Journal Citation Reports' journal categories. Available versions of original articles and publication notices were accessed from journal websites. Citations to retracted publications were identified using Web of Science. Overall trends were assessed. Forty-eight retracted original research articles were identified within radiology journals since 1983, which included 1.1% of all PubMed "retracted publication" entries. Distinct PubMed entries were available for the retracted publication and retraction notification in 39 of 48 articles. The original PDF was available for 37 articles, although the articles were not watermarked as retracted in 23 cases. In six cases with a watermarked PDF, further searches identified nonwatermarked versions. Original HTML versions were available for 13 articles but 11 were not watermarked. The mean (± SD) delay between publication and retraction was 2.7 ± 2.8 years (range, 0-16 years). The mean number of citations to retracted articles was 10.9 ± 17.1 (range, 0-94 citations). Reasons for retraction included problematic or incorrect methods or results (although it typically was unclear whether these represented honest errors or misconduct) in 33.3% of cases, complete or partial duplicate publication in 33.3% of cases, plagiarism in 14.6% of cases, a permission issue in 8.3% of cases, the publisher's error in 6.3% of cases, and no identified reason in 6.3% of cases. One or no retractions occurred annually from 1986 to 2001, although two or more retractions occurred annually in nine of the 12 years from 2002 through 2013. Retraction represents an uncommon, yet potentially increasing, issue within radiology journals that publishers

  2. Citation advantage of open access articles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunther Eysenbach

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Open access (OA to the research literature has the potential to accelerate recognition and dissemination of research findings, but its actual effects are controversial. This was a longitudinal bibliometric analysis of a cohort of OA and non-OA articles published between June 8, 2004, and December 20, 2004, in the same journal (PNAS: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Article characteristics were extracted, and citation data were compared between the two groups at three different points in time: at "quasi-baseline" (December 2004, 0-6 mo after publication, in April 2005 (4-10 mo after publication, and in October 2005 (10-16 mo after publication. Potentially confounding variables, including number of authors, authors' lifetime publication count and impact, submission track, country of corresponding author, funding organization, and discipline, were adjusted for in logistic and linear multiple regression models. A total of 1,492 original research articles were analyzed: 212 (14.2% of all articles were OA articles paid by the author, and 1,280 (85.8% were non-OA articles. In April 2005 (mean 206 d after publication, 627 (49.0% of the non-OA articles versus 78 (36.8% of the OA articles were not cited (relative risk = 1.3 [95% Confidence Interval: 1.1-1.6]; p = 0.001. 6 mo later (mean 288 d after publication, non-OA articles were still more likely to be uncited (non-OA: 172 [13.6%], OA: 11 [5.2%]; relative risk = 2.6 [1.4-4.7]; p < 0.001. The average number of citations of OA articles was higher compared to non-OA articles (April 2005: 1.5 [SD = 2.5] versus 1.2 [SD = 2.0]; Z = 3.123; p = 0.002; October 2005: 6.4 [SD = 10.4] versus 4.5 [SD = 4.9]; Z = 4.058; p < 0.001. In a logistic regression model, controlling for potential confounders, OA articles compared to non-OA articles remained twice as likely to be cited (odds ratio = 2.1 [1.5-2.9] in the first 4-10 mo after publication (April 2005, with the odds ratio increasing to 2.9 (1

  3. Bibliometrics and citation analysis from the science citation index to cybermetrics

    CERN Document Server

    De Bellis, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    Bibliometrics and Citation Analysis: From the Science Citation Index to Cybermetrics offers a comprehensive overview of theories, techniques, concepts, and applications in the interdisciplinary and steadily growing field of bibliometrics. This book looks at bibliographic citation and citation networks by discussing the past, present, and future of bibliometrics, from its foundations in the Science Citation Index to its expansion into the World Wide Web. It is useful to those in every area of scholarship involved in the quantitative analysis of information exchanges, but also to general readers

  4. Inheritance Patterns in Citation Networks Reveal Scientific Memes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Kuhn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Memes are the cultural equivalent of genes that spread across human culture by means of imitation. What makes a meme and what distinguishes it from other forms of information, however, is still poorly understood. Our analysis of memes in the scientific literature reveals that they are governed by a surprisingly simple relationship between frequency of occurrence and the degree to which they propagate along the citation graph. We propose a simple formalization of this pattern and validate it with data from close to 50 million publication records from the Web of Science, PubMed Central, and the American Physical Society. Evaluations relying on human annotators, citation network randomizations, and comparisons with several alternative approaches confirm that our formula is accurate and effective, without a dependence on linguistic or ontological knowledge and without the application of arbitrary thresholds or filters.

  5. Inheritance Patterns in Citation Networks Reveal Scientific Memes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, Tobias; Perc, Matjaž; Helbing, Dirk

    2014-10-01

    Memes are the cultural equivalent of genes that spread across human culture by means of imitation. What makes a meme and what distinguishes it from other forms of information, however, is still poorly understood. Our analysis of memes in the scientific literature reveals that they are governed by a surprisingly simple relationship between frequency of occurrence and the degree to which they propagate along the citation graph. We propose a simple formalization of this pattern and validate it with data from close to 50 million publication records from the Web of Science, PubMed Central, and the American Physical Society. Evaluations relying on human annotators, citation network randomizations, and comparisons with several alternative approaches confirm that our formula is accurate and effective, without a dependence on linguistic or ontological knowledge and without the application of arbitrary thresholds or filters.

  6. Statistical regularities in the rank-citation profile of scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Stanley, H. Eugene; Succi, Sauro

    2011-12-01

    Recent science of science research shows that scientific impact measures for journals and individual articles have quantifiable regularities across both time and discipline. However, little is known about the scientific impact distribution at the scale of an individual scientist. We analyze the aggregate production and impact using the rank-citation profile ci(r) of 200 distinguished professors and 100 assistant professors. For the entire range of paper rank r, we fit each ci(r) to a common distribution function. Since two scientists with equivalent Hirsch h-index can have significantly different ci(r) profiles, our results demonstrate the utility of the βi scaling parameter in conjunction with hi for quantifying individual publication impact. We show that the total number of citations Ci tallied from a scientist's Ni papers scales as . Such statistical regularities in the input-output patterns of scientists can be used as benchmarks for theoretical models of career progress.

  7. Citation Searching: Search Smarter & Find More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Chelsea C.; Brown, Stephanie Willen

    2008-01-01

    The staff at University of Connecticut are participating in Elsevier's Student Ambassador Program (SAmP) in which graduate students train their peers on "citation searching" research using Scopus and Web of Science, two tremendous citation databases. They are in the fourth semester of these training programs, and they are wildly successful: They…

  8. Citation Searching: Search Smarter & Find More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Chelsea C.; Brown, Stephanie Willen

    2008-01-01

    The staff at University of Connecticut are participating in Elsevier's Student Ambassador Program (SAmP) in which graduate students train their peers on "citation searching" research using Scopus and Web of Science, two tremendous citation databases. They are in the fourth semester of these training programs, and they are wildly successful: They…

  9. ISI's Journal Citation Reports on the Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Roberta Bronson

    2003-01-01

    This column features an overview of the Institute for Scientific Information's (ISI) Journal Citation Reports (JCR) database. Basic searching techniques are presented, as well as simple ways to manipulate data contained in the file. The Journal Citation Reports database can provide information on highest impact journals, most frequently used journals, "hottest" journals, and largest journals in a field or discipline.

  10. Higher Education Literature Revisited: Citation Patterns Examined

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, John M.; Magnuson, Lauren

    2010-01-01

    The discourse of the field of higher education is complex, as is its analysis. Citation analysis is means of examining communicative processes. This study investigates citations in the papers of three core journals in higher education, "Research in Higher Education, Review of Higher Education," and "Journal of Higher Education." The results…

  11. Citation Analysis on Current Science Publications:3 D Print Research Topics%基于引文分析的3D打印技术研究主题发展趋势

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴菲菲; 段国辉; 黄鲁成; 杨梓; 乔铮

    2014-01-01

    From Web of Science database, more than 8,000 papers published about 3D print technology from 1994 to 2014 are retrieved as data source. Through using Histcite and Pajek, citation chronological chart and the main path of 3D print technology are analyzed, and the development trend of the research subjects of 3D print technology are identified. The result provides a basis for grasping the current re-search focus and predicting future research direction.%利用汤森路透公司的Web of Science数据库,以1994-2014年出版文献中关于3D打印技术的8000多篇文献为数据源,借助Histcite和Pajek软件分析3D打印技术引文编年图和研究主路径,判断3D打印技术的研究主题发展趋势。研究结果对于把握当前研究重点和预测未来研究方向提供了依据。

  12. Citation Analysis May Severely Underestimate the Impact of Clinical Research as Compared to Basic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eck, Nees Jan; Waltman, Ludo; van Raan, Anthony F. J.; Klautz, Robert J. M.; Peul, Wilco C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Citation analysis has become an important tool for research performance assessment in the medical sciences. However, different areas of medical research may have considerably different citation practices, even within the same medical field. Because of this, it is unclear to what extent citation-based bibliometric indicators allow for valid comparisons between research units active in different areas of medical research. Methodology A visualization methodology is introduced that reveals differences in citation practices between medical research areas. The methodology extracts terms from the titles and abstracts of a large collection of publications and uses these terms to visualize the structure of a medical field and to indicate how research areas within this field differ from each other in their average citation impact. Results Visualizations are provided for 32 medical fields, defined based on journal subject categories in the Web of Science database. The analysis focuses on three fields: Cardiac & cardiovascular systems, Clinical neurology, and Surgery. In each of these fields, there turn out to be large differences in citation practices between research areas. Low-impact research areas tend to focus on clinical intervention research, while high-impact research areas are often more oriented on basic and diagnostic research. Conclusions Popular bibliometric indicators, such as the h-index and the impact factor, do not correct for differences in citation practices between medical fields. These indicators therefore cannot be used to make accurate between-field comparisons. More sophisticated bibliometric indicators do correct for field differences but still fail to take into account within-field heterogeneity in citation practices. As a consequence, the citation impact of clinical intervention research may be substantially underestimated in comparison with basic and diagnostic research. PMID:23638064

  13. Citation analysis may severely underestimate the impact of clinical research as compared to basic research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nees Jan van Eck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Citation analysis has become an important tool for research performance assessment in the medical sciences. However, different areas of medical research may have considerably different citation practices, even within the same medical field. Because of this, it is unclear to what extent citation-based bibliometric indicators allow for valid comparisons between research units active in different areas of medical research. METHODOLOGY: A visualization methodology is introduced that reveals differences in citation practices between medical research areas. The methodology extracts terms from the titles and abstracts of a large collection of publications and uses these terms to visualize the structure of a medical field and to indicate how research areas within this field differ from each other in their average citation impact. RESULTS: Visualizations are provided for 32 medical fields, defined based on journal subject categories in the Web of Science database. The analysis focuses on three fields: Cardiac & cardiovascular systems, Clinical neurology, and Surgery. In each of these fields, there turn out to be large differences in citation practices between research areas. Low-impact research areas tend to focus on clinical intervention research, while high-impact research areas are often more oriented on basic and diagnostic research. CONCLUSIONS: Popular bibliometric indicators, such as the h-index and the impact factor, do not correct for differences in citation practices between medical fields. These indicators therefore cannot be used to make accurate between-field comparisons. More sophisticated bibliometric indicators do correct for field differences but still fail to take into account within-field heterogeneity in citation practices. As a consequence, the citation impact of clinical intervention research may be substantially underestimated in comparison with basic and diagnostic research.

  14. Data Citation: An International Oceanographic Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, L. M.; Chandler, C. L.; Lowry, R. K.; Urban, E. R.; Moncoiffe, G.; Leadbeter, A.; Pissierssens, P.; Norton, C.; Pikula, L.

    2012-12-01

    links to datasets deposited in WHOAS that are associated with Elsevier articles. The Published Data Library (PDL) is a project of the British Oceanographic Data Centre that provides snapshots of specially chosen datasets that are archived using rigorous version management. The publication process exposes a fixed copy of an object and then manages that copy in such a way that it may be located and referred to over an indefinite period of time. Using metadata standards adopted across NERC's Environmental Data Centres, the repository assigns DOIs obtained from the British Library to appropriate datasets. SCOR, IODE, and the MBLWHOI Library have established a framework for data publication that encourages proper data citation. This framework is being shared and adopted within the marine science community.

  15. Ophthalmology and vision science research. Part 1: Understanding and using journal impact factors and citation indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Victoria A; McGhee, Charles N J

    2005-10-01

    In an increasingly "publish or perish" clinical and academic environment, all clinicians and clinician-scientists involved in research must have a firm understanding of the measures commonly used to assess the quality of scientific journals and, by default, those extended to grade individual articles and authors. The publication of research is a vital part of clinical and experimental research, and citation analyses of research publications have increasingly been adopted as a means of assessing the apparent quality of journals and the research published therein. In the first of a series of articles for those embarking on ophthalmic and vision science research, this paper discusses the key features of citation analysis, concentrating on the 2004 Journal Citation Report figures for the field of ophthalmology that include 42 ophthalmology, vision science, physiological optics, and optometry journals. The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) calculates a number of parameters including citation counts, Journal Impact Factor (JIF), Immediacy Index, and cited/citing half-life. This article discusses the methods of calculation and possible uses along with current controversies and potential abuses. The JIF and its relevance, potential bias, and limitations are discussed in depth as it has become the most widely used analysis of journal quality. The possible alternatives to ISI citation analysis are presented, and we conclude that citation analysis can be considered a reasonable measure of journal research quality only if used correctly.

  16. Ranking national research systems by citation indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksnes, Dag W.; Schneider, Jesper Wiborg; Gunnarsson, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical analysis of two different methodologies for calculating national citation indicators: whole counts and fractionalised counts. The aim of our study is to investigate the effect on relative citation indicators when citations to documents are fractionalised among...... the authoring countries. We have performed two analyses: a time series analysis of one country and a cross-sectional analysis of 23 countries. The results show that all countries’ relative citation indicators are lower when fractionalised counting is used. Further, the difference between whole...... and fractionalised counts is generally greatest for the countries with the highest proportion of internationally co-authored articles. In our view there are strong arguments in favour of using fractionalised counts to calculate relative citation indexes at the national level, rather than using whole counts, which...

  17. Citation analysis of Journal of Documentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navneet Kaur

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Citation analysis of all the journal articles published in the Journal of Documentation from 1996-2010 is carried out. 487 articles are published in the journal during 15 years. Highest numbers (44 of articles are published in the year 2005. The journal contained 15587 citations from 1996-2010. Average number of citation per article is maximum in the year 2009. This study also covers the analyses of authorship patterns in citing article. In authorship pattern, single author citations are dominant than others and it is 201 (49%. This study also reveals that Journal of Documentation is the most preferred journal used by authors in their citation. The paper concludes that only 10 core periodicals can cover more than 2951 (16 % references.

  18. Citation score normalized by cited references (CSNCR): The introduction of a new citation impact indicator

    CERN Document Server

    Bornmann, Lutz

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a new field-normalized indicator is introduced, which is rooted in early insights in bibliometrics, and is compared with several established field-normalized indicators (e.g. the mean normalized citation score, MNCS, and indicators based on percentile approaches). Garfield (1979) emphasizes that bare citation counts from different fields cannot be compared for evaluative purposes, because the "citation potential" can vary significantly between the fields. Garfield (1979) suggests that "the most accurate measure of citation potential is the average number of references per paper published in a given field". Based on this suggestion, the new indicator is basically defined as follows: the citation count of a focal paper is divided by the mean number of cited references in a field to normalize citations. The new indicator is called citation score normalized by cited references (CSNCR). The theoretical analysis of the CSNCR shows that it has the properties of consistency and homogeneous normalizatio...

  19. CITATION ANALYSIS OF URBAN PLANNING SCHOLARS IN THE U.S.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanchez Thomas W

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a complete citation analysis for the field of urban planning in the U.S. Urban planning is multi-disciplinary with a rich tradition of debate about the knowledge domain of both research and practice. Urban planning includes consideration of social, economic, technological, environmental, and political systems that are highly sophisticated, which therefore has an extensive body of scholarship. The article argues that Google Scholar is an appropriate source of citation data for urban planning and includes a brief example of one urban planning scholar to demonstrate GS citation patterns. This is followed by the results of a descriptive analysis showing general patterns of citation activity for urban planning schools. A greater depth of analysis is required to better understand the dynamics of these scholarly activities.

  20. Fame and Obsolescence: Disentangling growth and ageing dynamics of patent citations

    CERN Document Server

    Higham, K W; Jaffe, A B; Zülicke, U

    2016-01-01

    We present an analysis of citations accrued over time by cohorts of patents from specific technology sectors (e.g., Electrical and Electronic) granted by the United States Patent and Trademark Office in 1998. In contrast to previous studies that did not differentiate patents by technology category, we observe an intrinsic citation rate that clearly separates into an ageing function and a completely time-independent preferential-attachment-type growth kernel. In the long run, the aging function turns out to be an exponential function of time. Relevant parameters for the ageing and growth functions are reliably extracted. The time-dependent citation distribution is obtained analytically for the general case of a separable citation rate, thus establishing a useful framework for the quantitative investigation of general knowledge-propagation dynamics.

  1. A Comparison of the Citation Counts in the Science Citation Index and the NASA Astrophysics Data System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abt, Helmut A.

    2006-01-01

    From a comparison of 1000+ references to 20 papers in four fields of astronomy (solar, stellar, nebular, galaxy), we found that the citation counts in Science Citation Index (SCI) and Astrophysics Data System (ADS) agree for 85% of the citations. ADS gives 15% more citation counts than SCI. SCI has more citations among physics and chemistry journals, while ADS includes more from conferences. Each one misses less than 1% of the citations.

  2. Citation impact of papers published from six prolific countries: A national comparison based on InCites data

    CERN Document Server

    Bornmann, Lutz

    2012-01-01

    Using the InCites tool of Thomson Reuters, this study compares normalized citation impact values calculated for China, Japan, France, Germany, United States, and the UK throughout the time period from 1981 to 2010. The citation impact values are normalized to four subject areas: natural sciences; engineering and technology; medical and health sciences; and agricultural sciences. The results show an increasing trend in citation impact values for France, the UK and especially for Germany across the last thirty years in all subject areas. The citation impact of papers from China is still at a relatively low level (mostly below the world average), but the country follows an increasing trend line. The USA exhibits a relatively stable pattern of high citation impact values across the years. With small impact differences between the publication years, the US trend is increasing in engineering and technology but decreasing in medical and health sciences as well as in agricultural sciences. Similar to the USA, Japan f...

  3. Do open access working papers attract more citations compared to printed journal articles from the same research unit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Elleby, Anita

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an empirical case study of the characteristics of citations received by 10 open accessible non-peer reviewed working papers published by a prestigious multidisciplinary, but basically social science research institute, compared to 10 printed peer reviewed journal...... publication types, the citation distributions over the individual sample publications and observed years as well as over external, institutional and personal self-citations. The institute concerned is the Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS), Copenhagen. The results demonstrate that the open...... access working papers publicly accessible through the DIIS e-archive became far less cited than the corresponding sample of DIIS journal articles published in printed form. However, highly cited working papers have higher impact than the average of the lower half of cited articles. Citation time series...

  4. Do open access working papers attract more citations compared to printed journal articles from the same research unit?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Elleby, Anita

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an empirical case study of the characteristics of citations received by 10 open accessible non-peer reviewed working papers published by a prestigious multidisciplinary, but basically social science research institute, compared to 10 printed peer reviewed journal...... publication types, the citation distributions over the individual sample publications and observed years as well as over external, institutional and personal self-citations. The institute concerned is the Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS), Copenhagen. The results demonstrate that the open...... access working papers publicly accessible through the DIIS e-archive became far less cited than the corresponding sample of DIIS journal articles published in printed form. However, highly cited working papers have higher impact than the average of the lower half of cited articles. Citation time series...

  5. Produção e citação em Saúde Coletiva: um olhar a partir dos periódicos Cadernos de Saúde Pública e Revista de Saúde Pública Output and citation in Public Health: a perspective based on the journals Cadernos de Saúde Pública and Revista de Saúde Pública

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Carvalho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho é um estudo bibliométrico comparativo entre as duas principais revistas científicas da área da Saúde Coletiva publicadas no Brasil: Cadernos de Saúde Pública (CSP e Revista de Saúde Pública (RSP. Foram analisados 24 fascículos de cada periódico, publicados entre 1996 e 2003, construindo uma amostra de 819 artigos (496 de CSP e 323 de RSP. Os seguintes elementos dos artigos foram identificados e analisados: área temática do artigo e padrão de citações de publicações (artigos em periódicos, livros e/ou capítulos de livro, teses/dissertações, documentos de Internet, "literatura cinzenta" e outros tipos de publicações. Os dados encontrados mostram que a maioria dos artigos publicados é da subárea "epidemiologia". O padrão de citação identificado nas revistas foi de citações a artigos em periódico em maior número, seguidas das citações a livros e/ou capítulos de livro. Artigos na subárea "ciências sociais em saúde" publicados em CSP apresentam características distintas, com maior número de citações a livros e capítulos. Os autores argumentam que as informações são relevantes na caracterização da produção da área, com desdobramentos importantes no plano da avaliação acadêmico-científica da Saúde Coletiva no país.This is a comparative bibliometric study of the two main scientific journals in the Public Health field in Brazil: Cadernos de Saúde Pública (CSP and Revista de Saúde Pública (RSP. Twenty-four issues of each periodical were analyzed, published from 1996 to 2003, comprising a sample of 819 articles (496 from CSP and 323 from RSP. The following elements in the articles were identified and analyzed: thematic area of the article and citation pattern of publications (articles in periodicals, books and/or book chapters, theses/dissertations, Internet documents, "gray" literature, and other types of publications. The resulting data showed that the majority of the

  6. Citations to articles citing Benford's law: a Benford analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mir, Tariq Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    The observation that in large data the occurrence of first significant digits of numbers is often governed by a logarithmically decreasing distribution, quite far from the ordinarily expected uniform distribution, is called Benford's law (BL). It was first reported by S. Newcomb and many decades later independently by F. Benford. Due to its counter-intuitiveness the law was ignored for decades as a mere curious observation. However, huge swell in number of publications which the law has seen lately is an indication of its remarkable resurgence. The law has come a long way, from obscurity to now being a regular subject of books, peer reviewed papers, patents, blogs and news. Here, we use Google Scholar (GS) to collect the data on the number of citations received by the articles citing the original papers of Newcomb and Benford, and then investigate whether the leading digits of this citations data are distributed according to the law they discovered. We find that the monthly citations data of the articles citi...

  7. Brain Metastases Research 1990–2010: Pattern of Citation and Systematic Review of Highly Cited Articles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Carsten; Grosu, Anca L.; Mehta, Minesh P.

    2012-01-01

    Background. High and continuously increasing research activity related to different aspects of prevention, prediction, diagnosis and treatment of brain metastases has been performed between 1990 and 2010. One of the major databases contains 2695 scientific articles that were published during this time period. Different measures of impact, visibility, and quality of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For this overview, article citation rate was chosen. Results. Among the 10 most cited articles, 7 reported on randomized clinical trials. Nine covered surgical or radiosurgical approaches and the remaining one a widely adopted prognostic score. Overall, 30 randomized clinical trials were published between 1990 and 2010, including those with phase II design and excluding duplicate publications, for example, after longer followup or with focus on secondary endpoints. Twenty of these randomized clinical trials were published before 2008. Their median number of citations was 110, range 13–1013, compared to 5-6 citations for all types of publications. Annual citation rate appeared to gradually increase during the first 2-3 years after publication before reaching high levels. Conclusions. A large variety of preclinical and clinical topics achieved high numbers of citations. However, areas such as quality of life, side effects, and end-of-life care were underrepresented. Efforts to increase their visibility might be warranted. PMID:23028253

  8. Argonne National Laboratory 1986 publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopta, J.A.; Springer, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    This report is a bibliography of scientific and technical 1986 publications of Argonne National Laboratory. Some are ANL contributions to outside organizations' reports published in 1986. This compilation, prepared by the Technical Information Services Technical Publications Section (TPS), lists all nonrestricted 1986 publications submitted to TPS by the Laboratory's Divisions. Author indexes list ANL authors only. If a first author is not an ANL employee, an asterisk in the bibliographic citation indicates the first ANL author. The report is divided into seven parts: Journal Articles -- Listed by first author; ANL Reports -- Listed by report number; ANL and non-ANL Unnumbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Non-ANL Numbered Reports -- Listed by report number; Books and Book Chapters -- Listed by first author; Conference Papers -- Listed by first author; and Complete Author Index.

  9. Analysis of self-citation and impact factor in dermatology journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiter, Ofer; Mimouni, Michael; Mimouni, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Concerns have been raised regarding the impact factor's (IF) accuracy and credibility, which may be affected by different factors, including self-citations. To investigate the self-citation rate (SCR) of dermatology journals and its relationship to the IF. Data on all dermatology journals listed in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR) were retrieved, and the following parameters were analyzed: IF, total publications used to calculate the IF, total citations used to calculate the IF, self-citations used to calculate the IF, SCR, and IF without self-citations (corrected IF). The median SCR was 10.53% (0-50%), and the median IF and corrected IF, 1.54 (0.05-6.37) and 1.35 (0.03-5.84), respectively. There was an inverse correlation between the IF and the SCR. A statistically significant difference was noted in the SCR between general and subspecialty journals and between journals that offered a full English text and those that did not. In general, the IF of dermatology journals is not influenced by the SCR. However, journals with a lower IF tend to have a higher SCR. Subspecialty journals and foreign language journals have a higher SCR than general dermatology and English language journals, respectively, probably owing to their limited distribution and the difficulty experienced by international authors in accessing references in specific languages. © 2015 The International Society of Dermatology.

  10. A simple index for the high-citation tail of citation distribution to quantify research performance in countries and institutions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alonso Rodríguez-Navarro

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Conventional scientometric predictors of research performance such as the number of papers, citations, and papers in the top 1% of highly cited papers cannot be validated in terms of the number of Nobel Prize achievements across countries and institutions. The purpose of this paper is to find a bibliometric indicator that correlates with the number of Nobel Prize achievements. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study assumes that the high-citation tail of citation distribution holds most of the information about high scientific performance. Here I propose the x-index, which is calculated from the number of national articles in the top 1% and 0.1% of highly cited papers and has a subtractive term to discount highly cited papers that are not scientific breakthroughs. The x-index, the number of Nobel Prize achievements, and the number of national articles in Nature or Science are highly correlated. The high correlations among these independent parameters demonstrate that they are good measures of high scientific performance because scientific excellence is their only common characteristic. However, the x-index has superior features as compared to the other two parameters. Nobel Prize achievements are low frequency events and their number is an imprecise indicator, which in addition is zero in most institutions; the evaluation of research making use of the number of publications in prestigious journals is not advised. CONCLUSION: The x-index is a simple and precise indicator for high research performance.

  11. A citation analysis of systematic review and meta-analysis published in Chinese journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Liang; Chen, Yaolong; Huang, Jin; Li, Youping

    2012-05-01

    The numbers of systematic reviews (SRs) and meta-analyses (MAs) published in China have dramatically increased in recent years. Comprehensive analysis of their citation status may prove beneficial to the production and integration of high quality research, thereby increasing the quality of medical policy-making, research, and clinical practice. The Chinese Medical Citation Index (up to February 2010) was searched to identify SRs/MAs. Data were input using Microsoft Excel 2007 and statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 15.0 software. A total of 2224 SRs/MAs were included. Among the 591 different publications distributed from 1994 to 2009, the median publication count per publication was two (1-270). The total citation count was 2796, with an average of 1.26 citations per publication (0-57 citation). SRs/MAs that were never cited amounted to 1380 papers (62.1%), distributed in 272 journals (46.0%). MAs were easier to find than SRs. The major conditions affecting citation were whether or not the report was published in a Western field (r = 0.287, P = 0.000); whether or not the report was published in an "evidence-based" titled journal (r =-0.480, P = 0.002); and the length of time since publication (r = 0.455, P = 0.000). Since 2004, publication of SRs/MAs has exhibited a downward trend, forming a negative correlation with publication count. Over half of the SRs/MAs included had never been cited by the time research had concluded. In many other cases these reports exhibited extremely low citation rates. Citation of traditional Chinese medicine SRs/MAs exceeded that of Western medicine studies. This indirectly suggests that the quality of SRs/MAs usage is relatively low in China. This may be a result of various reasons and suggests that emphasis should be placed on raising the quality of SRs/MAs and significance of practical application. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd and Chinese Cochrane Center, West China Hospital of Sichuan University.

  12. Glioblastoma research 2006-2010: pattern of citation and systematic review of highly cited articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Carsten; Astner, Sabrina T; Grosu, Anca L

    2012-11-01

    High and continuously increasing research activity related to different aspects of pathogenesis, epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of glioblastoma has been performed between 2006 and 2010. Different measures of impact, visibility and quality of published research are available, each with its own pros and cons. For this review, article citation rate was chosen. Articles were identified through systematic search of the abstract database PubMed followed by analyses of total number of citations and proportion of highly cited articles, arbitrarily defined as those with ≥100, 50-99, and 25-49 citations, respectively (citation database Scopus). Overall 5831 scientific articles on the subject were published during this time period. 1.5% of all articles accumulated at least 100 citations, 3.2% were cited between 50 and 99 times, and 7.5% were cited between 25 and 49 times. Among the 10 most cited articles, 7 reported on genomic analyses, molecular subclasses of glioblastoma and/or stem cells. Overall, 18 randomized clinical trials were published between 2006 and 2010, including those with phase II design. Thirty-nine percent of them accumulated at least 50 citations and 72% were cited at least 25 times. In general, annual citation rate appeared to gradually increase during the first 2-3 years after publication before reaching high levels. A large variety of preclinical and clinical topics achieved at least 25 citations. However, areas such as quality of life, side effects, and end-of-life care were underrepresented. Efforts to increase their visibility might be warranted.

  13. Median Citation Index vs Journal Impact Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonoyiannakis, Manolis

    2015-03-01

    The Journal Impact Factor is an arithmetic mean: It is the average number of citations, in a year, to a journal's articles that were published the previous two years. But for the vast majority of scholarly journals, the distribution of these citations is skewed (non-symmetric). We argue that a more representative member of the skewed distribution of citations is its median, not the mean. We thus introduce the Median Citation Index (MCI) and compare it to the journal Impact Factor (JIF) as a potentially more suitable choice of the ``center'' of the distribution, or its typical value. Unlike the JIF, the MCI is far less sensitive to outlier (very highly cited) papers or to gaming, and does not lend itself to the hype of calculating it to three decimal digits.

  14. Homophily and missing links in citation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, Valerio; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Panzarasa, Pietro; Latora, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Citation networks have been widely used to study the evolution of science through the lenses of the underlying patterns of knowledge flows among academic papers, authors, research sub-fields, and scientific journals. Here we focus on citation networks to cast light on the salience of homophily, namely the principle that similarity breeds connection, for knowledge transfer between papers. To this end, we assess the degree to which citations tend to occur between papers that are concerned with seemingly related topics or research problems. Drawing on a large data set of articles published in the journals of the American Physical Society between 1893 and 2009, we propose a novel method for measuring the similarity between articles through the statistical validation of the overlap between their bibliographies. Results suggest that the probability of a citation made by one article to another is indeed an increasing function of the similarity between the two articles. Our study also enables us to uncover missing ci...

  15. What is the dimension of citation space?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clough, James R.; Evans, Tim S.

    2016-04-01

    Citation networks represent the flow of information between agents. They are constrained in time and so form directed acyclic graphs which have a causal structure. Here we provide novel quantitative methods to characterise that structure by adapting methods used in the causal set approach to quantum gravity by considering the networks to be embedded in a Minkowski spacetime and measuring its dimension using Myrheim-Meyer and Midpoint-scaling estimates. We illustrate these methods on citation networks from the arXiv, supreme court judgements from the USA, and patents and find that otherwise similar citation networks have measurably different dimensions. We suggest that these differences can be interpreted in terms of the level of diversity or narrowness in citation behaviour.

  16. Mapping the Chinese Science Citation Database

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2009-01-01

    Methods developed for mapping the journal structures contained in aggregated journal-journal citations in the Science Citation Index are applied to the Chinese Science Citation Database of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. This database covers 991 journals, of which only 37 had originally English titles. Using factor-analytical and graph-analytical techniques we show that this data is dually structured. The main structure is the intellectual organization of the journals in journal groups (as in the international SCI), but the university-based journals provide an institutional layer that orients this structure towards practical ends (e.g., agriculture). The Chinese Science Citation Database exhibits the characteristics of Mode 2 in the production of scientific knowledge more than its western counterparts. The contexts of application lead to correlation (interfactorial complexity) among the components.

  17. Citation Behaviour of Information Science Students II: Postgraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Maria Elizabeth; Oppenheim, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a study of student citation behaviours in the Department of Information Science, Loughborough University. The research methods were citation analysis of student dissertation bibliographies from 1998 to 2003, a survey of student's attitudes to citation behaviour and a test of student citation accuracy. The results…

  18. A Bibliography of Bibliometrics and Citation Indexing and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjerppe, Roland

    More than 2,000 documents about citations, citation analysis, citation indexes, and bibliometrics are cited in this bibliography. Some documents on communication in science, scientometrics, the science of science, and information retrieval have been included where they apply to citation indexing. Although most of the documents cited are in…

  19. Science Citation Index Expanded: The Effect of Journal Editorial Policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Robert A.

    2007-01-01

    Citation attributes were found to be strongly associated with the omission of citations from the cited article lists in 603 "SCIE" records from six chemistry journals. By requiring well-documented citations and by making it easier to identify where one citation ends and the next one begins, journals can help minimize the number of omitted…

  20. Antimatter: (Latest citations from the INSPEC Database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning physical theory, testing, and practical applications of antimatter. Related nuclear phenomena, matter-antimatter interactions, relativity, antigravity, formation of the universe, and space-time configurations are described. The roles of cosmic rays, black holes, antiprotons, and positrons are discussed. Antimatter propulsion spacecraft are briefly cited. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  1. Clustering of scientific citations in Wikipedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Finn Årup

    The instances of templates in Wikipedia form an interesting data set of structured information. Here I focus on the cite journal template that is primarily used for citation to articles in scientific journals. These citations can be extracted and analyzed: Non-negative matrix factorization...... is performed on a (article x journal) matrix resulting in a soft clustering of Wikipedia articles and scientific journals, each cluster more or less representing a scientific topic....

  2. Evidence of pro-homosexual bias in social science: citation rates and research on lesbian parenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumm, Walter R

    2010-04-01

    Three refereed journal articles concerning lesbian family life were identified and compared for content and methodological quality. The articles shared the same authors, same academic institution of origin, the same samples, similar dates of publication, and even the same journals. However, one article reported evidence less supportive of lesbian parenting while two articles reported evidence more supportive of lesbian parenting. Citation rates for the articles were compared. The supportive reports have been cited 28 to 37 times since their publication compared to only two citations for the less supportive report, in spite of its possibly better methodological qualities. The citation rate differences were statistically significant. Implications for this possible evidence of pro-homosexual bias in the social sciences are discussed.

  3. Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar citation rates: a case study of medical physics and biomedical engineering: what gets cited and what doesn't?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapp, Jamie

    2016-12-01

    There are often differences in a publication's citation count, depending on the database accessed. Here, aspects of citation counts for medical physics and biomedical engineering papers are studied using papers published in the journal Australasian physical and engineering sciences in medicine. Comparison is made between the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar. Papers are categorised into subject matter, and citation trends are examined. It is shown that review papers as a group tend to receive more citations on average; however the highest cited individual papers are more likely to be research papers.

  4. Patterns of citations of open access and non-open access conservation biology journal papers and book chapters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, Michael C; Bradley, J Stuart

    2010-06-01

    Open access (OA) publishing, whereby authors, their institutions, or their granting bodies pay or provide a repository through which peer-reviewed work is available online for free, is championed as a model to increase the number of citations per paper and disseminate results widely, especially to researchers in developing countries. We compared the number of citations of OA and non-OA papers in six journals and four books published since 2000 to test whether OA increases number of citations overall and increases citations made by authors in developing countries. After controlling for type of paper (e.g., review or research paper), length of paper, authors' citation profiles, number of authors per paper, and whether the author or the publisher released the paper in OA, OA had no statistically significant influence on the overall number of citations per journal paper. Journal papers were cited more frequently if the authors had published highly cited papers previously, were members of large teams of authors, or published relatively long papers, but papers were not cited more frequently if they were published in an OA source. Nevertheless, author-archived OA book chapters accrued up to eight times more citations than chapters in the same book that were not available through OA, perhaps because there is no online abstracting service for book chapters. There was also little evidence that journal papers or book chapters published in OA received more citations from authors in developing countries relative to those journal papers or book chapters not published in OA. For scholarly publications in conservation biology, only book chapters had an OA citation advantage, and OA did not increase the number of citations papers or chapters received from authors in developing countries.

  5. Public Safety Transmitter Towers, Emergency communication towers developed for Risk Management in Oct., 2004. Completeness is unknown. Not published., Published in 2004, 1:1200 (1in=100ft) scale, Sedgwick County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Public Safety Transmitter Towers dataset current as of 2004. Emergency communication towers developed for Risk Management in Oct., 2004. Completeness is unknown. Not...

  6. Evaluation of unique identifiers used for citation linking [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Holst Madsen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Unique identifiers (UID are seen as an effective tool to create links between identical publications in databases or identify duplicates in a database. The purpose of the present study is to investigate how well UIDs work for citation linking. We have two objectives: Explore the coverage, precision, and characteristics of publications matched versus not matched with UIDs as the match key.   Illustrate how publication sets formed by using UIDs as the match key may affect the bibliometric indicators: Number of publications, number of citations and the average number of citations per publication.   The objectives are addressed in a literature review and a case study. The literature review shows that only a few studies evaluate how well UIDs work as a match key. From the literature we identify four error types: Duplicate digital object identifiers (DOI, incorrect DOIs in reference lists and databases, DOIs not registered by the database where a bibliometric analysis is performed, and erroneous optical or special character recognition.   The case study explores the use of UIDs in the integration between the databases Pure and SciVal. Specifically journal publications in English are matched between the two databases. We find all error types except erroneous optical or special character recognition in our publication sets. In particular the duplicate DOIs constitute a problem for the calculation of bibliometric indicators as both keeping the duplicates to improve the reliability of citation counts and deleting them to improve the reliability of publication counts will distort the calculation of average number of citations per publication.   The use of UIDs as a match key in citation linking is implemented in many settings, and the availability of UIDs may become critical for the inclusion of a publication or a database in a bibliometric analysis.

  7. Using Google Scholar Citations to Support the Impact of Scholarly Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitney, William A.; Gilson, Todd A.

    2012-01-01

    Athletic training faculty seeking tenure and promotion, or simply undergoing an annual merit review, may need an understanding of the impact of their scholarly work. To that end, citation counts are frequently used as a measure of impact that a journal article has had in a given discipline. As compared to the simple quantity of publications, the…

  8. Line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia and Serbia V (1997-2000). (Bibliography and citation index)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, Milan S.

    2001-05-01

    The first part of the publication contains a review and anylysis of the results of spectral line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia and Serbia for 1997-2000. In the second part, the bibliography of the contributions of Yugoslav and Serbian scientists for 1997-2000 is given, together with the Citation Index for 1997-2000 for articles published 1962-2000.

  9. Line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia and Serbia III (1989 - 1993). (Bibliography and citation index).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    1994-08-01

    The first part of the publication contains review and analysis of the results of spectral line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia and Serbia in the period 1989 - 1993. In the second part, the bibliography of the contributions of Yugoslav and Serbian scientists is given, together with the citation index.

  10. Line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia and Serbia IV (1993 - 1997). (Bibliography and citation index).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    1997-09-01

    The first part of this publication contains review and analysis of the results of spectral line shapes investigations in Yugoslavia and Serbia for 1993 - 1997. In the second part, the bibliography of the contributions of Yugoslav and Serbian scientists for 1993 - 1997 is given, together with the citation index for 1993 - 1997 for articles published 1962 - 1997.

  11. SemCiR: A Citation Recommendation System Based on a Novel Semantic Distance Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarrinkalam, Fattane; Kahani, Mohsen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to propose a novel citation recommendation system that inputs a text and recommends publications that should be cited by it. Its goal is to help researchers in finding related works. Further, this paper seeks to explore the effect of using relational features in addition to textual features on the quality of…

  12. Does Interdisciplinary Research Lead to Higher Citation Impact? The Different Effect of Proximal and Distal Interdisciplinarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegros-Yegros, Alfredo; Rafols, Ismael; D'Este, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the effect of degree of interdisciplinarity on the citation impact of individual publications for four different scientific fields. We operationalise interdisciplinarity as disciplinary diversity in the references of a publication, and rather than treating interdisciplinarity as a monodimensional property, we investigate the separate effect of different aspects of diversity on citation impact: i.e. variety, balance and disparity. We use a Tobit regression model to examine the effect of these properties of interdisciplinarity on citation impact, controlling for a range of variables associated with the characteristics of publications. We find that variety has a positive effect on impact, whereas balance and disparity have a negative effect. Our results further qualify the separate effect of these three aspects of diversity by pointing out that all three dimensions of interdisciplinarity display a curvilinear (inverted U-shape) relationship with citation impact. These findings can be interpreted in two different ways. On the one hand, they are consistent with the view that, while combining multiple fields has a positive effect in knowledge creation, successful research is better achieved through research efforts that draw on a relatively proximal range of fields, as distal interdisciplinary research might be too risky and more likely to fail. On the other hand, these results may be interpreted as suggesting that scientific audiences are reluctant to cite heterodox papers that mix highly disparate bodies of knowledge--thus giving less credit to publications that are too groundbreaking or challenging.

  13. "Studies in Higher Education" 1976-2013: A Retrospective Using Citation Network Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calma, Angelito; Davies, Martin

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides a citation network analysis of the publications in "Studies in Higher Education" from 1976 to 2013 inclusive. This represents the entire history of the journal to date. It analyses the most published authors, most cited authors and most discussed topics using keywords. 1056 articles were taken from Web of…

  14. Use of Citations within Manuscripts Published by the Journal of Agricultural Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Hanna E.; Zimmerman, Bryan W.; Shoulders, Catherine W.; Johnson, Donald M.

    2014-01-01

    Because publications serve as the institutional memory of a discipline, researchers have the responsibility of becoming familiar with and acknowledging previous literature. The use of citations in manuscripts is considered ethical best practice, and is a method of manuscript evaluation. In agricultural education, researchers have recommended that…

  15. Measuring the value of research data: a citation analysis of oceanographic data sets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W Belter

    Full Text Available Evaluation of scientific research is becoming increasingly reliant on publication-based bibliometric indicators, which may result in the devaluation of other scientific activities--such as data curation--that do not necessarily result in the production of scientific publications. This issue may undermine the movement to openly share and cite data sets in scientific publications because researchers are unlikely to devote the effort necessary to curate their research data if they are unlikely to receive credit for doing so. This analysis attempts to demonstrate the bibliometric impact of properly curated and openly accessible data sets by attempting to generate citation counts for three data sets archived at the National Oceanographic Data Center. My findings suggest that all three data sets are highly cited, with estimated citation counts in most cases higher than 99% of all the journal articles published in Oceanography during the same years. I also find that methods of citing and referring to these data sets in scientific publications are highly inconsistent, despite the fact that a formal citation format is suggested for each data set. These findings have important implications for developing a data citation format, encouraging researchers to properly curate their research data, and evaluating the bibliometric impact of individuals and institutions.

  16. Extended Analysis of Empirical Citations with Skinner's "Verbal Behavior": 1984-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Mark R.; Small, Stacey L.; Rosales, Rocio

    2007-01-01

    The present paper comments on and extends the citation analysis of verbal operant publications based on Skinner's "Verbal Behavior" (1957) by Dymond, O'Hora, Whelan, and O'Donovan (2006). Variations in population parameters were evaluated for only those studies that Dymond et al. categorized as empirical. Preliminary results indicate that the…

  17. El estudio de caso en las bases de datos del Science Citation Index, Social Science Citation Index y Arts and Humanities Citation Index (1992-2000).

    OpenAIRE

    Delgado-Lopez-Cozar, Emilio; Fernández-Cano, A

    2002-01-01

    A bibliometric study in data bases of INSTITUTE FOR SCIENTIFIC INFORMATION(ISI) of Philadelphia: SCIENCE CITATION INDEX(SCI), SOCIAL SCIENCE CITATION INDEX(SSCI) snd ARTS AND HUMANITIES CITATION INDEX(A&HCI)is presented. The central finding attests to widespread use, progressive and diverse case study on such a basis, over time, in diverse disciplines, topics and in many scientific journals.

  18. Top classic citations in pancreatic cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiang; Jiang, Yuan

    2016-11-29

    The number of times that articles are cited by is widely used to evaluate the impact of an article or an individual author has on its scientific community. This bibliometric analysis aimed to explore the top classic citations in pancreatic cancer (PC) research. A computerized literature search was conducted using the database, the Science Citation Index Expanded. The top 100 highly cited articles were included and further analyzed. The most cited article had 3,032 citations, with a mean of 626 citations per paper. These highly cited articles were published in 37 journals, led by Cancer Research (15 articles). Of the 100 articles, 40 were observational studies, 36 dealt with basic science, and 14 were randomized controlled trials. These articles came from 11 countries, with the USA contributing 79 articles. Fifty-one institutions produced these 100 citation classics, led by Johns Hopkins University (20 articles). Twenty-seven persons authored two or more of the top-cited articles, led by Kern SE (6) and Yeo CJ (5). This analysis of the top highly cited articles allows for the recognition of major advances in PC research and gives a historic perspective on the progress of this specialty of PC research.

  19. Identifying “Sleeping Beauties ” and the Princes Who Woke Up Sleeping Beauties in Terms of Citation Speed Measures:A Case Study of the Key Publications by Stefan W . Hell%基于被引速率指标识别睡美人文献及其“王子”-以2014年诺贝尔化学奖得主 Stefan Hell的睡美人文献为例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜建; 武夷山

    2015-01-01

    Objective:Based on citation curve and citation speed,which measures how fast a paper accumulates its citations,we try to investigate whether a paper by Nobel laureate Stephan W . Hell,hereafter noted as Hell ( 1994 ) ,is a Sleeping Beauty document and identify the Princes who wake up the Sleeping Beauty,if that’s the case. Methods:T w o pairs of indicators,i. e. Citation Speed and Delayed Recognition Index ( DRI) as well as Co-Citation Speed and co-Delayed Recognition Index(cDRI) are proposed for rapidly discovering Sleeping Beauties and their Princes. CitNetExporler is used to reveal direct citation networks composed of the concerned documents. Results :There was a significant pattern of delayed recognition revealed by three aspects: Hell' 1994 $ ’ citation distribution over 1994 - 2014 period,a very slow citation speed and very high DRI. W e did not only find that Hell' 2000 $ is the first prince,but also detected another prince i. e. Hell' 2003 $ and two “retinues” of the prince i. e. Betzig'2006 $ and Rust & Z h uang' 2006 $ . It seems that these four documents 'two princes and two retinues) led more authors to refer to Hell' 1994 $ . Conclusions :Citation Speed and D R I are proved effective metrics for distinguishing “sleeping beauties” citation patterns from “flash in the p a n ” patterns. By examining the reference list of articles citing Sleeping Beauties,one can discern ‘Prince ’articles characterized by the following features :1 $ They were published not long after Sleeping Beauty’s awakening; 2 $ They are highly co-cited with Sleeping Beauty ;3 $ They have almost the same co-citation speed and co-Delayed Recognition Index with Sleeping Beauty. A Sleeping Beauty m ay need a prince plus other agents to wake her u p ,and those documents with awakening function tend to be highly cited articles also and published in journals with higher impact than the journals publishing sleeping beauties. Publications belonging to so

  20. Citation analysis in journal rankings: medical informatics in the library and information science literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishwanatham, R

    1998-10-01

    Medical informatics is an interdisciplinary field. Medical informatics articles will be found in the literature of various disciplines including library and information science publications. The purpose of this study was to provide an objectively ranked list of journals that publish medical informatics articles relevant to library and information science. Library Literature, Library and Information Science Abstracts, and Social Science Citation Index were used to identify articles published on the topic of medical informatics and to identify a ranked list of journals. This study also used citation analysis to identify the most frequently cited journals relevant to library and information science.

  1. Recycling plastics and polymeric wastes. (Latest citations from the EI compendex*plus database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the recycling and uses of plastic and polymeric scraps and wastes. Topics include communition or grinding of scrap, degradation by heat or chemical reaction, compatibility of various plastics with one another, sorting problems, physical properties of reprocessed materials, economics, public awareness, waste minimization, waste re-use, and foreign experience in plastics recycling. New products made from recycled materials, and products expressly made to be recyclable are also discussed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  2. Evaluation of a Brief Homework Assignment Designed to Reduce Citation Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Pamela

    2004-01-01

    I evaluated a brief homework assignment designed to reduce citation problems in research-based term papers. Students in 2 developmental psychology classes received a brief presentation and handout defining plagiarism with tips on how to cite sources to avoid plagiarizing. In addition, students in 1 class completed 2 brief homework assignments in…

  3. Influence of international co-authorship on the research citation impact of young universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, K A; Yu, L-G

    We investigated the effect of international collaboration (in the form of international co-authorship) on the impact of publications of young universities (100 years old). The following impact indicators are used in this study, they are: (1) the 5-year citations per paper (CPP) data, (2) the international co-authorship rate, (3) the CPP differential between publications with and without international co-authorships, and (4) the difference between the percentage of international co-authored publications falling in the global top 10 % highly cited publications and the percentage of overall publications falling in the global top 10 % highly cited publications (Δ%Top10%). The increment of 5-year (2010-2014) field weighted citation impact (FWCI) of internationally co-authored papers over the 5-year overall FWCI of the institutions in SciVal(®) is used as another indicator to eliminate the effect of discipline difference in citation rate. The results show that, for most top institutions, the difference between the citations per paper (CPP) for their publications with and without international co-authorship is positive, with increase of up to 5.0 citations per paper over the period 1996-2003. Yet, for some Asian institutions, by attracting a lot of researchers with international background and making these collaborating "external" authors as internal researchers, these institutions have created a special kind of international collaboration that are not expressed in co-authorship, and the CPP gaps between publications with and without international co-authorship are relatively small (around 0-1 citations per paper increment) for these institutions. The top old institutions have higher CPP than young institutions, and higher annual research expenditures; while young universities have a higher relative CPP increment for the current 5-year period over the previous 5-year period. The Δ%Top10% for international co-authored publications is generally higher than that for

  4. Trends in citations to books on epidemiological and statistical methods in the biomedical literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miquel Porta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are no analyses of citations to books on epidemiological and statistical methods in the biomedical literature. Such analyses may shed light on how concepts and methods changed while biomedical research evolved. Our aim was to analyze the number and time trends of citations received from biomedical articles by books on epidemiological and statistical methods, and related disciplines. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The data source was the Web of Science. The study books were published between 1957 and 2010. The first year of publication of the citing articles was 1945. We identified 125 books that received at least 25 citations. Books first published in 1980-1989 had the highest total and median number of citations per year. Nine of the 10 most cited texts focused on statistical methods. Hosmer & Lemeshow's Applied logistic regression received the highest number of citations and highest average annual rate. It was followed by books by Fleiss, Armitage, et al., Rothman, et al., and Kalbfleisch and Prentice. Fifth in citations per year was Sackett, et al., Evidence-based medicine. The rise of multivariate methods, clinical epidemiology, or nutritional epidemiology was reflected in the citation trends. Educational textbooks, practice-oriented books, books on epidemiological substantive knowledge, and on theory and health policies were much less cited. None of the 25 top-cited books had the theoretical or sociopolitical scope of works by Cochrane, McKeown, Rose, or Morris. CONCLUSIONS: Books were mainly cited to reference methods. Books first published in the 1980s continue to be most influential. Older books on theory and policies were rooted in societal and general medical concerns, while the most modern books are almost purely on methods.

  5. Trends in citations to books on epidemiological and statistical methods in the biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Miquel; Vandenbroucke, Jan P; Ioannidis, John P A; Sanz, Sergio; Fernandez, Esteve; Bhopal, Raj; Morabia, Alfredo; Victora, Cesar; Lopez, Tomàs

    2013-01-01

    There are no analyses of citations to books on epidemiological and statistical methods in the biomedical literature. Such analyses may shed light on how concepts and methods changed while biomedical research evolved. Our aim was to analyze the number and time trends of citations received from biomedical articles by books on epidemiological and statistical methods, and related disciplines. The data source was the Web of Science. The study books were published between 1957 and 2010. The first year of publication of the citing articles was 1945. We identified 125 books that received at least 25 citations. Books first published in 1980-1989 had the highest total and median number of citations per year. Nine of the 10 most cited texts focused on statistical methods. Hosmer & Lemeshow's Applied logistic regression received the highest number of citations and highest average annual rate. It was followed by books by Fleiss, Armitage, et al., Rothman, et al., and Kalbfleisch and Prentice. Fifth in citations per year was Sackett, et al., Evidence-based medicine. The rise of multivariate methods, clinical epidemiology, or nutritional epidemiology was reflected in the citation trends. Educational textbooks, practice-oriented books, books on epidemiological substantive knowledge, and on theory and health policies were much less cited. None of the 25 top-cited books had the theoretical or sociopolitical scope of works by Cochrane, McKeown, Rose, or Morris. Books were mainly cited to reference methods. Books first published in the 1980s continue to be most influential. Older books on theory and policies were rooted in societal and general medical concerns, while the most modern books are almost purely on methods.

  6. Coauthorship and Citation Networks for Statisticians

    CERN Document Server

    Ji, Pengsheng

    2014-01-01

    We have collected and cleaned two network data sets: Coauthorship and Citation networks for statisticians. The data sets are based on all research papers published in four of the top journals in statistics from 2003 to the first half of 2012. We analyze the data sets from many different perspectives, focusing on (a) productivity, patterns and trends, (b) centrality, and (c) community structures, and present an array of interesting findings. For (a), we find that over the 10-year period, both the average number of papers per author and the fraction of self citations have been decreasing, but the proportion of distant citations has been increasing. These suggest that the statistics community has become increasingly more collaborative, competitive, and globalized, driven by the boom of online resources and Search Engines. For (b), we identify the most prolific, the most collaborative, and the most highly cited authors. We also identify a handful of "hot" papers and suggest "Variable Selection" and several other ...

  7. High Citation of Iranian Coauthored articles in comparison with single authored ones: does it link with self-citation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seaid Nazarian

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to investigate the effect of co-authorship and self-citation on the citation rates of Iranian indexed articles in Web of Science (WoS. Research population included Iranian indexed articles in WoS in 2007 which had been received at least one citation. Numbers of articles in the time of research (October & November 2010 was 7355, which 390 of them, using stratified random sampling, was selected as sample. Research results showed that co-authored articles have received more citations than single-authored ones and this difference was statistically significant. On the other hand, self-citation exclusion has significantly reduced the citation rates of both co-authored and single-authored articles. After self-citation exclusion, existing difference between citation rates of co-authored and single-authored articles lost its significance. So, it can be concluded that self-citation exclusion led to reduction of citation rates of Iranian indexed articles in WoS, but this exclusion affected co-authored articles citation rates more than single-authored ones. In other words, high citation of Iranian co-authored articles in comparison with single-authored articles has been affected mainly by self-citation, not by foreign citation. This finding, which was our contribution, contradicted with results of previous researches.

  8. MKT 438 Complete Class

    OpenAIRE

    admin

    2015-01-01

      To purchase this material click below link   http://www.assignmentcloud.com/MKT-438/MKT-438-Complete-Class-Guide   For more classes visit www.assignmentcloud.com   MKT 438 Week 1 Individual Assignment Defining Public Relation Paper MKT 438 Week 2 Team Assignment Public Relations Campaign Overview Paper MKT 438 Week 3 Individual Assignment Functions of Public Relation Paper MKT 438 Week 3 Team Assignment Public Relations Campaig...

  9. Citations and the h index of soil researchers and journals in the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minasny, Budiman; Hartemink, Alfred E; McBratney, Alex; Jang, Ho-Jun

    2013-01-01

    Citation metrics and h indices differ using different bibliometric databases. We compiled the number of publications, number of citations, h index and year since the first publication from 340 soil researchers from all over the world. On average, Google Scholar has the highest h index, number of publications and citations per researcher, and the Web of Science the lowest. The number of papers in Google Scholar is on average 2.3 times higher and the number of citations is 1.9 times higher compared to the data in the Web of Science. Scopus metrics are slightly higher than that of the Web of Science. The h index in Google Scholar is on average 1.4 times larger than Web of Science, and the h index in Scopus is on average 1.1 times larger than Web of Science. Over time, the metrics increase in all three databases but fastest in Google Scholar. The h index of an individual soil scientist is about 0.7 times the number of years since his/her first publication. There is a large difference between the number of citations, number of publications and the h index using the three databases. From this analysis it can be concluded that the choice of the database affects widely-used citation and evaluation metrics but that bibliometric transfer functions exist to relate the metrics from these three databases. We also investigated the relationship between journal's impact factor and Google Scholar's h5-index. The h5-index is a better measure of a journal's citation than the 2 or 5 year window impact factor.

  10. Citations and the h index of soil researchers and journals in the Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budiman Minasny

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Citation metrics and h indices differ using different bibliometric databases. We compiled the number of publications, number of citations, h index and year since the first publication from 340 soil researchers from all over the world. On average, Google Scholar has the highest h index, number of publications and citations per researcher, and the Web of Science the lowest. The number of papers in Google Scholar is on average 2.3 times higher and the number of citations is 1.9 times higher compared to the data in the Web of Science. Scopus metrics are slightly higher than that of the Web of Science. The h index in Google Scholar is on average 1.4 times larger than Web of Science, and the h index in Scopus is on average 1.1 times larger than Web of Science. Over time, the metrics increase in all three databases but fastest in Google Scholar. The h index of an individual soil scientist is about 0.7 times the number of years since his/her first publication. There is a large difference between the number of citations, number of publications and the h index using the three databases. From this analysis it can be concluded that the choice of the database affects widely-used citation and evaluation metrics but that bibliometric transfer functions exist to relate the metrics from these three databases. We also investigated the relationship between journal’s impact factor and Google Scholar’s h5-index. The h5-index is a better measure of a journal’s citation than the 2 or 5 year window impact factor.

  11. Science Citation Index data: Two additional reasons against its use for administrative purposes

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2007-01-01

    First, for decades the use of anonymity in reviews for science funding proposals and for evaluating manuscripts for publication has been gradually corrupting American science, encouraging and rewarding the dark elements of human nature. Unethical reviewers, secure and unaccountable through anonymity, all too often make untrue and/or pejorative statements to eliminate their professional competitors. Survival in this corrupt environment has led to a consensus-only mentality. Consequently, important scientific contradictions, if they can be published at all, are selectively ignored in many instances out of fear of anonymous retaliation. Science Citation Index data in such a corrupt environment may be of little administrative value, except for possible use in documenting scientific fraud. Second, as knowledge of the administrative use of Science Citation Index data spreads, scientists will adapt and will shift to research on popular subjects to elicit greater numbers of citations, rather than to take the paths le...

  12. Does diversity of papers affect their citations? Evidence from American Physical Society Journals

    CERN Document Server

    Enduri, Murali Krishna; Jolad, Shivakumar

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we study the correlation between interdisciplinarity of papers within physical sciences and their citations by using meta data of articles published in American Physical Society's Physical Review journals between 1985 to 2012. We use the Weitzman diversity index to measure the diversity of papers and authors, exploiting the hierarchical structure of PACS (Physics and Astronomy Classification Scheme) codes. We find that the fraction of authors with high diversity is increasing with time, where as the fraction of least diversity are decreasing, and moderate diversity authors have higher tendency to switch over to other diversity groups. The diversity index of papers is correlated with the citations they received in a given time period from their publication year. Papers with lower and higher end of diversity index receive lesser citations than the moderate diversity papers.

  13. Central indexes to the citation distribution: A complement to the h-index

    CERN Document Server

    Dorta-Gonzalez, Pablo; 10.1007/s11192-011-0453-3

    2013-01-01

    The citation distribution of a researcher shows the impact of their production and determines the success of their scientific career. However, its application in scientific evaluation is difficult due to the bi-dimensional character of the distribution. Some bibliometric indexes that try to synthesize in a numerical value the principal characteristics of this distribution have been proposed recently. In contrast with other bibliometric measures, the biases that the distribution tails provoke, are reduced by the h-index. However, some limitations in the discrimination among researchers with different publication habits are presented in this index. This index penalizes selective researchers, distinguished by the large number of citations received, as compared to large producers. In this work, two original sets of indexes, the central area indexes and the central interval indexes, that complement the h-index to include the central shape of the citation distribution, are proposed and compared.

  14. Do PageRank-based author rankings outperform simple citation counts?

    CERN Document Server

    Fiala, Dalibor; Žitnik, Slavko; Bajec, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The basic indicators of a researcher's productivity and impact are still the number of publications and their citation counts. These metrics are clear, straightforward, and easy to obtain. When a ranking of scholars is needed, for instance in grant, award, or promotion procedures, their use is the fastest and cheapest way of prioritizing some scientists over others. However, due to their nature, there is a danger of oversimplifying scientific achievements. Therefore, many other indicators have been proposed including the usage of the PageRank algorithm known for the ranking of webpages and its modifications suited to citation networks. Nevertheless, this recursive method is computationally expensive and even if it has the advantage of favouring prestige over popularity, its application should be well justified, particularly when compared to the standard citation counts. In this study, we analyze three large datasets of computer science papers in the categories of artificial intelligence, software engineering,...

  15. Normal tissue studies in radiation oncology: A systematic review of highly cited articles and citation patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Carsten; Andratschke, Nicolaus H; Grosu, Anca L

    2014-09-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the cornerstones of modern multidisciplinary cancer treatment. Normal tissue tolerance is critical as radiation-induced side effects may compromise organ function and quality of life. The importance of normal tissue research is reflected by the large number of scientific articles, which have been published between 2006 and 2010. The present study identified important areas of research as well as seminal publications. The article citation rate is among the potential indicators of scientific impact. Highly cited articles, arbitrarily defined as those with ≥15 citations, were identified via a systematic search of the citation database, Scopus. Up to 608 articles per year were published between 2006 and 2010, however, distribution, clinical prevention or mitigation studies are critical and must receive higher priority, funding and attention.

  16. The Rise and Rise of Citation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Meho, L I

    2006-01-01

    With the vast majority of scientific papers now available online, this paper describes how the Web is allowing physicists and information providers to measure more accurately the impact of these papers and their authors. Provides a historical background of citation analysis, impact factor, new citation data sources (e.g., Google Scholar, Scopus, NASA's Astrophysics Data System Abstract Service, MathSciNet, ScienceDirect, SciFinder Scholar, Scitation/SPIN, and SPIRES-HEP), as well as h-index, g-index, and a-index.

  17. Analysis and visualization of citation networks

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Dangzhi

    2015-01-01

    Citation analysis-the exploration of reference patterns in the scholarly and scientific literature-has long been applied in a number of social sciences to study research impact, knowledge flows, and knowledge networks. It has important information science applications as well, particularly in knowledge representation and in information retrieval.Recent years have seen a burgeoning interest in citation analysis to help address research, management, or information service issues such as university rankings, research evaluation, or knowledge domain visualization. This renewed and growing interest

  18. Annual Journal citation indices: a comparative study

    CERN Document Server

    Khaleque, Abdul; Sen, Parongama

    2016-01-01

    We study the statistics of citations made to the indexed Science journals in the Journal Citation Reports during the period 2004-2013 using different measures. We consider different measures which quantify the impact of the journals. To our surprise, we find that the apparently uncorrelated measures, even when defined in an arbitrary manner, show strong correlations. This is checked over all the years considered. Impact factor being one of these measures, the present work raises the question whether it is actually a nearly perfect index as claimed often. In addition we study the distributions of the different indices which also behave similarly.

  19. Annual Journal Citation Indices: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Khaleque

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We study the statistics of citations made to the indexed Science journals in the Journal Citation Reports during the period 2004-2013 using different measures. We consider different measures which quantify the impact of the journals. To our surprise, we find that the apparently uncorrelated measures, even when defined in an arbitrary manner, show strong correlations. This is checked over all the years considered. Impact factor being one of these measures, the present work raises the question whether it is actually a nearly perfect index as claimed often. In addition, we study the distributions of the different indices which also behave similarly.

  20. A new bibliometric index based on the shape of the citation distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lando, Tommaso; Bertoli-Barsotti, Lucio

    2014-01-01

    In order to improve the h-index in terms of its accuracy and sensitivity to the form of the citation distribution, we propose the new bibliometric index [symbol in text]. The basic idea is to define, for any author with a given number of citations, an "ideal" citation distribution which represents a benchmark in terms of number of papers and number of citations per publication, and to obtain an index which increases its value when the real citation distribution approaches its ideal form. The method is very general because the ideal distribution can be defined differently according to the main objective of the index. In this paper we propose to define it by a "squared-form" distribution: this is consistent with many popular bibliometric indices, which reach their maximum value when the distribution is basically a "square". This approach generally rewards the more regular and reliable researchers, and it seems to be especially suitable for dealing with common situations such as applications for academic positions. To show the advantages of the [symbol in text]-index some mathematical properties are proved and an application to real data is proposed.

  1. Flawed citation practices facilitate the unsubstantiated perception of a global trend toward increased jellyfish blooms

    KAUST Repository

    Sanz-Martín, Marina

    2016-06-24

    Speculation over a global rise in jellyfish populations has become widespread in the scientific literature, but until recently the purported ‘global increase’ had not been tested. Here we present a citation analysis of peer-reviewed literature to track the evolution of the current perception of increases in jellyfish and identify key papers involved in its establishment. Trend statements and citation threads were reviewed and arranged in a citation network. Trend statements were assessed according their degree of affirmation and spatial scale, and the appropriateness of the citations used to support statements was assessed. Analyses showed that 48.9% of publications misinterpreted the conclusions of cited sources, with a bias towards claiming jellyfish populations are increasing, with a single review having the most influence on the network. Collectively, these disparities resulted in a network based on unsubstantiated statements and citation threads. As a community, we must ensure our statements about scientific findings in general are accurately substantiated and carefully communicated such that incorrect perceptions, as in the case of jellyfish blooms, do not develop in the absence of rigorous testing. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  2. Nonuniversal power law scaling in the probability distribution of scientific citations

    CERN Document Server

    Peterson, G J; Dill, K A; 10.1073/pnas.1010757107

    2010-01-01

    We develop a model for the distribution of scientific citations. The model involves a dual mechanism: in the direct mechanism, the author of a new paper finds an old paper A and cites it. In the indirect mechanism, the author of a new paper finds an old paper A only via the reference list of a newer intermediary paper B, which has previously cited A. By comparison to citation databases, we find that papers having few citations are cited mainly by the direct mechanism. Papers already having many citations (`classics') are cited mainly by the indirect mechanism. The indirect mechanism gives a power-law tail. The `tipping point' at which a paper becomes a classic is about 25 citations for papers published in the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science database in 1981, 31 for Physical Review D papers published from 1975-1994, and 37 for all publications from a list of high h-index chemists assembled in 2007. The power-law exponent is not universal. Individuals who are highly cited have a system...

  3. Nonuniversal power law scaling in the probability distribution of scientific citations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, George J; Pressé, Steve; Dill, Ken A

    2010-09-14

    We develop a model for the distribution of scientific citations. The model involves a dual mechanism: in the direct mechanism, the author of a new paper finds an old paper A and cites it. In the indirect mechanism, the author of a new paper finds an old paper A only via the reference list of a newer intermediary paper B, which has previously cited A. By comparison to citation databases, we find that papers having few citations are cited mainly by the direct mechanism. Papers already having many citations ("classics") are cited mainly by the indirect mechanism. The indirect mechanism gives a power-law tail. The "tipping point" at which a paper becomes a classic is about 25 citations for papers published in the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science database in 1981, 31 for Physical Review D papers published from 1975-1994, and 37 for all publications from a list of high h-index chemists assembled in 2007. The power-law exponent is not universal. Individuals who are highly cited have a systematically smaller exponent than individuals who are less cited.

  4. Citation analysis did not provide a reliable assessment of core outcome set uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Karen L; Kirkham, Jamie J; Clarke, Mike; Williamson, Paula R

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate citation analysis as an approach to measuring core outcome set (COS) uptake, by assessing whether the number of citations for a COS report could be used as a surrogate measure of uptake of the COS by clinical trialists. Citation data were obtained for COS reports published before 2010 in five disease areas (systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, eczema, sepsis and critical care, and female sexual dysfunction). Those publications identified as a report of a clinical trial were examined to identify whether or not all outcomes in the COS were measured in the trial. Clinical trials measuring the relevant COS made up a small proportion of the total number of citations for COS reports. Not all trials citing a COS report measured all the recommended outcomes. Some trials cited the COS reports for other reasons, including the definition of a condition or other trial design issues addressed by the COS report. Although citation data can be readily accessed, it should not be assumed that the citing of a COS report indicates that a trial has measured the recommended COS. Alternative methods for assessing COS uptake are needed. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact maturity times and citation time windows: The 2-year maximum journal impact factor

    CERN Document Server

    Dorta-Gonzalez, Pablo

    2013-01-01

    Journal metrics are employed for the assessment of scientific scholar journals from a general bibliometric perspective. In this context, the Thomson Reuters journal impact factors (JIF) are the citation-based indicators most used. The 2-year journal impact factor (2-JIF) counts citations to one and two year old articles, while the 5-year journal impact factor (5-JIF) counts citations from one to five year old articles. Nevertheless, these indicators are not comparable among fields of science for two reasons: (i) each field has a different impact maturity time, and (ii) because of systematic differences in publication and citation behaviour across disciplines. In fact, the 5-JIF firstly appeared in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR) in 2007 with the purpose of making more comparable impacts in fields in which impact matures slowly. However, there is not an optimal fixed impact maturity time valid for all the fields. In some of them two years provides a good performance whereas in others three or more years are...

  6. Preserving the Integrity of Citations and References by All Stakeholders of Science Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparyan, Armen Yuri; Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A; Gerasimov, Alexey N; Kostyukova, Elena I; Kitas, George D

    2015-11-01

    Citations to scholarly items are building bricks for multidisciplinary science communication. Citation analyses are currently influencing individual career advancement and ranking of academic and research institutions worldwide. This article overviews the involvement of scientific authors, reviewers, editors, publishers, indexers, and learned associations in the citing and referencing to preserve the integrity of science communication. Authors are responsible for thorough bibliographic searches to select relevant references for their articles, comprehend main points, and cite them in an ethical way. Reviewers and editors may perform additional searches and recommend missing essential references. Publishers, in turn, are in a position to instruct their authors over the citations and references, provide tools for validation of references, and open access to bibliographies. Publicly available reference lists bear important information about the novelty and relatedness of the scholarly items with the published literature. Few editorial associations have dealt with the issue of citations and properly managed references. As a prime example, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) issued in December 2014 an updated set of recommendations on the need for citing primary literature and avoiding unethical references, which are applicable to the global scientific community. With the exponential growth of literature and related references, it is critically important to define functions of all stakeholders of science communication in curbing the issue of irrational and unethical citations and thereby improve the quality and indexability of scholarly journals.

  7. Citation distribution of individual scientist: approximations of stretch exponential distribution with power law tails

    CERN Document Server

    Garanina, O S

    2016-01-01

    A multi-parametric family of stretch exponential distributions with various power law tails is introduced and is shown to describe adequately the empirical distributions of scientific citation of individual authors. The four-parametric families are characterized by a normalization coefficient in the exponential part, the power exponent in the power-law asymptotic part, and the coefficient for the transition between the above two parts. The distribution of papers of individual scientist over citations of these papers is studied. Scientists are selected via total number of citations in three ranges: 102-103, 103-104, and 104-105 of total citations. We study these intervals for physicists in ISI Web of Knowledge. The scientists who started their scientific publications after 1980 were taken into consideration only. It is detected that the power coefficient in the stretch exponent starts from one for low-cited authors and has to trend to smaller values for scientists with large number of citation. At the same tim...

  8. Citation classics in the burn literature during the past 55 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jason J; Chung, Kevin K; King, Booker T; Jones, John A; Cancio, Leopoldo C; Baer, David G; Renz, Evan M; Blackbourne, Lorne H; Orman, Jean A

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the 100 most cited, peer-reviewed burn-related articles over the past half century. Burn care presents ongoing challenges to both U.S. civilian and military healthcare personnel. Improvements in burn survival and quality of life are the result of advances in burn research. The Web of Science (including Science Citation Index) was searched for the most cited articles related to burn care, published from 1955 to the present. The most cited article was "Permanent coverage of large burn wounds with autologous cultured human epithelium," by G.G. Gallico et al, New England Journal of Medicine, 1984 (711 citations). Between the 1970s and the 1990s, there was a near doubling of the number of highly cited publications with each subsequent decade. A total of 85% of the articles were on the topics of pathophysiology (37%), wounds, tissue, or dressings (31%), or organ failure/sepsis (17%). B.A. Pruitt Jr. (2320 citations), D.N. Herndon (1972 citations), and A.D. Mason Jr. (1435 citations) were the most cited authors. This study identified some of the most important contributions to burn research and the areas of greatest scientific interest to the specialty during the past five decades, and highlights key research that has contributed to the evolution of modern burn care.

  9. [Citation analysis of the Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine from 2001 to 2004].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua; Li, Li

    2005-11-01

    To study the information absorbency of Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine and its half-citing life, to find out the core journals and characteristics of literature requested by scientists, and to analyze the trend of preventive medicine research. The citation analysis was used to analyze the references cited in 766 articles in Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine from 2001-2004. 505 (65.93%) of 766 articles have the 4 708 references, and the self-citation rate was 3.97%. The average number of references per paper was 6.15, and the maximum of references in one paper was 39. Main types of citations were from journals (87.43%) and the books (9.98%). The Price Index was 45.20%, and the self-citation rate was 3.97%. The percent of citations from the high-ranked 22 journals were 26.51%. The publications in Chinese Journal of Preventive Medicine have received more concerns than those from other major journals in medicine. Periodical and English literature were mostly used by the preventive researcher. Moreover, the articles published in the journal were able to keep closely along with the advances of the subject research.

  10. Preserving the Integrity of Citations and References by All Stakeholders of Science Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yessirkepov, Marlen; Voronov, Alexander A.; Gerasimov, Alexey N.; Kostyukova, Elena I.; Kitas, George D.

    2015-01-01

    Citations to scholarly items are building bricks for multidisciplinary science communication. Citation analyses are currently influencing individual career advancement and ranking of academic and research institutions worldwide. This article overviews the involvement of scientific authors, reviewers, editors, publishers, indexers, and learned associations in the citing and referencing to preserve the integrity of science communication. Authors are responsible for thorough bibliographic searches to select relevant references for their articles, comprehend main points, and cite them in an ethical way. Reviewers and editors may perform additional searches and recommend missing essential references. Publishers, in turn, are in a position to instruct their authors over the citations and references, provide tools for validation of references, and open access to bibliographies. Publicly available reference lists bear important information about the novelty and relatedness of the scholarly items with the published literature. Few editorial associations have dealt with the issue of citations and properly managed references. As a prime example, the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) issued in December 2014 an updated set of recommendations on the need for citing primary literature and avoiding unethical references, which are applicable to the global scientific community. With the exponential growth of literature and related references, it is critically important to define functions of all stakeholders of science communication in curbing the issue of irrational and unethical citations and thereby improve the quality and indexability of scholarly journals. PMID:26538996

  11. Towards a "Book Publishers Citation Reports". First approach using the "Book Citation Index"

    OpenAIRE

    Torres-Salinas, Daniel; Robinson-García, Nicolás; Jiménez- Contreras, Evaristo; Delgado López-Cózar, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    The absence of books and book chapters in the Web of Science Citation Indexes (SCI, SSCI and A&HCI) has always been considered an important flaw but the Thomson Reuters ‘Book Citation Index’ database was finally available in October of 2010 indexing 29,618 books and 379,082 book chapters. The Book Citation Index opens a new window of opportunities for analyzing Humanities and Social Sciences from a bibliometric point of view. The main objective of this article is to analyze different impa...

  12. Successful ageing: A study of the literature using citation network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumastuti, Sasmita; Derks, Marloes G M; Tellier, Siri; Di Nucci, Ezio; Lund, Rikke; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Westendorp, Rudi G J

    2016-11-01

    Ageing is accompanied by an increased risk of disease and a loss of functioning on several bodily and mental domains and some argue that maintaining health and functioning is essential for a successful old age. Paradoxically, studies have shown that overall wellbeing follows a curvilinear pattern with the lowest point at middle age but increases thereafter up to very old age. To shed further light on this paradox, we reviewed the existing literature on how scholars define successful ageing and how they weigh the contribution of health and functioning to define success. We performed a novel, hypothesis-free and quantitative analysis of citation networks exploring the literature on successful ageing that exists in the Web of Science Core Collection Database using the CitNetExplorer software. Outcomes were visualized using timeline-based citation patterns. The clusters and sub-clusters of citation networks identified were starting points for in-depth qualitative analysis. Within the literature from 1902 through 2015, two distinct citation networks were identified. The first cluster had 1146 publications and 3946 citation links. It focused on successful ageing from the perspective of older persons themselves. Analysis of the various sub-clusters emphasized the importance of coping strategies, psycho-social engagement, and cultural differences. The second cluster had 609 publications and 1682 citation links and viewed successful ageing based on the objective measurements as determined by researchers. Subsequent sub-clustering analysis pointed to different domains of functioning and various ways of assessment. In the current literature two mutually exclusive concepts of successful ageing are circulating that depend on whether the individual himself or an outsider judges the situation. These different points of view help to explain the disability paradox, as successful ageing lies in the eyes of the beholder. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland

  13. Completing $h$

    CERN Document Server

    Dienes, Keith R

    2014-01-01

    Nearly a decade ago, the science community was introduced to the $h$-index, a proposed statistical measure of the collective impact of the publications of any individual researcher. It is of course undeniable that any method of reducing a complex data set to a single number will necessarily have certain limitations and introduce certain biases. However, in this paper we point out that the definition of the $h$-index actually suffers from something far deeper: a hidden mathematical incompleteness intrinsic to its definition. In particular, we point out that one critical step within the definition of $h$ has been missed until now, resulting in an index which only achieves its stated objectives under certain rather limited circumstances. For example, this incompleteness explains why the $h$-index ultimately has more utility in certain scientific subfields than others. In this paper, we expose the origin of this incompleteness and then also propose a method of completing the definition of $h$ in a way which remai...

  14. Number of citations on Scholar Google to educational papers published in Medisur journal from 2008-2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raidell Avello Martínez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medisur journal has a wide publication profile, considering papers related to: Public Health, Health Administration, Basic Sciences, Clinical Sciences, Nursing, Pedagogy, and other areas relevant to health and health services.Objective: to analyze the number of citations on Google Scholar gained by educational papers published in Medisur journal, from 2008 to October 2013.Methods: the Journal Impact Analysis option of the software Publish or Perish version 4.4.6 was used for estimating the citation indicators on Google Scholar, taking into account the range of time from 2008 to October 2013. The search was performed using the exact name of the journal: “Medisur”.Results: a total of 153 articles with 860 citations were found in the period, among them, 95 citations to 26 articles on Pedagogy, accounting for the 11%. The year 2010 was particularly significant with 13 articles that received 43 citations. Sixteen point nine percent of the articles cited at least once was related to Pedagogy.Conclusions: as Medisur journal is primarily concerned with medical research, it is important to note that over 15 % of the articles that are cited at least once was related to the area of Pedagogy, which indicates the quality of these papers, since those who receive more citations are associated with quality and usefulness to the scientific community in that area of science.

  15. Macro-indicators of citation impacts of six prolific countries: InCites data and the statistical significance of trends.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Bornmann

    Full Text Available Using the InCites tool of Thomson Reuters, this study compares normalized citation impact values calculated for China, Japan, France, Germany, United States, and the UK throughout the time period from 1981 to 2010. InCites offers a unique opportunity to study the normalized citation impacts of countries using (i a long publication window (1981 to 2010, (ii a differentiation in (broad or more narrow subject areas, and (iii allowing for the use of statistical procedures in order to obtain an insightful investigation of national citation trends across the years. Using four broad categories, our results show significantly increasing trends in citation impact values for France, the UK, and especially Germany across the last thirty years in all areas. The citation impact of papers from China is still at a relatively low level (mostly below the world average, but the country follows an increasing trend line. The USA exhibits a stable pattern of high citation impact values across the years. With small impact differences between the publication years, the US trend is increasing in engineering and technology but decreasing in medical and health sciences as well as in agricultural sciences. Similar to the USA, Japan follows increasing as well as decreasing trends in different subject areas, but the variability across the years is small. In most of the years, papers from Japan perform below or approximately at the world average in each subject area.

  16. Capturing citation activity in three health sciences departments: a comparison study of Scopus and Web of Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkozy, Alexandra; Slyman, Alison; Wu, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    Scopus and Web of Science are the two major citation databases that collect and disseminate bibliometric statistics about research articles, journals, institutions, and individual authors. Liaison librarians are now regularly called upon to utilize these databases to assist faculty in finding citation activity on their published works for tenure and promotion, grant applications, and more. But questions about the accuracy, scope, and coverage of these tools deserve closer scrutiny. Discrepancies in citation capture led to a systematic study on how Scopus and Web of Science compared in a real-life situation encountered by liaisons: comparing three different disciplines at a medical school and nursing program. How many articles would each database retrieve for each faculty member using the author-searching tools provided? How many cited references for each faculty member would each tool generate? Results demonstrated troubling differences in publication and citation activity capture between Scopus and Web of Science. Implications for librarians are discussed.

  17. Evaluation of Scientific Outputs of Kashan University of Medical Sciences in Scopus Citation Database based on Scopus, ResearchGate, and Mendeley Scientometric Measures

    OpenAIRE

    Batooli, Zahra; Ravandi, Somaye Nadi; Bidgoli, Mohammad Sabahi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction It is essential to evaluate the impact of scientific publications through citation analysis in citation indexes. In addition, scientometric measures of social media also should be assessed. These measures include how many times the publications were read, viewed, and downloaded. The present study aimed to assess the scientific output of scholars at Kashan University of Medical Sciences by the end of March 2014 based on scientometric measures of Scopus, ResearchGate, and Mendeley....

  18. The citation impact of hydrology journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Martyn P.; Hanson, R. Brooks

    2017-06-01

    We examine a suite of journal-level productivity and citation statistics for six leading hydrology journals in order to help authors understand the robustness and meaning of journal impact factors. The main results are (1) the probability distribution of citations is remarkably homogenous across hydrology journals; (2) hydrology papers tend to have a long-lasting impact, with a large fraction of papers cited after the 2 year window used to calculate the journal impact factor; and (3) journal impact factors are characterized by substantial year-to-year variability (especially for smaller journals), primarily because a small number of highly cited papers have a large influence on the journal impact factor. Consequently, the ranking of hydrology journals with respect to the journal impact factor in a given year does not have much information content. These results highlight problems in using citation data to evaluate hydrologic science. We hope that this analysis helps authors better understand journal-level citation statistics, and also helps improve research assessments in institutions and funding agencies.

  19. Superconducting magnets. Citations from NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimherr, G. W.

    1980-10-01

    The cited reports discuss research on materials studies, theory, design and applications of superconducting magnets. Examples of applications include particle accelerators, MHD power generation, superconducting generators, nuclear fusion research devices, energy storage systems, and magnetic levitation. This updated bibliography contains 218 citations, 88 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  20. What 37,000 Citations Can Tell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanepoel, Adriaan

    2010-01-01

    A longitudinal study at the TUT (Tshwane University of Technology) used citation analysis to analyze the reference lists of 480 Master's and Doctoral (M and D) theses and dissertations submitted at TUT between 2004 and 2007. The purpose was to determine what types of information sources M and D students at TUT use most, how the patterns of use…

  1. Exploiting citation contexts for physics retrieval

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowska, Anna; Larsen, Birger

    2015-01-01

    The text surrounding citations within scientific papers may contain terms that usefully describe cited documents and can benefit retrieval. We present a preliminary study that investigates appending ci- tation contexts from citing documents to cited documents in the iSearch test collection. We...

  2. Jagten på det autentiske citat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovmark, Henrik

    2004-01-01

    Ønsket om at gengive et fraseologisk stof der er så autentisk som muligt, er helt centralt for en videnskabelig dokumentationsordbog over talesprog som Ømålsordbogen. Derfor skelnes der i ordbogen mellem autentiske og ikke-autentiske citater. Citatmaterialet kan imidlertid give anledning til...

  3. Tracking Our Writing Theorists through Citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshnick, Damian C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Working between bibliometrics and theories in the sociology of knowledge, this research demonstrates a method for aggregating and studying the content of citations in order to both quantitatively capture and qualitatively describe significant patterns in the uses of prominent writing theorists and their books over time. Realized specifically as a…

  4. Cosmology. (Latest Citations from the NTIS Bibliographic Database)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theories and explorations into the origin of the universe. Citations focus on various genesis models including perturbation, unified field and string theories. Large scale structure of the universe, galactic evolution, quantum gravity, dark matter, black holes, entropy, Feynman diagrams and multi-dimensional systems represent areas of coverage. The citations include theoretical investigations and astronomical observations. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Weighted citation: An indicator of an article's prestige

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Erjia

    2010-01-01

    We propose using the technique of weighted citation to measure an article's prestige. The technique allocates a different weight to each reference by taking into account the impact of citing journals and citation time intervals. Weighted citation captures prestige, whereas citation counts capture popularity. We compare the value variances for popularity and prestige for articles published in the Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology from 1998 to 2007, and find that the majority have comparable status.

  6. Spreading the word on sports concussion: citation analysis of summary and agreement, position and consensus statements on sports concussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alla, Sridhar; Sullivan, S John; McCrory, Paul; Hale, Leigh

    2011-02-01

    the growing concern over concussion in sports has led to the publication of five major summary and agreement, position and consensus statements since 2000. The dissemination of information from these statements is largely unknown and difficult to quantify, but their impact on the research community can be quantified by analysing the number of citations to these key publications. The purpose of this review is to report the number and pattern of citations to the key published statements on sports concussion. Web of Science, Scopus and PubMed were searched from 2000 to mid-December 2009 using two different search strategies. The first strategy used the search terms 'concussion' and 'first author' of the statement article, while the second used the 'title' of the target article as the key search term. the publications resulting from the three 'Concussion in Sport' (CIS) group conferences were cited by 532 journal articles, while the National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement was cited 123 times. The highest number of citations to each of the five identified statements was seen in 2009. British Journal of Sports Medicine was the most frequently cited journal. the citation analysis of the key statements on sports concussion has shown that the target papers have been widely cited in the research literature, with the highest number of citations being from the publications arising from the CIS group conferences. The authors have shown their preference to cite source articles published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine.

  7. Citation content analysis (cca): A framework for syntactic and semantic analysis of citation content

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Guo; Milojević, Staša

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a new framework for Citation Content Analysis (CCA), for syntactic and semantic analysis of citation content that can be used to better analyze the rich sociocultural context of research behavior. The framework could be considered the next generation of citation analysis. This paper briefly reviews the history and features of content analysis in traditional social sciences, and its previous application in Library and Information Science. Based on critical discussion of the theoretical necessity of a new method as well as the limits of citation analysis, the nature and purposes of CCA are discussed, and potential procedures to conduct CCA, including principles to identify the reference scope, a two-dimensional (citing and cited) and two-modular (syntactic and semantic modules) codebook, are provided and described. Future works and implications are also suggested.

  8. MScanner: a classifier for retrieving Medline citations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altman Russ B

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Keyword searching through PubMed and other systems is the standard means of retrieving information from Medline. However, ad-hoc retrieval systems do not meet all of the needs of databases that curate information from literature, or of text miners developing a corpus on a topic that has many terms indicative of relevance. Several databases have developed supervised learning methods that operate on a filtered subset of Medline, to classify Medline records so that fewer articles have to be manually reviewed for relevance. A few studies have considered generalisation of Medline classification to operate on the entire Medline database in a non-domain-specific manner, but existing applications lack speed, available implementations, or a means to measure performance in new domains. Results MScanner is an implementation of a Bayesian classifier that provides a simple web interface for submitting a corpus of relevant training examples in the form of PubMed IDs and returning results ranked by decreasing probability of relevance. For maximum speed it uses the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH and journal of publication as a concise document representation, and takes roughly 90 seconds to return results against the 16 million records in Medline. The web interface provides interactive exploration of the results, and cross validated performance evaluation on the relevant input against a random subset of Medline. We describe the classifier implementation, cross validate it on three domain-specific topics, and compare its performance to that of an expert PubMed query for a complex topic. In cross validation on the three sample topics against 100,000 random articles, the classifier achieved excellent separation of relevant and irrelevant article score distributions, ROC areas between 0.97 and 0.99, and averaged precision between 0.69 and 0.92. Conclusion MScanner is an effective non-domain-specific classifier that operates on the entire Medline

  9. Citation analysis of meta-analysis articles on posttraumatic stress disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Xi-ming; CHEN Ping-yan

    2011-01-01

    Background In the past two decades enormously scientific researches on posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been undertaken and many related meta-analyses have been published. Citation analysis was used to get comprehensive perspectives of meta-analysis articles (MA articles) on PTSD for the purpose of facilitating the researchers,physicians and policy-makers to understand the PTSD.Methods MA articles on PTSD in any languages from January 1980 to March 2009 were included if they presented meta-analytical methods and received at least one citation recorded in the Web of Science (WoS). Whereas studies,in which any effect sizes of PTSD were not distinguished from other psychological disorders,were excluded. Citations to and by identified MA articles were documented basing on records in WoS. Citation analysis was used to examine distribution patterns of characteristics and citation impact of MA articles on PTSD. Canonical analysis was used to explore the relationship between the characteristics of MA articles and citation impact.Results Thirty-four MA articles published during 1998 and 2008 were identified and revealed multiple study topics on PTSD:10 (29.4%) were about epidemiology,13 (38.2%) about treatment or intervention,6 (17.6%) about pathophysiology or neurophysiology or neuroendocrine,3 (8.8%) about childhood and 2 (5.9%) about psychosocial adversity. Two articles cited most frequently with 456 and 145 counts were published in Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology by Brewin (2000) and Psychological Bulletin by Ozer (2003),respectively. Mean cited count was 7.48±10.56and mean age (year 2009 minus article publication year) was (4.24±2.91) years. They had been cited approximately by 67 disciplines and by authors from 42 countries or territories. Characteristics of meta-analysis highly correlated with citation impact and reflected by canonical correlation of 0.899 (P <0.000 01).Conclusions The age of MA articles predicted their citation impact

  10. Statistical regularities in the rank-citation profile of scientists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alexander M; Stanley, H Eugene; Succi, Sauro

    2011-01-01

    Recent science of science research shows that scientific impact measures for journals and individual articles have quantifiable regularities across both time and discipline. However, little is known about the scientific impact distribution at the scale of an individual scientist. We analyze the aggregate production and impact using the rank-citation profile c(i)(r) of 200 distinguished professors and 100 assistant professors. For the entire range of paper rank r, we fit each c(i)(r) to a common distribution function. Since two scientists with equivalent Hirsch h-index can have significantly different c(i)(r) profiles, our results demonstrate the utility of the β(i) scaling parameter in conjunction with h(i) for quantifying individual publication impact. We show that the total number of citations C(i) tallied from a scientist's N(i) papers scales as [Formula: see text]. Such statistical regularities in the input-output patterns of scientists can be used as benchmarks for theoretical models of career progress.

  11. Citation analysis cannot legitimate the strategic selection of excellence

    CERN Document Server

    Opthof, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    In reaction to a previous critique (Opthof & Leydesdorff, 2010), the Center for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS) in Leiden proposed to change their old "crown" indicator in citation analysis into a new one. Waltman et al. (2011a) argue that this change does not affect rankings at various aggregated levels. However, CWTS data is not publicly available for testing and criticism. In this correspondence, we use previously published data of Van Raan (2006) to address the pivotal issue of how the results of citation analysis correlate with the results of peer review. A quality parameter based on peer review was neither significantly correlated with the two parameters developed by the CWTS in the past (CPP/JCSm or CPP/FCSm) nor with the more recently proposed h-index (Hirsch, 2005). Given the high correlations between the old and new "crown" indicators, one can expect that the lack of correlation with the peer-review based quality indicator applies equally to the newly developed ones.

  12. Local Citation Analysis of Graduate Biology Theses: Collection Development Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura Newton

    2011-01-01

    This paper will focus on the citation analysis of graduate masters theses from Carleton University's Biology Department with implications for library collection management decisions. Twenty-five masters theses were studied to determine citation types and percentages, ranking of journals by frequency of citation and by number of authors citing, and…

  13. Individual, country, and journal self-citation in soil science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minasny, B.; Hartemink, A.E.; McBratney, A.

    2010-01-01

    Self-citation is common practice in most sciences but it differs between disciplines, countries and journals. Here we report on self-citation in soil science. We investigated citations in the major soil science journals and conducted an analysis on a country basis and for the subdiscipline of Pedome

  14. Rankings and Trends in Citation Patterns of Communication Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Journal citations are increasingly used as indicators of the impact of scholarly work. Because many communication journals are not included in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), SSCI impact factors are potentially misleading for communication journals. The current paper reports a citation analysis of 30 communication journals based on…

  15. The Ripple Effect: Citation Chain Reactions of a Nobel Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the possible citation chain reactions of a Nobel Prize using the mathematician Robert J. Aumann as a case example. The results show that the award of the Nobel Prize in 2005 affected not only the citations to his work, but also affected the citations to the references in his s...

  16. Unraveling Scientific Impact : Citation Types in Marketing Journals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stremersch (Stefan); N.M.A. Camacho (Nuno); S. Vanneste (Sofie); I.W.J. Verniers (Isabel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe number of citations a paper receives is the most commonly used measure of scientific impact. In this paper, we study not only the number but also the type of citations that 659 marketing articles generated. We discern five citation types: application, affirmation, negation, review an

  17. Stirling engines. (Latest citations from the COMPENDEX database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning Stirling engine technology. Design, development, performance testing, and applications are discussed, including power generation, cryogenic cooling, solar power applications, and ground and marine vehicles. The citations also examine engine component design and material testing results. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Individual, country, and journal self-citation in soil science

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minasny, B.; Hartemink, A.E.; McBratney, A.

    2010-01-01

    Self-citation is common practice in most sciences but it differs between disciplines, countries and journals. Here we report on self-citation in soil science. We investigated citations in the major soil science journals and conducted an analysis on a country basis and for the subdiscipline of Pedome

  19. Rankings and Trends in Citation Patterns of Communication Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Timothy R.

    2010-01-01

    Journal citations are increasingly used as indicators of the impact of scholarly work. Because many communication journals are not included in the Social Science Citation Index (SSCI), SSCI impact factors are potentially misleading for communication journals. The current paper reports a citation analysis of 30 communication journals based on…

  20. Co-Citation Analysis and the Invisible College.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noma, Elliot

    1984-01-01

    Argues that co-citation methods combine citing behavior of authors by assuming they share common view of scientific literature which affects assessments of dimensionality and clustering of articles. Co-citation matrices, effects of shared point-of-view assumption, and co-citation compared with bibliographic coupling and centroid scaling are…

  1. Unraveling Scientific Impact : Citation Types in Marketing Journals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Stremersch (Stefan); N.M.A. Camacho (Nuno); S. Vanneste (Sofie); I.W.J. Verniers (Isabel)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe number of citations a paper receives is the most commonly used measure of scientific impact. In this paper, we study not only the number but also the type of citations that 659 marketing articles generated. We discern five citation types: application, affirmation, negation, review an

  2. The Structure and Dynamics of Co-Citation Clusters: A Multiple-Perspective Co-Citation Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Chaomei; Hou, Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    A multiple-perspective co-citation analysis method is introduced for characterizing and interpreting the structure and dynamics of co-citation clusters. The method facilitates analytic and sense making tasks by integrating network visualization, spectral clustering, automatic cluster labeling, and text summarization. Co-citation networks are decomposed into co-citation clusters. The interpretation of these clusters is augmented by automatic cluster labeling and summarization. The method focuses on the interrelations between a co-citation cluster's members and their citers. The generic method is applied to a three-part analysis of the field of Information Science as defined by 12 journals published between 1996 and 2008: 1) a comparative author co-citation analysis (ACA), 2) a progressive ACA of a time series of co-citation networks, and 3) a progressive document co-citation analysis (DCA). Results show that the multiple-perspective method increases the interpretability and accountability of both ACA and DCA n...

  3. Influence of a performance indicator on Danish research production and citation impact 2000-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Larsen, Birger

    2014-01-01

    (37 %) after the start of the performance indicator and the citation impact progresses linearly over the entire period, regardless the introduction of the performance indicator. Academic staff progression is only 24 % during the same time period. The collaboration ratio between purely Danish......This paper analyses the patterns of Danish research productivity, citation impact and (inter)national collaboration across document types 2000-2012, prior to and after the introduction of the Norwegian publication point-based performance indicator in 2008. Document types analysed are: research...... Danish universities have significantly altered their research publication profiles since 2009. The publication performance model is regarded as the significant accelerator of these processes in recent years....

  4. Citation Patterns of Engineering, Statistics, and Computer Science Researchers: An Internal and External Citation Analysis across Multiple Engineering Subfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Madeline

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a multidimensional approach to citation analysis, examining citations in multiple subfields of engineering, from both scholarly journals and doctoral dissertations. The three major goals of the study are to determine whether there are differences between citations drawn from dissertations and those drawn from journal articles; to…

  5. Citation Patterns of Engineering, Statistics, and Computer Science Researchers: An Internal and External Citation Analysis across Multiple Engineering Subfields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Madeline

    2015-01-01

    This study takes a multidimensional approach to citation analysis, examining citations in multiple subfields of engineering, from both scholarly journals and doctoral dissertations. The three major goals of the study are to determine whether there are differences between citations drawn from dissertations and those drawn from journal articles; to…

  6. Methods for measuring the citations and productivity of scientists across time and discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alexander M; Wang, Fengzhong; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-03-01

    Publication statistics are ubiquitous in the ratings of scientific achievement, with citation counts and paper tallies factoring into an individual's consideration for postdoctoral positions, junior faculty, and tenure. Citation statistics are designed to quantify individual career achievement, both at the level of a single publication, and over an individual's entire career. While some academic careers are defined by a few significant papers (possibly out of many), other academic careers are defined by the cumulative contribution made by the author's publications to the body of science. Several metrics have been formulated to quantify an individual's publication career, yet none of these metrics account for the collaboration group size, and the time dependence of citation counts. In this paper we normalize publication metrics in order to achieve a universal framework for analyzing and comparing scientific achievement across both time and discipline. We study the publication careers of individual authors over the 50-year period 1958-2008 within six high-impact journals: CELL, the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Nature, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), Physical Review Letters (PRL), and Science. Using the normalized metrics (i) "citation shares" to quantify scientific success, and (ii) "paper shares" to quantify scientific productivity, we compare the career achievement of individual authors within each journal, where each journal represents a local arena for competition. We uncover quantifiable statistical regularity in the probability density function of scientific achievement in all journals analyzed, which suggests that a fundamental driving force underlying scientific achievement is the competitive nature of scientific advancement.

  7. Methods for measuring the citations and productivity of scientists across time and discipline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Alexander M.; Wang, Fengzhong; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2010-03-01

    Publication statistics are ubiquitous in the ratings of scientific achievement, with citation counts and paper tallies factoring into an individual’s consideration for postdoctoral positions, junior faculty, and tenure. Citation statistics are designed to quantify individual career achievement, both at the level of a single publication, and over an individual’s entire career. While some academic careers are defined by a few significant papers (possibly out of many), other academic careers are defined by the cumulative contribution made by the author’s publications to the body of science. Several metrics have been formulated to quantify an individual’s publication career, yet none of these metrics account for the collaboration group size, and the time dependence of citation counts. In this paper we normalize publication metrics in order to achieve a universal framework for analyzing and comparing scientific achievement across both time and discipline. We study the publication careers of individual authors over the 50-year period 1958-2008 within six high-impact journals: CELL, the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM), Nature, the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS), Physical Review Letters (PRL), and Science. Using the normalized metrics (i) “citation shares” to quantify scientific success, and (ii) “paper shares” to quantify scientific productivity, we compare the career achievement of individual authors within each journal, where each journal represents a local arena for competition. We uncover quantifiable statistical regularity in the probability density function of scientific achievement in all journals analyzed, which suggests that a fundamental driving force underlying scientific achievement is the competitive nature of scientific advancement.

  8. Uncovering the dynamics of citations of scientific papers

    CERN Document Server

    Golosovsky, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a comprehensive framework that accounts for citation dynamics of scientific papers and for the age distribution of references. We show that citation dynamics of scientific papers is nonlinear and this nonlinearity has far-reaching consequences, such as diverging citation distributions and runaway papers. We propose a nonlinear stochastic dynamic model of citation dynamics based on link copying/redirection mechanism. The model is fully calibrated by empirical data and does not contain free parameters. This model can be a basis for quantitative probabilistic prediction of citation dynamics of individual papers and of the journal impact factor.

  9. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1991-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    This catalog lists 458 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA Scientific and Technical Information database during accession year 1991 through 1992. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  10. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    This catalog lists 190 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1989. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  11. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of Special Publications, Reference Publications, Conference Publications, and Technical Papers, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    This catalog lists 239 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered in the NASA scientific and technical information database during accession year 1987. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  12. NASA scientific and technical publications: A catalog of special publications, reference publications, conference publications, and technical papers, 1987-1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    This catalog lists 783 citations of all NASA Special Publications, NASA Reference Publications, NASA Conference Publications, and NASA Technical Papers that were entered into NASA Scientific and Technical Information Database during the year's 1987 through 1990. The entries are grouped by subject category. Indexes of subject terms, personal authors, and NASA report numbers are provided.

  13. The most frequently cited adsorption research articles in the Science Citation Index (Expanded).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hui-Zhen; Wang, Ming-Huang; Ho, Yuh-Shan

    2012-08-01

    The 126 most frequently cited articles published in the adsorption field between 1900 and 2011 were identified and characterized using the Science Citation Index (Expanded). The data analyzed cover a range of publication years, journals, Web of Science categories, authors, institutions, countries/territories, life citation cycle curves, and characteristics of frequently cited articles. The 126 most-frequently-cited articles were each cited an average of 1014 times, ranging from 502 to 9922 citations per article from 1918 to 2006; 80% of these articles were published after 1970. Fifty-five journals were represented, led by the Journal of the American Chemical Society, and followed by Science and Nature. Three categories out of the 35 Web of Science categories constituted 60% of the citations. The three categories were: physical chemistry, multidisciplinary chemistry, and multidisciplinary sciences. Thirteen of the authors contributed three or more articles. Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Washington led the list of 107 institutions, while the United States led the list of 17 countries/territories, comprising more than half of the articles. Collaboration among the top authors was a frequent occurrence, while inter-institutional collaboration and national collaboration was not obvious among the topmost articles. Moreover, the citation patterns as a function of time varied widely among the topmost articles. As evidenced by citation life cycles, the well known BET and Langmuir isotherms have received considerable attention during the study period, and will probably continue to be popular in the adsorption field. Some emerging hotspots are likely to receive particular attention in the near future; these include the new family of "M41S" materials, pseudo-second-order kinetic models, and the nudged elastic band method.

  14. Citation distribution profile in Brazilian journals of general medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lustosa, Luiggi Araujo; Chalco, Mario Edmundo Pastrana; Borba, Cecília de Melo; Higa, André Eizo; Almeida, Renan Moritz Varnier Rodrigues

    2012-01-01

    Impact factors are currently the bibliometric index most used for evaluating scientific journals. However, the way in which they are used, for instance concerning the study or journal types analyzed, can markedly interfere with estimate reliability. This study aimed to analyze the citation distribution pattern in three Brazilian journals of general medicine. This was a descriptive study based on numbers of citations of scientific studies published by three Brazilian journals of general medicine. The journals analyzed were São Paulo Medical Journal, Clinics and Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira. This survey used data available from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) platform, from which the total number of papers published in each journal in 2007-2008 and the number of citations of these papers in 2009 were obtained. From these data, the citation distribution was derived and journal impact factors (average number of citations) were estimated. These factors were then compared with those directly available from the ISI Journal of Citation Reports (JCR). Respectively, 134, 203 and 192 papers were published by these journals during the period analyzed. The observed citation distributions were highly skewed, such that many papers had few citations and a small percentage had many citations. It was not possible to identify any specific pattern for the most cited papers or to exactly reproduce the JCR impact factors. Use of measures like "impact factors", which characterize citations through averages, does not adequately represent the citation distribution in the journals analyzed.

  15. Citations of Brazilian physical therapy journals in national publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Renan K C; Yamaki, Vitor N; Botelho, Nara M; Teixeira, Renato C

    2014-01-01

    Quotations in Brazilian journals are mainly obtained from national articles (articles from Brazilian journals); thus, it is essential to determine how frequently these articles reference Brazilian journals. This study sought to verify how frequently national papers are cited in the references of three Brazilian physical therapy journals. All references for articles published in Fisioterapia em Movimento, Fisioterapia e Pesquisa and Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia between 2010 and 2012 were evaluated. In particular, the numbers of national articles and international articles (articles from international journals) cited in these references were determined. A total of 13,009 references cited by 456 articles were analyzed, and 2,924 (22.47%) of the cited works were national articles. There were no significant differences among the three examined years. A total of 36 (7.89%) articles did not cite national articles, whereas 65 (13.25%) articles cited more national articles than international articles. On average, 22.47% of the works cited by the evaluated articles were national articles. No significant differences were detected among the three analyzed years.

  16. Citations of Brazilian physical therapy journals in national publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Renan K. C.; Yamaki, Vitor N.; Botelho, Nara M.; Teixeira, Renato C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Quotations in Brazilian journals are mainly obtained from national articles (articles from Brazilian journals); thus, it is essential to determine how frequently these articles reference Brazilian journals. Objective This study sought to verify how frequently national papers are cited in the references of three Brazilian physical therapy journals. Method All references for articles published in Fisioterapia em Movimento, Fisioterapia e Pesquisa and Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia between 2010 and 2012 were evaluated. In particular, the numbers of national articles and international articles (articles from international journals) cited in these references were determined. Results A total of 13,009 references cited by 456 articles were analyzed, and 2,924 (22.47%) of the cited works were national articles. There were no significant differences among the three examined years. A total of 36 (7.89%) articles did not cite national articles, whereas 65 (13.25%) articles cited more national articles than international articles. Conclusion On average, 22.47% of the works cited by the evaluated articles were national articles. No significant differences were detected among the three analyzed years. PMID:24675917

  17. Narrative Style Influences Citation Frequency in Climate Change Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Ann; Kelly, Ryan P; Klinger, Terrie

    2016-01-01

    Peer-reviewed publications focusing on climate change are growing exponentially with the consequence that the uptake and influence of individual papers varies greatly. Here, we derive metrics of narrativity from psychology and literary theory, and use these metrics to test the hypothesis that more narrative climate change writing is more likely to be influential, using citation frequency as a proxy for influence. From a sample of 732 scientific abstracts drawn from the climate change literature, we find that articles with more narrative abstracts are cited more often. This effect is closely associated with journal identity: higher-impact journals tend to feature more narrative articles, and these articles tend to be cited more often. These results suggest that writing in a more narrative style increases the uptake and influence of articles in climate literature, and perhaps in scientific literature more broadly.

  18. Citation context and impact of 'sleeping beauties' in paediatric research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter; Del Torso, Stefano; Blažun Vošner, Helena

    2016-12-01

    Objectives 'Sleeping beauties', i.e. publications that are not cited for a long while, present interesting findings in science. This study analysed the citation trends of sleeping beauties in paediatric research. Methods The study used bibliometric software to analyse the papers citing sleeping beauties in paediatric research, to understand the context in which paediatric sleeping beauties were finally cited and the impact of these sleeping beauties on paediatric research. Results Two paediatric sleeping beauties, addressing medical homes and the transition from paediatric to adult health care, respectively, awakened in response to organizational needs. Both presented novel concepts of paediatric service organization that became important because of an increased need for optimization of services. Conclusion All sleeping beauties bring new knowledge that becomes important only after several years. Paediatric sleeping beauties exhibited unique characteristics; however, their presence in paediatric research shows that knowledge acquisition in paediatrics resembles that in other disciplines.

  19. Publication point indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Anita; Ingwersen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with novel publication point indicators (PPIs) that are formalized and exemplified. Two diachronic citation windows are applied: 2006-07 and 2006-08. Web of Science (WoS) as well as Google Scholar (GS) are applied to observe the cite delay and citedness for the different document types published by DIIS......The paper presents comparative analyses of two publication point systems, The Norwegian and the in-house system from the interdiscplinary Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS), used as case in the study for publications published 2006, and compares central citation-based indicators......; the Cumulated Publication Point Indicator (CPPI), which graphically illustrates the cumulated gain of obtained vs. ideal points, both seen as vectors; and the normalized Cumulated Publication Point Index (nCPPI) that represents the cumulated gain of publication success as index values, either graphically...

  20. PubFocus: semantic MEDLINE/PubMed citations analytics through integration of controlled biomedical dictionaries and ranking algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuong Cheng-Ming

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding research activity within any given biomedical field is important. Search outputs generated by MEDLINE/PubMed are not well classified and require lengthy manual citation analysis. Automation of citation analytics can be very useful and timesaving for both novices and experts. Results PubFocus web server automates analysis of MEDLINE/PubMed search queries by enriching them with two widely used human factor-based bibliometric indicators of publication quality: journal impact factor and volume of forward references. In addition to providing basic volumetric statistics, PubFocus also prioritizes citations and evaluates authors' impact on the field of search. PubFocus also analyses presence and occurrence of biomedical key terms within citations by utilizing controlled vocabularies. Conclusion We have developed citations' prioritisation algorithm based on journal impact factor, forward referencing volume, referencing dynamics, and author's contribution level. It can be applied either to the primary set of PubMed search results or to the subsets of these results identified through key terms from controlled biomedical vocabularies and ontologies. NCI (National Cancer Institute thesaurus and MGD (Mouse Genome Database mammalian gene orthology have been implemented for key terms analytics. PubFocus provides a scalable platform for the integration of multiple available ontology databases. PubFocus analytics can be adapted for input sources of biomedical citations other than PubMed.

  1. Citation classics in periodontology: a controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieri, Michele; Saletta, Daniele; Guidi, Luisa; Buti, Jacopo; Franceschi, Debora; Mauro, Saverio; Pini-Prato, Giovanpaolo

    2007-04-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the most cited articles in Periodontology published from January 1990 to March 2005; and to analyse the differences between citation Classics and less cited articles. The search was carried out in four international periodontal journals: Journal of Periodontology, Journal of Clinical Periodontology, International Journal of Periodontics and Restorative Dentistry and Journal of Periodontal Research. The Classics, that are articles cited at least 100 times, were identified using the Science Citation Index database. From every issue of the journals that contained a Classic, another article was randomly selected and used as a Control. Fifty-five Classics and 55 Controls were identified. Classic articles were longer, used more images, had more authors, and contained more self-references than Controls. Moreover Classics had on the average a bigger sample size, often dealt with etiopathogenesis and prognosis, but were rarely controlled or randomized studies. Classic articles play an instructive role, but are often non-Controlled studies.

  2. Geopressured geothermal bibliography. Volume 1 (citation extracts)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, T.R.; Sepehrnoori, K.

    1981-08-01

    This bibliography was compiled by the Center for Energy Studies at The University of Texas at Austin to serve as a tool for researchers in the field of geopressured geothermal energy resources. The bibliography represents citations of papers on geopressured geothermal energy resources over the past eighteen years. Topics covered in the bibliography range from the technical aspects of geopressured geothermal reservoirs to social, environmental, and legal aspects of tapping those reservoirs for their energy resources. The bibliography currently contains more than 750 entries. For quick reference to a given topic, the citations are indexed into five divisions: author, category, conference title, descriptor, and sponsor. These indexes are arranged alphabetically and cross-referenced by page number.

  3. La citation à l’œuvre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael HINCHLIFFE

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Le colloque “La citation à l’œuvre”, organisé en janvier 2003, s’inscrivait dans le prolongement de bien d’autres travaux consacrés à l’intertextualité. En effet, le champ d’études ouvert par la prise de conscience de ce phénomène est presque infini, du moment qu l’on postule que tout texte littéraire se place nécessairement, d’une manière ou d’une autre, par rapport à d’autres textes, et que l’acte d’écrire procède d’actes répétés de lecture, qu’il contient.Mais la citation reste une forme s...

  4. Eponymous citations to Homi Jehangir Bhabha

    OpenAIRE

    Swarna, T.; Kalyane, V. L.; Prakasan, E. R.; Vijai Kumar, *

    2004-01-01

    The epoch-making research by H. J. Bhabha has gained eponymous status synonymous with his name and international fame. Out of the 427 eponymous bibliographic records for H. J. Bhabha retrieved from the Science Citation Index (1982-2002), majority of the records were for: bhabha scattering (290), angle bhabha scattering (42), small angle bhabha scattering (21), radiative bhabha scattering (17), large-angle bhabha scattering (16), resonant bhabha scattering (12), and low-angle bhabha scattering...

  5. Database Citation in Full Text Biomedical Articles

    OpenAIRE

    Şenay Kafkas; Jee-Hyub Kim; Johanna R. McEntyre

    2013-01-01

    Molecular biology and literature databases represent essential infrastructure for life science research. Effective integration of these data resources requires that there are structured cross-references at the level of individual articles and biological records. Here, we describe the current patterns of how database entries are cited in research articles, based on analysis of the full text Open Access articles available from Europe PMC. Focusing on citation of entries in the European Nucleoti...

  6. Electronic journals and scholarly communication: a citation and reference study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen P. Harter

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available The journal is fundamental to formal scholarly communication. This research reports highlights and preliminary findings from an empirical study of scholarly electronic journals. The purpose of the research is to assess the impact of electronic journals (e-journals on scholarly communication, by measuring the extent to which they are being cited in the literature, both print and electronic. The intent is to provide a snapshot of the impact e-journals were having on scholarly communication at a given point in time, roughly the end of 1995. This study provides one measure of that impact, specifically on the formal, as opposed to informal, communication process. The study also examines the forms in which scholars cite e-journals, the accuracy and completeness of citations to e-journals, and practical difficulties faced by scholars and researchers who wish to retrieve e-journals through the networks.

  7. Déjà vu: a database of highly similar citations in the scientific literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errami, Mounir; Sun, Zhaohui; Long, Tara C.; George, Angela C.; Garner, Harold R.

    2009-01-01

    In the scientific research community, plagiarism and covert multiple publications of the same data are considered unacceptable because they undermine the public confidence in the scientific integrity. Yet, little has been done to help authors and editors to identify highly similar citations, which sometimes may represent cases of unethical duplication. For this reason, we have made available Déjà vu, a publicly available database of highly similar Medline citations identified by the text similarity search engine eTBLAST. Following manual verification, highly similar citation pairs are classified into various categories ranging from duplicates with different authors to sanctioned duplicates. Déjà vu records also contain user-provided commentary and supporting information to substantiate each document's categorization. Déjà vu and eTBLAST are available to authors, editors, reviewers, ethicists and sociologists to study, intercept, annotate and deter questionable publication practices. These tools are part of a sustained effort to enhance the quality of Medline as ‘the’ biomedical corpus. The Déjà vu database is freely accessible at http://spore.swmed.edu/dejavu. The tool eTBLAST is also freely available at http://etblast.org. PMID:18757888

  8. Deja vu: a database of highly similar citations in the scientific literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Errami, Mounir; Sun, Zhaohui; Long, Tara C; George, Angela C; Garner, Harold R

    2009-01-01

    In the scientific research community, plagiarism and covert multiple publications of the same data are considered unacceptable because they undermine the public confidence in the scientific integrity. Yet, little has been done to help authors and editors to identify highly similar citations, which sometimes may represent cases of unethical duplication. For this reason, we have made available Déjà vu, a publicly available database of highly similar Medline citations identified by the text similarity search engine eTBLAST. Following manual verification, highly similar citation pairs are classified into various categories ranging from duplicates with different authors to sanctioned duplicates. Déjà vu records also contain user-provided commentary and supporting information to substantiate each document's categorization. Déjà vu and eTBLAST are available to authors, editors, reviewers, ethicists and sociologists to study, intercept, annotate and deter questionable publication practices. These tools are part of a sustained effort to enhance the quality of Medline as 'the' biomedical corpus. The Déjà vu database is freely accessible at http://spore.swmed.edu/dejavu. The tool eTBLAST is also freely available at http://etblast.org.

  9. "'Jackin’ for Beats'": DJing for Citation Critique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd Craig

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A challenge in teaching English composition is helping students envision plagiarism as “borrowing” – showing love to author(s and/or text(s that further their argument(s, versus “stealing” – biting someone’s style and words. Alastair Pennycook (1996 and Sarah Wakefield (2006 have contributed pieces to the elaborate plagiarism/citation puzzle, while Houston Baker situated the hip-hop DJ in seminal text Black Studies, Rap and the Academy (1993. Merging these moments introduces critical questions: Did Diddy invent “the remix” or become the illest beat-biter ever? How did DJ/Producers Pete Rock and Large Professor pay homage to previous musical genres to further hip-hop remix production without just taking 4-8 bar samples, copying sources and claiming unethical ownership? And how can this discussion provide students a window into citation conversations? This article will remix these “texts” to introduce the idea of DJ Rhetoric to discuss plagiarism. Through the lens of the hip-hop DJ in writing classrooms, one can foster an appreciation of the difference between “love and theft” in student citation. This article will couple examples from hip-hop music/culture while simultaneously remixing interviews from various hip-hop DJ/producers to help answer these difficult questions.

  10. Testing the fairness of citation indicators for comparison across scientific domains: the case of fractional citation counts

    CERN Document Server

    Radicchi, Filippo; 10.1016/j.joi.2011.09.002

    2011-01-01

    Citation numbers are extensively used for assessing the quality of scientific research. The use of raw citation counts is generally misleading, especially when applied to cross-disciplinary comparisons, since the average number of citations received is strongly dependent on the scientific discipline of reference of the paper. Measuring and eliminating biases in citation patterns is crucial for a fair use of citation numbers. Several numerical indicators have been introduced with this aim, but so far a specific statistical test for estimating the fairness of these numerical indicators has not been developed. Here we present a statistical method aimed at estimating the effectiveness of numerical indicators in the suppression of citation biases. The method is simple to implement and can be easily generalized to various scenarios. As a practical example we test, in a controlled case, the fairness of fractional citation count, which has been recently proposed as a tool for cross-discipline comparison. We show that...

  11. Citation Analysis and Histographic Outline of Scientific Output in Agriculture Using Science Citation Index (2000-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitra Pashootanizadeh

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation, by reviewing 22,617 records indexed between 2000 and 2008 in the Web of Science database and employing citation analysis methods attempts to identify key authors and institutes and their degree of collaboration, core journals, rate of scientific output, publishing forms and languages and leading countries in this field. It also attempts to draw a histographic outline of the agricultural science. The average annual growth in publications for the period studied was shown to be seven percent. Total of 22,617 records were presented in 15 different formats in 25 languages. 173 countries were involved. All agricultural articles retrieved from WOS had been submitted from 14,852 institutes and published in 3252 journals. 51,655 authors were identified who had cited 658381 sources. The clusters formed in the histographic outline based on LCS and GCS also included five clusters.

  12. A small world of citations? The influence of collaboration networks on citation practices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Wallace

    Full Text Available This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10% of references and the social sciences (20%, the same cannot be said for citations to authors who are members of the co-author network. Differences between fields and trends over time lie not only in the degree of co-authorship which defines the large-scale topology of the collaboration network, but also in the referencing practices within a given discipline, computed by defining a propensity to cite at a given distance within the collaboration network. Overall, there is little tendency to cite those nearby in the collaboration network, excluding direct self-citations. These results are interpreted in terms of small-scale structure, field-specific citation practices, and the value of local co-author networks for the production of knowledge and for the accumulation of symbolic capital. Given the various levels of integration between co-authors, our findings shed light on the question of the availability of 'arm's length' expert reviewers of grant applications and manuscripts.

  13. A small world of citations? The influence of collaboration networks on citation practices

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, Matthew L; Gingras, Yves

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers) is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10% of citations) and the social sciences (20%), the same cannot be said for citations to authors who are members of the co-author network. Differences between fields and trends over time lie not only in the degree of co-authorship which defines the large-scale topology of the collaboration network, but also in the referencing practices within a given discipline, computed by defining a propensity to cite at a given distance within the collaboration network. Overall, there is little tendency to cite those nearby in the collaboration network, excluding direct self-citations. By analyzing these social references, we characterize the social...

  14. A small world of citations? The influence of collaboration networks on citation practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Matthew L; Larivière, Vincent; Gingras, Yves

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers) is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10% of references) and the social sciences (20%), the same cannot be said for citations to authors who are members of the co-author network. Differences between fields and trends over time lie not only in the degree of co-authorship which defines the large-scale topology of the collaboration network, but also in the referencing practices within a given discipline, computed by defining a propensity to cite at a given distance within the collaboration network. Overall, there is little tendency to cite those nearby in the collaboration network, excluding direct self-citations. These results are interpreted in terms of small-scale structure, field-specific citation practices, and the value of local co-author networks for the production of knowledge and for the accumulation of symbolic capital. Given the various levels of integration between co-authors, our findings shed light on the question of the availability of 'arm's length' expert reviewers of grant applications and manuscripts.

  15. Open Access Papers Have a Greater Citation Advantage in the Author-Pays Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Sullo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To investigate the citation performance of open access (OA and toll access (TA papers published in author-pays open access journals. Design – Longitudinal citation analysis. Setting – Publications in Springer and Elsevier’s author-pays open access journals. Subjects – 633 journals published using the author-pays model. This model encompasses both journals where the article processing charge (APC is required and journals in which authors can request open access and voluntarily pay APCs for accepted manuscripts. Methods – The authors identified APC funded journals (journals funded by mandatory author processing charges as well as those where authors voluntarily paid a fee in order to have their articles openly accessible from both Springer and Elsevier, and analyzed papers published in these journals from 2007 to 2011. The authors excluded journals that adopted the APC model later than 2007. To identify Springer titles, the authors created a search strategy to identify open access articles in SpringerLink. A total of 576 journals were identified and double checked in the Sherpa-Romeo database (a database of copyright and open access self-archiving policies of academic journals to verify their open access policies. The authors then downloaded the journal content using SpringerLink, and using Springer Author-Mapper, separated out the open access articles from the toll access articles. In order to identify the Elsevier APC funded journals, the authors referred to “Open Access Journal Directory: A-Z,” which contained 35 OA journals (p. 584. Once the authors consulted “Sponsored articles” issued by Elsevier and verified titles in Sherpa-Romeo, they identified 57 journals that fit the “author-pays” model. The bibliographic information was downloaded and OA articles were separated from TA articles. The authors confirmed that all journals were indeed OA publications by downloading the full-text from off-campus locations

  16. Men set their own cites high: Gender and self-citation across fields and over time

    CERN Document Server

    King, Molly M; Correll, Shelley J; Jacquet, Jennifer; West, Jevin D

    2016-01-01

    How common is self-citation in scholarly publication and does the practice vary by gender? Using novel methods and a dataset of 1.5 million research papers in the scholarly database JSTOR published between 1779-2011, we find that nearly 10% of references are self-citations by a paper's authors. We further find that over the years between 1779-2011, men cite their own papers 56% more than women do. In the last two decades of our data, men self-cite 70% more than women. Women are also more than ten percentage points more likely than men to not cite their own previous work at all. Despite increased representation of women in academia, this gender gap in self-citation rates has remained stable over the last 50 years. We break down self-citation patterns by academic field and number of authors, and comment on potential mechanisms behind these observations. These findings have important implications for scholarly visibility and likely consequences for academic careers.

  17. Normal tissue studies in radiation oncology: A systematic review of highly cited articles and citation patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Nieder, Carsten; Andratschke, Nicolaus H.; GROSU, ANCA L.

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the cornerstones of modern multidisciplinary cancer treatment. Normal tissue tolerance is critical as radiation-induced side effects may compromise organ function and quality of life. The importance of normal tissue research is reflected by the large number of scientific articles, which have been published between 2006 and 2010. The present study identified important areas of research as well as seminal publications. The article citation rate is among the potential...

  18. Survey of formal and informal citation in Google search engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Teymourikhani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Informal citations is bibliographic information (title or Internet address, citing sources of information resources for informal scholarly communication and always neglected in traditional citation databases. This study is done, in order to answer the question of whether informal citations in the web environment are traceable. The present research aims to determine what proportion of web citations of Google search engine is related to formal and informal citation. Research method: Webometrics is the method used. The study is done on 1344 research articles of 98 open access journal, and the method that is used to extract the web citation from Google search engine is “Web / URL citation extraction". Findings: The findings showed that ten percent of the web citations of Google search engine are formal and informal citations. The highest formal citation in the Google search engine with 19/27% is in the field of library and information science and the lowest official citation by 1/54% is devoted to the field of civil engineering. The highest percentage of informal citations with 3/57% is devoted to sociology and the lowest percentage of informal citations by 0/39% is devoted to the field of civil engineering. Journal Citation is highest with 94/12% in the surgical field and lowest with 5/26 percent in the philosophy filed. Result: Due to formal and informal citations in the Google search engine which is about 10 percent and the reduction of this amount compared to previous research, it seems that track citations by this engine should be treated with more caution. We see that the amount of formal citation is variable in different disciplines. Cited journals in the field of surgery, is highest and in the filed of philosophy is lowest, this indicates that in the filed of philosophy, that is a subset of the social sciences, journals in scientific communication do not play a significant role. On the other hand, book has a key role in this filed

  19. Publication point indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Anita; Ingwersen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with novel publication point indicators (PPIs) that are formalized and exemplified. Two diachronic citation windows are applied: 2006-07 and 2006-08. Web of Science (WoS) as well as Google Scholar (GS) are applied to observe the cite delay and citedness for the different document types published by DIIS...

  20. The substantive and practical significance of citation impact differences between institutions: Guidelines for the analysis of percentiles using effect sizes and confidence intervals

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Richard; Bornmann, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    In our chapter we address the statistical analysis of percentiles: How should the citation impact of institutions be compared? In educational and psychological testing, percentiles are already used widely as a standard to evaluate an individual's test scores - intelligence tests for example - by comparing them with the percentiles of a calibrated sample. Percentiles, or percentile rank classes, are also a very suitable method for bibliometrics to normalize citations of publications in terms o...

  1. A `curve of growth' of astronomers on the Citation Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, H. C.

    1996-03-01

    The average citation career of a sample of 72 astronomers who received their PhD between 1977 and 1988, and who were employed in astronomy in 1994, is analysed using data from the Science Citation Index. The citation rates n_i(t) are fairly well represented by the assumption n_i(t)=alpha_i f(t) where f(t) is a `universal' function and alpha_i an individual `amplitude factor'. The shape of f shows that the citation rate 2 years after PhD is, on average, already one half of what it will be 12 years after PhD. Probability intervals are given for the later citation rate, for given rates early in the career. Early citation rates are found to have a modest but measurable predictive value.

  2. Milutin Milanković in Science Citation Index 1946 - 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrijević, M. S.

    1997-12-01

    The result of an investigation of presence of the most famous Serbian astronomer Milutin Milanković in the Science Citation Index for 1946 - 1996 is presented. Milutin Milanković (1879 - 1958) is the author of the mathematical theory of climate and he explained the origin of ice ages. Within the considered period 522 citations of 17 works and scientific writing have been found. Bibliography of the cited works with citation index is also given.

  3. Incites into Citation Linking using the OAI-PMH

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    deposit process. This highly-distributed approach to citation linking utilises the OAI-PMH to transfer structured citation data between IRs and citation indexing services. OpenURL - a standard for contextual linking using bibliographic data - is now a NISO standard. As well as it's linking role, OpenURL is a useful standard for the transfer of bibliographic data for the purposes of...

  4. Stratification of Time to First Citation for Articles Published in the "Journal of Research in Music Education": A Bibliometric Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Carl B.

    2015-01-01

    The author examined the speed of research dissemination by determining the time elapsed from publication to first citation for 617 articles in the "Journal of Research in Music Education (JRME)". Google Scholar was used to create a unique data set of 6,930 references originating from journals in the arts, education, music, and other…

  5. The Topic of Instructional Design in Research Journals: A Citation Analysis for the Years 1980-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra

    2009-01-01

    This study examines research publication and trends in instructional design, as found in selected professional journals during the period 1980-2008. Citation analysis was used to investigate documents relating to instructional design, as indexed in the "Web of Science. Instructional design; instruction design; educational design; learning design;…

  6. The Topic of Instructional Design in Research Journals: A Citation Analysis for the Years 1980-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcinar, Zehra

    2009-01-01

    This study examines research publication and trends in instructional design, as found in selected professional journals during the period 1980-2008. Citation analysis was used to investigate documents relating to instructional design, as indexed in the "Web of Science. Instructional design; instruction design; educational design; learning design;…

  7. Data Identifiers and Citations Enable Reproducible Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmes, C.

    2011-12-01

    Modern science often involves data processing with tremendous volumes of data. Keeping track of that data has been a growing challenge for data center. Researchers who access and use that data don't always reference and cite their data sources adequately for consumers of their research to follow their methodology or reproduce their analyses or experiments. Recent research has led to recommendations for good identifiers and citations that can help address this problem. This paper will describe some of the best practices in data identifiers, reference and citation. Using a simplified example scenario based on a long term remote sensing satellite mission, it will explore issues in identifying dynamic data sets and the importance of good data citations for reproducibility. It will describe the difference between granule and collection level identifiers, using UUIDs and DOIs to illustrate some recommendations for developing identifiers and assigning them during data processing. As data processors create data products, the provenance of the input products and precise steps that led to their creation are recorded and published for users of the data to see. As researchers access the data from an archive, they can use the provenance to help understand the genesis of the data, which could have effects on their usage of the data. By citing the data on publishing their research, others can retrieve the precise data used in their research and reproduce the analyses and experiments to confirm the results. Describing the experiment to a sufficient extent to reproduce the research enforces a formal approach that lends credibility to the results, and ultimately, to the policies of decision makers depending on that research.

  8. Link Label Prediction in Signed Citation Network

    KAUST Repository

    Akujuobi, Uchenna

    2016-04-12

    Link label prediction is the problem of predicting the missing labels or signs of all the unlabeled edges in a network. For signed networks, these labels can either be positive or negative. In recent years, different algorithms have been proposed such as using regression, trust propagation and matrix factorization. These approaches have tried to solve the problem of link label prediction by using ideas from social theories, where most of them predict a single missing label given that labels of other edges are known. However, in most real-world social graphs, the number of labeled edges is usually less than that of unlabeled edges. Therefore, predicting a single edge label at a time would require multiple runs and is more computationally demanding. In this thesis, we look at link label prediction problem on a signed citation network with missing edge labels. Our citation network consists of papers from three major machine learning and data mining conferences together with their references, and edges showing the relationship between them. An edge in our network is labeled either positive (dataset relevant) if the reference is based on the dataset used in the paper or negative otherwise. We present three approaches to predict the missing labels. The first approach converts the label prediction problem into a standard classification problem. We then, generate a set of features for each edge and then adopt Support Vector Machines in solving the classification problem. For the second approach, we formalize the graph such that the edges are represented as nodes with links showing similarities between them. We then adopt a label propagation method to propagate the labels on known nodes to those with unknown labels. In the third approach, we adopt a PageRank approach where we rank the nodes according to the number of incoming positive and negative edges, after which we set a threshold. Based on the ranks, we can infer an edge would be positive if it goes a node above the

  9. Structures and Statistics of Citation Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    abstract of each paper, (iii) SLAC dates of each paper in the form of (paper_id, SLAC_date), and (iv) citation graph data in the form of (citing_paper_id...cited_paper_id). SLAC date refers to the date the paper has been published online at the library of Stanford Linear Acceleration Center ( SLAC ) (26...download in the form of XML files. These metadata files list the author names, abstracts, and the SLAC dates for each unique paper. In some cases, the

  10. Incites into Citation Linking using the OAI-PMH

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    There are some 300 repositories of research material (Source: IAR), most of which have an OAI-PMH interface, but no current Institutional Repositories export reference data - nor do they provide their users with citation impact metrics. We propose a model for extending IR's to be citation aware and to expose that data to citation indices using the OAI-PMH and OpenURL. We present some techniques for the export of citation data using the OAI-PMH in Citebase Search. As part of a proposed Open Access Citation Information study we have developed a proposal for the integration of reference parsing and linking into the author- deposit process. This highly-distributed approach to citation linking utilises the OAI-PMH to transfer structured citation data between IRs and citation indexing services. OpenURL - a standard for contextual linking using bibliographic data - is now a NISO standard. As well as it's linking role, OpenURL is a useful standard for the transfer of bibliographic data for the purposes of citation in...

  11. The relationship between quality of research and citation frequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rucker Gerta

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Citation counts are often regarded as a measure of the utilization and contribution of published articles. The objective of this study is to assess whether statistical reporting and statistical errors in the analysis of the primary outcome are associated with the number of citations received. Methods We evaluated all original research articles published in 1996 in four psychiatric journals. The statistical and reporting quality of each paper was assessed and the number of citations received up to 2005 was obtained from the Web of Science database. We then examined whether the number of citations was associated with the quality of the statistical analysis and reporting. Results A total of 448 research papers were included in the citation analysis. Unclear or inadequate reporting of the research question and primary outcome were not statistically significantly associated with the citation counts. After adjusting for journal, extended description of statistical procedures had a positive effect on the number of citations received. Inappropriate statistical analysis did not affect the number of citations received. Adequate reporting of the primary research question, statistical methods and primary findings were all associated with the journal visibility and prestige. Conclusion In this cohort of published research, measures of reporting quality and appropriate statistical analysis were not associated with the number of citations. The journal in which a study is published appears to be as important as the statistical reporting quality in ensuring dissemination of published medical science.

  12. Using Citation Indexes, Citation Searching, and Bibliometrics to Improve Chemistry Scholarship, Research, and Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntrock, Robert E.

    2016-01-01

    Citation searching and bibliometrics are terms foreign to many chemists and educators, yet well-known and used by librarians and information specialists. This article aims to help chemistry students, educators, and other readers of this "Journal" to better appreciate and use these powerful and profound methods. Although these subjects…

  13. A Tri-Citation Analysis Exploring the Citation Image of Kurt Lewin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marion, Linda S.

    2002-01-01

    Presents the initial phase of a comparison of cocitation and social network analysis methods for the study of scholarly communication, based on a case study of the intellectual contributions of Kurt Lewin, a social psychologist. Highlights include an author tri-citation analysis; cluster analysis; multidimensional scaling; and diffusion of ideas.…

  14. Blog Citations as Indicators of the Societal Impact of Research : Content Analysis of Social Sciences Blogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid R. Jamali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes motivations behind social sciences blog posts citing journal articles in order to find out whether blog citations are good indicators for the societal impact or benefits of research. A random sample of 300 social sciences blog posts (out of 1,233 blog posts from ResearchBlogging.org published between 01/01/2012 to 18/06/2014 were subjected to content analysis. The 300 blog posts had 472 references including 424 journal articles from 269 different journals. Sixty‐one (22.68% of all cited journals were from the social sciences and most of the journals with high frequency were highly cited general science journals such as PNAS and Science. Seventy‐five percent of all journals were referenced only once. The average age of articles cited at the time of citation was 5.8 years. Discussion and criticism were the two main categories of motivations. Overall, the study shows the potential of blog citations as an altmetric measure and as a proxy for assessing the research impact. A considerable number of citation motivations in blogs such as disputing a belief, suggesting policies, providing a solution to a problem, reacting to media, criticism and the like seemed to support gaining societal benefits. Societal benefits are considered as helping stimulate new approaches to social issues, or informing public debate and policymaking. Lower self‐citation (compared to some other altmetric measures such as tweets and the fact that blogging involves generating content (i.e. an intellectual process give them an advantage for altmetrics. However, limitations and contextual issues such as disciplinary differences and low uptake of altmetrics, in general, in scholarly communication should not be ignored when using blogs as a data source for altmetrics.

  15. An Introduction to Citation Indexing at the University of Rhode Island Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etchingham, John B., Jr.

    Instructions are given for using three citation indexes produced by the Institute for Scientific Information: "Science Citation Index,""Social Sciences Citation Index," and "Arts and Humanities Citation Index." A brief explanation of citation indexing and a discussion of its benefits precedes descriptions of how to…

  16. Edited Volumes, Monographs, and Book Chapters in the Book Citation Index (BCI) and Science Citation Index (SCI, SoSCI, A&HCI)

    CERN Document Server

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, Thomson-Reuters introduced the Book Citation Index (BCI) as part of the Science Citation Index (SCI). The interface of the Web of Science version 5 enables users to search for both "Books" and "Book Chapters" as new categories. Books and book chapters, however, were always among the cited references, and book chapters have been included in the database since 2005. We explore the two categories with both BCI and SCI, and in the sister databases for the social sciences (SoSCI) and the arts and humanities (A&HCI). Book chapters in edited volumes can be highly cited. Books contain many citing references, but are relatively less cited. We suggest that this may find its origin in the slower circulation of books then of journal articles. It is possible to distinguish scientometrically between monographs and edited volumes among the "Books". Monographs may be underrated in terms of citation impact or overrated using publication performance indicators because individual chapters are counted separately as ...

  17. Edited volumes, monographs and book chapters in the Book Citation Index (BKCI and Science Citation Index (SCI, SoSCI, A&HCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loet Leydesdorff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2011, Thomson-Reuters introduced the Book Citation Index (BKCI as part of the Science Citation Index (SCI. The interface of the Web of Science version 5 enables users to search for both ′Books′ and ′Book Chapters′ as new categories. Books and book chapters, however, were always among the cited references, and book chapters have been included in the database since 2005. We explore the two categories with both BKCI and SCI, and in the sister social sciences (SoSCI and the arts & humanities (A&HCI databases. Book chapters in edited volumes can be highly cited. Books contain many citing references but are relatively less cited. This may find its origin in the slower circulation of books than of journal articles. It is possible to distinguish between monographs and edited volumes among the ′Books′ scientometrically. Monographs may be underrated in terms of citation impact or overrated using publication performance indicators because individual chapters are counted as contributions separately in terms of articles, reviews, and/or book chapters.

  18. Dioxins: Toxicity and health risks. January 1979-August 1989 (Citations from Pollution Abstracts). Report for January 1979-August 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning the toxicology of dioxins and the health risks associated with dioxin exposure. Articles include mortality and physiological studies of major dioxin contamination such Seveso and Love Canal. The biochemistry of dioxin poisoning, environmental impacts, sources of dioxin pollution, metabolism of dioxins by microorganisms, carcinogenicity, occupational exposure, and risk assessment of dioxin exposure by the general public are also discussed. Some mention is made of Agent Orange exposure in the military during the Vietnam War. (Contains 276 citations fully indexed and including a title list.)

  19. Citation Analysis of Hepatitis Monthly by Journal Citation Report (ISI), Google Scholar, and Scopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miri, Seyyed Mohammad; Raoofi, Azam; Heidari, Zahra

    2012-09-01

    Citation analysis as one of the most widely used methods of bibliometrics can be used for computing the various impact measures for scholars based on data from citation databases. Journal Citation Reports (JCR) from Thomson Reuters provides annual report in the form of impact factor (IF) for each journal. We aimed to evaluate the citation parameters of Hepatitis Monthly by JCR in 2010 and compare them with GS and Sc. All articles of Hepat Mon published in 2009 and 2008 which had been cited in 2010 in three databases including WoS, Sc and GS gathered in a spreadsheet. The IFs were manually calculated. Among the 104 total published articles the accuracy rates of GS and Sc in recording the total number of articles was 96% and 87.5%. There was a difference between IFs among the three databases (0.793 in ISI [Institute for Scientific Information], 0.945 in Sc and 0.85 GS). The missing rate of citations in ISI was 4% totally. Original articles were the main cited types, whereas, guidelines and clinical challenges were the least ones. None of the three databases succeed to record all articles published in the journal. Despite high sensitivity of GS comparing to Sc, it cannot be a reliable source for indexing since GS has lack of screening in the data collection and low specificity. Using an average of three IFs is suggested to find the correct IF. Editors should be more aware on the role of original articles in increasing IF and the potential efficacy of review articles in long term impact factor.

  20. The citation pattern of Brazilian economists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Ricardo Faria

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the determinants of international citations by Brazilian economists in papers published in the top domestic journals in 1994 and 2004. Brazilian research in economics has become more open to international influence and widespread geographically; researchers more specialized and technically oriented and the research topics more diversified. However, Brazil is plagued by editorial favoritism, reflected in the negative and significant impact of references to the works authored by domestic journals editors on international citations. We also find that longer technical papers written on topics other than the economic history of Brazil are more likely to cite foreign literature.Este artigo estuda os determinantes das citações internacionais dos economistas brasileiros em artigos publicados nas principais revistas domésticas de economia nos anos 1994 e 2004. A pesquisa de economia no Brasil se tornou mais aberta à influencia internacional e mais espalhada geograficamente; os pesquisadores mais especializados e tecnicamente orientados e os tópicos de pesquisa mais diversificados. Entretanto, a pesquisa continua sendo prejudicada pelo favoritismo editorial, refletido no impacto negativo e significante das referências dos autores aos trabalhos dos editores das revistas domésticas sobre as citacoes internacionais. Constatamos que artigos técnicos mais longos sobre tópicos que não sejam sobre história econômica do Brasil têm maior chance de citar a literatura internacional.

  1. [Analysis of the impact of Anales Españoles de Pediatría through the Science Citation Index from 1997-2000].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Río, F; Mayoralas Alises, S; Esparza Paz, P; González Pérez-Yarza, E

    2002-08-01

    To quantify the impact factor of Anales Españoles de Pediatría from 1997 until 2000 and to identify the journal's citation patterns and the topics with the greatest impact. SCISEARCH was used to locate citations of articles published in Anales Españoles de Pediatría between 1995 and 1999. The following data were collected for each article: year of publication, authors, journal, country of publication, language, specialty or specialties, institution(s), residence of the first author and topic. The impact factor was calculated as the ratio between citations received over 1 year by articles published in Anales Españoles de Pediatría in the two previous years and the total number of articles published by Anales Españoles de Pediatría over the 2 years under study. The impact factor of Anales Españoles de Pediatría was 0.052 in 1997, 0.080 in 1998, 0.101 in 1999, 0.089 in 2000 and 0.064 in 2001. Citations were found in a wide range of source journals. The greatest proportion (35.6 %) were found in Spanish medical journals. Citations were made mainly by Spanish authors (62.8 %) and self-citation was moderate (14.3 %). Topics related to neurology (16.9 % of the citations received), infectious diseases (16.2 %) and neonatology (14.8 %) had the greatest impact. The impact factor of Anales Españoles de Pediatria is modest, although higher than that of some other biomedical publications included in Journal Citation Reports.

  2. Choosing and using citation and bibliographic database software (BDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, David A; El-Masri, Maher M; Hernandez, Cheri Ann

    2008-01-01

    The diabetes educator/researcher is faced with a proliferation of diabetes articles in various journals, both online and in print. Keeping track of cited references and remembering how to cite the references in text and the bibliography can be a daunting task for the new researcher and a tedious task for the experienced researcher. The challenge is to find and use a technology, such as bibliographic database software (BDS), which can help to manage this information overload. This article focuses on the use of BDS for the diabetes educator who is undertaking research. BDS can help researchers access and organize literature and make literature searches more efficient and less time consuming. Moreover, the use of such programs tends to reduce errors associated with the complexity of bibliographic citations and can increase the productivity of scholarly publications. The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of BDS currently available, describe how it can be used to aid researchers in their work, and highlight the features of different programs. It is important for diabetes educators and researchers to explore the many benefits of such BDS programs and consider their use to enhance the accuracy and efficiency of accessing and citing references of their research work and publications. Armed with this knowledge, researchers will be able to make informed decisions about selecting BDS which will meet their usage requirements.

  3. Citation distribution profile in Brazilian journals of general medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiggi Araujo Lustosa

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Impact factors are currently the bibliometric index most used for evaluating scientific journals. However, the way in which they are used, for instance concerning the study or journal types analyzed, can markedly interfere with estimate reliability. This study aimed to analyze the citation distribution pattern in three Brazilian journals of general medicine. DESIGN AND SETTING: This was a descriptive study based on numbers of citations of scientific studies published by three Brazilian journals of general medicine. METHODS: The journals analyzed were São Paulo Medical Journal, Clinics and Revista da Associação Médica Brasileira. This survey used data available from the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI platform, from which the total number of papers published in each journal in 2007-2008 and the number of citations of these papers in 2009 were obtained. From these data, the citation distribution was derived and journal impact factors (average number of citations were estimated. These factors were then compared with those directly available from the ISI Journal of Citation Reports (JCR. RESULTS: Respectively, 134, 203 and 192 papers were published by these journals during the period analyzed. The observed citation distributions were highly skewed, such that many papers had few citations and a small percentage had many citations. It was not possible to identify any specific pattern for the most cited papers or to exactly reproduce the JCR impact factors. CONCLUSION: Use of measures like "impact factors", which characterize citations through averages, does not adequately represent the citation distribution in the journals analyzed.

  4. International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health in world documentation services: the SCOPUS based analysis of citation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przyłuska, Jolanta

    2006-01-01

    A high classification of scientific journals in the ranking of international transfer of knowledge is reflected by other researchers' citations. The International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health (IJOMEH) is an international professional quarterly focused on such areas as occupational medicine, toxicology and environmental health edited in Poland. IJOMEH, published in English, is indexed in numerous world information services (MEDLINE, EMBASE, EBSCO, SCOPUS). This paper presents the contribution of IJOMEH publications to the world circulation of scientific information based on the citation analysis. The analysis, grounded on the SCOPUS database, assessed the frequency of citations in the years 1996-2005. Journals in which they have been cited were retrieved and their list is also included.

  5. Influence of university mergers and the Norwegian performance indicator on overall Danish citation impact 2000-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingwersen, Peter; Larsen, Birger

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyses the patterns of Danish research productivity, citation impact and (inter)national collaboration across document types 2000-2012, prior to and after 1) the university mergers in 2006 and 2) the introduction of the Norwegian publication point-based performance indicator 2008....../09. Document types analysed are: research articles; conference proceedings papers excluding meeting abstracts; and review articles. The Web of Science citation index (WoS) combined with the Danish Research & Innovation Agency’s basic statistics is used for data collection and analyses. Findings demonstrate...... that the overall productivity and citation impact steadily increases over the entire period, regardless the university fusions and the introduction of the performance indicator. The collaboration ratio between purely Danish and internationally cooperated research articles remains stable during the period while...

  6. Specific character of citations in historiography (using the example of Polish history).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa, Władysław Marek

    2012-03-01

    The first part of the paper deals with the assessment of international databases in relation to the number of historical publications (representation and relevance in comparison with the model database). The second part is focused on providing answer to the question whether historiography is governed by similar bibliometric rules as exact sciences or whether it has its own specific character. Empirical database for this part of the research constituted the database prepared ad hoc: The Citation Index of the History of Polish Media (CIHPM). Among numerous typically historical features the main focus was put on: linguistic localism, specific character of publishing forms, differences in citing of various sources (contributions and syntheses) and specific character of the authorship (the Lorenz Curve and the Lotka's Law). Slightly more attention was devoted to the half-life indicator and its role in a diachronic study of a scientific field; also, a new indicator (HL14), depicting distribution of citations younger then half-life was introduced. Additionally, the comparison and correlation of selected parameters for the body of historical science (citations, HL14, the Hirsch Index, number of publications, volume and other) were also conducted.

  7. Assessing the relationship between the alternative metrics of visibility and social bookmarking with citation index in PLOS Altmetrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeideh Ebrahimy

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to measure the relationship between metrics of visibility and bookmarking in social platforms (Citeulike, Mendeley and Figshare with citation counts in Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed central and Crossref. Current study is original in terms of objective and the data gathering scheme is descriptive of correlation type with a citation analysis approach. The population in this study is consists of 90,728 research papers which published in PLOS between 2009 and 2013. A sample of 1892 samples was chosen based on Cochran formula. The results showed that the visibility, Citeulike and Mendeley bookmarking counts have significant positive correlation with citations in all of the investigated systems. Conversely, social bookmarking counts on Figshare showed significant negative correlation with citations. Visibility metric has significant positive correlation with bookmarking counts in Citeulike and Mendeley, while it does not correlate with social bookmarking metric on Figshare. The results of this study suggest sharing scientific publications in social networks such as Mendeley, may increases the visibility and the future citations.

  8. Severe Language Effect in University Rankings: Particularly Germany and France are wronged in citation-based rankings

    CERN Document Server

    van Raan, Anthony F J; Visser, Martijn S

    2010-01-01

    We applied a set of standard bibliometric indicators to monitor the scientific state-of-arte of 500 universities worldwide and constructed a ranking on the basis of these indicators (Leiden Ranking 2010). We find a dramatic and hitherto largely underestimated language effect in the bibliometric, citation-based measurement of research performance when comparing the ranking based on all Web of Science (WoS) covered publications and on only English WoS covered publications, particularly for Germany and France.

  9. Severe language effect in university rankings: particularly Germany and France are wronged in citation-based rankings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Raan, Anthony F J; van Leeuwen, Thed N; Visser, Martijn S

    2011-08-01

    We applied a set of standard bibliometric indicators to monitor the scientific state-of-arte of 500 universities worldwide and constructed a ranking on the basis of these indicators (Leiden Ranking 2010). We find a dramatic and hitherto largely underestimated language effect in the bibliometric, citation-based measurements of research performance when comparing the ranking based on all Web of Science (WoS) covered publications and on only English WoS covered publications, particularly for Germany and France.

  10. Core Communication Journals: Character Profiles, Citation Networks, and Research Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Clement Y. K.

    To examine the change in the communication literature in the past five years, a content analysis was made of the 1985 edition of the Social Sciences Citation Index's Journal Citation Reports, which reports the 1984 survey of more than 3,000 journals and provides answers to the following types of questions: How often has a particular journal been…

  11. Analysis of Scifinder Scholar and Web of Science Citation Searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Katherine M.

    2002-01-01

    With "Chemical Abstracts" and "Science Citation Index" both now available for citation searching, this study compares the duplication and uniqueness of citing references for works of chemistry researchers for the years 1999-2001. The two indexes cover very similar source material. This analysis of SciFinder Scholar and Web of…

  12. Ecosystem models. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the design and applications of ecosystem models. Ecosystem simulation and characterization models, together with models for marine biology, plants, microorganisms, and food chains, are described. Models that assess the effect of pollutants on specific environments and habitat suitability index models are also included. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  13. Citation Matching in Sanskrit Corpora Using Local Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Abhinandan S.; Rao, Shrisha

    Citation matching is the problem of finding which citation occurs in a given textual corpus. Most existing citation matching work is done on scientific literature. The goal of this paper is to present methods for performing citation matching on Sanskrit texts. Exact matching and approximate matching are the two methods for performing citation matching. The exact matching method checks for exact occurrence of the citation with respect to the textual corpus. Approximate matching is a fuzzy string-matching method which computes a similarity score between an individual line of the textual corpus and the citation. The Smith-Waterman-Gotoh algorithm for local alignment, which is generally used in bioinformatics, is used here for calculating the similarity score. This similarity score is a measure of the closeness between the text and the citation. The exact- and approximate-matching methods are evaluated and compared. The methods presented can be easily applied to corpora in other Indic languages like Kannada, Tamil, etc. The approximate-matching method can in particular be used in the compilation of critical editions and plagiarism detection in a literary work.

  14. Thermal energy storage. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavagnaro, D. M.

    1980-09-01

    The cited reports of federally-funded research concern thermal energy storage. The citations cover the design of equipment, performance evaluation, theory, materials used, and experimental design. This updated bibliography contains 240 citations, 128 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  15. Gas dynamic lasers. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, B.

    1980-07-01

    The citations cover research on kinetic and energy transfer processes, design, optics, nozzles, and performance of gas and chemical lasers relying on gas dynamic effects for lasing enhancement. Diffusion and flow studies specifically applicable to such lasers are also included. This updated bibliography contains 253 citations, 6 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  16. Hot wire anemometry. Citations from the NTIS data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habercom, G. E., Jr.

    1980-08-01

    Citations include principles; calibrating; circuit diagrams; flow measurement; hypersonic, supersonic, transonic, and subsonic characteristics; boundary layer studies; turbulence; jet, pipe, and tunnel flow; mathematical models; wind tunnel model tests, airport structure simulation; mass transfer and flow stability; probe modifications; flow about geometric forms; flow patterns; and related topics. This updated bibliography contains 249 citations, 28 of which are new entries to the previous edition.

  17. Bioremediation. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the decomposition of toxic materials by biological means. Bacterial decomposition of jet fuel, wood preservatives, explosives, crude oil, halogenated organics, diesel fuel, aviation fuel, and creosote is discussed. Enhancement of decomposition rates by addition of nutrients is also included.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  18. Core Communication Journals: Character Profiles, Citation Networks, and Research Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Clement Y. K.

    To examine the change in the communication literature in the past five years, a content analysis was made of the 1985 edition of the Social Sciences Citation Index's Journal Citation Reports, which reports the 1984 survey of more than 3,000 journals and provides answers to the following types of questions: How often has a particular journal been…

  19. Aircraft maintenance. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern various aspects of aircraft maintenance. Both military and civil aviation experience are included. Articles cited concern airline operations, engine and avionics reliability, the use of automatic test equipment, maintenance scheduling, and reliability engineering. This updated bibliography contains 347 citations, 85 of which are new additions to the previous edition.

  20. Analysis of Scifinder Scholar and Web of Science Citation Searches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitley, Katherine M.

    2002-01-01

    With "Chemical Abstracts" and "Science Citation Index" both now available for citation searching, this study compares the duplication and uniqueness of citing references for works of chemistry researchers for the years 1999-2001. The two indexes cover very similar source material. This analysis of SciFinder Scholar and Web of…