WorldWideScience

Sample records for public life began

  1. How life began.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloud, P

    1986-11-01

    Study of the origin of life has become a legitimate scientific inquiry, with an international, multidisciplinary membership and a cogent body of data. Experiments involving plausible early Earth conditions and biogeochemical analyses of carbonaceous meteorites imply a variety of available starting molecules. Biogeological evidence indicates microbial beginnings about 3800 million years (3.8 aeons) ago. By then the known universe had been in existence for perhaps 15 aeons and galaxies abundant for ten. Conditions suitable for the origin of life may require a long prior cosmic evolution. The natural origin of life on the early Earth is now widely agreed upon but not the pathways. The beginnings of catalysis, replication and a functional cell remain moot. Much discussion has centered on the templating role that crystals such as clays and zeolites might have played in prebiotic evolution. Recent discovery of the catalytic and replicative functions of RNA recommend it as the key molecule in the transition from chemical to biological evolution. Copyright © 1986. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. How nuclear power began

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gowing, M.

    1987-01-01

    Many of the features of the story of nuclear power, both in nuclear weapons and nuclear power stations, derive from their timing. Usually, in the history of science the precise timing of discovery does not make much difference, but in the case of nuclear fission there was the coincidence that crucial discoveries were made and openly published in the same year, 1939, as the outbreak of the Second World War. It is these events of the 1930s and the early post-war era that are mainly discussed. However, the story began a lot earlier and even in the early 1900s the potential power within the atom had been foreseen by Soddy and Rutherford. In the 1930s Enrico Fermi and his team saw the technological importance of their discoveries and took out a patent on their process to produce artificial radioactivity from slow neutron beams. The need for secrecy because of the war, and the personal trusts and mistrusts run through the story of nuclear power. (UK)

  3. Women in public life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The UN Division for the Advancement of Women publication has devoted an issue to the role of women in public lie based on an analysis of women's status in industrialized countries presented in Vienna, Austria, in May 1991. Women already contribute to political life and make a difference in politics, but societal institutions and government processes have not yet adapted to this fact. Women's nongovernmental organizations promote women's interests at the governmental level, but often do not have the economic or political power as do other interests groups such as trade unions. Women often participation public life via their membership in women's organizations, community action groups, voluntary organizations, and other close to home groups. They prefer to participate in activities which are problem solving rather than institution building. These activities and groups operate outside established political institutions and are not considered as part of public and political life. Society's exclusion of women from leadership positions in public life keeps it from benefiting from the special contributions that women bring to decision making. Women show a tendency to have different leadership styles than men (e.g., ability to relate to people affected by their decisions), which are most needed for the modern world. They often do not campaign just for women's issues, but, once in office, they do tend to become more involved in women's issues. Women have affected positive changes in career and child care, often on a non-Socialist agenda, in various countries (e.g. Norway). This effect is referred to as the politics of motherhood. More access to politics and public life calls for removal of structural and situational barriers including the glass ceiling, discrimination, insufficient funds, and bearing most of the responsibility for child care. The UN women's groups has drafted a platform for interregional consultation on women's role in public life and scheduled the 4th

  4. The Geneva conference - How it began

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1964-08-15

    The First International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy had its origin in President Eisenhower's initiative of the early nineteen-fifties, when he proposed a concerted international effort to divert the power of the atom from warlike purposes into the service of peace. To the United Nations General Assembly in December 1953, he pledged the determination of the United States 'to help solve the fearful atomic dilemma - to devote its entire heart and mind to finding the way by which the miraculous inventiveness of man shall not be dedicated to his death, but consecrated to his life'. The UN General Assembly in plenary session, in December 1954, unanimously and enthusiastically adopted a resolution which provided for the establishment of an International Atomic Energy Agency, and for the holding of an international technical conference of governments under the auspices of the United Nations. To prepare the way, an Advisory Committee was set up, consisting of representatives of Brazil, Canada, France, India, USSR, United Kingdom and USA. The result was the largest meeting that had been convened under the auspices of the United Nations; it was held from 8 to 25 August 1955 in the Palais des Nations, Geneva, where the necessary facilities were available for such a large multilingual conference. Thirty-eight governments submitted 1067 papers and 1428 participants attended. The conference was wide in scope, embracing all major aspects of the peaceful applications of atomic energy.

  5. The Geneva conference - How it began

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1964-01-01

    The First International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy had its origin in President Eisenhower's initiative of the early nineteen-fifties, when he proposed a concerted international effort to divert the power of the atom from warlike purposes into the service of peace. To the United Nations General Assembly in December 1953, he pledged the determination of the United States 'to help solve the fearful atomic dilemma - to devote its entire heart and mind to finding the way by which the miraculous inventiveness of man shall not be dedicated to his death, but consecrated to his life'. The UN General Assembly in plenary session, in December 1954, unanimously and enthusiastically adopted a resolution which provided for the establishment of an International Atomic Energy Agency, and for the holding of an international technical conference of governments under the auspices of the United Nations. To prepare the way, an Advisory Committee was set up, consisting of representatives of Brazil, Canada, France, India, USSR, United Kingdom and USA. The result was the largest meeting that had been convened under the auspices of the United Nations; it was held from 8 to 25 August 1955 in the Palais des Nations, Geneva, where the necessary facilities were available for such a large multilingual conference. Thirty-eight governments submitted 1067 papers and 1428 participants attended. The conference was wide in scope, embracing all major aspects of the peaceful applications of atomic energy.

  6. Publication Life Cycle at CERN Document Server

    CERN Multimedia

    Witowski, Sebastian; Costa, Flavio; Gabancho, Esteban; Marian, Ludmila; Tzovanakis, Harris

    2017-01-01

    This presentation guides listeners through all the stages of publication life cycle at CERN Document Server, from the ingestion using one of the various tools, through curation and processing, until the data is ready to be exported to other systems. It describes different tools that we are using to curate the incoming publications as well as to further improve the existing data on CDS. The second part of the talk goes through various challenges we have faced in the past and how we are going to overcome them in the new version of CDS.

  7. Interrupting Everyday Life: Public Interventionist Art as Critical Public Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Dipti; Darts, David

    2016-01-01

    In this article we explore two urban interventions art projects in the public sphere designed by our Masters' students at New York University as they set the stage for a discussion on how urban art interventions can function as a form of critical public pedagogy. We argue that these kinds of public art projects provided a space for dialogue with…

  8. Brooklyn Dreams: My Life in Public Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    In "Brooklyn Dreams," Sonia Nieto--one of the leading authors and teachers in the field of multicultural education--looks back on her formative experiences as a student, activist, and educator, and shows how they reflect and illuminate the themes of her life's work. Nieto offers a poignant account of her childhood and the complexities of…

  9. Russel Nye: The Professor in Public Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hungiville, Maurice

    1995-01-01

    A discussion of the influence of Russel Nye, a college English professor at Michigan State University and journalist, focuses on the values that shaped his teaching, scholarship, and writing and his defense of democratic values, especially in education. It is concluded that Nye's experience suggests that public service can be a source of personal…

  10. Life sciences. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-09-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with life sciences: nuclear medicine, medical physics and radiation biology and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 September 2001

  11. Repositioning news and public connection in everyday life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swart, Joëlle; Peters, Chris; Broersma, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    News has traditionally served as a common ground, enabling people to connect to others and engage with the public issues they encounter in everyday life. This article revisits these theoretical debates about mediated public connection within the context of a digitalized news media landscape. While...... of public connection into four dimensions that emphasize people’s lived experiences: inclusiveness, engagement, relevance, and constructiveness. Situating these in an everyday life framework, this article advances a user-based perspective that considers the role of news for people in digital societies...

  12. Monumentality vs. everyday life: architecture's public role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Manoel Guedes Sobrinho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Conference held in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, on March 18, 2006. Thoughts about architecture and the nation." Architecture is everything dealing with construction." (ARGAN, c. 1992. An object's cultural and ethical value is measured by how well it addresses demand, which in turn is related to the planet Earth, to scarce resources, and to people's survival. Architecture, its craft, and its teaching are studied from the perspective of the act, which is the art of building, to meet social, public and private demands through historical processes of power games, at a given place and time. Architecture is reduced to its essence to unveil the roots of its emergence and understand the architect's responsibilities in the new mass society, when we enter this" new popular period in history" (SANTOS; SOUZA, c1998. We suggest the following sequence of procedures as a path of knowledge and to support the free development of invention: 1 Initially assess the prospective problem to choose and study the location and the tasks of the architect, the client, society, and government; 2 identify and understand building plans for that location; 3 study the activities, flows, quantity, quality and combination of spaces resulting from the conflicting yearnings of people, in line with social needs and translated into private and public building plans; 4 graphically analyze the sectorial subsystems of areas associated according to affinities, considering their arrangement and organization in the site; 5 work on the rigorous construction of architecture, which in final analysis is matter and form; It should be pointed out that it is necessary to: 6 expand the supply of information on specific architectural problems to be addressed, and to organize the actual and effective involvement of people in the discussion of projects and works of their interest, unlike assembly and participative meetings; 7 expand opportunities to allow a greater number of architects to take part

  13. Before time began the Big Bang and the emerging universe

    CERN Document Server

    Satz, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    What is the origin of the universe? What was there before the universe appeared? We are currently witnessing a second Copernican revolution: neither our Earth and Sun, nor our galaxy, nor even our universe, are the end of all things. Beyond our world, in an endless multiverse, are innumerable other universes, coming and going, like ours or different. Fourteen billion years ago, one of the many bubbles constantly appearing and vanishing in the multiverse exploded to form our universe. The energy liberated in the explosion provided the basis for all the matter our universe now contains. But how could this hot, primordial plasma eventually produce the complex structure of our present world? Does not order eventually always lead to disorder, to an increase of entropy? Modern cosmology is beginning to find out how it all came about and where it all might lead. Before Time Began tells that story.

  14. The publics and the government of life in social networks

    OpenAIRE

    Saulo Mota

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study is an analysis of the relationship between the publics, analyzed by Gabriel Tarde and the government of practices of life, studied by Michel Foucault in the context of social networks, making a comparison between the practices of this kind of social grouping in the early twentieth century with its update in the social networks context in the twenty-first century. Initially we investigate the relationship between a private company with its public, identifying the salient...

  15. Coaxing an intimate public : Life narrative in digital storytelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poletti, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This article considers the practice of digital storytelling in light of contemporary theories of autobiography and affect. Using the concept of coaxed life narrative developed by Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson, I analyse the role of digital storytelling in diversifying the voices in the public

  16. Theology for Life: Doing Public Theology in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Constantineanu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper builds on my previous work, “God in Public: A Prolegomena to Public Theology in the Romanian Context,” where I made an argument for the need of public theology in the Romanian context and offered a brief introduction to the nature of this new field. Now I present several issues that would need attention in a public theology in our context. One such issue, to begin with, is the atrophy of the capacity for dreaming, for envisioning a better world, of the capacity for imagination and hope. Most of people living through the difficult period of a long transition period, with such a high rate of corruption, poverty and uncertainty, have lost any hope for a positive social change. There are no solid institutions and structures in these young democracies and people are really struggling to live a normal life. Similarly, other crucial dimensions of life have been downplayed and so in need to be recovered, such as work, family, civil society, justice, to name just a few. It is argued that a public theology for Romania and for the entire region of Central and Eastern Europe would need to address exactly these kinds of issues: a vision for a better world, Christianity and nation-building, faith and work, faith and society. The paper concludes by pointing to several example of platforms that are very promising for public theology.

  17. The trail to Leduc began in the North

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenzie-Brown, P.

    2000-06-01

    A milestone event in the history of the petroleum industry in Canada occurred in 1914 with the expedition down the Mackenzie River by Dr. T. O. Bosworth, a British geologist, which rivals in importance two better known events, namely the Dingman No. 1 discovery which began disgorging wet gas at Turner Valley in 1914, and the beginning of the modern era with the discovery of oil at Leduc, Alberta in 1947. The Bosworth expedition was commissioned by two Calgary businessmen to investigate the petroleum potential of northern Alberta and beyond, and to stake the most promising claims. That Dr. Bosworth did not disappoint his sponsors is evident from his 70-page long report which he produced upon his return, indicating excellent exploration prospects in three general regions, namely the Mackenzie River between Old Fort Good Hope and Fort Norman, the Tar Springs District on the Great Slave Lake, and the Tar Sand District on the Athabasca River. Exploration was postponed by the exigencies of World War I, but Imperial Oil drilled on one of Bosworth's claims after the war ended and oil was found in 1920. Because of lack of infrastructure to get the oil to major markets, development was lagging until after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941, when Norman Wells was developed with American help, primarily to supply oil to the Pacific Fleet. Imperial drilled, while construction crews built a 1,000-km oil pipeline over the Mackenzie Mountains to a newly constructed refiner in Whitehorse. Despite a total cost to the U.S. taxpayers of $134 million, the Canol project (as it was known) contributed little to the war effort. Total production was 1.98 million barrels of oil, of which 46,000 barrels were spilled along the poorly constructed pipeline. Refined petroleum product output was just 866,670 barrels. The appalling disposal and clean up practices eventually led to having the Whitehorse site declared an environmentally contaminated site in 1998. The Maxwell Tar Pit is

  18. A Liquid work-life under public service contracting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindholst, Christian

    for staff, however, are only poorly understood in current theory and research on public service contracting through partial concepts and a tendency to focus merely on negative outcomes. Against this shortfall, the aim in this paper is to build a conceptually and empirically richer and more authentic account......A part of the reality behind public service contracting in Denmark as well as in many other countries is that a growing number of people are employed in uncertain and temporary conditions and relations in what can be characterized as ‘liquidized’ work-lives. This reality and its consequences...... of staffs’ work-life under public service contracting. The paper relies empirically on focus group interviews in two cases of staff transfers in public service contracting with different levels of liquefaction. it is found that staff transfer is a composite experience for staff with differential outcomes...

  19. Working the Boardwalk: The Social Life of a Public Marketplace

    OpenAIRE

    Orrico, Laura Ann

    2015-01-01

    In this article-based dissertation I present four distinct – but interrelated – articles to expose the social life of a public marketplace. Drawing on over four years of ethnographic data, I present the experience of a group of marginalized entrepreneurs who independently generate income along the Venice Beach Boardwalk. Using an interactionist approach, I reveal the ground level processes through which people turn an otherwise everyday pathway into a place from which to make a living. In the...

  20. MODERN CLINICAL SCIENCE BEGAN WITH SANTORIO SANTORIO (1561-1636

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natale G. De Santo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Santorio Santorio (1561-1636, born in Capodistria, a Venice Republic territory, (now Koper in Slovenia, student, medical doctor, and professor of theoretical medicine at the university of Padua, marked the beginning of modern medicine. Santorio introduced measurements and mathematics into human experimentation. By means of a weighing machine, over a 30-year period, he investigated on more than ten thousand persons, including Galileo Galilei. He used to measure daily body weight, along with the quantity of ingested food and drink, and the quantity of body discharges (urine and feces so that he could calculate the insensible perspiration which he used as a dual token to characterize health and disease, to cure patients after knowing their physical parameters including the pulse and the temperature. His main work was De statica medicina, a well received book which had more than 40 editions during the 17th and 18th century and was translated into English, Italian, French and German. A book small but praised by Boerhaave, von Haller and Lavoisier which granted to Santorio the definition of Galilean, by many historians of medicine including Salvatore De Renzi, Castiglioni, Pucinotti and Pazzini. Santorio embodied the modern physician-scientist, continually experimenting on humans and immediately transforming into medical devices using the data originating in basic science. So the findings repported in the books were immediately used to help patients. He also introduced self-experimentation in medicine, an important problem even nowadays. Although he was aware that the university took credit for his work, he respected the institution from which he obtained a salary for life even when he stopped the teaching at the University. So he even showed his modernity: pioneer in granting to the University of Padua, through his last will, money for yearly scholarships.

  1. Darwin and the origin of life: public versus private science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strick, James E

    2009-12-01

    In the first twenty years after the publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species, an intense debate took place within the ranks of Darwin's supporters over exactly what his theory implied about the means by which the original living organism formed on Earth. Many supporters of evolutionary science also supported the doctrine of spontaneous generation: life forming from nonliving material not just once but many times up to the present day. Darwin was ambivalent on this topic. He feared its explosive potential to drive away liberal-minded Christians who might otherwise be supporters. His ambivalent wording created still more confusion, both among friends and foes, about what Darwin actually believed about the origin of life. A famous lecture by Thomas H. Huxley in 1870 set forth what later became the 'party line' Darwinian position on the subject.

  2. PUBLIC SECTOR - CONCEPTUAL ELEMENTS, IMPLICATIONS IN ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Popa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The public economy, branch of economic science analyses the state, as economic actor; its field of research interacts with investigations of other areas of economic science (monetary, international trade, market organization etc.. The state has experienced various stages of manifestation of its role in the economy, against the changes in society, which led to either an increase in its intervention, to regulate market phenomena, the recovery of economic activity in times of crisis, or to its decline against the modernization of the economies of industrialized countries, the increase of the role of entrepreneurs, technological progress. Thus, the development of economic science, changes in economic area, the emergence of capitalism, of industrialization in the nineteenth century, especially the second half, outlined a new role towards state intervention in economic life; in the context of new economic developments of the last decades of the twentieth century, the interventionist role of the state has diminished, the state giving up certain activities, in return for initiating other actions (privatization, reducing state monopoly, deregulation.nThe paper presents conceptual elements referring to public sector, peculiarities that distinguish it from the private sector, as well as issues about the state implication in the economic life, in different periods of evolution of society.

  3. Course 'Radiation and life', assessment of issues of public concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Cruz, Dumenigo; Quevedo Garcia, Jose R.; Betancourt Hernandez, Luisa; Fuente Puch, Andres de la; Perez Reyes, Yolanda; Jerez Vegueria, Pablo F.

    2008-01-01

    The public of the XXI Century is avid for information about the newest technical and scientific advances occurred and on how do they impact in our daily life. All over the world, the channels of mass communication provide all kind of valuable knowledge that could be of interest for the audience. Part of this broadcasted information however, is managed without the required scientific strictness due to its technical complexity or in most the cases, because it is being used for sensational purposes. The Nuclear Energy has been subjected to different manipulations and misinterpretation by the media because the disastrous consequences of its initial utilization for war purposes. For this reason, the International Atomic Energy Agency has recommended to its Member States the development of a coherent policy for public information based on an adequate real balance of the risk and the benefits of the pacific uses of the nuclear energy, with special emphasis in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. In this context, the Regulatory Bodies are invited to use all available resources for information distribution to provide the truth that the society requires with transparency and the appropriate technical strictness as well as to develop periodical assessment on how does the population incorporate this information and what changes on the public perception of the nuclear energy have occurred. In line with the policy of the Government of the Republic of Cuba concerning the systematic improvement and strengthening the level of the general culture of our population, a comprehensive course entitled 'Radiation and Life' was designed and prepared by the authors of the present paper, and broadcasted by the Cuban television in the popular programme 'University for all'. The email recipient 'radiacionesyvida at cnsn.cu' was specially implemented to assess the impact of this course in the public opinion. This email address was used as an effective way of interaction between the lectures

  4. Life sciences: Nuclear medicine, radiation biology, medical physics, 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with Life Sciences issued during the period 1980-1994. The publications are grouped in the following chapters: Nuclear Medicine (including Radiopharmaceuticals), Radiation Biology and Medical Physics (including Dosimetry)

  5. [End of life and vulnerability, a public health issue].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucomont, Aude

    2016-02-01

    End of life and precarity, two words which were linked by the French national observatory for end of life care in its work carried out in 2014. The study provided an overview of current support practices in different areas, highlighting certain lessons to be learned and making recommendations to the different partners involved. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. The contribution which committed lay persons are called to give in public life.

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Fernando; Jesuit Centre for Faith and Justice; Pastoral Formation Institute

    2009-01-01

    A talk organised by the Jesuit Center for Faith and Justice in collaboration with the Pastoral Formation Institute entitled: The contribution which committed lay persons are called to give in public life. This talk is delivered by Fr Fermando Franco.

  7. Street as Public Space - Measuring Street Life of Kuala Lumpur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Normah; Ayu Abdullah, Yusfida; Hamdan, Hazlina

    2017-10-01

    Kuala Lumpur has envisioning in becoming World Class City by the year 2020. Essential elements of form and function of the urban environment are streets. Streets showcase the community and connect people. It’s one of the most comfortable social environment that provides aesthetical and interaction pleasure for everyone. Classified as main shopping streets in the local Kuala Lumpur urban design guidelines, Jalan Masjid India (JMI) has its uniqueness of shopping experience and social interaction. This conceptual paper will study the physical and cultural characteristics of the street that will generate the street character by mapping its original characters. The findings will focus on strengthening the methodology applied to promote improvements in evaluating it as a great public space. Results will also contribute to understanding the overall site context, the street connectivity, and urban dynamics. This paper is part of a larger study that addresses on transforming the sociability of public space.

  8. The relationship between extrinsic motivation, job satisfaction and life satisfaction amongst employees in a public organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Mafini, Chengedzai; Dlodlo, Nobukhosi

    2014-01-01

    Orientation: There is much research on extrinsic motivation, job satisfaction and life satisfaction in organisations. However, empirical evidence on how such factors affect employees in public organisations in developing countries is lacking. Research purpose: To examine the relationships between extrinsic motivation, job satisfaction and life satisfaction amongst employees in a public organisation. Motivation for the study: Labour strife is an endemic phenomenon in South Africa’s publ...

  9. Do we need Berlin Walls or Chinese Walls between research, public consultation and advice? New public responsibilities for life scientist

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korthals, M.J.J.A.A.

    2004-01-01

    During the coming decades, life scientists will become involved more than ever in the public and private lives of patients and consumers, as health and food sciences shift from a collective approach towards individualization, from a curative to a preventive approach, and from being driven by desires

  10. A Day in the Life (and Death) of a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Frances

    2015-01-01

    This is a narrative of an actual day in the author's working life at a large public university in the southern hemisphere. It is an enquiry into life, and death, at the university. It attempts to balance a critical and informed perspective with a lived perspective and, as a story that contributes to a developing genre of academic writing, it works…

  11. Quality of School Work Life of Public School Teachers: Cases from Turkey and Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akram, Muhammad; Ilgan, Abdurrahman; Ozu, Oyku; Shah, Ashfaque Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    The Quality of Work life (QWL) is the employees' feeling or perception of being comfortable with their work. The objective of the present study was to compare Quality of School Work Life (QSWL) of public school teachers from Turkey and Pakistan. A QSWL scale developed by Ilgan, Ata, Zepeda and Ozu-Cengiz (2014) having 30 items was used as the…

  12. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2014 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Bonnie R. Strickland. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  13. Seminar on the Professions and Public Life (Washington, DC, June 1998).

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Scott

    This seminar brought together professionals from three fields--higher education, philanthropy and journalism. Discussed at the seminar was the role that these professions play in public life. It was noted that there is increasing dismay over the public's declining trust in America's institutions. Professional reform efforts to remedy this…

  14. Living ‘private life in the public gaze’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singla, Rashmi

    and the next generation. Profound implications of these findings for psychosocial services for mixed couples and their children are lastly discussed. *Singla, R. (2015) “Intermarriage, Mixed Parenting, Promoting mental health and wellbeing: Crossover Love Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan...... the background of the theoretical framework, foregrounded by a combination of intersectionality, everyday life perspective and transnationalism. The narratives are thematically analysed through meaning condensation and coding. The analyses of the narratives show how ethnicity, gender and socio-economic belonging...... in the present study. The former is illustrated through an awareness of the discrimination processes they face in different social domains such as the labour market, the stereotypical views of family members, negative attitudes of personnel in the children’s day care institutions, curious questions, while...

  15. The Gift of Education: Public Education and Venture Philanthropy. Education, Politics and Public Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltman, Kenneth J.

    2010-01-01

    This is a cutting edge book that not only maps and criticizes venture philanthropy, but also offers a new and different way of conceptualizing public education in response to the neoliberal climate affecting all aspects of public education. This book contains the following chapters: (1) The Trojan School: How Venture Philanthropy is Corporatizing…

  16. Ever Since the World Began: A Reading & Interview with Masha Tupitsyn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masha Tupitsyn

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Writer and cultural critic Masha Tupitsyn is interviewed on her audio recording of her reading Ever Since This World Began, produced specially for this issue of continent. and adapted from her recently published Love Dog (Success and Failure out from Penny-Ante Editions.

  17. Ever Since the World Began: A Reading & Interview with Masha Tupitsyn

    OpenAIRE

    Masha Tupitsyn

    2013-01-01

    Writer and cultural critic Masha Tupitsyn is interviewed on her audio recording of her reading Ever Since This World Began, produced specially for this issue of continent. and adapted from her recently published Love Dog (Success and Failure) out from Penny-Ante Editions.

  18. A Life Dedicated to Public Service: The Lady L Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maribeth P. Bentillo

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study featured how a lady local politician rose to power as a barangay captain. It aimed to: describe her leadership orientation before she became a barangay captain, analyze the factors of her success stories in political leadership, extrapolate her values based on the problems/challenges met in the barangay, unveil her initiatives to address these problems, and interpolate her enduring vision for the future of the barangay. Through a biographical research design, with purposive sampling, a key female informant named as Lady L was chosen with the sole criteria of being a female Barangay Captain of Cebu City. Interview guides were utilized in the generation of Lady L’s biographic information about her political career.Lady L’s experiences in waiting for the perfect time and working in the private sector destined her to have a successful political career enhanced with passion and family influence. Encountering problems concerning basic education and unwanted migrants in Barangay K did not discourage her choice to run for re-election, because of her dedication to public service. Her ways to reach out and collaborate with welfare groups mitigate the problems of parental neglect and informal settlers in her barangay. The story of Lady L implies that in Cebu City, issues arise as a result of the practice of partisan politics, gender issues have minor bearing, and she envisioned a healthy and welleducated barangay, with an improved wellness and child care development.

  19. The relationship between extrinsic motivation, job satisfaction and life satisfaction amongst employees in a public organisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengedzai Mafini

    2014-04-01

    Research purpose: To examine the relationships between extrinsic motivation, job satisfaction and life satisfaction amongst employees in a public organisation. Motivation for the study: Labour strife is an endemic phenomenon in South Africa’s public sector as evidenced by the high incidences of industrial action and labour turnover. This study contributes to this subject by identifying the extrinsic factors that could be optimised with a view to enhancing job and life satisfaction amongst government employees. Research approach, design and method: The study used the quantitative research survey approach: a questionnaire was administered to 246 employees in a South African public organisation. Extrinsic motivation factors were identified using principal components analysis. Mean score ranking was used to compare the relative importance of all factors. The conceptual framework was tested using Spearman’s rank correlation analysis and linear regression analysis. Main findings: Statistically significant relationships were observed between job satisfaction and four extrinsic motivation factors: remuneration, quality of work life, supervision and teamwork. The relationship with promotion was insignificant, but a statistically significant relationship was established with life satisfaction. Practical/managerial implications: The findings may be used to implement strategies for enhancing employee performance and industrial relations within public organisations. Contribution/value-add: The study provides evidence of the interplay between extrinsic motivation, job satisfaction and life satisfaction for public servants in developing countries.

  20. Closure of a local public hospital in Korea: focusing on the organizational life cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeo YH

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Young Hyun Yeo,1 Keon-Hyung Lee,2 Hye Jeong Kim3 1Department of Public Administration, Sunmoon University, Asan, ChungNam, South Korea; 2Askew School of Public Administration and Policy, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USA; 3Department of Public Administration, Sunmoon University, Asan, ChungNam, South Korea Abstract: Just as living organisms have a creation-maintenance-extinction life cycle, organizations also have a life cycle. Private organizations will not survive if they fail to acquire necessary resources through market competition. Public organizations, however, continue to survive because the government has provided financial support in order to enhance public interest. Only a few public organizations in Korea have closed. With the introduction of new public management since the economic crisis in 1997, however, public organizations have had to compete with private organizations. Public hospitals are not free to open or close their business. They are also controlled by the government in terms of their prices, management, budgets, and operations. As they pursue public interest by fulfilling the government’s order such as providing free or lower-priced care to the vulnerable population, they tend to provide a lower quality of care and suffer a financial burden. Employing a case study analysis, this study attempts to understand the external environment that local public hospitals face. The fundamental problem of local public hospitals in Korea is the value conflict between public interest and profitability. Local public hospitals are required to pursue public interest by assignment of a public mission including building a medical safety net for low-income patients and managing nonprofitable medical facilities and emergent health care situations. At the same time, they are required to pursue profitability by achieving high-quality care through competition and the operation of an independent, self-supporting system according to

  1. A Review of Perspectives on Frameworks for Ethical Theories in Public Service Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deoram Sing

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Given the dynamic and changing interwoven and intertwined internal and external environments impacting on public service life, establishing and promoting a proper ethical foundation in public service life, has in itself emerged as a profound and daunting challenge, a worldwide phenomenon. The role of frameworks for ethical theories  –  such as teleological, deontological, virtue-based, and learning and growth, is crucial to dealing with this challenge. It is the view of the author that a keen grasp and application of the various frameworks, as well as their various components, could project their viewing and that of their components, not in isolation, but in an interconnected and intertwined manner. This could enhance the clarification of ethical and moral alternatives, as well as facilitate the spreading and diffusion of techniques for ethical reasoning and moral awareness, throughout public service life.

  2. Closure of a local public hospital in Korea: focusing on the organizational life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Young Hyun; Lee, Keon-Hyung; Kim, Hye Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Just as living organisms have a creation-maintenance-extinction life cycle, organizations also have a life cycle. Private organizations will not survive if they fail to acquire necessary resources through market competition. Public organizations, however, continue to survive because the government has provided financial support in order to enhance public interest. Only a few public organizations in Korea have closed. With the introduction of new public management since the economic crisis in 1997, however, public organizations have had to compete with private organizations. Public hospitals are not free to open or close their business. They are also controlled by the government in terms of their prices, management, budgets, and operations. As they pursue public interest by fulfilling the government's order such as providing free or lower-priced care to the vulnerable population, they tend to provide a lower quality of care and suffer a financial burden. Employing a case study analysis, this study attempts to understand the external environment that local public hospitals face. The fundamental problem of local public hospitals in Korea is the value conflict between public interest and profitability. Local public hospitals are required to pursue public interest by assignment of a public mission including building a medical safety net for low-income patients and managing nonprofitable medical facilities and emergent health care situations. At the same time, they are required to pursue profitability by achieving high-quality care through competition and the operation of an independent, self-supporting system according to private business logic. Under such paradoxical situations, a political decision may cause an unexpected result.

  3. Citizen and Resident Satisfaction with Public Services in Qatar : And the impact on quality of life

    OpenAIRE

    Benmansour, Nada Abdelkader , [بن منصور، ندى عبد القادر

    2016-01-01

    In Qatar notable differences in public service satisfaction exist across individual state services, across nationality groupings, and across demographic categories. Among all citizens and residents, however, there is an empirical link between satisfaction with state services and overall perceptions of quality of life. Policymakers should thus study efforts to collect regular and systematic data on the performance of key public institutions, including through the collection of consumer feedbac...

  4. Doing public theology in the anthropocene towards life-creating theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann-Albrecht Meylahn

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available If one presumes that we are today living in the anthropocene, how does this challenge the doing of public theology? What is the calling of a public theologian in the anthropocene? To be able to answer these questions, this article shortly described the anthropocene and then sought to unpack a possible doing of theology in a particular local context, within the time of the anthropocene, creating (poiesis a deconstructive space for possible resurrection life to emerge.

  5. Ethical implications of an accelerated work life in the Danish Public School

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke; Böwadt, Pia Rose

    Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the concept of alienation in order to revitalize the concept within a late modern context (Jaeggi 2016). In this paper, we will examine the critical potential of alienation, applying the concept within a Danish public school context in order to raise...... questions on ethical implications of an accelerated work life. The analysis is based on a qualitative survey asking why teachers are leaving the Danish public school....

  6. And so it all began: A personal tribute to the man behind the scientist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliotta, Marialuisa

    2018-01-01

    At the time I began my scientific career as a PhD student under the supervision of Claudio Spitaleri, the Trojan Horse Method was still in its infancy. Like with any new-born idea, it took time and passion and effort to plant the early seeds that would eventually develop into a now well-established method in nuclear astrophysics research. Here, I offer my own recollection of those early years as a personal homage to Claudio's unique mix of human traits that shaped our professional relationship for many years since.

  7. Choose and Tell Cards: A 4-H Cloverbud Resource for Promoting Public Speaking and Life Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stechschulte, Jill; Scheer, Scott D.

    2017-01-01

    Choose and Tell is a curriculum for 4-H Cloverbud members that introduces them to public speaking and life skill enhancement (communication and social interaction). Choose and Tell consists of activity cards analogous to a deck of cards. Activity card titles include Wash and Comb Your Hair, Plant a Seed, and Floss Your Teeth. The activities are…

  8. Public Opinion regarding Juvenile Life without Parole in Consecutive Statewide Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiak, Sheryl Pimlott; Allen, Terrence

    2011-01-01

    Abolition of the death penalty results in life without parole (LWOP) as the most severe sanction for convicted juveniles. Although internationally the use of LWOP for juveniles is rare, 2,225 youth have been sentenced to LWOP within the United States. To address the dearth of public opinion on the issue, the authors proposed questions to the…

  9. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Bernice Lott

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in…

  10. Choreographing a Life: Kimberly Bolan--Taney Webster Public Library, NY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library Journal, 2004

    2004-01-01

    When Kim Taney is not tending 80 workstations on the Webster Public Library's local area network, supervising the pages, working the reference desk, and advising libraries on how to improve teen services, she teaches ballet and choreographs her dance studio's productions. Choreography is a useful skill for someone with such a multifaceted life. As…

  11. Outlaw, hackers, victorian amateurs: diagnosing public participation in the life sciences today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kelty

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available This essay reflects on three figures that can be used to make sense of the changing nature of public participation in the life sciences today: outlaws, hackers and Victorian gentlemen. Occasioned by a symposium held at UCLA (Outlaw Biology: Public Participation in the Age of Big Bio, the essay introduces several different modes of participation (DIY Bio, Bio Art, At home clinical genetics, patient advocacy and others and makes three points: 1 that public participation is first a problem of legitimacy, not legality or safety; 2 that public participation is itself enabled by and thrives on the infrastructure of mainstream biology; and 3 that we need a new set of concepts (other than inside/outside for describing the nature of public participation in biological research and innovation today.

  12. Life satisfaction across nations: the effects of women's political status and public priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Richard; Bell, Shannon Elizabeth

    2014-11-01

    Feminist scholars suggest that improving the quality of life of individuals living in nations around the world may be more readily achieved by increasing women's political power and by reorienting public-policy priorities, than by focusing primarily on economic growth. These considerations raise the question of which characteristics of societies are associated with the quality of life of the people in those societies. Here, we address this issue empirically by statistically analyzing cross-national data. We assess the effects of gender equality in the political sphere, as well as a variety of other factors, on the subjective well-being of nations, as indicated by average self-reported levels of life satisfaction. We find that people report the highest levels of life satisfaction in nations where women have greater political representation, where military spending is low, and where health care spending is high, controlling for a variety of other factors. GDP per capita, urbanization, and natural resource exploitation are not clearly associated with life satisfaction. These findings suggest that nations may be able to improve the subjective quality of life of people without increasing material wealth or natural resource consumption by increasing gender equality in politics and changing public spending priorities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Homo Politicus meets Homo Ludens: Public participation in serious life science games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radchuk, Olga; Kerbe, Wolfgang; Schmidt, Markus

    2017-07-01

    Public participation in science and gamification of science are two strong contemporary trends, especially in the area of emerging techno-sciences. Involvement of the public in research-related activities is an integral part of public engagement with science and technologies, which can be successfully achieved through a participatory game design. Focusing on the participatory dimension of educational games, we have reviewed a number of existing participation heuristics in light of their suitability to characterize available mobile and browser science games. We analyzed 87 games with respect to their participatory and motivational elements and demonstrated that the majority of mobile games have only basic participative features. This review of the landscape of participative science games in the domain of life sciences highlights a number of major challenges present in the design of such applications. At the same time, it reveals a number of opportunities to enhance public engagement using science games.

  14. [Plato's philosophy and the bioethical debate on the end of life: intersections in public health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira-Batista, Rodrigo; Schramm, Fermin Roland

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses bioethical aspects of medical futility, focusing on some of its intersections in public health. Starting from a demarcation of finitude in the core of the philosophical and bioethical debate on the end of life, we confront the contemporary criticism regarding medical futility with the ideas of Plato (427-347 B.C.), a philosopher who proposed significant considerations on numerous features of the medicine of his time. We thus explore novel theoretic references to guide the disputes related to this essential problem, the implications of which are decisive to health and life.

  15. The effect of different public health interventions on longevity, morbidity, and years of healthy life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cai Liming

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Choosing cost-effective strategies for improving the health of the public is difficult because the relative effects of different types of interventions are not well understood. The benefits of one-shot interventions may be different from the benefits of interventions that permanently change the probability of getting sick, recovering, or dying. Here, we compare the benefits of such types of public health interventions. Methods We used multi-state life table methods to estimate the impact of five types of interventions on mortality, morbidity (years of life in fair or poor health, and years of healthy life (years in excellent, very good, or good health. Results A one-shot intervention that makes all the sick persons healthy at baseline would increase life expectancy by 3 months and increase years of healthy life by 6 months, in a cohort beginning at age 65. An equivalent amount of improvement can be obtained from an intervention that either decreases the probability of getting sick each year by 12%, increases the probability of a sick person recovering by 16%, decreases the probability that a sick person dies by 15%, or decreases the probability that a healthy person dies by 14%. Interventions aimed at keeping persons healthy increased longevity and years of healthy life, while decreasing morbidity and medical expenditures. Interventions focused on preventing mortality had a greater effect on longevity, but had higher future morbidity and medical expenditures. Results differed for older and younger cohorts and depended on the value to society of an additional year of sick life. Conclusion Interventions that promote health and prevent disease performed well, but other types of intervention were sometimes better. The value to society of interventions that increase longevity but also increase morbidity needs further research. More comprehensive screening and treatment of new Medicare enrollees might improve their health and

  16. Man creation had began since the creation of the first biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords – Man creation, Early life evolution, Montmorillonite clay, RNA oligomerization ... appearance of specific conditions when liquid hydrocarbons and water could meet each ..... Journal of Physical Chemistry B. 112, 3597–3604. Nahvi ...

  17. Publication selection and the income elasticity of the value of a statistical life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucouliagos, Hristos; Stanley, T D; Viscusi, W Kip

    2014-01-01

    Estimates of the value of a statistical life (VSL) establish the price government agencies use to value fatality risks. Transferring these valuations to other populations often utilizes the income elasticity of the VSL, which typically draw on estimates from meta-analyses. Using a data set consisting of 101 estimates of the income elasticity of VSL from 14 previously reported meta-analyses, we find that after accounting for potential publication bias the income elasticity of value of a statistical life is clearly and robustly inelastic, with a value of approximately 0.25-0.63. There is also clear evidence of the importance of controlling for levels of risk, differential publication selection bias, and the greater income sensitivity of VSL from stated preference surveys. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Dating the period when intensive anthropogenic activity began to influence the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jinxin; Gao, Chuanyu; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Shaoqing; He, Jiabao; Wang, Guoping

    2016-02-01

    Dating the start of intensive anthropogenic influence on ecosystems is important for identifying the conditions necessary for ecosystem recovery. However, few studies have focused on determining when anthropogenic influences on wetland began through sedimentary archives. To fill this critical gap in our knowledge, combustion sources and emission intensities, reconstructed via black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed in two wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain in Northeast China. 14C provided age control for the sedimentary records. By combining previous sedimentary and archaeological studies, we attempt to date the beginning of intensive anthropogenic influences on the Sanjiang Plain. Our results showed that BC deposition fluxes increased from 0.02 to 0.7 g C/m2.yr during the last 10,000 years. An upward trend was apparent during the last 500 years. Before 1200 cal yr BP, human activities were minor, such that the wetland ecosystem in the Sanjiang Plain before this period may represent the reference conditions that for the recovery of these wetlands. As the human population increased after 1200 cal yr BP, combustion sources changed and residential areas became a major source of BC and PAHs. In this way, the wetland ecosystem gradually became more heavily influenced by human activities.

  19. Dating the period when intensive anthropogenic activity began to influence the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Jinxin; Gao, Chuanyu; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Shaoqing; He, Jiabao; Wang, Guoping

    2016-01-01

    Dating the start of intensive anthropogenic influence on ecosystems is important for identifying the conditions necessary for ecosystem recovery. However, few studies have focused on determining when anthropogenic influences on wetland began through sedimentary archives. To fill this critical gap in our knowledge, combustion sources and emission intensities, reconstructed via black carbon (BC) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed in two wetlands in the Sanjiang Plain in Northeast China. 14C provided age control for the sedimentary records. By combining previous sedimentary and archaeological studies, we attempt to date the beginning of intensive anthropogenic influences on the Sanjiang Plain. Our results showed that BC deposition fluxes increased from 0.02 to 0.7 g C/m2.yr during the last 10,000 years. An upward trend was apparent during the last 500 years. Before 1200 cal yr BP, human activities were minor, such that the wetland ecosystem in the Sanjiang Plain before this period may represent the reference conditions that for the recovery of these wetlands. As the human population increased after 1200 cal yr BP, combustion sources changed and residential areas became a major source of BC and PAHs. In this way, the wetland ecosystem gradually became more heavily influenced by human activities. PMID:26907560

  20. Wired to freedom: Life science, public politics, and the case of Cochlear Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Kim Sune; Bertilsson, T Margareta

    2017-02-01

    Cochlear Implantation is now regarded as the most successful medical technology. It carries promises to provide deaf/hearing impaired individuals with a technological sense of hearing and an access to participate on a more equal level in social life. In this article, we explore the adoption of cochlear implantations among Danish users in order to shed more light on their social and political implications. We situate cochlear implantation in a framework of new life science advances, politics, and user experiences. Analytically, we draw upon the notion of social imaginary and explore the social dimension of life science through a notion of public politics adopted from the political theory of John Dewey. We show how cochlear implantation engages different social imaginaries on the collective and individual levels and we suggest that users share an imaginary of being "wired to freedom" that involves new access to social life, continuous communicative challenges, common practices, and experiences. In looking at their lives as "wired to freedom," we hope to promote a wider spectrum of civic participation in the benefit of future life science developments within and beyond the field of Cochlear Implantation. As our empirical observations are largely based in the Scandinavian countries (notably Denmark), we also provide some reflections on the character of the technology-friendly Scandinavian welfare states and the unintended consequences that may follow in the wake of rapid technology implementation of life science in society.

  1. Ethics in Public Life: Good Practitioners in a Rising Asia (Book Abstract)

    OpenAIRE

    Winston, Kenneth I.

    2015-01-01

    The topic of moral competence is generally neglected in the study of public management and policy, yet it is critical to any hope we might have for strengthening the quality of governance and professional practice. What does moral competence consist in? How is it developed and sustained? These questions are addressed in this book through close examination of selected practitioners in Asian countries making life-defining decisions in their work. The protagonists include a doctor in Singapore, ...

  2. Public sector austerity cuts in Britain and the changing discourse of work-life balance

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, Suzan; Anderson, Deirdre; Lyonette, Clare; Payne, Nicola; Wood, Stephen; ,

    2017-01-01

    The relative importance of economic and other motives for employers to provide support for work- life balance (WLB) is debated within different literatures. However, discourses of WLB can be sensitive to changing economic contexts. This article draws on in-depth interviews with senior HR professionals in British public sector organisations to examine shifting discourses of WLB in an austerity context. Three main discourses were identified: WLB practices as organisationally embedded amid finan...

  3. Public spaces - public life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Jan; Gemzøe, Lars

    A handbook on how to create human qualities in the city comparing European cities in general to what is obtained in Copenhagen. A metod of assessing urban quality and a thorough insigt into how people use urban spaces.......A handbook on how to create human qualities in the city comparing European cities in general to what is obtained in Copenhagen. A metod of assessing urban quality and a thorough insigt into how people use urban spaces....

  4. Assessing the quality of life history information in publicly available databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorson, James T; Cope, Jason M; Patrick, Wesley S

    2014-01-01

    Single-species life history parameters are central to ecological research and management, including the fields of macro-ecology, fisheries science, and ecosystem modeling. However, there has been little independent evaluation of the precision and accuracy of the life history values in global and publicly available databases. We therefore develop a novel method based on a Bayesian errors-in-variables model that compares database entries with estimates from local experts, and we illustrate this process by assessing the accuracy and precision of entries in FishBase, one of the largest and oldest life history databases. This model distinguishes biases among seven life history parameters, two types of information available in FishBase (i.e., published values and those estimated from other parameters), and two taxa (i.e., bony and cartilaginous fishes) relative to values from regional experts in the United States, while accounting for additional variance caused by sex- and region-specific life history traits. For published values in FishBase, the model identifies a small positive bias in natural mortality and negative bias in maximum age, perhaps caused by unacknowledged mortality caused by fishing. For life history values calculated by FishBase, the model identified large and inconsistent biases. The model also demonstrates greatest precision for body size parameters, decreased precision for values derived from geographically distant populations, and greatest between-sex differences in age at maturity. We recommend that our bias and precision estimates be used in future errors-in-variables models as a prior on measurement errors. This approach is broadly applicable to global databases of life history traits and, if used, will encourage further development and improvements in these databases.

  5. Priority to End of Life Treatments? Views of the Public in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, Sofie; van Exel, Job; Baker, Rachel; B F Brouwer, Werner

    2017-01-01

    Recent debates in the Netherlands on health care priority setting have focused on the relative value of gains generated by life-extending medicines for people with a terminal illness, mostly new cancer drugs. These treatments are generally expensive, provide relatively small health gains, and therefore usually do not meet common cost per QALY thresholds. Nevertheless, these drugs may be provided under the assumption that there is public support for making a special case for treatments for people with a terminal illness. This study investigated the views of the public in the Netherlands on a range of equity and efficiency considerations relevant to priority setting and examines whether there is public support for making such a special case. Using Q methodology, three viewpoints on important principles for priority setting were identified. Data were collected through ranking exercises conducted by 46 members of the general public in the Netherlands, including 11 respondents with personal experience with cancer. Viewpoint 1 emphasized that people have equal rights to healthcare and opposed priority setting on any ground. Viewpoint 2 emphasized that the care for terminal patients should at all times respect the patients' quality of life, which sometimes means refraining from invasive treatments. Viewpoint 3 had a strong focus on effective and efficient care and had no moral objection against priority setting under certain circumstances. Overall, we found little public support for the assumption that health gains in terminally ill patients are more valuable than those in other patients. This implies that the assumption that society is prepared to pay more for health gains in people who have only a short period of lifetime left does not correspond with societal preferences in the Netherlands. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Images of eyes enhance investments in a real-life public good.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien Francey

    Full Text Available A key issue in cooperation research is to determine the conditions under which individuals invest in a public good. Here, we tested whether cues of being watched increase investments in an anonymous public good situation in real life. We examined whether individuals would invest more by removing experimentally placed garbage (paper and plastic bottles from bus stop benches in Geneva in the presence of images of eyes compared to controls (images of flowers. We provided separate bins for each of both types of garbage to investigate whether individuals would deposit more items into the appropriate bin in the presence of eyes. The treatment had no effect on the likelihood that individuals present at the bus stop would remove garbage. However, those individuals that engaged in garbage clearing, and were thus likely affected by the treatment, invested more time to do so in the presence of eyes. Images of eyes had a direct effect on behaviour, rather than merely enhancing attention towards a symbolic sign requesting removal of garbage. These findings show that simple images of eyes can trigger reputational effects that significantly enhance on non-monetary investments in anonymous public goods under real life conditions. We discuss our results in the light of previous findings and suggest that human social behaviour may often be shaped by relatively simple and potentially unconscious mechanisms instead of very complex cognitive capacities.

  7. The public goods hypothesis for the evolution of life on Earth

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McInerney, James O

    2011-08-23

    Abstract It is becoming increasingly difficult to reconcile the observed extent of horizontal gene transfers with the central metaphor of a great tree uniting all evolving entities on the planet. In this manuscript we describe the Public Goods Hypothesis and show that it is appropriate in order to describe biological evolution on the planet. According to this hypothesis, nucleotide sequences (genes, promoters, exons, etc.) are simply seen as goods, passed from organism to organism through both vertical and horizontal transfer. Public goods sequences are defined by having the properties of being largely non-excludable (no organism can be effectively prevented from accessing these sequences) and non-rival (while such a sequence is being used by one organism it is also available for use by another organism). The universal nature of genetic systems ensures that such non-excludable sequences exist and non-excludability explains why we see a myriad of genes in different combinations in sequenced genomes. There are three features of the public goods hypothesis. Firstly, segments of DNA are seen as public goods, available for all organisms to integrate into their genomes. Secondly, we expect the evolution of mechanisms for DNA sharing and of defense mechanisms against DNA intrusion in genomes. Thirdly, we expect that we do not see a global tree-like pattern. Instead, we expect local tree-like patterns to emerge from the combination of a commonage of genes and vertical inheritance of genomes by cell division. Indeed, while genes are theoretically public goods, in reality, some genes are excludable, particularly, though not only, when they have variant genetic codes or behave as coalition or club goods, available for all organisms of a coalition to integrate into their genomes, and non-rival within the club. We view the Tree of Life hypothesis as a regionalized instance of the Public Goods hypothesis, just like classical mechanics and euclidean geometry are seen as

  8. The Public Goods Hypothesis for the evolution of life on Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, James O; Pisani, Davide; Bapteste, Eric; O'Connell, Mary J

    2011-08-23

    It is becoming increasingly difficult to reconcile the observed extent of horizontal gene transfers with the central metaphor of a great tree uniting all evolving entities on the planet. In this manuscript we describe the Public Goods Hypothesis and show that it is appropriate in order to describe biological evolution on the planet. According to this hypothesis, nucleotide sequences (genes, promoters, exons, etc.) are simply seen as goods, passed from organism to organism through both vertical and horizontal transfer. Public goods sequences are defined by having the properties of being largely non-excludable (no organism can be effectively prevented from accessing these sequences) and non-rival (while such a sequence is being used by one organism it is also available for use by another organism). The universal nature of genetic systems ensures that such non-excludable sequences exist and non-excludability explains why we see a myriad of genes in different combinations in sequenced genomes. There are three features of the public goods hypothesis. Firstly, segments of DNA are seen as public goods, available for all organisms to integrate into their genomes. Secondly, we expect the evolution of mechanisms for DNA sharing and of defense mechanisms against DNA intrusion in genomes. Thirdly, we expect that we do not see a global tree-like pattern. Instead, we expect local tree-like patterns to emerge from the combination of a commonage of genes and vertical inheritance of genomes by cell division. Indeed, while genes are theoretically public goods, in reality, some genes are excludable, particularly, though not only, when they have variant genetic codes or behave as coalition or club goods, available for all organisms of a coalition to integrate into their genomes, and non-rival within the club. We view the Tree of Life hypothesis as a regionalized instance of the Public Goods hypothesis, just like classical mechanics and euclidean geometry are seen as regionalized

  9. Suicide Risk, Meaning in Life, and Need for Life Respect in Adults and Elderly Among Public Hospital Outpatients in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyung-Ah; Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kim Ellis, Hyon

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the differences in suicide risk, meaning in life, and need for life respect among three age groups (young adults, the middle aged, and the elderly) of 540 public hospital outpatients in South Korea. This was a cross-sectional study. Among these 3 age groups, we observed significant differences in suicide risk, meaning in life, and need for life respect according to education level, marital status, living arrangements, type of disease, gender, and monthly income. These findings might contribute to the prevention of suicide in the future and the implementation of better community-based nursing care.

  10. City of sounds: An heuristic of sensible aspects of public life in contemporary urban landscape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Fortuna

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the sensible aspects of public life, or, in other words, Henri Lefebvre’s rhythmanalysis, has an enormous heuristic potential for the study of cities and their images. This text argues that city images are also made of sounds and that urban sounds can reveal not only urban evolution, but also the current mode of organization of the social environments of cities. However, the Social Sciences have not dealt consistently with these sounds. Making inroads into Sociology and Geography, this text defends the need to pay more attention to the urban soundscapes, in order to detect with more rigor their social-political trajectories and configurations.

  11. Life science-based neuroscience education at large Western Public Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Volkan; Carpenter, Ellen M

    2016-12-01

    The last 40 years have seen a remarkable increase in the teaching of neuroscience at the undergraduate level. From its origins as a component of anatomy or physiology departments to its current status as an independent interdisciplinary field, neuroscience has become the chosen field of study for many undergraduate students, particularly for those interested in medical school or graduate school in neuroscience or related fields. We examined how life science-based neuroscience education is offered at large public universities in the Western United States. By examining publicly available materials posted online, we found that neuroscience education may be offered as an independent program, or as a component of biological or physiological sciences at many institutions. Neuroscience programs offer a course of study involving a core series of courses and a collection of topical electives. Many programs provide the opportunity for independent research, or for laboratory-based training in neuroscience. Features of neuroscience programs at Western universities closely matched those seen at the top 25 public universities, as identified by U.S. News & World Report. While neuroscience programs were identified in many Western states, there were several states in which public universities appeared not to provide opportunities to major in neuroscience. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Work Began on Contracts for Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA has had a history of successful space flight missions that depended on radioisotope-fueled power systems. These Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) converted the heat generated from the decay of radioisotope material into useful electrical power. An RPS is most attractive in applications where photovoltaics are not optimal, such as deep-space applications where the solar flux is too low or extended applications on planets such as Mars where the day/night cycle, settling of dust, and life requirements limit the usefulness of photovoltaics. NASA s Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology (RPCT) Program is developing next-generation power-conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by the two RPS flight systems currently being developed by the Department of Energy for NASA: the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator and the Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG).

  13. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Public Investment in the Increase in Life Expectancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Nikolaevich Kabanov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the 21st century was marked by the emergence of national projects in our country, which exactly correspond to the private integral indicators used by the UN in calculating the index of human capital development since 1996. The national project “Health care” is aimed at increasing life expectancy, “Education” – expanding the population’s access to knowledge, “Doubling GDP” – raising people’s income. Attaching equal importance to each indicator, the author of the article set a task to consider the economic efficiency of budgetary funds allocated to improve the nation’s health. The author assumed a proportion as the main hypotheses about the nature of correlation between life expectancy (H and expenditures on health care (G; the calculated coefficients of correlation (Pearson, r of dependence H = f(G for all RF subjects for 2003–2013 (0.49 < r < or = 0.97 confirmed the existence of correlation. The author proposed to use the slope of the straight H = f(G to x-axis as a quantitative value, indicating the economic efficiency of the transformation of budget expenditures to the increase in life expectancy. This indicator means that the achieved increase in life expectancy (Y axis motion depending on changes in budget expenditures on health (axis motion. The proposed indicator to estimate the socio-economic effectiveness of state investments in domestic health care guarantees the most objective and clear assessment, conducted on the basis of standard methods of mathematical statistics, ensuring a high accuracy of the calculations. The rate of rise in life expectancy, depending on the volume of public investment in health care, can be used for the scientific justification, for example, of the degree of Federal budget participation in the regional programs to promote national health

  14. Attack-Related Life Disruption and Child Psychopathology in New York City Public Schoolchildren 6-Months Post-9/11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Jonathan S.; Fan, Bin; Duarte, Cristiane S.; Wu, Ping; Musa, George J.; Mandell, Donald J.; Albano, Anne Marie; Hoven, Christina W.

    2010-01-01

    In the aftermath of disasters, understanding relationships between disaster-related life disruption and children's functioning is key to informing future postdisaster intervention efforts. The present study examined attack-related life disruptions and psychopathology in a representative sample (N = 8,236) of New York City public schoolchildren…

  15. Public outreach supports the entire life-cycle of the Ketzin pilot site, Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Sonja; Kollersberger, Tanja; Möller, Fabian; Liebscher, Axel

    2017-04-01

    Interdisciplinary research at the Ketzin pilot site in Germany contributes to the understanding of the geological CO2 storage since 2004. In addition to the research activities, public outreach has been a key element through the entire life-cycle of the project including site assessment, characterization, development as well as operation (2008-2013) and post-closure. From the very beginning of the project, the research activities were accompanied by an open dialogue with the general public including locals and interested people from all over Germany and the world. The visitor centre at the Ketzin site is run by GFZ and the most important contact point to inform about first-hand experiences from the project. Up to now, about 3,000 visitors came to the Ketzin site for guided tours and the annual open house days. In addition, project status and progress are disseminated in brochures and on the public website www.co2ketzin.de. The Ketzin project is also presented in short films, e.g. on monitoring, drilling and well closure. As the post-closure and pre-transfer phase started after the cease of CO2 injection in August 2013 and the injection facility was dismantled in December 2013, we were looking for a tool to further inform about the previous operation and site infrastructure. A virtual tour was set up for the Ketzin site which is accessible via the website. This tour includes several videos which virtually guide you on site and provide information on the (former) facilities. Public acceptance is a key issue for the Ketzin project as it is for any other CO2 storage project. For example, an open communication with the local residents helped to conduct large-scale seismic campaigns without severe restrictions. The experience from the Ketzin pilot site shows that honest communication and a diverse dissemination program is able to overcome critical public perception even for highly debated technologies.

  16. Health factors in the everyday life and work of public sector employees in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlandsson, Lena-Karin; Carlsson, Gunilla; Horstmann, Vibeke; Gard, Gunvor; Holmström, Eva

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to explore aspects of everyday life in addition to established risk factors and their relationship to subjective health and well-being among public sector employees in Sweden. Gainful employment impact on employees' health and well-being, but work is only one part of everyday life and a broader perspective is essential in order to identify health-related factors. Data were obtained from employees at six Social Insurance Offices in Sweden, 250 women and 50 men. A questionnaire based on established instruments and questions specifically designed for this study was used. Relationships between five factors of everyday life, subjective health and well-being were investigated by means of multivariate logistic regression analysis. The final model revealed a limited importance of certain work-related factors. A general satisfaction with everyday activities, a stress-free environment and general control in addition to not having monotonous movements at work were found to be factors explaining 46.3% of subjective good health and well-being. A person's entire activity pattern, including work, is important, and strategies for promoting health should take into account the person's situation as a whole. The interplay between risk and health factors is not clear and further research is warranted.

  17. Course 'The radiations and the life', an alternative of information to the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumenigo G, C.; Quevedo G, J.R.; Betancourt H, L.A.; Fuente P, A. de la; Perez R, Y.; Diaz G, P.I.; Jerez V, P.F.; Contreras M, M.; Prendes A, M.; Garcia L, O.; Cardenas, J.; Zerquera J, T.; Benitez, J.C.; Oliva, J.P.; Alert, J.; Barcelo, C.; Pedroso, L.E.; Diaz, A.; Perez, S.; Morin, J.

    2006-01-01

    The public of the XXI century is avid one to obtain information on the advances of the science and the technique and their impact in the daily life, for it has it a powerful arsenal of means that constantly transmit all that being of interest can for the big masses. However the technical complexity of the information that is transmitted and the sensationalist intentions with which they are managed it can in many cases to distort their scientific rigor and to misinform to the public in question. The Nuclear energy from their emergence, and for the disastrous consequences of their initial use with warlike ends, it has been target of those more diverse manipulations and misrepresentations in a such way that it left generating a strong oppositor current together with their development. It is for it that the International Atomic Energy Agency recommends to all the countries members that together with the development of the applications of the nuclear energy one works in the information to the public on those risks and benefits of the use of the same one. This recommendation this in full agreement with the intentions of Cuba of elevating the population's integral general culture systematically and for it the authors of this work designed a course that with the Title of 'The Radiations and the Life', it was proposed at the corresponding levels to be transmitted by National Television in the mark of the program 'University for All'. The present work exposes the experience of the authors in the realization of this course, the same one represented a challenge for the specialists of very high qualification that were responsible for the elaboration of a pamphlet or tabloid with the contents of the course and that they imparted the conferences in the popular television program. An important and novel element of this course was the dialogue established with the public through the Electronic mail: radiacionesyvida at cnsn.cu that stayed flowingly during the time in the one which

  18. Public health dental hygiene: an option for improved quality of care and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmsted, Jodi L; Rublee, Nancy; Zurkawski, Emily; Kleber, Laura

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this research was to document quality of life (QoL) and quality of care (QoC) measures for families receiving care from dental hygienists within public health departments, and to consider if oral health for families with economic disparities and cultural differences was improved. A descriptive research study using a retrospective record review was conducted considering QoC. A review of state epid "Do preventive oral health programs based in local health departments provide quality care services, thus impacting QoL for underserved populations?" A dental hygienist working in public health made significant contributions to improving access to care and QoL in a rural, socioeconomically disadvantaged community. A total of 2,364 children received education, 1,745 received oral screenings and 1,511 received dental sealants. Of these, 804 children with caries were referred, with 463 receiving restorations and follow-up care. QoL metrics basis assessed Health Outcomes & Health Determinants. Initial QoL data was ranked in the bottom half of the state, while 70% of original determinant data was also ranked in the bottom half of reported metrics. Dental hygienists in public health settings can positively affect patients offering preventive care outreach services. Education and sealant placement were considered effective as measured by access, delivery and, when required, referral for restorative care. Improvement in QoL for individuals was noted through improved health outcomes and determinant metrics.

  19. Teaching authorship and publication practices in the biomedical and life sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macrina, Francis L

    2011-06-01

    Examination of a limited number of publisher's Instructions for Authors, guidelines from two scientific societies, and the widely accepted policy document of the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) provided useful information on authorship practices. Three of five journals examined (Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) publish papers across a variety of disciplines. One is broadly focused on topics in medical research (New England Journal of Medicine) and one publishes research reports in a single discipline (Journal of Bacteriology). Similar elements of publication policy and accepted practices were found across the policies of these journals articulated in their Instructions for Authors. A number of these same elements were found in the professional society guidelines of the Society for Neuroscience and the American Chemical Society, as well as the ICMJE Uniform Requirements for Manuscripts Submitted to Biomedical Journals. Taken together, these sources provide the basis for articulating best practices in authorship in scientific research. Emerging from this material is a definition of authorship, as well as policy statements on duplicative publication, conflict of interest disclosure, electronic access, data sharing, digital image integrity, and research requiring subjects' protection, including prior registration of clinical trials. These common elements provide a foundation for teaching about scientific authorship and publication practices across biomedical and life sciences disciplines.

  20. The quality of quality of life publications in the spinal literature: are we getting any better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, John; Lenehan, Brian; Fisher, Charles

    2009-11-01

    Criteria for methodological quality have been widely accepted in many fields of surgical practice. These criteria include those of Velanovich and Gill and Feinstein. No such analysis of the spine surgery literature has ever been reported. This study is a systematic review of the quality of life (QOL) publications to determine if the recent interest in QOL measurements following spinal surgery has been accompanied by an improvement in the quality of the papers published. The archives of the journals Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine, Spine, Journal of Spinal Disorders & Techniques, European Spine Journal, and The Spine Journal, for the years 2000-2004 inclusive, were examined, and all publications reporting QOL outcomes were analyzed. Each paper was scored according to the criteria of Velanovich and Gill and Feinstein, and the methodological quality of these manuscripts-and any time-dependent changes-were determined. During the study period, the total number of articles published increased by 36%, while the number of QOL articles increased by 102%. According to the criteria of Velanovich, there was a statistically significant improvement in the quality of the publications over the study period (p = 0.0394). In 2000, only 27% of outcome measures were disease specific, 77% were valid, and 77% were appropriate for the study design. In 2004, 43% were disease specific, 88% were valid, and 89% were appropriate. In 2000, 53% of studies used appropriate statistical analysis compared with 100 and 96% for 2003 and 2004, respectively. There was no demonstrable improvement in the fulfillment of the more rigorous Gill and Feinstein criteria for any of the 5 journals over the period of the study. The authors' study illustrates a moderate improvement in the quality of these publications over the study period but much methodological improvement is required.

  1. Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest: Beatrice A. Wright.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in 4 areas of psychology. The 2016 recipient of Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in Psychology in the Public Interest is Beatrice A. Wright. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are: Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. The LIFE Project “Monitoring of insects with public participation” (MIPP: aims, methods and conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maria Carpaneto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Life Project “Monitoring of insects with public participation” (LIFE11 NAT/IT/000252 had as the main objective to develop and test methods for the monitoring of five beetle species listed in the Annexes of the Habitats Directive (92/43/EEC: Osmoderma eremita (hermit beetle, Scarabaeidae, Lucanus cervus (European stag beetle, Lucanidae, Cerambyx cerdo (great capricorn beetle, Cerambycidae, Rosalia alpina (rosalia longicorn, Cerambycidae and Morimus asper/funereus (morimus longicorn, Cerambycidae. The data gathered represent an important contribution to the monitoring of these target species in Italy. The methods developed for monitoring of the target species are intended for use by the local management authorities and staff of protected areas. These developed methods are the result of extensive fieldwork and ensure scientific validity, ease of execution and limited labour costs. The detailed description of methods and the results for each species are published in separate articles of this special issue of Nature Conservation. A second objective of the project was to gather faunistic data with a Citizen Science approach, using the web and a mobile application software (app specifically built for mobile devices. The validation of the records collected by the citizens was carried out by experts, based on photographs, which were obligatory for all records. Dissemination activities represented the principal way to contact and engage citizens for the data collection and also offered the possibility of providing information on topics such as Natura 2000, the Habitats Directive, the role of monitoring in nature conservation, the importance of forest ecosystems and the ecological role of the saproxylic insects. An innovative method tested during the project was the training of a dog for searching and monitoring the elusive hermit beetle; the trained dog also added a “curiosity” factor to attract public attention towards this rare insect and

  3. Incidence of Data Duplications in a Randomly Selected Pool of Life Science Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oksvold, Morten P

    2016-04-01

    Since the solution to many public health problems depends on research, it is critical for the progress and well-being for the patients that we can trust the scientific literature. Misconduct and poor laboratory practice in science threatens the scientific progress, leads to loss of productivity and increased healthcare costs, and endangers lives of patients. Data duplication may represent one of challenges related to these problems. In order to estimate the frequency of data duplication in life science literature, a systematic screen through 120 original scientific articles published in three different cancer related journals [journal impact factor (IF) 20] was completed. The study revealed a surprisingly high proportion of articles containing data duplication. For the IF 20 journals, 25% of the articles were found to contain data duplications. The IF 5-10 journal showed a comparable proportion (22.5%). The proportion of articles containing duplicated data was comparable between the three journals and no significant correlation to journal IF was found. The editorial offices representing the journals included in this study and the individual authors of the detected articles were contacted to clarify the individual cases. The editorial offices did not reply and only 1 out of 29 cases were apparently clarified by the authors, although no supporting data was supplied. This study questions the reliability of life science literature, it illustrates that data duplications are widespread and independent of journal impact factor and call for a reform of the current peer review and retraction process of scientific publishing.

  4. Health-related quality of life of employees of a public university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Olga Quintana Zavala

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Health-related quality of life is the level of perception that people having of their subjective well-being, considering their health, with measures of physical and mental well-being. Aim: to determine the level of health-related quality of life of employees of a public university of Hermosillo, Mexico. Methodology: quantitative study, transversal and comparative. The sample consisted of 62 participants. Data collection instrument: Questionnaire of biosociodemographic variables and work, and SF 36. The IBM SPSS version 22 was used for the statistical analysis. The U Mann-Whitney test was used to compare two groups, and Spearman correlation was utilized to explore correlations between variables. The significance level admitted was 0.05. We had the support of the University Ethics Committee and an informed consent was elaborated. Results: 51.6% were men, mean age and age were 45.5 (SD = 10.3 and 17.2 (SD = 9.4 respectively, 40.3% perform administrative activities, 75.8% consumed tobacco. The dimension physical role was the best evaluated with an average of 96.8 (SD = 17.8 and general health was the one that had the lowest average with 73.4 (SD = 14.2, tobacco consumption and physical role are related (p = 0.0210, physical function (p = 0.0261 and social function (p = 0.0466 showed differences by sex. Conclusion: most of the dimensions of the health-related quality of life of employees are within the parameters of normality. However, the need for an intervention from the employees’ health services is evident, here the health team may contribute to increasing aspects of occupational health.

  5. Online public reactions to fMRI communication with patients with disorders of consciousness: Quality of life, end-of-life decision making, and concerns with misdiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Jennifer A; Sun, Jeffrey A; Racine, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the news media have reported on the discovery of covert awareness and the establishment of limited communication using a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neuroimaging technique with several brain-injured patients thought to have been in a vegetative state. This discovery has raised many ethical, legal, and social questions related to quality of life, end-of-life decision making, diagnostic and prognostic accuracy in disorders of consciousness, resource allocation, and other issues. This project inquires into the public responses to these discoveries. We conducted a thematic analysis of online comments (n = 779) posted in response to 15 news articles and blog posts regarding the case of a Canadian patient diagnosed for 12 years as in a vegetative state, but who was reported in 2012 as having been able to communicate via fMRI. The online comments were coded using an iteratively refined codebook structured around 14 main themes. Among the most frequent public reactions revealed in the online comments were discussions of the quality of life of patients with disorders of consciousness, whether life-sustaining treatment should be withdrawn (and whether the fMRI communication technique should be used to ask patients about this), and misgivings about the accuracy of diagnosis in disorders of consciousness and brain death. These public perspectives are relevant to the obligations of clinicians, lawyers, and public policymakers to patients, families, and the public. Future work should consider how best to alleviate families' concerns as this type of research shakes their faith in diagnostic accuracy, to clarify the legal rules relating to advance directives in this context, and to address the manner in which public messaging might help to alleviate any indirect impact on confidence in the organ donation system.

  6. Stoicism in Luísa Sigea’s thinking: the dichotomy between public life and private life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tereza Carrasco Botto Gonçalves dos Santos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to examine Sigea’s position to the question of life at court, the central topic of the Colloquium (Dialogue between two young women on courtly and private life, published in 1552 in Lisbon. The development of the text starts with the explanation of some aspects such as the princes’ mirror (specula principum and the palace circle of the Princess D. Maria, during the Portuguese Renaissance Humanism. Further on the text, it is analyzed how Sigea interprets the training needed to achieve happy life (beatauita.

  7. Tomorrow Began Yesterday

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Lidin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of the sixtiers was prepared by the previous historical period. The period after the World War II comprises a fundamental change of the world order – from a multipolar world to a confrontation of two superpowers and two ideological systems, and, at the same time, formation of a complex of international organizations on a global scale. In this context, the Soviet architecture made a sharp turn from Stalin’s Empire style to an extreme ascetism – the continuation of constructivism of the early XXth century. The Irkutsk architectural school, unlike the main flow of the 1960s, developed the style of Neo-Brutalism. The article draws parallels between Neo-Brutalism of the Irkutsk school and “a severe style” of the Soviet pictorial art of the same period.

  8. How nonimaging optics began

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Roland

    2016-09-01

    Classical optics was traditionally the mapping of point sources by lenses, mirrors and occasionally holograms , i.e. making an image. The subject has had many famous scientists associated with it; Fermat, Huygens, Descartes, Hamilton just to name a few. By the mid 20th Century it was a well-developed field as exemplified by such luminaries as Walter T. Welford, Emil Wolf and many others. The theory of aberrations which addresses the imperfections of the mapping codified the state of the art. Then arose the need to collect energy, not just images. To the author's knowledge it can be traced back to WWII Germany with collection of infra-red radiation (the work by D. E. Williamson, was not published until 1952). The radiation collector, a simple right-circular cone, was a harbinger of things to come.

  9. Perceived external prestige as a mediator between quality of work life and organisational commitment of public sector employees in Ghana

    OpenAIRE

    Ojedokun, Oluyinka; Idemudia, Erhabor S.; Desouza, Mercy

    2015-01-01

    Orientation: Research efforts have been directed at understanding the relationship between quality of work life and organisational commitment, but these studies have not elucidated the mediating role of perceived external prestige in this relationship. Research purpose: This research seeks to close a research gap by determining the role of perceived external prestige in the relationship between quality of work life and organisational commitment amongst public sector employees in Ghana. ...

  10. Perceived external prestige as a mediator between quality of work life and organisational commitment of public sector employees in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluyinka Ojedokun

    2015-04-01

    Research purpose: This research seeks to close a research gap by determining the role of perceived external prestige in the relationship between quality of work life and organisational commitment amongst public sector employees in Ghana. Research approach, design and method: Theoretically guided hypotheses and models were formulated and tested with hierarchical multiple regression statistics using data from a sample of 137 employees from two public sector organisations in Ghana. Main findings: The results support the hypothesis that quality of work life is positively related to both perceived external prestige and organisational commitment. Also, perceived external prestige was found to predict organisational commitment and partially mediate the relationship between quality of work life and organisational commitment. Practical/managerial implications: The findings imply that one sure way to enhance organisational commitment of employees is by improving their quality of work life and boosting their perceptions of external prestige of the organisation. These results will be of particular interest to policymakers, public organisations and stakeholders interested in increasing organisational commitment of their employees. Contribution/value-add: The findings extend previous research by establishing the mediating role of perceived external prestige in the relationship between quality of work life and organisational commitment. If managers of organisations wish to improve organisational commitment, it is wise to institutionalise an organisational culture that promotes good quality of work life and boost the external prestige of the organisation in the employees’ mind.

  11. Design and Implementation of a New Run-time Life-cycle for Interactive Public Display Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Jorge C. S.; Perpétua, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Public display systems are becoming increasingly complex. They are moving from passive closed systems to open interactive systems that are able to accommodate applications from several independent sources. This shift needs to be accompanied by a more flexible and powerful application management. In this paper, we propose a run-time life-cycle model for interactive public display applications that addresses several shortcomings of current display systems. Our mo...

  12. Quality of life in children and adolescents: a European public health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravens-Sieberer, U; Gosch, A; Abel, T; Auquier, P; Bellach, B M; Bruil, J; Dür, W; Power, M; Rajmil, L

    2001-01-01

    The measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is increasingly important as a means of monitoring population health status over time, of detecting sub-groups within the general population with poor HRQOL, and of assessing the impact of public health interventions within a given population. At present, no standardised instrument exists which can be applied with equal relevance in pediatric populations in different European populations. The collaborative European KIDSCREEN project aims to develop a standardised screening instrument for children's quality of life which will be used in representative national and European health surveys. Participants of the project are centres from Austria, France, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, Switzerland, and United Kingdom. By including the instrument in health services research and health reporting, it also aims at identifying children at risk in terms of their subjective health, thereby allowing the possibility of early intervention. Instrument development will be based on constructing a psychometrically sound HRQOL instrument taking into account the existing state of the art. Development will centre on literature searches, expert consultation (Delphi Methods) and focus groups with children and adolescents (8-17 years). According to international guidelines, items will be translated into the languages of the seven participating countries for a pilot test with 2,100 children and their parents in Europe. The final instrument will be used in representative mail and telephone surveys of HRQOL in 1,800 children and their parents per country (total n = 25,200) and normative data will be produced. The potential for implementing the measurement tool in health services and health reporting will also be evaluated in several different research and public health settings. The final analysis will involve national and cross cultural-analysis of the instrument. The international, collaborative nature of the KIDSCREEN project means it

  13. Teaching Basic Life Support to Students of Public and Private High Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Gonçalves Fernandes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background:Despite being recommended as a compulsory part of the school curriculum, the teaching of basic life support (BLS has yet to be implemented in high schools in most countries.Objectives:To compare prior knowledge and degree of immediate and delayed learning between students of one public and one private high school after these students received BLS training.Methods:Thirty students from each school initially answered a questionnaire on cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR and use of the automated external defibrillator (AED. They then received theoretical-practical BLS training, after which they were given two theory assessments: one immediately after the course and the other six months later.Results:The overall success rates in the prior, immediate, and delayed assessments were significantly different between groups, with better performance shown overall by private school students than by public school students: 42% ± 14% vs. 30.2% ± 12.2%, p = 0.001; 86% ± 7.8% vs. 62.4% ± 19.6%, p < 0.001; and 65% ± 12.4% vs. 45.6% ± 16%, p < 0.001, respectively. The total odds ratio of the questions showed that the private school students performed the best on all three assessments, respectively: 1.66 (CI95% 1.26-2.18, p < 0.001; 3.56 (CI95% 2.57-4.93, p < 0.001; and 2.21 (CI95% 1.69-2.89, p < 0.001.Conclusions:Before training, most students had insufficient knowledge about CPR and AED; after BLS training a significant immediate and delayed improvement in learning was observed in students, especially in private school students.

  14. Health related quality of life in pregeriatric patients with chronic diseases at urban, public supported clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nguyen Kim M

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding health-related quality of life (HRQOL leads to more effective and focused healthcare. America's growing health disparities makes it is increasingly necessary to understand the HRQOL of pregeriatric individuals who are now 55–64 years old, i.e. before they are eligible for federally mandated health care at age 65. Our study measured the self-perceived HRQOL of pregeriatric, poor patients with multiple chronic diseases treated at 2 public clinics. Methods Consecutive patients aged 55–64 years, many with multiple chronic diseases, responded in an interview to the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF–36 as a general measure of HRQOL during a regular visit to one of two university-staffed urban public clinics. Results The perceived physical and mental functioning of 316 pregeriatric patients was tabulated from SF–36 scores to yield their HRQOL. Their scores were statistically significantly lower than those of the general US pregeriatric population and lower than averages for US patients with multiple chronic diseases. All eight subscale scores of SF–36 were 16% to 36% lower compared with the averages of the general US pregeriatric population. Further, as the number of chronic diseases increased, the lower was the HRQOL. Lower physical and mental scores were associated with a lower income, unemployment, and higher numbers of multiple chronic diseases. Conclusion Chronic diseases have a powerful negative impact on perceived mental and physical functioning in pregeriatric patients. HRQOL information can assist health care providers to gain a more complete picture of their pregeriatric patients' health.

  15. Health Care Public Sector Share and the U.S. Life Expectancy Lag: A Country-level Longitudinal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Megan M

    2018-04-01

    Growing research on the political economy of health has begun to emphasize sociopolitical influences on cross-national differences in population health above and beyond economic growth. While this research investigates the impact of overall public health spending as a share of GDP ("health care effort"), it has for the most part overlooked the distribution of health care spending across the public and private spheres ("public sector share"). I evaluate the relative contributions of health care effort, public sector share, and GDP to the large and growing disadvantage in U.S. life expectancy at birth relative to peer nations. I do so using fixed effects models with data from 16 wealthy democratic nations between 1960 and 2010. Results indicate that public sector share has a beneficial effect on longevity net of the effect of health care effort and that this effect is nonlinear, decreasing in magnitude as levels rise. Moreover, public sector share is a more powerful predictor of life expectancy at birth than GDP per capita. This study contributes to discussions around the political economy of health, the growth consensus, and the American lag in life expectancy. Policy implications vis-à-vis the U.S. Affordable Care Act are discussed.

  16. Bioethics and Public Health Collaborate to Reveal Impacts of Climate Change on Caribbean Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, C.; Akpinar-Elci, M.

    2011-12-01

    Interdisciplinary dialog and collaboration aimed at protecting health against climate change is impeded by the small number of scientists and health professionals skilled in interdisciplinary work, and by the view held by many that "climate change won't affect me personally". These challenges may be surmounted by discussions about the lived experience of climate change and how this threatens things we value. Dialog between bioethics and public health generated an innovative collaboration using the focus group method. The main limitation of focus groups is the small number of participants however the data obtained is generalizable to wider groups and is used regularly in business to enhance marketing strategies. Caribbean academicians from varied disciplines discussed how climate change affects them and life in the Caribbean. Caribbean states are particularly vulnerable to climate change because their large coastal areas are directly exposed to rising sea levels and their development relies heavily on foreign aid. The Caribbean comprises about half of the 39 members of the Association of Small Island States (AOSIS), and small island states comprise about 5% of global population [1]. Participants described socioeconomic and environmental changes in the Caribbean that they attribute to climate change. These include extreme weather, unusual rain and drought, drying rivers, beach erosion, declining fish catches, and others. The session exposed impacts on individuals, businesses, agriculture, and disaster preparedness. This data helps to reframe climate change as a personal reality rather than a vague future concern. It is relevant to the design, implementation, and sustainability of climate policies in the Caribbean and perhaps other small island states. The method and interdisciplinary approach can be used in other settings to elicit dialog about experiences and values across sectors, and to inform policies. Those who have experienced extreme weather are more concerned

  17. Alice—A Fight for Life (1982 and the Public Perception of the Occupational Risks of Asbestos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Menéndez Navarro

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this contribution is to explore the historical influence of documentary films, in particular within the sphere of the public perception of the risks posed by asbestos. For this purpose, we study the British documentary Alice—A Fight for Life, the context in which it was produced, and the impact that its screening in 1982 had on British public opinion. The drama of the testimonies of some of the victims shown in the film and the visual treatment they received were determinant in heightening public awareness of asbestos risks. We also explore the effects of the documentary when it was shown in Spain in 1984.

  18. A Life Course Model of Self-Reported Violence Exposure and Ill-health with A Public Health Problem Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olofsson, Niclas

    2014-01-01

    Violence has probably always been part of the human experience. Its impact can be seen, in various forms, in all parts of the world. In 1996, WHO:s Forty-Ninth World Health Assembly adopted a resolution, declaring violence a major and growing public health problem around the world. Public health work centers around health promotion and disease prevention activities in the population and public health is an expression of the health status of the population taking into account both the level and the distribution of health. Exposure to violence can have many aspects, differing throughout the life course - deprivation of autonomy, financial exploitation, psychological and physical neglect or abuse - but all types share common characteristics: the use of destructive force to control others by depriving them of safety, freedom, health and, in too many instances, life; the epidemic proportions of the problem, particularly among vulnerable groups; a devastating impact on individuals, families, neighborhoods, communities, and society. There is considerable evidence that stressful early life events influence a variety of physical and/or psychological health problems later in life. Childhood adversity has been linked to elevated rates of morbidity and mortality from number of chronic diseases. A model outlining potential biobehavioural pathways is put forward that may be a potential explanation of how exposure to violence among both men and women work as an important risk factor for ill health and should receive greater attention in public health work.

  19. Analyzing Gender in Public Places: Rethinking Goffman's Vision of Everyday Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Carol Brooks

    1989-01-01

    Discusses Erving Goffman's work on public places with regard to how that work represents women's experience in public places. Reviews strategies that women devise to manage appearances in public places in order to illustrate how gender-conscious appraisal is necessary to appreciate the character of public places. (Author/LS)

  20. Publications of the planetary biology program for 1975: A special bibliography. [on NASA programs and research projects on extraterrestrial life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, K. A. (Compiler); Young, R. S. (Compiler)

    1976-01-01

    The Planetary Biology Program of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is the first and only integrated program to methodically investigate the planetary events which may have been responsible for, or related to, the origin, evolution, and distribution of life in the universe. Research supported by this program is divided into the seven areas listed below: (1) chemical evolution, (2) organic geochemistry, (3) life detection, (4) biological adaptation, (5) bioinstrumentation, (6) planetary environments, and (7) origin of life. The arrangement of references in this bibliography follows the division of research described above. Articles are listed alphabetically by author under the research area with which they are most closely related. Only those publications which resulted from research supported by the Planetary Biology Program and which bear a 1975 publication date have been included. Abstracts and theses are not included because of the preliminary and abbreviated nature of the former and the frequent difficulty of obtaining the latter.

  1. Promoting Oral Health and Quality of Life of Older People - The Need for Public Health Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Poul Erik; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2018-01-01

    This report intends to review the global burden of oral disease among older people and to examine their oral health needs. The evidence on the inter-relationships between poor oral health conditions of older people, general health and quality of life is highlighted. Finally, WHO strategies to improve oral health of older people are reviewed. The information relevant to this review was extracted from the WHO Global Oral Health Data Bank, the PubMed database, and the Cochrane Library. Surveys were carried out according to the criteria recommended by the WHO epidemiological manual Oral Health Surveys - Basic Methods. In addition, global data were sought on coverage of oral health care among older people. Finally, WHO policy documents on health care for aged people were gathered through the WHO website. Across the globe, many older people suffer from oral pain or discomfort. Poor oral health during old age is mostly manifest in high caries experience, high prevalence rates of advanced periodontal disease, severe tooth loss, dry mouth, and oral pre-cancer/cancer. In both developing and developed countries, the burden of disease is particularly high among underprivileged and disadvantaged older people. In numerous countries, high proportions of the aged population are not covered by primary oral health care; this is mainly the case in low and middle income countries due to a critical shortage of dentists. In 2015, the WHO published the World Report on Ageing and Health, which outlines a framework for action to foster healthy ageing. The policies are highly relevant to the improvement of oral health. Transformation of oral health systems away from a disease-based curative model and towards disease prevention, as well as the provision of older-person-centred integrated care are required. Moreover, wide-ranging public health action on ageing is urgently needed.

  2. Psychosocial stress based on public speech in humans: is there a real life/laboratory setting cross-adaptation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezova, D; Hlavacova, N; Dicko, I; Solarikova, P; Brezina, I

    2016-07-01

    Repeated or chronic exposure to stressors is associated with changes in neuroendocrine responses depending on the type, intensity, number and frequency of stress exposure as well as previous stress experience. The aim of the study was to test the hypothesis that salivary cortisol and cardiovascular responses to real-life psychosocial stressors related to public performance can cross-adapt with responses to psychosocial stress induced by public speech under laboratory setting. The sample consisted of 22 healthy male volunteers, which were either actors, more precisely students of dramatic arts or non-actors, students of other fields. The stress task consisted of 15 min anticipatory preparation phase and 15 min of public speech on an emotionally charged topic. The actors, who were accustomed to public speaking, responded with a rise in salivary cortisol as well as blood pressure to laboratory public speech. The values of salivary cortisol, systolic blood pressure and state anxiety were lower in actors compared to non-actors. Unlike non-actors, subjects with experience in public speaking did not show stress-induced rise in the heart rate. Evaluation of personality traits revealed that actors scored significantly higher in extraversion than the subjects in the non-actor group. In conclusion, neuroendocrine responses to real-life stressors in actors can partially cross-adapt with responses to psychosocial stress under laboratory setting. The most evident adaptation was at the level of heart rate responses. The public speech tasks may be of help in evaluation of the ability to cope with stress in real life in artists by simple laboratory testing.

  3. Life on the Bleeding Edge: Philosophy, Practice, and Public Relations in Charter Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, George

    2004-01-01

    Charter schools represent one of the most intriguing developments within public education in the past decade. Although they vary widely among themselves and differ from regular public schools in some regards, they also show many similarities. Consequently, many of the public relations strategies that work for other schools should also be useful…

  4. Publicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Joan

    Publicity for preschool cooperatives is described. Publicity helps produce financial support for preschool cooperatives. It may take the form of posters, brochures, newsletters, open house, newspaper coverage, and radio and television. Word of mouth and general good will in the community are the best avenues of publicity that a cooperative nursery…

  5. Political life and half-life: the future formulation of nuclear waste public policy in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, David

    2006-11-01

    The United States continues to need forward-thinking and revised public policy to assure safe nuclear waste disposal. Both the high- and low-level disposal plans enacted by Congress in the 1980's have been frustrated by practical and political interventions. In the interim, ad hoc solutions and temporary fixes have emerged as de facto policy. Future statutory, regulatory, and administrative guidance will likely be less bold, more narrowly focused, and adopted at lower levels of government, more informally, in contrast to the top-down, statutory policies of the 1980's.

  6. Quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff at public healthcare institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala, María Olga Quintana; Klinj, Tatiana Paravic; Carrillo, Katia Lorena Saenz

    2016-08-08

    to determine the quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff at public institutions in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. quantitative, correlational, cross-sectional, and comparative. We used a probabilistic sample of 345 nurses with data collected in 2013 using an instrument created by the authors to gather bio-socio-demographic data and the CVT-GOHISALO instrument with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.95. SPSS 15 was used to analyze the data. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test was used to calculate the normality of the data; the medians were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test and Kruskal-Wallis test with the significance level set at 0.05. the average overall quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff was 207.31 (DE 41.74), indicating a moderate level. The quality of life in the workplace was higher for people with permanent contracts (p=0.007) who did not engage in other remunerative activities (p=0.046). Differences in the quality of life in the workplace were observed depending on the institution where the subjects worked (p=0.001). the nursing staff perceives itself as having a moderate-level quality of life in the workplace. This level was determined in the statistical analysis based on the type of contract, whether the person performed other remunerated activities, and the institution where the person worked. determinar el nivel de calidad de vida en el trabajo del personal de enfermería de instituciones públicas en Hermosillo, Sonora, México. cuantitativo, correlacional, transversal y comparativo. Muestreo probabilístico, de 345 enfermeras, datos recolectados en 2013, a través de instrumentos que recogen datos biososiodemográficos; creado por las autoras y CVT -GOHISALO con Alpha de Cronbach de 0.95. Para el análisis de datos se usó SPSS 15, para conocer la normalidad de los datos se utilizó Kolmogorov- Smirnov, se compararon medianas con U de Mann Whitney y Kruskal-Wallis, nivel de significancia admitido 0.05. promedio de calidad de vida en el trabajo

  7. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeny, Angela M

    2014-07-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association's (APA's) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The present paper analyzes the subject of psychologists taking a public position on controversial public issues. Although the APA Ethics Code does not restrict how psychologists conduct themselves during their personal time, taking a public stance on a controversial issue could potentially strain professional relationships and inadvertently reflect negatively on the profession. The present paper examines ethical issues that a) should be taken into account before psychologists take a public position on a controversial issue, and b) are in conflict with APA's Ethics Code or current research.

  8. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeny, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association’s (APA’s) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The present paper analyzes the subject of psychologists taking a public position on controversial public issues. Although the APA Ethics Code does not restrict how psychologists conduct themselves during their personal time, taking a public stance on a controversial issue could potentially strain professional relationships and inadvertently reflect negatively on the profession. The present paper examines ethical issues that a) should be taken into account before psychologists take a public position on a controversial issue, and b) are in conflict with APA’s Ethics Code or current research. PMID:25342876

  9. The Perceived Quality of Life among School District Superintendents in Illinois Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, Debra J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perception of quality of life among Illinois male and female superintendents, and to determine demographic differences. Frisch's Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) was used, which measured perceived levels of importance, satisfaction and weighted satisfaction (importance and satisfaction) in sixteen…

  10. Trade union activity, cultural, public and political life of Krasnoyarsk Polytechnic Institute in the second half of 1950s–1980

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrik Valeriy V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Basing on rich documentary, the article studies the activity of the trade union organization in Krasnoyarsk Polytechnic Institute and the impact the trade union had on the cultural, public and political life of the Institute in the second half of the 1950s-1980s. The activity is stated to be held in different forms and areas: amateur arts, propaganda, wall-newspaper and house magazine, vigilant groups, University of Culture, student club, lecturing agitation group, student construction brigades, department, groups and hostels competitions. The authors come to the conclusion that involving students and faculty members into cultural, public and political life added greatly to fostering the future engineers as it took them less time to adapt to the team-spirited workforce after graduating from the higher educational establishment. The article is intended for the people interested in history of higher education in Siberia and Russia.

  11. Informed decision making about predictive DNA tests: arguments for more public visibility of personal deliberations about the good life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boenink, Marianne; van der Burg, Simone

    2010-05-01

    Since its advent, predictive DNA testing has been perceived as a technology that may have considerable impact on the quality of people's life. The decision whether or not to use this technology is up to the individual client. However, to enable well considered decision making both the negative as well as the positive freedom of the individual should be supported. In this paper, we argue that current professional and public discourse on predictive DNA-testing is lacking when it comes to supporting positive freedom, because it is usually framed in terms of risk and risk management. We show how this 'risk discourse' steers thinking on the good life in a particular way. We go on to argue that empirical research into the actual deliberation and decision making processes of individuals and families may be used to enrich the environment of personal deliberation in three ways: (1) it points at a richer set of values that deliberators can take into account, (2) it acknowledges the shared nature of genes, and (3) it shows how one might frame decisions in a non-binary way. We argue that the public sharing and discussing of stories about personal deliberations offers valuable input for others who face similar choices: it fosters their positive freedom to shape their view of the good life in relation to DNA-diagnostics. We conclude by offering some suggestions as to how to realize such public sharing of personal stories.

  12. Rock Art and Radiance: Archaeology in the Public Domain as Life-Long Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouzman, Sven

    The re-invigoration of storytelling in academic and public spheres allows rock art to offer opportunities to various publics, of which archaeologists are part. But how exactly this process of archaeology as lifelong learning is to proceed is not always clear, particularly in the United States. Until the last half decade of the twentieth century,…

  13. Hipocrates (2014. Real life of a resident at a public hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilio PINTOR HOLGUIN

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available It describes Benjamin´s first weeks of work as a new resident of Internal Medicine in a public hospital in Paris. Next to him, an experienced Algerian physician; Abdel, performs his practices of validation. Main problems with these two doctors are described: doubts, decision making, camaraderie, bioethical and liability problems as well as problems derived from public health system budgets. All mixed with short ironic and comic scenes that sometimes reach surrealism.

  14. Life Cycle Assessment of Road Vehicles for Private and Public Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Sundvor, Christian Fredric

    2013-01-01

    Ever increasing prosperity and global civilization heralds an increasing demand for communication and transport. The transport sector alone accounts for one quarter of global human greenhouse gas emissions. In the transport sector, road transport alone is responsible for 70%. To help mitigate these emissions, people are advised to take advantage of public transportation systems, on the argument that public transit is more environmentally friendly than private transport. To assess the environm...

  15. Pubs in Public Life: A Place for Liquor Spaces in the City of Vancouver

    OpenAIRE

    Forbes, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Vancouver liquor licensing bylaws has been described by members of the media, industry, government and general public as overly restrictive, especially in the areas of hours ofservice, geographical distribution and the cultural diversity ofpublic liquor spaces. According to the City of Vancouver, the objective of city stewardship is to provide for the social, economic and physical well-being of citizens. A consultation of both academic research and the Vancouver community suggests that public...

  16. A new theme within public health science for increased life quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Evastina

    2015-08-01

    In 2006 the Nordic Council of Ministers concluded that there was need for education and training in how to plan and design society to enable people to live active, independent, and full lives without adding supplementary, segregating adjustments or expensive specialised solutions, especially for the elderly or persons with disabilities. The universal design (UD) concept became a public health issue for all Nordic countries. The first academic educational-training initiative in universal design was initiated at the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV) in 2006. Thereafter, a number of UD courses were held for professionals mainly from the Nordic countries who worked with development and creation of the public arena. In 2011 the first diploma programme in universal design was established at NHV. A new field in public health research was also established and a number of publications in scientific journals, presentations at Nordic and international conferences, together with seminars and workshops have established a solid ground for further development of the field in the Nordic countries. © 2015 the Nordic Societies of Public Health.

  17. Life after cancer: how does public stigma increase psychological distress of childhood cancer survivors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ah; Yi, Jaehee

    2014-12-01

    Public stigma is a major source of stress for cancer survivors. However, factors that buffer or exacerbate the negative effects of public stigma on psychological distress have not been elucidated. This study examined how perceived public stigma affects psychological distress as mediated by cancer disclosure, internalized reactions to stigma, and social support availability. Cross-sectional study. The study was conducted in South Korea. The study sample was 223 adolescent and young adult survivors of childhood cancer diagnosed before the age of 19 and currently between 15 and 39 years old. Psychological distress was assessed using the Brief Symptom Inventory-18. Structural equation modeling was used with 1000 bootstrap samples. The goodness of model fit was acceptable. Public stigma perceived by cancer survivors influenced psychological distress via cancer disclosure, internalized shame, and social support availability. Higher levels of perceived public stigma predicted higher levels of internalized shame and self-blame and lower levels of social support availability, which subsequently increased psychological distress. Higher levels of perceived public stigma predicted lower levels of disclosure about cancer history and experiences. Cancer disclosure indirectly ameliorated psychological distress by reducing internalized shame. This study offers evidence that cognitive and social factors play important roles in mediating the effects of perceived public stigma on psychological distress in Korean cancer survivors. A greater understanding of factors that influence psychological distress may help psychosocial oncology service providers to identify childhood cancer survivors in need of psychosocial services and provide them with appropriate resources and interventions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Family Life and Human Development (Sex Education): The Prince George's County Public Schools Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    The Prince George's County schools' sex education program for grades K-12 was developed and implemented in the late 1960s and has three focus areas: family life and interpersonal relationships; the physiological and personality changes during puberty; and advanced physiology and psychology of human sexual behavior. The program augments what the…

  19. Is the method for succesful health promotion, public involvement and the everyday life?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schøler, Maja

    The everyday life as a platform for health practices as well as the citizens’ perceptions of health and healthy aging has traditionally not been the core part of health promotion strategies. The project focuses on a groups of citizens and how they interpret and interact with health information...

  20. Urban Public Space and the Construction of Social Life: A Social-Pedagogical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Visscher, Sven; Bouverne-De Bie, Maria; Verschelden, Griet

    2012-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of what meaning urban public space has in relation to the process of children's socialisation. It builds on data from qualitative research into the social-pedagogical meaning of three contrasting neighbourhoods in the city of Ghent. In this research, the neighbourhood was studied as a social and spatial context in…

  1. Family Life and Alcohol Consumption: The Transmission of "Public" and "Private" Drinking Cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayne, Mark; Valentine, Gill; Gould, Myles

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the transmission of drinking cultures within families. In particular, we highlight the differential and discursive construction of the home as a space where parents/carers are happy to introduce children to alcohol in a "safe" environment in opposition to public spaces which they consider to be locations where…

  2. LIFE EXPECTANCY AND THE HEALTHY LIFE OF A POPULATION – A CONSONANT VECTOR OF ECONOMIC PERFORMANCE, PUBLIC HEALTH SYSTEM AND MORAL VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Luchian

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the therapeutical act depends on the personal training and optimum interdisciplinary cooperation of the medical staff involved, representing dynamic elements directly supported by adequate logistic means –medical technique and implements, drugs, procedures, etc. Considered from a dialectic perspective, all such factors of force are made up and are mainly and conjunctly manifested at the level of an elevated (ethic-moral and juridical deontological and normative level. The cooperative vectors of interest may be protected and increased by means of some key factors characteristic to the system of public health assurance, implicitly of the functional medical structures, for attaining the major goal of consolidating general health condition, alongwith the strategic factors for promoting a healthy, really economically and socially performant life of the population to come.

  3. Virtual Reality and Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István TÓZSA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study serves as an introduction to how virtual reality systems could be applied in public administration and what research tasks would be necessary to accomplish a project. E-government solutions began to emerge in public administration approximately a decade ago all over the developed world. Administration service facilities via the Internet did not attract many customers, because of the digital divide. E-government solutions were extended to mobile devices as well, but the expected breakthrough of usage has not ensued. The virtual reality form of public administration services recommended in this study has the most attractive outlay and the simplest navigation tools if compared to ‘traditional’ Internet based e-government. Thus, in accordance with the worldwide amazingly quick spread of the virtual reality systems of Second Life and 3 D types of entertainment, virtual reality applications in public administration could rely on a wide range of acceptance as well.

  4. Mexico's Epidemic of Violence and Its Public Health Significance on Average Length of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; Aburto, José Manuel; García-Guerrero, Victor Manual

    2017-01-01

    levels, respectively. In 2014, female life expectancy at age 20 was 59.5 years (95% CI 59.0 to 60.1); 71% of these years (42.3 years, 41.6 to 43.0) were spent with perceived vulnerability of violence taking place in the state and 26% at the home (15.3 years, 15 to 15.8). For males, life expectancy at age...... 20 was 54.5 years (53.7 to 55.1); 64% of these years (34.6 years, 34.0 to 35.4) were lived with perceived vulnerability of violence at the state and 20% at the home (11.1 years, 10.8 to 11.5). Conclusions The number of years lived with perceived vulnerability among Mexicans has increased by 30.......5 million person-years over the last 10 years. If perceived vulnerability remains at its 2014 level, the average Mexican adults would be expected to live a large fraction of his/her life with perceived vulnerability of violence. Acts of violence continue to rise in the country and they should be addressed...

  5. Emotional Life: Exploring Contradictions in Health Behavior Through Creative Writing in Public Health Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Lise

    2017-09-01

    Weaving personal experience with literature on social determinants and health humanities, the author argues that including art and literature in public health education will benefit efforts to integrate health care and public health by reminding practitioners that communities are composed of individuals with complicated and often contradictory impulses. She argues that those whose work involves planning interventions and reviewing population data also need to perform the tasks of mental flexibility, of imagination, to think about the people behind the numbers. Together with colleagues at the University of Missouri, the author researches the role of creative writing and imagination in reducing HIV stigma and finds hopeful signs in student responses that they are prepared to consider the contradictions present in human behavior if they are given the opportunity to reflect deeply upon them. Creative writing, literature, and art belong in public health education, she argues, because that is how we make space for emotion in our lives and how we connect with the emotional lives of others.

  6. Life-cycle energy implications of different residential settings: Recognizing buildings, travel, and public infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichols, Brice G.; Kockelman, Kara M.

    2014-01-01

    The built environment can be used to influence travel demand, but very few studies consider the relative energy savings of such policies in context of a complex urban system. This analysis quantifies the day-to-day and embodied energy consumption of four different neighborhoods in Austin, Texas, to examine how built environment variations influence various sources of urban energy consumption. A microsimulation combines models for petroleum use (from driving) and residential and commercial power and natural gas use with rigorously measured building stock and infrastructure materials quantities (to arrive at embodied energy). Results indicate that the more suburban neighborhoods, with mostly detached single-family homes, consume up to 320% more embodied energy, 150% more operational energy, and about 160% more total life-cycle energy (per capita) than a densely developed neighborhood with mostly low-rise-apartments and duplexes. Across all neighborhoods, operational energy use comprised 83 to 92% of total energy use, and transportation sources (including personal vehicles and transit, plus street, parking structure, and sidewalk infrastructure) made up 44 to 47% of the life-cycle energy demands tallied. Energy elasticity calculations across the neighborhoods suggest that increased population density and reduced residential unit size offer greatest life-cycle energy savings per capita, by reducing both operational demands from driving and home energy use, and from less embodied energy from construction. These results provide measurable metrics for comparing different neighborhood styles and develop a framework to anticipate energy-savings from changes in the built environment versus household energy efficiency. - Highlights: • Total energy demands (operational and embodied) of 5 Austin settings were studied here. • Suburban settings consume much more energy than densely developed neighborhoods. • Transportation sources make up 44 to 47% of the total energy

  7. Learning from the public: citizens describe the need to improve end-of-life care access, provision and recognition across Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daveson, B.A.; Alonso, J.P.; Calanzani, N.; Ramsenthaler, C.; Gysels, M.; Antunes, B.; Moens, K.; Groeneveld, E.I.; Albers, G.; Finetti, S.; Pettenati, F.; Bausewein, C.; Higginson, I.J.; Harding, R.; Deliens, L.; Toscani, F.; Ferreira, P.L.; Ceulemans, L.; Gomes, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Despite ageing populations and increasing cancer deaths, many European countries lack national policies regarding palliative and end-of-life care. The aim of our research was to determine public views regarding end-of-life care in the face of serious illness. Methods: Implementation of a

  8. There may not be a cultural life script for public events, but there is a youth bias: Response to Janssen (2014)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koppel, Jonathan Mark; Berntsen, Dorthe

    2015-01-01

    Janssen asserts that, in a recent paper, we introduced the concept of a cultural life script for public events, in the form of the youth bias. Moreover, he contends that we claimed to have found evidence for such a life script. Correspondingly, he frames his own failure to find evidence for a lif...

  9. Lung function, asthma symptoms, and quality of life for children in public housing in Boston: a case-series analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steinbach Suzanne

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children in urban public housing are at high risk for asthma, given elevated environmental and social exposures and suboptimal medical care. For a multifactorial disease like asthma, design of intervention studies can be influenced by the relative prevalence of key risk factors. To better understand risk factors for asthma morbidity in the context of an environmental intervention study, we conducted a detailed baseline evaluation of 78 children (aged 4–17 years from three public housing developments in Boston. Methods Asthmatic children and their caregivers were recruited between April 2002 and January 2003. We conducted intake interviews that captured a detailed family and medical history, including questions regarding asthma symptom severity, access to health care, medication usage, and psychological stress. Quality of life was evaluated for both the child and caregiver with an asthma-specific scale. Pulmonary function was measured with a portable spirometer, and allergy testing for common indoor and outdoor allergens was conducted with skin testing using the prick puncture method. Exploratory linear and logistic regression models evaluating predictors of respiratory symptoms, quality of life, and pulmonary function were conducted using SAS. Results We found high rates of obesity (56% and allergies to indoor contaminants such as cockroaches (59% and dust mites (59%. Only 36% of children with persistent asthma reported being prescribed any daily controller medication, and most did not have an asthma action plan or a peak flow meter. One-time lung function measures were poorly correlated with respiratory symptoms or quality of life, which were significantly correlated with each other. In multivariate regression models, household size, body mass index, and environmental tobacco smoke exposure were positively associated with respiratory symptom severity (p Conclusion Given the elevated prevalence of multiple risk factors

  10. [The quality of professional life and the pride in working in public health. The results of a survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clúa Espuny, J L; Aguilar Martín, C

    1998-09-30

    To find what factors explain best the pride of belonging to a public health enterprise. A descriptive crossover study. One primary care CHS. Staff of 363 from Tortosa's Primary Care administrative staff. All the employees were sent a self-filling questionnaire on the quality of their professional life. 232 returned the questionnaire filled in (63.9%). They showed an average value for the overall quality of professional life (5.40 +/- 2.09). The general profile covered the following perceptions taken together: sufficient intrinsic motivation; in a work-place with sufficient responsibility, training and social support; associated with enough work-load; with some emotional support from the managers; having some inconveniences caused by work. The pride in belonging to the CHS was high (6.86 +/- 2.50), with those over 45 giving a significantly higher average reply. Among doctors, pride was significantly lower. The multiple regression model identified three significant variables which explained 67.5% of the variability in the pride of belonging to the CHS: recognition of effort, being properly trained for their current job and length of service. a) Professionals are quite proud of belonging to the CHS. b) Their perception of the quality of professional life is average.

  11. Objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict among hospital employees in the Finnish public sector study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhula, Kati; Puttonen, Sampsa; Ropponen, Annina; Koskinen, Aki; Ojajärvi, Anneli; Kivimäki, Mika; Härmä, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    This epidemiological cohort study, based on Finnish public sector data, investigated the associations between objective working hour characteristics and work-life conflict in day and shift work. The comprehensive data of hospital workers (n = 8 931, 92% women, average age 45 years), consisted of survey responses from 2012, linked with the payroll data of working hour characteristics from 91 days preceding the survey. Logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the associations between working hour characteristics and experiencing work-life conflict often/very often. The analyses were adjusted for age (50 years), sex, level of education, marital status, number of small (0-6 years) and school-aged (7-18 years) children, and the overall stressfulness of the life situation. We also conducted stratified analyses of age and sex on the basis of significant interactions. Difficulties in combining work and life were more often associated with shift work without night shifts and shift work with night shifts than with day work (41% and 34 versus 27%; OR for shift work with night shifts 1.78, 95% CI 1.59-2.00, OR for shift work without night shifts 1.42, 95% CI 1.26-1.60). A high proportion (> 25%) of long (> 40h, (OR 1.26, 95% 1.14-1.39) and very long (> 48h, OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.15-1.49) weekly working hours were associated with work-life conflict, and in the stratified analysis, the latter was also true among women (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.25-1.89). Of the unsocial working hour characteristics, a relatively large amount (> 10% of all shifts) of evening (OR 1.56, 95% CI 1.41-1.72) and night shifts (OR 1.46, 95%CI 1.32-1.61), a high proportion (> 25% of all shifts) of quick returns (work (OR 1.44, 95% CI 1.31-1.58) were associated with work-life conflict. A large amount of single days off (> 25% of all days off) was associated with work-life conflict among men (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.11-3.25), but not in the whole sample. When the two types of shift work were analyzed separately

  12. Reducing risks and increasing safety in everyday life: the role of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enander, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: in social science risk research more attention has been paid to examining how people in general perceive risks than to how they perceive possible measures to reduce risks and to increase their own safety. The latter area is, however, becoming increasingly important to understand, particularly in the light of current emphasis on individual responsibility in risk prevention and emergency preparedness. For example, in Sweden a major effort to increase safety awareness among the general public and to increase knowledge and skills in a number of safety-related areas is at present being planned. This effort is being undertaken as a cooperative effort between different authorities and institutions and is coordinated by the Swedish Rescue Services Agency. The intentions behind this and similar programmes raise a number of questions concerning how people view risks and safety measures in their own immediate environment. Knowledge of the factors affecting willingness to take precautions is important in the design of communication and information. The factors which are of significance may be risk-related and concern perceptions of personal risk, but may also be related to attitudes an beliefs concerning different precautionary measures, to perception of social norms and conventions as well as to personal experiences and values. This paper presents some data concerning views and actions among lay groups in relation to reducing risks and increasing safety. Factors affecting these views are discussed in the light of previous research and of empirical data from some recent studies. (author)

  13. Playing it by the rules: Local bans on the public use of soft drugs and the production of shared spaces of everyday life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chevalier, D.A.M.

    2015-01-01

    In a nutshell, this book is about formalized social control in public space: it examines the different ways shared public spaces of everyday life are used and perceived, focusing on the manner in which the urge to control such space is operationalized, and how in turn formalized control effects the

  14. The public life of the European North of Russia in the prehistoric era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kondreskul A.M.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available the article gives the characteristics of the social life of the North of European Russia in the prehistoric era, examines its features in different periods of the stone age, defines the time (milestones and ways of penetration of the first people on the European North, clarifies the nature and causes of this process, techniques of adaptation of primitive communities, stresses the importance in this process of natural and geographical factors. At each stage of the development of the northern populations is characterized by changes in the economy, the stone industry, religion and art. The author demonstrates the continuity of the social order: from the community to the tribal community and tribe, focuses on the problem of the coexistence of Cro-Magnon and Neanderthals and the causes of the Neanderthals death, as well as military clashes between the tribes belonging to different archaeological cultures.

  15. Effects on Public Health of Heat Waves to Improve the Urban Quality of Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vito Telesca

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Life satisfaction has been widely used in recent studies to evaluate the effect of environmental factors on individuals’ well-being. In the last few years, many studies have shown that the potential impact of climate change on cities depends on a variety of social, economic, and environmental determinants. In particular, extreme events, such as flood and heat waves, may cause more severe impacts and induce a relatively higher level of vulnerability in populations that live in urban areas. Therefore, the impact of climate change and related extreme events certainly influences the economy and quality of life in affected cities. Heat wave frequency, intensity, and duration are increasing in global and local climate change scenarios. The association between high temperatures and morbidity is well-documented, but few studies have examined the role of meteo-climatic variables on hospital admissions. This study investigates the effects of temperature, relative humidity, and barometric pressure on health by linking daily access to a Matera (Italy hospital with meteorological conditions in summer 2012. Extreme heat wave episodes that affected most of the city from 1 June to 31 August 2012 (among the selected years 2003, 2012, and 2017 were analyzed. Results were compared with heat waves from other years included in the base period (1971–2000 and the number of emergency hospital admissions on each day was considered. The meteorological data used in this study were collected from two weather stations in Matera. In order to detect correlations between the daily emergency admissions and the extreme health events, a combined methodology based on a heat wave identification technique, multivariate analysis (PCA, and regression analysis was applied. The results highlight that the role of relative humidity decreases as the severity level of heat waves increases. Moreover, the combination of temperatures and daily barometric pressure range (DPR has been

  16. Public health approaches to end-of-life care in the UK: an online survey of palliative care services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Sally; Sallnow, Libby

    2013-06-01

    The public health approach to end-of-life care has gained recognition over the past decade regarding its contribution to palliative care services. Terms, such as health-promoting palliative care, and compassionate communities, have entered the discourse of palliative care and practice; examples exist in the UK and globally. This scoping study aimed to determine if such initiatives were priorities for hospices in the UK and, if so, provide baseline data on the types of initiatives undertaken. An online survey was designed, piloted and emailed to 220 palliative care providers across the four UK countries. It included a total of six questions. Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data were analysed thematically. There was a 66% response rate. Of those providers, 60% indicated that public health approaches to death, dying and loss were a current priority for their organisation. Respondents identified a range of work being undertaken currently in this area. The most successful were felt to be working with schools and working directly with local community groups. The findings demonstrate the relevance of a public health approach for palliative care services and how they are currently engaging with the communities they serve. Although the approach was endorsed by the majority of respondents, various challenges were highlighted. These related to the need to balance this against service provision, and the need for more training and resources to support these initiatives, at both national and community levels.

  17. Public secondary school teachers' attitude to family life education in two geopolitical zones of Nigeria: a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okusanya, B O; Isabu, P A

    2010-03-01

    This qualitative study was conducted to assess and compare the attitude of teachers in two geopolitical zones of Nigeria to family life education. Multi stage sample selection was used to pick 6 public secondary schools (3 junior, 3 senior) in each zone. All teachers (221) in the selected schools were surveyed. Pre-tested questionnaires were self administered, responses analyzed and results presented using descriptive frequencies. Where appropriate statistical evaluation was done with Yates corrected Chi square at 95% confidence interval. Katsina respondents were mostly Muslims (92.4%), married (64.8%) and had the National Certificate of Education (62.9%). Ekpoma teachers were mostly Christians (97.4%), married (93.1%) and 67.2% had a University degree. Attendance at a seminar on family life education was by 19% and 25.9% of respondents from Katsina and Ekpoma respectively. Teachers' knowledge of family life education was very good and most teachers in both regions considered it useful but there were geographical disparities in perception and attitude. While teachers in Katsina discussed HIV/AIDS twice more with their students than sexuality (54.3% vs 28%) those in Ekpoma discussed sexuality more than HIV/AIDS (80.2% vs 72.4%). Respondents in Katsina reported three times (60% vs 19.8%) more that parents would object to FLE in schools than those in Ekpoma and also that its introduction would encourage promiscuity amongst the students (53.3% vs 21.6%). While being married positively influenced respondents' perception, their attitude was influenced positively by having university degree and teaching at the senior secondary school. Christians significantly discussed sexuality (Chi square 58.60; RR: 3.03) and HIV/AIDS (Chi square 15.01; RR: 1.50) with students than Muslims. Policy makers need to be aware of the regional differences in teachers' attitude to family life education as this may hinder the implementation of curriculum.

  18. End of life care and decision making: Opinions and experiences of the general public, bereaved relatives, and professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.J.H. Raijmakers (Natasja)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractEnd-of-life care aims to improve quality of life of patients and their relatives facing problems associated with life-threatening illness in the last days of life. End-of-life decision-making is an important aspect of end-of-life care that can have a significant impact on the process of

  19. University and public health system partnership: A real-life intervention to improve asthma management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Janaina; Moreno, Adriana; Ferriani, Virginia; Araujo, Ana Carla; Vianna, Elcio; Borges, Marcos; Roxo, Pérsio; Gonçalves, Marcos; Mello, Luane; Parreira, Rosa; Silva, Jorgete; Stefanelli, Patricia; Panazolo, Larissa; Cetlin, Andrea; Queiroz, Luana; Araujo, Rosângela; Dias, Marina; Aragon, Davi; Domingos, Nélio; Arruda, L Karla

    2017-05-01

    Asthma is under-diagnosed in many parts of the world. We aimed to assess the outcome of a capacitating program on asthma for non-specialist physicians and other healthcare professionals working in the public system in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil. A group of 16 asthma specialists developed a one-year capacitating program in 11 healthcare clinics in the Northern District of the city, which included lectures on asthma, training on inhalation device use and spirometry, and development of an asthma management protocol. Researchers visited one health unit 2-4 times monthly, working with doctors on patients' care, discussing cases, and delivering lectures. Asthma education was also directed to the general population, focusing on recognition of signs and symptoms and long-term treatment, including production of educational videos available on YouTube. Outcome measures were the records of doctors' prescriptions of individual asthma medications pre- and post-intervention. Prior to the program, 3205 units of inhaled albuterol and 2876 units of inhaled beclomethasone were delivered by the Northern District pharmacy. After the one-year program, there was increase to 4850 units (51.3%) for inhaled albuterol and 3526 units (22.6%) for inhaled beclomethasone. The albuterol increase followed the recommendation given to the non-specialist doctors by the asthma experts, that every patient with asthma should have inhaled albuterol as a rescue medication, by protocol. No increase was observed in other districts where no capacitating program was conducted. A systematic capacitating program was successful in changing asthma prescription profiles among non-specialist doctors, with increased delivery of inhaled albuterol and beclomethasone.

  20. Experience of stigma in the public life of relatives of people diagnosed with schizophrenia in the Republic of Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupchanka, Dzmitry; Kruk, Nina; Sartorius, Norman; Davey, Silvia; Winkler, Petr; Murray, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    Mental health-related stigma affects people with mental disorders and their families. We aimed to investigate the experience of stigma among relatives of patients with schizophrenia in Belarus and formulate recommendations for anti-stigma interventions. We conducted and thematically analysed 20 interviews with relatives of people diagnosed with schizophrenia. Experience of discrimination, strategies to cope with it, and requests for interventions were examined. A number of themes related to the experience of stigma in the public life of relatives of people with schizophrenia were elicited in relation to: (1) mental health care (difficulties in contacting mental health professionals; in getting appropriate information; lack of alternatives to hospital treatment; absence of appropriate long-term care services); (2) employment of people living with schizophrenia and (3) contact with the police. Analysis of the strategies used to overcome difficulties revealed resignation and passive acceptance, self-reliance, and emotional containment during crises. Despite the passivity and scepticism in expressing needs, participants suggested a number of interventions that could reduce the burden of stigma. With respect to the public domain of life, substantial stigma and discrimination perceived by families of people living with schizophrenia in Belarus is associated with structural issues of the country's mental health care system. To reduce the stigma-related burden, action must be taken to: (1) educate and support families and (2) deal with structural issues, by reorganising mental health services to better meet the needs of the families of people diagnosed with schizophrenia, and by including them in decision making at all levels.

  1. [Quality of life of hemodialysis patients in a Brazilian Public Hospital in Belém - Pará].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Cíntia Botelho; Pantoja, Ivaneida Kzarina Olaia Ribeiro; Silva, Allan Roberto Marques; Azevedo, Rômulo Nina de; Sá, Nayara Bandeira de; Turiel, Marck Gregório Pereira; Nunes, Mário Barbosa Guedes

    2010-03-01

    End-stage chronic kidney disease (CKD) requiring dialysis affects the quality of life sometimes more severely than other chronic diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, heart failure, coronary artery disease, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exerting a negative effect on the energy and vitality levels, limiting social interactions, and hindering psychic health. To evaluate the quality of life of patients with CKD on hemodialysis in a public Brazilian Amazonian hospital. Data were collected through interview based on the Brazilian version of the SF-36 questionnaire. The study was conducted on 50 patients (mean age, 48 ± 16 years; mean hemodialysis time, 3 ± 2.9 years). The most affected domain was role limitations due to physical health, with a mean score of 36 ± 36, and 58% of the patients in the lowest quartile, while mental health and social functioning were relatively preserved, with most patients in the highest quartile. Men obtained poorer scores than women did for role limitations due to physical health and vitality. Age correlated negatively with physical functioning. Patients on hemodialysis for more than one year had better scores in the social functioning domain, with a positive correlation between dialysis time and physical functioning. The domains assessed were globally impaired in the population studied, especially regarding role limitations due to physical health, suggesting that chronic disease with prolonged treatment has a negative influence on those domains.

  2. Women leadership in the Valle del Cauca: daily life and tensions between the public and the private spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Felipe Castelar

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Historically, the concepts of the masculine and feminine have been projected as composite dichotomies of opposing values, socially priviledging the values that characterize the male. Thus, women have been assigned roles as reproductive as opposed to productivity; affection, as opposed to the force; private as opposed to public. However, there are paradigmatic cases that are blurring the apparently clear boundaries of gender that imposed these dichotomies. This document is derived from a research project that explores the everyday life of women “community leaders” who, by their work and vocation of leadership and power, represent an example of how fuzzy the boundaries between the values assigned to the masculine and the feminine may become. This article seeks to identify, in the lives of these women, the conflicts and the facilities with which they have to perform a leadership work subjectively demanding and forces them to stake resources to distinguish or being consistent the private and the public.

  3. EIA publications directory, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This directory contains abstracts and ordering information for EIA publications. The abstracts are arranged by broad subject category such as coal, petroleum, natural gas, and electric power. A comprehensive subject index, a title index, and a report number index are included. Each entry gives the title, report number, publication frequency, date, number of pages, and ordering information. Publication began with the 1979 edition

  4. Does organisational justice protect from sickness absence following a major life event? A Finnish public sector study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elovainio, M; Kivimäki, M; Linna, A; Brockner, J; van den Bos, K; Greenberg, J; Pentti, J; Virtanen, M; Vahtera, J

    2010-05-01

    It has been shown that fairness perceptions have a strong impact on health, especially under conditions of great work stress. The aim of this study was to extend previous research in studying whether working in high justice workplace would protect from health effects following environmental stressors outside work. Using a prospective longitudinal design, the relationships between organisational justice and sickness-related absences both before and after a major life event among 25 459 public sector employees working in 2551 work units were studied. Sickness absences covered the period from 36 months before the event until 30 months after the event. The increase in sickness absences after the event was larger and stayed at a higher level even 30 months after the event, among those who perceived the management practices in their work unit to be relatively unfair. Similar patterns were found for each of the distributive, procedural and interactional dimensions of organisational justice. Fair organisational and managerial procedures may buffer the negative health effects of psychosocial health risks outside work.

  5. Development of evaluation method of collective dose of general public considering the daily life activity and time use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoka, Toshi; Saito, Kimiaki; Sakamoto, Ryuichi; Tsutsumi, Masahiro; Moriuchi, Shigeru

    1994-11-01

    A code for evaluation of collective dose of general public to natural radiation has been developed, in which the variation of dose rate due to place of stay is taken into consideration. Only external exposure to natural radiation is subject to discussion in this report. Strict manner of dose evaluation requires the dose rate and the time period of stay for each place and for each person. It is possible to know (measure) them all, but not practicable. In this code, dose rate information was obtained from actually measured data by the authors and estimation based on the environmental conditions. Information on the time period of stay was obtained from a Survey Data on Time Use and Leisure Activities by Management and Coordination Agency, and from Statistical Yearbook of Tokyo with some realistic assumptions. By using them, collective dose was evaluated taking both the daily life style and dose rate varying place by place into consideration. In this report, the dose evaluation code and the results about doses for Tokyo citizens are mentioned. (author)

  6. Public Health Nurses in Israel: A Case Study on a Quality Improvement Project of Nurse's Work Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ilya; Shachaf, Sara; Rapaport, Zofia; Livne, Tzipi; Madjar, Batya

    2017-01-01

    Public health nurses (PHNs) working in Well Baby Clinic in Israel's Haifa district were voicing great distress to inspectors-the impossibility of meeting their workload, feeling overwhelmed, poor physical, and technological conditions. They were feeling tired and frustrated and burn-out was rising. The district's nursing management took the decision, together with Tel Aviv University's nursing research unit, to conduct a quality improvement project based on issues that arose from meetings with focus groups on the nurses' difficulties. This paper is a case study of a quality improvement project targeting nurses daily working life. One of its chief contributions is as a study of meeting PHNs' frustration by integrating focus groups and round-table brainstorming (involving nurses, clinic managers and nursing inspectors) in order to identify targets for practical intervention. This strategy has been very successful. It has provided the district's nursing management a battery of forcefully argued and realistically grounded proposals for making the work of Well Baby clinics more relevant to their communities and giving nurses (a) the conditions to meet their assignments and (b) greater professional self-respect. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. How newspapers began to blog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rasmus Kleis

    2012-01-01

    of technologists (project managers, computer programers, information architects, etc.) that are increasingly integral to how legacy media organizations operate in a new and ever more convergent media environment under circumstances of great economic uncertainty, and discuss the wider implications for how we......In this article, I examine how ‘old’ media organizations develop ‘new’ media technologies by analyzing processes of technological innovation in two Danish newspaper companies that integrated blogs into their websites in very different ways in 2007. Drawing on concepts from science and technology...... studies and sociology and building on previous research on blogging by news media organizations, I analyze how the three different communities involved in the development process – journalists and managers, but also the often-overlooked community of technologists – articulated different versions of what...

  8. When the atomic age began

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    2 December 1942, just twenty-five years ago, is the date most often proclaimed as marking the beginning of the atomic age. On that day Enrico Fermi's atomic 'pile' went critical - man had achieved the first self-sustained nuclear chain reaction and controlled it. This achievement is an outstanding example of how modern science can work. It had been predicted in theory, calculated in advance and finally realised through the work of large teams of scientists, headed by some of the most imaginative personalities of our century. The military aspects of man-made nuclear chain reaction still dominate our world today. However, within this quarter of a century, nuclear energy has also become significant as a source of power for peaceful purposes. By the end of another quarter of a century it will, according to the best forecasts we can make today, produce a major part of the electricity in the world. The control of nuclear fission was initiated by Fermi and his collaborators. It had a tremendous impact on politics, on concepts of warfare and finally on scientific progress for man's welfare. Fifteen years afterwards the International Atomic Energy Agency was created to promote the peaceful uses of the new technology and to assist in winning the advantages it offered for improving health and prosperity. Another of its great objects is to ensure, as far as possible, that nuclear materials intended for peaceful purposes shall not be diverted to military ends. The hope of the world must be that this, one day, will include all nuclear materials

  9. Cost effectiveness and quality of life assessment on dental filling and tooth extraction in Balongsari Public Health Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufan Bramantoro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental health services program implementation in Balongsari Public Health Center during three years, 2006 until 2008, have a high average ratio of filling treatment compared to tooth extraction treatment (1:1.79 as compared to the standard set by the Ministry of Health (1:1. Cost effectiveness analysis and quality of life is needed as a form of economic evaluation of costs incurred by the consequences or impacts of health care programs, especially dental filling and tooth extraction, use to help in supporting the process of policy making in health care. The objective of this study was to assess cost effectiveness analysis (CEA and quality of life (QoL on dental filling and extraction treatment in Public Health Center. Methods: The study was conducted on 31 respondents who received filling treatment and 38 respondents who received tooth extraction. All of the respondents carried out to evaluate the total costs incurred in obtaining treatment and QoL between before and after treatment, which consist of the physical aspects, psychological, social, and economic. Results: The average total cost of dental filling treatment of the 31 respondents was Rp. 27,934.45, and in tooth extraction of the 38 respondents at Rp. 22,406.83. The average difference in the QoL, before and after dental filling treatment amounted to 121.25. In extractions, QoL difference in value before and after treatment at 132.36. Cost effectiveness ratio value in dental filling treatment amounted to 230.37, and in tooth extraction at 169.63. Conclusion: It is concluded that cost effectiveness ratio in the filling treatment is higher than the extraction, that the tooth extraction treatment is considered more cost effective than filling treatment.Latar belakang: Pelaksanaan program pelayanan kesehatan gigi di Puskesmas Balongsari selama tiga tahun, yaitu tahun 2006 hingga 2008, memiliki rata-rata rasio perbandingan perawatan tumpatan dengan pencabutan gigi (1:1,79 yang

  10. Submission of the national commission of the public debate on the options concerning the long life high and medium activity radioactive wastes management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This document deals with the presentation of a public debate on the radioactive wastes management and the opportunities of its organization. It presents successively the long life high and medium activity radioactive wastes, the today radioactive wastes management policy and some questions and topics which could be discussed during the debate. (A.L.B.)

  11. Work Life Balance Amongst the Working Women in Public Sector Banks - A Case Study of State Bank of India

    OpenAIRE

    Dabhade, Nishant; Yadav, Rajesh K.

    2013-01-01

    In terms of Indian context, the concern over work-life balance is gradually becoming a common talk especially for women employees. Work life balance is a state of equilibrium in which the demand of both professional and personal life is equal. Each role having different set of demands and when such role demands overlap, multiple problems are faced. In reality life and work over-lap and interact. In designing the work life policies employer should think that the commitment of employees can mak...

  12. Enhancing Scientific Collaboration, Transparency, and Public Access: Utilizing the Second Life Platform to Convene a Scientific Conference in 3-D Virtual Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, B. W.

    2006-12-01

    Recent studies reveal a general mistrust of science as well as a distorted perception of the scientific method by the public at-large. Concurrently, the number of science undergraduate and graduate students is in decline. By taking advantage of emergent technologies not only for direct public outreach but also to enhance public accessibility to the science process, it may be possible to both begin a reversal of popular scientific misconceptions and to engage a new generation of scientists. The Second Life platform is a 3-D virtual world produced and operated by Linden Research, Inc., a privately owned company instituted to develop new forms of immersive entertainment. Free and downloadable to the public, Second Life offers an imbedded physics engine, streaming audio and video capability, and unlike other "multiplayer" software, the objects and inhabitants of Second Life are entirely designed and created by its users, providing an open-ended experience without the structure of a traditional video game. Already, educational institutions, virtual museums, and real-world businesses are utilizing Second Life for teleconferencing, pre-visualization, and distance education, as well as to conduct traditional business. However, the untapped potential of Second Life lies in its versatility, where the limitations of traditional scientific meeting venues do not exist, and attendees need not be restricted by prohibitive travel costs. It will be shown that the Second Life system enables scientific authors and presenters at a "virtual conference" to display figures and images at full resolution, employ audio-visual content typically not available to conference organizers, and to perform demonstrations or premier three-dimensional renderings of objects, processes, or information. An enhanced presentation like those possible with Second Life would be more engaging to non- scientists, and such an event would be accessible to the general users of Second Life, who could have an

  13. Determinants of Quality of Work Life among Nurses Working in Hawassa Town Public Health Facilities, South Ethiopia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelbiso, Lolemo; Belay, Admasu; Woldie, Mirkuzie

    2017-01-01

    A high quality of work life (QWL) is a crucial issue for health care facilities to have qualified, dedicated, and inspired employees. Among different specialties in health care settings, nurses have a major share among other health care providers. So, they should experience a better QWL to deliver high-quality holistic care to those who need help. To assess the level of quality of work life and its predictors among nurses working in Hawassa town public health facilities, South Ethiopia. A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted on 253 nurses of two hospitals and nine health centers. The total sample size was allocated to each facility based on the number of nurses in each facility. Data were collected using a structured questionnaire. The interitem consistency of the scale used to measure QWL had Cronbach's alpha value of 0.86. A multinomial logistic regression model was fitted to identify significant predictors of quality of work life using SPSS version 20. The study showed that 67.2% of the nurses were dissatisfied with the quality of their work life. We found that educational status, monthly income, working unit, and work environment were strong predictors of quality of work life among nurses ( p quality of their work life. The findings in this study and studies reported from elsewhere pinpoint that perception of nurses about the quality of their work life can be modified if health care managers are considerate of the key issues surrounding QWL.

  14. The Quality of College Life from Viewpoint of Native and Non-Native Students of Tehran’s Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Shokri

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The quality of college life means the overall satisfaction of students from the college life as a whole which is affected by different aspects of life based on the theory of generalization. The aim of this study is to evaluate the quality of college life among local and non-local students from non-state universities in Tehran. This study is developmental with respect to the aim and uses survey method for data gathering. The statistical population of the study are undergraduate students and 500 samples are chosen from the universities in the target population randomly and data are gathered using the questionnaire designed by the researcher the validity of the questionnaire has been verified based on the views of 5 experts and using some similar tested questionnaires as a model. The reliability has been estimated using Alpha Cronbach’s index by pre-test of 15 samples about 0.86. To data analyze SPSS software and statistical tests are used. The quality of the college life of students has been evaluated significantly lower than average and the quality of college life of non-local students is significantly higher than the quality of college life of local students. The low quality of college life shows that higher education policies on quality and national resources productivity have had low effectiveness. Dissatisfaction of students, as the key stakeholder of higher education system, from quality of college life could be a starting point to stray away from the higher education missions and philosophies. It is necessary that academic managers and leaders make serious decisions to promote the quality of college life. The higher education without the quality of college life, will be defeating the purpose.

  15. Virological failure of staggered and simultaneous treatment interruption in HIV patients who began Efavirenz-based regimens after allergic reactions to nevirapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siripassorn Krittaecho

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective The objective of this work was to study the virological outcomes associated with two different types of treatment interruption strategies in patients with allergic reactions to nevirapine (NVP. We compared the virological outcomes of (1 HIV-1-infected patients who discontinued an initial NVP-based regimen because of cutaneous allergic reactions to NVP; different types of interruption strategies were used, and second-line regimen was based on efavirenz (EFV; and (2 HIV-1-infected patients who began an EFV-based regimen as a first-line therapy (controls. Methods This retrospective cohort included patients who began an EFV-based regimen, between January 2002 and December 2008, as either an initial regimen or as a subsequent regimen after resolving a cutaneous allergic reaction against an initial NVP-based regimen. The study ended in March 2010. The primary outcome was virological failure, which was defined as either (a two consecutive plasma HIV-1 RNA levels >400 copies/mL or (b a plasma HIV-1 RNA level >1,000 copies/mL plus any genotypic resistance mutation. Results A total of 559 patients were stratified into three groups: (a Simultaneous Interruption, in which the subjects simultaneously discontinued all the drugs in an NVP-based regimen following an allergic reaction (n=161; (b Staggered Interruption, in which the subjects discontinued NVP treatment while continuing nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI backbone therapy for a median of 7 days (n=82; and (c Control, in which the subjects were naïve to antiretroviral therapy (n=316. The overall median follow-up time was 43 months. Incidence of virological failure in Simultaneous Interruption was 12.9 cases per 1,000 person-years, which trended toward being higher than the incidences in Staggered Interruption (5.4 and Control (6.6. However, differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions Among the patients who had an acute allergic reaction to first

  16. Effort-reward and work-life imbalance, general stress and burnout among employees of a large public hospital in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Hämmig, Oliver; Brauchli, Rebecca; Bauer, Georg F

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and work-life imbalance (WLI) are recognised risk factors for work stress and burnout but have not been investigated conjointly so far and compared with each other in this regard. The present cross-sectional study provides initial evidence by studying associations of ERI and WLI with general stress and burnout simultaneously. METHODS: The study was based on survey data collected in 2007 among the personnel of a large public hospital in the canton...

  17. Determinants of quality of life (QoL) and quality of university life (QuL) in Malaysian public university students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haron, Halilah; Osman, Balkish Mohd; Maidinsah, Hamidah; Sari, Maznita Maksari @ Md; Zaki, Nurul Qusna Mohd

    2015-02-01

    Quality of life (QoL) refers to the degree of satisfaction, or the sense of well being, people experience in organizations including universities. The quality of life students experience in a university increases when they believe their needs are aligned with the goals of the university because they perceive that the university is responsive to their needs. Quality of University Life (QuL) refers to the students' ability to stabilize their life regarding social activities, academic performance, health and spiritual. A study was undertaken to investigate the accountability of Universiti Teknologi MARA (UiTM), Malaysia, in terms of teaching and learning. The objective of this paper is to identify and evaluate the determinants of QoL and QuL measurement models. Data from 788 students who responded to a set of questionnaire were collected from nine faculties. Factor analysis performed on the data resulted in six determinants for QuL; friendly, skills, satisfaction, interest, learning and feeling. Only two determinants, environment and quality represented QoL. Results indicated that the measures were highly reliable (in terms of internal consistency) based on Cronbach Alpha values ranging from 0.705 to 0.905 for QuL and 0.826 to 0.888 for QoL. Construct validity was supported by Average Variance Extraction values of more than 0.5 for QuL (0.481 - 0.724) and QoL. (0.503 and 0.519). The construct reliability (CR) values ranging between 0.623 to 0.882 for QuL and 0.731 to 0.815 for QoL suggested good reliability construct.

  18. Health-related quality of life and working conditions on public transport workers in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte, Brazil, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Luiz Sérgio; Assunção, Ada Ávila

    2015-01-01

    Drivers and conductors working in public transport are frequently exposed to inadequate working conditions and consequently to health problems relating to their work activities. This study investigates the relationship between the working conditions of drivers and conductors in the Metropolitan Region of Belo Horizonte and their perception of health-related quality of life. Health-related quality of life was measured in a sample of 1,607 public transport workers in the city of Belo Horizonte using the SF-12 (Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form General Health Survey). The presence and magnitude of independent associations between the SF-12 domains and the exposure variables were determined by means of odds ratios obtained through logistic regression. After adjustments, the PCS (Physical Component Score) was found to be negatively associated with the existence of breaks during the working day and positively associated with unavailability of technical resources for meeting needs. The MCS (Mental Component Score) was positively associated with being female, having two or more medical diagnoses of illnesses, absenteeism and recent episodes of aggression or threats, and feeling vibration in the whole body. The MCS was negatively associated with the practice of physical exercise. Both components were negatively associated with older age and positively associated with having a poor self-assessment of health. Exposure to a variety of risk factors while performing work worsened health-related quality of life. The results obtained may provide support for rethinking and guiding public policies directed towards metropolitan populations.

  19. Swiss Life Sciences - a science communication project for both schools and the wider public led by the foundation Science et Cité.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röthlisberger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The foundation Science et Cité was founded 1998 with the aim to inform the wider Swiss public about current scientific topics and to generate a dialogue between science and society. Initiated as an independent foundation by the former State Secretary for Science and Research, Dr. Charles Kleiber, Science et Cité is now attached to the Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences as a competence center for dialogue with the public. Due to its branches in all language regions of the country, the foundation is ideally suited to initiate and implement communication projects on a nationwide scale. These projects are subdivided into three categories: i) science communication for children/adolescents, ii) establishing a dialogue between science and the wider public, and iii) conducting the role of a national center of competence and networking in science communication. Swiss Life Sciences is a project that fits into all of these categories: a year-round program for schools is complemented with an annual event for the wider public. With the involvement of most of the major Swiss universities, the Swiss National Science Foundation, the foundation Gen Suisse and many other partners, Swiss Life Sciences also sets an example of national networking within the science communication community.

  20. Comparison of Oral Health-Related Quality Of Life among Adult Referred to Public and Private Dental Clinics of Mashhad, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Mohammadzadeh

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nowadays, appraisal of patients' perception of health has largely replaced the clinical evaluations. This study aimed to compare oral health-related quality of life in patients referring to public and private clinics in Mashhad, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, we enrolled 383 patients referred to five private and two public dental clinics in Mashhad, Iran. The study variables including age, gender, level of education, functional dentition status, decayed, missing, and filled teeth, and the reason for referral were recorded. Oral Impact on Daily Performance (OIDP score was calculated for each patient. To analyze the data, independent samples t-test, Man-Whitney U test, and Chi-squared test were run. Results: The reason for visiting the public and private clinics was significantly different (P

  1. The Materiality of Territorial Production - A Conceptual Discussion of Territoriality, Materiality and the Everyday Life of Public Space

    OpenAIRE

    Kärrholm, Mattias

    2007-01-01

    This article brings together research on territoriality and actor-network theory in order to develop new ways of investigating the role of materiality and material design in the territorial power relations of urban public places. Using the public square as a main example, I suggest some new ways of conceptualizing the production and stabilization of territories in the everyday urban environment. Setting out from a brief outline of the history of territoriality research, I re-appropriate the t...

  2. Relationship between Quality of Work-Life and Job Satisfaction of the Employees in Public Hospitals in Rasht

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Goudarznand-Chegini

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between quality of work-life and job satisfaction regarding their educational level of hospital employees in Rasht, Gilan.Materials and Method: Statistical society included 2,800 staffs of governmental hospitals in Rasht, in which 338 persons were selected by categorized sampling. Using a standard questionnaire, we collected necessary data and analyzed them using Pearson correlation, correlation coefficient and regression analysis.Results: Our findings showed that between each component of the quality of working life and job satisfaction of employees with 99% confidence level and 1% alpha according to the correlation coefficient (R and a significant positive relationship.Conclusion: Overall results expression and a significant positive correlation between the components of quality of work life and job satisfaction and variable reduction effect on the severity of education relationship between dependent and independent variables

  3. Healthy End of Life Project (HELP): a progress report on implementing community guidance on public health palliative care initiatives in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Andrea; Rumbold, Bruce

    2018-04-01

    Contemporary end of life care policies propose increasing community capacity by developing sustainable skills, policies, structures, and resources to support members of a community in caring for each other at the end of life. Public health approaches to palliative care provide strategies to bring this about. Practical implementation can however be ineffective, principally due to failures to grasp the systemic nature of public health interventions, or to ensure that programs are managed and owned by community members, not the professionals who may have introduced them. This article outlines a comprehensive community development project that identifies local end of life needs and meets them through the efficient use of community resources. The project is the product of a three-phase enquiry. The first phase, carried out in a local community, examined carers' experiences of home-based dying, the networks that supported them during care, and broader community networks with the potential to extend care. Data were collected through in-depth research interviews, focus groups and consultation with a community research reference group. Findings were key issues to be targeted by a local community development strategy. In the second phase, these local findings were compared with other practice accounts to identify themes common to many contexts. A public health palliative care framework was then used to produce an evidence-informed community development model for end of life care. The third phase involves implementing and evaluating this model in different Australian contexts. A major theme emerging in phase one of the enquiry was the reluctance of carers to ask for, or even accept, offers of help from family, friends and community networks despite their evident need for support while providing end of life care at home. Others' willingness to provide support was thus hindered by uncertainty about what to offer, and concern about infringing on people's privacy. To develop

  4. Micro scale spatial relationships in urban studies : The relationship between private and public space and its impact on street life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Nes, A.; Lopez, M.J.J.

    2007-01-01

    Research on urban environment by means of space syntax theory and methods tends to focus on macro scale spatial conditions. However, micro scale conditions should not be neglected. In research on street life and dispersal of crime in urban areas, it became inevitable to pay attention to the

  5. Inpatient care expenditure of the elderly with chronic diseases who use public health insurance: Disparity in their last year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandoevwit, Worawan; Phatchana, Phasith

    2018-06-01

    The Thai elderly are eligible for the Civil Servant Medical Benefit Scheme (CS) or Universal Coverage Scheme (UCS) depending on their pre-retirement or their children work status. This study aimed to investigate the disparity in inpatient care expenditures in the last year of life among Thai elderly individuals who used the two public health insurance schemes. Using death registration and inpatient administrative data from 2007 to 2011, our subpopulation group included the elderly with four chronic disease groups: diabetes mellitus, hypertension and cardiovascular disease, heart disease, and cancer. Among 1,242,150 elderly decedents, about 40% of them had at least one of the four chronic disease conditions and were hospitalized in their last year of life. The results showed that the means of inpatient care expenditures in the last year of life paid by CS and UCS per decedent were 99,672 Thai Baht and 52,472 Thai Baht, respectively. On average, UCS used higher healthcare resources by diagnosis-related group relative weight measure per decedent compared with CS. In all cases, the rates of payment for inpatient treatment per diagnosis-related group adjusted relative weight were higher for CS than UCS. This study found that the disparities in inpatient care expenditures in the last year of life stemmed mainly from the difference in payment rates. To mitigate this disparity, unified payment rates for various types of treatment that reflect costs of hospital care across insurance schemes were recommended. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Russian in Estonia's Public Sector: "Playing on the Borderline" between Official Policy and Real-Life Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezkina, Maimu

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the use of Russian in state communication in officially monolingual Estonia. Drawing on interviews with high-level public employees in four central state institutions and an analysis of these institutions' websites, the article shows that while Russian is not specifically mentioned in the laws, it is "de facto"…

  7. Socio-Technical Deliberation about Free and Open Source Software: Accounting for the Status of Artifacts in Public Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit-Barne, Chantal

    2007-01-01

    This essay investigates the rhetorical practices of socio-technical deliberation about free and open source (F/OS) software, providing support for the idea that a public sphere is a socio-technical ensemble that is discursive and fluid, yet tangible and organized because it is enacted by both humans and non-humans. In keeping with the empirical…

  8. Why Does Unemployment Hurt the Employed? Evidence from the Life Satisfaction Gap between the Public and the Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luechinger, Simon; Meier, Stephan; Stutzer, Alois

    2010-01-01

    High unemployment rates entail substantial costs to the working population in terms of reduced subjective well-being. This paper studies the importance of individual economic security, in particular job security, by exploiting sector-specific institutional differences in the exposure to economic shocks. Public servants have stricter dismissal…

  9. A Portrait of a Teacher's Life: Learning to Teach, Curriculum-Making, and Teaching about Islam in a Public School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aown, Najwa

    2012-01-01

    Despite the importance and the inclusion of teaching about religion in most national and state curriculum standards, especially in social studies curriculum, many public school teachers are not adequately prepared to how, and what, to teach about religion, in particular Islam. As a result, many teachers are left alone to sink and swim in their…

  10. Collaborative Business Models for Exploration: - The Expansion of Public-Private Partnerships to Enable Exploration and Improve the Quality of Life on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    In May of 2007, The Space Life Sciences Strategy was published, launching a series of efforts aimed at driving human health and performance innovations that both meet space flight needs and benefit life on Earth. These efforts, led by the Space Life Science Directorate (SLSD) at the NASA Johnson Space Center, led to the development and implementation of the NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) in October 2010. The NHHPC now has over 100 members including seven NASA centers; other federal agencies; some of the International Space Station partners; industry; academia and non-profits. The NHHPC seeks to share best practices, develop collaborative projects and experiment with open collaboration techniques such as crowdsourcing. Using this approach, the NHHPC collaborative projects are anticipated to be at the earliest possible stage of development utilizing the many possible public-private partnerships in this center. Two workshops have been successfully conducted in 2011 (January and October) with a third workshop planned for the spring of 2012. The challenges of space flight are similar in many respects to providing health care and environmental monitoring in challenging settings on the earth. These challenges to technology development include the need for low power consumption, low weight, in-situ analysis, operator independence (i.e., minimal training), robustness, and limited resupply or maintenance. When similar technology challenges are identified (such as the need to provide and monitor a safe water supply or develop a portable medical diagnostic device for remote use), opportunities arise for public-private partnerships to engage in co-creation of novel approaches for space exploration and health and environmental applications on earth. This approach can enable the use of shared resources to reduce costs, engage other organizations and the public in participatory exploration (solving real-world problems), and provide technologies with multiple uses

  11. A description of pharmacological analgesia administration by public sector advanced life support paramedics in the City of Cape Town

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Matthews

    2017-03-01

    Discussion: Pre-hospital acute pain management in the Western Cape does not appear to conform to best practice as Advanced Life Support providers in the Western Cape use low doses of morphine. Chest pain is an important reason for drug administration in acute pre-hospital pain. Multimodal analgesia is not a feature of care in this pre-hospital service. The development of a Clinical Practice Guideline for and training in pre-hospital pain should be viewed as imperative.

  12. Ethical Considerations for Psychologists Taking a Public Stance on Controversial Issues: The Balance Between Personal and Professional Life

    OpenAIRE

    Haeny, Angela M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous literature has documented the general issues psychologists often face while balancing their personal and professional lives. The struggle stems from attempting to satisfy the need to maintain a life outside of work while having the professional obligation to follow the American Psychological Association’s (APA’s) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (Ethics Code) to prevent their personal lives from interfering with their professional roles and relationships. The p...

  13. Digitisation and public accessibility of old Polish guides on self-treatment and quality-of-life improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Nowak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This letter to the Editor can prove useful as a mini-guide. Interest in health and quality of life is continuing to grow in the second decade of the 21st century, both among professionals actively involved in giving advice to others and among diverse social groups, as well as individually, among those sick and those healthy. Along with recent novelties, traditional Old Polish methods also feature prominently in discussions, but those interested know relatively little about how to access source materials. This letter therefore describes the possibilities for open access to Polish-language health guides from the Renaissance and Baroque era, whose authors included medical doctors and which focused on describing food and herbs used in self-treatment and promoting the healthy life style of the period. The works of Andrzej from Kobylin, Zawacki, Śleszkowski, Olszowski and Haur are briefly described and information is given about their availability in full-text on-line data bases.

  14. The Effects of Quality of Life and Ability to Perform Activities of Daily Living on Mild Cognitive Impairment in Older People Living in Publicly Managed Congregate Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Feng; Yang, Rea-Jeng; Chang, Shu-Fang; Chou, Yuan Hwa; Huang, Ean-Wen

    2017-06-01

    Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is characterized by a decrease in cognitive abilities that does not affect the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). Therefore, this condition is easily overlooked. The prevalence and factors of influence for MCI in older people living in publicly managed congregate housing are currently unknown. This study investigated the prevalence and distribution of MCI in older people living in publicly managed congregate housing and assessed the correlations among quality of life (QoL), ADL, and MCI. This study applied a correlational study design. The participants were older people who met the study criteria and who lived in public housing in Wanhua District, Taipei City, Taiwan. One-on-one interviews were conducted to measure the cognitive abilities of the participants, and 299 valid samples were collected. The prevalence of MCI in older people living in publicly managed congregate housing was 16.1%. The χ test was employed to evaluate the distribution of MCI prevalence and indicated that the group with higher MCI prevalence exhibited the following characteristics: older than 81 years; married; lived in public housing for more than 20 years; cohabiting; had a history of drinking; and exhibited severe memory regression, physical disabilities, psychological distress, and low QoL. The difference between the groups achieved statistical significance (p < .05). After performing logistical regression analysis to control demographic variables, we found that QoL and ADL were critical for predicting MCI. This study confirmed that QoL and ADL correlate significantly with MCI in older people. Maintaining an open and supportive community enables older people to maintain sufficient mental activity, which has been shown to reduce MCI. These findings may provide an important reference for policy makers, educators, researchers, and community practitioners in their development of service strategies for older people.

  15. WA42 Proving its worth - changing public policy for palliative care, end of life care and bereavement through advocacy and communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edghill, Angela; Donohoe, Miriam

    2015-04-01

    The 2015 palliative care budget is €72 million (Euros) but up to €1.3 billion spent on end of life care annually - much of this larger figure unplanned and uncoordinated. Geographic and other inequities evident in palliative care provision. Build support for the development and implementation of a National Strategy on Palliative Care, End of Life and Bereavement. Multi-layered approach to raising awareness and building consensus: Targeting the correct audience who can make change happen Presenting robust evidence including costs justifying reform and investment Demonstrating that issues affect a significant number of people Sharing experience and knowledge Knowing their policy priorities Staying resilient - advancing and introducing new angles to argument Engaging directly as advocates within the political system at all political levels - developing relationships with politicians Identifying advocates in the public service to promote policy change Using a variety of new and existing projects and programmes Encouraging patients and families to be self-advocates - using a novel project for discussing and recording future care preferences Supporting healthcare professionals to become effective advocates for patients Creating alliances to lobby for policy development Using media opportunities to sell the message The recognition of the importance of a strategic approach to palliative and end of life care acknowledged in Parliamentary Committee Report affords an opportunity to develop further policy and practice. This a long - term exercise, dependent on supporting the implementation plan, building momentum and promoting a public dialogue on sensitive issues around dying, death and bereavement. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. Quality of life of women submitted to myocardial revascularization surgery in a public hospital - doi:10.5020/18061230.2010.p237

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Melo de Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the sociodemografic profile, risck factors and the quality of life of women submitted to myocardial revascularization surgery. Methods: We conducted a qualitative study by applying a questionnaire on lifestyle and risk factors and an interview with four guiding questions to 15 revascularized inpatients of cardiology units of a referral public hospital and who had no manifestations of depression prior to surgery. Results: The patients profile showed that 9 (60% were Caucasian, 8 (54% had incomplete primary education, 4(27% were housewives, 9 (60% lived in urban area, 10 (67% were married, all had a family income lower than three minimum wages and 4(27% had only two kids. From the content analysis of the interviews, the following categories aroused: religiosity, disruption with everyday life, family and quality of life. Conclusion: We found out that the knowledge about the psychosocial structure of each patient helps in the treatment of the individual submitted to myocardial revascularization. By identifying the lifestyle and risk factors, women promote self-knowledge, which can avoid habits that lead to cardiovascular diseases. We suggest the development of strategies for prevention and health promotion involving the patients and their families so that there is an extension of hospital care at home and a better adaptation to the new condition.

  17. La mort d’un couple : prière(s et vie publiques Death of a couple: prayer(s and public life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Touzeil-Divina

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Si, avant la Loi du 5 décembre 1905, les Eglises et l’Etat concrétisaient matériellement leurs liens étroits par des rites officiels nommés prières publiques, ceux-ci sont censés avoir été supprimés depuis. C’est l’histoire de cette suppression (après en avoir retenu une définition qui est ici envisagée à travers trois secteurs cardinaux de l’action administrative : la vie universitaire, parlementaire et judiciaire. Dans ces trois hypothèses les prières publiques ont été supprimées de façon différente (respectivement : par désuétude, par une Loi constitutionnelle et par circulaire. On constatera, enfin, l’actualité (troublante de certains de ces rites non exclus totalement de notre vie publique … laïque.If, before the law from December 5, 1905 law, Churches and the State would concretely manifest their close links through official rites called public prayers, these rites are supposed to have since been abolished. This article deals with the history of this abolition – which it first defines – through the study of the three central sectors of the public sector’s activity: university, parliament and judiciary life. In these three hypotheses, prayers have been abolished in various ways (respectively: by obsolescence, by constitutional statute-law and by decree. It will eventually focus on the (disquieting actuality of some of these rites not entirely excluded from our « secular » public life.

  18. An examination of environmental collective identity development across three life-stages: The contribution of social public experiences at zoos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, John Robert

    This research breaks ground toward a revised theory of how collective environmental identity is associated with pro-environmental behaviors. My research comprises three activities that examined the experiences of three groups of people who claim zoo visiting as an important part of their life-story. The three studied groups were; conservation biologists who describe zoo experiences as having significant formative role in their childhood development of environmental values; parents who prioritize zoo visits as an important cultural experiences for their children; and a active zoo volunteers. This research also investigated whether the group experiences these participants had at zoos contributed to the value these people place on their current collective and environmental identities. Field conservationists' interest in learning from animals was validated by parents who also valued education and helped these children develop identities that included other animals in their scope of justice. Parents used zoos instrumentally to promote caring for others as a skill that will serve their children's socio-political future as part of human society. In both cases, these experiences appeared to be shaped around developing attitudes that would include animals in these children's scope of justice in later life. Zoo volunteers included animals in their scope of justice, believing that other species were also important sources of for their knowledge development. Shared positive attitudes toward animals were central to volunteers feeling part of a community and contributing to their collective self-esteem. The group may serve a restorative function in their lives, allowing them to take on a more activist role in society, seeking to promote social norms that are more inclusive of animal rights, and helping them to change their behaviors toward more environmentally responsible ends. This research contributes to the understanding of the theory of planned behavior and the values

  19. Children enrolled in public pre-K: the relation of family life, neighborhood quality, and socioeconomic resources to early competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbarin, Oscar; Bryant, Donna; McCandies, Terry; Burchinal, Margaret; Early, Diane; Clifford, Richard; Pianta, Robert; Howes, Carollee

    2006-04-01

    This article presents data on the family and social environments of 501 children enrolled in public sponsored pre-K in 5 states and tests the relation of these resources to child competence. Structured interviews and questionnaires provide information from parents about the family's social and economic status. Direct assessments and teacher reports provide data on children's literacy, numeracy, and behavioral problems. A majority of the children served in public pre-K lived in poverty and showed decrements in language but not in other domains. A socioeconomic resource factor consisting of parental education, household income, and material need predicted all domains of children's functioning. Children from households high in socioeconomic resources entered pre-K with more well developed language and math skill but fewer behavioral problems than their disadvantaged peers. Neighborhood quality status was related to language competence and mother's marital status to math competence. Neighborhood quality and income level may have their impact on child competence through their relation to dyadic quality and the health and the psychological well-being of the parents. Copyright 2006 APA, all rights reserved.

  20. Quality of life of young clinical doctors in public hospitals in China's developed cities as measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ying; Wang, Hanwei; Tao, Xiaojun

    2015-09-24

    In contemporary Chinese society, obstacles such as frequent violence against medical workers and tense doctor-patient relationships affect the health of Chinese doctors. This study attempted to explore the quality of life (QOL) of young clinical doctors in public hospitals in China's developed cities to study the psychometric properties of QOL and related risk factors of doctors' health. This study sampled young doctors aged 15-45 in 18 public hospitals of three cities in East China (Shanghai, Nanjing, and Hangzhou, N = 762). The Nottingham Health Profile was used to measure QOL, the dependent variable of this study. Methodologies such as reliability analysis, mean comparison, and exploratory factor analysis were used to study related psychometric properties. Almost 90 % of young Chinese clinical doctors have a bachelor's degree or above. Approximately 70.4 % of the doctors have relatively low job titles. Among the sample, 76.1 % have a monthly income ranging from USD 326 to USD 1139, and 91.3 % work over eight hours daily. These respondents have poor sleeping habits and mental functions, but have relatively good physical functions. Being female, low education, low job title, low salary, and long work hours are factors associated with doctors' poor QOL. Regression analysis results emphasize the great effect of high education on the improvement of QOL. Young clinical doctors in public hospitals in Chinese developed cities have poor QOL. Reforms on the current medical health system, improving the working environment of doctors and relieve their occupational stress should be required.

  1. «Life Cycle Contract» in the field of Transport Infrastructure – the New Public-Private Partnership Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica V. Turgeneva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the purpose of this article is to analyze the Russian experience in using public-private partnership mechanism (further – PPP for the supply and maintenance of rolling stock for Moscow public transport vehicle fleet under the «Life Сycle Сontract» (further – LLC. Overview of LLC, benefits, strengths and weakness identification are needed to achieve the objectives. Methods: methodological and theoretical background of the article based on feasibility study of LCC implementation projects as well as practical experience of LCC in CUE «Mosgortrans» and CUE «Moscow Metro». Information based on official data from Ministry of Economic development of the RF, Moscow Mayor official website, Moscow City Investment Agency. Results: research into LCC in PPP system, strengths and weaknesses identification will allow to minimize risks and to improve system. Conclusions and Relevance: this article proves that LCC model under the tready of of rolling stock procurement and maintenance contracts for Moscow public transport can provide a city with the new generation rolling stock, increase comfort and safety, obtain additional reliability assurance and timekeeping, remain high properties of rolling stock during exploitation period. 

  2. Envision Downtown: Public Space Public Life Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Pedestrian and Bicycle counts, Stationary Activity Counts, and Age and Gender counts for 16 locations in Downtown Pittsburgh. Data was collected over a weekday (7am...

  3. Changing concepts of life-saving procedures in 19th century Polish popular first-aid publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieznanowska, Joanna

    2006-12-01

    Throughout Europe, before the era of health insurance, access to professional medical help in an emergency was limited, for the vast majority of people, especially for those living outside big cities. This did not improve in the nineteenth century, even though the number of physicians grew rapidly. The industrial revolution added a range of previously unknown threats and, with the dramatic rise in population, many more people could not afford medical help. Therefore, the need for popular, easy-to-understand instructions on first aid became urgent. In Poland, such publications were especially needed because of the country's political situation, which resulted in restricted access to university medical education. During the nineteenth century, approximately 50 works on first aid were published in Polish, with almost 90% addressed to non-physicians. Evaluation of the contents of these books and the instructions which they contained gives a good insight into the evolution that first aid concepts underwent in the nineteenth century. These range from changes in the most urgent threats (from epidemic disorders to industrial accidents and combat injuries) and the accelerating development of medical knowledge (especially the asepsis / antisepsis concept), to the changing spectrum of readers (with growing numbers of those who could read but were otherwise poorly educated).

  4. Involving Members of the Public in Health Economics Research: Insights from Selecting Health States for Valuation to Estimate Quality-Adjusted Life-Year (QALY) Weights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Elizabeth; Boddy, Kate; Tatnell, Lynn; Hawton, Annie

    2018-04-01

    Over recent years, public involvement in health research has expanded considerably. However, public involvement in designing and conducting health economics research is seldom reported. Here we describe the development, delivery and assessment of an approach for involving people in a clearly defined piece of health economics research: selecting health states for valuation in estimating quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs). This involvement formed part of a study to develop a condition-specific preference-based measure of health-related quality of life, the Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-8D), and the work reported here relates to the identification of plausible, or realistic, health states for valuation. An Expert Panel of three people with multiple sclerosis (MS) was recruited from a local involvement network, and two health economists designed an interactive task that enabled the Panel to identify health states that were implausible, or unlikely to be experienced. Following some initial confusion over terminology, which was resolved by discussion with the Panel, the task worked well and can be adapted to select health states for valuation in the development of any preference-based measure. As part of the involvement process, five themes were identified by the Panel members and the researchers which summarised our experiences of public involvement in this health economics research example: proportionality, task design, prior involvement, protectiveness and partnerships. These are described in the paper, along with their practical implications for involving members of the public in health economics research. Our experience demonstrates how members of the public and health economists can work together to improve the validity of health economics research. Plain Language Summary It has become commonplace to involve members of the public in health service research. However, published reports of involving people in designing health economics research are rare. We

  5. Inverted U-Shaped Dose-Response Curve of the Anxiolytic Effect of Cannabidiol during Public Speaking in Real Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuardi, Antonio W; Rodrigues, Natália P; Silva, Angélica L; Bernardo, Sandra A; Hallak, Jaime E C; Guimarães, Francisco S; Crippa, José A S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the anxiolytic effect of cannabidiol (CBD) in humans follows the same pattern of an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve observed in many animal studies. Sixty healthy subjects of both sexes aged between 18 and 35 years were randomly assigned to five groups that received placebo, clonazepam (1 mg), and CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg). The subjects were underwent a test of public speaking in a real situation (TPSRS) where each subject had to speak in front of a group formed by the remaining participants. Each subject completed the anxiety and sedation factors of the Visual Analog Mood Scale and had their blood pressure and heart rate recorded. These measures were obtained in five experimental sessions with 12 volunteers each. Each session had four steps at the following times (minutes) after administration of the drug/placebo, as time 0: -5 (baseline), 80 (pre-test), 153 (speech), and 216 (post-speech). Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that the TPSRS increased the subjective measures of anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. Student-Newman-Keuls test comparisons among the groups in each phase showed significant attenuation in anxiety scores relative to the placebo group in the group treated with clonazepam during the speech phase, and in the clonazepam and CBD 300 mg groups in the post-speech phase. Clonazepam was more sedative than CBD 300 and 900 mg and induced a smaller increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure than CBD 300 mg. The results confirmed that the acute administration of CBD induced anxiolytic effects with a dose-dependent inverted U-shaped curve in healthy subjects, since the subjective anxiety measures were reduced with CBD 300 mg, but not with CBD 100 and 900 mg, in the post-speech phase.

  6. Inverted U-Shaped Dose-Response Curve of the Anxiolytic Effect of Cannabidiol during Public Speaking in Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio W. Zuardi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the anxiolytic effect of cannabidiol (CBD in humans follows the same pattern of an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve observed in many animal studies. Sixty healthy subjects of both sexes aged between 18 and 35 years were randomly assigned to five groups that received placebo, clonazepam (1 mg, and CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg. The subjects were underwent a test of public speaking in a real situation (TPSRS where each subject had to speak in front of a group formed by the remaining participants. Each subject completed the anxiety and sedation factors of the Visual Analog Mood Scale and had their blood pressure and heart rate recorded. These measures were obtained in five experimental sessions with 12 volunteers each. Each session had four steps at the following times (minutes after administration of the drug/placebo, as time 0: -5 (baseline, 80 (pre-test, 153 (speech, and 216 (post-speech. Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that the TPSRS increased the subjective measures of anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. Student-Newman-Keuls test comparisons among the groups in each phase showed significant attenuation in anxiety scores relative to the placebo group in the group treated with clonazepam during the speech phase, and in the clonazepam and CBD 300 mg groups in the post-speech phase. Clonazepam was more sedative than CBD 300 and 900 mg and induced a smaller increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure than CBD 300 mg. The results confirmed that the acute administration of CBD induced anxiolytic effects with a dose-dependent inverted U-shaped curve in healthy subjects, since the subjective anxiety measures were reduced with CBD 300 mg, but not with CBD 100 and 900 mg, in the post-speech phase.

  7. Occupational stress and health-related quality of life among public sector bank employees: A cross-sectional study in Mysore, Karnataka, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malamardi, Sowmya N; Kamath, Ramachandra; Tiwari, Rajnarayan; Nair, Binu Valsalakumari Sreekumaran; Chandrasekaran, Varalakshmi; Phadnis, Sameer

    2015-01-01

    Occupational morbidities have been estimated to cause an economic loss up to 10-20% of the gross national product of a country. It is an important cause of occupational morbidity and decreased quality of life (QOL) for the workers. The aim of the present study is to assess the level of occupational stress and its association with the QOL among the public sector bank employees. The present study was conducted among employees of public sector banks in Mysore district, Karnataka, India. A cross-sectional study design was used for the study. Job stress was measured by using occupational stress index (OSI) scale questionnaire and health-related QOL was measured using the short form 12 (SF-12) questionnaire. The sample size estimated for the study was 526 and cluster random sampling technique was used. Chi-square test was used to find the association between the study variables and level of stress. Multiple linear regression model was used to find the determinants of health-related QOL among the study subjects. The total number of the study subjects was 546 out of which 57% were males and 43% were females. The proportion of study subjects reporting to be current smokers was 4.2% and almost all study subjects reported occasional alcohol consumption. The mean physical component summary (PCS) score and mental component summary (MCS) using the original United States standardization were 47.90 and 48.30, respectively. The individuals with mild stress scored higher in both PCS and MCS than the individuals who had moderate to severe stress levels. There was significant association of health related quality of life with the age of the respondent,presence of at least one morbidity and level of stress with health-related QOL. This study has shown an association of occupational stress with the QOL. There is a need for interventions aimed at mitigating the occupational stress among employees of the banking sector.

  8. How to analyse a Big Bang of data: the mammoth project at the Cern physics laboratory in Geneva to recreate the conditions immediately after the universe began requires computing power on an unprecedented scale

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas, Kim

    2005-01-01

    How to analyse a Big Bang of data: the mammoth project at the Cern physics laboratory in Geneva to recreate the conditions immediately after the universe began requires computing power on an unprecedented scale

  9. Is public communication about end-of-life care helping to inform all? Cancer news coverage in African American versus mainstream media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jessica M; Ten Have, Thomas; Casarett, David

    2012-04-15

    Because cancers are a leading cause of death, these diseases receive a great deal of news attention. However, because news media frequently target specific racial or ethnic audiences, some populations may receive different information, and it is unknown whether reporting equally informs all audiences about the options for care at the end of life. This study of news reporting compared "mainstream" (general market) media with African American media, which serves the largest minority group. The specific goal of this study was to determine whether these news media communicate differently about cure-directed cancer treatment and end-of-life alternatives. This content analysis included 660 cancer news stories from online and print media that targeted either African American or mainstream audiences. The main outcome measures included whether reporting discussed adverse events of cancer treatment, cancer treatment failure, cancer death/dying, and end-of-life palliative or hospice care. Unadjusted and adjusted analyses indicated that the news stories in the African American media are less likely than those in mainstream media to discuss each of the topics studied. Comparing the proportions of news stories in mainstream versus African American media, 31.6% versus 13.6% discussed adverse events (odds ratio [OR], 2.92; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.51-5.66; P = .001); 14.1% versus 4.2% mentioned treatment failure (OR, 3.79; 95% CI, 1.45-9.88; P = .006); and 11.9% versus 3.8% focused on death/dying (OR, 3.42; 95% CI, 1.39-8.38; P = .007). Finally, although very few news stories discussed end-of-life hospice or palliative care, all were found in mainstream media (7/396 vs 0/264). The African American news media sampled are less likely than mainstream news media to portray negative cancer outcomes and end-of-life care. Given media's segmented audiences, these findings raise concerns that not all audiences are being informed equally well. Because media content is modifiable

  10. Is Public Communication about End-of-Life Care Helping to Inform All?: Cancer News Coverage in African American vs. Mainstream Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Jess M.; Ten Have, Thomas; Casarett, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Because cancers are a leading cause of death, these diseases receive a great deal of news attention. However, because news media frequently target specific racial or ethnic audiences, some populations may receive different information, and it is unknown whether reporting equally informs all about options for care at the end of life. This study of US news reporting compares “mainstream” (general market) media to African American media, which serves the largest minority group. The specific goal of this study was to determine whether these news media communicate differently about cure-directed cancer treatment and end-of-life alternatives. Methods This content analysis includes 660 cancer news stories from online and print media that target either African American or mainstream audiences. The main outcome measures include whether reporting discussed: adverse events of cancer treatment; cancer treatment failure; cancer death/dying; and end-of-life palliative or hospice care. Results Unadjusted and adjusted analyses indicate that the news stories in the African American media are less likely than those in mainstream media to discuss each of the topics studied. Comparing the proportions of news stories in mainstream vs. African American media , 31.6% vs. 13.6% discussed adverse events (OR 2.92; 95% CI 1.51-5.66; P=0.001); 14.1% vs. 4.2% mentioned treatment failure (OR, 3.79; 95% CI 1.45-9.88; P=0.006); and 11.9% vs. 3.8% focused on death/dying (OR, 3.42; 95% CI 1.39-8.38; P=.007). Lastly, although very few news stories discussed end-of-life hospice or palliative care, all were found in mainstream media (7/396 vs. 0/264). Conclusion The African American news media sampled are less likely than mainstream news media to portray negative cancer outcomes and end-of-life care. Given media's segmented audiences, these findings raise concerns that not all audiences are being informed equally well. Because media content is modifiable, there may be opportunities to

  11. Trend of public perception on nuclear energy and future PA programs for winning public consensus in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Seung-Jin

    1996-01-01

    Before the second half of 1980's, the Korean government could carry out the nuclear power projects easily without any oppositions. However, the anti-nuclear and environmental preservation movement has been more vigorous after Chernobyl accident. Since 1987, the democratized social environment and improved standard of living which is resulted from economic growth have increased the public interest on a positive environment and safety of life. Moreover, the introduction of local self-government system has imposed heavy burdens on nuclear power development. The prevailing of local egoism is also a hard task to overcome in securing nuclear facility sites. The public began to recognize the necessity of nuclear energy. However, this is still a far cry from the ultimate target to the site selection. Therefore, winning public acceptance is the most important issue in implementing the nation's nuclear programs without significant obstacles, and it is necessary to develop sociopolitical approaches to deal with nuclear issues. (author)

  12. Trend of public perception on nuclear energy and future PA programs for winning public consensus in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Seung-Jin [Organization for Korea Atomic Energy Awareness, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    Before the second half of 1980`s, the Korean government could carry out the nuclear power projects easily without any oppositions. However, the anti-nuclear and environmental preservation movement has been more vigorous after Chernobyl accident. Since 1987, the democratized social environment and improved standard of living which is resulted from economic growth have increased the public interest on a positive environment and safety of life. Moreover, the introduction of local self-government system has imposed heavy burdens on nuclear power development. The prevailing of local egoism is also a hard task to overcome in securing nuclear facility sites. The public began to recognize the necessity of nuclear energy. However, this is still a far cry from the ultimate target to the site selection. Therefore, winning public acceptance is the most important issue in implementing the nation`s nuclear programs without significant obstacles, and it is necessary to develop sociopolitical approaches to deal with nuclear issues. (author)

  13. Neonatal near miss and mortality: factors associated with life-threatening conditions in newborns at six public maternity hospitals in Southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Lorena Kale

    Full Text Available Abstract: We aimed to evaluate factors associated with cases of neonatal near miss and neonatal deaths at six public maternity hospitals in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro States, Brazil, in 2011. A prospective hospital-based birth cohort investigated these outcomes among live births with life-threatening conditions. Associations were tested using multinomial logistic regression models with hierarchical levels. High rates of near miss were observed for maternal syphilis (52.2‰ live births and lack of prenatal care (80.8‰ live births. Maternal black skin color (OR = 1.9; 95%CI: 1.2-3.2, hemorrhage (OR = 2.2; 95%CI: 1.3-3.9, hypertension (OR = 3.0; 95%CI: 2.0-4.4, syphilis (OR = 3.3; 95%CI: 1.5-7.2, lack of prenatal care (OR = 5.6; 95%CI: 2.6-11.7, cesarean section and hospital, were associated with near miss; while hemorrhage (OR = 4.6; 95%CI: 1,8-11.3, lack of prenatal care (OR = 17.4; 95%CI: 6.5-46.8 and hospital, with death. Improvements in access to qualified care for pregnant women and newborns are necessary to reduce neonatal life-threatening conditions.

  14. Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit: is it an adequate public health response to addressing the issue of caregiver burden in end-of-life care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison M; Eby, Jeanette A; Crooks, Valorie A; Stajduhar, Kelli; Giesbrecht, Melissa; Vuksan, Mirjana; Cohen, S Robin; Brazil, Kevin; Allan, Diane

    2011-05-18

    An increasingly significant public health issue in Canada, and elsewhere throughout the developed world, pertains to the provision of adequate palliative/end-of-life (P/EOL) care. Informal caregivers who take on the responsibility of providing P/EOL care often experience negative physical, mental, emotional, social and economic consequences. In this article, we specifically examine how Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit (CCB)--a contributory benefits social program aimed at informal P/EOL caregivers--operates as a public health response in sustaining informal caregivers providing P/EOL care, and whether or not it adequately addresses known aspects of caregiver burden that are addressed within the population health promotion (PHP) model. As part of a national evaluation of Canada's Compassionate Care Benefit, 57 telephone interviews were conducted with Canadian informal P/EOL caregivers in 5 different provinces, pertaining to the strengths and weaknesses of the CCB and the general caregiving experience. Interview data was coded with Nvivo software and emerging themes were identified by the research team, with such findings published elsewhere. The purpose of the present analysis was identified after comparing the findings to the literature specific to caregiver burden and public health, after which data was analyzed using the PHP model as a guiding framework. Informal caregivers spoke to several of the determinants of health outlined in the PHP model that are implicated in their burden experience: gender, income and social status, working conditions, health and social services, social support network, and personal health practises and coping strategies. They recognized the need for improving the CCB to better address these determinants. This study, from the perspective of family caregivers, demonstrates that the CCB is not living up to its full potential in sustaining informal P/EOL caregivers. Effort is required to transform the CCB so that it may fulfill the

  15. Quentin Skinner, Staten og friheten. Oslo: Res Publica, 2011. José Luis Martí and Philip Pettit, A Political Philosophy in Public Life. Civic Republicanism in Zapatero's Spain. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2010 (Simon Laumann Jørgensen)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Simon Laumann

    2012-01-01

    Anmeldelse af Quentin Skinner, Staten og friheten, Oslo: Res Publica 2011, 199 NOK & José Luis Martí & Philip Pettit, A Political Philosophy in Public Life. Civic Republicanism in Zapatero’s Spain, Princeton: Princeton University Press 2010, $ 24.95......Anmeldelse af Quentin Skinner, Staten og friheten, Oslo: Res Publica 2011, 199 NOK & José Luis Martí & Philip Pettit, A Political Philosophy in Public Life. Civic Republicanism in Zapatero’s Spain, Princeton: Princeton University Press 2010, $ 24.95...

  16. State of the ART: clinical efficacy and improved quality of life in the public antiretroviral therapy program, Free State province, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wouters, E; Van Loon, F; Van Rensburg, D; Meulemans, H

    2009-11-01

    The South African public-sector antiretroviral treatment (ART) program has yielded promising early results. To extend and reinforce these preliminary findings, we undertook a detailed assessment of the clinical efficacy and outcomes over two years of ART. The primary objective was to assess the clinical outcomes and adverse effects of two years of ART, while identifying the possible effects of baseline health and patient characteristics. A secondary objective was to address the interplay between positive and negative outcomes (clinical benefits versus adverse effects) in terms of the patients' physical and emotional quality of life (QoL). Clinical outcome, baseline characteristics, health status, and physical and emotional QoL scores were determined from clinical files and interviews with 268 patients enrolled in the Free State ART program at three time points (6, 12, and 24 months of ART). Age, sex, education, and baseline health (CD4 cell count and viral load) were all independently associated with the ART outcome in the early stages of treatment, but their impact diminished as the treatment progressed. The number of patients classified as treatment successes increased over the first two years of ART, whereas the proportion of patients experiencing adverse effects diminished. Importantly, our findings show that ART had strong and stable positive effects on physical and emotional QoL. These favorable results demonstrate that a well-managed public-sector ART program can be very successful within a high-HIV-prevalence resource-limited setting. This finding emphasizes the need to adopt treatment scale-up as a key policy priority, while at the same time ensuring that the highest standards of healthcare provision are maintained. Healthcare services should also target vulnerable groups (males, less-educated patients, those with low baseline CD4 cell counts, and high baseline viral loads) who are most likely to experience treatment failure.

  17. Preferences for care towards the end of life when decision-making capacity may be impaired: A large scale cross-sectional survey of public attitudes in Great Britain and the United States.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma Clarke

    Full Text Available There is continuing public debate about treatment preferences at the end of life, and the acceptability and legal status of treatments that sustain or end life. However, most surveys use binary yes/no measures, and little is known about preferences in neurological disease when decision-making capacity is lost, as most studies focus on cancer. This study investigates changes in public preferences for care towards the end of life, with a focus on measures to sustain or end life.Large-scale international public opinion surveys using a six-stage patient vignette, respondents chose a level of intervention for each stage as health and decision-making capacity deteriorated. Cross-sectional representative samples of the general public in Great Britain and the USA (N = 2016. Primary outcome measure: changes in respondents' preferences for care, measured on a four-point scale designed before data collection. The scale ranged from: maintaining life at all costs; to intervention with agreement; to no intervention; to measures for ending life.There were no significant differences between GB and USA. Preference for measures to sustain life at all costs peaked at short-term memory loss (30.2%, n = 610. Respondents selecting 'measures to help me die peacefully' increased from 3.9% to 37.0% as the condition deteriorated, with the largest increase occurring when decision-making capacity was lost (10.3% to 23.0%. Predictors of choosing 'measures to help me die peacefully' at any stage were: previous personal experience (OR = 1.34, p<0.010, and older age (OR = 1.09 per decade, p<0.010. Negative predictors: living with children (OR = 0.72, p<0.010 and being of "black" race/ethnicity (OR = 0.45, p<0.001.Public opinion was uniform between GB and USA, but markedly heterogeneous. Despite contemporaneous capacitous consent providing an essential legal safeguard in most jurisdictions, there was a high prevalence of preference for "measures to end my life peacefully" when

  18. Effort-reward and work-life imbalance, general stress and burnout among employees of a large public hospital in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmig, Oliver; Brauchli, Rebecca; Bauer, Georg F

    2012-05-31

    Effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and work-life imbalance (WLI) are recognised risk factors for work stress and burnout but have not been investigated conjointly so far and compared with each other in this regard. The present cross-sectional study provides initial evidence by studying associations of ERI and WLI with general stress and burnout simultaneously. The study was based on survey data collected in 2007 among the personnel of a large public hospital in the canton of Zurich covering a random sample of 502 employees of all professions and positions. Prevalence rates, correlation coefficients, standardised regression coefficients and odds ratios were calculated as measures of association. Concerning the main research question and relating to the entire study sample, WLI was found to be more strongly associated with general stress and burnout than ERI. As stratified analyses with regard to burnout have shown, this applied especially to nursing, technical care and emergency staffs who account for more than three fifths of the study population. But for other professional categories like physicians, therapists and medical-technical personnel the opposite of a stronger association of ERI with burnout was found. Results also suggested that general stress plays a (rather minor) mediating role in the relationships between ERI and burnout and particularly between WLI and burnout. For the prevention of chronic stress and burnout one should consider both high efforts put into work as well as all job demands that are competing and interfering with family responsibilities or other private activities should be considered.

  19. Impacts of air pollution wave on years of life lost: A crucial way to communicate the health risks of air pollution to the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jing; Pan, Xiaochuan; Guo, Xinbiao; Li, Guoxing

    2018-04-01

    Limited studies have explored the impacts of exposure to sustained high levels of air pollution (air pollution wave) on mortality. Given that the frequency, intensity and duration of air pollution wave has been increasing in highly polluted regions recently, understanding the impacts of air pollution wave is crucial. In this study, air pollution wave was defined as 2 or more consecutive days with air pollution index (API) > 100. The impacts of air pollution wave on years of life lost (YLL) due to non-accidental, cardiovascular and respiratory deaths were evaluated by considering both consecutive days with high levels of air pollution and daily air pollution levels in Tianjin, China, from 2006 to 2011. The results showed the durational effect of consecutive days with high levels of air pollution was substantial in addition to the effect of daily air pollution. For instance, the durational effect was related to an increase in YLL of 116.6 (95% CI: 4.8, 228.5) years from non-accidental deaths when the air pollution wave was sustained for 4 days, while the corresponding daily air pollution's effect was 121.2 (95% CI: 55.2, 187.1) years. A better interpretation of the health risks of air pollution wave is crucial for air pollution control policy making and public health interventions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ressenya a Henry Ettinghausen, How the Press Began. The Pre-Periodical Printed News in Early Modern Europe, A Coruña, SIELAE – Facultad de Filología, Universidade da Coruña, 2015,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricard Expósito i Amagat

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ressenya a Henry Ettinghausen, How the Press Began. The Pre-Periodical Printed News in Early Modern Europe, A Coruña, SIELAE – Facultad de Filología, Universidade da Coruña, 2015, 302 pp., 80 il·ls., ISBN: 978-84-608-3423-6 Review to  Henry Ettinghausen, How the Press Began. The Pre-Periodical Printed News in Early Modern Europe, A Coruña, SIELAE – Facultad de Filología, Universidade da Coruña, 2015, 302 pp., 80 il·ls., ISBN: 978-84-608-3423-6

  1. Melanoma screening: Informing public health policy with quantitative modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Gilmore

    Full Text Available Australia and New Zealand share the highest incidence rates of melanoma worldwide. Despite the substantial increase in public and physician awareness of melanoma in Australia over the last 30 years-as a result of the introduction of publicly funded mass media campaigns that began in the early 1980s -mortality has steadily increased during this period. This increased mortality has led investigators to question the relative merits of primary versus secondary prevention; that is, sensible sun exposure practices versus early detection. Increased melanoma vigilance on the part of the public and among physicians has resulted in large increases in public health expenditure, primarily from screening costs and increased rates of office surgery. Has this attempt at secondary prevention been effective? Unfortunately epidemiologic studies addressing the causal relationship between the level of secondary prevention and mortality are prohibitively difficult to implement-it is currently unknown whether increased melanoma surveillance reduces mortality, and if so, whether such an approach is cost-effective. Here I address the issue of secondary prevention of melanoma with respect to incidence and mortality (and cost per life saved by developing a Markov model of melanoma epidemiology based on Australian incidence and mortality data. The advantages of developing a methodology that can determine constraint-based surveillance outcomes are twofold: first, it can address the issue of effectiveness; and second, it can quantify the trade-off between cost and utilisation of medical resources on one hand, and reduced morbidity and lives saved on the other. With respect to melanoma, implementing the model facilitates the quantitative determination of the relative effectiveness and trade-offs associated with different levels of secondary and tertiary prevention, both retrospectively and prospectively. For example, I show that the surveillance enhancement that began in

  2. University Students' Views of a Public Service Graduation Requirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moely, Barbara E.; Ilustre, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    As New Orleans began to rebuild after Hurricane Katrina, Tulane University also began its recovery process. A new initiative in the recovery was the establishment of a public service graduation requirement for undergraduate students. Attitudes toward the requirement were assessed for 290 first-year and 257 advanced students in fall 2006. The…

  3. Satisfying story of how it all began

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liddle, Andrew

    2004-12-01

    {sup N}ow this 'Big Bang' idea seemed to me to be unsatisfactory...for it is an irrational process that cannot be described in scientific terms.' With this rather derisory remark (or at least so intended) in a 1950 radio broadcast, Fred Hoyle named the theory that rivalled his steady-state theory. The Big Bang has subsequently become the dominant paradigm in attempts to understand our universe. It is also one of the dominant ways in which popular-science writing seeks to persuade people to part with their cash. Simon Singh has rapidly made a name for himself as one of the leading popularizers of science, with his previous books Fermat's Last Theorem and The Code Book bringing accessible science to a wide audience . Big Bang brings him to a much busier marketplace, where he must compete both with other science writers and with working scientists. (U.K.)

  4. The day the Internet age began

    CERN Multimedia

    Cerf, Vinton G

    2009-01-01

    Forty years ago today the first message was sent between computers on the ARPANET. Vinto G. Cerf, who was a principal programmer on the project, reflects on how our online world was shaped by its innovative origins. (2 pages)

  5. Submission of the national commission of the public debate on the options concerning the long life high and medium activity radioactive wastes management; Saisine de la commission nationale du debat public sur les options generales en matiere de gestion des dechets radioactifs de haute activite et de moyenne activite a vie longue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    This document deals with the presentation of a public debate on the radioactive wastes management and the opportunities of its organization. It presents successively the long life high and medium activity radioactive wastes, the today radioactive wastes management policy and some questions and topics which could be discussed during the debate. (A.L.B.)

  6. Providing End-Of-Life Care in Disability Community Living Services: An Organizational Capacity-Building Model Using a Public Health Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grindrod, Andrea; Rumbold, Bruce

    2017-01-01

    Background: There is broad consensus within the disability field that the end-of-life care offered to people with intellectual disabilities should be of a quality consistent with that advocated by contemporary palliative care. In practice, however, various barriers are encountered when applying palliative care strategies to the end-of-life care of…

  7. Aggression, Recognition and Qualification: On the Social Psychology of Adult Education in Everyday Life. [Publications from the Adult Education Research Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kirsten

    This paper discusses the impact of life history and everyday life in the context of training unskilled adults for social work in Denmark. It describes origins of these two texts used as empirical material: a discussion by a group of long-term unemployed skilled adult male workers who went through a 2-year training program to obtain permanent…

  8. Publicity and public relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosha, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses approaches to using publicity and public relations to meet the goals of the NASA Space Grant College. Methods universities and colleges can use to publicize space activities are presented.

  9. Effectiveness of various public private partnership pavement rehabilitation treatments: A big data informatics survival analysis of pavement service life : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-29

    Past research efforts have used a wide variety of methodological approaches to analyze pavement performance indicators, pavement rehabilitation treatments, and pavement service life. Using big data informatics methods, the intent of this study is to ...

  10. Gender difference in health related quality of life and associated factors among people living with HIV/AIDS attending anti-retroviral therapy at public health facilities, western Ethiopia: comparative cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebremichael, Delelegn Yilma; Hadush, Kokeb Tesfamariam; Kebede, Ermiyas Mulu; Zegeye, Robel Tezera

    2018-04-23

    Though HIV/AIDS has multidimensional consequences on quality of life, there is a gap in measuring and monitoring health related quality of life of HIV/AIDS patients. Hence, this study intended to measure health related quality of life domains and associated determinants among people living with HIV/AIDS in western Ethiopia. A comparative cross-sectional study was conducted among 520 HIV/AIDS patients on anti-retroviral therapy in public health facilities in West Shoa Zone, Western Ethiopia from April to May, 2016. Participants were selected using simple random sampling method. Quality of life was measured using WHOQOL-HIV BREF and depression was assessed using Beck Depression Inventory, Second Edition (BDI-II). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 22. An independent sample t-test was used to compare quality of life domains between men and women and logistic regression analysis was used to determine independent predictors. Females had significantly lower quality of life in physical, psychological, independence and environmental domains as compared with males except social relationship and spiritual domains. Depressed HIV patients had significantly lower quality of life in all domains as compared with HIV infected patients without depression in both genders. Malnutrition and anemia were significantly associated with poor physical, psychological, independence and environmental domains. Anemic women had 1.9 times lower independence quality of life compared with women who had no anemia (AOR = 1.9, 95%CI: 1.4, 3.5). Tuberculosis was also predictor of physical, psychological, independence and social domains in both genders. TB/HIV co-infected females had 2.0 times poorer environmental health compared to only HIV infected females (AOR = 2.0, 95%CI: 1.2, 3.5). Family support, education and occupation were also independent significant predictors of QOL domains in both genders. In females, residence was significantly associated with independence (AOR = 1.8, 95%CI

  11. Public Health

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ian health ministry, and the Canadian. International ... Tanzanian and Canadian researchers began work on ... information on the major causes of death ... The effects have been dramatic. Accord- ... destroy mosquito breeding grounds, such.

  12. 'The stigma attached isn't true of real life': Challenging public perception of dementia through a participatory approach involving people with dementia (Innovative Practice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Laura; Innes, Anthea; Poyner, Christopher; Hambidge, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    This paper discusses the potential impact of viewing public performances of an orchestra comprising people with dementia, family members, student volunteers and professional symphony orchestra members in contributing to challenging negative perceptions of dementia. Negative perceptions of dementia abound despite recent policy attempts to challenge the stigma associated with the condition. This paper reports on the findings from the performance element of a music project for people with dementia, known as the BUDI Orchestra, designed to replicate the traditional rehearse and perform cycle of musicians. Data were collected via self-completion questionnaires from audience members ( N = 109) at three public performances. The performances exceeded the expectations of the general public, and findings suggest a positive impact on perceptions of dementia, demonstrating the power and potential of participatory approaches showcasing the achievements of those living with dementia when attempting to raise awareness of dementia and challenge negative perceptions.

  13. Using Disability-Adjusted Life Years and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis to define Priorities for the Public Health Care Sector in Zimbabwe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Schultz

    by estimates from epidemiological studies from other settings if no Zimbabwean sources were available. Disease and public health experts were consulted about the identification of the best possible sources of information, the quality of these sources and the data adjustments made. Epidemiological information...

  14. public spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this issue is PUBLIC SPACES. It is familiar and clear to every citizen. The streets and courtyards as childhood experiences remain with us forever. And these are the places where we come with our parents at weekends, where we meet friends, where we have dates and where we already come for a walk with our children.The history of public spaces is long and captivating. It was the main city squares where the most important events took place in history. The Agoras of Ancient Greece and the Roman Forums, the squares of Vatican, Paris and London, Moscow and Saint Petersburg… Greve, Trafalgar, Senate, Palace, Red, Bolotnaya – behind every name there is life of capitals, countries and nations.Public spaces, their shapes, image and development greatly influence the perception of the city as a whole. Both visitors and inhabitants can see in public spaces not only the visage but the heart, the soul and the mind of the city.Unfortunately, sometimes we have to prove the value of public spaces and defend them from those who consider them nothing but a blank space, nobody’s land destined for barbarous development.What should happen to make citizens perceive public spaces as their own and to make authorities consider development and maintenance of squares and parks their priority task against the  background of increasing competition between cities and the fight for human capital? Lately they more often say about “a high-quality human capital”. And now, when they say “the city should be liveable” they add “for all groups of citizens, including the creative class”.

  15. Measuring the accomplishments of public participation programs: Overview of a methodological study performed for DOE's Office of Environmental Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweitzer, M.; Carnes, S.A.; Peelle, E.B.; Wolfe, A.K.

    1997-01-01

    Recently, staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed a study for the Office of Intergovernmental and Public Accountability within the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), examining how to measure the success of public participation programs. While the study began with a thorough literature review, the primary emphasis of this research effort was on getting key stakeholders to help identify attributes of successful public participation in EM activities and to suggest how those attributes might be measured. Interviews were conducted at nine DOE sites that provided substantial variety in terms of geographic location, types of environmental management activities undertaken, the current life-cycle stage of those EM efforts, and the public participation mechanisms utilized. Approximately 12 to 15 oral interviews were conducted at each site, and each respondent also was asked to complete a written survey. Those interviewed included: non-regulatory state and local government officials; project managers and public participation staff for DOE and its management and operations contractors; non-government groups concerned with environmental protection, public safety, and health issues; federal and state environmental regulators; business organizations; civic groups; and other interested parties. While this study examined only those public participation programs sponsored by DOE, the resulting findings also have applicability to the public involvement efforts sponsored by many other public and private sector organizations

  16. Life between buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Jan

    2001-01-01

    A classic is republished. Life between Buildings was first published in 1971. This book - frequently revised over the years - is still the best source for understanding how people use public spaces in our cities. Published in many languages, it is a standard textbook in Architecture and Planning...... Schools around the world, and continues to be the undisputed basic introduction to the interplay between public space design and social life. This book is now available in its third English language version....

  17. Talking about living and dying with the oldest old: public involvement in a study on end of life care in care homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodman Claire

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public involvement in research on sensitive subjects, such as death and dying, can help to ensure that questions are framed to reflect the interests of their peers, develop a shared understanding of issues raised, and moderate the often unequal power relationship between researcher and participant. This paper describes the contribution and impact of older members of a Public Involvement in Research group (PIRg to a study on living and dying in care homes. Methods A longitudinal study, with a mixed method approach, its aims were to capture key experiences, events and change over one year, of older people resident in participating care homes in the East of England. Residents were interviewed up to three times and their case notes were reviewed four times over the year. Interviews were semi structured, and recorded. Four members of a Public Involvement in Research group (PIRg contributed to preliminary discussions about the research and three were involved with many of the subsequent stages of the research process including the facilitation of discussion groups with residents. Results There were three areas where the involvement of the Public Involvement in Research group (PIRg positively influenced the study process. These were recruitment, governance and safeguarding, and in collaboration with the residents in the care homes, the discussion and interpretation of emergent findings. PIRg members were of similar age to the residents and their involvement provided different and often more reflective insights of the significance of the findings for the participants. There were examples where decision making about the range of PIRg participation was not always negotiable, and this raised issues about power relationships within the team. Nevertheless, PIRg members expressed personal benefit and satisfaction through participating in the research and a commitment to continue to support research with this older age group. Conclusions

  18. Saving Water Means Saving Life

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩文盛

    2005-01-01

    On the""""""""World Water Day"""""""" (March 22, 2005) the United Nations began an """"""""International Decade for Action: Water for Life"""""""" to focus the world's attention on water resources. """"""""Water is essential for life"""""""", said the UN Secretary-General, Kofi Annanin, in an address prepared for the ceremony. """"""""This is an urgent matter of human development and human dignity."""""""" Is this matter so important to the Chinese people? What can be done to help solve the water resources problem in China? Please write down your views in a composition in no less than 200 words.

  19. Tree of Life: Gustav with Gusto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Joan

    2010-01-01

    Gustav Klimt was born in Vienna in 1862. At age 14, he received a scholarship to the Vienna Public Art School. After graduating, he painted realistic portraits and later began to paint landscapes. Klimt was best known for creating a style known as Art Nouveau, in answer to the Industrial Revolution of the early 20th century. Art Nouveau was a…

  20. Investigating Teachers' Life Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli, Abidin; Baysal, Nigah

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the life satisfaction perceptions of teachers working at public primary schools according to some variables. In this study, descriptive survey model was used. A random sample of 200 teachers from 25 public primary schools in Diyarbakir/Turkey during 2013-2014 academic year were selected to represent the…

  1. Life Expectancy in 2040

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canudas-Romo, Vladimir; DuGoff, Eva H; Wu, Albert W.

    2016-01-01

    We use expert clinical and public health opinion to estimate likely changes in the prevention and treatment of important disease conditions and how they will affect future life expectancy. Focus groups were held including clinical and public health faculty with expertise in the six leading causes...

  2. Course 'The radiations and the life', an alternative of information to the public; Curso 'Las radiaciones y la vida', una alternativa de informacion al publico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumenigo G, C.; Quevedo G, J.R.; Betancourt H, L.A.; Fuente P, A. de la; Perez R, Y.; Diaz G, P.I.; Jerez V, P.F. [Centro Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear (Cuba); Contreras M, M. [Oficina de Regulacion Ambiental y Seguridad Nuclear (Cuba); Prendes A, M.; Garcia L, O.; Cardenas, J.; Zerquera J, T.; Benitez, J.C. [Centro de Proteccion e Higiene de las Radiaciones (Cuba); Oliva, J.P.; Alert, J. [Instituto Nacional de Oncologia y Radiobiologia (Cuba); Barcelo, C. [Instituto Nacional de Higiene de los Alimentos y Microbiologia (Cuba); Pedroso, L.E. [Hospital ' Salvador Allende' (Cuba); Diaz, A. [Agencia de Energia Nuclear y Tecnologia de Avanzadas (Cuba); Perez, S.; Morin, J. [Centro de Isotopos (Cuba)]. e-mail: cruz@orasen.co.cu

    2006-07-01

    The public of the XXI century is avid one to obtain information on the advances of the science and the technique and their impact in the daily life, for it has it a powerful arsenal of means that constantly transmit all that being of interest can for the big masses. However the technical complexity of the information that is transmitted and the sensationalist intentions with which they are managed it can in many cases to distort their scientific rigor and to misinform to the public in question. The Nuclear energy from their emergence, and for the disastrous consequences of their initial use with warlike ends, it has been target of those more diverse manipulations and misrepresentations in a such way that it left generating a strong oppositor current together with their development. It is for it that the International Atomic Energy Agency recommends to all the countries members that together with the development of the applications of the nuclear energy one works in the information to the public on those risks and benefits of the use of the same one. This recommendation this in full agreement with the intentions of Cuba of elevating the population's integral general culture systematically and for it the authors of this work designed a course that with the Title of 'The Radiations and the Life', it was proposed at the corresponding levels to be transmitted by National Television in the mark of the program 'University for All'. The present work exposes the experience of the authors in the realization of this course, the same one represented a challenge for the specialists of very high qualification that were responsible for the elaboration of a pamphlet or tabloid with the contents of the course and that they imparted the conferences in the popular television program. An important and novel element of this course was the dialogue established with the public through the Electronic mail: radiacionesyvida at cnsn.cu that stayed flowingly during

  3. WA4 Volunteering in partnership: a public health approach to delivering compassionate care to those at end of life and the frail elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gail

    2015-04-01

    Young people are often denied volunteering experiences with vulnerable dying people as this is considered to be 'too distressing'. This project challenged this paternalistic attitude and trained young people to volunteer in the hospice, and other organisations to enhance the delivery of compassionate care. To promote dignity in care, for older people, people with dementia, those at end of life and those with learning disabilities. To reduce social isolation and the stigma associated with dying and being old. To create new volunteering opportunities for young people to raise their awareness of the needs of the dying and the frail elderly. Develop a model of best practice - that could be replicated in other parts of the country. A health promotion approach was used combining education and a community development, partnership approach. Results 120 Volunteers delivered over 3,650 hrs of volunteering activities, supporting individuals to engage in social activities. The project broke myths about having 16-18 year olds volunteering. The relationship between the hospice and the local community has strengthened and the employability skills for the young people taking part have increased. 16% of those who responded to an exit survey had gained full time employment, 9% had gained university places. The personalisation of care for the frail elderly and those at end of life has increased by the use of volunteers. Young volunteers need mentoring. Staff needs support to feel confident to utilise the volunteers and let go of myths about risks. © 2015, Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. From networked publics to issue publics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkbak, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    As an increasing part of everyday life becomes connected with the web in many areas of the globe, the question of how the web mediates political processes becomes still more urgent. Several scholars have started to address this question by thinking about the web in terms of a public space....... In this paper, we aim to make a twofold contribution towards the development of the concept of publics in web science. First, we propose that although the notion of publics raises a variety of issues, two major concerns continue to be user privacy and democratic citizenship on the web. Well-known arguments hold......, this paper points towards an alternative way to think about publics by proposing a pragmatist reorientation of the public/private distinction in web science, away from seeing two spheres that needs to be kept separate, towards seeing the public and the private as something that is continuously connected...

  5. New life for CERN's first accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    Building 300 right in the middle of the CERN site houses a special "antique": the Laboratory's very first accelerator. After several years in the wilderness following its decommissioning in 1990, the Synchrocyclotron is set to take on a new lease of life in the near future, this time as a visitor attraction.   The Synchrocyclotron as it was in 1975; it will be restored to this configuration for public viewing. The Synchrocyclotron (SC) began operation in 1957, two years before the PS was commissioned. Running at an energy of 600 MeV and producing beams of protons, neutrons, muons and pions, it helped to further research in the nuclear physics field for no fewer than 33 years, providing beams for various decay experiments as well as the muon capture experiment (*). Since the SC was decommissioned in 1990, three of its four buildings (160, 161 and 301) have been converted into offices for members of the ALICE collaboration, but the shielded hall housing the machine it...

  6. Low-dose irradiation of fresh, non-frozen chicken and other preservation methods for shelf-life extension and for improving its public-health quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahan, R.S.; Howker, J.J.

    1978-01-01

    Fresh eviscerated broiler chicken, both with salt treatment (part of kosher processing) and without, were gamma irradiated and stored at -1, 0, +1.6 and +4.4 0 C for up to 31 days. At intervals samples were withdrawn for microbial, physical and sensory evaluations. Combination of a 250 krad irradiation dose and storage at 1.6 0 C were adequate for a radurized chicken process. The product was free from microbial spoilage and of excellent quality for at least 15 days and, in addition, was essentially free from Salmonella and other organisms of public-health significance. It is therefore proposed that the doses recommended recently by the Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Committee are unnecessarily high and should be markedly reduced. A 500 krad dose caused marked flesh discolouring without improving the microbiological or enzymatic preservation, and this is likely to be found generally true for commercial poultry flocks under veterinary inspection. Flesh discolouring of chicken treated with 300 krad is unlikely to be detectable by the untrained eye and a maximum dose of 300 krad should be the target for non-frozen chicken irradiation processes. (author)

  7. Poorer functionality is related to better quality of life response following the use of biological drugs: 6-month outcomes in a prospective cohort from the Public Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde), Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira Junior, Haliton Alves; dos Santos, Jéssica Barreto; Acurcio, Francisco Assis; Almeida, Alessandra Maciel; Kakehasi, Adriana Maria; Alvares, Juliana; de Carvalho, Luis Fernando Duarte; Cherchiglia, Mariangela Leal

    2015-06-01

    We aim to analyze factors associated with the quality of life (QOL) response of individuals with rheumatic diseases treated by the Public Health System (Sistema Único de Saúde) with biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs). Data from 428 patients using bDMARDs were collected using a standardized form at baseline and 6 months after the onset of treatment. The average reduction of the scores on EuroQol-five dimension was 0.11 ± 0.18 6 months after the onset of treatment with bDMARDs, denoting significant improvement of the participants' QOL. All the investigated types of disease exhibited significant improvement at the 6-month assessment, without any difference among them (p = 0.965). The participants with baseline poorest functionality and best QOL exhibited the best QOL outcomes after 6 months of treatment. Our study showed that the use of biological drugs induced considerable improvement in the participants' QOL.

  8. Finding privacy from a public death: a qualitative exploration of how a dedicated space for end-of-life care in an acute hospital impacts on dying patients and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slatyer, Susan; Pienaar, Catherine; Williams, Anne M; Proctor, Karen; Hewitt, Laura

    2015-08-01

    To explore the experiences and perceptions of hospital staff caring for dying patients in a dedicated patient/family room (named Lotus Room). Dying in hospital is a common outcome for people across the world. However, noise and activity in acute environments present barriers to quality end-of-life care. This is of concern because care provided to dying patients has been shown to affect both the patients and the bereaved families. A qualitative descriptive approach was used. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 17 multidisciplinary staff and seven families provided information through an investigator-developed instrument. Qualitative data analysis generated three categories describing: Dying in an hospital; The Lotus Room; and the Outcomes for patients and families. The Lotus Room was seen as a large, private and, ultimately, safe space for patients and families within the public hospital environment. Family feedback supported staff perspectives that the Lotus Room facilitated family presence and communication. The privacy afforded by the Lotus Room within this acute hospital provided benefits for the dying patients and grieving families. Improved outcomes included a peaceful death for patients, which may have assisted the family with their bereavement. This study provides evidence of how the physical environment can address well-established barriers to quality end-of-life care in acute hospitals. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Monitoring of insects with public participation (MIPP; EU LIFE project 11 NAT/IT/000252: overview on a citizen science initiative and a monitoring programme (Insecta: Coleoptera; Lepidoptera; Orthoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Mason

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The LIFE project “MIPP” - Monitoring of Insects with Public Participation (11 NAT/IT/000252 is focused on selected insect species (five Coleoptera, three Lepidoptera, one Orthoptera, all included in the annexes II and IV of the Habitats Directive (HD 92/43/EEC. One important aim is a citizen science initiative where every person may become a citizen scientist and collect faunistic data on the above species throughout Italy. Another objective of the project MIPP is the development of standard methods for monitoring the conserva- tion status of the five target beetle species. One innovative method employed is a sniffer-dog (“Osmodog”, trained to find the rare and endangered hermit beetle, Osmoderma eremita, which lives in veteran, hollow trees. The dog detects the strong smell of mature peach produced by adult males and an odor produced by the larvae. Another objective of the project MIPP is the dissemination of topics such as HD, Natura 2000, importance of dead-wood, Life projects, insect monitoring and conservation.

  10. Public Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck Jørgensen, Torben; Rutgers, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    administration is approached in terms of processes guided or restricted by public values and as public value creating: public management and public policy-making are both concerned with establishing, following and realizing public values. To study public values a broad perspective is needed. The article suggest......This article provides the introduction to a symposium on contemporary public values research. It is argued that the contribution to this symposium represent a Public Values Perspective, distinct from other specific lines of research that also use public value as a core concept. Public...... a research agenda for this encompasing kind of public values research. Finally the contributions to the symposium are introduced....

  11. Bryophyte in the Beginning of Terrestrial Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özcan ŞİMŞEK

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of life has been wondered by human beings since ancient ages. The widely accepted opinion is that life began in water and after that landed. In this process, the landing of plants and adapting to terrestrial life of plants are important stages. The last 20 years it’s been done many researches to find out the relationship of bryophytes and tracheophytes. The results of these researches revealed that in evolutionary development process bryophytes and tracheophytes are sister groups. Thesis about earliest land plants are bryophytes is widely accepted recent years. To understand evolutionary process and plants of today’s better, researches about bryophytes must increase.

  12. Pregnancies and Fetal Anomalies Incompatible with Life in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivaldi, Lieta

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Chile allows abortion under no circumstances. Whether it’s fetal anomaly incompatible with life or congenital malformation resulting in little or no life expectancy, all Chilean women are expected to carry their pregnancies to term. In this context, in January 2015 the Chilean Congress began debating a bill to legalize abortion on three grounds, including fatal congenital malformation. The medical community, including midwives, has presented its views for and against, especially on how the law may affect clinical practices; in addition, women, many of whom have experienced a fatal congenital malformation diagnosis, have weighed in. This qualitative study draws on 22 semi-structured interviews with nine certified nurse-midwives, one neonatologist, nine obstetrician-gynecologists, one psychiatrist, one psychologist, and one sociologist who provide care during gestation, pregnancy, delivery, and post-delivery in the public and private sectors, plus three interviews with two women and the former partner of a woman who underwent the experience. These interviews starkly illustrate the plight facing women carrying nonviable fetuses, including women’s shock upon receiving the diagnosis, their feelings of bereavement and loss, and the clinical practices used in an attempt to ease their suffering under the weight of exceedingly difficult legal restrictions. These interviews confirmed that compelling women to carry nonviable fetuses to term violates their human rights. They also show that the chances of legislative change are real and that such change will present new challenges to the Chilean health care system. PMID:28630544

  13. Spacelab Life Sciences 1: Reprints of Background Life Sciences Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ronald (Editor); Leonard, Joel I. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The research being conducted on SLS-1 is primarily concerned with the short-term adaptation of physiological systems to weightlessness. A comprehensive overview of the various disciplines being studied on SLS-1 is presented. Citations and abstracts of all the papers submitted by the SLS-1 investigator teams are contained. The physiological systems studied include: cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, neurovestibular, renal and endocrine, hematological, and immunological.

  14. Psychographic segmentation: A new approach to reaching the Canadian public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenette, F.

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the Canadian nuclear industry's public information campaign, which began in 1987, and to describe a new approach to public opinion research that is guiding revised strategy. The authors have begun to implement research-based communications strategy and plan to track its effectiveness through additional, regular public opinion research. The tracking exercise is to fine-tune the campaign, support communications products, and evaluate the overall effectiveness of the strategy

  15. Advertising public outreach--going where the people are

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradford, D.; Burns, D.

    1994-01-01

    In a continuing effort to invite new and larger segments of the public to participate in Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) Public Outreach Programs, examination of methods to enhance existing Public Outreach advertising programs began in 1993. Apart from the desire to promote greater public awareness and participation of the YMP, the Project itself is receiving less coverage of its scientific aspects in the local media. Since the public is already comfortable receiving messages in these media, this becomes an additional reason to explore and study advertising as a platform for invitations to the public

  16. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The function of public lighting and the relationship between public lighting and accidents are considered briefly as aspects of effective countermeasures. Research needs and recent developments in installation and operational described. Public lighting is an efficient accident countermeasure, but

  17. 'The Public Spectre'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Kim Sune Karrasch; Bertilsson, Margareta; Delgado, Ana

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with how forms of publics come into being in situations of technological innovation and change. The paper attends to sudden social formations which arise as responses to what is perceived of as threatening socio-technical inventions into the routine of everyday social life....... We revisit the Dewey-Lippmann debate, and we look at spontaneous citizens’ reactions towards emerging technologies such as Google Street View as well as we discuss some institutionally organized events of public engagement with science. As we explore the formation of publics inside and outside...

  18. Charles Robert Darwin (to the 200th Birthday and the 150th Anniversary of the publication of the book «On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vagin Yu. V.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Charles Robert Darwin (to the 200th Birthday and the 150th Anniversary of the publication of the book «On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life»

  19. Life Cycle Impact Assessment Research Developments and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) developments are explained along with key publications which record discussions which comprised ISO 14042 and SETAC document development, UNEP SETAC Life Cycle Initiative research, and research from public and private research institutions. It ...

  20. From matter to life information and causality

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, Paul C W; Ellis, George F R

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances suggest that the concept of information might hold the key to unravelling the mystery of life's nature and origin. Fresh insights from a broad and authoritative range of articulate and respected experts focus on the transition from matter to life, and hence reconcile the deep conceptual schism between the way we describe physical and biological systems. A unique cross-disciplinary perspective, drawing on expertise from philosophy, biology, chemistry, physics, and cognitive and social sciences, provides a new way to look at the deepest questions of our existence. This book addresses the role of information in life, and how it can make a difference to what we know about the world. Students, researchers, and all those interested in what life is and how it began will gain insights into the nature of life and its origins that touch on nearly every domain of science.

  1. Quimp (QUality of life IMPairment): an addition to the Quality of Life lexicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chernyshov, P. V.; Linder, M. D.; Pustišek, N.; Manolache, L.; Szepietowski, J. C.; Tomas-Aragones, L.; Marron, S. E.; Poot, F.; Augustin, M.; Bewley, A.; van Cranenburgh, O. D.; Jemec, G. B.; Salek, N. N.; Sampogna, F.; Svensson, A.

    2017-01-01

    There has been a constant growth in the number of publications each year concerning "quality of life (QoL)" and "dermatology," since the publication of the Dermatology Life Quality Index in 1994. Numerous dermatology and disease-specific QoL instruments have since been created. Quality of life is

  2. Public Anthropology as Public Pedagogy: An Autobiographical Account

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This autobiographical account provides a historical map of landmarks in the author's personal and professional life that led him to his present understanding of public anthropology as public pedagogy and vice versa. He indicates that his experiences led him to study sociocultural anthropology to investigate learning from experience, a foundational…

  3. Life Role Salience and Values

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hattem, A.H.; Ossenkop, C.; Dikkers, J.S.E.; Vinkenburg, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose-Even though both values and life roles are intensively studied topics, limited research has been conducted regarding the association between the two. In the context of the Dutch public sector, this study therefore examines how life roles and values relate to each other. Moreover, the

  4. The Life of Australian Banknotes

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandra Rush

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the life of banknotes is important to a currency issuer's forward planning. Without accurate predictions of banknote life, there is a risk of incurring the economic costs of overproducing and storing excess banknotes or conversely, in an extreme case, of not being able to meet the public's demand. The life of a banknote, however, is not directly observed and must be estimated – a process complicated by the manner in which banknotes are issued and circulated. Often currency issue...

  5. Public trust: Struggle and regain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Tadao

    1999-01-01

    The after-effect of Monju and Tokai accidents has been much larger than expected. It struck PNC a fierce blow and the damage did not stop there but extended to the nuclear community at large. As a result, PNC was reformed into a new corporate, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). JNC has been given a new body but its mind must be cultivated so as to be able to regain public trust. This presentation summarizes the struggle to regain public trust in case of Monju. After five and a half years of construction work, Monju began pre-operation tests in May 1991, achieved initial criticality in April 1994 and the first connection to the grid in August 1995, and the accident occurs in December 1995. Until then, there was confidence, perhaps overconfidence, and it was taken for granted that the public was always in favour of 'nuclear'. The struggle to regain the public confidence involved: (1) Improvement of safety measures and emergency management; (2) Cultivation of a new corporate culture; (3) Open information; (4) Public communication (i.e. 'Door-to-door visit', 'Public meeting', 'Come-and-see', Weekly press conference. The struggle may continue for some time

  6. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2013-14. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2014-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  7. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2016-17. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2017-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  8. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2014-15. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  9. Texas Public School Attrition Study, 2015-16. IDRA Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Roy L.; Montes, Felix; Hinojosa, David

    2016-01-01

    Since 1986, Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA) has conducted an annual attrition study to track the number and percent of students in Texas who are lost from public secondary school enrollment prior to graduation. The study builds on the series of studies that began when IDRA conducted the first comprehensive study of school…

  10. The Rhode Island Life Saving Score (RILSS)--a proposed life-saving definition for EMS and emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Kenneth A; Sullivan, Francis M

    2013-12-03

    Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and Emergency Medicine staff are often described as life-saving providers, but there is no generally accepted objective definition of a life saved by these providers. Therefore, a proposed definition is described. Development of this definition began with conceptual rules, followed by a survey of physician EMS medical directors, and then by the development of a tool to implement the definition, and measure its validity and reliability through a review of 100 critical care transport EMS patient charts.

  11. Facing death, gazing inward: end-of-life and the transformation of clinical subjectivity in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stonington, Scott

    2011-06-01

    In this article, I describe a new form of clinical subjectivity in Thailand, emerging out of public debate over medical care at the end of life. Following the controversial high-tech death of the famous Buddhist monk Buddhadasa, many began to denounce modern death as falling prey to social ills in Thai society, such as consumerism, technology-worship, and the desire to escape the realities of existence. As a result, governmental and non-governmental organizations have begun to focus on the end-of-life as a locus for transforming Thai society. Moving beyond the classic outward focus of the medical gaze, they have begun teaching clinicians and patients to gaze inward instead, to use the suffering inherent in medicine and illness to face the nature of existence and attain inner wisdom. In this article, I describe the emergence of this new gaze and its major conceptual components, including a novel idea of what it means to be 'human,' as well as a series of technologies used to craft this humanity: confession, "facing suffering," and untying "knots" in the heart. I also describe how this new subjectivity has begun to change the long-stable Buddhist concept of death as taking place at a moment in time, giving way for a new concept of "end-of-life," an elongated interval to be experienced, studied, and used for inner wisdom.

  12. Public Schools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This Public Schools feature dataset is composed of all Public elementary and secondary education in the United States as defined by the Common Core of Data, National...

  13. Public relations and ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bajić Milan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is the analysis of different forms of PR implementation and research its relation with ethics in practice. 'Public relations' is the every-day term that represents the job that is widely used in all aspects of life and work in today's society. Public relations represent a specific form of communication that has a particular application in society. Public relations involve focusing on a public aspect of organization with the aim of building a positive attitude and image. Image of public relations as a profession is often unfairly negative, and the reason for this is unprofessional and unethical relation of individuals towards their profession. In practice ethics in public relations is often considered to be an oxymoron. Ethical thinking of experts in public relations goes from Biblical attitude 'all you want people to do to you, do even so to them' (Matthew 7:12to professional loyalty to organization they work for. Because of unethical appearance it is important to set the rules, in the form of codex by which the public relations professionals will set their behaviors. .

  14. Public acceptability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolter, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    An urgent need to rebuild public confidence after an incident attracting widespread adverse publicity led to the development by British Nuclear Fuels plc of a completely new approach to public relations. The Company's experience suggests that impressions count more than sheer information, provided the impressions have a firm base in reality. (author)

  15. Picturing Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molly Bathje MS, OTR/L

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The cover art of the summer 2013 issue of The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy provided by Jonathan Darnall reflects his unique life perspective, current roles, and values. An exploration of Jon’s life experience reveals how creative arts, including photography, have positively influenced his life and inform OT practitioners about the benefits of photography as an intervention and an occupation.

  16. Quality of Life in Macau, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rato, Ricardo; Davey, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    We report the initial findings of an ongoing, long-term investigation into subjective quality of life in Macau, a Special Administrative Region of China. Data were collected via quarterly public surveys (2007 to 2009; n = 8,230), as part of the Macau Quality of Life Report. The main aims of the study were to: (a) ascertain the public's…

  17. Migrant life stories and the Web

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marselis, Randi

    2013-01-01

    The life stories of migrants are increasingly being told, as part of the work of cultural organizations, and websites are well suited to making such life story projects accessible to the public. However, by using the lives of real people as raw material in a public forum, Web projects raise...

  18. Healthscaping a medieval city: Lucca’s Curia viarum and the future of public health history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geltner, G.

    2013-01-01

    In early fourteenth-century Lucca, one government organ began expanding its activities beyond the maintenance of public works to promoting public hygiene and safety, and in ways that suggest both a concern for and an appreciation of population-level preventative healthcare. Evidence for this shift

  19. Editorial: As the World Turns So Do We: A New Publication Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial Board

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In Brief: Announcing an update to In the Library with the Lead Pipe’s publication strategy. In the Library With the Lead Pipe began in the fall of 2008 with lofty publication goals. Six librarians launched the site as a peer-reviewed blog, with plans to publish an article every Wednesday. In their introductory post, they even […

  20. Life sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Day, L. (ed.)

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs. (MHB)

  1. Life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Day, L.

    1991-04-01

    This document is the 1989--1990 Annual Report for the Life Sciences Divisions of the University of California/Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Specific progress reports are included for the Cell and Molecular Biology Division, the Research Medicine and Radiation Biophysics Division (including the Advanced Light Source Life Sciences Center), and the Chemical Biodynamics Division. 450 refs., 46 figs

  2. Academic Publications

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco H C Felix

    2017-01-01

    Alternative modes of academic publication. What it is: Page for the dissemination of academic papers in alternative formats. Aimed at the diffusion of the idea of open publication, or open access publication, a branch of open science, a multidisciplinary movement that seeks to modify the paradigm of knowledge production that centralizes it and prevents its spreading. Historically, Western tradition has become firmly rooted in the free dissemination of knowledge among peers. However, the c...

  3. Public transport

    OpenAIRE

    Lethbridge, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Public transport plays an essential role in enabling people from low income and other disadvantaged groups to access employment and services. It also contributes to the development of social networks and social capital, by helping people to visit friends and relatives and take part in community and other social activities. Public policy makers have begun to recognise that adequate public transport provision can play an important role in reducing social exclusion. [Taken from introductory para...

  4. How We Began - About the Guard - The National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshal Office of the Joint Surgeon PARC Small Business Programs Chaplain Diversity NGB-GOMO Resources Legislative Liaison Small Business Programs Social Media State Websites Videos Featured Videos On Every Front the organization date of the oldest Army National Guard units is based in law. The Militia Act of May

  5. Construction recently began on the new CERN hostel

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Construction begins on a third CERN hostel to add almost 100 more rooms for Laboratory visitors. The new hostel, building 41, will be a three-story structure containing 98 rooms, ready for occupancy in June 2007

  6. The South African commercial abalone Haliotis midae fishery began ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    and 20 m deep, and virtually no abalone occur at ... factories were granted processing rights to a fixed percentage of an overall .... behaviour and temporal change in individual and aggre- ... series, is to gain further information through carefully.

  7. Origins how the planets, stars, galaxies, and the universe began

    CERN Document Server

    Eales, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    This book looks at answers to the biggest questions in astronomy – the questions of how the planets, stars, galaxies and the universe were formed. Over the last decade, a revolution in observational astronomy has produced possible answers to three of these questions. This book describes this revolution. The one question for which we still do not have an answer is the question of the origin of the universe. In the final chapter, the author looks at the connection between science and philosophy and shows how new scientific results have laid the groundwork for the first serious scientific studies of the origin of the universe.

  8. Where Radiobiology Began in Russia: A Physician’s Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    White Archipelago”) (Gubarev, 2004): “Visiting a number of production facilities that worked with plutonium and polonium - 210 , I was struck by the...its owners. The wide array of food on the table was all vegetarian fare. I found out for the first time that both of them were Orthodox Christians...was ordinary food poisoning. After several days’ treatment, the workers returned to the area. Later, after changes in their skin and blood

  9. Life quality index revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2004-01-01

    The derivation of the life quality index (LQI) is revisited for a revision. This revision takes into account the unpaid but necessary work time needed to stay alive in clean and healthy conditions to be fit for effective wealth producing work and to enjoyable free time. Dimension analysis...... at birth should not vary between countries. Finally the distributional assumptions are relaxed as compared to the assumptions made in an earlier work by the author. These assumptions concern the calculation of the life expectancy change due to the removal of an accident source. Moreover a simple public...... consistency problems with the standard power function expression of the LQI are pointed out. It is emphasized that the combination coefficient in the convex differential combination between the relative differential of the gross domestic product per capita and the relative differential of the expected life...

  10. Life with osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carrinna

    Background: Osteoporosis is considered a major worldwide public health problem. Men and women with osteoporosis are mostly unaware of the illness, until bone fractures occur. It is estimated that more than one in three European women and one in five men over 50 years will experience osteoporotic...... fractures followed by considerable morbidity and mortality. In line with many other chronic illnesses, one of the pronounced challenges related to osteoporosis is considered to be compliance and persistence to medical treatment. The causes of low compliance and persistence to treatment remain unclear....... Living with a chronic illness often affects the entire human life situation, specifically, emotionally and existentially. How this is experienced personally and how this affects the individual’s life is still unknown. Aim: To gain a deeper understanding of patients’ life with osteoporosis by determining...

  11. Public Transparency

    OpenAIRE

    UNCTAD; World Bank

    2018-01-01

    This note provides guidance on the type of information about agricultural investments that investors and governments can make publicly available. Transparency about certain aspects of investments can improve relations between investors and communities, enable external stakeholders to hold investors to commitments, and improve investors’ public image. Although some information should be kep...

  12. Public relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Public relations activities continued in a well-proved form of organizing plant visits and Information Centre off - site activities. Bohunice NPPs were visited by the number of 7294 visitors in 1997. A brief account of activities in public relations carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented

  13. Advances in dental public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, R D

    2001-07-01

    Dental public health has been defined as 'the science and art of preventing oral diseases, promoting oral health and improving the quality of life through the organised efforts of society'. Dental practitioners most often have the oral health of individual patients as their primary focus but the aim of public health is to benefit populations. Early developments in dental public health were concerned largely with demonstrating levels of disease and with treatment services. With greater appreciation of the nature of oral health and disease, and of their determinants has come recognition of the need for wider public health action if the effects of prevention and oral health promotion are to be maximized.

  14. Extraterrestrial Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Extraterrestrial Intelligence is intelligent life that developed somewhere other than the earth. Such life has not yet been discovered. However, scientific research, including astronomy, biology, planetary science and studies of fossils here on earth have led many scientists to conclude that such life may exist on planets orbiting at least some of the hundreds of billions of stars in our Milky Way Galaxy. Today, some researchers are trying to find evidence for extraterrestrial intelligence. This effort is often called SETI, which stands for Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence. SETI researchers decided that looking for evidence of their technology might be the best way to discover other intelligent life in the Galaxy. They decided to use large radio telescopes to search the sky over a wide range of radio frequencies...

  15. Life management plants at nuclear power plants PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, G.

    2014-01-01

    Since in 2009 the CSN published the Safety Instruction IS-22 (1) which established the regulatory framework the Spanish nuclear power plants must meet in regard to Life Management, most of Spanish nuclear plants began a process of convergence of their Life Management Plants to practice 10 CFR 54 (2), which is the current standard of Spanish nuclear industry for Ageing Management, either during the design lifetime of the plant, as well as for Long-Term Operation. This article describe how Life Management Plans are being implemented in Spanish PWR NPP. (Author)

  16. Transforming spaces into lively public open places

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cilliers, E.J.; Timmermans, W.

    2016-01-01

    Urban public open spaces are an important part of the urban environment, creating the framework for public life. The transformation of open space into successful public places is crucial in this regard. In the context of target-driven performance it is essential to identify the value of

  17. Competence Development in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjort, Katrin

    2009-01-01

    The article analyses the popular concept of Competence Development as constructed of at least three different discourses (Life Long Learning, New Public Management and professionalisation) and discusses the relations between the transformations of the public sectors in Scandinavian Welfare States......, Competence Development and Professionalisation/Deprofessionalisation among the public employees....

  18. Da (contranormatividade do cotidiano escolar: problematizando discursos sobre a indisciplina discente On the (counter-normative spectrum of everyday school life: an analysis of the disciplinary events of a public school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Groppa Aquino

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O artigo ambiciona colocar em causa a proliferação discursiva contemporânea em torno das condutas do alunado tidas como indisciplinadas, situando-a, em diálogo com a conceituação foucaultiana, no interior de um quadro socio-histórico e institucional atravessado por demandas multiformes de governamento dos sujeitos escolares. Para tanto, o texto oferece primeiramente uma configuração preliminar da produção acadêmica brasileira sobre a temática disciplinar nas últimas três décadas, bem como problematiza os nortes teórico-metodológicos da investigação voltada ao âmbito (contranormativo do cotidiano escolar. Em seguida, apresenta os resultados de uma investigação baseada nos registros das ocorrências disciplinares que tomaram lugar no ensino médio de uma escola pública na cidade de São Paulo, num intervalo de cinco anos (2003-2007. Por fim, opera algumas aproximações analíticas do problema, apontando que se as queixas disciplinares parecem ser, num primeiro momento, solidárias a uma espécie de esgarçadura do modus operandi escolar clássico, num segundo momento, elas passam a apontar para a irrupção de modos sutis de controle das condutas não apenas discentes, mas também dos profissionais, de modo consoante aos processos de governamentalização em ação na contemporaneidade.This article seeks to question the present day proliferation of discourses related to undisciplined conduct of pupils in schools. Such propagation will be situated, within a foucaultian framework, against the backdrop of complex institutional and socio-historic realities constituted by multiple demands of government of the school subjects. It starts out with a preliminary overview of brazilian academic production concerning the disciplinary theme, and spanning over the last three decades. This leads to a problematization of the theoretical and methodological orientations of research regarding the (counter-normative in everyday school life

  19. Publications, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilborn, H.S.

    1979-03-01

    This is a compilation of documents that communicate the results of scientific and technical work done at Savannah River. The compilation includes those documents that have been published (research and development reports, journal articles, book chapters, etc.), documents that have been announced in Energy Research Abstracts, and papers that have been presented at technical meetings but have not yet been published or announced. The information was compiled by machine methods to produce bibliographic, subject, and author listings. This report updates the information included in DP-929, Rev. 2, Publications, 1951 through 1971 DP-929-1, Publications, 1972 through 1976, and DP-929-1, Supplement 1, Publications, 1977

  20. Intervenção nos hábitos de vida em instituição pública Life-habit intervention in a public institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Scherr

    2010-06-01

    suffered an acute myocardial infarction (AMI; within 6 years, 18% of the men and 35% of the women will have a new AMI. The secondary prevention, of which effectiveness has been previously demonstrated, is of utmost importance. OBJECTIVE: To test the effectiveness of a multiprofessional program that aims at modifying risk factors for atherosclerosis in the public health system. METHODS: Of the 2,337 patients with coronary artery disease undergoing outpatient treatment, 513 with a coronary angiography study agreed to participate in the present study, which used lectures on how and why to control risk factors as therapeutic tool. Statistical analysis: significant variation pre and post-intervention; paired Student's t test or Wilcoxon's test ; existence of a significant difference between the two groups; Student's t test for independent samples or Mann-Whitney test. Comparison among three groups: analysis of variance (ANOVA or Kruskal-Wallis. RESULTS: Cholesterol, LDL, triglycerides, body mass index, Castelli indexes I and II and waist circumference showed a significant decrease, even in patients without hypolipemiant treatment. The assessment of the diet impact showed that 72% of the patients that did not follow a diet, started to do so. Physical activity: of the 55% sedentary patients, 71% started to exercise three or more times a week. Smoking: of the smokers, 60% (9% of the total stopped smoking and 32% decreased the number of cigarettes. CONCLUSION: These results demonstrated the effectiveness of the programs to improve life habits when applied to the units of the public health system. (Arq Bras Cardiol. 2010; [online]. ahead print, PP.0-0

  1. Public Airports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set is a vector point digital data structure that contains the locations of General Public Use Airports in the State of New Mexico. It only contains those...

  2. Public Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    by the media? Does the choice of public sociology mean the relinquishment of scientific integrity and critical conviction? These questions will also be addressed in this book - together with a host of others related to the topic of public sociology.   The chapters included in this book are all manuscripts......What is the role of sociology in society? How can - and should - sociology contribute with insights relevant and useful to the outside world? Is sociology attuned to accommodate the demands of the wider public and of surrounding society? Who benefits from the knowledge produced and provided...... by sociology? What are the social implications and cultural effects of the knowledge sociology provides and creates? All of these questions, and many others, concern and centre on sociology's relationship to the surrounding society, in short to the ‘public'. All of these questions - and many others...

  3. The Life and Works of Han Shin Gwang : a Midwife and Nurse of Korean Modern Times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YI Ggodme

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Han Shin Gwang, born in an early Christian family in Korea in 1902, could get western education different from the ordinary Korean girls in that period. She participated in the 1919 Samil Independence Movement in her teens, and got nursing and midwifery education in a missionary hospital. She got a midwife license and worked as a member in an early mother-and-child health center. She organized 'Korean Nurses' Association' in 1924 and focused on public health movement as the chairwoman. She actively participated in women's movement organizations, and Gwangjoo Student's Movement. She was known to be a representative of leading working women, and wrote articles on woman's right, the needs and works of nurses and midwives. From late Japanese colonial period, she opened her own clinic and devoted herself to midwifery. After the Korean Liberation in 1945, she began political movement and went in for a senate election. During the Korean War, she founded a shelter for mothers and children in help. After the War, she reopened a midwifery clinic and devoted to the works of Korean Midwives' Association. Han Shin Gwang's life and works belong to the first generation of Korean working women in modern times. She actively participated in women's movement, nurses' and midwives professional movement, Korea liberation movement, and mother-and-child health movement for 60 years. Her life is truly exemplary as one of the first generation of working women in modern Korea, distinguished of devotion and calling.

  4. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Do you have questions about the elections to the Staff Council, 2017 MERIT exercise, EVE and School, LD to IC exercise, CHIS, the Pension Fund… Come get informed and ask your questions at our public meetings. These public meetings are also an opportunity to get the more information on current issues. Benefit from this occasion to get the latest news and to discuss with the representatives of the statutory body that is the Staff Association!

  5. Microbial genomes: Blueprints for life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Relman, David A.; Strauss, Evelyn

    2000-12-31

    Complete microbial genome sequences hold the promise of profound new insights into microbial pathogenesis, evolution, diagnostics, and therapeutics. From these insights will come a new foundation for understanding the evolution of single-celled life, as well as the evolution of more complex life forms. This report is an in-depth analysis of scientific issues that provides recommendations and will be widely disseminated to the scientific community, federal agencies, industry and the public.

  6. Origin of life experts might find inspiration at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony & Anaïs Schaeffer

    2011-01-01

    “How did life appear on Earth?” That was the unanswered question on attendees’ minds at a single-day workshop held at CERN, 20 May. The brainstorming session featured experts from the biology field and CERN physicists. Although the million-dollar question wasn't answered, the group explored the possibility of organising a large-scale research project that could do just that.   Darwin’s vision of "descent with modification" from his "B" notebook. According to workshop chair Stuart Kauffman, an American theoretical biologist, currently Finland Distinguished Professor (FiDiPro) at the Tampere University of Technology: “The Origin of Life problem began with Louis Pasteur, who refused to believe in the ‘spontaneous generation principle’ of life. All life, he said, comes from life. This left Pasteur in a conundrum: how did life start in the first place?” As a renowne...

  7. Personalism for public health ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Petrini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In public health ethics, as in bioethics, utilitarian approaches usually prevail, followed by Kantian and communitarian foundations. If one considers the nature and core functions of public health, which are focused on a population perspective, utilitarianism seems still more applicable to public health ethics. Nevertheless, faulting additional protections towards the human person, utilitarianism doesn't offer appropriate solutions when conflicts among values do arise. Further criteria must be applied to protect the fundamental principles of respect for human life. Personalism offers similar advantages to utilitarianism but warrants more protection to the human person. We suggest a possible adaptation of personalism in the specific field of public health by means of four principles: absolute respect for life or principle of inviolability; subsidiarity and the "minimum" mandatory principle; solidarity; justice and non discrimination.

  8. Personalism for public health ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, Carlo; Gainotti, Sabina; Requena, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    In public health ethics, as in bioethics, utilitarian approaches usually prevail, followed by Kantian and communitarian foundations. If one considers the nature and core functions of public health, which are focused on a population perspective, utilitarianism seems still more applicable to public health ethics. Nevertheless, faulting additional protections towards the human person, utilitarianism doesn't offer appropriate solutions when conflicts among values do arise. Further criteria must be applied to protect the fundamental principles of respect for human life. Personalism offers similar advantages to utilitarianism but warrants more protection to the human person. We suggest a possible adaptation of personalism in the specific field of public health by means of four principles: absolute respect for life or principle of inviolability; subsidiarity and the "minimum" mandatory principle; solidarity; justice and non discrimination.

  9. Design Enriches Life,Life Breeds Fashion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Gong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As society advances and technology changes,fashion design has developed from the initial few exclusive to public demand, and fashion category also covers all walks of life, extends to every area from a single demand to industrialization. Fashion design development, has become an indispensable part of people's lives. Fashion satisfies public demand, reflecting the public interest towards, and designer correctly grasp of fashion and taste of popular motivated the design of continuous innovation to creating new business value, cultural values of the social value of fashion. A precise definition to fashion is hard, cause too broad as it relates to areas, such as products, clothing, entertainment, advertising, decoration, home, fashion is reach into every aspect of our lives. Fashion derived from life elements, convergence elements of era and innovation into your life all over again, this cycle forward and updated, fully embodies the understanding of art and life. Design enriches life, life gave birth to fashion.

  10. Recognising life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    ’ – that the contemporary discursive pragmatics of more or less pharmaceutical life practices still include forms of transcendence – and by the wish to fertilize the field of bio-politics with the indexical inter-subjectivity of the concept of ideology, as derived from an antiessentialist reading of Hegelian......–Marxist traditions. The analysis unfolds as an ideology critique that reconstructs, and seeks ways to overcome, particular forms of recognition that are identifiable in the data and in the field of drug practices, and how these form part of the constitution of singular collectives and participants – in these life...

  11. Bioethics in Public Health Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Peguero

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The bioethics study method concerns the duties and values that must be fulfilled for respect for life. The aim of this article is to provide a reflection on bioethics in public health actions. It is a review article that includes authors with different positions. Bioethics, despite its apparent individual focus, is vital to fulfil essential functions in public health, and to guarantee the right to health and respect for human dignity.

  12. Extraterrestrial Life: Life on Mars - Then and Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrhenius, Gustaf; Mojzsis, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    The recent claim to have identified possible signs of ancient life on Mars has been widely publicized and discussed. The authors conceded that none of the half-dozen pieces of evidence adduced in their paper individually provided strong support for extraterrestrial life, though they argued that the pieces added up to a case worth considering. Most - perhaps all - of the observed phenomena have counterparts in the inorganic world, so even the combination does not make a compelling case that there was ever life on Mars. Nevertheless, the importance of the problem has justified bringing the results to general attention. The paper has focussed interest on the origin and possible ubiquity of life, and on how we can design techniques capable of giving a more definitive answer to the question of whether there is, or has ever been, life elsewhere in the Universe.

  13. Public involvement in environmental surveillance at Hanford

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanf, R.W. Jr.; Patton, G.W.; Woodruff, R.K.; Poston, T.M.

    1994-08-01

    Environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site began during the mid-1940s following the construction and start-up of the nation's first plutonium production reactor. Over the past approximately 45 years, surveillance operations on and off the Site have continued, with virtually all sampling being conducted by Hanford Site workers. Recently, the US Department of Energy Richland Operations Office directed that public involvement in Hanford environmental surveillance operations be initiated. Accordingly, three special radiological air monitoring stations were constructed offsite, near hanford's perimeter. Each station is managed and operated by two local school teaches. These three stations are the beginning of a community-operated environmental surveillance program that will ultimately involve the public in most surveillance operations around the Site. The program was designed to stimulate interest in Hanford environmental surveillance operations, and to help the public better understand surveillance results. The program has also been used to enhance educational opportunities at local schools

  14. Communicating astronomy with the public for scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girola, R.

    2015-03-01

    This article intends to convey the improvement regarding the knowledge exchange in the astronomical field through an improvement in the quality of professional communication between researchers, teachers and the like whose job is to broadcast astronomical concepts. It has been a couple of years since the difficulty of communicating astronomical concepts decreased due to institutional projects, schools and education systems. Inside the education system, the need to include astronomy as an innovative element in curricula has become obvious. Outside, an informal public interested in astronomy became greater in number and began to be fostered by different organizations which spread their astronomical knowledge via workshops and demonstrations.

  15. Going public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    conduct, contains a tacit maxim of openness which may naturally be extended to cover the public relations of science. Discussing openness as access, accountability, transparency and receptiveness, the argumentation concentrates on the possible prevention of misconduct with respect to, on the one hand......The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem...... deal with ethical public relations issues, guided by a norm or maxim of openness. Drawing on and rethinking the CUDOS codification of the scientific ethos, as it was worked out by Robert K. Merton in 1942, we propose that this, which is echoed in current codifications of norms for good scientific...

  16. Public Sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trenz, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In modern societies, the public sphere represents the intermediary realm that supports the communication of opinions, the discovery of problems that need to be dealt with collectively, the channeling of these problems through the filter of the media and political institutions, and the realization...... of the collective will of the people in the act of democratic self-government. The concept of the public sphere is used across the fields of media and communication research, cultural studies and the humanities, the history of ideas, legal and constitutional studies as well as democracy studies. Historically......, public spheres have undergone structural transformations that were closely connected to the emergence of different mass media. More recently, they are subject to trends of transnationalization and digitalization in politics and society....

  17. INIS in My Life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolstenkov, Anatoly

    2015-01-01

    The first time I learned about INIS was in 1975, when I began my career as a junior researcher at the Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP). At that time, I could not imagine that my future life would be so closely linked to this unique system. Having begun scientific work at IHEP, I faced a serious problem of lack of access to foreign nuclear information that was a vital prerequisite for any scientific activity. At the time, there were only 3 main ways to access foreign information: the use of the Russian information system Referativnyi Zhurnal; a subscription to the leading nuclear journals such as Physical Review and Nuclear Physics; and direct personal contacts, mainly at international conferences. This was obviously insufficient, and access to pre-prints and reports was necessary, considering that at that time there was a significant time lag in published journal articles. Receiving the first magnetic tape with INIS records was a momentous occasion for scientists at my Institute. The first use of INIS information demonstrated the many innovative ideas and thoughts used to develop INIS. Obviously, at that time, there was no other nuclear information system that could compete with INIS on completeness of coverage, the volume of the information, and on the number of people involved in data collection and processing. Even now, I continue to be amazed that from the first day of operations, INIS started collecting NCL documents. As a result, the INIS NCL archive, with over 700 000 documents, was created and many of the documents from the NCL archive remain relevant to modern nuclear research

  18. Work Life Balance Programs at Workplaces in the US (Japanese)

    OpenAIRE

    KUROSAWA Masako

    2011-01-01

    With the very limited policy intervention, work-life balance (WLB) enhancing programs available at workplaces in the US are not as prevalent as those observed in most continental European countries. Nevertheless, starting in the late 80s, firms began to introduce WLB enhancing programs, mostly in terms of flexible schedules, as ways to help workers and improve firm performance. The availability of workplace flexibility, however, has been mostly limited to highly skilled workers. This paper sh...

  19. Public Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, E. C.

    2013-01-01

    America’s first planetaria all opened in the 1930s, and each was the distinctive product of local circumstances. In Los Angeles, the populist sensibilities of Griffith J. Griffith prompted him to value the transformative power of a personal encounter with a telescope, and he quickly embraced the idea of a public observatory with free access to all. Griffith Observatory and its planetarium emerged from that intent. Authenticity, intelligibility, and theatricality were fundamental principles in Griffith’s thinking, and they were transformed into solid and enduring scientific and astronomical values by those who actually guided the Observatory’s design, construction, and programming. That said, the public profile of Griffith Observatory was most defined by its inspired hilltop location, its distinctive, commanding architecture, and its felicitous proximity to Hollywood. The Observatory is theatric in placement and in appearance, and before the Observatory even opened, it was used as a motion picture set. That continuing vocation turned Griffith Observatory into a Hollywood star. Because entertainment industry objectives and resources were part of the Los Angeles landscape, they influenced Observatory programming throughout the Observatory’s history. Public astronomy in Los Angeles has largely been framed by the Observatory’s fundamental nature. It has exhibits, but it is not a museum. It has a planetarium, but it is essentially an observatory. As a public observatory, it is filled with instruments that transform visitors into observers. This role emphasized the importance of personal experience and established the perception of Griffith Observatory as a place for public gathering and shared contact with the cosmos. The Observatory’s close and continuous link with amateur astronomers made amateurs influential partners in the public enterprise. In full accord with Griffith J. Griffith’s original intent, Griffith Observatory has all been about putting

  20. Public acceptance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bucaille, A.

    2006-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: A great deal of determination and professionalism are required when communicating to the public on nuclear energy. Challenging the advantages and adopting an educational tone are, of course, essential. But we have to do much more if we truly want to set people thinking and give nuclear energy its rightful position among the possible energy solutions. This is particularly important in Europe where dissension between countries is on the increase, whereas the US and China, shortly to be joined by India, have clearly decided to invest in nuclear energy. (author)

  1. Current and future trends in public sector reform: The views of trade unions and consultants in ten European countries.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.S.D. Curry; W. Blijleven (Wieke); S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ While public sector reform has been a constant process, sometimes evolutionary and sometimes revolutionary, the financial crisis that started in 2008, along with the streamlining and efficiency aims of New Public Management paradigms that began to emerge in the 1980s,

  2. 77 FR 48583 - 2012 Special 301 Out-of-Cycle Review of Notorious Markets: Request for Public Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    ... from the public. SUMMARY: In 2010, the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) began... examples of Internet and physical markets that have been the subject of enforcement action or that may... counterfeiting. USTR is hereby requesting written submissions from the public identifying potential Internet and...

  3. Publicaciones Periodicas de Educacion de America Latina y el Caribe (Educational Publications of Latin America and the Caribbean).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oficina Regional de Educacion de la Unesco para America Latina y el Caribe, Santiago (Chile).

    The periodicals listed in this bibliography are those published in Latin America and the Caribbean that deal exclusively with educational themes. Information for each entry, when available, includes the title, subtitle, name and address of publisher, frequency of publication, year the publication began and/or terminated, any previous title, and…

  4. The Right to Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varvara Coman

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, we set ourselves to analyze a subject, which, due to its importance andextreme complexity, generated many discussions and controversies both at national and international level:the right to life. The great evolution of the contemporary society and the progress registered in various fieldsbrought into the attention of the states, international organizations, specialists in the field and public opinionthe pressing problem of interpreting the content and limits of the human fundamental rights and liberties. Weset ourselves to analyze the main international instruments regulating the right to life and to identify thesituations where determining the content of this fundamental right in necessary. Without the intent of acomplete work, we understand, throughout this study, to highline the great importance of the right to liferespecting for the entire humanity.

  5. Comparing public and private sector switchers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Anders; Hansen, Jesper Rosenberg; Bozeman, Barry

    are related to sector switching and the pattern of sector switch, public to private versus private to public. We propose a life stage model arguing that people's needs change in different life stages of their lives. We further suggest that this can help explain why they switch sector. We use unique Danish...... labor market data that include information on all employees in Denmark (both private and public sector). The data are for the period 1980 to 2006, and this longitudinal database includes abundant information about job changes, including sector switching. Our findings indicate mixed support....... Finally, we find that people with more education are likely to switch from private to public sector....

  6. "The Teachers Put Effort into Teaching Us about Life, and What's Right and What's Wrong": Values and Moral Education in Publicly-Managed Schools in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, J.; Liddy, M.; McCormack, O.

    2018-01-01

    In light of cultural and demographic changes in the Republic of Ireland, there is an important and urgent need for research on the articulation of values education in Irish publicly-managed schools. This article reports the findings from a research project on the moral, religious and spiritual values and traditions of staff and students in…

  7. Public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Agnes van den Berg wrote an essay about human health and nature, establishing that subject as an important policy argument in developing (urban) nature in the Netherlands. She studied the public balance of fear and fascination for nature, summarising benefits on human health. In this chapter, she

  8. Publication Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Roy Paul

    This book is designed to solve the problem of coordinating art and typography with content in publications. Through text and illustrations, this book suggests ways to make pages and spreads in magazines, newspapers, and books attractive and readable. As a book of techniques, it is directed at potential and practicing art directors, designers, and…

  9. Nanotechnology and public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdi Tanır

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a new revolution in technology; being used in different parts of life such as self-cleaning paints, dirt repellent fabrics, the destruction of cancer cells without harming the person, biosensors that can detect even a single bacterium, odorless socks due to the destruction of bacteria, germ-free refrigerators, disinfection etc. In this article, we consider in the perspective of public health the possible risks of this new technology, which is starting to appear in all areas of our daily lives. 

  10. Ethics in Ethnobiology Publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R. Welch

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available With the recent multiplication of traditional and electronic venues for publishing in ethnobiology, the social sciences, the life sciences, and related fields, it is increasingly important that authors practice self-diligence to ensure that the contents of their publications meet criteria of veracity and ethical soundness. Although the peer-review process encourages high standards, it is an insufficient means for verifying the ethical worthiness of most publications. The ethical merits of published research derive from a cumulative process including formulating a research design, obtaining permissions, collecting and analyzing data, and finally composing and submitting a manuscript. Unfortunately, there is no failsafe ethical gatekeeper at any stage of the process. The importance of ethical publishing is all the more important in the field of ethnobiology, as professionals in the field  often cross the intellectual and methodological boundaries between disciplines, and their research often involves multiple stakeholders in widespread jurisdictions.

  11. One life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demkova E.E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It is not easy to care for a special needs child. Especially, it is easy to understand parents’ worries about their grown up children. Living in one’s own family or supported living in the community are much more preferable than the options the state can offer. The author — a mother of a young woman with autism — contemplates about possibilities for independent living for a person with special needs after their parents are gone. She is confident that teaching a child skills for independent living is not less important than giving them school education. The author illustrates her thoughts with real examples of support for adults with disabilities in their independent life or life in a foster family in a city, as well in rural areas.

  12. Life support for aquatic species - past; present; future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slenzka, K.

    Life Support is a basic issue since manned space flight began. Not only to support astronauts and cosmonauts with the essential things to live, however, also animals which were carried for research to space etc together with men need support systems to survive under space conditions. Most of the animals transported to space participate at the life support system of the spacecraft. However, aquatic species live in water as environment and thus need special developments. Research with aquatic animals has a long tradition in manned space flight resulting in numerous life support systems for them starting with simple plastic bags up to complex support hardware. Most of the recent developments have to be identified as part of a technological oriented system and can be described as small technospheres. As the importance arose to study our Earth as the extraordinary Biosphere we live in, the modeling of small ecosystems began as part of ecophysiological research. In parallel the investigations of Bioregenerative Life Support Systems were launched and identified as necessity for long-term space missions or traveling to Moon and Mars and beyond. This paper focus on previous developments of Life Support Systems for aquatic animals and will show future potential developments towards Bioregenerative Life Support which additionally strongly benefits to our Earth's basic understanding.

  13. Pumping life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sitsel, Oleg; Dach, Ingrid; Hoffmann, Robert Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The name PUMPKIN may suggest a research centre focused on American Halloween traditions or the investigation of the growth of vegetables – however this would be misleading. Researchers at PUMPKIN, short for Centre for Membrane Pumps in Cells and Disease, are in fact interested in a large family o......’. Here we illustrate that the pumping of ions means nothing less than the pumping of life....

  14. EXTRA LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S. Contreras Espinosa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available El creciente número de personas jugando videojuegos significa que estos están teniendo un efecto innegable sobre nuestra cultura. Este efecto es claramente visible en una aceptación general. Los videojuegos también han cambiado la forma en que muchas otras formas de medios de comunicación, se producen y consumen. Los videojuegos tienen una influencia creciente en nuestra cultura, y en "EXTRA LIFE" diferentes autores expresan sus opiniones sobre este nuevo medio. EXTRA LIFE Abstract The increasing number of people playing video games means that they are having an undeniable effect on culture. This effect is clearly visible in the increasing mainstream acceptance of aspects of gaming culture. Video games have also changed the way that many other forms of media, are produced and consumed. Video games have an increasing influence on our culture,  and in "EXTRA LIFE" diferent authors have voiced their opinions on this new media. Keywords: Video games; culture; effects; games.

  15. Quality of Work-Life Programs in U.S. Medical Schools: Review and Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Ann; Bourguet, Claire

    2006-01-01

    Quality of work life is being recognized more and more as a driving factor in the recruitment and retention of highly qualified employees. Before Northeastern Ohio Universities College of Medicine began development of its QWL initiative, it surveyed other medical schools across the U.S. to determine benchmarks of best practices in these programs.…

  16. A Second Reformation? : Liberal Protestantism in Dutch Religious, Social and Political Life, 1870-1940

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krijger, Tom-Eric Marinus

    2017-01-01

    In the third quarter of the nineteenth century, a movement of ‘modernists’ or ‘liberals’ began to manifest itself within Dutch Protestantism. Modernists firmly believed to be the heralds of a ‘second Reformation’, harmonising Christianity with contemporary intellectual and cultural life, and as such

  17. Life cycle costs for Alaska bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    A study was implemented to assist the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities (ADOT&PF) with life cycle costs for : the Alaska Highway Bridge Inventory. The study consisted of two parts. Part 1 involved working with regional offices...

  18. Cultural Trauma and Life Stories / Ene Kõresaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kõresaar, Ene

    2007-01-01

    Aili Aarelaid-Tarti 15-aastase uuringu tulemused raamatus "Cultural Trauma and Life Stories", Hesinki, Kikimora Publications, 2006. Uuritud on kolme suurt rahvusgruppi 1940-test tingitud trauma kontekstis: eestlased kodumaal, eestlased eksiilis ja venekeelne rahvusgrupp Eestis postsovetlikus diskursuses

  19. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    MARS PENSIONS CONTRACT POLICY GENERAL INFORMATION   PUBLIC MEETINGS COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Monday 15 Oct. 2 pm Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Wednesday 17 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Thursday 18 Oct. 10 am Salle du Conseil/ Council Chamber 503-1-001 Meyrin Thursday 18 Oct. 2 pm Filtration Plant, 222-R-001(in English) Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2012 : lessons learned Pension Fund Capital preservation policy : what is it ? Contract policy LC2IC statistics SA proposal General information CVI 2013 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS)  

  20. Publications, 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilborn, H.S.

    1978-02-01

    A compilation of documents that communicate the results of scientific and technical work done at Savannah River is given. The compilation includes those documents that have been published (research and development reports, journal articles, book chapters, etc.), documents that have been announced in Energy Research Abstracts, and papers that have been presented at technical meetings but have not yet been published or announced. The information was compiled by machine methods to produce bibliographic, subject, and author listings. This report updates the information included in DP-929, Rev. 2, Publications, 1951 through 1971 and DP-929-1, Publications, 1972 through 1976. The bibliographic listing is arranged alphabetically by the first-mentioned author of each document. Author and subject indexes are provided

  1. Public relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    At Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR), the public relations belongs to the secretariat of the Chairman, and are a part of the policy of carefully planned and purposeful efforts to establish mutual relations between the authority and the public. A spokesmen of NRA SR is in charge of the public relations. The spokesman is ready, without a useless filibuster and based on a particular requirement, to inform governmental bodies, other national bodies and organizations, embassies and international organizations, the public and news media in case of an event at a nuclear installation. To provide for communications activities, NRA SR constructed and opened the Information centre with a particular equipment in autumn 1995, that has already started communications with some dailies, broadcasting, television and Press Agency SR. It has been envisaged that there will be press conferences held in the Information centre a few times a year, or NRA SR senior staff may be interviewed here on extraordinary events at NPPs, or on some other important occasions in NRA SR. In 1995, NRA Sr issued the Annual report in a few variants - each suitable for different use - on NRA SR activities and nuclear safety of Slovak nuclear power plants as of 1994. The NRA SR's Bulletin has started to be published with periodicity of 3 times a year, focusing on NRA SR activities both in Slovakia and abroad. NRA SR Information centre provides foreign visitors with independent propagation and information materials about the issue of nuclear safety enhancement at operational Slovak NPPs. Furthermore, the Information centre provides both the NRA SR's residences in Bratislava and Trnava with daily press monitoring of topical news

  2. Long life reaction control system design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanciullo, Thomas J.; Judd, Craig

    1993-02-01

    Future single stage to orbit systems will utilize oxygen/hydrogen propellants in their main propulsion means due to the propellant's high energy content and environmental acceptability. Operational effectiveness studies and life cycle cost studies have indicated that minimizing the number of different commodities on a given vehicle not only reduces cost, but reduces the ground span times in both the pre- and postflight operations. Therefore, oxygen and hydrogen should be used for the reaction controls systems, eliminating the need to deal with toxic or corrosive fluids. When the hydrogen scramjet powered NASP design development began in 1985, new system design studies considered overall integration of subsystems; in the context of that approach, O2/H2 reaction controls system were more than competitive with storable propellant systems and had the additional benefits of lower life cycle cost, rapid turnaround times, and O2 and H2 commodities for use throughout the vehicle. Similar benefits were derived in rocket-powered SSTO vehicles.

  3. Life lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitschke, Jonathan R

    2015-01-01

    Reminiscing about his younger self: "I mean I can't very well just 86 [in American slang, to "86" is to eject, remove, or discard someone or something, J.R.N.] this guy from my life. On the other hand, if through some as yet undeveloped technology I were to run into him today, how comfortable would I feel about lending him money, or for that matter even stepping down the street to have a beer and talk over old times?" - Thomas Pynchon, Slow Learner.

  4. Denmark's Master of Public Governance Program: Assessment and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Carsten; Pedersen, Anne Reff

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on Denmark's Master of Public Governance and its assessments and lessons learned. Denmark is seen to have an efficient economy and public sector, a digitalized public service delivery system, and an advanced work-life balance. The Danish government invested substantial resources into developing a Master of Public Governance…

  5. How Public Is Public Administration? A Constitutional Approach of Publicness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeling, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Both in Public Administration and in practice, there is a loss of the concept of public. A view became dominant in which markets were superior to governments and public to private. Not only did the esteem of the public sphere diminish, but also its significance in our reasoning and teaching. It became less clear what the public sphere stood for.…

  6. Place of Death and Use of Health Services in the Last Year of Life

    OpenAIRE

    Grande, Gunn E.; McKerral, Angela; Addington-Hall, Julia M.; Todd, Chris J.

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether health service input in the last year of life differs between cancer patients who die at home versus those dying in inpatient care. Methods: Post hoc exploratory case-control study of 127 home deaths and 200 inpatient deaths. Retrospective electronic record linkage of patients' community and inpatient care during the last year of life. Results: Patients who died at home began their home nursing care closer to death than those who died as inpatients. Their first con...

  7. Public relations as public information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coninx, C.

    1983-01-01

    To the man in the street, the topic of nuclear energy on the one hand is a highly emotional subject incorporating dangers hard to assess. However, on the other hand, there is in most cases little inclination to concern oneself with problems of energy economy. Public relations activities therefore frequently must motivate their adresses to accept information before they can actually inform. In this connection, the informing party must appear trustworthy and avoid that a teacher : pupil relationship is created. In addition, the changes in the socio-political environment must be taken into account. Within the industries and organizations engaged in the nuclear field there is the problem that the effects and the impact of public relations work can hardly be gaged by individually, which greatly hampers quantification of the work actually done.

  8. The Quality of Life in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sing, Ming

    2009-01-01

    The AsiaBarometer of 1,000 respondents shows that Hong Kong people have a great desire for materialistic attainment, and such an emphasis on materialism bodes ill for their quality of life. Negative assessments of the public life sphere, which encompasses the natural environment, the social welfare system, and the democratic system, also detract…

  9. Woman's harmony at work and family life

    OpenAIRE

    Trnková, Dagmar

    2009-01-01

    The subject of this bachelor's essay is problem of Work Life Balance from the woman's perspective. The study describes woman's position in the Czech society and labour market, using relevant sociological and statistical data. Author reveals the immediate link between maternity and disadvantaging of woman in the work. The text deals with the family life and its public support and employers' policies in detail.

  10. Public relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) laid the foundation of a policy of keeping the public informed about the activities and the safety of nuclear installations in the SR already in its origins by opening the NRA Information Centre. The NRA SR issues the Bulletin on NRA SR for domestic and foreign use, the bilingual Annual report on NRA activities for domestic and foreign public - detailed report for the specialists and a version for the Slovak Republic state authorities. On the occasion of the anniversary of the IAEA a special publication on the IAEA was prepared. Forty-nine contributions on NRA national and foreign activities were trans-missed to the Press Agency of the SR (TASR) over the course of 1997. In the journal Safety of Nuclear Energy the column 'Information' periodically carries the briefs on NRA activities. Four essential articles on NRA mission and responsibility in the are of peaceful uses of atomic energy were published in the Newsletter of the Slovak Information Agency (SIA). Contributions on NRA activities and international co-operation are periodically put out in the 'Slovenske elektrarne' Newsletter, the Slovak Nuclear Society Bulletin. Report on the Safety of NPPs in the Slovak Republic is annually published in the Journal European Nuclear Society - Nuclear Europe Worldscan. Some articles on NRA activities were published in the world information agency NucNet. The NRA issued in 1997 four editions of the internal Bulletin on the NRA's national and foreign activities and personnel. Three press conferences were held and six events were arranged in radio broadcasting in 1997

  11. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Public meetings : Come and talk about your future employment conditions !   The Staff Association will come and present the results of our survey on the 2015 five-yearly review. Following the survey, the topics discussed, will be contract policy, recognition of merit (MARS), working time arrangements and family policy. After each meeting and around a cup of coffee or tea you will be able to continue the discussions. Do not hesitate to join us, the five-yearly review, it is with YOU!

  12. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      MARS 2015 FIVE YEARLY REVIEW CONTRACT POLICY PENSION FUND GENERAL INFORMATION   COME AND BE INFORMED! PUBLIC MEETINGS Friday 3rd October at 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Friday 3rd October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Monday 6th October at 10 am Kjell Johnsen Auditorium, 30-7-018 Meyrin Monday 6th October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin  

  13. Inaugural Editorial - Modern working life and inclusion

    OpenAIRE

    Vinberg, Stig

    2012-01-01

    Working life occupies a considerable part of life for most people and is therefore of great importance to public health. Besides work environment factors, employment conditions and the possibilty to balance work and leisure are of importance to individual health. Working environment conditions and the health of individuals are also important issues for the development and growth of organizations and regions. Health in working life is therefore a special target in several European and Swedish ...

  14. Towards Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzia Traverso

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is nowadays accepted by all stakeholders as a guiding principle for both public policy making and corporate strategies. However, the biggest challenge for most organizations remains in the real and substantial implementation of the sustainability concept. The core of the implementation challenge is the question, how sustainability performance can be measured, especially for products and processes. This paper explores the current status of Life Cycle Sustainability Assessment (LCSA for products and processes. For the environmental dimension well established tools like Life Cycle Assessment are available. For the economic and social dimension, there is still need for consistent and robust indicators and methods. In addition to measuring the individual sustainability dimensions, another challenge is a comprehensive, yet understandable presentation of the results. The “Life Cycle Sustainability Dashboard” and the “Life Cycle Sustainability Triangle” are presented as examples for communication tools for both experts and non expert stakeholders.

  15. School Everyday Life in Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Ferraço

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at questioning school everyday life in images, based on intercessors and concepts from Deleuze and Guattari’s Philosophy of Difference. It is based on data-image-graffiti produced during investigations developed by us with public schools’ everyday life in the city of Vitória, ES, Brazil. The text claims that, in order to speak about school everyday life in images to favor the sudden, the production of meaning and the multiplicity of knowledge, it is necessary to invest in another research attitude - one that considers chaos, chance and permanent openness and complexity of school everyday life as forces to constitute an immanence plane and create concepts. The article affirms the idea of impossibility of choosing images that would be considered the most representative to speak about events in the schools.

  16. Public-Private Partnerships In Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    khalid BOUTI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Extract:The current importance of public debt requires governments to increasingly shift towards Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs. They are long-term contracts of private financing method providing or contributing to public service. The payment is made by the public partner and/or users of the service.The World Health Organization (WHO defines this type of partnership as ‘‘a means to bring together a set of actors for the common goal of improving the health of populations based on mutually agreed roles and principles.’’Historically, the principle of PPP was established by the Private Finance Initiative (PFI, launched by the conservative government of John Major in 1992. It was from this moment that this model quickly spread to the rest of the world. In the mid-90s and from Australia, PPP agreement began to become part of the language of governments. In 1997, Labour with Tony Blair leading, strongly developed this management method, first and particularly in hospitals and then, in the entire public sector and spreading to the Royal Navy. Today, 10-15% of British public investments are made using PFI method....

  17. Participatory Research in Support of Quality Public Education in New Orleans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Burel, Deirdre; Drame, Elizabeth; Frattura, Elise

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, two years after Hurricane Katrina, several education and child advocacy groups began discussing the depleted conditions of the New Orleans public school district. These groups came together to discuss how to create a sustainable education reform movement post Katrina. New Orleans-based community groups and outside university researchers…

  18. The Impact of Internet Subsidies in Public Schools. NBER Working Paper Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsbee, Austan; Guryan, Jonathan

    As part of the Telecommunications Act of 1996, the U.S. government began subsidizing Internet and telecommunications access in classrooms and libraries through a tax on long-distance services (the E-Rate Program). This paper analyzes the impact of this program on public schools' technology adoption during 1996-2000, examining data on technology…

  19. (Re)membering Basic Writing at a Public Ivy: History for Institutional Redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassoni, John Paul

    2006-01-01

    This essay offers a history of a basic writing course that began at a public ivy campus in the 1970s. Relying on principles of universal design and on insights derived from his school's studio program about ways the institution's selective functions can impact curricular matters, the author describes how the basic writing course was merely…

  20. Managing Public Accountability : How Public Managers Manage Public Accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Accountability is of growing importance in contemporary governance. The academic literature on public accountability is fraught with concerned analyses, suggesting that accountability is a problematic issue for public managers. This article investigates how public managers experience accountability

  1. Pregnancies and Fetal Anomalies Incompatible with Life in Chile: Arguments and Experiences in Advocating for Legal Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casas, Lidia; Vivaldi, Lieta

    2017-06-01

    Chile allows abortion under no circumstances. Whether it's fetal anomaly incompatible with life or congenital malformation resulting in little or no life expectancy, all Chilean women are expected to carry their pregnancies to term. In this context, in January 2015 the Chilean Congress began debating a bill to legalize abortion on three grounds, including fatal congenital malformation. The medical community, including midwives, has presented its views for and against, especially on how the law may affect clinical practices; in addition, women, many of whom have experienced a fatal congenital malformation diagnosis, have weighed in. This qualitative study draws on 22 semi-structured interviews with nine certified nurse-midwives, one neonatologist, nine obstetrician-gynecologists, one psychiatrist, one psychologist, and one sociologist who provide care during gestation, pregnancy, delivery, and post-delivery in the public and private sectors, plus three interviews with two women and the former partner of a woman who underwent the experience. These interviews starkly illustrate the plight facing women carrying nonviable fetuses, including women's shock upon receiving the diagnosis, their feelings of bereavement and loss, and the clinical practices used in an attempt to ease their suffering under the weight of exceedingly difficult legal restrictions. These interviews confirmed that compelling women to carry nonviable fetuses to term violates their human rights. They also show that the chances of legislative change are real and that such change will present new challenges to the Chilean health care system.

  2. Proposal of a New Public Health End of Life approach for Brazil: how the Project EstaraoSeuLado-Primary Palliative Care is working and how it can help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    Brazil has 206 million people, and 1.2 million deaths and 600,000 new cases of cancer per year. Palliative Care services are patchily distributed. The Family Health Strategy, made up from 41,000 primary care teams across Brazil forms a comprehensive primary care network. The Project EstaraoSeuLado-Primary Palliative Care developed working from Community Centers. We created a model based on compassionate communities, with community carers working alongside primary care teams. We identified people who need palliative care, gave them specific care and enrolled their carers into a program of monthly meetings called "Comunidade Cuidador". We discussed caring at end of life and provided skills training. During 2015 we ran 8 training programmes with an average of 10 carers. The major themes of discussion were carer burnout, dealing with denial and skills needed daily. The effect of these meetings was better relations between carers and professionals with expansion of the naturally occurring supportive network. The results of this project have been remarkable. The joint working of professionals and supportive networks together is recognised as being transformational. Carers themselves spread this approach by recommending it to others they know with life limiting illness. We will discuss the model and how it can be replicated more broadly across Brazil. Family Health teams can use tools of identification, evaluation and assessment working with networks including the community as an important part. We will propose a new model of End-of-Life Care to be adopted as national policy. We have implemented a compassionate community programme in the area of Rio Grande in Brazil. This has been a combination of primary care working in harmony with communities, providing education, resources and training to enhance the skill of communities to care for their dying. This is a necessary solution for Brazil, where resources and access to healthcare is limited. Our model is successful and

  3. Public relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic (NRA SR) started building up a broad information publicity conception resulting in NRA SR Information Centre establishment in 1995. The Centre provides information on the NRA SR activities. The Authority's speaker provides information about NRA SR domestic and foreign activities for TASR, newspapers, Slovak radio and television. Information on nuclear energy facilities situation is given to state authorities, organizations as well as to domestic and foreign mass-media on request. 41 press releases, 3 radio interviews and 5 television records providing information on some important NRA SR events was worked out in 1996. 4 basic NRA SR document have been presented by the Slovak Information Agency, consequently 3 press-conferences were held. Concerning some less frequent communication activities, NRA SR can present the NRA SR annual report in three versions (for the Slovak Government, for public and detailed report for experts). NRA SR and State Authority for Nuclear Safety of the Czech Republic issue together Nuclear Energy Safety News every two months. NRA SR activities Bulletin started issuing in 1996 3 to 4 volumes per year. Newspaper, radio and television news monitoring is performed for Bratislava and Trnava offices providing interesting papers or important events records and photos of NRA SR visits. Practical experience of the information activities performance in connection with the Authority mission and liability was obtained last year. Methodical and organizational guidelines to adjust the state regulatory authority activities in this field have been prepared

  4. Public Journalism Challenges to Curriculum and Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, Tanni

    2000-01-01

    Considers some challenges of teaching public journalism. Discusses how journalism educators can help students prepare for a career in the service of public life by teaching them how to actively involve citizens in the journalistic processes of gathering information, writing stories, and evaluating performance. Offers teaching applications and…

  5. From cosmos to intelligent life: the four ages of astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiser, Marcelo

    2012-10-01

    The history of life on Earth and in other potential life-bearing planetary platforms is deeply linked to the history of the Universe. Since life, as we know, relies on chemical elements forged in dying heavy stars, the Universe needs to be old enough for stars to form and evolve. The current cosmological theory indicates that the Universe is 13.7 +/- 0.13 billion years old and that the first stars formed hundreds of millions of years after the Big Bang. At least some stars formed with stable planetary systems wherein a set of biochemical reactions leading to life could have taken place. In this paper, I argue that we can divide cosmological history into four ages, from the Big Bang to intelligent life. The physical age describes the origin of the Universe, of matter, of cosmic nucleosynthesis, as well as the formation of the first stars and Galaxies. The chemical age began when heavy stars provided the raw ingredients for life through stellar nucleosynthesis and describes how heavier chemical elements collected in nascent planets and Moons gave rise to prebiotic biomolecules. The biological age describes the origin of early life, its evolution through Darwinian natural selection and the emergence of complex multicellular life forms. Finally, the cognitive age describes how complex life evolved into intelligent life capable of self-awareness and of developing technology through the directed manipulation of energy and materials. I conclude discussing whether we are the rule or the exception.

  6. Public confidence and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaussade, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    Today in France there are 54 nuclear power units in operation at 18 sites. They supply 75% of all electricity produced, 12% of which is exported to neighbouring countries, and play an important role in the French economy. For the French, nuclear power is a fact of life, and most accept it. However, the accident of Chernobyl has made public opinion more sensitive, and the public relations work has had to be reconsidered carefully with a view to increase the confidence of the French public in nuclear power, anticipating media crises and being equipped to deal with such crises. The three main approaches are the following: keeping the public better informed, providing clear information at time of crisis and international activities

  7. Public libraries and lifelong learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Gerner; Borlund, Pia

    2015-01-01

    society as a result of easy and free access to information. A basic understanding of the concept is ‘learning throughout life, either continuously or periodically’. This implies that learning is not restricted to educational institutions, but can also take place in for example the public library. Public...... libraries thus may play an important role in supporting the learning process not the least because lifelong learning is characterised by the inclusion of informal elements of learning, flexible learning opportunities, and a shift towards selfdirected learning. This self-directed learning promotes active...... at teaching? The study reports on data from 12 interviews of purposely selected public librarians and a large-scale e-mail survey (questionnaire). The e-mail survey contained 28 questions and was sent to all staff members in public libraries in Denmark, and resulted in 986 responses. The results show...

  8. The public debate on CIGEO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This document first indicates the two laws which govern the public debate on the storage of high activity and long life wastes. It reports the progress of this public debate which started with a statement of 45 associations committed in the protection of environment saying they will not participate to this debate. A first debate in Bures had to be very quickly stopped as these opponents irrupted into the room. The vision of these opponents is very briefly presented. The reaction of public debate organizers is indicated. The results of the debate are briefly discussed. It appears that the ethical aspect is often raised by the opponents and this document outlines that their reactions were mostly irrational. The major issues of the debate have been: risks related to water, hydrogen and earthquake, costs and financing, transport safety, the loss of geological resources, job creation, and governance. The various aspects of this public debate are commented and discussed

  9. Design Enriches Life,Life Breeds Fashion

    OpenAIRE

    Yun Gong

    2016-01-01

    As society advances and technology changes,fashion design has developed from the initial few exclusive to public demand, and fashion category also covers all walks of life, extends to every area from a single demand to industrialization. Fashion design development, has become an indispensable part of people's lives. Fashion satisfies public demand, reflecting the public interest towards, and designer correctly grasp of fashion and taste of popular motivated the design of continuous innovation...

  10. 41 CFR 101-27.205 - Shelf-life codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Shelf-life codes. 101-27...-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.205 Shelf-life codes. Shelf-life items shall be identified by use of a one-digit code to provide for uniform coding of shelf-life materials by all agencies. (a) The...

  11. Optimal Public Infrastructure: Some Guideposts to Ensure we don’t Overspend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Bazel

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It’s time to consider a more economically efficient model for financing roads, bridges and other public infrastructure. It’s true that Canada has become one of the biggest spenders on infrastructure among OECD countries, at four per cent of GDP, but using GDP to measure the share the government should spend on infrastructure is an anachronistic and arbitrary measure. We all know it is important that Canada keep pace with maintaining and building the necessary infrastructure to maximise our productive capacity and economic prosperity. But how do we know if we are on the right track? How much investment is enough, and what is the optimal level of public investment in infrastructure? This paper proposes a framework for evaluating current and future levels of financing for public infrastructure. Rather than relying on arbitrary comparisons with Canadas post war ‘golden age’ of infrastructure investment (an all too common standby in political circles, we propose a standard that is based in economic efficiency and which aims to maximise the public benefits associated with infrastructure investment. We also take a historical look public capital spending in Canada, as well as the trend toward privatization of public infrastructure and core services that began some 30 years ago after the Mulroney government was elected. This trend has seen many core services and assets that were once publicly run transition to outright privatization. It is interesting to note that the most heavily privatized sectors (utilities and communications are also the sectors most often spared from the label of ‘inadequate’, a label that befalls so much of Canada’s public infrastructure. When infrastructure is financed through taxation, there is a tendency for spending to be discouraged to ease the burden on taxpayers; however, this inevitably leads to infrastructure maintenance and construction being deferred, with a significant deficit inevitably built up. A user

  12. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to a public meeting which will be held on Thursday 11 November 2010 at 2:30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium (welcome coffee from 2 p.m.) In this meeting Sigurd Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure will present the Management’s proposals towards restoring full funding of the Pension Fund. The meeting will follow discussions which took place with the Staff Association, at the Standing Concertation Committee (CCP) of 1 November 2010 and will be held with the Members States, at the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) of 4 November 2010. You will be able to attend this presentation in the Main Auditorium or via the webcast. The Management will also be available to reply to your questions on this subject. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  13. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    MARS SURVEY 5YR 2015 GENERAL INFORMATION ELECTIONS 2013   COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Tuesday 1st Oct. 10 am Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Tuesday 1st Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin Friday 4 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Monday 7 Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Tuesday 8 Oct. 10 am Amphi Kjell Johnsen, 30-7-018 Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2013: lessons learned Survey: five-yearly review, give us your opinion General information CVI 2014 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS) Elections 2013 Renewal of the Staff Council 2014 - 2015  

  14. Public acceptance and public relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Yasumasa

    1977-01-01

    A set of problems are discussed, which must be studied before the public relations are dealt with. Firstly, the trade-off between energy and health must be considered. There were several ages in which the consideration on health took preference to the energy requirement in the past. For example, the use of coal in London was prohibited by the King's proclamation in 1,306. Secondly, the selection for the acceptance of atomic power development and utilization is based on the subjective susceptibility psychologically, and cannot be concluded only by the logical reasoning. Thirdly, the strict definition of ''national consensus'' is necessary. That is, whether does it mean pleviscite or mere mood. Fourthly, whether the atomic energy is free from the danger or death biologically or not. Fifthly, is there any method for discriminating the persons who accept atomic power from the persons who do not socially. Although the probability of death caused by atomic accidents is very small (one three hundred millionth a year), many peoples hate atomic power and oppose to the construction of nuclear power plants. Four reasons for this are considered: (1) social diffusion of innovation, (2) nuclear allergy, (3) shortage of the conception of risk-benefit, and (4) heterogeneity of the public. According to the investigation of the relationship between electric power and livelihood, carried out by the policy and science research institute in Tokyo, the highly subjective decision for the acceptance of atomic power is independent of the objective knowledge on atomic power. (Iwakiri, K.)

  15. Risk tradeoffs and public health protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charnley, G.

    1998-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: over the last 25 years, the traditional command-and-control, chemical-by-chemical environmental medium-by-environmental medium, risk-by-risk approach to protecting public health from environmental risks has worked well to greatly improve the quality of our food, air, water, and workplaces, but we are now left with the more complex problems, like urban air pollution or personal dietary behavior, that a chemical-by-chemical approach is not going to solve. Because current environmental regulatory programs have curbed the 'low-hanging fruit' and because of today's emphasis on achieving risk reductions cost-effectively, new and creative public health-based approaches to risk management are needed. Since public concern about pollution-related disease become serious in the 1960's and 1970's and regulatory agencies and laws began to proliferate, the public health goals of environmental protection have been obscured. As a society, we have made a tradeoff between environmental health and public health. The public health foundation of environmental health protection has been obscured by legalistic, technical, centralized decision-making processes that have often mistaken hazard for risk. A greater focus on public health would help us to assess aggregate risks and to target risk management resources by focusing on a problem and then identifying what is causing the problem as a guide to determining how best to solve it. Most of our current approaches start with a cause and then try to eliminate it without determining the extent to which it actually may contribute to a problem, making it difficult to set priorities among risks or to evaluate the impact of risk management actions on public health. (author)

  16. Membranes and the Origin of Life: A Century of Conjecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, David

    2016-12-01

    Cells are the units of all life today, and are defined by their membranous boundaries. The membranes have multiple functions; the most obvious being that, in the absence of a boundary, the systems of functional macromolecular components of the cytosol would spill into the environment and disperse. Membranes also contain the pigments essential for photosynthesis, electron transport enzymes that pump and maintain proton gradients, the ATP synthase that uses proton gradients to produce energy for the cell, and enzymes that use ATP to maintain ion gradients essential for life. But what about the function of membranes in the first forms of cellular life? Could life have begun in the absence of membranous boundaries? In order to answer that question, this review presents a history of the key research observations that began over a century ago.

  17. CANDU plant life management - An integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charlebois, P.; Hart, R.S.; Hopkins, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    Commercial versions of CANDU reactors were put into service starting more than 25 years ago. The first unit of Ontario Hydro's Pickering A station was put into service in 1971, and Bruce A in 1977. Most CANDU reactors, however, are only now approaching their mid-life of 15 to 20 years of operation. In particular, the first series of CANDU 6 plants which entered service in the early 1980's were designed for a 30 year life and are now approaching mid life. The current CANDU 6 design is based on a 40 year life as a result of advancement in design and materials through research and development. In order to assure safe and economic operation of these reactors, a comprehensive CANDU Plant Life Management (PLIM) program is being developed from the knowledge gained during the operation of Ontario Hydro's Pickering, Bruce, and Darlington stations, worldwide information from CANDU 6 stations, CANDU research and development programs, and other national and international sources. This integration began its first phase in 1994, with the identification of most of the critical systems structures and components in these stations, and a preliminary assessment of degradation and mechanisms that could affect their fitness for service for their planned life. Most of these preliminary assessments are now complete, together with the production of the first iteration of Life Management Plans for several of the systems and components. The Generic CANDU 6 PLIM program is now reaching its maturity, with formal processes to systematically identify and evaluate the major CSSCs in the station, and a plan to ensure that the plant surveillance, operation, and maintenance programs monitor and control component degradation well within the original design specifications essential for the plant life attainment. A Technology Watch program is being established to ensure that degradation mechanisms which could impact on plant life are promptly investigated and mitigating programs established. The

  18. Human Disturbance during Early Life Impairs Nestling Growth in Birds Inhabiting a Nature Recreation Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remacha, Carolina; Delgado, Juan Antonio; Bulaic, Mateja; Pérez-Tris, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Nature recreation conflicts with conservation, but its impacts on wildlife are not fully understood. Where recreation is not regulated, visitors to natural areas may gather in large numbers on weekends and holidays. This may increase variance in fitness in wild populations, if individuals whose critical life cycle stages coincide with periods of high human disturbance are at a disadvantage. We studied nestling development of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus) in a natural area where recreation activities intensify during weekends and other public holidays at picnic and leisure facilities, but not in the surrounding woods. In nests located near recreation facilities, blue tit nestlings that hatched during holidays developed slowly, and fledged with low body mass and poor body condition. However, nestlings that hatched outside of holidays and weekends in these nest boxes developed normally, eventually attaining similar phenotypes as those hatching in the surrounding woods. Within-brood variance in body mass was also higher in broods that began growing during holidays in disturbed areas. Our results show that early disturbance events may have negative consequences for wild birds if they overlap with critical stages of development, unveiling otherwise cryptic impacts of human activities. These new findings may help managers better regulate nature recreation.

  19. Human Disturbance during Early Life Impairs Nestling Growth in Birds Inhabiting a Nature Recreation Area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Remacha

    Full Text Available Nature recreation conflicts with conservation, but its impacts on wildlife are not fully understood. Where recreation is not regulated, visitors to natural areas may gather in large numbers on weekends and holidays. This may increase variance in fitness in wild populations, if individuals whose critical life cycle stages coincide with periods of high human disturbance are at a disadvantage. We studied nestling development of blue tits (Cyanistes caeruleus in a natural area where recreation activities intensify during weekends and other public holidays at picnic and leisure facilities, but not in the surrounding woods. In nests located near recreation facilities, blue tit nestlings that hatched during holidays developed slowly, and fledged with low body mass and poor body condition. However, nestlings that hatched outside of holidays and weekends in these nest boxes developed normally, eventually attaining similar phenotypes as those hatching in the surrounding woods. Within-brood variance in body mass was also higher in broods that began growing during holidays in disturbed areas. Our results show that early disturbance events may have negative consequences for wild birds if they overlap with critical stages of development, unveiling otherwise cryptic impacts of human activities. These new findings may help managers better regulate nature recreation.

  20. Female sexuality and consent in public discourse: James Burt's "love surgery".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Sarah B

    2013-04-01

    Beginning in the mid-1960s, gynecologist and obstetrician James Burt developed what he called "love surgery" on unknowing women after they gave birth. It was, he later told them, a modification of episiotomy repair. In the mid-1970s, Burt began promoting love surgery as an elective sexual enhancement surgery and women came to his clinic in hopes of a surgically-enabled better sex life. But though Burt now offered love surgery, he continued to perform it on patients who did not come to him for it through the late 1980s. Over the course of more than two decades, discourse on love surgery occurred twice nationally. In the late 1970s, feminists and sex therapists attacked love surgery as altering a woman's body for male sexual pleasure. Though Burt never hid his continued use of love surgery on women who had not elected for it, the public discourse at this time focused on love surgery as a reflection of larger cultural ideas about female sexuality. In the late 1980s, when Burt's love surgery again appeared in the national media, the issue of informed consent, largely absent from the discourse about love surgery in the late 1970s, moved to the center. Though significant activity happened within the local medical and legal communities beginning in the mid-1970s regarding Burt and his practice of love surgery, my interest here is on these two periods when the discourse regarding love surgery, female sexuality, and informed consent occurred within a national frame.

  1. The Human Behavioral Ecology of Contemporary World Issues : Applications to Public Policy and International Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Bram; Rende Taylor, Lisa

    2007-09-01

    Human behavioral ecology (HBE) began as an attempt to explain human economic, reproductive, and social behavior using neodarwinian theory in concert with theory from ecology and economics, and ethnographic methods. HBE has addressed subsistence decision-making, cooperation, life history trade-offs, parental investment, mate choice, and marriage strategies among hunter-gatherers, herders, peasants, and wage earners in rural and urban settings throughout the world. Despite our rich insights into human behavior, HBE has very rarely been used as a tool to help the people with whom we work. This article introduces a special issue of Human Nature which explores the application of HBE to significant world issues through the design and critique of public policy and international development projects. The articles by Tucker, Shenk, Leonetti et al., and Neil were presented at the 104th annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association (AAA) in Washington, D.C., in December 2005, in the first organized session of the nascent Evolutionary Anthropology Section (EAS). We conclude this introduction by summarizing some theoretical challenges to applying HBE, and ways in which evolutionary anthropologists can contribute to solving tough world issues.

  2. Personel and life coaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael

    2018-01-01

    Personal coaching and life-coaching psychology is for assisting individuals clarify values, visions and meaning of life, through a systematic process in which the coach facilitates improvement of satisfying and fruitful life experiences and achievement of personal life goals....

  3. Public History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gouveia de Oliveira Rovai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como proposta apresentar o conceito e as práticas de História Pública como um novo posicionamento da ciência histórica em diálogo com profissionais da comunicação, no sentido de produzir e divulgar as experiências humanas. Para isso, discute-se a origem do conceito de História Pública e as diferentes formas de educação histórica que a utilização das novas tecnologias podem proporcionar (dentre elas a internet. Nesse sentido, convida-se o leitor para a reflexão sobre as possibilidades de publicização e de democratização do conhecimento histórico e da cultura, ampliando-se a oportunidade de produção, de divulgação e de acesso do público a diferentes formas experiências no tempo. O artigo também intenciona chamar atenção dos profissionais que lidam com a História e com a Comunicação para os perigos de produções exclusivamente submetidas ao mercado que transformam a popularização da História no reforço de estigmas culturais.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: História Pública; Educação histórica e Comunicação; democratização e estigmatização.     ABSTRACT This article aims to present the concept and practices of Public History as a new positioning of historical science in dialogue with communication professionals, in the sense of producing and disseminating human experiences. For this, the origin of the concept of Public History and the different forms of historical education that the use of the new technologies can provide (among them the Internet is discussed. In this sense, the reader is invited to reflect on the possibilities of publicizing and democratizing historical knowledge and culture, expanding the opportunity for production, dissemination and public access to different forms of experience in time. The article also intends to draw attention from professionals dealing with History and Communication to the dangers of exclusively commercialized productions that transform the popularization

  4. Public optimism towards nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottini, Massimo; Rosato, Nicola; Gloria, Fulvia; Adanti, Sara; Corradino, Nunziella; Bergamaschi, Antonio; Magrini, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Previous benefit-risk perception studies and social experiences have clearly demonstrated that any emerging technology platform that ignores benefit-risk perception by citizens might jeopardize its public acceptability and further development. The aim of this survey was to investigate the Italian judgment on nanotechnology and which demographic and heuristic variables were most influential in shaping public perceptions of the benefits and risks of nanotechnology. In this regard, we investigated the role of four demographic (age, gender, education, and religion) and one heuristic (knowledge) predisposing factors. The present study shows that gender, education, and knowledge (but not age and religion) influenced the Italian perception of how nanotechnology will (positively or negatively) affect some areas of everyday life in the next twenty years. Furthermore, the picture that emerged from our study is that Italian citizens, despite minimal familiarity with nanotechnology, showed optimism towards nanotechnology applications, especially those related to health and medicine (nanomedicine). The high regard for nanomedicine was tied to the perception of risks associated with environmental and societal implications (division among social classes and increased public expenses) rather than health issues. However, more highly educated people showed greater concern for health issues but this did not decrease their strong belief about the benefits that nanotechnology would bring to medical fields. The results reported here suggest that public optimism towards nanomedicine appears to justify increased scientific effort and funding for medical applications of nanotechnology. It also obligates toxicologists, politicians, journalists, entrepreneurs, and policymakers to establish a more responsible dialog with citizens regarding the nature and implications of this emerging technology platform.

  5. Public Relations Strategies for Scholastic Publication Staffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance to scholastic publications staffs of four public relations strategies: meticulous research, systematic planning, strengthening communication efforts, and evaluation. Notes internal and external factors crucial to good public relations. Lists activities to consider. (SR)

  6. Informing the public on radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woffinden, G.B.

    1982-01-01

    In order to inform the public on radiation and help them to understand the nature of radioactivity it is necessary to relate radiation phenomena to everyday experience and this makes the information more attractive to the media. Visual aids and analogies play an important role in any public information programme. A useful demonstration kit is described and some examples of analogies used are given. the aim of any such programme should be to stimulate interest and understanding and to place radiation hazards in perspective by comparing them with the more familiar hazards of life. (author)

  7. Public Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we want to affirm the desiring-social-change that we find in practices presently represented by theorists and policy-makers as examples of ‘social entrepreneurship’ (SE). We do this as an attempt to intensify the presence of the social and sociality in today's discourse on the entre......In this paper we want to affirm the desiring-social-change that we find in practices presently represented by theorists and policy-makers as examples of ‘social entrepreneurship’ (SE). We do this as an attempt to intensify the presence of the social and sociality in today's discourse...... on the entrepreneurship–society relationship. SE, as all entrepreneurship practices, operates by social and economic forces (limiting ourselves to those here), and generates social and economic outcomes (amongst others). Its second half, however, dominates the concept of SE, and our analysis seek to remedy this imbalance...... by focusing on the social productivity of entrepreneurship, on entrepreneurship desiring social change. We suggest ‘public entrepreneurship’ might grasp this as a more balanced concept that will also support a more precise analysis of the entrepreneurship–society relationship....

  8. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Last Monday at 9 a.m. the Council Chamber was full, with several people standing, for the public meeting of the Staff Association. Simultaneously, many of our colleagues followed the presentations in the Amphitheatre in Prévessin. We would like to thank all of you for the interest you have shown and for your feedback. In the introduction we explained how the Staff Association represents the staff in its discussions with Management and Member States, and how the staff itself defined, by its participation in the 2013 staff survey, the priority assigned to various points related to the employment conditions. The position of the Staff Association regarding the new contract policy, to be implemented as of 31 March 2015 after approval by Council, was stated. Then, in the framework of the 2015 five-yearly review, the general approach that we would like to see for the new career structure, was explained. Concerning diversity, based on what we know about the situation in other international organiza...

  9. Economic evaluation of Kori and Wolsong Unit 1 plant life extension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, T. H.; Jeong, I. S.

    2002-01-01

    24 years have been passed since Kori Unit 1 began its commercial operation, and 19 years have been passed since Wolsong Unit 1 began its commercial operation. As the end point of design life become closer, plant life extension and periodic safety assessment is paid more and more attention to by the utility company. In this paper, the methodologies and results of plant lifetime management economic evaluations of both units have been presented in comparison with Korean standard nuclear power plant 10, 20 and 30 year life extension cases respectively. In addition to that, sensitivity analysis and break even point analysis results are presented with the variables of capacity factor, operation and maintenance cost, and discount rate

  10. The Search for Life on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumma, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    For centuries, the planet Mars has been regarded as a possible abode for life. Serious searches for the signatures of life began in the 19th century, and continue via telescopic investigations and landed missions. While early work focused on phenomenology and bordered on fantasy, modern scientific inquiry has emphasized the search for chemical signatures of life in the soil and rocks at the planet's surface, and the search for biomarker gases in the atmosphere. Living systems produce more than 90% of Earth's atmospheric methane; the balance is of geochemical origin. The discovery of methane on Mars will be described, along with the ongoing extended search for clues to its origins. The possible origins of Mars methane will be discussed in the context of terrestrial analogue sites where geologic and biologic methane production now occurs - ranging from sub-permafrost zones in the arctic to hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean. Terrestrial organisms that could prosper on Mars today will be mentioned. I will briefly touch upon experiments conducted by landed spacecraft, ranging from the Viking Life Science Experiments in 1976 to the impending Mars Science laboratory, and the Trace Gas Orbiter and ExoMars missions now being developed for flight in the coming decade.

  11. Beyond Work-Life "Integration".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Joan C; Berdahl, Jennifer L; Vandello, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Research on the work-family interface began in the 1960s and has grown exponentially ever since. This vast amount of research, however, has had relatively little impact on workplace practice, and work-family conflict is at an all-time high. We review the work-family research to date and propose that a shift of attention is required, away from the individual experience of work and family and toward understanding how identity and status are defined at work. Several factors enshrine cherished identities around current workplace norms. The work devotion schema demands that those who are truly committed to their work will make it the central or sole focus of their lives, without family demands to distract them. Importantly, the work devotion schema underwrites valued class and gender identities: Work devotion is a key way of enacting elite class status and functions as the measure of a man--the longer the work hours and higher the demand for his attention, the better. Advocating change in the way work is done and life is lived meets resistance because it places these cherished identities at risk. Resistance to these identity threats keeps current workplace norms in place. This is why even the business case-which shows that current practices are not economically efficient-fails to persuade organizations to enact change. What is needed now is sustained attention to the implicit psychological infrastructure that cements the mismatch between today's workplace and today's workforce.

  12. Neuroeconomics and Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

      Objective: To identify and describe the parameters of the Frontal Power of Concentration (C). Method: Systematic review of EEG- and fMRI-studies from a neuroeconomic point of view. Results: C is a quadripartite executive integrator depending on: 1) Limbic system (L) generates emotions and cogni...... + εI → 1   Discussion:  How to reinforce volitional flexibility (c)? Firstly, cognitive predictions are improved by open-mindedness. Secondly, emotional control is best maintaining an appropriate level of physical fitness. Thirdly, our imagination is directly facilitated by in...... predicts that well-organized stress-management integrating LowTech-interventions as exercise (L↓ and c↑), in-depth-relaxation (c↓) and diet (integrating L, R and c) tailored to the individual would improve public health (national life expectancy) significantly...

  13. Years of potential life lost and life expectancy in schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorthøj, Carsten; Stürup, Anne Emilie; McGrath, John J

    2017-01-01

    was least in the Asian study and greatest in Africa. The overall weighted average life expectancy was 64·7 years (95% CI 61·1-71·3), and was lower for men than women (59·9 years, 95% CI 55·5-64·3 vs 67·6 years, 63·1-72·1). Life expectancy was lowest in Asia and Africa. Timing of publication and risk of bias...... (Africa n=1, Asia n=1, Australia n=1, Europe n=7, and North America n=3) that involved up to 247 603 patients. Schizophrenia was associated with a weighted average of 14·5 years of potential life lost (95% CI 11·2-17·8), and was higher for men than women (15·9, 13·8-18·0 vs 13·6, 11·4-15·8). Loss...

  14. Jewish national cultural-and-religious public motion in Ukraine in 1920th

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. O. Dotsenko

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is based on the archived documents, periodic press and monographic literature analysis and deals with the problem of cultural-and-religious development of Jewish society’ public initiative in Ukraine in 1920th. The special features of activity of religiously-elucidative public associations are determined, their relationships with Communist Party organs. Anti-religious work of Communist Party organs is illuminated. At the beginning of 1920th Ukrainian Jewishness actively supported and heard the confession Judaism that remained next to languages Yiddish and Hebrew like instrument for maintenance of jewries national identity in the new soviet state. At the beginning of 1920th the cells of many public associations of religiously-cultural and educational aspiration functioned in Ukraine. Religious organizations developed in Jewish cult buildings. Separately maintenance of national identity of jewries was assisted by educational establishments that were actively helped by religious communities and societies. From the first years the Communist Party organs began active attacks on Jewish religious public motion. Active politics of division of jewries on atheists and believers was conducted. The last was constantly pursued and yielded to the repressions. Active voice in an anti-religious campaign was accepted by Jewish-section at the Central Committee of CP(bU. For their assistance local authorities closed synagogues, converted them into working clubs, khati-chital’ni (reading homes. Headers and eshibotes were closed, the retinues of Thora, prayer books and other religious literature were destroyed. During the Jewish holytides and on Saturdays, various atheistic actions, trials of rabbis and Judaism. got organized among the Jewish young people, workers and intelligentsia. With rolling down of New Economic Policy and beginning of mass population sovietization at the end of 1920th pressure on religious Jewish public motion from the side of

  15. Nuclear energy and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is the opening speech from a national seminar on the uses for nuclear energy in everyday life. The speaker, the public information director for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), stresses the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. He points out that used for peaceful purposes, and prudently, nuclear energy applications have, tremendous benefits to offer mankind in both the industrial world and developing nations

  16. The Greenlandic Life Script and Life Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaragoza Scherman, Alejandra; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Adults older than 40 years remember a significantly greater amount of personal life events from their 15 - 30 years of age. This phenomenon is known as the reminiscence bump (Rubin, Rahal, & Poon, 1998). The reminiscence bump is highly populated by emotionally positive events (Rubin & Berntsen......, 2003), when cued by requests for important events. This dominance of positive events is not seen when cued by random words. Berntsen and Rubin (2004) presented a cultural explanation for the bump: cultural life script theory. Their theory claims that the bump for the life story can be explained...... by the life script; that is, culturally shared expectations about the order and timing of life events in an typical, idealized life course. According to the cultural life script theory, the life script is used as a guideline for the recall of autobiographical memories, which help construct personal life...

  17. Utility and applicability of the "Childhood Obesity Risk Evaluation" (CORE)-index in predicting obesity in childhood and adolescence in Greece from early life: the "National Action Plan for Public Health".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manios, Yannis; Vlachopapadopoulou, Elpis; Moschonis, George; Karachaliou, Feneli; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Koutsouki, Dimitra; Bogdanis, Gregory; Carayanni, Vilelmine; Hatzakis, Angelos; Michalacos, Stefanos

    2016-12-01

    CORE-index, a screening tool that estimates obesity risk in 9-13 year-old children. What is new? • The utility and applicability of the CORE-index as screening tool can be extended to the age range of 6-15 years. • The CORE-index is a cost-effective screening tool that can assist health professionals in initiating obesity preventive measures from early life.

  18. Learning for life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, N

    1989-07-01

    UNICEF's position on education availability in Africa is posited, and both recent initiatives taken on its own and those conducted through collaborative efforts with other international agencies are described. UNICEF supports the notion of learning for life, with education being accessible to all of Africa's children. Learning should be relevant and responsive to the needs of individuals and communities, helpful for surviving and developing in a dynamic environment, and emphasize their roles in the community, the nation, the work force, and the household. UNICEF supports low cost, community-based early child care and education programs, with a view to maintaining flexible approaches depending upon the types of education which may be required in different contexts. Presently, UNICEF's work in Africa centers upon communicating practical child survival and maternal health information to children, families, opinion leaders, and communicators. Collaborative efforts by UNICEF, WHO, and UNESCO include publishing a new book entitles "Facts for Life," and implementing an action-oriented school health curriculum for primary schools in 5 countries. "Health-into-Mathematics" is another UNICEF publication integrating the 2 fields for children. women in development, the importance of primary education, and the use of radio in education are also addressed. In the face of economic crisis and destabilization, education services must be protected. An initiative to promote renewed national and international commitment to basic education for all, a World Conference on Education for All-Meeting Basic Learning Needs," is noted.

  19. Facets of a life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakharov, A.

    1991-01-01

    This book is physicist's tribute to Andrei Dmitrievich Sakharov. This out-standing person - a talented physicist and citizen of the world - has played an extremely important role in the deep-going changes occurring in our country. His name belongs to history. Accounts of people who met him and are capable of assessing his scientific work and public activism are just beginning to pour in. In our view, this collection of reminiscences is only a small but essential, contribution to the restoration of A.D. Sakharov's image. Most of the authors, physicists, mathematicians and computer scientists from many countries, knew him as a colleague. To a varying extent, they were a part of his difficult life. This is what this collection is about. Both professional and humanistic facets of his life are described. The book begins with the texts published when he ran for a post of a people's deputy of the USSR and the biographical note printed in the Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk journal after his death. They are mutually complementary for the former contains a short description of his biography and human rights activism, and the latter emphasizes Sakharov's scientific work. The authors' index contains basic data about them. The Annexes contain some previously unpublished Sakharov's documents. Among them there is 'The Letter to Soviet Scientists' with an appeal which, unfortunately, did not get the support it deserved

  20. Public Space, Public Waste, and the Right to the City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikarmane, Poornima

    2016-08-01

    I draw on my experiences as an organizer with a waste-pickers collective, Kagad Kach Patra Kashtakari Panchayat in Pune, India, to reflect on the power dynamics in control of public space. The Pune Municipal Corporation (PMC), a public body, has used public resources to facilitate and enable accumulation by private companies, who have not been able to produce what they had committed to in the processing of waste. The waste pickers, in alliance with affected village-based land agitation committees, have mobilized against the dumping that is ruining their way of life, environments, and health, and are fighting for their own integration into waste value chains. The article uses the frame of David Harvey's(1) "right to the city"; a key part of the mobilizing work with waste pickers has been Freirean conscientization methods to spread awareness of the economic importance, to the city and to the planet, of waste recycling. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. Public values in public-private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynaers, A.; de Graaf, G.

    2014-01-01

    Although public-private partnerships (PPPs) are often evaluated in terms of efficiency, their impact on public values is often neglected. In order to find out what we know about the public values-PPPs relation, this article reviews public administration literature and describes two opposite

  2. Music and Public Health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonde, Lars Ole; Juel, Knud; Ekholm, Ola

    2016-01-01

    Background: ‘Music and public health’ is a new field of study. Few scientific studies with small samples have documented health implications of musical participation. Research questions in this epidemiological study were: 1) Is there an association between self-rated health and active use of musi......: 57%. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to investigate associations between musical background/activities and health-related indicators. Discussion: The study documents that a majority of informants use music to regulate physical and psychological states......Background: ‘Music and public health’ is a new field of study. Few scientific studies with small samples have documented health implications of musical participation. Research questions in this epidemiological study were: 1) Is there an association between self-rated health and active use of music...... in daily life? 2) What associations can be observed between musical background, uses and understanding of music as a health factor, and self-reported health? Method: Data came from the Danish Health and Morbidity Survey 2013, based on a simple random sample of 25.000 adult Danes (16+ years). Response rate...

  3. Marie Curie - science was her life

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolschendorf, K.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper a short survey of the life and the work of Marie Curie is presented. She was born in 1867 in Warsaw/Poland and went to Paris in 1891 to study physics, mathematics, and chemistry. In 1895 the married the physicist Pierre Curie, and together they began research work on radioactivity. For her doctorate she investigated various radiating substances and discovered the radioactive element Radium in 1898. She was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1903, and later on the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1911 for performing pioneering studies with radium and contributing profoundly to the understanding of radioactivity. In 1934 she died in a health resort due to leukemia. (orig.) [de

  4. Life span study report, 11, part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yukiko; Kato, Hiroo; Schull, W.J.

    1988-12-01

    ABCC and its successor, RERF, have followed since 1959 and retrospectively to 1950 the mortality in a fixed cohort of survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, the so-called Life Span Study sample. The present study, the 11th in a series that began in 1961, extends the surveillance period three more years and covers the period 1950-85. It is based on the recently revised dose system, called DS86, that has replaced previous estimates of individual exposures. The impact of the change from the old system of dosimetry, the T65DR, to the new on the dose-response relationships for cancer mortality was described in the first of this series of reports. Here, the focus is on cancer mortality among the 76,000 A-bomb survivors within the LSS sample for whom DS86 doses have been estimated, with the emphasis on biological issues associated with radiation carcinogenesis. (author)

  5. Inactive Publics: The Forgotten Publics in Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallahan, Kirk

    2000-01-01

    Notes that recent public relations theory has largely ignored inactive publics, stakeholder groups that demonstrate low levels of knowledge and involvement in the organization or its products, services, candidates, or causes, but are important to an organization. Examines the nature of inactive publics and proposes a model that locates inactive…

  6. Researching quality of life in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Tonón

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of quality of life considers at the same time objective and subjective circumstances of people life. In 1995 was created the International Society for Quality of Life Studies (ISQOLS whose purposes are to promote and encourage research in the field of quality-of-life studies and provide an organization through which all academic and professional researchers interested in QOL studies may coordinate their efforts to advance the field of QOL studies within various disciplines. In the case of Argentina since 2004, the Facultad de Ciencias Sociales, Universidad Nacional de Lomas de Zamora has organized the Research Program in Quality of life to develop different kind of projects about quality of life in different fields, trying to be considered by national institutions that decide public policies. 

  7. The Third Life of Quantum Logic: Quantum Logic Inspired by Quantum Computing

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, J. Michael; Moss, Lawrence S.; Wang, Zhenghan

    2013-01-01

    We begin by discussing the history of quantum logic, dividing it into three eras or lives. The first life has to do with Birkhoff and von Neumann's algebraic approach in the 1930's. The second life has to do with attempt to understand quantum logic as logic that began in the late 1950's and blossomed in the 1970's. And the third life has to do with recent developments in quantum logic coming from its connections to quantum computation. We discuss our own work connecting quantum logic to quant...

  8. Life on the front lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hern, W M

    1993-01-01

    A physician who owns and operates an abortion clinic in Boulder, Colorado, in the US relates how he came to offer this procedure to women and how this choice has affected his life. The physician had worked as a medical student at a Schweitzer-inspired hospital in the Peruvian Amazon in 1964 and later as a Peace Corps physician in Brazil. He performed his first abortion in 1970, in Washington, D. C., for a 17-year-old high school student whose future plans would have been derailed by her pregnancy. At that time, the physician was working to change the federal government's restrictions on abortion funding and he began to correspond with abortion rights groups and heard the Supreme Court arguments in the landmark abortion cases. As part-time medical director of a family planning training program in the Rocky Mountain region, part of his job was to provide information about new abortion techniques. In 1973, he was asked to help start an abortion clinic in Boulder, and he accepted the position of medical director reporting to an executive director. He had to struggle to acquire privileges at Boulder Community Hospital in order to admit patients with complications. In addition, a "Fight the Abortion Clinic Committee" tried to have the clinic closed by the Colorado Board of Health. Further obstacles were placed by members of the Boulder County Medical Society who formed another committee with the intent of closing the clinic. After a tour of the clinic, the committee chairman declared that the clinic met the highest standards of medical care, so that effort was ended. In November 1973, antiabortion groups began to picket the clinic and the physician began to receive threatening phone calls at home. He purchased a rifle and kept it by his bed. In the summer of 1974, he participated in a debate on Denver television. He had to be secreted out a back door after a subsequent debate. The same summer, the Denver chapter of the National Organization for Women held a rally to

  9. Managing Daily Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duchenne / Managing Daily Life Print Email Managing Daily Life Environmental accessibility As the person with Duchenne starts ... such as wider doorways and ramps, can make life easier once the person with Duchenne cannot climb ...

  10. Middle School Math Acceleration and Equitable Access to Eighth-Grade Algebra: Evidence from the Wake County Public School System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Shaun M.; Goodman, Joshua S.; Hill, Darryl V.; Litke, Erica G.; Page, Lindsay C.

    2015-01-01

    Taking algebra by eighth grade is considered an important milestone on the pathway to college readiness. We highlight a collaboration to investigate one district's effort to increase middle school algebra course-taking. In 2010, the Wake County Public Schools began assigning middle school students to accelerated math and eighth-grade algebra based…

  11. Students and Teachers Accessing Tomorrow (STAT): Baltimore County Public School's One-to-One Digital Conversion Case in Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbriale, Ryan; Schiner, Nicholas; Elmendorf, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Baltimore County Public Schools is in the midst of a transformation of teaching and learning; the goal being the creation of student-centered classrooms supported by a one-to-one computer for every student. This transformation, known as Students and Teachers Accessing Tomorrow, began in 2014 and is now in its third academic year. We present this…

  12. The Pursuit of Excellence: An Analysis of the Honors College Application and Enrollment Decision for a Large Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Tang, Hui-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Honors colleges housed in public universities began only in the last half century, but have become nearly ubiquitous over the last 20 years. This paper, using recent data from the oldest stand-alone honors college in the country, is the first to study how the application and enrollment decisions of honors college students differ from the general…

  13. 78 FR 57924 - 2013 Special 301 Out-Of-Cycle Review of Notorious Markets: Request For Public Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... identifying potential Internet and physical notorious markets that exist outside the United States and that may be included in the 2013 Notorious Markets List. In 2010, USTR began publishing the notorious... notorious markets (``Notorious Markets List'') results in the publication of examples of Internet and...

  14. Publications in Cuba after Latin American Independences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José SÁNCHEZ BAENA

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This article has a double objective. On the one hand, it aims to offer a vision of the consequences of the liberal Triennium, and the end of Spanish domain in continental America, on the Cuban printing culture. On the other hand, it analyses the main aspects that influenced Cuban society through the most important periodical contents. The extraordinary economic and commercial development, whose most influential agent was the economic group denominated «sacarocracia», made the printing evolution unstoppable, despite the strong control and censorship imposed by the Spanish government fearing the independence of near Republics. Some new serial publications with good content appeared, such as Revista Bimestre Cubana, and the expansion of printing slowly began in new Cuban populations.

  15. A distant light scientists and public policy

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    A collection of essays by a Nobel Prize Laureate on a wide range of critical issues facing the world, and the role of scientists in solving these problems. Kendall has been closely involved with the Union of Concerned Scientists, a group that began as an informal assocation at MIT in 1969 to protest US involvement in Vietnam and is today an organization with an annual budget exceeding $6 million, with 100,000 supporters worldwide. UCD is today a voice of authority in US government science policy, particularly with regard to environment issues, most recently the worldwide initiatives on global warming. Together, these essays represent both the sucessses and failures of science to impact public policy, the challenges facing scientists, and offers practical guidelines for involvement in science policy. The essays are roughly chronological, organized by subject with introductions, beginning with the controversies on nuclear power safety and Three Mile Island,then followed by sections on national security issues, ...

  16. [From Vesalius to Descartes: the heart, the life].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitbol-Hespériès, Annie

    2014-01-01

    At the end of 1629, Descartes, settled in the Lower Countries, began studying anatomy and performing dissections in order to write L'Homme (The Treatise on Man). He acknowledged his debt towards "Vezalius and the others". In those years, in Europe, the influence of Vesalius was increasing, as shown by Rembrandt's Anatomy of Dr Tulp and by the Theatrum anatomicum by Caspar Bauhin. Descartes rejected the divisions of the soul, then a common place in medical treatises, and he stated a principle of life defined by the heath in the heart linked to the new demonstration of the circulation of the blood by William Harvey.

  17. Dice world science and life in a random universe

    CERN Document Server

    Clegg, Brian

    2013-01-01

    For centuries scientists believed that the universe was a vast machine ? with enough detail, you could predict exactly what would happen. Admittedly real life wasn’t like that. But only, they argued, because we didn’t have enough data to be certain. Then the cracks began to appear. It proved impossible to predict exactly how three planets orbiting each other would move. Meteorologists discovered that the weather was truly chaotic ? so dependent on small variations that it could never be predicted for more than a few days out. And the final nail in the coffin was quantum theory,

  18. 41 CFR 101-27.206 - Procurement of shelf-life materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Procurement of shelf-life materials. 101-27.206 Section 101-27.206 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... MANAGEMENT 27.2-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.206 Procurement of shelf-life materials. ...

  19. Qualidade de vida em urticária crônica: inquérito em ambulatório público universitário, Botucatu (Brasil Quality of life in chronic urticaria: a survey at a public university outpatient clinic, Botucatu (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Regina Cavariani Silvares

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar o impacto da urticária crônica na qualidade de vida dos pacientes de ambulatório universitário a partir do questionário DLQI (Dermatology Life Quality Index. MÉTODOS: Inquérito sobre o impacto na qualidade de vida infligido pela urticária crônica a partir do questionário DLQI validado para a língua portuguesa. Pacientes foram entrevistados durante suas consultas em ambulatório especializado, entre maio de 2009 e maio de 2010, em serviço público brasileiro (Botucatu-SP. Os escores do DLQI foram analisados segundo subgrupos: idade, gênero, escolaridade, tempo de doença e presença de angioedema. RESULTADOS: Foram entrevistados 100 pacientes com urticária crônica. Predominou o gênero feminino (86%, a idade média foi de 41,8 anos, duração média da doença foi de seis anos e angioedema ocorreu em 82% dos pacientes. O escore médio do DLQI foi de 13,5, caracterizando grave impacto à qualidade de vida, superior a hanseníase, psoríase, eczema atópico e carcinoma basocelular. Presença de angioedema se associou a maiores escores: 14,5 x 9,9 (p OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the impact of chronic urticaria on quality of life of outpatients through the university questionnaire Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI. METHODS: Survey of the impact on quality of life caused by chronic urticaria, using the DLQI questionnaire validated for the Portuguese language. Patients were interviewed during visits to a specialized outpatient clinic between May 2009 and May 2010 at a Brazilian public service (Botucatu-SP. DLQI scores were analyzed according to the following subgroups: age, gender, education, disease duration, and presence of angioedema. RESULTS: We interviewed 100 patients with chronic urticaria. There was a female predominance (86%, mean age 41.8 years, mean disease duration of 6 years, and angioedema occurrence in 82% of patients. The mean DLQI score was 13.5, characterized by serious impact on quality of life, higher

  20. Media System, Public Knowledge and Democracy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salovaara-Moring, Inka; Curran, James; Iyengar, Shanto

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the implications of the movement towards entertainment-centred, market-driven media by comparing what is reported and what the public knows in four countries with different media systems. The different systems are public service (Denmark and Finland), a `dual' model (UK) an...... consumption and contributes to a smaller within-nation knowledge gap between the advantaged and disadvantaged. But wider processes in society take precedence over the organization of the media in determining how much people know about public life......) and the market model (US). The comparison shows that public service television devotes more attention to public affairs and international news, and fosters greater knowledge in these areas, than the market model. Public service television also gives greater prominence to news, encourages higher levels of news...

  1. The genesis of public health ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Ronald; Fairchild, Amy L

    2004-11-01

    As bioethics emerged in the 1960s and 1970s and began to have enormous impacts on the practice of medicine and research--fuelled, by broad socio-political changes that gave rise to the struggles of women, African Americans, gay men and lesbians, and the antiauthoritarianism impulse that characterised the New Left in democratic capitalist societies--little attention was given to the question of the ethics of public health. This was all the more striking since the core values and practices of public health, often entailing the subordination of the individual for the common good, seemed opposed to the ideological impulses of bioethics. Of what relevance is autonomy-focused bioethics for public health, with its mix of justifications including those that are either implicitly or explicitly paternalistic or that seek to impose strictures on individuals and communities in the name of collective welfare? To examine the deep divide between the central commitments of bioethics and the values that animate the practice of public health, we focus on a series of controversies implicating the concepts of privacy, liberty, and paternalism. Recognising the role of moral values in decision-making was a signal contribution of bioethics in its formative period. Over the past three decades a broad array of perspectives emerged under the rubric of bioethics but individualism remains central. As we commence the process of shaping an ethics of public health, it is clear that bioethics is the wrong place to start when thinking about the balances required in defence of the public's health.

  2. Public values in public-private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reynaers, A.

    2014-01-01

    Although public-private partnerships (PPPs) are frequently analyzed and lauded in terms of efficiency, their impact on public values is often neglected. As a result, there is little empirical evidence supporting or rejecting the claim that PPPs have a negative effect on public values. This case

  3. Gaining public acceptance for Temelin NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novak, Miroslav

    1995-01-01

    The construction of the Temelin nuclear power plant, which initially was planned to consist of 4 units with the Russian WWER-1000 reactors, later reduced to 2 began in 1986. There were no public opinion problems, because then, in the communist Czechoslovakia, public opinion was no issue of major importance. The first problems emerged after 1989 when Czechoslovakia began to seek it place among democratic countries. Then it turned out that the nuclear power plant had its opponents, that it aroused fright among the uninformed people and could become a tool for political manipulation. Generally, public opinion was in favour of nuclear power but the voice of the opponents had to be taken seriously. It was not later than 1989, during the political changes, that the first germs of Public Relations departments began to form at Czechoslovak nuclear power plants. The technicians and economists, however, were to say the crucial words. For the CEZ utility, with its Temelin under construction, to become a credible partner for the public in Czechoslovakia and abroad, efforts had to be made for the plant to be completed so that it should meet safety requirements which are conventional in Western Europe and in the United States. There came IAEA missions and international audits, which confirmed that the power plant would be able to meet international safety standards provided that some upgrading and changes in the Russian design are implemented, in particular, the instrumentation and control. We foster and expand personal contacts with media and make efforts to keep them informed. We arrange events through which they can get familiar with nuclear power problems abroad. The Temelin newspaper is a monthly through which we inform the population within 20 km from the power plant about all important events. We have expanded the Information Center which, following the model of the French EDF, employs external female guide staff. Over 13 thousand people visit the Center every year. So

  4. Public requirement to demonstrate safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, P.

    1991-01-01

    To many working within Government or industry, public concern over the disposal of radioactive waste is misplaced and has arisen out of an irrational and unscientific fear of technology, or even science in general. Members of the public, it is argued, are concerned because they do not understand the size of the risk in question. From the industry's point of view, the risk arising from the disposal of radioactive waste is ''negligible when compared to other everyday risks of life. Furthermore, any public exposure that may arise, either soon after closure of a facility or in the far future would comply with internationally accepted safety standards. In this context, the continuing concern over disposal of radioactive waste is viewed as evidence of the irrational and unscientific attitude of the public. The assessment and regulation of risk from waste disposal therefore is presented as a purely scientific question. Some of these issues are examined and public concern is shown not to be irrational but to be based upon legitimate questions over current waste management policy. An important question is not just ''how safe is safe, but who decides and how?''. (Author)

  5. CEGB experience of public communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, R.R.; Usher, E.F.

    1977-01-01

    studies, nature trails, bird and wild life reserves. Housing for the power station staff is dispersed into local communities and the employees are encouraged to take full part in local affairs. These actions ensure close contact at all levels with local people who come to accept power stations. A more recent feature is the appearance of national pressure groups against nuclear power with a marked similarity in approach to that used in America and elsewhere. It is perhaps significant that to date there has been little public support for these groups in areas where nuclear power stations are established. This may be an indication of the Board achievement in obtaining public acceptance of nuclear power stations

  6. Breaching barriers to collaboration in public spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinemann, Trine; Mitchell, Robb

    2014-01-01

    Technology provoking disparate individuals to collaborate or share experiences in the public space faces a difficult barrier, namely the ordinary social order of urban places. We employed the notion of the breaching experiment to explore how this barrier might be overcome. We analyse responses...... of life in public spaces. Arising from this, we argue for the importance of qualities such as availability, facilitation, perspicuous settings, and perspicuous participants to encourage and support co-located strangers to collaborate and share experiences....

  7. Scientific Publication Ethics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman İnci

    2015-06-01

    showing conscious deceptive intention. Duplication, salamislicing, publications aiming partiality, partiality in choice of sources, authorship rights violations (Author concealment, Gift Autorship, Honory Autorship or Ghost Autorship,author addition changing the order of author list, and not thanking to the contributers are other irregular applications. Innocent faults and carelessness should not be evaluated as irregular applications. It is the task and responsibility of administrators of academic committee, editors and publication committees, referees, supporting institutions, and mainly academic readers and writers to avoid irregular applications in academic publications. It is of vital importance to give ‘an academic ethics’ instructions just at the very beginning of academic life. The ones who do not know principles and rules of academic ethics are not efficient for academic research and publications. Besides sanctions should be applied against approved irregular applications.

  8. Same-sex marriage and other moral taboos : cultural acceptances, change in American public opinion and the evidence from the opinion polls

    OpenAIRE

    MORINI, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Published online: 25 January 2017 Creative Commons Licence This article analyzes the evolution of gay and lesbian rights and same-sex marriage in American public opinion. It describes how Obergefell v. Hodges, state-level decisions and the public opinion trends can be considered as the outcome of a grassroots coordinated campaign which began more than a decade ago and was able to conquer the majority of Americans. It also focuses on the American public opinion trends related to moral is...

  9. [The life of Dr. RO Kishun, a reflection of modern Korean medical history of the borders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Young-Jeon; Park, Se-Hong

    2009-06-01

    RO Kishun was born on February 2, 1893 in Ongjin County, Hwanghae Province of Joseon Korea. He graduated from the Medical Training Center, a campus associated with the Joseon Government-General Hospital, in 1915, and from Kyushu Imperial University School of Medicine in 1917. He continued his medical study at the university in 1929, majoring in biochemistry, and earned a doctorate in medicine in 1932. Dr. RO, one of the earliest pioneers in Korean biochemistry, was active in his research, publishing four studies in the Japanese Journal of Biochemistry between 1931 and 1932. After returning from Japan in 1932, Dr. RO opened a medical practice in Mokpo and Busan, port cities situated on the southern tip of Korea. Later in 1936, he moved north to Manchuria (northeast China) to practice medicine at the International Hospital in Mukden (present-day Shenyang). He also served as president of Tumen Public Hospital between 1942 and 1946. When Japan signed unconditional surrender bringing World War II to an end, Dr. RO relocated to Yanbian and began providing medical training to ethnic Koreans. In October 1946, he was appointed dean of the First Branch School of China Medical University in Longjing, and in October 1948 the first dean of Yanbian Medical School, the predecessor of Yanbian University College of Medicine. Dr. RO dedicated his life to medical practice, teaching and training students, and mentoring younger faculty. A brilliant clinician, he also inspired and helped his colleagues with his outstanding ability to diagnose and treat patients. He was one of the founding members of Yanbian University College of Medicine. RO Kishun died on June 7, 1957 at age 64. Ethnic Koreans hailed him as Sinui (literally, the physician of God), and a bronze statue of himself was erected in front of the medical college in 1988. Dr. RO's life brings modern historians' attention to the issue of determining geographical territories and nationality, in that his life unfolded at the

  10. Expanding the horizons of soil science to the public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, David L.; Hopmans, Jan; Olson, Carolyn; Fisk, Susan; Chapman, Susan

    2015-04-01

    Soils are critical to all life on the planet yet most individuals treat soil like dirt. As soil scientist we have long recognized this and have struggled to find ways to communicate the importance of soils to the public. The goal is not purely altruistic as we recognize that society funds or research and provides the workforce in soils that we need to continue to gain knowledge and expertise in soil science. In 2006 the Soil Science Society of America took a bold move and created its K12 Committee in part to compliment the Dig It! The Secrets of Soil exhibit that opened in July 2008 at the Smithsonian's Institution's Nation Museum of Natural History (of which SSS was a founding sponsor). The committee's work began quickly with a website designed to provide resources for K12 teachers (primary and school teachers). The first accomplishments included reviewing and posting links to web based information already available to teachers. These links were sorted by subject and grade level to make it easier for teachers to navigate the web and find what they needed quickly. Several presentations and lessons designed for K12 teachers were also posted at this time. Concurrent with this effort a subcommittee review and organized the national teaching standards to show where soils could fit into the overall K12 curriculum. As the website was being developed another subcommittee developed a soils book (Soil! Get the Inside Scoop, 2008) to further compliment the Dig It! exhibit. This was a new endeavor for SSSA having never worked with the non-academic audience in developing a book. Peer-reviews of this book included not only scientist but also students in order to make sure the book was attractive to them. Once the book was published and the website developed it became clear more outreach was needed. SSSA K12 Committee has attended both the National Science Teachers Association (since 2008) the USA Science and Engineering Festival (since 2010) with exhibits and workshops. It has

  11. From lab to life: Making storable orange-fleshed sweetpotato purée a commercial reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bocher Temesgen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Research in Rwanda demonstrated that orange-fleshed sweetpotato (OFSP purée (steamed, mashed roots was an economically viable, vitamin A enhancing ingredient in baked products when the purée was produced and used in the same bakery. Having a storable, packaged OFSP purée produced by a firm to supply bakers is an alternative model. Vacuum-packed OFSP purée with preservatives with a four-month shelf-life at 23°C was developed by the International Potato Center under laboratory conditions in 2015. Turning it into a commercial reality required developing a public-private partnership to establish an OFSP purée-bread value chain. The phases in developing the chain are described. Cost-benefit assessment focuses on two points along the chain: the farmers producing roots for the purée factory and purée production. The first OFSP bread began to be marketed in six Tuskys’ stores in June 2015 at a premium price (5 Ksh above its regular bread, reaching 20 stores by August 2016. OFSP bread was well-received by consumers. Purée production became profitable (18% profit margin when we shifted from using peeled to unpeeled roots--the new product being a “high fiber” purée. Commercial OFSP purée production has been improved and is poised for profitable, larger-scale output.

  12. Sudbury District Energy - a public/private partnership model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prudhomme, H.

    1999-01-01

    The issue of public/private partnership as it relates to the Sudbury District Energy Project was discussed. When completed, it will be the first cogeneration-based district heating and cooling project involving private sector/public sector partnership in Canada. The equal partners include Toromont Energy and Sudbury Hydro. Sudbury Hydro is a community owned energy and communications utility. It was the first electric utility in Ontario to retail natural gas in the new competitive market place. The Sudbury District Energy Project began in 1996, when the utility began the development of a community district energy system in partnership with the City of Sudbury. At the time, the downtown district heating/cooling system supplied cold and hot water to Sudbury's Wellness Centre. In 1998, Toromont Energy accepted a 50/50 partnership arrangement between themselves and the public sector partners to form the Sudbury District Energy Corporation. Sudbury Hydro will benefit from the project because it will reduce their peak loads and it will also be an alternate source of revenue. It is expected that the project will displace 39,600 tons of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas which contributes to global warming

  13. Public Relations in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    the findings. The study also suffers from the limits of a quantitative research approach, which provides less elaborate accounts of public communication officers’ perceptions of the strategic role of communication in the public sector. Originality/value of paper: This study contributes to the existing......Purpose of the paper: The aim of this study is to examine the level of strategic management of public administrations and information and communication programs by public communication officers in Italy. Methodology: The study is quantitative in nature. It was constructed according to the findings...... of the Excellence Project in Public Relations and thus applies a research instrument similar to that used in other international scholarly investigations in public relations. The population comprises civil servants working in information and communication activities for Italian public administrations. Findings...

  14. FINANCING PUBLIC TRANSPORT SERVICES FROM PUBLIC FUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miloš POLIAK

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of efficiency of public passenger transport through financial support from public funds from the perspective of improving road safety. The aim is to verify the hypothesis that financing public passenger transport from public funds is a significant tool to influence the number of passengers carried by individual automobile transport, and thus it can be used a tool for influencing road safety in a particular territory. The first part of the paper analyses the sources for financial support of public passenger transport. The next part describes the assumptions for improving road safety through increasing the support of public passenger transport. The last part analyses possible impacts of financing public passenger transport on the road safety in relation to the specified hypothesis.

  15. Environment and public health; Environnement et sante publique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escande, J P [Hopital Cochin, 75 - Paris (France); Cicolella, A [Institut National de l' Environnement Industriel et des Risques, 60 - Verneuil en Halatte (INERIS) (France); Hemon, D [Institut National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale (INSERM), 75 - Paris (France); and others

    1999-06-01

    These fourteen presentations on the public health effects of the pollution, showed the environment and life style modifications effects on the public health but also the difficulty to evaluate the risk assessment. This analysis brings information and opinion on the environment, the public health, the scientific representation, the evaluation paradigm, the press amplification, the public health policy choices and the risks of too severe regulations. (A.L.B.)

  16. A Bibliography of Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) Publications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Robert V.

    2016-01-01

    The Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Langley Research Center began research operations in early 1960. Since that time, over 600 tests have been conducted, primarily in the discipline of aeroelasticity. This paper presents a bibliography of the publications that contain data from these tests along with other reports that describe the facility, its capabilities, testing techniques, and associated research equipment. The bibliography is divided by subject matter into a number of categories. An index by author's last name is provided.

  17. Public procurement process

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NESG Policy Brief: April 2017. Public ... transparency in public procurement; and greater concerns about efficiency, fairness, and equity. ... government enacted the Public Procurement Act (2007) [1] which provides legislative framework for.

  18. Life Cycle Assessment of Diesel and Electric Public Transportation Buses

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Clean Air Act identifies diesel powered motor vehicles, including transit buses, as significant sources of several criteria pollutants which contribute to ground level ozone formation or smog. The effects of air pollution in urban areas are often more significant due to con...

  19. Review of Point Hope Alaska: life on frozen water, by Berit Arnestad Foote

    OpenAIRE

    Elias, Scott

    2009-01-01

    This beautifully illustrated book documents three years in the life of Point Hope, Alaska. Point Hope has been a whaling camp site of the Inupiat people for over 2500 years, based on archaeological studies. Up until the 1950s, the settlement here had remained much as it had been since its inhabitants first began having contact with outsiders. Missionaries, school teachers and supplies had arrived from the USA in the 20th century, as the Territory of Alaska started to receive greater attention...

  20. Public Health Departments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — State and Local Public Health Departments in the United States Governmental public health departments are responsible for creating and maintaining conditions that...

  1. Public Value Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, lotte bøgh; Beck Jørgensen, Torben; Kjeldsen, Anne-Mette

    2012-01-01

    Further integration of the public value literature with other strands of literature within Public Administration necessitates a more specific classification of public values. This paper applies a typology linked to organizational design principles, because this is useful for empirical public...... administration studies. Based on an existing typology of modes of governance, we develop a classification and test it empirically, using survey data from a study of the values of 501 public managers. We distinguish between seven value dimensions (the public at large, rule abidance, societal interests, budget...... the integration between the public value literature and other parts of the Public Administration discipline....

  2. CRIMINAL PROTECTION OF PRIVATE LIFE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADU SLAVOIU

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This study is meant, first of all, to analyze the incriminations that the new Romanian Criminal Code sets for the protection of a person’s private life as a social value of maximum significance both for the human being and for any democratic society as a whole.There are two criminal offences treated in this study that are not to be found in the current criminal legislation: violation of private life and criminal trespassing of a legal person’s property. Likewise, the study will bring forth the novelties and the differences regarding the offences of criminal trespassing of a natural person’s property, disclosure of professional secret, violation of secret correspondence, illegal access to computerized system and illegal interception of electronic data transfer – acts that when, directly or indirectly, committed can cause harm to the intimacy of a person’s life.As an expression of the interdisciplinary nature of this subject, the study also sets out, as a subsidiary aspect, an evaluation of the circumstances under which the new criminal proceeding legislation allows public authorities to interfere with an individual’s private life. Thus, the emphasis is on the analysis of the circumstances under which special surveillance and investigation techniques can be used as evidence proceedings regulated by the new Romanian Criminal Procedure Code.

  3. An Urban Way of Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Kirstine

    This paper presents how my PhD project “An Urban Way of life – practices, networks and identities in Odense 1100-1500 AD” engages with the overall research perspectives presented in the research and public outreach project “Urban Encounters”. I will explore how urbanism in Medieval Odense can...... of the cultural deposits and sampling for scientific analysis. It resulted in an extensive finds assemblage and well-preserved structures such as booths, houses, byres and stables, latrines, paths, roads, fences, manure heaps and much more with a vast potential for further research. One of the features...... was a large latrine from the 15th century that contained a variety of finds such as coopered beakers, seeds from plants or fruits and ceramics. The latrine does not only tell about people and practices of daily life but studied with a contextual approach and chaine operatoire as point of departure...

  4. Quality of life and philosophy of life determines physical and mental health: status over research findings from the Quality of Life Research Center, Copenhagen, 1991-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2007-10-22

    Quality of life (QOL) has over the past decade become an important part of health science and also increased public awareness. It has become increasingly apparent that illness is closely related to the individual perception of a good life, and therefore the exploration of indicators related to quality of life appears to be of broad importance for the prevention and treatment of diseases. Identifying, which factors constitute a good life may reveal an understanding about what areas in life should be encouraged, in order to enhance the global quality of life, health, and ability. In this paper we present results from studies initiated in 1989 to examine quality of life in relation to disease. The purpose of this presentation was to assemble the results from the study carried out in the years between 1993 and 1997, examining a total of 11,500 Danes, to show the association between quality of life and a wide series of social indicators.

  5. Legacy for ChildrenTM: a pair of randomized controlled trials of a public health model to improve developmental outcomes among children in poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perou Ruth

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One in five Americans under age 18 lives in a family below the Federal poverty threshold. These more than 15 million children are at increased risk of a wide variety of adverse long-term health and developmental outcomes. The early years of life are critical to short- and long-term health and well-being. The Legacy for ChildrenTM model was developed in response to this need and marries the perspectives of epidemiology and public health to developmental psychology theory in order to better address the needs of children at environmental risk for poor developmental outcomes. Methods/design The Legacy for ChildrenTM group-based parenting intervention model was evaluated as a pair of randomized controlled trials among low-income families in Miami and Los Angeles. The study was designed to allow for site-stratified analysis in order to evaluate each model implementation separately. Evaluation domains include comprehensive assessments of family, maternal, and child characteristics, process outcomes, and prospective programmatic cost. Data collection began prenatally or at birth and continues into school-age. Discussion The societal costs of poor developmental outcomes are substantial. A concerted effort from multiple sectors and disciplines, including public health, is necessary to address these societal concerns. Legacy uses a public health model to engage parents and promote overall child well-being in families in poverty through rigorous evaluation methodologies and evidence-based intervention strategies. This study collects rich and modular information on maternal and child outcomes, process, and cost that will enable a detailed understanding of how Legacy works, how it can be refined and improved, and how it can be translated and disseminated. Taken together, these results will inform public policy and help to address issues of health disparities among at-risk populations. Trial registration NCT00164697

  6. Public communication toward Monju restart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Tadao

    2001-01-01

    Five years have gone by since the sodium leak took place at a prototype FBR Monju. Looking back upon that time, one journalist said, The Monju accident was technically far from the serious one as being reported in the media. Had it not been for the infamous 'accident cover-up', an uproar must have calmed down in a month. But an unexpectedly large negative public reaction has kept Monju idle all these years. What had really happened? There was a false report on the time of first entry to the piping room or the sodium-leak spot. Contrary to the fact that five staffs did enter the room at 2:00 am, PNC failed to mention it at a first press conference held at 8:30 am. Instead, PNC created a fictitious time of entry at 10:00 am and reported it to the authorities in a formal document. Another mishap was a video cover-up operation. A year and three months later, an explosion accident took place at PNC's Tokai Reprocessing Facility and similar mishap was repeated then, causing a fatal damage to the PNC's reputation. Public opinion polls taken by mass media have concluded that PNC is 'bureaucratic, closed, slow in coping with situation and untrustworthy'. PNC struggle began - struggle to regain public trust. A series of mishaps at PNC have created an anxiety and distrust about nuclear energy among the nation. In order to restore the trust of the nation, STA, a government agency supervising PNC, decided that PNC be reorganised to make a new start as Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC) on October 1, 1998. In the start of the new organisation, JNC is expected to carry out operations placing priority on the locality of its facilities. The most precious lesson learned from the Monju accident is the importance of public communication. Currently undertaking activities toward Monju restart are; 1) public opinion monitoring, 2) social meetings, 3) strengthening publicity activities, 4) dialogue with local administration officials and opinion leaders, 5) 'open meeting

  7. Public and private regulation of reproductive technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, C

    1995-01-01

    Human reproduction is interrelated with privacy. However, in most countries where new reproductive technologies are used public regulations have been passed to provide a legal framework for such technologies. This interference in private life can be justified by the need to control medical intervention in the human reproductive process. But in order to find a balance between public regulations and other social regulations, this article analyses the impact private regulation may have on issues raised by reproductive technologies. It also addresses the issue of the influence of private bodies on the drafting of public regulations.

  8. Juvenile technologies in foreign publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shpagina E.M.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The article provides the review of foreign publications, concerning the juvenile technologies used in France, Canada, Germany and Switzerland. The paper presents legal, social and psychotherapeutic aspects of juvenile judiciary in foreign countries. The authors paid special attention to the complexity of approaches to young children and teenagers who found themselves in complicated life circumstances or got into trouble with the law. The article gives examples of using the following techniques: cognitive-behavioral intervention, mediation, family therapy (including family background and family history, relations theory, narrative practices, utilization of «emotional intelligence» resources.

  9. 41 CFR 101-27.207-3 - Marking material to show extended shelf life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... extended shelf life. 101-27.207-3 Section 101-27.207-3 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal...-INVENTORY MANAGEMENT 27.2-Management of Shelf-Life Materials § 101-27.207-3 Marking material to show extended shelf life. When the shelf-life period of Type II material (except for critical end-use items as...

  10. Defending definitions of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mix, Lucas John

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, it has become unpopular to talk about definitions of life, under the assumption that attempts at a precise definition are counterproductive. Recent attempts have failed to meet strict philosophical criteria for definitions and have failed to reach consensus. I argue that provisional definitions are necessary for clear communications. Our current knowledge of biology justifies a number of universal claims about the category of life. Whether or not "life" represents a natural category, it maps to a number of important, observable processes. Given the importance of those processes and the extent of our knowledge, plural explicit definitions of life (and related categories) will be necessary for progress in astrobiology and origin-of-life studies as well as biology in general. I propose concrete categories related to, but not necessarily coextensive with, life for clear communication and hypothesis formation: Woese life, Darwin life, Haldane life.

  11. Public transport service design requirements for the changing face of the South African customer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mokonyama, Mathetha T

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the life cycle dynamics of the South African population, the paper investigates the implications of such dynamics on the design requirements of public transport services. The life cycle dynamics considered in this paper refer specifically...

  12. Developing IAM for Life Cycle Safety Assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Toxopeus, Marten E.; Lutters, Diederick; Nee, Andrew Y.C.; Song, Bin; Ong, Soh-Khim

    2013-01-01

    This publication discusses aspects of the development of an impact assessment method (IAM) for safety. Compared to the many existing IAM’s for environmentally oriented LCA, this method should translate the impact of a product life cycle on the subject of safety. Moreover, the method should be

  13. Career Integration in the Public Accounting Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ras, Gerard J. M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper seeks to solve the labor shortage in the public accounting profession. It examines why people want to become CPAs, the influence of generational differences on career choices and considers methods to attract and retain CPAs that focus on attracting students, work-life balance issues and alternative work arrangements through career…

  14. Public Attitudes toward Stuttering in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przepiorka, Aneta M.; Blachnio, Agata; St. Louis, Kenneth O.; Wozniak, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Background: People who stutter often experience negative judgments and reactions to their stuttering from the nonstuttering majority. Many are stigmatized because of their stuttering and threatened with social exclusion, placing them at risk for compromised quality of life. Aims: The purpose of this investigation was to measure public attitudes…

  15. Social innovation in public elder care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilfeldt, Annette; Andersen, John

    2013-01-01

    The chapter addresses the role of action research in social innovation related to elder care work at public nursing homes in Denmark. It is shown how critical utopian action research can contribute to the development of humanity in elder care to the benefit of the residents life quality...

  16. Publications | Page 122 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through books, articles, research publications, and studies, we aim to widen the impact of ... Addressing life's challenges in Cape Town's flooded shacklands calls for ... to work together, new research from the African Centre for Cities has found. ... by the Indian patent system to strike a balance between the innovator''s legal ...

  17. Bodies in Movement in Public Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    This article explores the sensorial and conceptual perception of space and time, in an urbanity defined by urban life and urban form in movement and flux. Particularly regarding what public spaces and domains can be in contemporary societies and how these can be designed and developed....

  18. Public demand for preserving local open space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey D. Kline

    2006-01-01

    Increased development results in the loss of forest, farm, range, and other open space lands that contribute to the quality of life of U.S. residents. I describe an economic rationale for growing public support for preserving local open space, based the growing scarcity of open space lands. I test the rationale empirically by correlating the prevalence of open space...

  19. Publication ethics in public health emergencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David; Elger, Bernice S

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we describe and analyse three issues in publication ethics that are raised when conducting research in emergencies and disasters. These include reluctance to share data and samples because of concerns about publications, loss of individual authorship in high high-profile multi-entity publications, and the deaths of authors during dangerous research projects. An emergency research pledge may be useful in avoiding some of these issues. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Public relations effectiveness in public health institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springston, Jeffrey K; Weaver Lariscy, Ruth Ann

    2005-01-01

    This article explores public relations effectiveness in public health institutions. First, the two major elements that comprise public relations effectiveness are discussed: reputation management and stakeholder relations. The factors that define effective reputation management are examined, as are the roles of issues and crisis management in building and maintaining reputation. The article also examines the major facets of stakeholder relations, including an inventory of stakeholder linkages and key audiences, such as the media. Finally, methods of evaluating public relations effectiveness at both the program level and the institutional level are explored.

  1. Public Values and Public Service Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Beck Jørgensen, Torben; Kjeldsen, Anne Mette

    2013-01-01

    The literatures on public values (PV) and public service motivation (PSM) both address whether public service delivery is driven by something more than self-interest. They have developed separately, although they can benefit from insights developed by the other, and this article discusses...... conceptual and empirical relationships between them. Based on a survey of 501 public managers, we find that PSM and PV are associated empirically, but not in a manner allowing total integration. The conceptual discussion reveals how the two concepts cannot be totally separated, as values can be motivating...

  2. Public Education and Radioactive Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarten, S.

    2009-01-01

    Throughout the country the mention of anything nuclear or the word radiation ignites fear in the minds of many Americans. Political hype, news stories and the lack of basic understanding about nuclear power and radiation causes many people to reject what they do not understand. Often little, if any, thought may have been given to nearby nuclear weapons facilities where family members and neighbors were gainfully employed at these sites. As older nuclear facilities are closed being a result of the end of the Cold War, with indications that radioactive materials might be transported to other parts of the country, the public in expressing concern. It is important that the public have an understanding of how these materials are handled to insure public safety. It becomes important that both the companies handling these materials and the U.S. Department of Energy create an environment that will involve community participation in developing strategies that will promote and support an understanding of how radioactive wastes will be packaged, transported, and disposed. This is being performed in Oak Ridge, TN. through the efforts of the Oak Ridge Site Specific Advisory Board (ORSSAB). The ORSSAB is a DOE sponsored board of private citizens from all walks of life and professionalism's. The objective of this paper is to offer suggestions as to how public confidence, through education about nuclear, radioactive and associated and wastes are effectively handle the problems related to waste disposal, removal or on-site storage. It is essential that the public fully understand and become involved in the need for the reduction of the waste stream volumes and the technical problems being faced in reaching this goal. The effort of gaining public understanding and support of this important task cannot be limited to just those within close proximity to the facility presently housing these materials, but must extend to those outlying areas and along any potential route that might be

  3. Theorising Public and Private Spheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Remina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The 19th century saw an expression of women’s ardent desire for freedom, emancipation and assertion in the public space. Women hardly managed to assert themselves at all in the public sphere, as any deviation from their traditional role was seen as unnatural. The human soul knows no gender distinctions, so we can say that women face the same desire for fulfillment as men do. Today, women are more and more encouraged to develop their skills by undertaking activities within the public space that are different from those that form part of traditional domestic chores. The woman of the 19th century felt the need to be useful to society, to make her contribution visible in a variety of domains. A woman does not have to become masculine to get power. If she is successful in any important job, this does not mean that she thinks like a man, but that she thinks like a woman. Women have broken through the walls that cut them off from public life, activity and ambition. There are no hindrances that can prevent women from taking their place in society.

  4. Life Stories and Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongshøj, Inge Lise Lundsgaard; Bohn, Annette; Berntsen, Dorthe

    Research has shown a connection between Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and integration of traumatic experiences into the life story. Furthermore, empirical evidence suggests that life story formation begins in mid to late adolescence. Following these findings, the present study investigated...... whether experiencing trauma in youth was associated with a greater risk to integrate the trauma into the life story compared to adult traumatic exposure. Life stories were collected from 115 participants recruited via Amazon Mechanical Turk. Moreover, participants filled out questionnaires regarding...... often integrate the trauma into their life story? Results will be discussed in relation to theories of development of life stories and of PTSD....

  5. Public Entrepreneurship and Innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Nancy

    1992-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual framework of public entrepreneurship. Public entrepreneurship is defined as the generation of a novel or innovative idea and the design and implementation of the innovative idea into public sector practice. The conceptual framework is used to distinguish between public entrepreneurs and other actors in the policy process, and to clarify the differences between policy, political, executive, and bureaucratic entrepreneurs....

  6. Public Relations and Marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Daniel D.

    1987-01-01

    Urges community colleges to adopt pro-active public relations strategies. Examines the role of the public information officer in such areas as coordination of public relations and marketing activities, relations with media, and the development of a comprehensive public relations plan. (AYC)

  7. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility.

  8. From Public International to International Public Law: Translating World Public Opinion into International Public Authority

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von Bogdandy, A.; Goldmann, M.; Venzke, I.

    This article argues that increasing demands in world public opinion for legitimate and effective international institutions require a paradigm shift in public international law. There is a part of public international law that should be better understood as international public law because it

  9. Achieving Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abowitz, Kathleen Knight

    2011-01-01

    Public schools are functionally provided through structural arrangements such as government funding, but public schools are achieved in substance, in part, through local governance. In this essay, Kathleen Knight Abowitz explains the bifocal nature of achieving public schools; that is, that schools are both subject to the unitary Public compact of…

  10. A Powerful Public Sphere?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiig, Christina

    The paper holds a critical discussion of the Habermasian model of the public sphere and proposes a revised model of a general public......The paper holds a critical discussion of the Habermasian model of the public sphere and proposes a revised model of a general public...

  11. The Public Administration Accounting in the Light Public Finance Managements Reform and Changes of the New Accounting Directive of the European Parliament and the European Council

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Košovská Iveta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of public administration accounting is to secure a database of relevant information essential for the management of public finances and need for presenting of operations results of our country within the European Union (EU. The accounting of public administration entities should provide a true and fair view on the assets and liabilities, as well as the financial situation and the use of public appropriations. After the entry of the Slovak Republic (SR to the European Union (EU the International Public Sector Accounting Standards began to be applied in our legislation. They provide a uniform basis for the data consolidation as well as more efficient information for the economic decisions of individual users

  12. Kazan period of life-sustaining activity of professor V.I. Ra-zumovsky — a pioneer of Russian neurosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilov V.I.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available There were presented historical data of life-sustaining activity of professor V. I. Razumovsky — a pioneer of Russian neurosurgery, who began to perform and then was performing systematically neurosurgical operations in the Kazan clinic under the guidance of outstanding neurologists V. M. Bekhterev and L. O. Darkshevich.

  13. Students with Special Educational Needs--Social Inclusion or Marginalisation? Factors of Risk and Resilience in the Transition between School and Early Adult Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvalsund, Rune; Bele, Irene Velsvik

    2010-01-01

    This article is based on data from two national research projects in Norway dealing with upper secondary educational reforms that began in 1994. Together, the research projects represent a longitudinal study of prospective life course data from 1995 to 2003, covering approximately 500 students from the time they were receiving special education in…

  14. Physician/chemist/geologist: Charles Thomas Jackson's life of conflict and controversy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landa, E.R.

    1995-01-01

    After a brief medical career, Charles Thomas Jackson (1805-1880) began work as a consulting chemist and geologist in Boston. He serves as State Geologist in Maine, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire from 1837 to 1884, and completed geological surveys of those States. In 1847, he was appointed United States Geologist to undertake a survey of the public lands of the Lake Superior region of Michigan. This survey was beset by strife, and Jackson was forced to resign in 1849. -from Author

  15. QUALITY OF SERVICE AND CRIME INCIDENTS IN PUBLIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Osondu

    2012-03-09

    Mar 9, 2012 ... Findings revealed that poor quality of bus stops, ... how to secure passengers life and properties in public transport system ..... Agbola, S. B. (1997), Architecture of fear: ... Odufuwa, B. (2010), Vulnerability and mobility stress ...

  16. Theorising the Intersection of Public Policy and Personal Lives ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    chifaou.amzat

    2011-08-02

    Aug 2, 2011 ... Theorising the Intersection of Public Policy and. Personal ..... of implementation contexts, as a result of changing policy, the vagaries of life, and the ... which is greatly dependent on the vagaries of the seasons and climate. It is.

  17. An Analysis of COSPA – A Consortium for Open Source in the Public Administration

    OpenAIRE

    Morgan, Lorraine

    2005-01-01

    peer-reviewed This paper reflects on a two-year EU funded specific research targeted project that officially began in January 2004 entitled COSPA, a Consortium for studying, evaluating and supporting the introduction of Open Source Software and Open Data Standards in the Public Administration. COSPA focuses on office automation and desktop system software and aims at rigorously measuring the effort, costs and benefits of a transition to Open Source. The project invo...

  18. [Giving up life in the labyrinth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portera Sánchez, A

    2001-01-01

    A brief historic survey of the labyrinth, from prehistoric images carved in stone, to gardens, Renaissance drawings and architectonic constructions will presented. The metaphor of the labyrinths, which began with Theseus killing the Minotaur with the help of Ariadne, can be applied to all: scientific investigation, artistic creation, wickedness, theology ... to life. In these eculiar and chaotic designs, structural simplicity and functional complexity coincide and therefore may produce repeated erroneous decisions. To wander successfully through these labyrinths, caution and repeated decision-makings are required to enable the traveller to reach the desired and elusive center. In each instant, decisions are made in our mind as a consequence of complex cerebral systems, activated by stimuli which originate in the intimate regions of the mind, the most complex labyrinth of all. These types of mental labyrinths are immaterial, without paths or walks, where each successive decision made facing multiple bifurcations, causes the mental traveller to advance until reaching the center. This center deceptively becomes the entrance to another of the innumerable and unknown mental labyrinths that the intimate life proposes.

  19. The public information imperative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copeland, S.

    2001-01-01

    Public approval hinges not only on delivering the information the public wants but on providing tangible evidence that we are listening to public concerns. We must respond. Public acceptance depends on making real change which speaks to people's concerns. The message that the public wants to hear is that government are listening and acting on what they hear. In Canada, the nuclear regulator is increasingly active in the public arena. We held cross-country consultations as we prepared Canada's strong new Act and regulations. We have developed information vehicles such as the Radiation Index and our web site. We continue to extensively involve the public in our licensing process. All licensing hearings are open to the public. Nothing is harder to capture than public trust. This conference marks a substantial investment in learning and in our common future. We can work to build our credibility as regulators who acts on public concerns. (N.C.)

  20. Reproductive Life Planning: Raising the Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jessica E; Moos, Merry-K

    2018-04-01

    Introduction Unintended pregnancy has been a concerning public health problem for decades. As we begin to understand the complexities of pregnancy intention and how women experience these pregnancies, reproductive life planning offers a paradigm shift. Methods Reproductive life planning is a patient-centered approach that places a patient's reproductive preferences-whether concrete or ambivalent-at the forefront of her clinical care. Results This process grants women and men the opportunity to consider how reproduction fits within the context of their broader lives. Within a clinical encounter, reproductive life planning allows counseling and care to be tailored to patient preferences. Discussion Although there is great potential for positive public health impacts in unintended pregnancy, contraceptive use and improved preconception health, the true benefit lies within reinforcing reproductive empowerment. Despite recommendations for universal adoption, many questions remain regarding implementation, equity and outcomes.

  1. Corporate political strategy: incorporating the management of public policy issues into hospital strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, B; Arndt, M; Stone, M M

    1997-01-01

    Hospitals engage in a variety of strategies designed to anticipate, shape, and respond to public policy issues. This article describes corporate political strategy and argues for its need throughout a public policy issue's life cycle.

  2. The hunt for alien life a wider perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Linde, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Astronomer Peter Linde takes the reader through the story of the search for extraterrestrial life in a captivating and thought-provoking way, specifically addressing the new research that is currently devoted towards discovering other planets with life. He discusses the methods used to detect possible signals from other civilizations and the ways that the space sciences are changing as a result of this new field. “Are we alone?” is a mystery that has forever fascinated mankind, gaining momentum by scientists since the 1995 discovery of the existence of exoplanets began to inspire new ways of thinking in astronomy. Here, Linde tries to answer many philosophical questions that derive from this area of research: Is humanity facing a change of paradigm, that we are not unique as intelligent beings? Is it possible to communicate with others out there, and even if we can—should we?

  3. Life and health insurance industry investments in fast food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Arun V; McCormick, Danny; Woolhandler, Steffie; Himmelstein, David U; Boyd, J Wesley

    2010-06-01

    Previous research on health and life insurers' financial investments has highlighted the tension between profit maximization and the public good. We ascertained health and life insurance firms' holdings in the fast food industry, an industry that is increasingly understood to negatively impact public health. Insurers own $1.88 billion of stock in the 5 leading fast food companies. We argue that insurers ought to be held to a higher standard of corporate responsibility, and we offer potential solutions.

  4. Architecture is Life... ...Life is Architecture

    OpenAIRE

    Snider, David E

    2001-01-01

    When thinking about architecture, I cannot help but think about my life and the things that have affected my life. How does the environment around us effect the daily decisions we make? How do the experiences throughout our life impact who we are and who we become? The people and surroundings we choose will ultimately decide the type of people we become. When we select our surroundings we are in turn selecting our ideal community. Everyone is trying to achieve community in some sense, from in...

  5. Life Assets in Teenage Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thatsanee Soontrapirom

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Teenage pregnancy is an evolving global public health problem. Level of life assets could predict behaviors and take effect to less sexual risk behaviors in teenagers. Objective: To compare life assets between pregnant and non-pregnant teenagers and to evaluate the relationship between basic factors and teenage pregnancy. Methods: A total of 172 female teenagers aged 12-19 years were included. The control group was matched with the case group by age with mean age of 17.07 years old. The case group consisted of 86 pregnant teenagers who attended the Teenage Antenatal Care Unit at Siriraj Hospital. The control group consisted of 86 teenagers who were not pregnant and who had never been pregnant. The research instruments were general information and life assets inventory questionnaires developed by Suriyadeo Tripathi with Cronbach’s Alpha coefficient at 0.890. Results: Mean life assets scores were significantly higher in the control group than in the case group (T-test analysis: Mean = 94.70/87.65, SD = 17.45/22.68, p-value =.024, respectively. The control group scored more favorably than the case group on 16 items. In addition, the case group could not meet the minimum assessment criteria on 21 items, which indicated their status as an at risk group. A total of 12 factors were found to be statistically significantly associated with teenage pregnancy. Conclusion: Overall life assets were significantly higher among teenagers who had not experienced pregnancy. The risk factors included level of education, GPA, family income, mothers or family members of teenagers having experience of teenage pregnancy, main guardians, father education, mother occupation, parental relationship, family warmth and smoking were found to be significantly associated with risk of teenage pregnancy in this study. These results will help to facilitate preventive interventions and the development of policies and guidelines to control and perhaps reverse current

  6. Go4Life

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... This item has been hidden Go4Life Exercises — Building Strength Play all Try some of these Go4Life exercises to improve your strength! Stronger muscles can make it easier to do ...

  7. Life cycle assessment (LCA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrane, Mikkel; Schmidt, Jannick Andresen

    2004-01-01

    The chapter introduces Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and its application according to the ISO 1404043 standards.......The chapter introduces Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) and its application according to the ISO 1404043 standards....

  8. Go4Life

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... useful upper body exercise from Go4Life, the Overhead Arm Raise. CC 3:10 Play next Play now Go4Life Exercise--Hand Grip - Duration: 3 minutes, 10 seconds. National Institute ...

  9. YOUR LIFE@CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Guinot, Genevieve

    2016-01-01

    Balancing work and home life, getting support for your family and thriving in an inclusive and respectful workplace: find out more about the support structures in place to enhance your working life@CERN!

  10. Go4Life

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... more This item has been hidden Go4Life Exercises — Balance Play all Try some of these Go4Life exercises to improve your balance! Balance is important because it can help reduce ...

  11. The role of public goods in planetary evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInerney, James O.; Erwin, Douglas H.

    2017-11-01

    Biological public goods are broadly shared within an ecosystem and readily available. They appear to be widespread and may have played important roles in the history of life on Earth. Of particular importance to events in the early history of life are the roles of public goods in the merging of genomes, protein domains and even cells. We suggest that public goods facilitated the origin of the eukaryotic cell, a classic major evolutionary transition. The recognition of genomic public goods challenges advocates of a direct graph view of phylogeny, and those who deny that any useful phylogenetic signal persists in modern genomes. Ecological spillovers generate public goods that provide new ecological opportunities. This article is part of the themed issue 'Reconceptualizing the origins of life'.

  12. End of Life Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planning for the end of life can be difficult. But by deciding what end-of-life care best suits your needs when you are healthy, you can ... right choices when the time comes. End-of-life planning usually includes making choices about the following: ...

  13. Chinese Student Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, James; Boone, Jerry N.

    1991-01-01

    Places life of university students in China in context of Tiananmen Square and Cultural Revolution, with implications of serving them as students in the United States. Presents basic facts of student life in China. Although the emphasis is on college life, some attention is paid to earlier student experiences as well. (Author/NB)

  14. Go4Life

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Go4Life Exercises — Stretching Play all Try some of these Go4Life exercises to improve your flexibility! 2:48 ... Exercises — Building Strength Play all Try some of these Go4Life exercises to improve your strength! Stronger muscles ...

  15. Life Cycle Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bey, Niki

    2018-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of Life Cycle Management (LCM)—a discipline that deals with the managerial tasks related to practicing sustainable development in an organisation . Just as Life Cycle Assessment, LCM advocates the life cycle perspective , and it applies this perspective in decision...

  16. Go4Life

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... some of these Go4Life exercises to improve your flexibility! 2:48 Play next Play now Go4Life Exercise-- ... 17,679 views Exercise your upper body at work like Linda with Go4Life's Wall Pushups. CC 1: ...

  17. Work–Life Interventions

    OpenAIRE

    He Lu Calvin Ong; Senthu Jeyaraj

    2014-01-01

    Despite disparities in the conceptualization of work–life balance (WLB) and work–life harmony (WLH) in the literature, there remains no evidence till date to validate these differences. Furthermore, there are currently no insights that shed light on the relationship between work–life initiatives and key business strategies of contemporary organizations. Hence, the current study investigated the differences between the ...

  18. Life in other planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, S.N.

    1977-01-01

    Speculations of life on other planets in space are discussed. The life history of a star in terms of the high temperature fusion reactions taking place in it, is outlined. The phenomenon of gases escaping from planetary atmospheres which destroys life on them is explained. Solar radiation effects, pulsar detection etc. are briefly touched upon. (K.B.)

  19. Life in other planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, S N [Calcutta Univ. (India). Dept. of Applied Physics

    1977-12-01

    Speculations of life on other planets in space are discussed. The life history of a star in terms of the high-temperature fusion reactions taking place in it is outlined. The phenomenon of gases escaping from planetary atmospheres which destroys life on them is explained. Solar radiation effects, pulsar detection, etc., are briefly touched upon.

  20. Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Military Child Education DSN: (315) 477-9422 COMM: (808) 477-9422 Individual Contacts Branch Chief, Quality Directory Media Inquiries Home : Resources : Quality of Life J102 Quality of Life and Military Child Education Branch PACOM Quality of Life and Education Facebook Page | USPACOM SAPR 24/7 Emergency Lines and

  1. Life management plants at nuclear power plants PWR; Planes de gestion de vida en centrales nucleares PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esteban, G.

    2014-10-01

    Since in 2009 the CSN published the Safety Instruction IS-22 (1) which established the regulatory framework the Spanish nuclear power plants must meet in regard to Life Management, most of Spanish nuclear plants began a process of convergence of their Life Management Plants to practice 10 CFR 54 (2), which is the current standard of Spanish nuclear industry for Ageing Management, either during the design lifetime of the plant, as well as for Long-Term Operation. This article describe how Life Management Plans are being implemented in Spanish PWR NPP. (Author)

  2. Inadvertent Exemplars: Life History Portraits of Two Socially Just Principals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Martin

    2012-01-01

    This study creates life history portraits of two White middle-class native-English-speaking principals demonstrating commitments to social justice in their work in public elementary schools serving disproportionately high populations of students who are marginalized by poverty, race, and linguistic heritage. Through self-reported life histories of…

  3. SIMPLE LIFE AND RELIGION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIRIM

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Individuals in terms of the economy in which we live is one of the most important phenomenon of the century. This phenomenon present itself as the only determinant of people's lives by entering almost makes itself felt. The mo st obvious objective needs of the economy by triggering motive is to induce people to consume . Consumer culture pervades all aspects of the situation are people . Therefore, these people have the blessing of culture , beauty and value all in the name of w hatever is consumed. This is way out of the siege of moral and religious values we have is to go back again . Referred by local cultural and religious values, based on today increasingly come to the fore and the Muslim way of life appears to be close to th e plain / lean preferred by many people life has been a way of life. Even the simple life , a way of life in the Western world , a conception of life , a philosophy, a movement as it has become widely accepted. Here in determining the Muslim way of life Pr ophet. Prophet (sa lived the kind of life a very important model, sample, and determining which direction is known. Religious values, which is the carrier of the prophets, sent to the society they have always been examples and models. Because every aspect of human life, his life style and the surrounding area has a feature. We also value his life that he has unknowingly and without learning and skills and to understand it is not possible to live our religion . We also our presentation, we mainly of Islam o utlook on life and predicted life - style, including the Prophet of Islam 's (sa simple life to scrutinize and lifestyle issues related to reveal , in short Islam's how life has embraced and the Prophet. Prophet's will try to find answers to questions reg arding how to live.

  4. World Health Organization Public Health Model: A Roadmap for Palliative Care Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callaway, Mary V; Connor, Stephen R; Foley, Kathleen M

    2018-02-01

    The Open Society Foundation's International Palliative Care Initiative (IPCI) began to support palliative care development in Central and Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union in 1999. Twenty-five country representatives were invited to discuss the need for palliative care in their countries and to identify key areas that should be addressed to improve the care of adults and children with life-limiting illnesses. As a public health concern, progress in palliative care requires integration into health policy, education and training of health care professionals, availability of essential pain relieving medications, and health care services. IPCI created the Palliative Care Roadmap to serve as a model for government and/or nongovernment organizations to use to frame the necessary elements and steps for palliative care integration. The roadmap includes the creation of multiple Ministry of Health-approved working groups to address: palliative care inclusion in national health policy, legislation, and finance; availability of essential palliative care medications, especially oral opioids; education and training of health care professionals; and the implementation of palliative care services at home or in inpatient settings for adults and children. Each working group is tasked with developing a pathway with multiple signposts as indicators of progress made. The roadmap may be entered at different signposts depending upon the state of palliative care development in the country. The progress of the working groups often takes place simultaneously but at variable rates. Based on our experience, the IPCI Roadmap is one possible framework for palliative care development in resource constrained countries but requires both health care professional engagement and political will for progress to be made. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Volcanic hazards and public response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Donald W.

    1988-05-01

    Although scientific understanding of volcanoes is advancing, eruptions continue to take a substantial toll of life and property. Some of these losses could be reduced by better advance preparation, more effective flow of information between scientists and public officials, and better understanding of volcanic behavior by all segments of the public. The greatest losses generally occur at volcanoes that erupt infrequently where people are not accustomed to dealing with them. Scientists sometimes tend to feel that the blame for poor decisions in emergency management lies chiefly with officials or journalists because of their failure to understand the threat. However, the underlying problem embraces a set of more complex issues comprising three pervasive factors. The first factor is the volcano: signals given by restless volcanoes are often ambiguous and difficult to interpret, especially at long-quiescent volcanoes. The second factor is people: people confront hazardous volcanoes in widely divergent ways, and many have difficulty in dealing with the uncertainties inherent in volcanic unrest. The third factor is the scientists: volcanologists correctly place their highest priority on monitoring and hazard assessment, but they sometimes fail to explain clearly their conclusions to responsible officials and the public, which may lead to inadequate public response. Of all groups in society, volcanologists have the clearest understanding of the hazards and vagaries of volcanic activity; they thereby assume an ethical obligation to convey effectively their knowledge to benefit all of society. If society resists, their obligation nevertheless remains. They must use the same ingenuity and creativity in dealing with information for the public that they use in solving scientific problems. When this falls short, even excellent scientific results may be nullified.

  6. NPP service life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elagin, Yu.P.

    2001-01-01

    Problems of NPP service life management and service life prolongation are reviewed. Methods for the prolongation of the French NPP service life are discussed, priority directions of nuclear block service life management in regard to aging in the context of the European program of investigation into the materials aging are identified. Questions of the provision of the 60 years service life of the Mihama 1 block (Japan) and decision of the problem of the control equipment aging in Great Britain are discussed. Situation with the prolongation of licenses on the NPP operation in the USA and Spain is considered [ru

  7. Working Parents' use of work-life policies

    OpenAIRE

    Dulk, Laura den; Peper, Bram

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we examine working parent’s use of work-life policies in three financial sector organizations in the Netherlands. We analyse the barriers and support regarding the actual take up of work-life policies by working parents and to what extent this in turn influence their experienced work-life balance. We collected survey data in three Dutch financial sector organizations: one public sector organization and two private firms. All three differ considerably regarding their organizatio...

  8. BALTICA III. Plant condition and life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hietanen, S.; Auerkari, P.

    1995-01-01

    The BALTICA III, International Conference on Plant Condition and Life Management was held on June 6 - 8, 1995 on board Silja Serenade on its cruise between Helsinki - Stockholm and at the Forest Lake Hotel Korpilampi in Espoo. BALTICA III provides forum for the transfer of technology from applied research to practise. This is the second volume of the publications, which contain the presentations given at the BALTICA III, Plant Condition and Life Management. A total of 45 articles report recent experience in plant condition and life management. The conference focuses on recent applications that have been demonstrated for the benefit of safe and economical operation of power plants. Practical approach is emphasised, including the presentations that aim to provide insight into new techniques, improvements in assessment methodologies as well as maintenance strategies. Compared to earlier occasions in the BALTICA series, a new aspect is in the applications of knowledge-based systems in the service of power plant life management. (orig.)

  9. J. E. W. Wallin's Diagnostic Theory for Classifying the Feeble-Minded and Backward in Early Twentieth-Century Public Schools in America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshii, Ryo

    2016-01-01

    In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, American psychologists began addressing problems related to the intellectual capacity of students enrolled in public schools. This paper focuses on the role and influence of psychologists in addressing these problems, specifically the difficulty of classifying students deemed feeble-minded and…

  10. Public Speaking on the Streets and in the Ivory Tower: A Comparison of the Dale Carnegie Course and the Academic Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christine M.

    Many speech communication educators and researchers look upon Dale Carnegie's public speaking course with derision for its methods as well as its motives. A comparison of Carnegie's course with university courses in speech communication reveals a number of differences between the two, which in part explains this attitude. Carnegie began his course…

  11. Life is pretty meaningful.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintzelman, Samantha J; King, Laura A

    2014-09-01

    The human experience of meaning in life is widely viewed as a cornerstone of well-being and a central human motivation. Self-reports of meaning in life relate to a host of important functional outcomes. Psychologists have portrayed meaning in life as simultaneously chronically lacking in human life as well as playing an important role in survival. Examining the growing literature on meaning in life, we address the question "How meaningful is life, in general?" We review possible answers from various psychological sources, some of which anticipate that meaning in life should be low and others that it should be high. Summaries of epidemiological data and research using two self-report measures of meaning in life suggest that life is pretty meaningful. Diverse samples rate themselves significantly above the midpoint on self-reports of meaning in life. We suggest that if meaning in life plays a role in adaptation, it must be commonplace, as our analysis suggests. (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  12. Cosmic Heritage Evolution from the Big Bang to Conscious Life

    CERN Document Server

    Shaver, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This book follows the evolutionary trail all the way from the Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago to conscious life today. It is an accessible introductory book written for the interested layperson – anyone interested in the ‘big picture’ coming from modern science. It covers a wide range of topics including the origin and evolution of our universe, the nature and origin of life, the evolution of life including questions of birth and death, the evolution of cognition, the nature of consciousness, the possibility of extraterrestrial life and the future of the universe. The book is written in a narrative style, as these topics are all parts of a single story. It concludes with a discussion on the nature and future of science.  “Peter Shaver has written engagingly for anyone curious about the world we inhabit.  If you'd like to know how the Universe began, where the chemical elements originated, how life may have started on Earth, how man, ants and bacteria are related to each other, or why we humans think...

  13. Best Practice Life Expectancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    been reported previously by various authors. Though remarkable, this is simply an empirical observation. Objective: We examine best-practice life expectancy more formally by using extreme value theory. Methods: Extreme value distributions are fit to the time series (1900 to 2012) of maximum life......Background: Whereas the rise in human life expectancy has been extensively studied, the evolution of maximum life expectancies, i.e., the rise in best-practice life expectancy in a group of populations, has not been examined to the same extent. The linear rise in best-practice life expectancy has...... expectancies at birth and age 65, for both sexes, using data from the Human Mortality Database and the United Nations. Conclusions: Generalized extreme value distributions offer a theoretically justified way to model best-practice life expectancies. Using this framework one can straightforwardly obtain...

  14. Beyond the 'Networked Public Sphere': Politics, Participation and Technics in Web 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Roberts

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In some ways discussion of the political implications of Web 2.0 reinvigorates a debate about the democratising nature of the Internet that began in the 1990s. The concept of participation is at the heart of many current debates about politics and technology. There are two main reasons for saying this. On the one hand is an ongoing and increasing concern about public participation, or lack of it, in modern (predominantly Western democracies. This participatory deficit is to be seen in falling voter turnout at elections, public apathy on key political issues and scorn or indifference for elected political representatives. On the other hand, there is a wave of optimism concerning the potential of new technologies, particularly the web, to enable new forms of participation in economic and public life, to transform political debate and citizenship and to renew the ailing (or perceived to be ailing institutions of democracy. This optimism around participation and politics, while it has played a role in utopian visions of the internet more or less since its inception, has been reinvigorated recently by the discussion around the so-called Web 2.0. This article argues for a much more critical or sceptical approach to the political promise of Web 2.0. Focusing particularly on Yochai Benkler's The Wealth of Networks, it argues that current accounts of the participatory aspects of web culture tend to take a rather narrow view of what such participation might mean. However, aspects of the work of Bernard Stiegler, and that of others in the Ars Industrialis group co-founded by Stiegler, can help inform a more nuanced account of the relationship between politics and participation. It looks specifically at the arguments in Marc Crépon and Bernard Stiegler's book De la démocratie participative, written during the recent French presidential campaign, and will examine how the idea of participation articulates with key themes in Stiegler's philosophy of technics

  15. The ghost of public health journalism: past, present, and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Glinda S; Brown, Rebecca C

    2010-03-01

    The news industry is undergoing shrinking newspaper circulations, cuts in science and health coverage, and expansion of Internet news sources. We examine the impact of these changes using a case study set in Libby, Montana. In 1999, a Seattle newspaper story focused attention on asbestos exposure and related diseases in this small town. In 2009, that newspaper became an online-only newspaper, just as coverage of a related criminal trial began. Later that year the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued a public health emergency. Online newspaper archives and a collaboration between the University of Montana's journalism and law schools contributed to coverage of these developments. Continued efforts to promote interest in and skills needed for high-quality public health and environmental reporting are needed.

  16. Public education in cancer prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Parijs, L G

    1986-01-01

    Life-style is now recognized as a main determinant of cancer risk. Public education is an important component of cancer control programmes and has been shown to be effective in leading to life-style changes. Four basic types of education programmes are reviewed: for increasing the public's awareness of cancer, for changing specific risk behaviour (such as stopping smoking), for learning self-examination skills (such as breast self-examination), and for promoting early cancer detection in the community.To change human behaviour it is best to approach the risk habit through the same forces that develop and sustain the habit. Simply giving information of an association between specific habits and cancer, even if repeated several times, will lead to increased public awareness and encourage some to make a minimal effort to change their behaviour, but in general the new habit does not persist and continuing and intensifying this approach are ineffective. An alternative strategy utilizes socially active forces to support the prevention practice and remove possible barriers to action. For example, an antismoking programme should create a favourable social image of the non-smoker. Although a culturally and socially relevant mass media campaign can influence knowledge and beliefs and induce people to participate in a screening activity, this needs to be supplemented over a period of time by personal contact methods, such as group discussions, telephone conversations and home visits, in order to promote a regular screening habit. Contrary to popular opinion, mass communication methods can be expensive on a per person cost-effectiveness basis because of low participation rates and weakness in sustaining healthy behaviour.

  17. Collaborating in Life Science Research Groups: The Question of Authorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how life science postdocs' perceptions of contemporary academic career rationales influence how they relate to collaboration within research groups. One consequential dimension of these perceptions is the high value assigned to publications. For career progress, postdocs consider producing publications and…

  18. Anxiety Level in Students of Public Speaking: Causes and Remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Farhan

    2017-01-01

    Despite being competent in their field of work, professional's worldwide struggle due to lack of good public speaking skills. Their assessments and appraisals are often not depictive of their professional competitiveness; therefore, it is important for students to overcome public speaking anxiety before they transit from academic life to…

  19. Teaching the Public Relations Case Studies/Campaigns Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottone, Laura Perkins

    The public relations case studies/campaigns class entails teaching students how to die and then come back to life. As students must learn to take a critical look at complex public and social issues, teachers should create an environment in which the students feel comfortable with the process of psychological reconstruction. Students must be taught…

  20. The Emergence of Public Relations in the Russian Federation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guth, David W.

    2000-01-01

    Describes the emergence of public relations in the Russian Federation over the past 7 years. Concludes that Russia is developing its own vision of public relations, similar in many aspects to that found in the West but also adapted to the harsh realities of Russian life. (NH)