WorldWideScience

Sample records for public largely successful

  1. Factors favorable to public participation success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peelle, E.; Schweitzer, M.; Munro, J.; Carnes, S.; Wolfe, A.

    1996-05-01

    Categories of factors linked to successful public participation (PP) program outcomes include PP process, organizational context, sociopolitical context, strategic considerations and unique (special circumstances) factors. We re-order the long list factors according to how essential, important, and unique they are and discuss their significance and interrelationships. It is argued that bureacratic structure and operational modes are basically in conflict with features of successful PP programs (openness, two-way education, communication with nonexpert outsiders). If this is so, then it is not surprising that the factors essential for PP success in bureacracies involve extraordinary management efforts by agencies to bypass, compensate for, or overcome structural constraints. We conclude by speculating about the long-term viability of PP practices in the agency setting as well as the consequences for agencies that attempt the problematic task of introducing PP into their complex, mission-oriented organizations.

  2. The Success Criteria of Public Housing Project in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Mohammed Mukhtar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is no consensus among researchers of what constitutes projects success; every project type may have different success criteria. Identifying project success criteria at the initial stage of a project can contribute to effective utilization of resources. The aim of this study is to establish the criteria for measuring public housing project success in Nigeria. The data collection was carried out in Nigeria by means of structured interviews with ten experts in housing, a pilot survey and questionnaire survey.  A questionnaire survey was carried out in which 550 questionnaires were administered to construction professionals who involve in public housing projects, in order to elicit their perceptions on success criteria for public housing projects. The sample was drawn using purposive sampling method since there is no sample frame of people with experience in public housing. Two hundred and seventy six questionnaires (276 were returned completed representing 50.2% response rate. The data collected were analysed using structural equation modelling technique. The results reveal six criteria for measuring public housing project management success, these are client’s satisfaction, project completed on time, project completed to specified quality standard, absence of disputes, safety, and completion within budget. The results also reveal four criteria for measuring public housing product success which include meeting the project purpose, end users’ satisfaction, environmental impact and aesthetic appearance of the . Understanding the findings of this study by policy makers and project managers can improve effectiveness and efficiency of public housing projects in Nigeria.

  3. [Success factors in public healthy eating campaigns: a case study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschemann-Witzel, J; Pérez-Cueto, F J A; Strand, M; Verbeke, W; Bech-Larsen, T

    2012-01-01

    Public campaigns and interventions are rarely fully evaluated regarding their effectiveness. The analysis of past, successful activities can contribute to the future development of public campaigns and interventions for healthier eating. The study of public campaigns and interventions for healthier eating aimed at identifying the underlying success factors and describing their relation. Interviews were conducted with representatives of 11 cases that had been identified as especially successful in an earlier research step. The interviews were analysed with regard to possible success factors and the latter used to develop a model of success factor interrelation. It was found that success of the cases was first, attributed to characteristics of the macro environment or to public private partnerships in the initiation of campaigns, second, to the engagement of social communities, elements of empowerment of the target group and the implementation of social marketing measures, and thirdly, in citizens adoption of the campaign and in accompanying structural changes. The model and identified success factors underline that success can stem from three crucial phases: the set up of a campaign, the conduction and finally, the interrelation with the citizen. The model can serve as a guide in the future development of campaigns.

  4. Student Engagement and Success in the Large Astronomy 101 Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, J. B.

    2014-07-01

    The large auditorium classroom presents unique challenges to maintaining student engagement. During the fall 2012 semester, I adopted several specific strategies for increasing student engagement and reducing anonymity with the goal of maximizing student success in the large class. I measured attendance and student success in two classes, one with 300 students and one with 42, but otherwise taught as similarly as possible. While the students in the large class probably did better than they would have in a traditional lecture setting, attendance was still significantly lower in the large class, resulting in lower student success than in the small control class by all measures. I will discuss these results and compare to classes in previous semesters, including other small classes and large Distance Education classes conducted live over remote television link.

  5. Acquisition Integration Models: How Large Companies Successfully Integrate Startups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Carbone

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Mergers and acquisitions (M&A have been popular means for many companies to address the increasing pace and level of competition that they face. Large companies have pursued acquisitions to more quickly access technology, markets, and customers, and this approach has always been a viable exit strategy for startups. However, not all deals deliver the anticipated benefits, in large part due to poor integration of the acquired assets into the acquiring company. Integration can greatly impact the success of the acquisition and, indeed, the combined company’s overall market success. In this article, I explore the implementation of several integration models that have been put into place by a large company and extract principles that may assist negotiating parties with maximizing success. This perspective may also be of interest to smaller companies as they explore exit options while trying to ensure continued market success after acquisition. I assert that business success with acquisitions is dependent on an appropriate integration model, but that asset integration is not formulaic. Any integration effort must consider the specific market context and personnel involved.

  6. Building a quality culture through small and large successes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowen, R; Nestlerode, S K

    1992-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is a unifying business strategy for achieving and sustaining growth. TQM proceeds, step by step, project by project, to transform the organization into one smoothly working, quality-focused team. For successful implementation of TQM, the small projects are every bit as important as the large ones. The simple, accessible successes validate the skills that employees are acquiring and encourage them to try more complex, long-term endeavors. This article discusses several TQM projects conducted at Baptist Medical Center in Columbia, SC: streamlining medical records processing (a large project that freed up millions of dollars in cash flow); improving the reliability of all hospital equipment; and ongoing small successes in the recovery room. Although the dollar value of the projects varied considerably, all were critical to creating a culture of total quality management at Baptist Medical Center.

  7. Success of the Undergraduate Public Health Program At Tulane University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luann Ellis White

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine (SPHTM launched the Bachelors of Science in Public Health (BSPH in 2005. The BSPH has steadily grown and comprises one third of the total enrollment in the school. A review of the organizational structure demonstrates that direct responsibility for undergraduate education by a school of public health is advantageous to the success of the program. The competency and skills-based curriculum attracts students. Outcome measures show the enrollment is steadily increasing. The majority of the BSPH graduates continue onto competitive graduate and professional degree programs. Those who seek jobs find employment related to their public health education, but outside of the traditional governmental public health agencies. The combined BSPH/MPH degree is a pipeline for students to pursue a MPH and increases the likelihood students will pursue careers in public health. The range and depth of study in the bachelors program is continually examined. Topics once within the purview of graduate education are now being incorporated into undergraduate courses. Undergraduate public health is one of a number of factors that is influencing changes in the MPH degree.

  8. Successful competitive strategies of large Croatian and Slovenian enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Buble

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research report, the authors identify and analyze the successful samples of strategic behaviour of large Croatian and Slovenian enterprises, as well as their similarities and dissimilarities. The research has encompassed the levels of corporate and business strategy (i.e. the strategy of a diversified firm and its strategic business units/areas, as well as the analysis of strategic performance and sources of competitive advantage. The research consists of two parts: the theoretical foundation for the analysis of the successful patterns of strategic behaviour and the empirical analysis, based on the primary data collected during the research project.

  9. Solving very large vehicle scheduling problems in public mass transit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loebel, A.; Groetschel, M.

    1994-12-31

    In public mass transit the problem of scheduling vehicles belonging to different depots such that a set of given timetabled trips is operated by exactly one vehicle arises. This Multiple-Depot-Vehicle-Scheduling-Problem (MDVSP) is a special case of a multi-commodity-flow-problem and is NP-hard. We discuss the polyhedron associated with the MDVSP, determine its dimension and give various classes of facet defining inequalities. These polyhedral results can be used in a branch and cut algorithm and have proven to be successful on very large scale real-world problems from Hamburger Hochbahn AG with up to 27 million variables.

  10. Perceptions of Information System Success in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørum, Hanne; Medaglia, Rony; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2012-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationships between constructs of information system (IS) success in the public sector, as perceived by webmaster intermediaries, and investigate how user testing affects these relationships. Design/methodology/approach – Online surveys were...... cannot be overlooked, especially considering that user empowerment in the design, implementation, and evaluation of information systems matches a window of opportunity originating in the ongoing growth of web interactivity. Originality/value – The paper is one of the few that investigates constructs...... their perceptions of IS success, with those who conduct no user testing displaying the weakest associations among success variables. Findings also suggest that webmasters who do little or no user testing conveniently assume that citizen users are satisfied, while webmasters who are more knowledgeable of the user...

  11. Success in large high-technology projects: What really works?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, P.

    2014-08-01

    Despite a plethora of tools, technologies and management systems, successful execution of big science and engineering projects remains problematic. The sheer scale of globally funded projects such as the Large Hadron Collider and the Square Kilometre Array telescope means that lack of project success can impact both on national budgets, and collaborative reputations. In this paper, I explore data from contemporary literature alongside field research from several current high-technology projects in Europe and Australia, and reveal common `pressure points' that are shown to be key influencers of project control and success. I discuss the how mega-science projects sit between being merely complicated, and chaotic, and explain the importance of understanding multiple dimensions of project complexity. Project manager/leader traits are briefly discussed, including capability to govern and control such enterprises. Project structures are examined, including the challenge of collaborations. I show that early attention to building project resilience, curbing optimism, and risk alertness can help prepare large high-tech projects against threats, and why project managers need to understand aspects of `the silent power of time'. Mission assurance is advanced as a critical success function, alongside the deployment of task forces and new combinations of contingency plans. I argue for increased project control through industrial-style project reviews, and show how post-project reviews are an under-used, yet invaluable avenue of personal and organisational improvement. Lastly, I discuss the avoidance of project amnesia through effective capture of project knowledge, and transfer of lessons-learned to subsequent programs and projects.

  12. Successful endoscopic fragmentation of large hardened fecaloma using jumbo forceps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yasumasa; Yasuda, Hiroshi; Nakano, Hiroyasu; Hattori, Miki; Ozawa, Midori; Sato, Yoshinori; Ikeda, Yoshiko; Ozawa, Shun-Ichiro; Yamashita, Masaki; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    We present a rare case of fecaloma, 7 cm in size, in the setting of systemic scleroderma. A colonoscopy revealed a giant brown fecaloma occupying the lumen of the colon and a colonic ulcer that was caused by the fecaloma. The surface of the fecaloma was hard, large and slippery, and fragmentation was not possible despite the use of various devices, including standard biopsy forceps, an injection needle, and a snare. However, jumbo forceps were able to shave the surface of the fecaloma and break it successfully by repeated biting for 6 h over 2 d. The ability of the jumbo forceps to collect large mucosal samples was also appropriate for achieving fragmentation of the giant fecaloma. PMID:28250902

  13. Application of GIS technology in public health: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher-Lartey, Stephanie M; Caprarelli, Graziella

    2016-04-01

    The uptake and acceptance of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology has increased since the early 1990s and public health applications are rapidly expanding. In this paper, we summarize the common uses of GIS technology in the public health sector, emphasizing applications related to mapping and understanding of parasitic diseases. We also present some of the success stories, and discuss the challenges that still prevent a full scope application of GIS technology in the public health context. Geographical analysis has allowed researchers to interlink health, population and environmental data, thus enabling them to evaluate and quantify relationships between health-related variables and environmental risk factors at different geographical scales. The ability to access, share and utilize satellite and remote-sensing data has made possible even wider understanding of disease processes and of their links to the environment, an important consideration in the study of parasitic diseases. For example, disease prevention and control strategies resulting from investigations conducted in a GIS environment have been applied in many areas, particularly in Africa. However, there remain several challenges to a more widespread use of GIS technology, such as: limited access to GIS infrastructure, inadequate technical and analytical skills, and uneven data availability. Opportunities exist for international collaboration to address these limitations through knowledge sharing and governance.

  14. Successful public-private partnerships: The NYPD shield model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadeo, Vincent; Iannone, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    This article will identify the challenges that post 9/11 law enforcement faces regarding privatepublic partnerships and describe in detail the NYPD Shield programme, created to combat those challenges. Recommendations made by the 911 Commission included the incorporation of the private sector into future homeland security strategies. One such strategy is NYPD Shield. This programme is a nationally recognized award-winning public-private partnership dedicated to providing counterterrorism training and information sharing with government agencies, non-government organizations, private businesses, and the community. Information is shared through several platforms that include a dedicated website, instruction of counterterrorism training curricula, e-mail alerts, intelligence assessments and the hosting of quarterly conferences. This article also details how the NYPD Shield is providing its successful template to other law enforcement agencies enabling them to initiate similar programmes in their respective jurisdictions, and in doing so joining a National Shield Network.

  15. Tracking Success in Large Introductory Classes using Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    A common problem frequently encountered in large introductory classes is the anonymity experienced by students. An effort is underway at Ball State University to explore the impact of technology on reducing this anonymity and improving student performance and success. In preparation for this study, performance and success measures for students in a previous class have been examined to provide background for construction of a model for formal testing and a control group for comparison of future results. Student performance measures obtained early in the course and final course grades were examined to identify potential early warning indicators that might be used to plan interventions much earlier than the traditional midterm course reports used to alert freshmen at academic risk. Class participation scores were based on data obtained with a personal response system (i>clicker). The scores were scaled to reflect about 80% comprehension and 20% attendance. Homework scores were obtained using the LON-CAPA Course Management System and instructional materials created by the author. Substantial linear correlations exist between 1) Exam 1 Scores after Four Weeks and 2) Raw Class Participation Scores for the First Six Weeks and the Final Course Score. A more modest linear correlation was found between 3) Homework Scores for First Six Weeks and Final Course Score. Of these three measures, only Class Participation Scores identified all students who ultimately received course grades lower than C. Several students scored in the danger zone according to Homework and Class Participation Scores but earned course grades of C or better. It appears that an early warning plan based on Class Participation Scores would permit effective identification of at-risk students early in the course.

  16. Battery Design for Successful Electrification in Public Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Rothgang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Public transport is an especially promising sector for full electric vehicles due to the high amount of cycles and predictable workload. This leads to a high amount of different vehicle concepts ranging from large batteries, designed for a full day of operation without charging, to fast-charging systems with charging power up to a few hundred kilowatts. Hence, many different issues have to be addressed in the whole design and production process regarding high-voltage (HV batteries for buses. In this work, the design process for electric public buses is analyzed in detail, based on two systems developed by the research projects Smart Wheels/econnect and SEB eÖPNV. The complete development process starting, with the demand analysis and the operating scenario, including the charging routine, is discussed. This paper also features details on cell selection and cost estimations as well as technical details on the system layout, such as the management system and passive components as well as thermal management.

  17. Research into practice: postsecondary success in the Chicago Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W; Moeller, Eliza; Holsapple, Mathew

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors describe nearly a decade of research examining postsecondary outcomes of students in the Chicago Public Schools conducted by the Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR). These analyses include both long-term trends in college going and findings on the dimensions of students' postsecondary transition experiences that shape those outcomes. The authors describe the evolution of research at CCSR, which emphasizes a specific type of partnership between researchers, district officials, and practitioners that builds the capacity of practitioners and district officials to think critically about big problems and utilize data to inform decision-making and evaluation. In addition to describing these findings, the authors discuss the development and operation of the Network for College Success, a research-based, integrated and intensive support for school improvement to principals, their instructional leadership teams, grade level teams, and counselors. The authors describe how NCS builds the capacity of school leaders to work together and to use data to improve practice in the postsecondary transition. Finally, the authors discuss ongoing challenges and new directions for ongoing and future research.

  18. A successful trap design for capturing large terrestrial snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirley J. Burgdorf; D. Craig Rudolph; Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; Richard R. Schaefer

    2005-01-01

    Large scale trapping protocols for snakes can be expensive and require large investments of personnel and time. Typical methods, such as pitfall and small funnel traps, are not useful or suitable for capturing large snakes. A method was needed to survey multiple blocks of habitat for the Louisiana Pine Snake (Pituophis ruthveni), throughout its...

  19. Functional brain imaging predicts public health campaign success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Emily B; O'Donnell, Matthew Brook; Tompson, Steven; Gonzalez, Richard; Dal Cin, Sonya; Strecher, Victor; Cummings, Kenneth Michael; An, Lawrence

    2016-02-01

    Mass media can powerfully affect health decision-making. Pre-testing through focus groups or surveys is a standard, though inconsistent, predictor of effectiveness. Converging evidence demonstrates that activity within brain systems associated with self-related processing can predict individual behavior in response to health messages. Preliminary evidence also suggests that neural activity in small groups can forecast population-level campaign outcomes. Less is known about the psychological processes that link neural activity and population-level outcomes, or how these predictions are affected by message content. We exposed 50 smokers to antismoking messages and used their aggregated neural activity within a 'self-localizer' defined region of medial prefrontal cortex to predict the success of the same campaign messages at the population level (n = 400,000 emails). Results demonstrate that: (i) independently localized neural activity during health message exposure complements existing self-report data in predicting population-level campaign responses (model combined R(2) up to 0.65) and (ii) this relationship depends on message content-self-related neural processing predicts outcomes in response to strong negative arguments against smoking and not in response to compositionally similar neutral images. These data advance understanding of the psychological link between brain and large-scale behavior and may aid the construction of more effective media health campaigns.

  20. Success Factors of Asymmetric Connections - Example of Large Slovenian Enterprises

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor Vračar

    2014-01-01

    More and more companies realize the fact that networking or partner collaborations, which are based on partner relations between companies, are essential for their long-term existence. In today’s global competitive environment each company is included at least in some different connections. Very common connections occur between large and smaller enterprises, where the so called asymmetric connections occur, which may be understood as the ability of one organisation to establish power, influen...

  1. A Guide to Successful Public Private Partnerships for Youth Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relave, Nanette; Deich, Sharon

    2007-01-01

    This publication is part of a series of tools and resources on financing and sustaining youth programming. These tools and resources are intended to help policymakers, program developers, and community leaders develop innovative strategies for implementing, financing, and sustaining effective programs and policies. This guide provides practical…

  2. Writing for Professional Publication: Three Road Signs for Writing Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttery, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    In the first edition of Writing for Publication: An Organizational Paradigm (Buttery, 2010), I recommend a model for organizing theoretical articles. The process includes seven components: title, introduction, outline/advanced organizer, headings, transitions, summary and references. This article will focus on the writing process. The strands of…

  3. TAB: A Middle School/Public Library Success Story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Margaret; Muller, Pat

    1994-01-01

    Describes a cooperative project developed between the Arlington (Virginia) Public Library and local middle schools to form a Teen Advisory Board (TAB), a group of students who read and review new young adult books. Highlights include expansion of the program; student involvement in other activities; and four lists of favorite titles. (LRW)

  4. Writing for Professional Publication. Keys to Academic and Business Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henson, Kenneth T.

    This book provides practical help for people writing for publication, especially for those writing for professional journals or university presses. Chapters cover the following topics: (1) reasons for writing; (2) finding topics; (3) getting started; (4) writing style; (5) organizing articles; (6) using journals, libraries, surveys, and action…

  5. The Relevance of Public Speaking for Entrepreneurial Success

    OpenAIRE

    Marica, Florian Gabriel; Hogea, Ioana; Costello, Douglas Allan; Negru, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    From previous experiences and examples, we have identified a pressing problem in the field of social entrepreneurship: the lack of networking among social entrepreneurs, mainly due to a lack of networking skills. This subject sparked very interesting discussions within our group, especially when considering the increasing development and importance of communication in modern society and connecting it with one’s abilities of speaking in public. Thus, this project sets out to analyze the con...

  6. Successful process management for public utilities; Erfolgreiches Prozessmanagement fuer Stadtwerke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knipprath, Daniel [projekt:unternehmensberatungsgesellschaft mbH, Muenchen (Germany); Schaefer, Anke [Dr. Schaefer PR- und Strategieberatung, Rostock (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    As a result of regulatory cuts in their revenue structure, public utilities are increasingly compelled to improve their cost efficiency. Furthermore, they have to deal with altered framework conditions of energy procurement as well as the necessity of sustainable customer loyalty management. The example of a regional supplier is used here to show how goal-oriented process management can contribute to securing a sustainable, promising position in the market.

  7. Strategic Management of ELT in Public Educational Systems: Trying to Reduce Failure, Increase Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Paul

    2009-01-01

    English as a foreign/second language teaching (ELT) is notably successful in some national public educational systems and unsuccessful in others. Holland, Singapore and Sweden are outstanding examples of great success in the strategic management of ELT in their public educational systems. General failures abound, particularly in countries that…

  8. Success Factors of Asymmetric Connections - Example of Large Slovenian Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Vračar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available More and more companies realize the fact that networking or partner collaborations, which are based on partner relations between companies, are essential for their long-term existence. In today’s global competitive environment each company is included at least in some different connections. Very common connections occur between large and smaller enterprises, where the so called asymmetric connections occur, which may be understood as the ability of one organisation to establish power, influence and control over the other organisation and its resources. According to numerous statements, the connections between enterprises are very frequently uneffectivenessful, with opinions on the optimal nature of asymmetric connections being quite common as well, whereby it is, as a rule, a synergic complementing of missing content for both partners. To verify the thesis, that companies achieve more competitiveness and effectiveness through connections, whereby the so called asymmetric connections are common, a structural model of the evolution of asymmetric connection has been developed, which connects the theoretically identified factors and all dependent concepts of competitiveness, efficiency and effectiveness. The empirical research also attempts to further expose the factors of asymmetric connections, which affect efficiency and effectiveness of the connected enterprises.

  9. When America Makes, America Works: A Successful Public Private 3D Printing (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    With the combined and integrated public and private investments, America Makes is establishing a culture of collaboration that is developing into...AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0190 WHEN AMERICA MAKES, AMERICA WORKS: A SUCCESSFUL PUBLIC-PRIVATE 3D PRINTING (POSTPRINT) Ed Morris and Rob...WHEN AMERICA MAKES, AMERICA WORKS: A SUCCESSFUL PUBLIC-PRIVATE 3D PRINTING (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-12-2-7230 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  10. Integrating RAP in Public Schools: Successes and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Julie; Milstein, Mindy; Posner, Sandi Ives

    2010-01-01

    For students with emotional disability (ED), school can be a stressful experience marked by disapproval, rejection, isolation, and shame. Staff serving these students in a large school district received Response Ability Pathways (RAP) training. This article summarizes positive impacts on behavior, as well as ongoing challenges in changing school…

  11. Public health and the prevention of obesity: failure or success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Aranceta Bartrina

    Full Text Available In recent decades, obesity has become a major public health problem in developed societies and economies in transition. Rapid social changes that have occurred since the mid 20th century prompted major changes in eating habits and lifestyles, with the gradual abandonment of traditional dietary patterns and culinary techniques, significant decrease in physical activity and increased sedentary time, giving as result in an imbalance in the energy balance. Obesity is a risk factor for many chronic diseases. There is evidence that childhood obesity influences adult health condition. Additionally, obesity in children affects their physical, emotional and social wellbeing. According to some estimates the cost of obesity may represent up to 12% of health cost in some countries. Many actions have been developed since around the year 2000 WHO alerted about the problem. The analysis of the factors involved in the origin of the problem have led to recognize the importance of creating supportive environments for healthier food choices and physical activity to be the easiest and accessible options in common everyday environments, such as schools, workplace or community environment. Evidence is long available that the most effective interventions to prevent childhood obesity should consider multiple strategies and last longer. Today it is also recognized the importance of implementing policies that encourage supportive friendly environments for physical activity and help decisions to opt for healthy eating habits.

  12. Public health and the prevention of obesity: failure or success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranceta Bartrina, Javier

    2013-09-01

    In recent decades, obesity has become a major public health problem in developed societies and economies in transition. Rapid social changes that have occurred since the mid 20th century prompted major changes in eating habits and lifestyles, with the gradual abandonment of traditional dietary patterns and culinary techniques, significant decrease in physical activity and increased sedentary time, giving as result in an imbalance in the energy balance. Obesity is a risk factor for many chronic diseases. There is evidence that childhood obesity influences adult health condition. Additionally, obesity in children affects their physical, emotional and social wellbeing. According to some estimates the cost of obesity may represent up to 12% of health cost in some countries. Many actions have been developed since around the year 2000 WHO alerted about the problem. The analysis of the factors involved in the origin of the problem have led to recognize the importance of creating supportive environments for healthier food choices and physical activity to be the easiest and accessible options in common everyday environments, such as schools, workplace or community environment. Evidence is long available that the most effective interventions to prevent childhood obesity should consider multiple strategies and last longer. Today it is also recognized the importance of implementing policies that encourage supportive friendly environments for physical activity and help decisions to opt for healthy eating habits.

  13. Evaluation of Large-scale Public Sector Reforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breidahl, Karen Nielsen; Gjelstrup, Gunnar; Hansen, Hanne Foss

    2017-01-01

    Research on the evaluation of large-scale public sector reforms is rare. This article sets out to fill that gap in the evaluation literature and argues that it is of vital importance. The impact of such reforms is considerable. Furthermore they change the context in which evaluations of other...... and more delimited policy areas take place. In our analysis we apply four governance perspectives (rational-instrumental, rational-interest based, institutional-cultural and a chaos perspective) in a comparative analysis of the evaluations of two large-scale public sector reforms in Denmark and Norway. We...... compare the evaluation process (focus and purpose), the evaluators and the organization of the evaluation as well as the utilization of the evaluation results. The analysis uncovers several significant findings including how the initial organization of the evaluation show strong impact on the utilization...

  14. A concept of public safety monitoring in large railway nodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław Siergiejczyk

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is to identify risks of public safety in railway transport and the concept ofresetting the system of monitoring and supervision of railway facilities in a large railway node by theexample of Warsaw Railway Junction – WWK. Switched concept of the system of monitoring andsupervision of railway facilities in a large railway node is an open computer system that allows futureexpansion of the spatial: it means that you can enter into the system more and more monitored objectsand increase the monitored area in a given subject. The proposed solution is an example of a systemthat allows monitoring and surveillance improvement in safety of railway transport.[b]Keyword[/b]s: public safety, railway junction, system, monitoring

  15. Selecting Large Portfolios of Social Projects in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Litvinchev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the portfolio selection of social projects in public organizations considering interdependencies (synergies affecting project funds requirements and tasks. A mixed integer linear programming model is proposed incorporating the most relevant aspects of the problem found in the literature. The model supports both complete (all or nothing and partial (a certain amount from a given interval of funding resource allocation policies. Numerical results for large-scale problem instances are presented.

  16. Genetically modified crops: success, safety assessment, and public concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Om V; Ghai, Shivani; Paul, Debarati; Jain, Rakesh K

    2006-08-01

    With the emergence of transgenic technologies, new ways to improve the agronomic performance of crops for food, feed, and processing applications have been devised. In addition, ability to express foreign genes using transgenic technologies has opened up options for producing large quantities of commercially important industrial or pharmaceutical products in plants. Despite this high adoption rate and future promises, there is a multitude of concerns about the impact of genetically modified (GM) crops on the environment. Potential contamination of the environment and food chains has prompted detailed consideration of how such crops and the molecules that they produce can be effectively isolated and contained. One of the reasonable steps after creating a transgenic plant is to evaluate its potential benefits and risks to the environment and these should be compared to those generated by traditional agricultural practices. The precautionary approach in risk management of GM plants may make it necessary to monitor significant wild and weed populations that might be affected by transgene escape. Effective risk assessment and monitoring mechanisms are the basic prerequisites of any legal framework to adequately address the risks and watch out for new risks. Several agencies in different countries monitor the release of GM organisms or frame guidelines for the appropriate application of recombinant organisms in agro-industries so as to assure the safe use of recombinant organisms and to achieve sound overall development. We feel that it is important to establish an internationally harmonized framework for the safe handling of recombinant DNA organisms within a few years.

  17. Community action success in public health: are we using a ruler to measure a sphere?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutilier, M A; Rajkumar, E; Poland, B D; Tobin, S; Badgley, R F

    2001-01-01

    The Community Action and Public Health study explored how Ontario public health practitioners interpret and implement guidance in community action. In-depth interviews were conducted with 107 public health professionals and community members in 6 Ontario health units. This report briefly describes the study methods and presents results pertaining to the measurement of success based on interviews with 67 public health professionals. Data substantiate the view that evaluation methodologies employing quantitative measures of epidemiological outcomes inadequately capture "success" in community action, possibly attributable to an unproductive dichotomization of "process" and "outcome". Results suggest two kinds of "success": a) changes related to stated goals and targets; and b) more iterative and process-oriented changes, including necessary but often undocumented shifts in relationships, structures, social conditions and processes. In order to legitimize and validate results that might otherwise pass unrecognized, we suggest a methodology that records project "milestones" as successes in their own right.

  18. The road to success - from high quality public services towards the high-quality public administration

    OpenAIRE

    Mitreva, Elizabeta; Taskov, Nako

    2013-01-01

    There is empirical evidence that various quality improvement programmes in public administration have increased users' satisfaction. Yet, at the same time, mass public surveys indicate a decrease in trust in national government, Parliament and the civil service. This indicates that there is no linear relationship between service quality and trust. The perception of quality come from very specific observations of public services whereas trust refers to the government machinery in general. ...

  19. Publicly Releasing a Large Simulation Dataset with NDS Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldbaum, Nathan

    2016-03-01

    Optimally, all publicly funded research should be accompanied by the tools, code, and data necessary to fully reproduce the analysis performed in journal articles describing the research. This ideal can be difficult to attain, particularly when dealing with large (>10 TB) simulation datasets. In this lightning talk, we describe the process of publicly releasing a large simulation dataset to accompany the submission of a journal article. The simulation was performed using Enzo, an open source, community-developed N-body/hydrodynamics code and was analyzed using a wide range of community- developed tools in the scientific Python ecosystem. Although the simulation was performed and analyzed using an ecosystem of sustainably developed tools, we enable sustainable science using our data by making it publicly available. Combining the data release with the NDS Labs infrastructure allows a substantial amount of added value, including web-based access to analysis and visualization using the yt analysis package through an IPython notebook interface. In addition, we are able to accompany the paper submission to the arXiv preprint server with links to the raw simulation data as well as interactive real-time data visualizations that readers can explore on their own or share with colleagues during journal club discussions. It is our hope that the value added by these services will substantially increase the impact and readership of the paper.

  20. Influence of External Environmental Factors on the Success of Public Housing Projects in Developing Countries

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    External environmental factors, which include political environment, economic environment and social environment, affect the success of public housing projects in developing countries. The purpose of this paper is to establish the effect of these factors on public housing project success using structural equation modelling (SEM) techniques.  The study was conducted in Nigeria by means of interviews, a pilot study and a main survey. Five hundred and fifty (550) questionnaires were administered...

  1. The Development and Implementation of Successful School-Community Partnerships in Public Elementary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Record, Vincent N.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to define common characteristics of successful school-community partnerships supporting the improvement of academic achievement in public elementary schools. Based on the perceptions of elementary school administrators, this study identified important factors of, barriers to, and benefits of successful school-community…

  2. Coffee Shops, Classrooms and Conversations: public engagement and outreach in a large interdisciplinary research Hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Jennifer A.

    2014-05-01

    Public engagement and outreach activities are increasingly using specialist staff for co-ordination, training and support for researchers, they are also becoming expected for large investments. Here, the experience of public engagement and outreach a large, interdisciplinary Research Hub is described. dot.rural, based at the University of Aberdeen UK, is a £11.8 million Research Councils UK Rural Digital Economy Hub, funded as part of the RCUK Digital Economy Theme (2009-2015). Digital Economy research aims to realise the transformational impact of digital technologies on aspects of the environment, community life, cultural experiences, future society, and the economy. The dot.rural Hub involves 92 researchers from 12 different disciplines, including Geography, Hydrology and Ecology. Public Engagement and Outreach is embedded in the dot.rural Digital Economy Hub via an Outreach Officer. Alongside this position, public engagement and outreach activities are compulsory part of PhD student contracts. Public Engagement and Outreach activities at the dot.rural Hub involve individuals and groups in both formal and informal settings organised by dot.rural and other organisations. Activities in the realms of Education, Public Engagement, Traditional and Social Media are determined by a set of Underlying Principles designed for the Hub by the Outreach Officer. The underlying Engagement and Outreach principles match funding agency requirements and expectations alongside researcher demands and the user-led nature of Digital Economy Research. All activities include researchers alongside the Outreach Officer are research informed and embedded into specific projects that form the Hub. Successful public engagement activities have included participation in Café Scientifique series, workshops in primary and secondary schools, and online activities such as I'm a Scientist Get Me Out of Here. From how to engage 8 year olds with making hydrographs more understandable to members of

  3. Lessons for public health campaigns from analysing commercial food marketing success factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; JA Perez-Cueto, Federico; Niedzwiedzka, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Background: Commercial food marketing has considerably shaped consumer food choice behaviour. Meanwhile, public health campaigns for healthier eating have had limited impact to date. Social marketing suggests that successful commercial food marketing campaigns can provide useful lessons for public...... sector activities. The aim of the present study was to empirically identify food marketing success factors that, using the social marketing approach, could help improve public health campaigns to promote healthy eating. Methods: In this case-study analysis, 27 recent and successful commercial food...... and beverage marketing cases were purposively sampled from different European countries. The cases involved different consumer target groups, product categories, company sizes and marketing techniques. The analysis focused on cases of relatively healthy food types, and nutrition and health-related aspects...

  4. "No Stone Left Unturned": how the public explains the Ugandan success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Elizabeth; Kipp, Walter; Rubaale, Tom

    2009-01-01

    We conducted a public poll to assess the public's perception about changes in HIV prevalence and its causes in a township in western Uganda. The main questions related to the declining HIV prevalence and its interpretation, as well as to the "Ugandan success story." The study used a qualitative methodology; we interviewed 68 citizens in eight focus group discussions. The majority stated that the HIV prevalence had declined in their town. Of those respondents, most cited behaviour changes related to Uganda's ABC strategy as their explanation of the declining trends. Those who said that a decline in HIV had taken place also stated that they believed in the Ugandan success story. Our study concludes that it is important to involve the public on important health issues such as HIV/AIDS in order to obtain more valid results by combining scientific findings with public/indigenous knowledge.

  5. "...No stone left unturned:" how the public explains the Ugandan success story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Elizabeth; Kipp, Walter; Rubaale, Tom

    2008-01-01

    We conducted a public poll to assess the public's perception about changes in HIV prevalence and its causes in a township in western Uganda. The main questions related to the declining HIV prevalence and its interpretation, as well as to the "Ugandan success story." The study used a qualitative methodology; we interviewed 68 citizens in eight focus group discussions. The majority stated that the HIV prevalence had declined in their town. Of those respondents, most cited behaviour changes related to Uganda's ABC strategy as their explanation of the declining trends. Those who said that a decline in HIV had taken place also stated that they believed in the Ugandan success story. Our study concludes that it is important to involve the public on important health issues such as HIV/AIDS in order to obtain more valid results by combining scientific findings with public/indigenous knowledge.

  6. Public Relations Handbook for Vocational Education in Large Cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koble, Daniel E., Jr.; And Others

    Intended for use by urban vocational staff members who face public relations problems and need to facilitate the outreach process in their cities, this handbook contains guidelines for organizing the public. First, Sanford's definition of public relations is outlined, followed by an explanation of why vocational education needs public relations.…

  7. Which factors are significant for obtaining business intelligence success in the public sector?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaardboe, Rikke

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present a brief introduction to the doctoral thesis of the author. The content of the thesis identifies the critical success factors for obtaining business intelligence success, measured as use, user satisfaction, net benefits and individual impact from an end user...... and the perceived individual impact of using business intelligence in the public sector. This PhD bridges a gap in obtaining an understanding of what tasks and quality fit the use of business intelligence....

  8. A Successful University--Public School Collaboration: The Union of Theory and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangemann, Paul; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This article examines a collaboration involving the Brigham Young University-Public School Partnership and the Egyptian exhibit, "Ramses II: The Pharoah and His Time." The practices of this partnership are compared to prevailing theories regarding successful university-school collaboration. Characteristics and conditions considered…

  9. Networking and Managers' Career Success in the Malaysian Public Sector: The Moderating Effect of Managerial Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasdi, Roziah Mohd; Garavan, Thomas N.; Ismail, Maimunah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how managerial level moderates the relationships between networking behaviours and career success (objective and subjective) in the context of a public sector organisation in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The study utilised a cross-sectional design and investigated these relationships…

  10. Networking and Managers' Career Success in the Malaysian Public Sector: The Moderating Effect of Managerial Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasdi, Roziah Mohd; Garavan, Thomas N.; Ismail, Maimunah

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how managerial level moderates the relationships between networking behaviours and career success (objective and subjective) in the context of a public sector organisation in Malaysia. Design/methodology/approach: The study utilised a cross-sectional design and investigated these relationships…

  11. Outlier Ohio: A Case Study of Ohio Public Libraries and an Analysis of Their Collective Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klentzin, Jacqueline Courtney

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the collective success and "Best in the Nation" status of Ohio public libraries as indicated in by various statistical rankings, like the HAPLR and "Library Journal" Star Libraries, as well as anecdotal reports in the trade literature. The study was qualitative in nature and utilized a single-subject case…

  12. Outlier Ohio: A Case Study of Ohio Public Libraries and an Analysis of Their Collective Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klentzin, Jacqueline Courtney

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the collective success and "Best in the Nation" status of Ohio public libraries as indicated in by various statistical rankings, like the HAPLR and "Library Journal" Star Libraries, as well as anecdotal reports in the trade literature. The study was qualitative in nature and utilized a single-subject case…

  13. Public Staff Meetings – thank you for a large attendance

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    The public meetings of the Staff Association which took place recently were attended by about 500 staff, a large fraction of them young and on a limited duration (LD) contract. The audience mainly shared the worries of the Staff Association concerning the low number of IC post openings in this and the coming years. Moreover, after the meeting several LD contract holders contacted the Staff Association to express their point of view and to put forward their ideas to tackle this problem. As explained in those meetings, the Staff Association emphasizes that personnel policy should not be guided by self-imposed quota, even under pressure by the Member States. As we have repeated several times, CERN needs a total staff complement well beyond the baseline ceiling of 2250, the number agreed by Council, if it has to guarantee an efficient and excellence level of service to the ever-growing user community, which has almost doubled over the last decade. Moreover, the indefinite contract (IC) component should stan...

  14. Lessons for public health campaigns from analysing commercial food marketing success factors: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aschemann-Witzel Jessica

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Commercial food marketing has considerably shaped consumer food choice behaviour. Meanwhile, public health campaigns for healthier eating have had limited impact to date. Social marketing suggests that successful commercial food marketing campaigns can provide useful lessons for public sector activities. The aim of the present study was to empirically identify food marketing success factors that, using the social marketing approach, could help improve public health campaigns to promote healthy eating. Methods In this case-study analysis, 27 recent and successful commercial food and beverage marketing cases were purposively sampled from different European countries. The cases involved different consumer target groups, product categories, company sizes and marketing techniques. The analysis focused on cases of relatively healthy food types, and nutrition and health-related aspects in the communication related to the food. Visual as well as written material was gathered, complemented by semi-structured interviews with 12 food market trend experts and 19 representatives of food companies and advertising agencies. Success factors were identified by a group of experts who reached consensus through discussion structured by a card sorting method. Results Six clusters of success factors emerged from the analysis and were labelled as "data and knowledge", "emotions", "endorsement", "media", "community" and "why and how". Each cluster subsumes two or three success factors and is illustrated by examples. In total, 16 factors were identified. It is argued that the factors "nutritional evidence", "trend awareness", "vertical endorsement", "simple naturalness" and "common values" are of particular importance in the communication of health with regard to food. Conclusions The present study identified critical factors for the success of commercial food marketing campaigns related to the issue of nutrition and health, which are possibly

  15. Lessons for public health campaigns from analysing commercial food marketing success factors: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschemann-Witzel, Jessica; Perez-Cueto, Federico J A; Niedzwiedzka, Barbara; Verbeke, Wim; Bech-Larsen, Tino

    2012-02-21

    Commercial food marketing has considerably shaped consumer food choice behaviour. Meanwhile, public health campaigns for healthier eating have had limited impact to date. Social marketing suggests that successful commercial food marketing campaigns can provide useful lessons for public sector activities. The aim of the present study was to empirically identify food marketing success factors that, using the social marketing approach, could help improve public health campaigns to promote healthy eating. In this case-study analysis, 27 recent and successful commercial food and beverage marketing cases were purposively sampled from different European countries. The cases involved different consumer target groups, product categories, company sizes and marketing techniques. The analysis focused on cases of relatively healthy food types, and nutrition and health-related aspects in the communication related to the food. Visual as well as written material was gathered, complemented by semi-structured interviews with 12 food market trend experts and 19 representatives of food companies and advertising agencies. Success factors were identified by a group of experts who reached consensus through discussion structured by a card sorting method. Six clusters of success factors emerged from the analysis and were labelled as "data and knowledge", "emotions", "endorsement", "media", "community" and "why and how". Each cluster subsumes two or three success factors and is illustrated by examples. In total, 16 factors were identified. It is argued that the factors "nutritional evidence", "trend awareness", "vertical endorsement", "simple naturalness" and "common values" are of particular importance in the communication of health with regard to food. The present study identified critical factors for the success of commercial food marketing campaigns related to the issue of nutrition and health, which are possibly transferable to the public health sector. Whether or not a particular

  16. Lessons for public health campaigns from analysing commercial food marketing success factors: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Commercial food marketing has considerably shaped consumer food choice behaviour. Meanwhile, public health campaigns for healthier eating have had limited impact to date. Social marketing suggests that successful commercial food marketing campaigns can provide useful lessons for public sector activities. The aim of the present study was to empirically identify food marketing success factors that, using the social marketing approach, could help improve public health campaigns to promote healthy eating. Methods In this case-study analysis, 27 recent and successful commercial food and beverage marketing cases were purposively sampled from different European countries. The cases involved different consumer target groups, product categories, company sizes and marketing techniques. The analysis focused on cases of relatively healthy food types, and nutrition and health-related aspects in the communication related to the food. Visual as well as written material was gathered, complemented by semi-structured interviews with 12 food market trend experts and 19 representatives of food companies and advertising agencies. Success factors were identified by a group of experts who reached consensus through discussion structured by a card sorting method. Results Six clusters of success factors emerged from the analysis and were labelled as "data and knowledge", "emotions", "endorsement", "media", "community" and "why and how". Each cluster subsumes two or three success factors and is illustrated by examples. In total, 16 factors were identified. It is argued that the factors "nutritional evidence", "trend awareness", "vertical endorsement", "simple naturalness" and "common values" are of particular importance in the communication of health with regard to food. Conclusions The present study identified critical factors for the success of commercial food marketing campaigns related to the issue of nutrition and health, which are possibly transferable to the public health

  17. Prevalence of Research Publication Misrepresentation Among Urology Residency Applicants and Its Effect on Match Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Jamie S; Pagano, Matthew J; Cooper, Kimberly L; McKiernan, James M; Badalato, Gina M

    2017-01-01

    To report the prevalence of research misrepresentation among urology residency applicants and assess its effect on match success. All applications to the Columbia University urology residency program for the 2014-2015 match cycle were reviewed. "In-press," "accepted," and "submitted" manuscripts were verified using PubMed, Google Scholar, and journal websites. Misrepresentation for "in-press" and "accepted" manuscripts was defined as: (1) nonexistent manuscript, (2) nonauthorship of existent manuscript, (3) self-promotion to a higher author rank, and/or (4) existent manuscript in a nonpeer-reviewed publication. Logistic regression was performed to identify associated factors of misrepresentation and of match success. Of 257 applicants, 204 (79.4%) reported 1098 total manuscripts and 142 (55.3%) reported 371 unpublished manuscripts. About 5% (13 of 257) of applicants misrepresented 1 or more publications: 10 listed nonexistent manuscripts, 1 listed a publication for which he/she was listed a lower author rank than reported, 1 listed an accepted manuscript in a nonpeer-reviewed publication and for which he/she was not listed as an author, and 1 listed 4 in-press manuscripts in a nonpeer-reviewed publication. Only 55.8% (139 of 249) of "submitted" manuscripts were published within 12 months, with 41% (51 of 139) published in a journal of a lower impact factor than the reported journal of submission. Higher number of unpublished manuscripts was associated with misrepresentation. Higher Step 1 score, number of away sub-internships, and publication ratio were associated with match success. Research misrepresentation is a persistent issue in urology residency applications. However, misrepresentation in this cohort did not confer a significant advantage in match success. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Successive inverse polynomial interpolation to optimize Smagorinsky's model for large-eddy simulation of homogeneous turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernard J.; Meyers, Johan

    2006-01-01

    We propose the successive inverse polynomial interpolation method to optimize model parameters in subgrid parameterization for large-eddy simulation. This approach is illustrated for the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model used in homogeneous decaying turbulence. The optimal Smagorinsky parameter is re

  19. Successful three stage repair of a large congenital abdominal region defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidehi Agrawal

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We present two infants born with large, right upper quadrant defects which cannot be categorized as either a gastroschisis or omphalocele. We successfully managed one infant with a three stage repair using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE patch, porcine urinary bladder matrix (UBM and delayed surgical closure. The second infant passed away due to parental consent care withdrawal.

  20. Successive inverse polynomial interpolation to optimize Smagorinsky's model for large-eddy simulation of homogeneous turbulence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Meyers, Johan

    We propose the successive inverse polynomial interpolation method to optimize model parameters in subgrid parameterization for large-eddy simulation. This approach is illustrated for the Smagorinsky eddy-viscosity model used in homogeneous decaying turbulence. The optimal Smagorinsky parameter is

  1. Examining the Interrelationship among Critical Success Factors of Public Private Partnership Infrastructure Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Shi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Examining the interrelationships among critical success factors (CSFs for public private partnership (PPP projects is of importance for improving PPP project performance and maintaining the sustainability of PPP project implementation. Previous studies mostly focused on the identification of the CSFs for PPP projects; limited studies investigated the interrelationships among CSFs. Hence, the research objectives are (a to determine the interrelationships among CSFs of PPP projects taking into account the public and (b to identify influence paths contributing to take advantage of CSFs in the process of PPP implementation. A literature review and expert interviews were adopted to construct the CSFs framework; nine hypotheses were constructed and tested by the structural equation modelling (SEM based on the data collected from a questionnaire survey. This research reveals that the relationship between public and private partners is the leader-follower relationship, not the partnership relationship, in PPP projects, indicating that the responsibilities, power or resources existing among partners are very unequal. It also highlights that public involvement has a negative effect on the process of service provisions, and costs and risks exist in the process of public involvement in PPP projects. The determined interrelationships among CSFs will contribute to the sustainability and success of a PPP project.

  2. Public Policy and Success of Business Start-ups in Germany

    OpenAIRE

    Eckl, Verena; Rothgang, Michael; Welter, Friederike

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the success of publicly supported business start-ups by comparing the outcomes of various support measures. Our question is: do business starter get what they need? Since we do not know the needs of the founders we analyse (1) who received which kind of support (financial support, individual coaching, general information) and (2) which kind of support is successful for whom with regard to his/her job history (employed, unemployed or being not part of the job market)...

  3. A Framework of Successful E-Business Incubator for Indonesian Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Gozali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In many developed countries, many business incubators take part to help starts-up company to develop their own business; especially the baby born business cannot compete with the giant industries that have become the old business players. Universities play an important role in motivating young graduates to become technology entrepreneur. Unemployment in Indonesia is still the main issue for the government program to increase welfare in the future. In year 2014 the data from Statistic Center of Indonesia state that Indonesia has 4% unemployment from Indonesia’ work generation. In Indonesia, incubators has been developed since 1992 initiated by the government, Cooperative Department and also universities. This effort continued in 1997 when there was a program called the Development of Entrepreneurship Culture in universities, and of its activity was New Entrepreneur Incubator. The objectives of the research are to investigate the success factor for e-business incubator, and to propose and develop a framework for successful e-business incubator for public universities in Indonesia. Research location is in Indonesia for the public universities that have their e-business incubator. This research will conduct quantitative and qualitative analyses based on data collection from incubator managers and business founders in Indonesia. The result of this research is a framework for successful e-business incubator in Indonesian public universities.

  4. Assessing Success: The Impacts of a Fundamentals of Speech Course on Decreasing Public Speaking Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Karla M.; Westwick, Joshua N.; Haleta, Laurie L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite assessment's prominence in higher education, many communication departments still find its implementation problematic. In this case study, we answer a call for heightened research pertaining to the best practices for assessment of large, multisection, standardized public speaking courses. We demonstrate the ease with which the basic course…

  5. Assessing Success: The Impacts of a Fundamentals of Speech Course on Decreasing Public Speaking Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Karla M.; Westwick, Joshua N.; Haleta, Laurie L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite assessment's prominence in higher education, many communication departments still find its implementation problematic. In this case study, we answer a call for heightened research pertaining to the best practices for assessment of large, multisection, standardized public speaking courses. We demonstrate the ease with which the basic course…

  6. CRITICAL SUCCESS FACTORS FOR SIX SIGMA IMPLEMENTATION IN LARGE-SCALE TURKISH CONSTRUCTION COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Tolga Taner

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to investigate the Critical Success Factors (CSFs for the successful introduction of Six Sigma in large-scale Turkish construction companies. A survey-based approach is used in order to identify and understand the current quality practices. CSFs and impeding factors are identified and analysed. Involvement and commitment of top management, linking quality initiatives to customer and linking quality initiatives to supplier are found to be the most important CSFs to the construction companies. Leadership and commitment of top management, cross-functional teamwork and commitment of middle managers are found to be the most CSFs for successful introduction of Six Sigma, whereas lack of knowledge of the system to initiate and complacency are found to be hindering its implementation. High costs and high amount of waste are found to lower the performance of Turkish construction companies.

  7. Determinants of Successful Public-Private Partnerships in the Context of Overweight Prevention in Dutch Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlijn Leenaars, MSc

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction A public-private partnership (PPP is an essential component of the Dutch community-based approach toward overweight prevention, Youth on Healthy Weight (JOGG. Beginning in 2010, 25 Dutch municipalities have implemented JOGG, but little is known about determinants of successful partnerships. This study aims to identify these determinants to guide other municipalities or communities in creating successful partnerships. Methods Semistructured interviews were held in Veghel, a town in the southeast of the Netherlands, with private (n = 7 and public (n = 5 partners from the PPP involved in JOGG. We developed a themes and topics list that fit the purpose of our study. The interviews focused on the formation, functioning, and output of the partnership. Results Recruitment of partners was facilitated by using preexisting networks. Corporate social responsibility, belief in the JOGG approach, importance of the health issue, and strengthened contacts with other partners were important motivations for partners to participate. In addition to partnership functioning and output, enthusiastic and decisive management, shared commitment, joint responsibility, and effective internal communication were important to the partners, as were clear goals and concrete actions to achieve these goals. Conclusion To create successful partnerships, the program and its goals should appeal to the motivations of the partners. Involving partners in defining local program objectives can help to create shared commitment and joint responsibility. Further evaluation of partnerships’ impact on achieving program goals is a subsequent step to be taken to identify long-term determinants of successful PPPs.

  8. Ethical budgets: a critical success factor in implementing new public management accountability in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosa, Iris M

    2010-05-01

    New public management accountability is increasingly being introduced into health-care systems throughout the world - albeit with mixed success. This paper examines the successful introduction of new management accounting systems among general practitioners (GPs) as an aspect of reform in the Italian health-care system. In particular, the study examines the critical role played by the novel concept of an 'ethical budget' in engaging the willing cooperation of the medical profession in implementing change. Utilizing a qualitative research design, with in-depth interviews with GPs, hospital doctors and managers, along with archival analysis, the present study finds that management accounting can be successfully implemented among medical professionals provided there is alignment between the management imperative and the ethical framework in which doctors practise their profession. The concept of an 'ethical budget' has been shown to be an innovative and effective tool in achieving this alignment.

  9. Lessons learned: Infrastructure development and financial management for large, publicly funded, international trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Gregg S; Carey, Cate; Grarup, Jesper; Hudson, Fleur; Sachi, Karen; Vjecha, Michael J; Gordin, Fred

    2016-04-01

    Randomized clinical trials are widely recognized as essential to address worldwide clinical and public health research questions. However, their size and duration can overwhelm available public and private resources. To remain competitive in international research settings, advocates and practitioners of clinical trials must implement practices that reduce their cost. We identify approaches and practices for large, publicly funded, international trials that reduce cost without compromising data integrity and recommend an approach to cost reporting that permits comparison of clinical trials. We describe the organizational and financial characteristics of The International Network for Strategic Initiatives in Global HIV Trials, an infectious disease research network that conducts multiple, large, long-term, international trials, and examine challenges associated with simple and streamlined governance and an infrastructure and financial management model that is based on performance, transparency, and accountability. It is possible to reduce costs of participants' follow-up and not compromise clinical trial quality or integrity. The International Network for Strategic Initiatives in Global HIV Trials network has successfully completed three large HIV trials using cost-efficient practices that have not adversely affected investigator enthusiasm, accrual rates, loss-to-follow-up, adherence to the protocol, and completion of data collection. This experience is relevant to the conduct of large, publicly funded trials in other disease areas, particularly trials dependent on international collaborations. New approaches, or creative adaption of traditional clinical trial infrastructure and financial management tools, can render large, international clinical trials more cost-efficient by emphasizing structural simplicity, minimal up-front costs, payments for performance, and uniform algorithms and fees-for-service, irrespective of location. However, challenges remain. They

  10. The Impact of the Public Library on Business Success: An Analysis Based on Medium-Sized Businesses in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Liwen Qiu

    1997-01-01

    Describes a survey of Ontario (Canada) medium-sized businesses that was conducted to investigate the impact of the public library on business success and discusses results that found a significant relationship between public library use and business success. A copy of the questionnaire used is appended. (Author/LRW)

  11. Organizational factors for successful entering to e-marketplace: Case of large organizations in Slovenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Pucihar

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The appeal of doing business on the Web is clear. By bringing together large numbers of buyers and sellers and by automating transactions, e-marketplaces expand the choices available to buyers, give sellers access to new customers (buyers, and reduce transaction costs for all participants. Entering the e-marketplace is related to the business process of reengineering, connecting of information systems, gaining new knowledge with training and learning, and making investments in new information technologies and software. Such organization must take very careful steps to prepare itself for a successful entrance on the e-marketplace. Only this kind of approach will enable the organization the full use of the available opportunities and will bring expected business results. The paper presents the different types of e-marketplaces and the use of e-marketplaces for business. Furthermore, the results of the research that was done among 250 large organizations in Slovenia are presented. The current status of the use e-commerce and e-marketplaces in large organizations in Slovenia is introduced. In addition, organizational factors found by large organizations to be important for a successful entrance to the e-marketplaces are presented. We conclude the paper with recommendations for the organizations that intend to enter e-marketplace.

  12. Successful flexible bronchoscopic management of a large-sized aspirated partial denture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshed, Nayer; Madan, Karan; Ekka, Meera; Guleria, Randeep

    2014-03-20

    A 48-year-old male patient presented to the emergency room with a history of chest pain and breathlessness. Chest X-ray demonstrated a large radio-opaque foreign body in relation to the proximal right bronchial tree. The patient subsequently revealed a history of a misplaced denture 4 months previously. Urgent flexible bronchoscopy (FB) examination demonstrated a large partial denture impacted in the right intermediate bronchus, which was removed successfully using a flexible bronchoscope. Although rigid bronchoscopy (RB) is the procedure of choice for large-sized and impacted airway foreign bodies, the present case highlights the utility of FB in airway foreign body removal. In clinically stable patients with foreign body inhalation, FB can be employed initially as it is an outpatient and cost-effective procedure which can obviate the need for administration of general anaesthesia.

  13. Public Relations: The Route to Success and Influence. Public Relations for Your Library: A Tool for Effective Communications; Tooting Your Own Horn: Web-Based Public Relations for the School Media Specialist; Bookmarks as a Teaching Tool; Customers and Culture: The Who and What of Library Public Relations Efforts; Strategies for Successful Job Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Linda; Silverstein, Roberta; Fisher, Julieta Dias; Hill, Ann; Hegel, Claudette; Miller, Donna; Moyer, Mary

    2002-01-01

    This special section includes five articles that discuss public relations strategies for school librarians. Highlights include effective communication, including measuring and evaluating the success of public relations efforts; Web-based public relations; giving bookmarks to students; customers and cultural contexts; and successful job…

  14. Public Relations: The Route to Success and Influence. Public Relations for Your Library: A Tool for Effective Communications; Tooting Your Own Horn: Web-Based Public Relations for the School Media Specialist; Bookmarks as a Teaching Tool; Customers and Culture: The Who and What of Library Public Relations Efforts; Strategies for Successful Job Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Linda; Silverstein, Roberta; Fisher, Julieta Dias; Hill, Ann; Hegel, Claudette; Miller, Donna; Moyer, Mary

    2002-01-01

    This special section includes five articles that discuss public relations strategies for school librarians. Highlights include effective communication, including measuring and evaluating the success of public relations efforts; Web-based public relations; giving bookmarks to students; customers and cultural contexts; and successful job…

  15. Low-Level and Successive Large-Level Excursions of a Stationary Gaussian Process

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Van Minh

    2012-01-01

    The present work investigates two properties of level crossings of a stationary Gaussian process $X(t)$ with autocorrelation function $R_X(\\tau)$. We show firstly that if $R_X(\\tau)$ admits finite second and fourth derivatives at the origin, the length of up-excursions above a low level $-\\gamma$ is asymptotically exponential as $-\\gamma \\to -\\infty$. Secondly, assume that $R_X(\\tau)$ admits a finite second derivative at the origin and some defined properties, we derive the mean number of crossings as well as the length of successive excursions above two adjacent large levels. The asymptotic results are showed to be effective even for practical values of crossing levels. An application of the developed results is proposed to derive the probability of successive excursions above adjacent levels during a time window.

  16. Gateway to Success for At-Risk Students in a Large-Group Introductory Chemistry Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Diana; Verdel, Ellen

    2001-02-01

    Thirty-six entering freshmen of a designated "at-risk" population were divided between two classes of introductory chemistry for nonscience majors. Seventeen students were placed in a typical large-group lecture (n = 210) class, and the remaining 19 were placed in a special class with enrollment restricted to the selected, at-risk students. To assure equity and control for consistency, both lecture classes met at the same time. The two female instructors gave the same lectures to each class. At-risk students from both sections were required to attend supplemental instruction sections led by the same teaching assistant, and the same instructor graded all assignments. Students of both classes were encouraged to form informal collaborative groups to complete 10 in-class problem sets, which were graded on an individual basis. The at-risk students from the large-group lecture (average = 75.5) outperformed students enrolled in the special class (average = 70.6). All targeted students were successful in the large-group lecture class; however, three at-risk students in the smaller class were unsuccessful. Scaffolding from a more diverse population in the larger group may be one reason for this unexpected outcome. In the larger lecture class, students rated the collaborative assignments as being most beneficial to their success.

  17. What are the critical success factors in managing innovation in the public sector?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Jóna Jónsdóttir

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to contribute to the knowledge and understanding of innovation in the public sector. The goal is to shed light on the first steps in the developmental or learning process involved when a new solution emerges from everyday work. The method involves descriptive analysis of managers’ narratives of events and procedures; furthermore, interpretive analysis and explanations of managers’ stories of actions and communication. The research seeks to answer the question of what the key success factors are in managing innovation in the public sector. Results indicate that managers clearly are the entrepreneurs in the developmental and learning process. Their tacit knowledge and management education, along with social need, provides the drive that initiates innovation. Communication is a significant factor in the innovation process; recurring themes in managers’ narratives are dialogue, dissemination of information, and active listening. Another important element is teamwork where diversity is ensured.

  18. Success-driven distribution of public goods promotes cooperation but preserves defection

    CERN Document Server

    Perc, Matjaz

    2011-01-01

    Established already in the Biblical times, the Matthew effect stands for the fact that in societies rich tend to get richer and the potent even more powerful. Here we investigate a game theoretical model describing the evolution of cooperation on structured populations where the distribution of public goods is driven by the reproductive success of individuals. Phase diagrams reveal that cooperation is promoted irrespective of the uncertainty by strategy adoptions and the type of interaction graph, yet the complete dominance of cooperators is elusive due to the spontaneous emergence of super-persistent defectors that owe their survival to extremely rare microscopic patterns. This indicates that success-driven mechanisms are crucial for effectively harvesting benefits from collective actions, but that they may also account for the observed persistence of maladaptive behavior.

  19. British Columbia capital regional district 100% smokefree bylaw: a successful public health campaign despite industry opposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drope, J; Glantz, S

    2003-09-01

    To describe how the British Columbia Capital Regional District successfully passed, implemented, and enforced a 100% smokefree bylaw in all public places, including restaurants and bars, despite an aggressive campaign by the tobacco industry (acting through the hospitality industry) to stop it. Information was obtained from news reports, internal tobacco industry documents, reports, public documents, and interviews with key players. Tobacco industry documents were accessed between February and April 2002. This project was approved by the University of California San Francisco committee on human research. As in the USA and elsewhere in the world, the tobacco industry in British Columbia, Canada, recruited and created hospitality associations to fight against the district smokefree bylaw. They used the classic industry rhetoric of individual rights and freedoms, economic devastation, and ventilation as a solution. Public health authorities were able to counter industry strategies with a strong education campaign, well written bylaws, and persistent enforcement. It is possible to overcome serious opposition orchestrated by the tobacco industry and develop and implement a 100% smokefree bylaw in Canada. Doing so requires attention to detail in drafting the bylaw, as well as a public education campaign on the health dangers of secondhand smoke and active enforcement to overcome organised resistance to the bylaw. Jurisdictions considering smokefree bylaws should anticipate this opposition when developing and implementing their bylaws.

  20. Critical Factors toward Successful R&D Projects in Public Research Centers: a Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Barragán-Ocaña

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Mexican Public Research Centers (PRCs have become one of the most important actors in technology development for most enterprises they interact with. Nevertheless, knowledge generated and accumulated by PRCs is being underutilized or not utilized at all in the advance of new projects to benefit productive sectors. In this paper we review a number of variables to pinpoint factors that either promote or hinder successful R&D projects; i.e. those transferred to the industry. We conclude that it is feasible to design policies to boost positive factors while preventing or reducing the impact of the negative ones.

  1. Treatment success in cancer: industry compared to publicly sponsored randomized controlled trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Djulbegovic

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess if commercially sponsored trials are associated with higher success rates than publicly-sponsored trials. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTINGS: We undertook a systematic review of all consecutive, published and unpublished phase III cancer randomized controlled trials (RCTs conducted by GlaxoSmithKline (GSK and the NCIC Clinical Trials Group (CTG. We included all phase III cancer RCTs assessing treatment superiority from 1980 to 2010. Three metrics were assessed to determine treatment successes: (1 the proportion of statistically significant trials favouring the experimental treatment, (2 the proportion of the trials in which new treatments were considered superior according to the investigators, and (3 quantitative synthesis of data for primary outcomes as defined in each trial. RESULTS: GSK conducted 40 cancer RCTs accruing 19,889 patients and CTG conducted 77 trials enrolling 33,260 patients. 42% (99%CI 24 to 60 of the results were statistically significant favouring experimental treatments in GSK compared to 25% (99%CI 13 to 37 in the CTG cohort (RR = 1.68; p = 0.04. Investigators concluded that new treatments were superior to standard treatments in 80% of GSK compared to 44% of CTG trials (RR = 1.81; p<0.001. Meta-analysis of the primary outcome indicated larger effects in GSK trials (odds ratio = 0.61 [99%CI 0.47-0.78] compared to 0.86 [0.74-1.00]; p = 0.003. However, testing for the effect of treatment over time indicated that treatment success has become comparable in the last decade. CONCLUSIONS: While overall industry sponsorship is associated with higher success rates than publicly-sponsored trials, the difference seems to have disappeared over time.

  2. Big names in science for the public at large

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ninth Wright Science Colloquium will be held in Geneva between 13 and 17 November 2000. The purpose of these biennial colloquia, founded by Dr H. Dudley Wright in 1984, is to bring recent progress in science to the attention of the general public. Each Colloquium consists of a series of lectures given by eminent scientists, this year including two Nobel Prize Winners, all of which are open to the general public. The 2000 series of Colloquium lectures is entitled “Time, Matter, Energy : from stars to our genes”, three familiar notions which nevertheless remain intangible for us. This series of five lectures will examine these notions in original ways. Thus the notion of time will be viewed from the perspective of the astronomer who, with the aid of telescopes, is able to go back in time and watch time expanding with the universe. The biologist has a different viewpoint since his notion of time is based on the biological clocks of the animal world. Matter will be addressed from the point of view of its ...

  3. Large forest patches promote breeding success of a terrestrial mammal in urban landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Soga

    Full Text Available Despite a marked increase in the focus toward biodiversity conservation in fragmented landscapes, studies that confirm species breeding success are scarce and limited. In this paper, we asked whether local (area of forest patches and landscape (amount of suitable habitat surrounding of focal patches factors affect the breeding success of raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides in Tokyo, Central Japan. The breeding success of raccoon dogs is easy to judge as adults travel with pups during the breeding season. We selected 21 forest patches (3.3-797.8 ha as study sites. In each forest patch, we used infra-red-triggered cameras for a total of 60 camera days per site. We inspected each photo to determine whether it was of an adult or a pup. Although we found adult raccoon dogs in all 21 forest patches, pups were found only in 13 patches. To estimate probability of occurrence and detection for raccoon in 21 forest fragments, we used single season site occupancy models in PRESENCE program. Model selection based on AIC and model averaging showed that the occupancy probability of pups was positively affected by patch area. This result suggests that large forests improve breeding success of raccoon dogs. A major reason for the low habitat value of small, isolated patches may be the low availability of food sources and the high risk of being killed on the roads in such areas. Understanding the effects of local and landscape parameters on species breeding success may help us to devise and implement effective long-term conservation and management plans.

  4. Evaluating Large-scale National Public Management Reforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breidahl, Karen Nielsen; Gjelstrup, Gunnar; Hansen, Morten Balle

    This article explores differences and similarities between two evaluations of large-scale administrative reforms which were carried out in the 2000s: The evaluation of the Norwegian NAV reform (EVANAV) and the evaluation of the Danish Local Government Reform (LGR). We provide a comparative analys...

  5. Two Successful Term Pregnancies with a Large Descending Aorta Aneurysm: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saghar Salehpour

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Aortic aneurysm is a rare but potentially lethal complication during pregnancy. In this article we described a 30-year-old woman with a large size descending aorta aneurysm (11 cm in length and 5.6 cm in its greatest diameter, who had two term uncomplicated pregnancies. The patient received prophylactic ß-blocker drug during her second pregnancy. Both pregnancies were terminated by caesarean section without any serious complications. Postpartum period was recovered successfully, but a noticeable increase in aneurysm’s length was detected in the period between two pregnancies.

  6. Large Bowel Obstruction Due to a Big Gallstone Successfully Treated with Endoscopic Mechanical Lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Balzarini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colonic gallstone ileus in an uncommon mechanical bowel obstruction caused by intraluminal impaction of one or more gallstones. The surgical management of gallstone ileus is complex and is potentially of high risk. There have been reports of gallstone extractions using various endoscopic modalities to relieve the obstruction. In this report we present the technique employed to successfully perform a mechanical lithotripsy and extraction of a large gallstone embedded in a sigmoid colon affected by diverticular stenosis. We passed through the stenosis with a 11.3 mm videoscope with 3.7 mm channel. A large lithotripsy extraction basket was used to catch and break up the stone and fragments were removed using the same basket. The patient was discharged asymptomatic three days after the procedure. Using appropriate devices mechanical lithotripsy is a safe and effective method to treat colonic obstruction and avoid surgery in the setting of gallstone ileus even in case of big stones.

  7. Measuring success: the case for calculating the return on investment of environmental public health tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, Alex E; Banerjee, Anyana; Carande-Kulis, Vilma G

    2008-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Public Health Tracking (EPHT) Program has funded multiple partners to develop a nationwide surveillance system that focuses on the environment and its impact on human health. To show that investing in a nationwide EPHT Network is a sound practice, the program must demonstrate that monetized improvements to the public's health due to tracking outweigh the costs. In the process of developing capacity for the EPHT Network, programs have had a positive impact on the public health. Results from successful programs can be used to estimate financial measures of the EPHT performance, such as net present value, return on investment, and payback period. The estimation of such measures for the EPHT requires an understanding of the economic elements for analysis in the context of surveillance systems. A quantitative assessment must take into account elements that are difficult to measure and value. By performing a return on investment, a financial measure of program performance, the expected costs and potential benefits of individual projects need to be assessed and compared with the current cost burden of the health condition.

  8. Successful Flexible Bronchoscopic Management of Dynamic Central Airway Obstruction by a Large Tracheal Carcinoid Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Hadda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Typical carcinoid of the trachea presenting as an endoluminal polypoidal mass is a rare occurrence. Herein, we report a case of a 34-year-old female patient who presented with features of central airway obstruction. Flexible bronchoscopy demonstrated a large pedunculated growth arising from the lower end of the trachea near carina which was flopping in and out of the main tracheal lumen and the proximal right bronchus leading to dynamic airway obstruction. Successful electrosurgical excision (using a snare loop of the polypoidal growth was performed using the flexible bronchoscope itself. The patient had immediate relief of airway obstruction and histopathological examination of the polyp demonstrated features of typical carcinoid (WHO Grade I neuroendocrine tumor.

  9. Successful Pregnancy in a Female with a Large Prolactinoma after Pituitary Tumor Apoplexy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Butheinah A. Al-Sharafi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Pituitary apoplexy is a rare condition which may cause death of the patient in severe cases and many times leads to hypopituitarism. We report a case of apoplexy in a large prolactinoma resulting in empty sella syndrome followed by a successful pregnancy. Our patient is a 32-year-old female with a history of a macroprolactinoma for approximately 17 years who presented to our hospital with a history of severe headache, decreased level of consciousness, fever, nausea, vomiting, and diplopia of 12 hours duration. Magnetic resonance imaging done on admission showed an increase in the size of the pituitary adenoma with a subtle hemorrhage. The patient was admitted to the intensive care unit and treated conservatively. The condition of the patient improved within a few days. A few months later, she started having regular menstrual periods. A magnetic resonance imaging of the pituitary 1.5 years later was reported as empty sella syndrome, and approximately one year later she became pregnant. With the pituitary adenoma being resolved after developing pituitary apoplexy and continuing on cabergoline, the patient had a successful pregnancy with no recurrence of the adenoma after delivery and breastfeeding.

  10. Large differences in publicly visible health behaviours across two neighbourhoods of the same city.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Nettle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are socioeconomic disparities in the likelihood of adopting unhealthy behaviours, and success at giving them up. This may be in part because people living in deprived areas are exposed to greater rates of unhealthy behaviour amongst those living around them. Conventional self-report surveys do not capture these differences in exposure, and more ethological methods are required in order to do so. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed 12 hours of direct behavioural observation in the streets of two neighbourhoods of the same city which were similar in most regards, except that one was much more socioeconomically deprived than the other. There were large differences in the publicly visible health behaviours observed. In the deprived neighbourhood, we observed 266 more adults smoking (rate ratio 3.44, 53 more adults drinking alcohol (rate ratio not calculable, and 38 fewer adults running (rate ratio 0.23, than in the affluent neighbourhood. We used data from the Health Survey for England to calculate the differences we ought to expect to have seen given the individual-level socioeconomic characteristics of the residents. The observed disparities between the two neighbourhoods were considerably greater than this null model predicted. There were also different patterns of smoking in proximity to children in the two neighbourhoods. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The differences in observed smoking, drinking alcohol, and physical activity between these two neighbourhoods of the same city are strikingly large, and for smoking and running, their magnitude suggests substantial area effects above and beyond the compositional differences between the neighbourhoods. Because of these differences, individuals residing in deprived areas are exposed to substantially more smoking and public drinking, and less physical activity, as they go about their daily lives, than their affluent peers. This may have important implications for the initiation

  11. Challenges to Successful Total Quality Management Implementation in Public Secondary Schools: A Case Study of Kohat District, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleman, Qaiser; Gul, Rizwana

    2015-01-01

    The current study explores the challenges faced by public secondary schools in successful implementation of total quality management (TQM) in Kohat District. A sample of 25 heads and 75 secondary school teachers selected from 25 public secondary schools through simple random sampling technique was used. Descriptive research designed was used and a…

  12. Through Resistance and Political Struggle: The Academic Success of Latina/o Students inside a Public Flagship University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez, Daniel Carlos

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how Latina/os recount their experiences and successes (or lack thereof) at a flagship public university. It examines how Latina/os form their identities in relation to their notions of academic success in the college environment, where social dynamics of race/ethnicity, class, and gender operate and intersect.…

  13. Business excellence as a success factor for the performance of large Croatian enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivica Zdrilić

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Croatian companies need a new approach that will provide them with sufficient competitive strength, based on business excellence. Focusing only on financial indicators and measures is insufficient. Therefore new concepts should be introduced, especially by large companies that are traditionally inert and exposed to global competition, and situated in the countries with ongoing transition, such as Croatia. Today 75% of the source of value within a company cannot be measured by means of the standard accounting techniques anymore, and in the 21st century it is impossible to rely exclusively on measuring financial parameters. According to the authors, in addition to financial measuring, a way should be found to measure non-financial parameters within a company. The paper is therefore aimed at exploring the influence of business excellence and its values on business in the Croatian business practice. The authors carried out a research on 106 large Croatian enterprises with more than 250 employees, exploring the connection between the values of business excellence and company performance, Results show a positive correlation between applying the principles of business excellence and successful company performance in practice.

  14. Successful Treatment of a Large Pelvic Abscess Using Intraluminal VAC: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Abbas; Celik, Sebahattin; Kiziltan, Remzi; Yilmaz, Özkan; Kotan, Çetin

    2016-04-01

    The most feared complication of the surgical treatment of rectal cancer is anastomotic leakage, which is related to high rates of mortality and morbidity. Here, we present a patient who could not be treated with surgical drainage but treated by intraluminal Vacuum Associated Closure (VAC). A 34-year-old male patient was treated for rectal cancer by low anterior resection, colorectal anastomosis, and diverting ileostomy following neoadjuvant CRT. The patient reported with a postoperative anastomotic disruption and a large pelvic abscess. Due to the continuation of foul-smell drainage inspite of perianal incision and drainage, intraluminal VAC was applied and the pelvic abscess and the foul-smell were successfully treated. The presence of an adequate anal sphincter tonus is a disadvantage in anastomotic leakage, since it prevents the emptying of the intestinal content and also precludes the drainage of the pelvic abscess. The endoluminal application of VAC, similar to the results of application of VAC in open wounds, has been demonstrated to decrease fibrin and necrotic tissue in the pelvic cavity and increase granulation tissue. VAC, which has long been used in the treatment of open wounds, is a promising method in the treatment of large pelvic abscesses due to anastomotic leakage following rectum resection.

  15. [A guide to successful public relations for hospitals and emergency medical services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ausserer, J; Schwamberger, J; Preloznik, R; Klimek, M; Paal, P; Wenzel, V

    2014-04-01

    Tragic accidents, e.g. involving celebrity patients or severe incidents in hospital occur suddenly without any advance warning, often produce substantial interest by the media and quickly overburden management personnel involved in both hospitals and emergency medical services. While doctors, hospitals and emergency medical services desire objective media reports, the media promote emotionalized and dramatized reports to ensure maximum attention and circulation. When briefing the media, the scales may quickly tilt from professional, well-deliberated information to unfortunate, often unintended disinformation. Such phenomena may result in continuing exaggerated reports in the tabloid press, which in the presence of aggressive lawyers and a competitive hospital environment can turn into image and legal problems. In this article, several aspects are discussed in order to achieve successful public relations.Interviews should be given only after consultation with the responsible press officer and the director of the respective department or hospital director. Requests for information by the media should always be answered as otherwise one-sided, unintentional publications can result that are extremely difficult to correct later. One should be available to be contacted easily by journalists, regular press conferences should be held and critics should be taken seriously and not be brushed off. Questions by journalists should be answered in a timely manner as journalists are continuously under time pressure and do not understand unnecessary delays. Information for the media should always be provided at the same time, no publication should be given preference and an absolutely current list of E-mail contacts is required. When facing big events a press conference is preferred as many questions can be answered at once. Always be well prepared for an interview or even for just a statement. Each interview should be regarded as an opportunity to put a story forward which you

  16. 'People pull the rug from under your feet': barriers to successful public health programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parry Odette

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A community public health programme, 'Breathing Space', aimed to tackle smoking in a low income area in Scotland. This paper draws on the qualitative process evaluation of a community-based initiative 'Breathing Space', which set out to tackle smoking in a low income area of Scotland, in order to explore user perceptions of key factors affecting implementation, and in particular to explore the implications of participant knowledge and expertise for programme stability and continuity. Methods The overall evaluation of Breathing Space used a quasi-experimental design and incorporated a detailed process evaluation. The process evaluation aimed to document development and implementation of the programme using a range of qualitative methods, including observation, in-depth interviews, focus groups and documentary analysis. The paper draws upon 59 semi-structured in-depth interviews which were carried out as part of the process evaluation. Findings Staff numbers from the multi-agency partnership dwindled across the lifecouof the programme and respondents identified lack of continuity as a key issue. While staff changes are an anticipated problem in programme implementation, here we draw on concepts of technicality and indeterminacy to explore the different aspects of public health programmes which are forfeited when individuals leave. The paper argues that, while technical components of public health programmes (such as the importance of staff complement and continuity are widely recognised, it is the more indeterminate aspects, including the loss of key theoretical understanding underpinning the programme, which most affect programme delivery. Indeed, the paper suggests that, where inadequate planning and resources threaten the continuity of indeterminate knowledge, the success of public health programmes may be especially jeopardised. Conclusion Community-based programmes which rely strongly on partnership processes would benefit

  17. High rates of adherence and treatment success in a public and public-private HIV clinic in India: potential benefits of standardized national care delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heylen Elsa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The massive scale-up of antiretroviral treatment (ART access worldwide has brought tremendous benefit to populations affected by HIV/AIDS. Optimising HIV care in countries with diverse medical systems is critical; however data on best practices for HIV healthcare delivery in resource-constrained settings are limited. This study aimed to understand patient characteristics and treatment outcomes from different HIV healthcare settings in Bangalore, India. Methods Participants from public, private and public-private HIV healthcare settings were recruited between 2007 and 2009 and were administered structured interviews by trained staff. Self-reported adherence was measured using the visual analogue scale to capture adherence over the past month, and a history of treatment interruptions (defined as having missed medications for more than 48 hours in the past three months. In addition, CD4 count and viral load (VL were measured; genotyping for drug resistance-associated mutations was performed on those who were in virological failure (VL > 1000 copies/ml. Results A total of 471 individuals were included in the analysis (263 from the public facility, 149 from the public-private facility and 59 from the private center. Private facility patients were more likely to be male, with higher education levels and incomes. More participants reported ≥ 95% adherence among public and public-private groups compared to private participants (public 97%; private 88%; public-private 93%, p Conclusions Adherence and treatment success was significantly higher among patients from public and public-private settings compared with patients from private facilities. These results suggest a possible benefit of the standardized care delivery system established in public and public-private health facilities where counselling by a multi-disciplinary team of workers is integral to provision of ART. Strengthening and increasing public-private partnerships can

  18. Successful Treatment in a Child with Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma and Coexistence of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Baka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 13-year-old girl was admitted to our department with a history of severe pain of her left axilla and fever. On physical examination, a block of lymph nodes in her left axilla, diffuse papular rash, and red-violet swelling of her supraclavicular and subclavian region were noted. Imaging investigations revealed left axillar and supraclavicular lymphadenopathy and a small nodular shade in the upper lobe of her left lung. A biopsy from an axillary lymph node established the diagnosis of anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL, whereas DNA of Mycobacterium tuberculosis was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR in the same tissue biopsy. Patient was started on chemotherapy for ALCL and achieved remission of all initially involved fields. Nevertheless, two new nodular lesions were detected in the left lower lobe. Biopsy revealed granulomas, and PCR was positive for M. tuberculosis. Our patient received treatment with the combination of isoniazid and rifampin (12 months, pyrazinamide (the first 2 months, and maintenance chemotherapy for her ALCL for one year simultaneously. Four years later, she is disease free for both mycobacterial infection and lymphoma. We are reporting this successful management of mycobacterial infection in a patient with ALCL despite intensive chemotherapy that the patient received at the same time.

  19. Factors affecting success of embryo collection and transfer in large dairy herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebel, R C; Demétrio, D G B; Metzger, J

    2008-01-01

    Our objective was to evaluate factors that affected the success of embryo transfer programs in large dairy herds. Non-lactating donor cows produced a larger number of ova/embryos (Pcows. The interaction between season and donor class was correlated with the proportion of ova/embryos classified as fertilized (P=0.03), because lactating donors had fewer fertilized ova in the summer. There was no correlation between 305-day mature equivalent milk yield and response to superstimulation. Although the interval between superstimulation protocols was correlated with the number of ova/embryos (P=0.03), there was no correlation with the number of viable embryos. Pregnancy per embryo transfer (P/ET) in heifer recipients was correlated with embryo quality grade (Pcows tended to have a lower rate of P/ET during the summer (P=0.12 to P=0.08). Synchronization protocols tended to be (P=0.06; Herd 1) or were (P=0.02; Herd 2) correlated with P/ET. Lactating cows receiving vitrified IVF embryos had a lower (P=0.01) P/ET than those receiving fresh IVF embryos, especially in the summer (P=0.09). Milk yield was not correlated with P/ET. The use of heat abatement systems is critical to improve embryo production and P/ET. Synchronization protocols that optimized synchrony of ovulation may increase fertility of recipient cows and eliminate the need for estrous detection.

  20. Increasing Student Success in Large Survey Science Courses via Supplemental Instruction in Learning Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Eric Jon; Nossal, S.; Watson, L.; Timbie, P.

    2010-05-01

    Large introductory astronomy and physics survey courses can be very challenging and stressful. The University of Wisconsin-Madison Physics Learning Center (PLC) reaches about 10 percent of the students in four introductory physics courses, algebra and calculus based versions of both classical mechanics and electromagnetism. Participants include those potentially most vulnerable to experiencing isolation and hence to having difficulty finding study partners as well as students struggling with the course. They receive specially written tutorials, conceptual summaries, and practice problems; exam reviews; and most importantly, membership in small groups of 3 - 8 students which meet twice per week in a hybrid of traditional teaching and tutoring. Almost all students who regularly participate in the PLC earn at least a "C,” with many earning higher grades. The PLC works closely with other campus programs which seek to increase the participation and enhance the success of underrepresented minorities, first generation college students, and students from lower-income circumstances; and it is well received by students, departmental faculty, and University administration. The PLC staff includes physics education specialists and research scientists with a passion for education. However, the bulk of the teaching is conducted by undergraduates who are majoring in physics, astronomy, mathematics, engineering, and secondary science teaching (many have multiple majors). The staff train these enthusiastic students, denoted Peer Mentor Tutors (PMTs) in general pedagogy and mentoring strategies, as well as the specifics of teaching the physics covered in the course. The PMTs are among the best undergraduates at the university. While currently there is no UW-Madison learning center for astronomy courses, establishing one is a possible future direction. The introductory astronomy courses cater to non-science majors and consequently are less quantitative. However, the basic structure

  1. A Case of Successful Remission of Extensive Primary Gastric Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma: Radiologic, Endoscopic and Pathologic Evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike M. Bismar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Though rare amongst stomach neoplasms, primary gastric diffuse large B cell lymphoma is one of the commonest extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas. If left untreated, it can have a devastating progression and life-threatening consequences. We present the case of a successfully treated large antral ulcer confirmed to be large B cell lymphoma as evidenced by radiologic, endoscopic and histopathologic findings. A brief discussion about the types of gastric lymphoma, their Helicobacter pylori relation and therapeutic modalities follows.

  2. Managerial skills and success in public services companies in the municipalities of: Riohacha, Maicao in the Guajira, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Yina Magdaniel Socarras; José Sánchez González; Marlenis Ucrós Brito

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research is to analyze the competencies for managerial success in public services companies in the municipalities of Maicao and Riohacha, Guajira Department, in Colombia. The study is based on research of Hellriegel, Koontz (2013), among others. It was framed in a descriptive research and quantitative approach. The results show that managers have basic administrative and managerial skills to achieve success in the companies under the study. However, there are weaknesses in the...

  3. Eight attention points when evaluating large-scale public sector reforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Breidahl, Karen Nielsen; Hjørdis Halvorsen, Anne;

    2017-01-01

    This chapter analyses the challenges related to evaluations of large-scale public sector reforms. It is based on a meta-evaluation of the evaluation of the reform of the Norwegian Labour Market and Welfare Administration (the NAV-reform) in Norway, which entailed both a significant reorganization...... of the central, regional and local government and a social policy reform. Meta-evaluations assess the usefulness of one or more evaluations and should not be confused with meta-analyses. The purpose of this meta-evaluation was to identify general principles for organizing the evaluations of large-scale public...... sector reforms. Based on the analysis, eight crucial points of attention when evaluating large-scale public sector reforms are elaborated. We discuss their reasons and argue that other countries will face the same challenges and thus can learn from the experiences of Norway....

  4. SGCC successfully developed large-capacity sodium-sulfur monomeric battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Through many years' cooperation,SGCC and Shanghai Silicate Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Science successfully developed 650 ampere-hours capacity sodium-sulfur monomeric storage battery with the independent intellectual property right

  5. Effects of Online Interaction and Instructor Presence on Students' Satisfaction and Success with Online Undergraduate Public Relations Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student success, failure, withdrawal, and satisfaction in online public relations courses based on instructor-student interaction, student-student interaction, and instructor presence. Student passing rates, D/F rates, withdrawal rates, and evaluations of instruction were compiled from fifty-one online PR courses run over the…

  6. Effects of Online Interaction and Instructor Presence on Students' Satisfaction and Success with Online Undergraduate Public Relations Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student success, failure, withdrawal, and satisfaction in online public relations courses based on instructor-student interaction, student-student interaction, and instructor presence. Student passing rates, D/F rates, withdrawal rates, and evaluations of instruction were compiled from fifty-one online PR courses run over the…

  7. Effects of Online Interaction and Instructor Presence on Students' Satisfaction and Success with Online Undergraduate Public Relations Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jensen

    2014-01-01

    This study examined student success, failure, withdrawal, and satisfaction in online public relations courses based on instructor-student interaction, student-student interaction, and instructor presence. Student passing rates, D/F rates, withdrawal rates, and evaluations of instruction were compiled from fifty-one online PR courses run over the…

  8. The Food Industry and Self-Regulation: Standards to Promote Success and to Avoid Public Health Failures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lisa L.; Teret, Stephen P.

    2010-01-01

    Threatened by possible government regulation and critical public opinion, industries often undertake self-regulatory actions, issue statements of concern for public welfare, and assert that self-regulation is sufficient to protect the public. The food industry has made highly visible pledges to curtail children's food marketing, sell fewer unhealthy products in schools, and label foods in responsible ways. Ceding regulation to industry carries opportunities but is highly risky. In some industries (e.g., tobacco), self-regulation has been an abject failure, but in others (e.g., forestry and marine fisheries), it has been more successful. We examined food industry self-regulation in the context of other self-regulatory successes and failures and defined 8 standards that should be met if self-regulation is to be effective. PMID:20019306

  9. The food industry and self-regulation: standards to promote success and to avoid public health failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Lisa L; Teret, Stephen P; Brownell, Kelly D

    2010-02-01

    Threatened by possible government regulation and critical public opinion, industries often undertake self-regulatory actions, issue statements of concern for public welfare, and assert that self-regulation is sufficient to protect the public. The food industry has made highly visible pledges to curtail children's food marketing, sell fewer unhealthy products in schools, and label foods in responsible ways. Ceding regulation to industry carries opportunities but is highly risky. In some industries (e.g., tobacco), self-regulation has been an abject failure, but in others (e.g., forestry and marine fisheries), it has been more successful. We examined food industry self-regulation in the context of other self-regulatory successes and failures and defined 8 standards that should be met if self-regulation is to be effective.

  10. Privatization Financing Alternatives: Blending Private Capital and Public Resources for a Successful Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BT Oakley; JH Holbrook; L Scully; MR Weimar; PK Kearns; R DiPrinzio

    1998-10-19

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Contract Reform Initiative in 1994 in order to improve the effectiveness and effkiency of managing major projects and programs. The intent of this initiative is to help DOE harness both technical and market forces to reduce the overall cost of accomplishing DOE's program goals. The new approach transfers greater risk to private contractors in order to develop incentives that align contractor performance with DOE's objectives. In some cases, this goal can be achieved through public-private partnerships wherein the govermhent and the contractor share risks associated with a project in a way that optimizes its economics. Generally, this requires that project risks are allocated to the party best equipped to manage and/or underwrite them. While the merits of privatization are well documented, the question of how privatized services should be financed is often debated. Given the cost of private sector equity and debt, it is difficult to ignore the lure of the government's "risk free" cost of capital. However, the source of financing for a project is an integral part of its overall risk allocation, and therefore, participation by the government as a financing source could alter the allocation of risks in the project, diminishing the incentive structure. Since the government's participation in the project's financing often can be a requirement for financial feasibility, the dilemma of structuring a role for the government without undermining the success of the project is a common and difficult challenge faced by policymakers around the world. However, before reverting to a traditional procurement approach where the government enters into a cost-plus risk profile, the government should exhaust all options that keep the private entity at risk for important aspects of the project. Government participation in a project can include a broad range of options and can be applied with precision to bridge a

  11. Public Research University Performance and Presidential Succession Events: 2000-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Tracey M.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. public research university performance narrative is dominated by "access, affordability, and accountability" rhetoric (National Science Foundation, 2012), while public policy advocacy is weakened (Basken, 2012), and presidents become increasingly transitory (Monks, 2012). The purpose of this study was to explore if presidential…

  12. How Public Universities Can Promote Access and Success for All Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Antoinette

    2014-01-01

    The nation's public universities--a key vehicle of upward mobility--must do more to even the playing field for all students. As it currently stands, students from the least advantaged populations earn degrees at a lower rate and are burdened with a greater portion of debt than their peers. However, some standout public universities are reversing…

  13. Alternative Measures of Economic Success among TANF Participants: Avoiding Poverty, Hardship, and Dependence on Public Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancian, Maria; Meyer, Daniel R.

    2004-01-01

    Current debates about the success of TANF reforms have been obscured by the use of inconsistent indicators of success, as well as by measurement difficulties associated with alternative indicators. This paper considers conceptual and measurement issues associated with three different indicators of economic well-being: independence from public…

  14. Public health response to a measles outbreak in a large correctional facility, Queensland, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, Madhumati; Baldwin, Anne M; Prakash, Rajendra; Vlack, Susan A; Lambert, Stephen B

    2014-12-31

    This report documents the prompt, co-ordinated and effective public health response to a measles outbreak in Queensland in 2013. There were 17 cases in a large, high-security, regional correctional facility, a setting with unique challenges. Recommendations are provided to reduce the likelihood and magnitude of measles outbreaks in correctional facilities.

  15. Research data supporting "Crowdsourcing the General Public for Large Scale Molecular Pathology Studies in Cancer"

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Complete data set for the manuscript "Crowdsourcing the general public for large scale molecular pathology studies in cancer". Published at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ebiom.2015.05.009 This work was supported by the Cancer Research UK [C490/A10124, C490/A16561

  16. Evaluation of Large-Scale Public-Sector Reforms: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breidahl, Karen N.; Gjelstrup, Gunnar; Hansen, Hanne Foss; Hansen, Morten Balle

    2017-01-01

    Research on the evaluation of large-scale public-sector reforms is rare. This article sets out to fill that gap in the evaluation literature and argues that it is of vital importance since the impact of such reforms is considerable and they change the context in which evaluations of other and more delimited policy areas take place. In our…

  17. Gender Differences in Academic Performance in a Large Public University in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayioglu, Meltem; Turut-Asik, Serap

    2007-01-01

    The paper attempts to determine whether there are significant gender differences in academic performance among undergraduate students in a large public university in Turkey based on three indicators; university entrance scores, performance in the English preparatory school and in the program the student is majoring in. The paper finds that a…

  18. Public attitudes toward programs of large-scale technological changes: Some reflections and policy prescriptions, appendix E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostak, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    The question of how ready the public is for the implementation of large-scale programs of technological change is considered. Four vital aspects of the issue are discussed which include: (1) the ways in which the public mis-perceives the change process, (2) the ways in which recent history impacts on public attitudes, (3) the ways in which the public divides among itself, and (4) the fundamentals of public attitudes towards change. It is concluded that nothing is so critical in the 1970's to securing public approval for large-scale planned change projects as is securing the approval by change-agents of the public.

  19. Public attitudes toward programs of large-scale technological changes: Some reflections and policy prescriptions, appendix E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shostak, A. B.

    1973-01-01

    The question of how ready the public is for the implementation of large-scale programs of technological change is considered. Four vital aspects of the issue are discussed which include: (1) the ways in which the public mis-perceives the change process, (2) the ways in which recent history impacts on public attitudes, (3) the ways in which the public divides among itself, and (4) the fundamentals of public attitudes towards change. It is concluded that nothing is so critical in the 1970's to securing public approval for large-scale planned change projects as is securing the approval by change-agents of the public.

  20. Successes and Challenges in Transitioning to Large Enrollment NEXUS/Physics IPLS Labs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kimberly

    2017-01-01

    UMd-PERG's NEXUS/Physics for Life Sciences laboratory curriculum, piloted in 2012-2013 in small test classes, has been implemented in large-enrollment environments at UMD from 2013-present. These labs address physical issues at biological scales using microscopy, image and video analysis, electrophoresis, and spectroscopy in an open, non-protocol-driven environment. We have collected a wealth of data (surveys, video analysis, etc.) that enables us to get a sense of the students' responses to this curriculum in a large-enrollment environment and with teaching assistants both `new to' and `experienced in' the labs. In this talk, we will provide a brief overview of what we have learned, including the challenges of transitioning to large N, student perception then and now, and comparisons of our large-enrollment results to the results from our pilot study. We will close with a discussion of the acculturation of teaching assistants to this novel environment and suggestions for sustainability.

  1. Successful large-scale use of CMOS devices on spacecraft traveling through intense radiation belts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucker, G. J.; Ohanian, R. S.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the environmental models of the radiation belts and computational techniques which have been developed for predicting the radiation hazards for spacecraft. These data and techniques are then applied to the Atmosphere Explorer 51 spacecraft to explain its successful survival for more than 18 months in a severe environment. In particular, the results of the analysis are used to explain the performance of some 2400 CMOS devices, and consequently, they demonstrate the reliability of this device technology in spacecraft systems.

  2. When America Makes, America Works A Successful Public Private 3D Printing (Additive Manufacturing) Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    development. The Public-Private Partnership— A Model for Innovation A combined public and private investment is the most efficient and effective...investment roadmap. This business model aligns well with the DoD’s Better Buying Power 3.0 initiative to increase the productivity of industry... business and part manufacturer Ox- ford Performance Materials (OPM), demonstrated a high- performance polymer as a viable material choice for air and

  3. A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FEAR OF SUCCESS AND BURNOUT AMONG WORKING WOMEN IN IRANIAN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Motaghi-Pishe

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fear of success is derived from lack of trust and confidence in one's own personality. To be in doubt of one's self and to be anxious about other's expectations, exists constantly in the thought and behavior of working women. This, on its own, is a great source of anxiety and sets the foundation of continuous job stress. Burnout is a response to chronic job stress. It is a gradual erosion and feeling of failure, and being worn out. This paper aims to investigate the relationship between fear of success and burnout among working women in Iranian public schools. Moreover, it examines whether fear of success and burnout are related to some demographic characteristics such as age, years of service, marital status, academic background and organizational rank. The results reveal that fear of success and burnout in women working in public schools are correlated; but there are no significant differences in levels of fear of success and/or burnout relative to demographic factors.

  4. Public-private partnerships for long-term success. Implementation of public construction projects in public-private partnerships; Mit PPP zu nachhaltigem Erfolg. Partnerschaftliche Realisierung oeffentlicher Bauaufgaben

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsch, Gerd; Glock, Christian; Herzog, Kati [Bilfinger Berger Hochbau GmbH, Frankfurt (Germany); Prein, Sascha [bauperformance GmbH, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Public private partnerships necessitate a comprehensive life cycle assessment, which makes them increasingly important as models of sustainability for public building owners. This is proved by the advantages in terms of efficiency and by the fact that two PPP projects received an award (''Guetesiegel nachhaltiges Bauen''). (orig.)

  5. Project management success in health : the need of additional research in public health projects

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Carolina; Santos, Vitor; Tavares, António J.; Varajão, João

    2014-01-01

    PROJMAN 2014 - International Conference on Project MANagement, Procedia Technology The research about the factors that are linked to project management performance and project management success, has been developed for several years, so the literature about this subject is relatively extensive. After a literature review about project success factors, it was found that the current research effort is mainly focused on information technology, engineering and software development proj...

  6. Evaluating the Health Impact of Large-Scale Public Policy Changes: Classical and Novel Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Sanjay; Meghani, Ankita; Siddiqi, Arjumand

    2017-03-20

    Large-scale public policy changes are often recommended to improve public health. Despite varying widely-from tobacco taxes to poverty-relief programs-such policies present a common dilemma to public health researchers: how to evaluate their health effects when randomized controlled trials are not possible. Here, we review the state of knowledge and experience of public health researchers who rigorously evaluate the health consequences of large-scale public policy changes. We organize our discussion by detailing approaches to address three common challenges of conducting policy evaluations: distinguishing a policy effect from time trends in health outcomes or preexisting differences between policy-affected and -unaffected communities (using difference-in-differences approaches); constructing a comparison population when a policy affects a population for whom a well-matched comparator is not immediately available (using propensity score or synthetic control approaches); and addressing unobserved confounders by utilizing quasi-random variations in policy exposure (using regression discontinuity, instrumental variables, or near-far matching approaches).

  7. [Successful treatment with azacitidine for myelodysplastic syndrome with large vessel vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Mai; Makita, Masanori; Sando, Yasuhisa; Yamamoto, Yoshikazu; Shiote, Yasuhiro; Hara, Yoshitaka; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Imajo, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Paraneoplastic inflammation of the large vessels is a rare complication of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and patients with MDS and systemic vasculitis have a poor prognosis. We present a 66-year-old male with MDS and large vessel vasculitis treated with azacitidine. Azacitidine administration improved his clinical symptoms, high fever and thickening of the arterial wall, and he achieved a complete bone marrow remission. However, 1 year later he showed progression of MDS. For MDS with vasculitis, intensive therapy, the same as that given to the high-risk group, should be considered and azacitidine administration may represent an efficacious treatment.

  8. Publication of clinical trials supporting successful new drug applications: a literature analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirby Lee

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The United States (US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approves new drugs based on sponsor-submitted clinical trials. The publication status of these trials in the medical literature and factors associated with publication have not been evaluated. We sought to determine the proportion of trials submitted to the FDA in support of newly approved drugs that are published in biomedical journals that a typical clinician, consumer, or policy maker living in the US would reasonably search. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cohort study of trials supporting new drugs approved between 1998 and 2000, as described in FDA medical and statistical review documents and the FDA approved drug label. We determined publication status and time from approval to full publication in the medical literature at 2 and 5 y by searching PubMed and other databases through 01 August 2006. We then evaluated trial characteristics associated with publication. We identified 909 trials supporting 90 approved drugs in the FDA reviews, of which 43% (394/909 were published. Among the subset of trials described in the FDA-approved drug label and classified as "pivotal trials" for our analysis, 76% (257/340 were published. In multivariable logistic regression for all trials 5 y postapproval, likelihood of publication correlated with statistically significant results (odds ratio [OR] 3.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.78-5.17; larger sample sizes (OR 1.33 per 2-fold increase in sample size, 95% CI 1.17-1.52; and pivotal status (OR 5.31, 95% CI 3.30-8.55. In multivariable logistic regression for only the pivotal trials 5 y postapproval, likelihood of publication correlated with statistically significant results (OR 2.96, 95% CI 1.24-7.06 and larger sample sizes (OR 1.47 per 2-fold increase in sample size, 95% CI 1.15-1.88. Statistically significant results and larger sample sizes were also predictive of publication at 2 y postapproval and in multivariable Cox

  9. Breeding bird assemblages associated with stages of forest succession in large river floodplains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutson, M.G.; McColl, L.E.; Suarez, S.A.

    2005-01-01

    Floodplain forests rival all other habitat types in bird density and diversity. However, major successional changes are predicted for floodplain forests along the Mississippi River in the coming decades; young forests may replace the existing mature silver maple (Acer saccharinum L.) forests in some areas. We wanted to assess how the breeding bird community might respond to these changes. We studied stands of young forests along the middle Mississippi River, comparing the breeding bird assemblages among three stages of forest succession: shrub/scrub, young cottonwood (Populus deltoides Marshall) and willow (Salix nigra Marshall) forests, and mature silver maple dominated forests. We recorded a total of 54 bird species; the most frequently observed species were the indigo bunting (Passerina cyanea), red-winged blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus), and yellow-billed cuckoo (Coccyzus americanus). Bird species richness differed among the habitat types, with mature forests supporting the largest number of species and the most species of management concern. The shrub/scrub and mature forest bird assemblages were distinct and shared few species, but the young forests had no identifiable bird species assemblage, sharing species found in both of the other habitat types. The bird assemblages we observed in young forests may become more prevalent as aging floodplain forests are replaced with younger stages of forest succession. Under this scenario, we would expect a temporary local decrease in bird species richness and habitat for species of management concern.

  10. Mentoring and Succession of Administrators: Critical Issues in Public and Private Secondary Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Oladipo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that the quality of outcome in Nigerian secondary schools is declining at an alarming rate due to shortage of required resources as well as leadership challenges. The challenges have been observed to be as a result of lack of mentoring which is not a common practice in school management in Nigeria. Consequently, this study investigated the extent to which mentoring as a strategy for administrators' succession plan impacts on the performance of their duties in public and private secondary schools in Lagos, Nigeria. The study adopted the descriptive survey design and administered a 25-item self-constructed questionnaire on participants. A total of 530 participants were randomly selected from the population of 4,350 senior teachers. The Participants were drawn from 145 secondary schools (91 public and 54 registered private in Education District IV of Lagos State. The findings showed that mentoring has significant impact on administrators' succession planning and that succession planning does not significantly differ in public and private secondary schools in Lagos State. The study concluded that leadership development is a critical factor in secondary school effectiveness and efficiency. Therefore, serving administrators as well as prospective administrators should be regularly evaluated to determine their training needs at different career stages. There should also be mentoring related policies to enhance the managerial skills, sense of competence and effectiveness of the prospective administrators.

  11. Tutorials for large classes of Common Foundation Program biomedical science students: successes and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Modhefer, Abdul-Kadhum J A; Roe, Sean M

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the problems encountered conducting biomedical science tutorials for nursing students in large classes with a typical student: staff ratio of 45:1. The study is based on level 1 Common Foundation Program students from the School of Nursing and Midwifery, Queen's University Belfast at the conclusion of two phases of biomedical sciences education which include a course of 12 interactive tutorials. Survey and interview methodologies were employed to investigate difficulties encountered by students in these large tutorial classes, to ascertain what characterises a good tutor and to explore student attitudes to interactive learning. The barriers to effective teaching and learning in tutorials are discussed and subsequently, a set of guidelines is proposed to enhance learning in them. These include being aware of the ability of the student group, having a compassionate questioning style, tailoring the teaching environment to fit the aims of the class and experimenting with different tutorial formats.

  12. How to Successfully Incorporate Undergraduate Researchers Into a Complex Research Program at a Large Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weldon, Rebecca B; Reyna, Valerie F

    2015-01-01

    One feature of the Laboratory for Rational Decision Making at Cornell University is the integration of a large number of undergraduate students into a relatively elaborate research program. We describe our thorough screening process, laboratory structure, and our expectations for undergraduate researchers in our lab. We have a structure in place that helps maintain organization and enhance productivity, including scheduled weekly and monthly meetings, and selecting undergraduate and graduate team leaders to lead each research project. We discuss how it is important to encourage students to aim high and have a good attitude toward learning and problem solving. We emphasize that both initiative and teamwork are important in a large research laboratory. We also discuss the importance of giving students responsibility in connection with research projects-our undergraduate researchers engage in data analysis, interpretation of results, and have a high-level understanding of theory.

  13. Successful treatment of a large oral verrucous hyperplasia with photodynamic therapy combined with cryotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chao Chang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies have shown that topical 5-aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA-PDT can be used successfully for the treatment of oral verrucous hyperplasia (OVH. Studies have also demonstrated that cryotherapy could be used as a treatment modality for OVH lesions. In this case report, we tested the efficacy of topical ALA-PDT, combined with cryogun cryotherapy, for an extensive OVH lesion on the right buccal mucosa of a 65-year-old male areca quid chewer. The tumor was cleared after six treatments of combined topical ALA-PDT and cryogun cryotherapy. No recurrence of the lesion was found after a follow-up period of 18 months. We suggest that our combined treatment protocol may be effective in treating OVH lesions. The treatment course may be slightly shortened with this combined protocol and was well tolerated by the patient.

  14. The Danish Rejsekortet (Smart Card for Public Transportation); Project Governance for Failure or Success?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harboe, Peter Georg; Riis, Eva

    2015-01-01

    . A framework for project governance in major public IT projects is developed based on a review of the relevant literature on major projects like analysis of deviations of forecasts and optimism bias (Budzier & Flyvbjerg, 2011; Flyvbjerg, 2006), and how to manage structural and dynamic complexity (Brady...

  15. Determinants of Lean Success and Failure in the Danish Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahbek Pedersen, Esben; Muniche, Mahad

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the determinants of lean implementation in Danish public sector organisations. It is proposed to structure the paper around a theoretical model based on a negotiated order perspective. Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on interviews...

  16. Methods used for successful follow-up in a large scale national cohort study in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chokkanapitak Jaruwan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ensuring successful follow-up is essential when conducting a prospective cohort study. Most existing literature reviewing methods to ensure a high response rate is based on experience in developed nations. Findings We report our 4-year follow-up success for a national cohort study examining the health transition underway in Thailand. We began the cohort study in 2005 with a baseline postal questionnaire sent to all 200,000 Thais enrolled as distance learning students at Sukhothai Thammathirat Open University and residing all over Thailand; 87,134 or 44% of the students responded. Subsequently we used University and national media to inform cohort members of study progress. Also, we prepared a health book with study results and health advice which was distributed to all cohort members. After 4 years we repeated the survey and achieved a 71% response rate. In this paper we report the methods used to achieve this response The initial follow-up mail-out generated a response rate of about 48% reflecting the extensive preparatory work between baseline and follow-up. After 4 rounds of telephone contact (more than 100,000 phone calls and 4 related mail-out rounds progressively over 16 months an overall response rate was achieved of just over 71% (n = 60,774. The total cost was US$4.06/respondent - 19% for printing, 21% for postage, 14% for tape measures (included in mail-out, 18% for data processing 22% for prizes and 6% for telephone. Conclusions Many of the methods reported as effective for mail questionnaire and cohort response rates held true for Thailand. These included being associated with a university, incentivating cooperation, follow-up contact, providing a second copy of questionnaire where necessary, and assurance of confidentiality. Telephone contact with the cohort and the small prizes given to responders were particularly important in the Thai context as was Thai leadership of the research team.

  17. Sustainable Environmental Education: Conditions and Characteristics Needed for a Successfully Integrated Program in Public Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieckenberg, Cara Rae

    This case study investigated what conditions and characteristics contributed to a successful environmental education program within elementary schools of a school district where environmental education was the mandate. While research does exist on practical application of environmental education within schools, little if any literature has been written or research conducted on schools actually implementing environmental education to study what contributes to the successful implementation of the program. To study this issue, 24 participants from a Midwestern school district were interviewed, six of whom were principals of each of the six elementary schools included in the study. All participants were identified as champions of environmental education integration within their buildings due to leadership positions held focused on environmental education. Analysis of the data collected via interviews revealed findings that hindered the implementation of environmental education, findings that facilitated the implementation of environmental education, and findings that indicated an environmental education-focused culture existed within the schools. Conditions and characteristics found to contribute to the success of these school's environmental education programs include: professional development opportunities, administrative support, peer leadership opportunities and guidance, passion with the content and for the environment, comfort and confidence with the content, ease of activities and events that contribute to the culture and student success. Keywords: environmental education, integration, leadership, teachers as leaders.

  18. A public debate on energy in France, how to make it successful?; Le debat public sur l'energie en France: les conditions de la reussite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, L.

    2003-04-01

    In this short article the author presents the different kinds of public debates. A debate can lead to a decision or not, be local or national and be directed to a large audience (all the citizens) or to a reduced public (specific users,...). Till now 2 types of public debates have been organized in France, the citizen conference and the public information meeting. In a citizen conference a panel of about 15 people, that are representative of the French society, are specially trained on the topic of the conference in order to enable them to participate actively in it and to contribute to the writing of the issued recommendations. 2 citizen conferences have taken place in France one about global warming and the other on gene engineering (OGM), both were lacking in notoriety. The second type of debate is a non-decision debate whose aim is to assure the information of the public on a particular topic and to give him the opportunity to express himself on that topic. This kind of debate implies the presence of experts and counter-experts and requires an important preliminary work (public information, selection of the experts and debate framing) from the authorities. (A.C.)

  19. Classroom management programs for deaf children in state residential and large public schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenkus, M; Rittenhouse, B; Dancer, J

    1999-12-01

    Personnel in 4 randomly selected state residential schools for the deaf and 3 randomly selected large public schools with programs for the deaf were surveyed to assess the types of management or disciplinary programs and strategies currently in use with deaf students and the rated effectiveness of such programs. Several behavioral management programs were identified by respondents, with Assertive Discipline most often listed. Ratings of program effectiveness were generally above average on a number of qualitative criteria.

  20. "Angel's Love" Chinese Goddess Nuwa Culture Large-scale Activities for Public Interests

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Initiated by Chinese Red Cross Foundation and sponsored by American General Business Association, Chinese Nuwa (a goddess-creator of the Chinese nation) Culture Large-scale Activities for Public Interests undertaken by Beijing Absolute Challenge International Advertising Co., Ltd. has recently commenced in an all-round way. A grand ceremony will be held at Nuwa Plaza in Shexian County, Hebei Province on Septemper 24, 2007.

  1. Barriers to Curricular Change in General Education Mathematics at a Large Public Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Jorgensen, Marcus

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study looked for barriers to curricular change in general education mathematics at a large public university (LPU) in the Western United States. The literature showed that a number of national organizations dealing in math education have recommended alternatives to the traditional algebra-intensive curriculum. LPU still relies predominantly on traditional College Algebra as its quantitative literacy (QL) course. With such an algebra-heavy emphasis, students may be missing mor...

  2. Ten key considerations for the successful implementation and adoption of large-scale health information technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-06-01

    The implementation of health information technology interventions is at the forefront of most policy agendas internationally. However, such undertakings are often far from straightforward as they require complex strategic planning accompanying the systemic organizational changes associated with such programs. Building on our experiences of designing and evaluating the implementation of large-scale health information technology interventions in the USA and the UK, we highlight key lessons learned in the hope of informing the on-going international efforts of policymakers, health directorates, healthcare management, and senior clinicians.

  3. Successful surgical removal of the large retrocardiac mass. The usefulness of CT scan and intraoperative echocardiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Minoru; Abe, Toshio; Murase, Mitsuya; Nogaki, Hideitsu; Takeuchi, Eiji (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1983-04-01

    Computed tomography had proved useful in identifying cardiac lesion, especially space taking lesion. A 53-year-old man, who had open mitral commissurotomy eight years ago, has been regarded as the patient with an unresectable tumor of the left ventricle by echocardiography during about five years before this operation. However, the finding of cardiac CT scan in this patient led to excision of the mass. The patient was operated on through the left fifth intercostal space incision without extracorporeal circulation. The pericardium was densely adherent to the heart. We could not tell the border between the mass and the myocardium. Therefore, it was too difficult to incise the mass without injury to the myocardium or the coronary artery. After embarrassment, intraoperative echocardiography was performed. Intraoperative echocardiography demonstrated the size and the location of the mass, and its relation to the myocardiom, which resulted in successful removal of the mass. The removed mass was old hematoma of 300 gr in weight. In this paper, the usefulness of CT and intraoperative echocardiograpy was described and the origin of this hematoma was discussed.

  4. Factors contributing to the success of folic acid public health campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Rofail, D; Colligs, A; Abetz, L; Lindemann, M.; Maguire, L

    2011-01-01

    Background Studies in the 1990s have found that periconceptional dietary folate, supplementation of folic acid or supplemental multivitamins containing folic acid, help prevent neural tube defect (NTDs) if taken at the right time. This literature review assesses the extant folic acid public health campaigns literature and identifies some common variables used in folic acid consumption campaign evaluations. Methods This review was part of a larger study that searched PUBMED, PsycINFO and Embas...

  5. [Public health crises in a developed society. Successes and limitations in Spain. SESPAS report 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérvas, Juan; Meneu, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    The perception, acceptability and management of risks are social construction. Consequently, in managing public health crises, the gap between facts, beliefs and feelings tests the responsiveness of official institutions to health alarms that can be objective, potential, or imaginary. On balance, a strong point of the Spanish experience of health crises is the presence of clinicians and public health officers working in an organization capable of responding adequately, although the quasi-federal Spanish political structure has both advantages and disadvantages. Weaknesses include the low profile given to public health and a management structure that relies too heavily on partitocracy. The management of these crises could be improved by transferring greater scope to health professionals in decisions about crisis identification and management (with transparency) and limiting bureaucratic inertia. For some, health crises involve visibility or business opportunities (not always legitimate). Therefore, the perception of crisis will increasingly rest less in the hands of experts and more in those of groups interested in spreading these crises or in providing solutions. While progress is needed to develop participation in strategies to respond to emerging crises, even more essential is the involvement of all healthcare levels in their preparation and dissemination.

  6. The impact of policy, environmental, and educational interventions: a synthesis of the evidence from two public health success stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Andrea C; Green, Lawrence W

    2015-04-01

    Motor vehicle safety and tobacco control are among the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As the number of miles traveled in the United States multiplied 10 times from the 1920s to the 1990s, the annual motor vehicle crash death rate per vehicle mile traveled decreased by 90%. Similarly, tobacco-related deaths from heart disease, stroke, and cancer were rapidly mounting over the first two thirds of the 20th century. Then, in the last third of the century, tobacco consumption decreased by more than 50%, and rates of heart disease and stroke deaths, and later cancer deaths, declined similarly. This analysis addresses the central question of what lessons can be learned from these success stories that will help public health professionals successfully tackle new and emerging health behavior problems of today and tomorrow? Surveillance, research, multilevel interventions, environmental modifications, and strong policies were key to reducing motor vehicle- and tobacco-related health problems. Generating public support and advocacy, and changing social norms also played critical roles in promoting the safer and smoke-free behaviors. Lessons learned include the need for evidence-based practices and interventions that are ecologically comprehensive with an emphasis on changing environmental determinants and capitalizing on the concept of reciprocal determinism. The analysis concludes with a description of how the PRECEDE-PROCEED planning framework can be used to apply the lessons from motor vehicle safety and tobacco control to other public health threats. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  7. Factors influencing successful peer-reviewed publication of original research presentations from the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinney, Erin C; Chun, Robert H; Cassidy, Laura D; Link, T Roxanne; Sulman, Cecille G; Kerschner, Joseph E

    2015-03-01

    To analyze factors associated with progression of an original scientific presentation at the American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO) Annual Meeting to publication in a peer-reviewed journal. A dataset of presenters was created to enable prospective follow-up to assess early impressions regarding publication success with longer-term publication outcomes. Prior to the Annual ASPO meeting in 2013, a survey consisting of 10 questions was e-mailed to all 59 presenters. Questions were designed to assess presenter expectations on publication, barriers to publishing, and experience in presenting, publishing and clinical practice. A second survey was sent 12 months later to those respondents of the first survey who were amenable to follow-up. Overall, 46 of 59 (78%) presenters responded to the initial survey prior to their ASPO 2013 presentation. Of these, 34 agreed to participate in a longer-term follow-up of their presentation to publication experience. Of these 34, there were 17 who participated in the follow-up survey 1 year later. Just under half of the original respondents were residents (46%). All presenters (100%) planned to re-submit a revised manuscript if initially rejected. However, 35% of follow-up respondents did not make initial submission to a peer-reviewed journal. Results of a descriptive analysis suggest that more experienced researchers expect their submitted manuscript to be accepted for publication within a shorter time frame than those that have published fewer papers. Time was ranked as the greatest barrier to publication (60%) of those surveyed both in the initial prospective survey and for those who did not publish a paper in the follow-up survey (83%). This study suggests a strong desire and expectation of publishing ASPO presentations. Despite this expectation, past research and this data set suggest this expectation often does not materialize. "Time constraints" were the most commonly identified barrier to publication. To enhance

  8. Public Investments, Human Capital, and Political Stability: The Triptych of Economic Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kostakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assesses the effects of fiscal policy on economic growth in a sample of 96 countries from 1990 to 2010. Ordinary Least Squares (OLS and Extreme Bound Analysis are mainly estimated in order to investigate whether public investments, human capital, and political stability affect growth controlling for initial output and human capital levels. Furthermore, in this empirical research four subsets of independent variables were used: (a demographic factors, (b political determinants, (c region variables, and (d variables regarding macroeconomic policy. Empirical results suggest that there is an important difference in the impact of public and private sector investments on the growth of per capita income. Moreover, political indicators such as corruption control, rule of law, and government effectiveness have a high impact on economic growth. Demographic factors, including fertility rate and mortality growth, as well as several macroeconomic variables, like inflation rate index and government consumption, were estimated to be statistically significant factors of economic performance. Fiscal volatility may also be a new possible channel of macroeconomic instability that leads to lower growth. Policy implications of the findings are discussed in detail.

  9. Factors contributing to the success of folic acid public health campaigns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofail, D; Colligs, A; Abetz, L; Lindemann, M; Maguire, L

    2012-03-01

    Studies in the 1990s have found that periconceptional dietary folate, supplementation of folic acid or supplemental multivitamins containing folic acid, help prevent neural tube defect (NTDs) if taken at the right time. This literature review assesses the extant folic acid public health campaigns literature and identifies some common variables used in folic acid consumption campaign evaluations. This review was part of a larger study that searched PUBMED, PsycINFO and Embase from 1976 to 2010 to identify articles related to the psychosocial and economic impact of NTDs (especially spina bifida) on patients and caregivers. Awareness of folic acid levels prior to conception improved post-campaign from 6 to 41%. Knowledge about consumption and correct periconceptional use of folic acid also improved. However, in most studies more than 50% of women did not take folic acid as prescribed. Many factors were associated with or without taking folic acid post-campaign, including incomplete outreach, prior awareness and knowledge, closeness to pregnancy, demographics and other personal characteristics. Sustained campaigning to maintain awareness about and promote periconceptional consumption of folic acid in order to reduce the incidence of NTDs is clearly needed. Additional initiatives could complement existing public health strategies.

  10. Large-scale virtual screening on public cloud resources with Apache Spark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capuccini, Marco; Ahmed, Laeeq; Schaal, Wesley; Laure, Erwin; Spjuth, Ola

    2017-01-01

    Structure-based virtual screening is an in-silico method to screen a target receptor against a virtual molecular library. Applying docking-based screening to large molecular libraries can be computationally expensive, however it constitutes a trivially parallelizable task. Most of the available parallel implementations are based on message passing interface, relying on low failure rate hardware and fast network connection. Google's MapReduce revolutionized large-scale analysis, enabling the processing of massive datasets on commodity hardware and cloud resources, providing transparent scalability and fault tolerance at the software level. Open source implementations of MapReduce include Apache Hadoop and the more recent Apache Spark. We developed a method to run existing docking-based screening software on distributed cloud resources, utilizing the MapReduce approach. We benchmarked our method, which is implemented in Apache Spark, docking a publicly available target receptor against [Formula: see text]2.2 M compounds. The performance experiments show a good parallel efficiency (87%) when running in a public cloud environment. Our method enables parallel Structure-based virtual screening on public cloud resources or commodity computer clusters. The degree of scalability that we achieve allows for trying out our method on relatively small libraries first and then to scale to larger libraries. Our implementation is named Spark-VS and it is freely available as open source from GitHub (https://github.com/mcapuccini/spark-vs).Graphical abstract.

  11. Predictors of intubation success and therapeutic value of paramedic airway management in a large, urban EMS system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel P; Fisher, Roger; Buono, Colleen; Brainard, Criss; Smith, Susan; Ochs, Ginger; Poste, Jennifer C; Dunford, James V

    2006-01-01

    Endotracheal intubation (ETI) is commonly used by paramedics for definitive airway management. The predictors of success and therapeutic value with regard to oxygenation are not well studied. 1) To explore the relationship between intubation success and perfusion status, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and end-tidal carbon dioxide (EtCO2); 2) to describe the incidence of unrecognized esophageal intubations with use of continuous capnometry; and 3) to document the incremental benefit of invasive versus noninvasive airway management techniques in correcting hypoxemia. This was a prospective, observational study conducted in a large urban emergency medical services system. Paramedics completed a telephone debriefing interview with quality assurance personnel following delivery of all patients in whom invasive airway management had been attempted. Continuous capnometry was used for confirmation of tube position in all patients. Descriptive statistics were used to document airway management performance, including first-attempt ETI success, overall ETI success, and Combitube insertion (CTI) success. In addition, the incidence of unrecognized esophageal intubation was recorded. The relationship between intubation success and perfusion status, GCS score, and initial EtCO2 value was explored using logistic regression. Finally, recorded SpO2 values and the incidence of hypoxemia (SpO2 intubation was observed (0.1%). A clear relationship between airway management success and perfusion status, GCS score, and initial EtCO2 value was observed. Only EtCO2 demonstrated an independent association with ETI success after adjusting for the other variables. Significant improvements in mean SpO2 and the incidence of hypoxemia over baseline were observed with both noninvasive and invasive airway management techniques in 168 perfusing patients. A relationship between intubation success and perfusion status, GCS score, and initial EtCO2 value was observed. Capnometry was effective in

  12. Success nonetheless : Making public utilities work in small-scale democracies despite difficult capital conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, Scott

    2011-01-01

    A large part of the study of politics is dedicated to identifying the circumstances under which democracy will flourish. Putnam made a major contribution to this field through his concept of social capital as developed in Making Democracy Work. Putnam found that communities with a high number of civ

  13. Exploring the Role of Human Capital Management on Organizational Success: Evidence from Public Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odunayo Paul SALAU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The demand for higher education in Nigeria has been considered as not only an investment in human capital, but also a pre-requisite for economic development. Consequent upon the expansion of higher education in Nigeria, quite a number of institutions have suffered decay due to poor work environments, inadequate educational facilities and poor funding which have resulted into unabated brain drain, strike and turnover. However, the need to develop talents is no longer hidden, what remains controversial is knowing the best method for managing human capacity especially in Nigerian State owned universities. Thus, this study examined the relationship between human capital management and organizational success using three State owned universities in Southwest, Nigeria. These universities (Ekiti State University (EKSU, Lagos State University (LASU, Tai Solarin University of Education (TASUED were chosen for their uniqueness. Survey research design was adopted with 398 respondents (staff. Self-administered questionnaire was adopted and analyzed with the adoption of Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. However, the results indicated that adequate leadership practices; learning capacity; workforce optimization; knowledge accessibility; workplace culture and; mentorship are significant predictors of organizational success in higher education.

  14. Life science-based neuroscience education at large Western Public Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, Volkan; Carpenter, Ellen M

    2016-12-01

    The last 40 years have seen a remarkable increase in the teaching of neuroscience at the undergraduate level. From its origins as a component of anatomy or physiology departments to its current status as an independent interdisciplinary field, neuroscience has become the chosen field of study for many undergraduate students, particularly for those interested in medical school or graduate school in neuroscience or related fields. We examined how life science-based neuroscience education is offered at large public universities in the Western United States. By examining publicly available materials posted online, we found that neuroscience education may be offered as an independent program, or as a component of biological or physiological sciences at many institutions. Neuroscience programs offer a course of study involving a core series of courses and a collection of topical electives. Many programs provide the opportunity for independent research, or for laboratory-based training in neuroscience. Features of neuroscience programs at Western universities closely matched those seen at the top 25 public universities, as identified by U.S. News & World Report. While neuroscience programs were identified in many Western states, there were several states in which public universities appeared not to provide opportunities to major in neuroscience. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Inspiring the undergraduate soil students for a future effective public outreach role: Success strategies and approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ismaily, Said; Al-Maktoumi, Ali; Kacimov, Anvar

    2015-04-01

    Undergraduates, majoring in soil sciences (SS), have a broad holistic role because SS integrates several intertwined geo-environmental/ecological and socio-economical aspects. Consequently, students have to learn how the information, advice, practices and expertise, pertinent to food security, water shortage, hydropedology, among others amalgamate through SS . Hence, university SS-programs should incorporate public outreach activities. We present experience at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) in Oman on how to develop an effective public outreach program that can be implemented by undergraduate students. Our strategy has three components : (i) offering a course Soil and Water Tour (SWAE 4110) of hydropedology nature that integrates field, laboratory-work, and presentation-extension activities; the course is research-oriented and designed to provide opportunities for students to practice their metacognitive abilities and critical thinking; the course is offered by the Department of Soils, Water & Agricultural Engineering (SWAE), (ii) Training and involving the undergraduates in planning and conducting enjoyable, interactive, and effective workshops for school pupils; a training workshop on "Soils" was conducted for pupils (a total 300 participants, grades 7-9) and teachers aiming to unveil the secrets and the role of soil in ecosystems; workshop was organized by the SWAE Students Society (iii) Guiding the undergraduates on the best practice for raising funds for their outreach activities (e.g. the undergraduates secured funds for the workshop on "Soils", which was sponsored by Muscat Municipality, a governmental agency, and several private companies such as HMR Consultants, Metal Engineering L.L.C and Bauer Nimr LLC); SS students were mentored in submission of research proposals to the national research agency (e.g. FURAP program of The Research Council, TRC, WWW.trc.gov.om). The three components were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively using fixed-response and

  16. Analyses on Energy Saving Potential Based on Large-scale Public Buildings Energy Consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuping Chen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available To analyze large-scale public buildings’ energy-saving potential is one of the methods to realize scientific energy control management and service. This method aims at a typical public building’s powerconsumed system. Through analyzing and comparing the consumption data, it succeeds in analyzing the use efficiency of building power, consumption level and economic effects of the energy utilization. More over, this method has a quantity analysis on the power-consumed unit’s building usage, so that it is able to find the unit’s energy-saving potential. Its bases of all analyses are building energy balance and analyzing theory of energy cost, analyzing theory of engineering economy and environment and rational distribution theory of energy utilization system.

  17. A Generic Discrete-Event Simulation Model for Outpatient Clinics in a Large Public Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waressara Weerawat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The orthopedic outpatient department (OPD ward in a large Thai public hospital is modeled using Discrete-Event Stochastic (DES simulation. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs are used to measure effects across various clinical operations during different shifts throughout the day. By considering various KPIs such as wait times to see doctors, percentage of patients who can see a doctor within a target time frame, and the time that the last patient completes their doctor consultation, bottlenecks are identified and resource-critical clinics can be prioritized. The simulation model quantifies the chronic, high patient congestion that is prevalent amongst Thai public hospitals with very high patient-to-doctor ratios. Our model can be applied across five different OPD wards by modifying the model parameters. Throughout this work, we show how DES models can be used as decision-support tools for hospital management.

  18. A generic discrete-event simulation model for outpatient clinics in a large public hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerawat, Waressara; Pichitlamken, Juta; Subsombat, Peerapong

    2013-01-01

    The orthopedic outpatient department (OPD) ward in a large Thai public hospital is modeled using Discrete-Event Stochastic (DES) simulation. Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) are used to measure effects across various clinical operations during different shifts throughout the day. By considering various KPIs such as wait times to see doctors, percentage of patients who can see a doctor within a target time frame, and the time that the last patient completes their doctor consultation, bottlenecks are identified and resource-critical clinics can be prioritized. The simulation model quantifies the chronic, high patient congestion that is prevalent amongst Thai public hospitals with very high patient-to-doctor ratios. Our model can be applied across five different OPD wards by modifying the model parameters. Throughout this work, we show how DES models can be used as decision-support tools for hospital management.

  19. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy for orthopedic infections - a successful public healthcare experience in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Priscila Rosalba; Felix, Cassia da Silva; Carvalho, Vladimir Cordeiro de; Giovani, Arlete Mazzini; Reis, Rosangela Suarti Dos; Beraldo, Marisa; Albuquerque, Edmir Peralta; Ferreira, Walter Cintra; Silva, Jorge Dos Santos; Lima, Ana Lucia Lei

    2016-01-01

    Treatment of orthopedic infections usually requires prolonged antimicrobial therapy, ranging from 14 days up to 6 months. Nowadays, rising levels of antimicrobial resistance demands parenteral therapy for many patients. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy (OPAT) is a modality that allows treatment out of hospital in these situations. In Brazil, where a public universal healthcare system allows full coverage for all citizens, implantation and dissemination of OPAT programs would be beneficial for patients and for the system, because it would allow a better allocation of health resources. The Instituto de Ortopedia e Traumatologia do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da USP (IOT) started, in July 2013, a partnership with municipal health authorities in Sao Paulo, Brazil, in order to initiate an OPAT program in which patients discharged from that hospital would be able to continue antimicrobial therapy at primary care facilities. When necessary, patients could also receive their therapy at the day-hospital located at IOT. Primary care nursing and physician staff were trained about antimicrobial infusion and peripherally inserted central catheter manipulation. An OPAT specific antimicrobial protocol was designed and a special reference and counter-reference organized. As a result, 450 primary healthcare professionals were trained. In the first year of this program, 116 patients were discharged for OPAT. Chronic and acute osteomyelitis were most frequent diagnosis. Teicoplanin, ertapenem and tigecycline were the most used drugs. Duration of treatment varied from 10 to 180 days (average 101, median 42). Total sum of days in OPAT regimen was 11,698. Only 3 patients presented adverse effects. Partnership between services of different levels of complexity allowed implantation of a safe and effective public healthcare OPAT program for treatment of orthopedic infections. This program can serve as a model for developing similar strategies in other regions

  20. A South African public-private partnership HIV treatment model: viability and success factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jude Igumbor

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The increasing number of people requiring HIV treatment in South Africa calls for efficient use of its human resources for health in order to ensure optimum treatment coverage and outcomes. This paper describes an innovative public-private partnership model which uses private sector doctors to treat public sector patients and ascertains the model's ability to maintain treatment outcomes over time. METHODS: The study used a retrospective design based on the electronic records of patients who were down-referred from government hospitals to selected private general medical practitioners (GPs between November 2005 and October 2012. In total, 2535 unique patient records from 40 GPs were reviewed. The survival functions for mortality and attrition were calculated. Cumulative incidence of mortality for different time cohorts (defined by year of treatment initiation was also established. RESULTS: The median number of patients per GP was 143 (IQR: 66-246. At the time of down-referral to private GPs, 13.8% of the patients had CD4 count <200 cell/mm(3, this proportion reduced to 6.6% at 12 months and 4.1% at 48 months. Similarly, 88.4% of the patients had suppressed viral load (defined as HIV-1 RNA <400 copies/ml at 48 months. The patients' probability of survival at 12 and 48 months was 99.0% (95% CI: 98.4%-99.3% and 89.0% (95% CI: 87.1%-90.0% respectively. Patient retention at 48 months remained high at 94.3% (95% CI: 93.0%-95.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings demonstrate the ability of the GPs to effectively maintain patient treatment outcomes and potentially contribute to HIV treatment scale-up with the relevant support mechanism. The model demonstrates how an assisted private sector based programme can be effectively and efficiently used to either target specific health concerns, key populations or serve as a stop-gap measure to meet urgent health needs.

  1. The Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT): Adapting a successful outreach programme to a new region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, K.; Jardins, A. D.; Grimberg, I.; Larson, , S. L.; Key, J.; Larson, M. B.; Heatherly, S. A.; McKenzie, D.; Littenberg, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    The Space Public Outreach Team (SPOT) recruits and trains undergraduate ambassadors from all disciplines to deliver astronomy and space-science-themed interactive presentations. They deliver these presentations to primary and secondary schools and organisations across the state of Montana, USA. SPOT was started in 1996 by physics graduate students at Montana State University, USA, and it has grown to reach an average of 10 000 students per year for a low institutional cost of less than five dollars (four euros) per student. In the last year, the Montana SPOT model has been adopted in the state of West Virginia. The West Virginia SPOT programme also shows great potential, with eleven ambassadors trained to give two new feature presentations, reaching over 2600 students. In this paper, we describe how the Montana SPOT model works in practice and discuss how this model was adapted with new resources, and for a new audience, such that others may also adapt the programme to inspire space science interest for their own particular setting. We invite these groups to plug into the SPOT brand to broaden the impact of astronomy and space programmes and applications in their own region.

  2. DETERMINANTS OF INTERNAL VS. EXTERNAL CEO SUCCESSIONS IN MALAYSIAN PUBLIC LISTED COMPANIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokiah Ishak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Following a CEO turnover, a company may select an internal or external successor. The objective of this study is to determine if firm performance, board attributes, ownership structure and incumbent power influence the decision of whether to elect an internal or external candidate. Results from logistic regression analysis on 145 succession events over a four-year period (2002 to 2005 indicate that firms which are controlled by blockholders tend to select an outsider as the successor. Further, firms that are controlled by family members and position their former CEOs within the firms are more likely to select insiders as successors. However, firm performance, board composition, CEO duality and turnover type do not affect the selection choice. This study implies that poor firm performance does not necessarily lead to outside CEO selection choice. Further, boards of Malaysian PLCs are not effective in choosing outsiders as successors as both board composition and CEO duality do not necessarily select outsiders to become new CEOs. Another implication of this study is that former CEOs who continue their directorship in the same companies do have some power in naming new CEOs as the former tend to select insiders as successors.

  3. Defining a Good Death (Successful Dying): Literature Review and a Call for Research and Public Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Emily A; Gallegos, Jarred V; Thomas, Lori P Montross; Depp, Colin A; Irwin, Scott A; Jeste, Dilip V

    2016-04-01

    There is little agreement about what constitutes good death or successful dying. The authors conducted a literature search for published, English-language, peer-reviewed reports of qualitative and quantitative studies that provided a definition of a good death. Stakeholders in these articles included patients, prebereaved and bereaved family members, and healthcare providers (HCPs). Definitions found were categorized into core themes and subthemes, and the frequency of each theme was determined by stakeholder (patients, family, HCPs) perspectives. Thirty-six studies met eligibility criteria, with 50% of patient perspective articles including individuals over age 60 years. We identified 11 core themes of good death: preferences for a specific dying process, pain-free status, religiosity/spirituality, emotional well-being, life completion, treatment preferences, dignity, family, quality of life, relationship with HCP, and other. The top three themes across all stakeholder groups were preferences for dying process (94% of reports), pain-free status (81%), and emotional well-being (64%). However, some discrepancies among the respondent groups were noted in the core themes: Family perspectives included life completion (80%), quality of life (70%), dignity (70%), and presence of family (70%) more frequently than did patient perspectives regarding those items (35%-55% each). In contrast, religiosity/spirituality was reported somewhat more often in patient perspectives (65%) than in family perspectives (50%). Taking into account the limitations of the literature, further research is needed on the impact of divergent perspectives on end-of-life care. Dialogues among the stakeholders for each individual must occur to ensure a good death from the most critical viewpoint-the patient's. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Public-private partnerships with large corporations: setting the ground rules for better health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galea, Gauden; McKee, Martin

    2014-04-01

    Public-private partnerships with large corporations offer potential benefits to the health sector but many concerns have been raised, highlighting the need for appropriate safeguards. In this paper we propose five tests that public policy makers may wish to apply when considering engaging in such a public-private partnership. First, are the core products and services provided by the corporation health enhancing or health damaging? In some cases, such as tobacco, the answer is obvious but others, such as food and alcohol, are contested. In such cases, the burden of proof is on the potential partners to show that their activities are health enhancing. Second, do potential partners put their policies into practice in the settings where they can do so, their own workplaces? Third, are the corporate social responsibility activities of potential partners independently audited? Fourth, do potential partners make contributions to the commons rather than to narrow programmes of their choosing? Fifth, is the role of the partner confined to policy implementation rather than policy development, which is ultimately the responsibility of government alone?

  5. How Consistent are Publicly Reported Cytotoxicity Data? Large-Scale Statistical Analysis of the Concordance of Public Independent Cytotoxicity Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Ciriano, Isidro; Bender, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    While increased attention is being paid to the impact of data quality in cell-line sensitivity and toxicology modeling, to date, no systematic study has evaluated the comparability of independent cytotoxicity measurements on a large-scale. Here, we estimate the experimental uncertainty of public cytotoxicity data from ChEMBL version 19. We applied stringent filtering criteria to assemble a curated data set comprised of pIC50 data for compound-cell line systems measured in independent laboratories. The estimated experimental uncertainty calculated was a mean unsigned error (MUE) value of 0.61-0.76, a median unsigned error (MedUE) value of 0.51-0.58, and a standard deviation of 0.76-1.00 pIC50 units. The experimental uncertainty (σE) estimated from all pairs of cytotoxicity measurements with a ΔpIC50 value lower than 2.5 was found to be 0.59-0.77 pIC50 units, and thus 21-60% and 21-26% higher than that of pKi and pIC50 data for ligand-protein data (σE =0.47-0.48 pKi units and σE =0.57-0.61 pIC50 units, respectively). The estimated σE value from the pairs of pIC50 values measured with metabolic assays was 0.98, whereas the σE value was found to be 0.69 when using the 1388 pIC50 pairs measured using exactly the same experimental setup. The maximum achievable Pearson correlation coefficient (RPearsonmax.2) of in silico models trained on cytotoxicity data from different laboratories was estimated to be 0.51-0.85, which is considerably different from the value of 1 corresponding to perfect predictions, hinting at the maximum performance one can expect also from computational cytotoxicity predictions. The lowest concordance between pairs of measurements was found for the drugs paclitaxel, methotrexate, zidovudine, and docetaxel, and for the cell lines HepG2, NCI-H460, L1210, and CCRF-CEM, hinting at particular sensitivity of those systems to experimental setups. The highest concordance was estimated for the compound-cell line system HL-60-etoposide (σE =0

  6. Technique of laparoscopic ventral hernia repair can be modified to successfully repair large defects in patients with loss of domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghai, Mercedeh; Ramshaw, Bruce J; Smith, C Daniel; Fearing, Nicole; Bachman, Sharon; Ramaswamy, Archana

    2009-03-01

    Laparoscopic ventral hernia repair (LVHR) can be challenging in patients with large abdominal wall defects and loss of domain (LOD). When hernia contents are reduced, the pneumoperitoneum preferentially fills the sac, leaving no space for mesh manipulation. This study presents a modification for LVHR in LOD patients, as well as outcomes for a series of patients. Between September 2002 and August 2004, 10 patients with large ventral hernias and LOD underwent attempts at LVHR. The technique is modified by placing additional trocars to allow for fixation from above the mesh. Patient data were harvested from a prospective database and analyzed. All hernias were recurrent in nature. Mean defect size was 626 cm(2), requiring 1 to 4 pieces of sutured Gore Dualmesh for a tension-free repair. Three patients' procedures were aborted after adhesiolysis, with concerns about missed enterotomies. All 3 underwent delayed mesh placement within the same hospitalization. Only 2 were successful. The third patient had significant bowel edema precluding mesh placement. Two patients were converted to open repairs (Rives-Stoppa and component separation). There were no mortalities, but there were 2 major complications: inferior vena cava thrombosis and transient abdominal compartment syndrome. In follow-up (7.7 months) there were 2 recurrences secondary to excision of infected mesh. It is possible to obtain a successful LVHR in patients with large defects and LOD. The technique is complex and is modified to allow for mesh fixation from above the mesh. Frequent change in patient positioning allows for visualization below the fascial defect.

  7. Large entropy change accompanying two successive magnetic phase transitions in TbMn2Si2 for magnetic refrigeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoxing; Wang, Jianli; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Ren, Qingyong; Fang, Chunsheng; Dou, Shixue

    2015-05-01

    Structural and magnetic properties in TbMn2Si2 are studied by variable temperature X-ray diffraction, magnetization, electrical resistivity, and heat capacity measurements. TbMn2Si2 undergoes two successive magnetic transitions at around Tc1 = 50 K and Tc2 = 64 K. Tc1 remains almost constant with increasing magnetic field, but Tc2 shifts significantly to higher temperature. Thus, there are two partially overlapping peaks in the temperature dependence of magnetic entropy change, i.e., -ΔSM (T). The different responses of Tc1 and Tc2 to external magnetic field, and the overlapping of -ΔSM (T) around Tc1 and Tc2 induce a large refrigerant capacity (RC) within a large temperature range. The large reversible magnetocaloric effect (-ΔSMpeak ˜ 16 J/kg K for a field change of 0-5 T) and RC (=396 J/kg) indicate that TbMn2Si2 could be a promising candidate for low temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  8. Estimated reproductive success of brooders and heritability of growth traits for large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea) using microsatellites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiande; SUI Banliang; WANG Zhiyong; CAI Mingyi; YAO Cuiluan; CHEN Qingkai

    2011-01-01

    We estimated the reproductive success of adult brood fish and the heritability of growthrelated traits for large yellow croaker (Larimichthys crocea).We created two independent full-factorial cross groups (1 and 2) by crossing 4 males×4 females and 4 males×3 females,respectively.We measured the body weight (BW),body length (BL),and body height (BH) of 281 individuals from group 1 and 318 individuals from group 2 at 20 months post hatch (harvest age).We also collected a tissue sample from each individual.The parents and offspring were genotyped using six polymorphic microsatellites.Of the 599 offspring,99.2% were assigned to a single pair of parents.In both groups,some parent pairs produced a large number of offsprings while other pairs did not produce any offspring.The genetic diversity and putative Ne were lower in the offsprings than in the parents in both groups.The heritability estimates at 20-month age were 0.13±0.10 for BW,0.19±0.13 for BL,and 0.09±0.06 for BH.The genetic and phenotype correlation between BW,BL,and BH was close to 1.The results provide basic information for selective breeding and further genetic characterization of large yellow croaker.

  9. Prolonged perceived stress and saliva cortisol in a large cohort of Danish public service employees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Sigurd; Forman, Julie Lyng; Fink, Samuel

    2017-01-01

    . METHODS: In 2007, 4467 Danish public service employees participated in a study of stress and mental health, and 3217 participated in a follow-up in 2009. Perceived stress during the past 4 weeks was assessed by Cohen's four item perceived stress scale. Participants were asked to collect saliva 30 min......PURPOSE: It is well known that acute stress can lead to a transient increase in cortisol secretion, but the effects of prolonged stress on cortisol secretion are uncertain. This study examines the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between prolonged perceived stress and salivary cortisol...... after awakening and at approximately 20:00 in the evening. The cortisol dependence on perceived stress was examined in regression analyses adjusted for effects of potential confounders. We adjusted for a large variation in saliva sampling times by modelling the time trajectory of cortisol concentrations...

  10. Clustering of Local Group distances: publication bias or correlated measurements? I. The Large Magellanic Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    de Grijs, Richard; Bono, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    The distance to the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) represents a key local rung of the extragalactic distance ladder. Yet, the galaxy's distance modulus has long been an issue of contention, in particular in view of claims that most newly determined distance moduli cluster tightly - and with a small spread - around the "canonical" distance modulus, (m-M)_0 = 18.50 mag. We compiled 233 separate LMC distance determinations published between 1990 and 2013. Our analysis of the individual distance moduli, as well as of their two-year means and standard deviations resulting from this largest data set of LMC distance moduli available to date, focuses specifically on Cepheid and RR Lyrae variable-star tracer populations, as well as on distance estimates based on features in the observational Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We conclude that strong publication bias is unlikely to have been the main driver of the majority of published LMC distance moduli. However, for a given distance tracer, the body of publications leading ...

  11. Public knowledge and Preventive Behavior During a Large-Scale Salmonella Outbreak: Results from an Online Survey in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velsen, van Lex; Beaujean, Desirée; Gemert-Pijnen, van Julia E.W.C.; Steenbergen, van Jim; Timen, aura

    2014-01-01

    Background Food-borne Salmonella infections are a worldwide concern. During a large-scale outbreak, it is important that the public follows preventive advice. To increase compliance, insight in how the public gathers its knowledge and which factors determine whether or not an individual complies wi

  12. Strategic Environmental Assessment and Environmental Auditing in Large-scale Public Infrastructure Construction: the case of Qinghai-Tibet Railway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, G.; Zhang, L.; Lu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Large-scale public infrastructure projects have featured in China’s modernization course since the early 1980s. During the early stages of China’s rapid economic development, public attention focused on the economic and social impact of high-profile construction projects. In recent years, however, w

  13. Successful laparoscopic bipolar coagulation of a large arteriovenous malformation due to invasive trophoblastic disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corusic, Ante; Barisic, Dubravko; Lovric, Helena; Despot, Albert; Planinic, Pavao

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of an acquired large arteriovenous malformation due to invasive gestational trophoblastic tumor that was treated successfully with laparoscopic surgery. After 4 cycles of methotrexate chemotherapy, a vascular tangle (volume, 28 cm(3)) was noted that emerged from the right uterine horn, invading the broad ligament adjacent to the uterine artery. Doppler ultrasonography along with magnetic resonance arteriography confirmed the diagnosis. The location, size and relation of this arteriovenous malformation to the uterine vasculature demanded urgent intervention. Laparoscopy was performed, and bipolar coagulation of the ovarian and uterine artery feeding branches was achieved after surgical resection of the tumor. The defect in the uterine wall with an intact uterine cavity was reconstructed using sutures. There were no intraoperative or postoperative complications. The patient underwent chemotherapy, and at 2-month follow-up was cured and has since had regular menstrual cycles.

  14. Successful endothelialization and remodeling of a cell-free small-diameter arterial graft in a large animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koobatian, Maxwell T; Row, Sindhu; Smith, Randall J; Koenigsknecht, Carmon; Andreadis, Stelios T; Swartz, Daniel D

    2016-01-01

    The large number of coronary artery bypass procedures necessitates development of off-the-shelf vascular grafts that do not require cell or tissue harvest from patients. However, immediate thrombus formation after implantation due to the absence of a healthy endothelium is very likely. Here we present the successful development of an acellular tissue engineered vessel (A-TEV) based on small intestinal submucosa that was functionalized sequentially with heparin and VEGF. A-TEVs were implanted into the carotid artery of an ovine model demonstrating high patency rates and significant host cell infiltration as early as one week post-implantation. At one month, a confluent and functional endothelium was present and the vascular wall showed significant infiltration of host smooth muscle cells exhibiting vascular contractility in response to vaso-agonists. After three months, the endothelium aligned in the direction of flow and the medial layer comprised of circumferentially aligned smooth muscle cells. A-TEVs demonstrated high elastin and collagen content as well as impressive mechanical properties and vascular contractility comparable to native arteries. This is the first demonstration of successful endothelialization, remodeling, and development of vascular function of a cell-free vascular graft that was implanted in the arterial circulation of a pre-clinical animal model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Large-scale annotation of small-molecule libraries using public databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingyao; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Kaisheng; Yan, S Frank; King, Frederick J; Jiang, Shumei; Winzeler, Elizabeth A

    2007-01-01

    While many large publicly accessible databases provide excellent annotation for biological macromolecules, the same is not true for small chemical compounds. Commercial data sources also fail to encompass an annotation interface for large numbers of compounds and tend to be cost prohibitive to be widely available to biomedical researchers. Therefore, using annotation information for the selection of lead compounds from a modern day high-throughput screening (HTS) campaign presently occurs only under a very limited scale. The recent rapid expansion of the NIH PubChem database provides an opportunity to link existing biological databases with compound catalogs and provides relevant information that potentially could improve the information garnered from large-scale screening efforts. Using the 2.5 million compound collection at the Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation (GNF) as a model, we determined that approximately 4% of the library contained compounds with potential annotation in such databases as PubChem and the World Drug Index (WDI) as well as related databases such as the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) and ChemIDplus. Furthermore, the exact structure match analysis showed 32% of GNF compounds can be linked to third party databases via PubChem. We also showed annotations such as MeSH (medical subject headings) terms can be applied to in-house HTS databases in identifying signature biological inhibition profiles of interest as well as expediting the assay validation process. The automated annotation of thousands of screening hits in batch is becoming feasible and has the potential to play an essential role in the hit-to-lead decision making process.

  16. Public-Private Partnerships for the Provision of Port Infrastructure: An Explorative Multi-Actor Perspective on Critical Success Factors1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Aerts

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Public-private cooperation on the level of project finance, and provision of large-scale infrastructure projects, is increasing on the global level. This paper uses a multi-actor analysis, in order to explore the critical success factors (CSFs for sound implementation of public-private partnerships (PPPs in the port context, and to determine the diverging opinions of stakeholders with regard to the importance of these CSFs. The results indicate that eight CSFs are of superior importance in port PPPs: the concreteness and preciseness of the concession agreement, the ability to appropriately allocate and share risk, the technical feasibility of the project, the commitment made by partners, the attractiveness of the financial package, a clear definition of responsibilities, the presence of a strong private consortium and a realistic cost/benefit assessment. The reason for their importance is their deal-breaking character, which can lead to a total failure of PPP projects during the early stages of project conception.

  17. The contribution of advisory committees and public involvement to large studies: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tew Jerry

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many large studies have complex advisory committee structures, yet there is no empirical evidence regarding their optimal composition, scope and contribution. The aim of this study was to inform the committee and advice infrastructure for future research studies. Methods In the context of a five-year study funded by the UK National Institute for Health Research, three advisory committees were formed. In addition, advice was obtained from individual experts. All recommendations received in the start-up phase (first seven months of the study were recorded, along with the decision about implementation of the recommendation. A particular focus was on the impact of public involvement. Results A total of 172 recommendations were made, including 70 from 20 individual experts. The recommendations were grouped into five emergent themes: Scientific, Pragmatic, Resources, Committee and Collaboration. Most recommendations related to strengthening existing components or adding new components to the study protocol. Very few recommendations either proposed removing study components or contradicted other recommendations. Three 'implementation criteria' were identified: scientific value, pragmatic feasibility, and paradigmatic consistency. 103 (60% of recommendations were implemented and 25 (15% were not implemented. The benefits identified by the research team were improved quality and confidence, and the costs were increased cognitive demands, protocol revision time, and slower progress. Conclusions The findings are discussed in the context of the wider literature on public involvement in research. Six recommendations are identified. First, have a clear rationale for each advisory committee expressed as terms of reference, and consider the best balance between committees and individual consultation with experts. Second, an early concern of committees is inter-committee communication, so consider cross-representation and copying minutes

  18. Crowdsourcing the General Public for Large Scale Molecular Pathology Studies in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candido dos Reis, Francisco J.; Lynn, Stuart; Ali, H. Raza; Eccles, Diana; Hanby, Andrew; Provenzano, Elena; Caldas, Carlos; Howat, William J.; McDuffus, Leigh-Anne; Liu, Bin; Daley, Frances; Coulson, Penny; Vyas, Rupesh J.; Harris, Leslie M.; Owens, Joanna M.; Carton, Amy F.M.; McQuillan, Janette P.; Paterson, Andy M.; Hirji, Zohra; Christie, Sarah K.; Holmes, Amber R.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Easton, Douglas F.; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Wang, Qin; Benitez, Javier; Milne, Roger L.; Mannermaa, Arto; Couch, Fergus; Devilee, Peter; Tollenaar, Robert A.E.M.; Seynaeve, Caroline; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Blows, Fiona M.; Sanders, Joyce; de Groot, Renate; Figueroa, Jonine; Sherman, Mark; Hooning, Maartje; Brenner, Hermann; Holleczek, Bernd; Stegmaier, Christa; Lintott, Chris; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Citizen science, scientific research conducted by non-specialists, has the potential to facilitate biomedical research using available large-scale data, however validating the results is challenging. The Cell Slider is a citizen science project that intends to share images from tumors with the general public, enabling them to score tumor markers independently through an internet-based interface. Methods From October 2012 to June 2014, 98,293 Citizen Scientists accessed the Cell Slider web page and scored 180,172 sub-images derived from images of 12,326 tissue microarray cores labeled for estrogen receptor (ER). We evaluated the accuracy of Citizen Scientist's ER classification, and the association between ER status and prognosis by comparing their test performance against trained pathologists. Findings The area under ROC curve was 0.95 (95% CI 0.94 to 0.96) for cancer cell identification and 0.97 (95% CI 0.96 to 0.97) for ER status. ER positive tumors scored by Citizen Scientists were associated with survival in a similar way to that scored by trained pathologists. Survival probability at 15 years were 0.78 (95% CI 0.76 to 0.80) for ER-positive and 0.72 (95% CI 0.68 to 0.77) for ER-negative tumors based on Citizen Scientists classification. Based on pathologist classification, survival probability was 0.79 (95% CI 0.77 to 0.81) for ER-positive and 0.71 (95% CI 0.67 to 0.74) for ER-negative tumors. The hazard ratio for death was 0.26 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.37) at diagnosis and became greater than one after 6.5 years of follow-up for ER scored by Citizen Scientists, and 0.24 (95% CI 0.18 to 0.33) at diagnosis increasing thereafter to one after 6.7 (95% CI 4.1 to 10.9) years of follow-up for ER scored by pathologists. Interpretation Crowdsourcing of the general public to classify cancer pathology data for research is viable, engages the public and provides accurate ER data. Crowdsourced classification of research data may offer a valid solution to problems of

  19. Crowdsourcing the General Public for Large Scale Molecular Pathology Studies in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Candido dos Reis

    2015-07-01

    Interpretation: Crowdsourcing of the general public to classify cancer pathology data for research is viable, engages the public and provides accurate ER data. Crowdsourced classification of research data may offer a valid solution to problems of throughput requiring human input.

  20. Effectiveness of Contemporary Public-Private Partnerships for Large Scale Infrastructure in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Bosso, Doran Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Increasingly, states are relying on creative financing and asset management to maintain and improve the nationâ s transportation infrastructure since budgetary challenges constrain potential options. One method of tapping into alternative sources of capital is the public-private partnership (PPP or P3). A public-private partnership is a long-term contractual agreement in which the public sector authority assigns a traditionally public responsibility (such as operations and/or financing) to t...

  1. Voluntary rewards mediate the evolution of pool punishment for maintaining public goods in large populations

    CERN Document Server

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Chen, Xiaojie

    2015-01-01

    Punishment is a popular tool when governing commons in situations where free riders would otherwise take over. It is well known that sanctioning systems, such as the police and courts, are costly and thus can suffer from those who free ride on other's efforts to maintain the sanctioning systems (second-order free riders). Previous game-theory studies showed that if populations are very large, pool punishment rarely emerges in public good games, even when participation is optional, because of second-order free riders. Here we show that a matching fund for rewarding cooperation leads to the emergence of pool punishment, despite the presence of second-order free riders. We demonstrate that reward funds can pave the way for a transition from a population of free riders to a population of pool punishers. A key factor in promoting the transition is also to reward those who contribute to pool punishment, yet not abstaining from participation. Reward funds eventually vanish in raising pool punishment, which is sustai...

  2. Voluntary rewards mediate the evolution of pool punishment for maintaining public goods in large populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Uchida, Satoshi; Chen, Xiaojie

    2015-03-01

    Punishment is a popular tool when governing commons in situations where free riders would otherwise take over. It is well known that sanctioning systems, such as the police and courts, are costly and thus can suffer from those who free ride on other's efforts to maintain the sanctioning systems (second-order free riders). Previous game-theory studies showed that if populations are very large, pool punishment rarely emerges in public good games, even when participation is optional, because of second-order free riders. Here we show that a matching fund for rewarding cooperation leads to the emergence of pool punishment, despite the presence of second-order free riders. We demonstrate that reward funds can pave the way for a transition from a population of free riders to a population of pool punishers. A key factor in promoting the transition is also to reward those who contribute to pool punishment, yet not abstaining from participation. Reward funds eventually vanish in raising pool punishment, which is sustainable by punishing the second-order free riders. This suggests that considering the interdependence of reward and punishment may help to better understand the origins and transitions of social norms and institutions.

  3. Characteristics of physicians receiving large payments from pharmaceutical companies and the accuracy of their disclosures in publications: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norris Susan L

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Financial relationships between physicians and industry are extensive and public reporting of industry payments to physicians is now occurring. Our objectives were to describe physician recipients of large total payments from these seven companies, and to examine discrepancies between these payments and conflict of interest (COI disclosures in authors’ concurrent publications. Methods The investigative journalism organization, ProPublica, compiled the Dollars for Docs database of payments to individuals from publically available data from seven US pharmaceutical companies during the period 2009 to 2010. We examined the cohort of 373 physicians in this database who each received USD $100,000 or more in the reporting period 2009 to 2010. Results These physicians received a total of $52,600,624 during this period (mean payment per physician $141,020. The predominant specialties were internal medicine and psychiatry. 147 of these physicians authored a total of 134 publications in the first quarter of 2011 and 77% (103 of these publications provided a COI disclosure. 69% of the 103 publications did not contain disclosures of the payment listed in the Dollars for Docs database. Conclusions With increased public reporting of industry payments to physicians, it is apparent that large sums are being paid for services such as consulting and peer education. In over two-thirds of publications where COI disclosures were provided, the disclosures by physician authors did not include industry payments that were documented in the Dollars for Docs database.

  4. Weak compliance undermines the success of no-take zones in a large government-controlled marine protected area.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J Campbell

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of marine protected areas depends largely on whether people comply with the rules. We quantified temporal changes in benthic composition, reef fish biomass, and fishing effort among marine park zones (including no-take areas to assess levels of compliance following the 2005 rezoning of the government-controlled Karimunjawa National Park (KNP, Indonesia. Four years after the rezoning awareness of fishing regulations was high amongst local fishers, ranging from 79.5±7.9 (SE % for spatial restrictions to 97.7±1.2% for bans on the use of poisons. Despite this high awareness and strong compliance with gear restrictions, compliance with spatial restrictions was weak. In the four years following the rezoning reef fish biomass declined across all zones within KNP, with >50% reduction within the no-take Core and Protection Zones. These declines were primarily driven by decreases in the biomass of groups targeted by local fishers; planktivores, herbivores, piscivores, and invertivores. These declines in fish biomass were not driven by changes in habitat quality; coral cover increased in all zones, possibly as a result of a shift in fishing gears from those which can damage reefs (i.e., nets to those which cause little direct damage (i.e., handlines and spears. Direct observations of fishing activities in 2009 revealed there was limited variation in fishing effort between zones in which fishing was allowed or prohibited. The apparent willingness of the KNP communities to comply with gear restrictions, but not spatial restrictions is difficult to explain and highlights the complexities of the social and economic dynamics that influence the ecological success of marine protected areas. Clearly the increased and high awareness of fishery restrictions following the rezoning is a positive step. The challenge now is to understand and foster the conditions that may facilitate compliance with spatial restrictions within KNP and marine parks

  5. Weak Compliance Undermines the Success of No-Take Zones in a Large Government-Controlled Marine Protected Area

    KAUST Repository

    Campbell, Stuart J.

    2012-11-30

    The effectiveness of marine protected areas depends largely on whether people comply with the rules. We quantified temporal changes in benthic composition, reef fish biomass, and fishing effort among marine park zones (including no-take areas) to assess levels of compliance following the 2005 rezoning of the government-controlled Karimunjawa National Park (KNP), Indonesia. Four years after the rezoning awareness of fishing regulations was high amongst local fishers, ranging from 79.5±7.9 (SE) % for spatial restrictions to 97.7±1.2% for bans on the use of poisons. Despite this high awareness and strong compliance with gear restrictions, compliance with spatial restrictions was weak. In the four years following the rezoning reef fish biomass declined across all zones within KNP, with >50% reduction within the no-take Core and Protection Zones. These declines were primarily driven by decreases in the biomass of groups targeted by local fishers; planktivores, herbivores, piscivores, and invertivores. These declines in fish biomass were not driven by changes in habitat quality; coral cover increased in all zones, possibly as a result of a shift in fishing gears from those which can damage reefs (i.e., nets) to those which cause little direct damage (i.e., handlines and spears). Direct observations of fishing activities in 2009 revealed there was limited variation in fishing effort between zones in which fishing was allowed or prohibited. The apparent willingness of the KNP communities to comply with gear restrictions, but not spatial restrictions is difficult to explain and highlights the complexities of the social and economic dynamics that influence the ecological success of marine protected areas. Clearly the increased and high awareness of fishery restrictions following the rezoning is a positive step. The challenge now is to understand and foster the conditions that may facilitate compliance with spatial restrictions within KNP and marine parks worldwide. © 2012

  6. Successive sheep grazing reduces population density of Brandt's voles in steppe grassland by altering food resources: a large manipulative experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoliang; Yin, Baofa; Wan, Xinrong; Wei, Wanhong; Wang, Guiming; Krebs, Charles J; Zhang, Zhibin

    2016-01-01

    Livestock grazing has shaped grassland ecosystems around the world. Previous studies indicated grazing showed various impacts on small rodents; however, most studies were conducted over 1-2 years without controlling for confounding factors such as immigration/emigration and predation in rodents. Brandt's voles (Lasiopodomys brandtii) are generally recognized as pests because of food overlap with domestic herbivores, but are also important for biodiversity conservation because they provide nests or food to many birds. Fully understanding the ecological relationship between domestic herbivores and small mammals is essential to making ecosystem management decisions. To address these needs, we carried out a field experiment during the period 2010-2013 to assess the effects of sheep grazing on vegetation and the population density of Brandt's voles along a gradient of three grazing intensities by using 12 large-scale enclosures. Responses of Brandt's voles to livestock grazing varied with grazing intensity and year. As compared to the control group, sheep grazing had no effect on vole abundance in the first year but an overall negative effect on vole abundance in the following 3 years. Successive grazing caused decreases in survival and male body mass of voles, but had no significant effect on fecundity. Negative effects of grazing were associated with a grazing-induced deterioration in both food quantity (reflected by biomass and cover of less-preferred plants), and food quality (measured by tannin and total phenol content). Our findings highlight the urgent need for more flexible management of yearly rotational grazing to optimize livestock production while maintaining species diversity and ecosystem health.

  7. Group Peer Mentoring: An Answer to the Faculty Mentoring Problem? A Successful Program at a Large Academic Department of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pololi, Linda H; Evans, Arthur T

    2015-01-01

    To address a dearth of mentoring and to avoid the pitfalls of dyadic mentoring, the authors implemented and evaluated a novel collaborative group peer mentoring program in a large academic department of medicine. The mentoring program aimed to facilitate faculty in their career planning, and targeted either early-career or midcareer faculty in 5 cohorts over 4 years, from 2010 to 2014. Each cohort of 9-12 faculty participated in a yearlong program with foundations in adult learning, relationship formation, mindfulness, and culture change. Participants convened for an entire day, once a month. Sessions incorporated facilitated stepwise and values-based career planning, skill development, and reflective practice. Early-career faculty participated in an integrated writing program and midcareer faculty in leadership development. Overall attendance of the 51 participants was 96%, and only 3 of 51 faculty who completed the program left the medical school during the 4 years. All faculty completed a written detailed structured academic development plan. Participants experienced an enhanced, inclusive, and appreciative culture; clarified their own career goals, values, strengths and priorities; enhanced their enthusiasm for collaboration; and developed skills. The program results highlight the need for faculty to personally experience the power of forming deep relationships with their peers for fostering successful career development and vitality. The outcomes of faculty humanity, vitality, professionalism, relationships, appreciation of diversity, and creativity are essential to the multiple missions of academic medicine. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  8. Assessing Dutch ambitions : Towards large scale ICT uptake in public sectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, L.; Lieshout, M.J. van

    2010-01-01

    The Dutch government has introduced a new policy instrument to promote and disseminate societal relevant ICT-applications that have proven to be successful on a small scale. It has invited social actors to disseminate their successful innovations on a larger scale. To this end, an innovation program

  9. Perception of Business Studies Teachers on the Infuence of Large Class Size in Public Secondary Schools in Yobe State, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamman, Jummai; Chadi, Aishatu Mohammad; Jirgi, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    This is a survey study conducted to determine the perception of business studies teacher's on the influence of large class size in Yobe state public secondary school. Three research questions were raised to guide the study. The population comprised of one hundred and twenty (120) business studies teachers from one hundred and five (105) Secondary…

  10. Large regional differences in incidence of arthroscopic meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hare, Kristoffer Borbjerg; Vinther, Jesper Høeg; Lohmander, L Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    of these procedures may differ from region to region. SETTING: We included data on all patients who underwent an arthroscopic meniscal procedure performed in the public or private sector in Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Data were retrieved from the Danish National Patient Register on patients who underwent arthroscopic...... for public and private procedures for each region. RESULTS: Incidence of meniscal procedures increased at private and at public hospitals. The private sector accounted for the largest relative and absolute increase, rising from an incidence of 1 in 2000 to 98 in 2011. In 2011, the incidence of meniscal...... procedures was three times higher in the Capital Region than in Region Zealand. CONCLUSIONS: Our study identified a large increase in the use of meniscal procedures in the public and private sector in Denmark. The increase was particularly conspicuous in the private sector as its proportion of procedures...

  11. 78 FR 61227 - Public Assistance Cost Estimating Format for Large Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... Planning and Review; Executive Order 13563, Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review B. The Paperwork... Grant Acceleration Program HMP Hazard Mitigation Planning HVAC Heating, Ventilation, and Air... construction data warehouse publications, such as RS Means, BNi Costbooks, Marshall & Swift, or Sweets...

  12. Wagering on a large scale: Relationships between public gambling and game manipulations in two state lotteries

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    Public wagering was examined in relation to game adjustments during the first 523 draws of Oregon's “Megabucks” lottery and the first 540 draws of Arizona's “The Pick” lottery. Oregon's lottery was modified five times during this period, and Arizona's lottery underwent four modifications. Public wagering was not related to decreases in the odds of winning in either state. Wagering increased in both states following the introduction of a minimum $1 million jackpot. Wagering also increased foll...

  13. Timetable-based simulation method for choice set generation in large-scale public transport networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Kjær; Anderson, Marie Karen; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2016-01-01

    The composition and size of the choice sets are a key for the correct estimation of and prediction by route choice models. While existing literature has posed a great deal of attention towards the generation of path choice sets for private transport problems, the same does not apply to public...... transport problems. This study proposes a timetable-based simulation method for generating path choice sets in a multimodal public transport network. Moreover, this study illustrates the feasibility of its implementation by applying the method to reproduce 5131 real-life trips in the Greater Copenhagen Area...

  14. Public and Private School Distinction, Regional Development Differences, and Other Factors Influencing the Success of Primary School Students in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulku, Seher Nur; Abdioglu, Zehra

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the factors influencing the success of students in primary schools in Turkey. TIMSS 2011 data for Turkey, measuring the success of eighth-grade students in the field of mathematics, were used in an econometric analysis, performed using classical linear regression models. Two hundred thirty-nine schools participated in the…

  15. Skin cancer has a large impact on our public hospitals but prevention programs continue to demonstrate strong economic credentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Sophy T F; Carter, Rob; Heward, Sue; Sinclair, Craig

    2017-08-01

    While skin cancer is still the most common cancer in Australia, important information gaps remain. This paper addresses two gaps: i) the cost impact on public hospitals; and ii) an up-to-date assessment of economic credentials for prevention. A prevalence-based cost approach was undertaken in public hospitals in Victoria. Costs were estimated for inpatient admissions, using State service statistics, and outpatient services based on attendance at three hospitals in 2012-13. Cost-effectiveness for prevention was estimated from 'observed vs expected' analysis, together with program expenditure data. Combining inpatient and outpatient costs, total annual costs for Victoria were $48 million to $56 million. The SunSmart program is estimated to have prevented more than 43,000 skin cancers between 1988 and 2010, a net cost saving of $92 million. Skin cancer treatment in public hospitals ($9.20∼$10.39 per head/year) was 30-times current public funding in skin cancer prevention ($0.37 per head/year). At about $50 million per year for hospitals in Victoria alone, the cost burden of a largely preventable disease is substantial. Skin cancer prevention remains highly cost-effective, yet underfunded. Implications for public health: Increased funding for skin cancer prevention must be kept high on the public health agenda. Hospitals would also benefit from being able to redirect resources to non-preventable conditions. © 2017 The Authors.

  16. Large Scale Pedagogical Transformation as Widespread Cultural Change in Mexican Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-Gallardo, Santiago

    2016-01-01

    This article examines how and under what conditions a new pedagogy can spread at scale using the Learning Community Project (LCP) in Mexico as a case study. Started as a small-scale, grassroots pedagogical change initiative in a handful of public schools, LCP evolved over an 8-year period into a national policy that spread its pedagogy of tutorial…

  17. Service Quality: An Unobtrusive Investigation of Interlibrary Loan in Large Public Libraries in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Francoise

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study that investigated the quality of interlibrary loan services in Canadian public libraries from the library's and the user's perspectives and then compared results. Measures of interlibrary loan performance are reviewed; an alternative conceptualization of service quality is discussed; and SERVQUAL, a measure of service quality, is…

  18. Beyond advertising: Large displays for supporting people’s needs and activities in public space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, Mettina; Kanis, Marije; Groen, Maarten; Meys, Wouter; Slakhorst, Wout

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores how displays can be used to support human needs and activities in public spaces rather than be employed for commercial purposes only. Based on our analysis of screen usage around the world, eight different categories of usage are described and motivated. For the purpose of illust

  19. [Nurses of large public hospitals in Rio de Janeiro: socio demographic and work related characteristics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griep, Rosane Härter; da Fonseca, Maria de Jesus Mendes; Melo, Enirtes Caetano Prates; Portela, Luciana Fernandes; Rotenberg, Lucia

    2013-09-01

    The study aimed at analyzing socio-demographic and working characteristics of nurses from public hospitals. It was carried out a cross-sectional study, involving 3.229 nurses from the eighteen largest public hospitals of the city of Rio de Janeiro. It was observed a feminine predominance (87.3%), with mean age of 39.9 ± 10 years. Around 7% referred having master or doctorate degree, 58.5% got their degree from public institutions and 24.5% used to work at the health sector before becoming nurses. Half the group has thought of abandoning their career, and almost a quarter is unsatisfied with their profession. Around 10% searched for a job outside nursing area in the previous month and 30% searched for a job in the same working area. Night work, engagement in more than one job and long professional work hours were more frequently found among men. The study has pointed challengeable aspects of nurses' profession. Results can subsidize support strategies to improve the working conditions in public hospitals due to their comprehensiveness.

  20. What Is Your Bench Strength? An Exploration of Succession Planning in Three Large School Districts in a Southeastern State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddick, Francine Piscitelli

    2009-01-01

    Large school districts face a number of challenges due to their sheer size. One of these challenges involves staffing the role of the principal. With Baby Boomers reaching retirement age, large school districts, especially those experiencing growth, have to fill numerous leadership positions. In order to fill these positions efficiently and…

  1. Critical Success Factors for Public Private Partnerships in the UAE Construction Industry- A Comparative Analysis between the UAE and the UK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Almarri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Procurement instruments by Public Private Partnerships (PPP have shown their amazing capacity in procuring public works from around the globe. Their success rate has been immense as they are known to bring efficiency, quality, innovation, experience, funds, and most importantly, the art of risk sharing to developed projects. This research aims to pinpoint the critical success factors (CSFs that are needed to implement PPPs in transitional economies. We have taken UAE as a case study and will be comparing its results with that of the UK’s; a developed country. Relevant data was collected through a questionnaire to establish the PPP critical success factors for the each of the two countries. In this questionnaire, data was collected from 30 participants residing in the UAE and 62 participants residing in the UK. A comparative analysis between the results of the UK and UAE showed a great deal of similarity between the two in PPP practice trends in the critical success factors. Both countries ranked the same nine factors as the most significant ones out of the eighteen critical success factors for implementing PPPs. These factors were commitment of public and private parties, appropriate risk allocation, committed and competent public agency, transparent procurement process, strong private consortium, competitive procurement process, political support, detailed cost/benefits assessment, and good governance. Whereas, the major differences were related to local financial market, macro-economic conditions, and favourable legal framework. The findings were validated through a small sample of practitioners using the Partnering Performance Index, and were found to be comprehensive, objective, reliable, practical, replicable, and adaptable.

  2. Public management and network specificity: Effects of colleges’ ties with professional organizations on graduates’ labour market success and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Agnes; Torenvlied, René

    2013-01-01

    Research on managerial networking in the public sector reports positive effects of network activity on performance. However, little is known about which network relations influence different aspects of performance. We argue that for specific organizational goals, organizations should direct their

  3. THE IMPORTANCE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN THE MANAGEMENT AND PROCESSING OF LARGE DATA VOLUMES IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARINA-ELENA STEGĂROIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Under a computerized society, technological resources become a source of identification for any community, institution or country. Globalization of information becomes a reality, all the resources having entered into a relationship of subordination with the World Wide Web, the information highways and the Internet. "Information technology - with its most important branch, data management computer science - enters a new era, in which the computer leads to the benefit of a navigable and transparent communication space, focusing on information". Therefore, in an information-based economy, information systems have been established which, based on management systems through the methods of algebra, with applications in economic engineering, have come to manage and process large volumes of data, especially in public institutions. Consequently, the Ministry of Public Affairs has implemented the “Increasing the public administration’s responsibility by modernising the information systems for generating the reports of the financial situations of public institutions” project (FOREXEBUG”, cod SMIS 34952, for which it received in 2012 non-refundable financing from the European Social Fund through the Operational Program for Developing the Administrative Capacity 2007-2013, based on which this paper will analyse the usefulness of implementing such a program in public institutions. Such a system aims to achieve a new form of reporting of budget execution and financial statements (including information related to legal commitments submitted monthly by each public institution in electronic, standardized, secure form, with increasing the reliability of data collected by cross-checking data from the treasury and providing reliable information for use by the Ministry of Finance, public institutions, other relevant institutions and the public, both at the level of detail and the consolidation possibilities at various levels, in parallel with their use for

  4. Public Health Adaptation to Climate Change in Large Cities: A Global Baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araos, Malcolm; Austin, Stephanie E; Berrang-Ford, Lea; Ford, James D

    2016-01-01

    Climate change will have significant impacts on human health, and urban populations are expected to be highly sensitive. The health risks from climate change in cities are compounded by rapid urbanization, high population density, and climate-sensitive built environments. Local governments are positioned to protect populations from climate health risks, but it is unclear whether municipalities are producing climate-adaptive policies. In this article, we develop and apply systematic methods to assess the state of public health adaptation in 401 urban areas globally with more than 1 million people, creating the first global baseline for urban public health adaptation. We find that only 10% of the sampled urban areas report any public health adaptation initiatives. The initiatives identified most frequently address risks posed by extreme weather events and involve direct changes in management or behavior rather than capacity building, research, or long-term investments in infrastructure. Based on our characterization of the current urban health adaptation landscape, we identify several gaps: limited evidence of reporting of institutional adaptation at the municipal level in urban areas in the Global South; lack of information-based adaptation initiatives; limited focus on initiatives addressing infectious disease risks; and absence of monitoring, reporting, and evaluation.

  5. HOW WE HAVE USED ITEM RESPONSE THEORY AND CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT TO IMPROVE STUDENT SUCCESS RATES IN LARGE GENERAL CHEMISTRY CLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brock L. Casselman

    Full Text Available Since 2012 we have tracked general chemistry student success rates at the University of Utah. In efforts to improve those rates we have implemented math prerequisites, changed our discussion session format, installed some metacognitive exercises aimed at the lowest quartile of students and instituted a flipped classroom model. Furthermore, using Item Response Theory we have identified what topics each individual student struggles with on practice tests. These steps have increased our success rates to ~76%. As well, student performance on nationally normed American Chemical Society final exams has improved to a median of 86 percentile. Our lowest quartile of students in spring 2016 scored at the 51 st percentile, above the national median.

  6. A Multi-Level Examination of Stakeholder Perspectives of Implementation of Evidence-Based Practices in a Large Urban Publicly-Funded Mental Health System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beidas, Rinad S; Stewart, Rebecca E; Adams, Danielle R; Fernandez, Tara; Lustbader, Susanna; Powell, Byron J; Aarons, Gregory A; Hoagwood, Kimberly E; Evans, Arthur C; Hurford, Matthew O; Rubin, Ronnie; Hadley, Trevor; Mandell, David S; Barg, Frances K

    2016-11-01

    Our goal was to identify barriers and facilitators to the implementation of evidence-based practices from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders in a large publicly funded mental health system. We completed 56 interviews with three stakeholder groups: treatment developers (n = 7), agency administrators (n = 33), and system leadership (n = 16). The three stakeholder groups converged on the importance of inner (e.g., agency competing resources and demands, therapist educational background) and outer context (e.g., funding) factors as barriers to implementation. Potential threats to implementation and sustainability included the fiscal landscape of community mental health clinics and an evolving workforce. Intervention characteristics were rarely endorsed as barriers. Inner context, outer context, and intervention characteristics were all seen as important facilitators. All stakeholders endorsed the importance of coordinated collaboration across stakeholder groups within the system to successfully implement evidence-based practices.

  7. Triangulating on success: innovation, public health, medical care, and cause-specific US mortality rates over a half century (1950-2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, George; Satcher, David; Fryer, George Edgar; Levine, Robert S; Blumenthal, Daniel S

    2010-04-01

    To identify successes in improving America's health, we identified disease categories that appeared on vital statistics lists of leading causes of death in the US adult population in either 1950 or 2000, and that experienced at least a 50% reduction in age-adjusted death rates from their peak level to their lowest point between 1950 and 2000. Of the 9 cause-of-death categories that achieved this 50% reduction, literature review suggests that 7 clearly required diffusion of new innovations through both public health and medical care channels. Our nation's health success stories are consistent with a triangulation model of innovation plus public health plus medical care, even when the 3 sectors have worked more in parallel than in partnership.

  8. Influencing Public School Policy in the United States: The Role of Large-Scale Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, William H.; Burroughs, Nathan A.

    2016-01-01

    The authors review the influence of state, national and international large-scale assessments (LSAs) on education policy and research. They distinguish between two main uses of LSAs: as a means for conducting research that informs educational reform and LSAs as a tool for implementing standards and enforcing accountability. The authors discuss the…

  9. Crowdsourcing the General Public for Large Scale Molecular Pathology Studies in Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. Candido dos Reis (Francisco J.); S. Lynn (Stuart); H.R. Ali (H. Raza); D. Eccles (Diana); A. Hanby (Andrew); E. Provenzano (Elena); C. Caldas (Carlos); W.J. Howat (Will); L.-A. McDuffus (Leigh-Anne); B. Liu (Bin); F. Daley (Frances); P. Coulson (Penny); R.J. Vyas (Rupesh J.); L.M. Harris (Leslie M.); J.M. Owens (Joanna M.); A.F.M. Carton (Amy F.M.); J.P. McQuillan (Janette P.); A.M. Paterson (Andy M.); Z. Hirji (Zohra); S.K. Christie (Sarah K.); A.R. Holmes (Amber R.); M.K. Schmidt (Marjanka); M. García-Closas (Montserrat); D.F. Easton (Douglas); M.K. Bolla (Manjeet); Q. Wang (Qing); J. Benítez (Javier); R.L. Milne (Roger L.); A. Mannermaa (Arto); F.J. Couch (Fergus); P. Devilee (Peter); R.A.E.M. Tollenaar (Rob); C.M. Seynaeve (Caroline); A. Cox (Angela); S.S. Cross (Simon); F. Blows (Fiona); J. Sanders (Joyce); R. de Groot (Renate); J.D. Figueroa (Jonine); M. Sherman (Mark); M.J. Hooning (Maartje); H. Brenner (Hermann); B. Holleczek (Bernd); C. Stegmaier (Christa); C. Lintott (Chris); P.D.P. Pharoah (Paul)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Citizen science, scientific research conducted by non-specialists, has the potential to facilitate biomedical research using available large-scale data, however validating the results is challenging. The Cell Slider is a citizen science project that intends to share images fr

  10. Successful aspiration and ethanol sclerosis of a large, symptomatic, simple liver cyst: Case presentation and review of the literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wojciech C Blonski; Mical S Campbell; Thomas Faust; David C Metz

    2006-01-01

    Simple liver cysts are congenital with a prevalence of 2.5%-4.25%. Imaging, whether by US, CT or MRI,is accurate in distinguishing simple cysts from other etiologies, including parasitic, neoplastic, duct-related,and traumatic cysts. Symptomatic simple liver cysts are rare, and the true frequency of symptoms is not known.Symptomatic simple liver cysts are predominantly large (> 4 cm), right-sided, and more common in women and older patients. The vast majority of simple hepatic cysts require no treatment or follow-up, though large cysts (> 4 cm) may be followed initially with serial imaging to ensure stability. Attribution of symptoms to a large simple cyst should be undertaken with caution, after alternative diagnoses have been excluded. Aspiration may be performed to test whether symptoms are due to the cyst; however, cyst recurrence should be expected.Limited experience with both laparoscopic deroofing and aspiration, followed by instillation of a sclerosing agent has demonstrated promising results for the treatment of symptomatic cysts. Here, we describe a patient with a large, symptomatic, simple liver cyst who experienced complete resolution of symptoms following cyst drainage and alcohol ablation, and we present a comprehensive review of the literature.

  11. Evolution of Doctoral Education in Pakistan: Challenges and Successes of Doctoral Students of Education in a Public Sector University of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halai, Nelofer

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a part of the findings from a larger study undertaken to explore the experience of graduate students in education in Pakistan. Analysis of a smaller slice of data collected from students who were enrolled in the PhD and MPhil programmes of the Department of Education in a large public sector university in Northern Pakistan was…

  12. Public management and network specificity: Effects of colleges’ ties with professional organizations on graduates’ labour market success and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Agnes; Torenvlied, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Research on managerial networking in the public sector reports positive effects of network activity on performance. However, little is known about which network relations influence different aspects of performance. We argue that for specific organizational goals, organizations should direct their ne

  13. Public Management and Network Specificity. Effects of colleges’ ties with professional organizations on graduates’ labour market success and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, A.; Torenvlied, R.

    2013-01-01

    Research on managerial networking in the public sector reports positive effects of network activity on performance. However, little is known about which network relations influence different aspects of performance. We argue that for specific organizational goals, organizations should direct their ne

  14. The Impact of Policy, Environmental, and Educational Interventions: A Synthesis of the Evidence from Two Public Health Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Andrea C.; Green, Lawrence W.

    2015-01-01

    Motor vehicle safety and tobacco control are among the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As the number of miles traveled in the United States multiplied 10 times from the 1920s to the 1990s, the annual motor vehicle crash death rate per vehicle mile traveled…

  15. The Impact of Policy, Environmental, and Educational Interventions: A Synthesis of the Evidence from Two Public Health Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gielen, Andrea C.; Green, Lawrence W.

    2015-01-01

    Motor vehicle safety and tobacco control are among the greatest public health achievements of the 20th century, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As the number of miles traveled in the United States multiplied 10 times from the 1920s to the 1990s, the annual motor vehicle crash death rate per vehicle mile traveled…

  16. Critical Success Factors for the Implementation of PeopleSoft Enterprise Resource Planning in a Public Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkamala, Hemanth K.

    2013-01-01

    Organizations of different sizes are changing their information technology (IT) strategies in order to achieve efficiency and effectiveness in today's global economy and to integrate their internal and external information by implementing PeopleSoft Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems. The literature has case studies of successful and…

  17. A Case Study: Faculty Perceptions of the Challenges and Successes in Experiential Learning at a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuberville, Kathy A.

    2014-01-01

    Faculty mentoring has been identified as an important component of experiential learning success. However, most higher education institutions lack the support to provide training and guidance to faculty for this type of instructional programming. The identified purpose of the conducted exploratory study was to explore the faculty perceptions…

  18. Why has a large Legionnaires’ disease outbreak been absent from public debate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felisbela Lopes

    Full Text Available The Legionnaires’ disease outbreak that hit Portugal in November 2014 was the third largest worldwide and was declared a “great public health emergency”. Nonetheless, the Portuguese outbreak, despite killing 12 people and infecting 375 others did not promote extensive media coverage, nor did it make it into the political debate. We conducted a quantitative analysis of 83 news pieces on Legionella published in four national newspapers, and interviewed the journalists who covered this outbreak. The communication process was controlled by a small group of official sources and the outbreak was pushed away from news lineups due to two political scandals. The production of another news wave made the outbreak’s news wave to break prematurely.

  19. Successfully Managing the Experimental Area of a Large Physics Experiment from Civil Engineering to the First Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Butin, F

    2010-01-01

    The role of "Experimental Area Manager" supported by a well organized, charismatic and motivated team is absolutely essential for managing the huge effort needed for a multi-cultural, multi-disciplinary installation of cathedral-size underground caverns housing a billion dollar physics experiment. Between the years 2002 and 2008, we supervised and coordinated the ATLAS work site at LHC, from the end of the civil engineering to the first circulating beams, culminating with 240 workers on the site, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, with activities taking place simultaneously on the surface, in the 60 m shafts and in the 100 m underground experimental cavern. We depict the activities preparation scheme (including tasks ranging from the installation of 280 ton cranes to super-delicate silicon detectors), the work-site organization method, the safety management that was a top priority throughout the whole project, and the opencommunication strategy that required maintaining permanent public visits. The accumulation o...

  20. Successful Gene Therapy in the RPGRIP1-deficient Dog: a Large Model of Cone–Rod Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lhériteau, Elsa; Petit, Lolita; Weber, Michel; Le Meur, Guylène; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Libeau, Lyse; Mendes-Madeira, Alexandra; Guihal, Caroline; François, Achille; Guyon, Richard; Provost, Nathalie; Lemoine, Françoise; Papal, Samantha; El-Amraoui, Aziz; Colle, Marie-Anne; Moullier, Philippe; Rolling, Fabienne

    2014-01-01

    For the development of new therapies, proof-of-concept studies in large animal models that share clinical features with their human counterparts represent a pivotal step. For inherited retinal dystrophies primarily involving photoreceptor cells, the efficacy of gene therapy has been demonstrated in canine models of stationary cone dystrophies and progressive rod–cone dystrophies but not in large models of progressive cone–rod dystrophies, another important cause of blindness. To address the last issue, we evaluated gene therapy in the retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein 1 (RPGRIP1)-deficient dog, a model exhibiting a severe cone–rod dystrophy similar to that seen in humans. Subretinal injection of AAV5 (n = 5) or AAV8 (n = 2) encoding the canine Rpgrip1 improved photoreceptor survival in transduced areas of treated retinas. Cone function was significantly and stably rescued in all treated eyes (18–72% of those recorded in normal eyes) up to 24 months postinjection. Rod function was also preserved (22–29% of baseline function) in four of the five treated dogs up to 24 months postinjection. No detectable rod function remained in untreated contralateral eyes. More importantly, treatment preserved bright- and dim-light vision. Efficacy of gene therapy in this large animal model of cone–rod dystrophy provides great promise for human treatment. PMID:24091916

  1. Problems and Countermeasures of Colloquial English Large Size Class Teach-ing of Higher Vocational Public English under the Constructivism Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yan-ping

    2014-01-01

    Based on the theory of constructivism, this article analyzes the open problems colloquial English large size class teach-ing of higher vocational public English and points out the countermeasures of colloquial English large-scale class teaching of high-er vocational public English.

  2. Successful Large-volume Leukapheresis for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Collection in a Very-low-weight Brain Tumor Infant with Coagulopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei Liao

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral apheresis has become a safe procedure to collect hematopoietic stem cells, even in pediatric patients and donors. However, the apheresis procedure for small and sick children is more complicated due to difficult venous access, relatively large extracorporeal volume, toxicity of citrate, and unstable hemostasis. We report a small and sick child with refractory medulloblastoma, impaired liver function, and coagulopathy after several major cycles of cisplatin-based chemotherapy. She successfully received large-volume leukapheresis for hematopoietic stem cell collection, although the patient experienced severe coagulopathy during the procedures. Health care providers should be alert to this potential risk.

  3. Asymmetry of the information and the knowledge between owners and workers in large family companies, as the determinant of their success

    OpenAIRE

    Ireneusz Maj

    2015-01-01

    In the majority economic areas of the world, family businesses are the overwhelming majority, it is certain in the case of small and medium-sized busi-nesses. Large family companies – in opposition to common opinion – are not the economy margin. It is other way round, they are not directly identifiable as a family companies. Family companies often reached global success in just decades.

  4. [Managing the difficult balance between employment needs and public health in large industrial sites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conversano, M

    2014-01-01

    Environmental pressures affecting Taranto area led institutional commitment to the local Health (LHA) and Environment Agency, which have helped to provide data in support of epidemiological and health impacts evidence.This is relevant in view of the issues related to the public health which led the Apulia Region to enact measures for environmental monitoring of dioxins (Regional Law 44/2008) and protection of food safety (Regional Council Deliberation 1442/2009). The LHA investigated three lines of development: monitoring of food matrices, studies of human biomonitoring and the establishment of local Cancer Registry. Same time to the actions of the Taranto Judiciary, Apulia Region has enacted the RL 24/12, integrating the legislative gap present into the Environmental Authorization procedures, which will allow the Health Damage Assessment, through the correlation between environmental monitoring data, biomonitoring and Cancer Registry. The next step will see the LHA involved in managing effective and feasible prevention initiatives. The Special Health and Environment Plan objective is to monitor the Taranto population health status, to screen the health determinants, to estimate the toxicologically relevant indicators of possible contamination and, if possible, to modify the correlations between risk factors, body burden, and specific diseases.

  5. Public participation in Full dome digital visualisations of large datasets in a planetarium sky theater : An experiment in progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathnasree, Nandivada

    2015-08-01

    A full dome digital planetarium system with a userfriendly content creation possibility can be used very effectively for communicating points of interest in large Astronomical datsets, to public and student visitors to a planetarium. Periodic public lectures by Astronomers, "Under the Stars", which use full dome visualisations of data sets, foster a regular interest group which becomes associated with the planetarium, ensuring a regular inflow of students (and a smaller number of non student visitors) willing to contribute to the entries in the full dome datasets.Regardless of whether or not completion is achieved for any of the data sets, the very process of this project is extremely rewarding in terms of generating a quickening of interest, for the casual visitor to a planetarium, in aspects related to intricacies of datasets. The casual visitor who gets interested, may just make one entry in the dataset, following instructions provided in the planetarium public interaction. For students who show sustained interest in this data entry project, it becomes a really fruitful learning process.Combining this purely data entry process with some interactions and discussions with Astronomers on the excitements in the areas related to specific data sets, allows a more organised enrichment possibility for student participants, nudging them towards exploring related possibilities of some "Hands on Astronomy" analysis oriented projects.Datasets like Gamma Ray bursts, variable stars, TGSS, and so on, are being entered within the planetarium production software at the New Delhi planetarium, by public and student visitors to the planetarium, as weekend activities.The Digital Universe data sets pre-existing in the planetarium system, allow preliminary discussions for weekend crowds related to Astronomical data sets, introduction of ever increasing multiwavelength data sets and onwwards to facilitating public participation in data entry within the planetarium software, for some

  6. Successful and cost neutral strategies to increase organic food used in public kitchens: results from the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Anne Vibeke; Brorson, B.; Lassen, Anne Dahl

    of practical strategies being effective in increasing the organic food used in the public kitchens.MethodsStudy design included baseline data collection, training sessions for all kitchens employees, goal setting, strategy development and implementation for each kitchen, and end point data collection...... baseline to end point were 29 percentage points (Ptrained in the principles of organic food production. The organic price premium was covered within...... existing budget by optimizing the budget and menu planning, minimizing food waste, increase production of homemade food, focusing on seasonal food, and optimizing meat and fish consumption.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates a large potential for public kitchens to increase the level of organic food...

  7. Public perceptions of low carbon energy technologies. Results from a Dutch large group workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunsting, S.; Van Bree, B.; Feenstra, C.F.J.; Hekkenberg, M. [ECN Policy Studies, Petten (Netherlands)

    2011-06-15

    This report describes the outcomes of a large group workshop held in Utrecht, the Netherlands on 21 May 2011. The workshop aims to learn about Dutch citizens perspectives on climate change and low emission energy technologies and how these perspectives may change after receiving and discussing objective information. This report presents participants environmental profile, stated beliefs, knowledge and attitudes, support for different energy technologies, and environmental behaviours and intentions, derived from questionnaire answers and observations during the day. The report also presents observed changes on the above over the course of the workshop. Whereas the report provides some conclusions and inferences throughout its sections, the focus of the report is on presenting the observations. No overall conclusions are drawn.

  8. Locally advanced breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma: A case report of successful treatment with radiation and chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Fleighton Estes

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of breast implant associated anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL is a rare phenomenon. A typical presentation is an effusion associated with a breast implant. Less commonly, disease can become more advanced locoregionally or distantly. The optimal treatment schema is a topic of debate: localized ALCL can potentially be cured with implant removal alone, while other cases in the literature, including those that are more advanced, have been treated with varying combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, and external beam radiotherapy. This is a case report of breast implant ALCL with pathologically proven lymph node involvement, the fifth such patient reported. Our patient experienced a favorable outcome with radiation therapy and chemotherapy.

  9. A Three-Step Approach for Creating Successful Electronic Immunization Record Exchanges between Clinical Practice and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Population health and individual health are strengthened through proactive immunization programs. Clinicians refer to immunization records at the point of care about to decide which vaccinations their patients and families need to reduce the risk of contracting (and spreading) vaccine preventable disease (VPD). Understanding the earliest possible age intervals that are safe to administer vaccinations provides the youngest children with as much immunity as possible as early as possible. This is especially useful for children at highest risk as their visits to a medical provider may be sporadic. This, coupled with the continuous development of new and combined vaccines and complex vaccination schedules, challenges the provider to understand the appropriate vaccinations to order for their patients. Under-vaccinating increases patients' VPD risk; over-vaccinating increases provider and consumer health care costs. Clinicians want to make the best clinical and economically responsible decisions - this is the challenge. The solution lies in providing clinicians timely and accurate vaccination data with decision support tools at the point of care. The use of Electronic Health Records (EHRs) alone cannot achieve this goal. It will take an accountable team made up of the clinician organization, their EHR vendor, and a public health agency to effectively manage immunization coverage for a patient population. This paper provides a three-step approach to establish and maintain EHR data exchanges, demonstrates the value of both clinical and technical testing prior to data exchange implementation, and discusses lessons learned. It illustrates the value of federal Meaningful Use criteria and considers how its objective to advance data exchange with public health systems increases providers' access to timely, accurate immunization histories and achieves desired mutual health outcomes for providers and public health programs.

  10. [Analysis of the educational requirements and planning in a large public hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degan, Mario; Bragato, Laura; Duminuco, Leonardo; Bagno, Carla; Genova, Valeria; Sansoni, Julita

    2007-01-01

    The educational needs in a large hospital in the Venice region were analysed in order to plan continuing education programs for 2005-2006. The reference model was the analysis of the educational waiting lists in both operative and managerial professions. Two identical questionnaires were used: the first was distributed to all the professional staff of the hospital with university qualifications and asked them to give their opinion regarding educational priorities. The second was given to staff with managerial roles, asking them to indicate the educational priorities for the staff under their direction. Analysis of the data collected focused on : the priority given to the various areas and topics of education; differences of opinion identified between the various working environments between professional groups and between staff/managers; influence of social and personal factors on the opinions expressed. The fact that the fields of interest indicated varied according to the role and working activities of staff involved, indicate the need to offer educational procedures tailored to the requirements of each group.

  11. Publications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    (1) A Large Area Mylar Foil Vacuum-silver-plated Equipment of RIBLL.Nuelear Electronics & Detection Technology, 21,1(2001). Wang Meng, Chen Zhiqiang, et al.(2) A Longitudinal Striped Anode Twin-foil Ionization Chamber for Particle Identification at RIBLL. Nuclear Techniques, 24,10(2001). Chen Zhiqiang.

  12. The Management of Long-Term Sickness Absence in Large Public Sector Healthcare Organisations: A Realist Evaluation Using Mixed Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Angela; O'Halloran, Peter; Porter, Sam

    2015-09-01

    The success of measures to reduce long-term sickness absence (LTSA) in public sector organisations is contingent on organisational context. This realist evaluation investigates how interventions interact with context to influence successful management of LTSA. Multi-method case study in three Health and Social Care Trusts in Northern Ireland comprising realist literature review, semi-structured interviews (61 participants), Process-Mapping and feedback meetings (59 participants), observation of training, analysis of documents. Important activities included early intervention; workplace-based occupational rehabilitation; robust sickness absence policies with clear trigger points for action. Used appropriately, in a context of good interpersonal and interdepartmental communication and shared goals, these are able to increase the motivation of staff to return to work. Line managers are encouraged to take a proactive approach when senior managers provide support and accountability. Hindering factors: delayed intervention; inconsistent implementation of policy and procedure; lack of resources; organisational complexity; stakeholders misunderstanding each other's goals and motives. Different mechanisms have the potential to encourage common motivations for earlier return from LTSA, such as employees feeling that they have the support of their line manager to return to work and having the confidence to do so. Line managers' proactively engage when they have confidence in the support of seniors and in their own ability to address LTSA. Fostering these motivations calls for a thoughtful, diagnostic process, taking into account the contextual factors (and whether they can be modified) and considering how a given intervention can be used to trigger the appropriate mechanisms.

  13. New Sustainability Programs and Their Impact at a Large Public State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bralower, T. J.; Guertin, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    The Pennsylvania State University comprises 24 campuses across the state. Students who are admitted to any campus are automatically admitted to the University Park Campus once they meet the entrance requirements for their major. The University Park Campus has a Geoscience Department with over 30 faculty and several degree programs. Several of the campuses also have Geoscience faculty. Two of the campuses offer majors in geoscience fields with plans at other campuses to add Environmental Science degree programs. Campus faculty play an instrumental role in recruiting students into the geosciences and providing them with general and allied science education. However, these faculty have high teaching loads and often struggle to fulfill student demand for courses. Penn State is also home to the World Campus which offers courses solely online to students all around the world including a large number of Military personnel. Penn State has led the development of five introductory-level blended and online courses as part of the InTeGrate STEP center. These courses are Coastal Processes, Hazards and Society; Water Science and Society; Climate, Energy, and Our Future; the Future of Food; and Earth Modeling. They add to an existing blended and online course, Earth in the Future that has been taught at the University Park and World Campuses for four years. Combined, the courses include 70 weekly modules. The courses constitute the basis of a recently approved Minor and Certificate of Excellence in Earth Sustainability offered in online format through the World Campus and in blended format at all the campuses. We are in the process of establishing an e-Learning Cooperative so that faculty at a campus can teach any of the sustainability courses online to students throughout the Penn State system. This will enable students to receive a greater introduction to, and variety of, sustainability courses at the campuses, and enable faculty to tailor courses to local campus interests and

  14. Flyby of Large-Size Space Debris Objects Situated at Leo with Their Successive De-Orbiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Baranov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Regarding the large-size space debris objects with a cross-section more than 5 m2 situated at LEO, it is possible to mark out 5 non-structured groups of such objects according to their spatial distribution. The orbits of objects in a group have approximately the same inclinations whereas the deviations in the Right Ascension of the Ascending node (RAAN may be arbitrary. The features of changing orbital planes’ mutual orientation in a group are seen from the RAAN deviations’ evolution portrait. The flights between the objects are being executed by a single active space vehicle (SV which captures a LSSD object and takes it away to the especially calculated circular or elliptical low disposal orbit (DO, and then returns back for the next object.The calculation of flyby maneuvers, in fact, breaks up into two independent tasks. At first, one can determine the parameters of the DO for each LSSD object using special software, so the coplanar maneuvers can be calculated ensuring the object’s transition to this orbit. Secondly, the flight to attain a new object is carried out from the DO of the previous object at the moment when their orbital planes will become equal. So it is possible to calculate the maneuvers, which help to return back for the next object, using numerical-analytical algorithm developed for noncoplanar rendez-vous of middle duration.The time interval for an active SV to stay at the DO is defined by difference of precession velocities of orbital planes of the de-orbited object and of the next object. The usage of a circular DO allows an LSSD object to leave promptly from the region (over 700 km where active SVs and other debris exist for a long time, whereas the apogee of the elliptical DO remains in the mentioned belt for 10 years. While forming elliptical DO one will need approximately 30% less of required summary characteristic velocity as compared with circular DO. The collision risk for an object staying at the elliptical DO

  15. How big is too big or how many partners are needed to build a large project which still can be managed successfully?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkel, Daniela; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2017-04-01

    During the last decades, the number of large research projects has increased and therewith the requirement for multidisciplinary, multisectoral collaboration. Such complex and large-scale projects pose new competencies to form, manage, and use large, diverse teams as a competitive advantage. For complex projects the effort is magnified because multiple large international research consortia involving academic and non-academic partners, including big industries, NGOs, private and public bodies, all with cultural differences, individually discrepant expectations on teamwork and differences in the collaboration between national and multi-national administrations and research organisations, challenge the organisation and management of such multi-partner research consortia. How many partners are needed to establish and conduct collaboration with a multidisciplinary and multisectoral approach? How much personnel effort and what kinds of management techniques are required for such projects. This presentation identifies advantages and challenges of large research projects based on the experiences made in the context of an Innovative Training Network (ITN) project within Marie Skłodowska-Curie Actions of the European HORIZON 2020 program. Possible strategies are discussed to circumvent and avoid conflicts already at the beginning of the project.

  16. Fifteen years of successful spread of Salmonella enterica serovar Mbandaka clone ST413 in Poland and its public health consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Hoszowski

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the 1990s, [i]Salmonella enterica[/i] serovar (S. Mbandaka occurred in feed and poultry in Poland. In the following years, the serovar also gained epidemiological importance in other EU countries. The objectives of current study were to evaluate the genetic relationship of contemporary S. Mbandaka with isolates originating from the beginning of the epidemics, and to assess the contribution of poultry as the source of infections in humans. Seventy S. Mbandaka isolated mainly in 2009 – 2010 from humans, poultry, food, and feed were typed with API ID32 [sup]®[/sup], MIC, plasmid profiling, PFGE, and MLST. PCR and sequencing were used to identify plasmid mediated quinolone and cephalosporin resistance mechanisms. Six biochemical profiles were identified and 59 of S. Mbandaka proved to be susceptible to the applied antimicrobials. Eight strains carried plasmids and a few of them were positive for [i]bla[/i][sub]CMY-2[/sub] and [i]qnr[/i]S1 genes. Two clusters of 15 [i]XbaI[/i]-PFGE profiles with similarity of 77.5% were found. The first cluster, gathered 7 profiles involving historical isolates and several contemporary non-human S. Mbandaka. The predominant profile in the second cluster consisted of 28 human and 1 broiler isolate. MLST analysis showed sequence type ST413 occurring among all tested isolates. The identification of close genetic relationships between S. Mbandaka of human and poultry origin indicates animals as a primal human infection route. Despite [i]Salmonella [/i]control programmes, the S. Mbandaka ST413 clone has been circulating for several years in Poland. [i]Salmonella[/i] control polices in food production chain should be continuously updated to target serovars of major epidemiological importance. Resistance noted in S. Mbandaka to such antimicrobials as fluoroquinolones and cephalosporins may hinder public health.

  17. How do you assign persistent identifiers to extracts from large, complex, dynamic data sets that underpin scholarly publications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyborn, Lesley; Car, Nicholas; Evans, Benjamin; Klump, Jens

    2016-04-01

    Persistent identifiers in the form of a Digital Object Identifier (DOI) are becoming more mainstream, assigned at both the collection and dataset level. For static datasets, this is a relatively straight-forward matter. However, many new data collections are dynamic, with new data being appended, models and derivative products being revised with new data, or the data itself revised as processing methods are improved. Further, because data collections are becoming accessible as services, researchers can log in and dynamically create user-defined subsets for specific research projects: they also can easily mix and match data from multiple collections, each of which can have a complex history. Inevitably extracts from such dynamic data sets underpin scholarly publications, and this presents new challenges. The National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) has been experiencing and making progress towards addressing these issues. The NCI is large node of the Research Data Services initiative (RDS) of the Australian Government's research infrastructure, which currently makes available over 10 PBytes of priority research collections, ranging from geosciences, geophysics, environment, and climate, through to astronomy, bioinformatics, and social sciences. Data are replicated to, or are produced at, NCI and then processed there to higher-level data products or directly analysed. Individual datasets range from multi-petabyte computational models and large volume raster arrays, down to gigabyte size, ultra-high resolution datasets. To facilitate access, maximise reuse and enable integration across the disciplines, datasets have been organized on a platform called the National Environmental Research Data Interoperability Platform (NERDIP). Combined, the NERDIP data collections form a rich and diverse asset for researchers: their co-location and standardization optimises the value of existing data, and forms a new resource to underpin data-intensive Science. New publication

  18. Effort-reward and work-life imbalance, general stress and burnout among employees of a large public hospital in Switzerland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hämmig, Oliver; Brauchli, Rebecca; Bauer, Georg F

    2012-01-01

    .... The study was based on survey data collected in 2007 among the personnel of a large public hospital in the canton of Zurich covering a random sample of 502 employees of all professions and positions...

  19. Retention and risk factors for attrition in a large public health ART program in Myanmar: a retrospective cohort analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aye Thida

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The outcomes from an antiretroviral treatment (ART program within the public sector in Myanmar have not been reported. This study documents retention and the risk factors for attrition in a large ART public health program in Myanmar. METHODS: A retrospective analysis of a cohort of adult patients enrolled in the Integrated HIV Care (IHC Program between June 2005 and October 2011 and followed up until April 2012 is presented. The primary outcome was attrition (death or loss-follow up; a total of 10,223 patients were included in the 5-year cumulative survival analysis. Overall 5,718 patients were analyzed for the risk factors for attrition using both logistic regression and flexible parametric survival models. RESULT: The mean age was 36 years, 61% of patients were male, and the median follow up was 13.7 months. Overall 8,564 (84% patients were retained in ART program: 750 (7% were lost to follow-up and 909 (9% died. During the 3 years follow-up, 1,542 attritions occurred over 17,524 person years at risk, giving an incidence density of 8.8% per year. The retention rates of participants at 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months were 86, 82, 80, 77 and 74% respectively. In multivariate analysis, being male, having high WHO staging, a low CD4 count, being anaemic or having low BMI at baseline were independent risk factors for attrition; tuberculosis (TB treatment at ART initiation, a prior ART course before program enrollment and literacy were predictors for retention in the program. CONCLUSION: High retention rate of IHC program was documented within the public sector in Myanmar. Early diagnosis of HIV, nutritional support, proper investigation and treatment for patients with low CD4 counts and for those presenting with anaemia are crucial issues towards improvement of HIV program outcomes in resource-limited settings.

  20. Retention and Risk Factors for Attrition in a Large Public Health ART Program in Myanmar: A Retrospective Cohort Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thida, Aye; Tun, Sai Thein Than; Zaw, Sai Ko Ko; Lover, Andrew A.; Cavailler, Philippe; Chunn, Jennifer; Aye, Mar Mar; Par, Par; Naing, Kyaw Win; Zan, Kaung Nyunt; Shwe, Myint; Kyaw, Thar Tun; Waing, Zaw Htoon; Clevenbergh, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    Background The outcomes from an antiretroviral treatment (ART) program within the public sector in Myanmar have not been reported. This study documents retention and the risk factors for attrition in a large ART public health program in Myanmar. Methods A retrospective analysis of a cohort of adult patients enrolled in the Integrated HIV Care (IHC) Program between June 2005 and October 2011 and followed up until April 2012 is presented. The primary outcome was attrition (death or loss-follow up); a total of 10,223 patients were included in the 5-year cumulative survival analysis. Overall 5,718 patients were analyzed for the risk factors for attrition using both logistic regression and flexible parametric survival models. Result The mean age was 36 years, 61% of patients were male, and the median follow up was 13.7 months. Overall 8,564 (84%) patients were retained in ART program: 750 (7%) were lost to follow-up and 909 (9%) died. During the 3 years follow-up, 1,542 attritions occurred over 17,524 person years at risk, giving an incidence density of 8.8% per year. The retention rates of participants at 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months were 86, 82, 80, 77 and 74% respectively. In multivariate analysis, being male, having high WHO staging, a low CD4 count, being anaemic or having low BMI at baseline were independent risk factors for attrition; tuberculosis (TB) treatment at ART initiation, a prior ART course before program enrollment and literacy were predictors for retention in the program. Conclusion High retention rate of IHC program was documented within the public sector in Myanmar. Early diagnosis of HIV, nutritional support, proper investigation and treatment for patients with low CD4 counts and for those presenting with anaemia are crucial issues towards improvement of HIV program outcomes in resource-limited settings. PMID:25268903

  1. Fulfilling Schmidt Ocean Institute's commitment to open sharing of information, data, and research outcomes: Successes and Lessons Learned from Proposal Evaluation to Public Repositories to Lasting Achievements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A.; Zykov, V.

    2016-02-01

    Schmidt Ocean Institute's vision is that the world's ocean be understood through technological advancement, intelligent observation, and open sharing of information. As such, making data collected aboard R/V Falkor available to the general public is a key pillar of the organization and a major strategic focus. Schmidt Ocean Institute supports open sharing of information about the ocean to stimulate the growth of its applications and user community, and amplify further exploration, discovery, and deeper understanding of our environment. These efforts are supported through partnerships with data management experts in the oceanographic community to enable standards-compliant sharing of scientific information and data collected during research cruises. To properly fulfill the commitment, proponents' data management plans are evaluated as part of the proposal process when applying for ship time. We request a thorough data management plan be submitted and expert reviewers evaluate the proposal's plan as part of the review process. Once a project is successfully selected, the chief scientist signs an agreement stating delivery dates for post-cruise data deliverables in a timely manner, R/V Falkor underway and meterological data is shared via public repositories, and links and reports are posted on the cruise webpage. This allows many more creative minds and thinkers to analyze, process, and study the data collected in the world ocean rather than privileging one scientist with the proprietary information, driving international and national scientific progress. This presentation will include the Institute's mission, vision, and strategy for sharing data, based on our Founders' passions, the process for evaluating proposed data management plans, and our partnering efforts to make data publically available in fulfillment of our commitment. Recent achievements and successes in data sharing, as well as future plans to improve our efforts will also be discussed.

  2. The Evolution of 21-cm Structure (EOS): public, large-scale simulations of Cosmic Dawn and Reionization

    CERN Document Server

    Mesinger, Andrei; Sobacchi, Emanuele

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the Evolution of 21-cm Structure (EOS) project: providing periodic, public releases of the latest cosmological 21-cm simulations. 21-cm interferometry is set to revolutionize studies of the Cosmic Dawn (CD) and epoch of reionization (EoR), eventually resulting in 3D maps of the first billion years of our Universe. Progress will depend on sophisticated data analysis pipelines, which are in turn tested on large-scale mock observations. Here we present the 2016 EOS data release, consisting of the largest (1.6 Gpc on side with a 1024^3 grid), public 21-cm simulations of the CD and EoR. We include calibrated, sub-grid prescriptions for inhomogeneous recombinations and photo-heating suppression of star formation in small mass galaxies. We present two simulation runs that approximately bracket the contribution from faint unseen galaxies. From these two extremes, we predict that the duration of reionization (defined as a change in the mean neutral fraction from 0.9 to 0.1) should be between 2.7 < Delt...

  3. What does "success" in public engagement activities mean? A comparison of goals, motivations and embedded assumptions in four polar outreach activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roop, H. A.; Salmon, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    Using four very different polar outreach case studies, we will discuss scientists' motivations, expectations, and institutional incentives (and dis-incentives) to engage with the public, and argue that improved training, evaluation, and academic value needs to be associated with scientist-led communication efforts - as well as clearer fora for sharing best practice in this field. We will illustrate our argument using examples from an Antarctic festival with public lectures and science cafes, outreach associated with an Antarctic expedition, the global launch of a climate change documentary that had a significant focus on Antarctica, and a series of "Polar Weeks" led by an international community of scientists and educators. While there is an excellent culture of accountability in both formal and informal science communication sectors, the same rigour is not applied to the majority of 'outreach' activities that are initiated by the science research community. Many of these activities are undertaken based on 'what feels right' and opportunism, and are proclaimed to be a success based on little or no formal evaluation. As a result, much of this work goes undocumented, is not evaluated from the perspective of the science community, and is rarely subject to peer-review and its associated benefits, including professional rewards. We therefore recommend new opportunities for publication in this field that would encourage science communication theory and practice to better inform each other, and for scientists to gain professional recognition for their efforts in this arena.

  4. Self-reported household impacts of large-scale chemical contamination of the public water supply, Charleston, West Virginia, USA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles P Schade

    Full Text Available A January 2014 industrial accident contaminated the public water supply of approximately 300,000 homes in and near Charleston, West Virginia (USA with low levels of a strongly-smelling substance consisting principally of 4-methylcyclohexane methanol (MCHM. The ensuing state of emergency closed schools and businesses. Hundreds of people sought medical care for symptoms they related to the incident. We surveyed 498 households by telephone to assess the episode's health and economic impact as well as public perception of risk communication by responsible officials. Thirty two percent of households (159/498 reported someone with illness believed to be related to the chemical spill, chiefly dermatological or gastrointestinal symptoms. Respondents experienced more frequent symptoms of psychological distress during and within 30 days of the emergency than 90 days later. Sixty-seven respondent households (13% had someone miss work because of the crisis, missing a median of 3 days of work. Of 443 households reporting extra expenses due to the crisis, 46% spent less than $100, while 10% spent over $500 (estimated average about $206. More than 80% (401/485 households learned of the spill the same day it occurred. More than 2/3 of households complied fully with "do not use" orders that were issued; only 8% reported drinking water against advice. Household assessments of official communications varied by source, with local officials receiving an average "B" rating, whereas some federal and water company communication received a "D" grade. More than 90% of households obtained safe water from distribution centers or stores during the emergency. We conclude that the spill had major economic impact with substantial numbers of individuals reporting incident-related illnesses and psychological distress. Authorities were successful supplying emergency drinking water, but less so with risk communication.

  5. Self-reported household impacts of large-scale chemical contamination of the public water supply, Charleston, West Virginia, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Charles P; Wright, Nasandra; Gupta, Rahul; Latif, David A; Jha, Ayan; Robinson, John

    2015-01-01

    A January 2014 industrial accident contaminated the public water supply of approximately 300,000 homes in and near Charleston, West Virginia (USA) with low levels of a strongly-smelling substance consisting principally of 4-methylcyclohexane methanol (MCHM). The ensuing state of emergency closed schools and businesses. Hundreds of people sought medical care for symptoms they related to the incident. We surveyed 498 households by telephone to assess the episode's health and economic impact as well as public perception of risk communication by responsible officials. Thirty two percent of households (159/498) reported someone with illness believed to be related to the chemical spill, chiefly dermatological or gastrointestinal symptoms. Respondents experienced more frequent symptoms of psychological distress during and within 30 days of the emergency than 90 days later. Sixty-seven respondent households (13%) had someone miss work because of the crisis, missing a median of 3 days of work. Of 443 households reporting extra expenses due to the crisis, 46% spent less than $100, while 10% spent over $500 (estimated average about $206). More than 80% (401/485) households learned of the spill the same day it occurred. More than 2/3 of households complied fully with "do not use" orders that were issued; only 8% reported drinking water against advice. Household assessments of official communications varied by source, with local officials receiving an average "B" rating, whereas some federal and water company communication received a "D" grade. More than 90% of households obtained safe water from distribution centers or stores during the emergency. We conclude that the spill had major economic impact with substantial numbers of individuals reporting incident-related illnesses and psychological distress. Authorities were successful supplying emergency drinking water, but less so with risk communication.

  6. Ethical implications of including children in a large biobank for genetic-epidemiologic research: a qualitative study of public opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David; Geller, Gail; Leroy, Lisa; Murphy, Juli; Scott, Joan; Hudson, Kathy

    2008-02-15

    The National Institutes of Health and other federal agencies are considering initiating a cohort study of 500,000 people, including 120,000 children, to measure genetic and environmental influences on common diseases. A community engagement pilot study was conducted to identify public attitudes and concerns about the proposed cohort study, including the ethics of involving children. The pilot included 15 focus groups where the inclusion of children in the proposed cohort study was discussed. Focus groups, conducted in six cities, included 141 adults of different ages, incomes, genders, ethnicities, and races. Many of the concerns expressed by participants mirrored those addressed in pediatric research guidelines. These concerns included minimizing children's fear, pain, and burdens; whether to include young children; and how to obtain children's assent. There was little agreement about which children can assent. Some voiced concern about children's privacy, but most expected that parents would have access to children's study results. Some believed children would not benefit from participating, while others identified personal and societal benefits that might accrue. A few people believed that children's participation would not advance the study's goals. To successfully include children, proposed cohort study would need to address children's changing capabilities and rights as they grow and reach the age of consent.

  7. Why (and how) they decide to leave: A grounded theory analysis of STEM attrition at a large public research university

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minutello, Michael F.

    A grounded theory investigation of STEM attrition was conducted that describes and explains why undergraduates at a large Mid-Atlantic research university decided to leave their initial STEM majors to pursue non-STEM courses of study. Participants ultimately decided to leave their initial STEM majors because they were able to locate preferable non-STEM courses of study that did not present the same kinds of obstacles they had encountered in their original STEM majors. Grounded theory data analysis revealed participants initially enrolled in STEM majors with tenuous motivation that did not withstand the various obstacles that were present in introductory STEM coursework. Obstacles that acted as demotivating influences and prompted participants to locate alternative academic pathways include the following: (1.) disengaging curricula; (2.) competitive culture; (3.) disappointing grades; (4.) demanding time commitments; and (5.) unappealing career options. Once discouraged from continuing along their initial STEM pathways, participants then employed various strategies to discover suitable non-STEM majors that would allow them to realize their intrinsic interests and extrinsic goals. Participants were largely satisfied with their decisions to leave STEM and have achieved measures of personal satisfaction and professional success.

  8. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaio, Gianfranco Di; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of citation success among authors who have recently published their work in economic history journals. Besides offering clues about how to improve one's scientific impact, our citation analysis also sheds light on the state of the field of economic history....... Consistent with our expectations, we find that full professors, authors appointed at economics and history departments, and authors working in Anglo-Saxon and German countries are more likely to receive citations than other scholars. Long and co-authored articles are also a factor for citation success. We...... find similar patterns when assessing the same authors' citation success in economics journals. As a novel feature, we demonstrate that the diffusion of research — publication of working papers, as well as conference and workshop presentations — has a first-order positive impact on the citation rate....

  9. Large entropy change accompanying two successive magnetic phase transitions in TbMn{sub 2}Si{sub 2} for magnetic refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guoxing; Cheng, Zhenxiang, E-mail: jianli@uow.edu.au, E-mail: cheng@uow.edu.au; Fang, Chunsheng; Dou, Shixue [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Wang, Jianli, E-mail: jianli@uow.edu.au, E-mail: cheng@uow.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); Bragg Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Lucas Heights, New South Wales 2234 (Australia); Ren, Qingyong [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Canberra, Australian Defence Force Academy, ACT 2600 (Australia)

    2015-05-04

    Structural and magnetic properties in TbMn{sub 2}Si{sub 2} are studied by variable temperature X-ray diffraction, magnetization, electrical resistivity, and heat capacity measurements. TbMn{sub 2}Si{sub 2} undergoes two successive magnetic transitions at around T{sub c1} = 50 K and T{sub c2} = 64 K. T{sub c1} remains almost constant with increasing magnetic field, but T{sub c2} shifts significantly to higher temperature. Thus, there are two partially overlapping peaks in the temperature dependence of magnetic entropy change, i.e., −ΔS{sub M} (T). The different responses of T{sub c1} and T{sub c2} to external magnetic field, and the overlapping of −ΔS{sub M} (T) around T{sub c1} and T{sub c2} induce a large refrigerant capacity (RC) within a large temperature range. The large reversible magnetocaloric effect (−ΔS{sub M}{sup peak} ∼ 16 J/kg K for a field change of 0–5 T) and RC (=396 J/kg) indicate that TbMn{sub 2}Si{sub 2} could be a promising candidate for low temperature magnetic refrigeration.

  10. High-effciency improved symmetric successive over-relaxation preconditioned conjugate gradient method for solving large-scale finite element linear equations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李根; 唐春安; 李连崇

    2013-01-01

    Fast solving large-scale linear equations in the finite element analysis is a classical subject in computational mechanics. It is a key technique in computer aided engineering (CAE) and computer aided manufacturing (CAM). This paper presents a high-effciency improved symmetric successive over-relaxation (ISSOR) preconditioned conjugate gradient (PCG) method, which maintains the convergence and inherent paral-lelism consistent with the original form. Ideally, the computation can be reduced nearly by 50% as compared with the original algorithm. It is suitable for high-performance computing with its inherent basic high-effciency operations. By comparing with the nu-merical results, it is shown that the proposed method has the best performance.

  11. Paving the Road to Success: Reflecting critically on year one of an undergraduate student support programme at a large South African university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danie de Klerk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Student success, faculty and university throughput, and the need for adequate and appropriate student support remain prevalent issues in the South African and global higher education sectors. Subsequently, the Faculty of Commerce, Law, and Management (CLM at a large South African university applied for Teaching and Development Grant (TDG funding in order to address these areas of concern. The grant was awarded and initially intended to help students at risk by implementing appropriate interventions to prevent them from dropping out of university or being excluded. However, being labelled as “at risk” was not well received by students and so the grant holders designed a new programme, adopting a decidedly more holistic approach. As such, the Road to Success Programme (RSP was born. The first three months saw those involved conceptualise, plan, and develop strategies, material, and interventions that were implemented in January 2015. The vision was to scaffold and support first-year students, particularly those in danger of being academically excluded, through an integrated network of tutorials, workshops, online support, and a series of resources called Toolkits for Success, in an attempt to help students achieve their academic goals. Despite a number of challenges, ranging from funding shortfalls and food security to students’ emotional wellbeing and resilience, 2015 proved invaluable in terms of refining strategies, gaining insight, and programme growth. Preliminary data shows an increased pass rate for students who engaged with the RSP, with higher pass rates linked to greater RSP attendance. Consequently, this article serves as a critical reflection of the RSP at the end of its inaugural year and will share data, highlight lessons learned and challenges faced, as well as discuss how the programme has been taken to scale in 2016.

  12. Successfully Engaging Scientists in NASA Education and Public Outreach: Examples from a Teacher Professional Development Workshop Series and a Planetary Analog Festival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.; Hsu, B. C.; Bleacher, L.; Shaner, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The Lunar Workshops for Educators are a series of weeklong workshops for grade 6-9 science teachers focused on lunar science and exploration, sponsored by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). These workshops have been held across the country for the past five years, in places underserved with respect to NASA workshops and at LRO team member institutions. MarsFest is a planetary analog festival that has been held annually in Death Valley National Park since 2012, made possible with support from the Curiosity (primarily the Sample Analysis at Mars) Education and Public Outreach team, NASA's Ames Research Center, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the SETI Institute, and Death Valley National Park. Both the Lunar Workshops for Educators and MarsFest rely strongly on scientist engagement for their success. In the Lunar Workshops, scientists and engineers give talks for workshop participants, support facility tours and field trips, and, where possible, have lunch with the teachers to interact with them in a less formal setting. Teachers have enthusiastically appreciated and benefited from all of these interactions, and the scientists and engineers also provide positive feedback about their involvement. In MarsFest, scientists and engineers give public presentations and take park visitors on field trips to planetary analog sites. The trips are led by scientists who do research at the field trip sites whenever possible. Surveys of festival participants indicate an appreciation for learning about scientific research being conducted in the park from the people involved in that research, and scientists and engineers report enjoying sharing their work with the public through this program. The key to effective scientist engagement in all of the workshops and festivals has been a close relationship and open communication between the scientists and engineers and the activity facilitators. I will provide more details about both of these programs, how scientists and engineers

  13. A new validated score for detecting patient-reported success on postoperative ICIQ-SF: a novel two-stage analysis from two large RCT cohorts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmakar, Debjyoti; Mostafa, Alyaa; Abdel-Fattah, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    The Patient Global Impression of Improvement (PGI-I) and International Consultation of Incontinence Questionnaire - Short Form (ICIQ-SF) are validated instruments for the assessment of patient reported outcome measures (PROM) following treatment of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). However, there is a paucity of evidence as to what represents a successful postintervention ICIQ-SF score. To determine the correlation between the postoperative ICIQ-SF scores with the PGI-I outcomes, the latter was considered one of the standard PROM following surgical treatment for SUI. The aim of this study was to determine, and if appropriate validate, an ICIQ-SF cut-off score that can predict a successful PROM as determined by PGI-I. Four large datasets yielding 674 ICIQ-SF score/PGI-I outcome data pairs were used in this study for (a) determining and (b) validating the cut-off ICIQ-SF score for a successful PGI-I outcome. Two long-term follow-up datasets were used representing follow-up periods of 3 and 8 years of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) performed between April 2005 and April 2007 in a tertiary urogynaecology centre in Scotland, UK. All patients had urodynamic SUI or mixed urinary incontinence (MUI, with predominant SUI) and were randomized to treatment with either an inside-out or an outside-in transobturator tape (TVT-O or TOT, respectively) as a sole procedure. The datasets yielded 432 ICIQ-SF score/PGI-I outcome data pairs. Successful outcome was defined as "very much improved/much improved" on the PGI-I scale. SPSS v. 22.0 (IBM Corp., Armonk, NY) was used for all statistical analyses. The correlations and cut-off scores generated were then validated on two independent datasets representing the 1-year and 4-year follow-up periods of the multicentre RCT in six units in the UK. The datasets yielded 242 ICIQ-SF score/PGI-I outcome data pairs. All patients had urodynamic SUI or MUI (with predominant SUI) and were randomized to either adjustable single incision

  14. Evaluation of the awareness and effectiveness of IT security programs in a large publicly funded health care system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Shelanne L; Tarraf, Rima C; Birney, Arden; Arain, Mubashir Aslam

    2017-01-01

    Electronic health records are becoming increasingly common in the health care industry. Although information technology (IT) poses many benefits to improving health care and ease of access to information, there are also security and privacy risks. Educating health care providers is necessary to ensure proper use of health information systems and IT and reduce undesirable outcomes. This study evaluated employees' awareness and perceptions of the effectiveness of two IT educational training modules within a large publicly funded health care system in Canada. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups included a variety of professional roles within the organisation. Participants also completed a brief demographic data sheet. With the consent of participants, all interviews and focus groups were audio recorded. Thematic analysis and descriptive statistics were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the IT security training modules. Five main themes emerged: (i) awareness of the IT training modules, (ii) the content of modules, (iii) staff perceptions about differences between IT security and privacy issues, (iv) common breaches of IT security and privacy, and (v) challenges and barriers to completing the training program. Overall, nonclinical staff were more likely to be aware of the training modules than were clinical staff. We found e-learning was a feasible way to educate a large number of employees. However, health care providers required a module on IT security and privacy that was relatable and applicable to their specific roles. Strategies to improve staff education and mitigate against IT security and privacy risks are discussed. Future research should focus on integrating health IT competencies into the educational programs for health care professionals.

  15. Caught you: threats to confidentiality due to the public release of large-scale genetic data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wjst, Matthias

    2010-12-29

    Large-scale genetic data sets are frequently shared with other research groups and even released on the Internet to allow for secondary analysis. Study participants are usually not informed about such data sharing because data sets are assumed to be anonymous after stripping off personal identifiers. The assumption of anonymity of genetic data sets, however, is tenuous because genetic data are intrinsically self-identifying. Two types of re-identification are possible: the "Netflix" type and the "profiling" type. The "Netflix" type needs another small genetic data set, usually with less than 100 SNPs but including a personal identifier. This second data set might originate from another clinical examination, a study of leftover samples or forensic testing. When merged to the primary, unidentified set it will re-identify all samples of that individual. Even with no second data set at hand, a "profiling" strategy can be developed to extract as much information as possible from a sample collection. Starting with the identification of ethnic subgroups along with predictions of body characteristics and diseases, the asthma kids case as a real-life example is used to illustrate that approach. Depending on the degree of supplemental information, there is a good chance that at least a few individuals can be identified from an anonymized data set. Any re-identification, however, may potentially harm study participants because it will release individual genetic disease risks to the public.

  16. Caught you: threats to confidentiality due to the public release of large-scale genetic data sets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wjst Matthias

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Large-scale genetic data sets are frequently shared with other research groups and even released on the Internet to allow for secondary analysis. Study participants are usually not informed about such data sharing because data sets are assumed to be anonymous after stripping off personal identifiers. Discussion The assumption of anonymity of genetic data sets, however, is tenuous because genetic data are intrinsically self-identifying. Two types of re-identification are possible: the "Netflix" type and the "profiling" type. The "Netflix" type needs another small genetic data set, usually with less than 100 SNPs but including a personal identifier. This second data set might originate from another clinical examination, a study of leftover samples or forensic testing. When merged to the primary, unidentified set it will re-identify all samples of that individual. Even with no second data set at hand, a "profiling" strategy can be developed to extract as much information as possible from a sample collection. Starting with the identification of ethnic subgroups along with predictions of body characteristics and diseases, the asthma kids case as a real-life example is used to illustrate that approach. Summary Depending on the degree of supplemental information, there is a good chance that at least a few individuals can be identified from an anonymized data set. Any re-identification, however, may potentially harm study participants because it will release individual genetic disease risks to the public.

  17. A Large-Scale Study of Surrogate Physicality and Gesturing on Human–Surrogate Interactions in a Public Space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kangsoo Kim

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Technological human surrogates, including robotic and virtual humans, have been popularly used in various scenarios, including training, education, and entertainment. Prior research has investigated the effects of the surrogate’s physicality and gesturing in human perceptions and social influence of the surrogate. However, those studies have been carried out in research laboratories, where the participants were aware that it was an experiment, and the participant demographics are typically relatively narrow—e.g., college students. In this paper, we describe and share results from a large-scale exploratory user study involving 7,685 people in a public space, where they were unaware of the experimental nature of the setting, to investigate the effects of surrogate physicality and gesturing on their behavior during human–surrogate interactions. We evaluate human behaviors using several variables, such as proactivity and reactivity, and proximity. We have identified several interesting phenomena that could lead to hypotheses developed as part of future hypothesis-based studies. Based on the measurements of the variables, we believe people are more likely to be engaged in a human–surrogate interaction when the surrogate is physically present, but movements and gesturing with its body parts have not shown the expected benefits for the interaction engagement. Regarding the demographics of the people in the study, we found higher overall engagement for females than males, and higher reactivity for younger than older people. We discuss implications for practitioners aiming to design a technological surrogate that will directly interact with real humans.

  18. [Primary diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the uterine cervix successfully treated with rituximabplus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy-a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Akari; Fujimi, Akihito; Kanisawa, Yuji; Matsuno, Teppei; Okuda, Toshinori; Minami, Shinya; Doi, Tadashi; Ishikawa, Kazuma; Uemura, Naoki; Jyomen, Yuko; Tomaru, Utano

    2013-12-01

    Primary malignant lymphoma of the uterine cervix is a rare disease, and the therapeutic strategy has not been clearly established. A 45-year old woman presented with vaginal bleeding and hypermenorrhea in January 2012. Physical examination revealed a mass in the pelvic cavity approximately the size of a neonate's head. Pelvic magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) showed a solid mass 11 cm in size in the uterine cervix with homogeneous low intensity on T1-weighted images, iso-high intensity on T2-weighted images, and heterogeneous iso-high intensity on gadolinium-diethylenetriaminepentaacetate(Gd- DTPA)-enhanced images. Multiple lymphadenopathy were also detected in the pelvis. The Papanicolaou smear indicated class 5 cervical cytology, and a subsequent histological examination by a punch biopsy of the cervix showed diffuse infiltration of medium- to large-sized mononuclear cells that stained positive for CD20 and CD79a and negative for CD3, CD5, and EBER. Bone marrow biopsy revealed no abnormality. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography(PET-CT)showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose(FDG)accumulation in the uterine cervix mass, and in the pelvic and right inguinal lymphadenopathy. The patient was diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the uterine cervix, Ann Arbor stage II AE. She was successfully treated with 8 courses of rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone(R-CHOP) chemotherapy, and maintains a complete remission.

  19. A multi-stage approach to maximizing geocoding success in a large population-based cohort study through automated and interactive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonderman, Jennifer S; Mumma, Michael T; Cohen, Sarah S; Cope, Elizabeth L; Blot, William J; Signorello, Lisa B

    2012-05-01

    To enable spatial analyses within a large, prospective cohort study of nearly 86,000 adults enrolled in a 12-state area in the southeastern United States of America from 2002-2009, a multi-stage geocoding protocol was developed to efficiently maximize the proportion of participants assigned an address level geographic coordinate. Addresses were parsed, cleaned and standardized before applying a combination of automated and interactive geocoding tools. Our full protocol increased the non-Post Office (PO) Box match rate from 74.5% to 97.6%. Overall, we geocoded 99.96% of participant addresses, with only 5.2% at the ZIP code centroid level (2.8% PO Box and 2.3% non-PO Box addresses). One key to reducing the need for interactive geocoding was the use of multiple base maps. Still, addresses in areas with population density geocoding than those in areas with >920 persons/km2 (odds ratio (OR) = 5.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 4.23, 6.49), as were addresses collected from participants during in-person interviews compared with mailed questionnaires (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.59, 2.11). This study demonstrates that population density and address ascertainment method can influence automated geocoding results and that high success in address level geocoding is achievable for large-scale studies covering wide geographical areas.

  20. A multi-stage approach to maximizing geocoding success in a large population-based cohort study through automated and interactive processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer S. Sonderman

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available To enable spatial analyses within a large, prospective cohort study of nearly 86,000 adults enrolled in a 12-state area in the southeastern United States of America from 2002-2009, a multi-stage geocoding protocol was developed to efficiently maximize the proportion of participants assigned an address level geographic coordinate. Addresses were parsed, cleaned and standardized before applying a combination of automated and interactive geocoding tools. Our full protocol increased the non-Post Office (PO Box match rate from 74.5% to 97.6%. Overall, we geocoded 99.96% of participant addresses, with only 5.2% at the ZIP code centroid level (2.8% PO Box and 2.3% non-PO Box addresses. One key to reducing the need for interactive geocoding was the use of multiple base maps. Still, addresses in areas with population density 920 persons/km2 (odds ratio (OR = 5.24; 95% confidence interval (CI = 4.23, 6.49, as were addresses collected from participants during in-person interviews compared with mailed questionnaires (OR = 1.83; 95% CI = 1.59, 2.11. This study demonstrates that population density and address ascertainment method can influence automated geocoding results and that high success in address level geocoding is achievable for large-scale studies covering wide geographical areas.

  1. Fluoridation: strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isman, R

    1981-07-01

    Of 19 referenda on community water fluoridation held in the first six months of 1980, 17 were defeated. Among the postulated reasons are a growing distrust of government and the health establishment. The public remains largely ignorant of the purpose and benefits of fluoridation. The emotionalism surrounding the issue has made it difficult to generate public support outside of the health professions. Opponents have also learned to fight fluoridation with increasingly sophisticated techniques. Some of the strategies used in recent successful campaigns in Oakland, California, and Portland, Oregon are described; recommendations that can be applied to communities considering fluoridation include careful wording of ballot measures so they are unequivocally clear and simple; timing ballot measures with elections likely to draw the largest voter turnout; broadening the base of political and financial support; using a figurehead if possible; and making maximum use of the media.

  2. The Role of Residential Communities for the Academic and Social Success of Undergraduate Women in STEM Majors: The Case of a Public University in Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuhib, Frehiwot Wondimu

    This study is an exploratory case study which explored the residential environment of an Ethiopian public university on its role for the social and academic integration of undergraduate women in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) fields. It also explained how the social and academic integration of the women contributed for their overall college success. There were three groups of participants; undergraduate women in STEM, female resident proctors, and relevant officials from the university and the Ministry of Education of the Ethiopian government. Each of the participants were interviewed on a one-on-one basis and the interviews were transcribed and coded for the analysis. Supportive quantitative data about the enrollment, performance and retention of students were also gathered from the university's registrar office and analyzed quantitatively to support the qualitative data obtained through interviews. The study was framed by Tinto's Integration Model and data were interpreted using Third World feminist theory. The findings showed that due to the fact that all same-sex, same-major women living in the same rooms, and all who live in one dorm take similar courses throughout their program, and dormitories serving multiple roles, including being collaboration spaces, played a big role for better social and academic integration of the women. It is also found that their social and academic integration helped them to better perform in their majors by enhancing their sense of belonging in the male-dominated STEM majors, enhancing their commitment, and promoting peer encouragement. On the other hand, the findings also showed that there were some factors which have negative influence in the integration process such as negative stereotypes against the presence and good performance of women in STEM, lack of support system, and limited interaction with faculty. So, the study recommends that working on improving the negatively influencing factors will

  3. Discussion on the Layout Design of the Large-scale Public Buildings%试论大型公建平面布局设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈宗略; 梁俊辉

    2014-01-01

    本文首先介绍了大型公共建筑的概念与现状、大型公共建筑平面布局的内容与原则,并利用图文结合的方式分析了总平流线设计及其平面布局,其次,以大型商业建筑为例,详细说明了大型公共建筑的功能、消防流线及其平面布局,最后在设计好平面布局的前提下对大型公共建筑的平面布局进行调整。%This paper firstly introduces the concept and pres- ent situation of large public buildings, the content and princip- le of the layout of large public buildings, and analyzes the flo- wn line design of the total flat and its layout by the way of combination of picture and text. Secondly, the author took a large commercial buildings as an example, giving a detailed description of the function of the large public buildings, the flown line of fire protection function and plane layout, and finally adjust the design of the layout under the premise of pl- ane layout of large public buildings.

  4. Temporal change in the genetic structure between and within cohorts of a marine fish, Diplodus sargus, induced by a large variance in individual reproductive success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planes, S; Lenfant, P

    2002-08-01

    Temporal changes at 16 allozyme loci in the Diplodus sargus population of Banyuls-sur-Mer (Mediterranean Sea, France) were monitored. Temporal genetic variation within a single population was examined over two temporal scales: (i) among three year-classes sampled at the same age, and (ii) within a single year-class sampled three times over a two-year period. We observed a significant change in the genotypic structure within the same cohort during the first two years following settlement and before recruitment into the adult population. In addition, comparison of year-classes showed that cohorts differed significantly one year after settlement, whereas they became similar later on before recruitment into the adult population. The observed changes in the genetic structure within and between year-classes may be the result of complex selective processes or genetic drift. Linkage disequilibrium and genetic relatedness data suggest that these changes are due to large variation in reproductive success, followed by homogenization through adult movement. Overall, these results demonstrated a rapid genetic change within a population.

  5. How Large Is the "Public Domain"? A Comparative Analysis of Ringer's 1961 Copyright Renewal Study and HathiTrust CRMS Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkin, John P.

    2017-01-01

    The 1961 Copyright Office study on renewals, authored by Barbara Ringer, has cast an outsized influence on discussions of the U.S. 1923-1963 public domain. As more concrete data emerge from initiatives such as the large-scale determination process in the Copyright Review Management System (CRMS) project, questions are raised about the reliability…

  6. Class Counts: Exploring Differences in Academic and Social Integration between Working-Class and Middle/Upper-Class Students at Large, Public Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Stebleton, Michael J.; Huesman, Ronald L., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    This multi-institutional study examines differences between working-class and middle/upper-class students at large, public research universities. Significant differences in factors related to working-class students' social integration (including satisfaction, campus climate, and sense of belonging) and academic integration (including collaborative…

  7. Optimization methodology for large scale fin geometry on the steel containment of a Public Acceptable Simple SMR (PASS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Yun, E-mail: dykim0129@kaist.ac.kr; NO, Hee Cheon, E-mail: hcno@kaist.ac.kr; Kim, Ho Sik, E-mail: hskim25@kaist.ac.kr

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Optimization methodology for fin geometry on the steel containment is established. • Optimum spacing is 7 cm in PASS containment. • Optimum thickness is 0.9–1.8 cm when a fin height is 10–25 cm. • Optimal fin geometry is determined in given fin height by overall effectiveness correlation. • 13% of material volume and 43% of containment volume are reduced by using fins. - Abstracts: Heat removal capability through a steel containment is important in accident situations to preserve the integrity of a nuclear power plant which adopts a steel containment concept. A heat transfer rate will be enhanced by using fins on the external surface of the steel containment. The fins, however, cause to increase flow resistance and to deteriorate the heat transfer rate at the same time. Therefore, this study investigates an optimization methodology of large scale fin geometry for a vertical base where a natural convection flow regime is turbulent. Rectangular plate fins adopted in the steel containment of a Public Acceptable Simple SMR (PASS) is used as a reference. The heat transfer rate through the fins is obtained from CFD tools. In order to optimize fin geometry, an overall effectiveness concept is introduced as a fin performance parameter. The optimizing procedure is starting from finding optimum spacing. Then, optimum thickness is calculated and finally optimal fin geometry is suggested. Scale analysis is conducted to show the existence of an optimum spacing which turns out to be 7 cm in case of PASS. Optimum thickness is obtained by the overall effectiveness correlation, which is derived from a total heat transfer coefficient correlation. The total heat transfer coefficient correlation of a vertical fin array is suggested considering both of natural convection and radiation. However, the optimum thickness is changed as a fin height varies. Therefore, optimal fin geometry is obtained as a function of a fin height. With the assumption that the heat

  8. A large-scale field study examining effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on honey bee colony health, development, and overwintering success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Christopher Cutler

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In summer 2012, we initiated a large-scale field experiment in southern Ontario, Canada, to determine whether exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola (oil seed rape has any adverse impacts on honey bees. Colonies were placed in clothianidin seed-treated or control canola fields during bloom, and thereafter were moved to an apiary with no surrounding crops grown from seeds treated with neonicotinoids. Colony weight gain, honey production, pest incidence, bee mortality, number of adults, and amount of sealed brood were assessed in each colony throughout summer and autumn. Samples of honey, beeswax, pollen, and nectar were regularly collected, and samples were analyzed for clothianidin residues. Several of these endpoints were also measured in spring 2013. Overall, colonies were vigorous during and after the exposure period, and we found no effects of exposure to clothianidin seed-treated canola on any endpoint measures. Bees foraged heavily on the test fields during peak bloom and residue analysis indicated that honey bees were exposed to low levels (0.5–2 ppb of clothianidin in pollen. Low levels of clothianidin were detected in a few pollen samples collected toward the end of the bloom from control hives, illustrating the difficulty of conducting a perfectly controlled field study with free-ranging honey bees in agricultural landscapes. Overwintering success did not differ significantly between treatment and control hives, and was similar to overwintering colony loss rates reported for the winter of 2012–2013 for beekeepers in Ontario and Canada. Our results suggest that exposure to canola grown from seed treated with clothianidin poses low risk to honey bees.

  9. Variations of snow petrel breeding success in relation to sea-ice extent: detecting local response to large-scale processes?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olivier, F.; Franeker, van J.A.; Creuwels, J.C.S.; Woehler, E.J.

    2005-01-01

    Demographic parameters were estimated for snow petrels Pagodroma nivea nesting at the study colony of Reeve Hill near Casey station, Antarctica between 1984 and 2003. Average breeding success for the colony varied from 18.2% to 76.5%. Breeding effort, hatching and fledging success were subject to a

  10. Going tobacco-free on 24 New York City university campuses: A public health agency's partnership with a large urban public university system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresnahan, Marie P; Sacks, Rachel; Farley, Shannon M; Mandel-Ricci, Jenna; Patterson, Ty; Lamberson, Patti

    2016-01-01

    The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene partnered with the nation's largest university system, the City University of New York (CUNY), to provide technical assistance and resources to support the development and implementation of a system-wide tobacco-free policy. This effort formed one component of Healthy CUNY-a larger initiative to support health promotion and disease prevention across the university system and resulted in the successful introduction of a system-wide tobacco-free policy on all CUNY campuses. Glassman et al (J Am Coll Health. 2011;59:764-768) published a blueprint for action related to tobacco policies that informed our work. This paper describes the policy development and implementation process and presents lessons learned from the perspective of the Health Department, as a practical case study to inform and support other health departments who may be supporting colleges and universities to become tobacco-free.

  11. 大型公共建筑的能源审计研究%Research on Energy Auditing of Large Public Buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丹; 李安桂

    2012-01-01

    This study takes large public buildings as examples to analyze energy auditing mode and design energy auditing evaluation system and method. In addition, this paper provides some powerful suggestions for energy auditing of large public buildings. This study is helpful to facilitate works on energy auditing of large public buildings and provides theoretical foundation for establishing national large building energy-saving system and improving level of building energy-saving management.%以大型公共建筑能源审计为研究对象,分析了建筑能源审计的内容和组织架构,建立了建筑能源审计的评价指标体系和方法.最后,针对我国大型公共建筑能源审计情况提出了相关的对策和建议.此研究有助于推动大型公共建筑能源审计工作,为客观、有效地开展大型公共建筑物的能源审计提供了理论依据和现实指导.

  12. 大跨度大空间公共建筑结构设计的分析%Analysis of Structure Design of Large Span and Large Space Public Building

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董丽萍

    2014-01-01

    为了保证大跨度大空间的质量安全、保证大跨度大空间建筑的可持续发展,就必须对大跨度大空间公共建筑结构进行合理地设计,使其更符合时代发展的需要。%In order to ensure the quality and safety and the su- stainable development of large span and large space buildings, we must carry on the reasonable design of large span and large space public architecture, to beter meet the needs of the de- velopment of the times.

  13. The Pursuit of Excellence: An Analysis of the Honors College Application and Enrollment Decision for a Large Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singell, Larry D., Jr.; Tang, Hui-Hsuan

    2012-01-01

    Honors colleges housed in public universities began only in the last half century, but have become nearly ubiquitous over the last 20 years. This paper, using recent data from the oldest stand-alone honors college in the country, is the first to study how the application and enrollment decisions of honors college students differ from the general…

  14. 生态化大空间公共建筑的美学表达%The Aesthetic Expression of Ecological Large Space Public Buildings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾贤光

    2014-01-01

    This article starts from the basic connotation of ec-ological large space public buildings and put forward the new aesthetic appeal respectively from four aspects of the function structure, environment context, development of space, and ec-ological order. And the author combines with the case to expl-ore the large space public building aesthetic expression of eco-logical design.%本文从生态化大空间公共建筑的基本内涵出发,分别从功能结构、环境文脉、空间拓展、生态秩序四个层面,提出了新的美学诉求。并结合案例,对生态化设计的大空间公共建筑美学表达进行了探索。

  15. Report on the ESO Workshop ''Rainbows on the Southern Sky: Science and Legacy Value of the ESO Public Surveys and Large Programmes''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, M.; Rejkuba, M.; Leibundgut, B.; Beccari, G.

    2015-12-01

    This was the third ESO workshop on the science from Large Programmes and the second on Public Surveys. By design, this workshop covered all areas of research in observational astronomy, providing a forum for the presentation of the most recent scientific results from these programmes and fostering discussions on the planned developments enabled by large and coherent time allocations on ESO telescopes. Several aspects of the legacy value of such programmes —technological, archival content, access to data, time domain and sociological — were evaluated and set a reference for future developments of ESO services to the community.

  16. 公共课教育学大班教学的困境与对策%DIFFICULTIES AND COUNTERMEASURES OF LARGE CLASSES TEACHING IN PUBLIC PEDAGOGY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李瑛

    2012-01-01

    近年来,高校扩招使得教学资源相对短缺,公共课教育学大班教学成为普遍现象,面临着学科地位尴尬、教学内容僵化庞杂、课堂缺乏吸引力、教学秩序差、师生关系不融洽等困境,学生厌学,教师厌教,降低了教学成效。必须采取有效措施,促进公共课教育学大班教学尽快走出窘境,真正发挥其在师范生专业培养中的独特作用。%In recent years,college enrollment has brought a relative shortage of teaching resources,public Pedagogy in large classes become a common phenomenon.Due to many reasons,public Pedagogy in large classes faced with many difficulties,such as: disciplines status embarrassment,rigid and numerous teaching content,classroom unattractive,poor teaching order,teacher-student relationship disharmony,and so on,leading to students weariness and teachers tired of teaching.Therefore,we must take effective measures,so that the public Pedagogy in large classes is out of the woods,really play the role of educati.

  17. Environmental Impact Assessment and Environmental Audit in Large-Scale Public Infrastructure Construction: The Case of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guizhen; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Yonglong

    2009-09-01

    Large-scale public infrastructure projects have featured in China’s modernization course since the early 1980s. During the early stages of China’s rapid economic development, public attention focused on the economic and social impact of high-profile construction projects. In recent years, however, we have seen a shift in public concern toward the environmental and ecological effects of such projects, and today governments are required to provide valid environmental impact assessments prior to allowing large-scale construction. The official requirement for the monitoring of environmental conditions has led to an increased number of debates in recent years regarding the effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and Governmental Environmental Audits (GEAs) as environmental safeguards in instances of large-scale construction. Although EIA and GEA are conducted by different institutions and have different goals and enforcement potential, these two practices can be closely related in terms of methodology. This article cites the construction of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway as an instance in which EIA and GEA offer complementary approaches to environmental impact management. This study concludes that the GEA approach can serve as an effective follow-up to the EIA and establishes that the EIA lays a base for conducting future GEAs. The relationship that emerges through a study of the Railway’s construction calls for more deliberate institutional arrangements and cooperation if the two practices are to be used in concert to optimal effect.

  18. Environmental impact assessment and environmental audit in large-scale public infrastructure construction: the case of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guizhen; Zhang, Lei; Lu, Yonglong

    2009-09-01

    Large-scale public infrastructure projects have featured in China's modernization course since the early 1980s. During the early stages of China's rapid economic development, public attention focused on the economic and social impact of high-profile construction projects. In recent years, however, we have seen a shift in public concern toward the environmental and ecological effects of such projects, and today governments are required to provide valid environmental impact assessments prior to allowing large-scale construction. The official requirement for the monitoring of environmental conditions has led to an increased number of debates in recent years regarding the effectiveness of Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) and Governmental Environmental Audits (GEAs) as environmental safeguards in instances of large-scale construction. Although EIA and GEA are conducted by different institutions and have different goals and enforcement potential, these two practices can be closely related in terms of methodology. This article cites the construction of the Qinghai-Tibet Railway as an instance in which EIA and GEA offer complementary approaches to environmental impact management. This study concludes that the GEA approach can serve as an effective follow-up to the EIA and establishes that the EIA lays a base for conducting future GEAs. The relationship that emerges through a study of the Railway's construction calls for more deliberate institutional arrangements and cooperation if the two practices are to be used in concert to optimal effect.

  19. The Edmonton Public Schools Story: Internationally Renowned Superintendent Angus McBeath Chronicles His District's Successes and Failures. Policy Brief. No. S2007-13

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeath, Angus

    2007-01-01

    This publication is a transcript of Superintendent Angus McBeath's presentation to legislators and media at an Issues and Ideas Forum hosted by the Mackinac Center for Public Policy in Lansing, Michigan. McBeath discusses education reform in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, including: (1) Basic Elements of Reform; (2) School Employee Union Involvement;…

  20. Using a Learning Activity Sequence in Large-Enrollment Physical Geology Classes: Supporting the Needs of Underserved Students While Motivating Interest, Learning, and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pun, A.; Smith, G. A.

    2011-12-01

    The learning activity sequence (LAS) strategy is a student-focused pedagogy that emphasizes active classroom learning to promote learning among all students, and in particular, those with diverse backgrounds. Online assessments both set the stage for active learning and help students synthesize material during their learning. UNM is one of only two Carnegie Research University Very High institutions also designated as Hispanic-serving and the only state flagship university that is also a majority-minority undergraduate institution. In 2010 Hispanics comprised 40% of 20,655 undergraduates (and 49% of freshmen), 37% of undergraduates were Pell Grant recipients (the largest proportion of any public flagship research university; J. Blacks Higher Ed., 2009) and 44% of incoming freshmen were first-generation students. To maximize student learning in this environment rich in traditionally underserved students, we designed a LAS for nonmajor physical geology (enrollments 100-160) that integrates in-class instruction with structured out-of-class learning. The LAS has 3 essential parts: Students read before class to acquire knowledge used during in-class collaborative, active-learning activities that build conceptual understanding. Lastly, students review notes and synthesize what they've learned before moving on to the next topic. The model combines online and in-class learning and assessment: Online reading assessments before class; active-learning experiences during class; online learning assessments after class. Class sessions include short lectures, peer instruction "clickers", and small-group problem solving (lecture tutorials). Undergraduate Peer-Learning Facilitators are available during class time to help students with problem solving. Effectiveness of the LAS approach is reflected in three types of measurements. (1) Using the LAS strategy, the overall rate of students earning a grade of C or higher is higher than compared to the average for all large

  1. Teaching Practices and Language Use in Two-Way Dual Language Immersion Programs in a Large Public School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jennifer; Steele, Jennifer; Slater, Robert; Bacon, Michael; Miller, Trey

    2016-01-01

    Many educators and policy makers look to two-way dual language immersion as one of the most promising options to close achievement gaps for English learners. However, the programs' effectiveness depends on the quality of their implementation. This article reports on a large-scale study of the implementation of dual language immersion across a…

  2. Teaching Practices and Language Use in Two-Way Dual Language Immersion Programs in a Large Public School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jennifer; Steele, Jennifer; Slater, Robert; Bacon, Michael; Miller, Trey

    2016-01-01

    Many educators and policy makers look to two-way dual language immersion as one of the most promising options to close achievement gaps for English learners. However, the programs' effectiveness depends on the quality of their implementation. This article reports on a large-scale study of the implementation of dual language immersion across a…

  3. THINKING ABOUT THE INDEBTEDNESS OF THE LARGE PUBLIC HOSPITAL%医院负债经营的思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    佘加玉

    2015-01-01

    Public hospital is a public medical institutions , but at the present, the government's financial abil-ity is limited, which input for the hospital is symbolic .In fact, in order to survive and develop , the hospital debts be-come the main means of financing of public hospital .The liabilities of hospital mainly include two aspects : one is the current liabilities, such as the credit payment which is formed by the drug ; the other is the long term liabilities, such as the borrowing from financial institutions , which is used to construct the fixed asset of the hospital .Now, the man-agement of the debts has become an important means for the development of hospital , although, the hospital can solve the problem of the shortage of the funds to expand the scale of development and the power of competing , but inevita-bly, which will accompany by some risks , at the same time of indebtedness .So, hospital should carry on the scientif-ic decision, and make the early warning and management about the necessary financial risk .%医院负债主要由两方面构成:一是流动性负债,包括医院赊购药品等的货款;另一种是长期负债,主要是医疗机构为购建固定资产等由金融机构贷出的借款。负债经营已经成了目前医院发展的重要手段,虽然医院通过负债可以解决其面临的资金短缺问题,并以此扩大发展规模和竞争实力,但在负债经营的同时,势必会伴随一定的风险。因而,医院在实施负债经营时应进行负债风险评估,并进行必要的财务风险预警与管理。

  4. Prevalence of depression among successful and unsuccessful students of Public Health and Nursing-Midwifery schools of Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences in 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H Baghiani Moghaddam

    2012-02-01

    Conclusion: Public Health and Nursing- Midwifery students in Yazd had a high prevalence of depression. Therefore planning is required to support advisory services to control and prevent depression among students.

  5. Innovation Processes in Large-Scale Public Foodservice-Case Findings from the Implementation of Organic Foods in a Danish County

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Bent Egberg; Nielsen, Thorkild; Kristensen, Niels Heine

    2005-01-01

    foods into large-scale foodservice such as that taking place in hospitals and larger homes for the elderly, has proven to be quite difficult. The very complex planning, procurement and processing procedures used in such facilities are among reasons for this. Against this background an evaluation...... was carried out of the change process related implementation of organic foods in large-scale foodservice facilities in Greater Copenhagen county in order to study the effects of such a change. Based on the findings, a set of guidelines has been developed for the successful implementation of organic foods...... into the large-scale foodservice. The findings and guidelines are however applicable to other types of innovation processes in food service....

  6. Large-Scale Participation: A Case Study of a Participatory Approach to Developing a New Public Library

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Eriksson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a case study of a participatory project that focuses on interaction in large-scale design, namely, the development of the new Urban Mediaspace Aarhus. This project, which has been under way for ten years, embodies a series of issues that arise when participatory design a...... different paradigms of inquiry and practice in a project of this scale, and how to capture and anchor the insights from participatory events to inform the ongoing design process....

  7. Government regulation and associated innovations in building energy-efficiency supervisory systems for large-scale public buildings in a market economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Xuezhi [China Academy of Building Research, Beijing 100013 (China)], E-mail: daixz9999@126.com; Wu Yong [Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100835 (China); Di Yanqiang [China Academy of Building Research, Beijing 100013 (China); Li Qiaoyan [Department of Building, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-06-15

    The supervision of energy efficiency in government office buildings and large-scale public buildings is the main embodiment for government implementation of Public Administration in the fields of resource saving and environmental protection. Aimed at improving the current situation of lack of government administration in building energy efficiency, this paper proposes the concept of 'change and redesign of governmental supervision in building energy efficiency', repositioning the role of government supervision. Based on this theory and other related theories in regulation economic and modern management, this paper analyzes and researches the action and function of all level governments in execution of the supervisory system of building energy efficiency in government office buildings and large-scale public buildings. This paper also defines the importance of government supervision in energy-efficiency system. Finally, this paper analyzes and researches the interaction mechanism between government and owners of different type buildings, government and energy-efficiency service institution with gambling as main features. This paper also presents some measurements to achieve a common benefit community in implementation of building energy-efficiency supervisory system.

  8. Government regulation and associated innovations in building energy-efficiency supervisory systems for large-scale public buildings in a market economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xuezhi; Di, Yanqiang [China Academy of Building Research, Beijing 100013 (China); Wu, Yong [Ministry of Housing and Urban-Rural Development of the People' s Republic of China, Beijing 100835 (China); Li, Qiaoyan [Department of Building, School of Design and Environment, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2009-06-15

    The supervision of energy efficiency in government office buildings and large-scale public buildings is the main embodiment for government implementation of Public Administration in the fields of resource saving and environmental protection. Aimed at improving the current situation of lack of government administration in building energy efficiency, this paper proposes the concept of 'change and redesign of governmental supervision in building energy efficiency', repositioning the role of government supervision. Based on this theory and other related theories in regulation economic and modern management, this paper analyzes and researches the action and function of all level governments in execution of the supervisory system of building energy efficiency in government office buildings and large-scale public buildings. This paper also defines the importance of government supervision in energy-efficiency system. Finally, this paper analyzes and researches the interaction mechanism between government and owners of different type buildings, government and energy-efficiency service institution with gambling as main features. This paper also presents some measurements to achieve a common benefit community in implementation of building energy-efficiency supervisory system. (author)

  9. Pulmonary intravascular large B-cell lymphoma successfully treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and prednisolone immunochemotherapy: Report of a patient surviving for over 1 year

    OpenAIRE

    NISHII-ITO, SHIZUKA; Izumi, Hiroki; Touge, Hirokazu; TAKEDA, KENICHI; Hosoda, Yuzuru; Yamasaki, Akira; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Shimizu, Eiji; Motokura, Toru

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old man with a history of lethargy, fever and dyspnea was admitted to Tottori University Hospital. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed splenomegaly and diffusely spreading ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in both lungs. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)-guided lung biopsy revealed intravascular proliferation of large atypical lymphoid cells in the arteries, veins and alveolar walls. The patient was diagnosed with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL); he receive...

  10. Public Relations Management in Large & Innovative Multinational Corporations : A qualitative & comparative study of Shell, Coloplast & Company A

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose:       The purpose of this study is to examine the factors that affect PR in multinational corporations (MNCs) today, and to explore how the factors affect PR management in the selected MNCs. Method:       A qualitative research was conducted through semi-structured interviews with PR managers at three multinational corporations. In addition to the primary data, a secondary data search was conducted. Conclusion: Both internal and external factors affect the PR management in large mult...

  11. USAR recruiting success factors

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, George W.; Kocher, Kathryn M.; Gandolfo, Robin Ragsdale

    1987-01-01

    This study attempts to identify attributes associated with successful recruiters, to evaluate existing data on recruiter performance and characteristics, and to develop a model to aid in the selection of personnel who are likely to become successful recruiters. Conventional multivariate statistical techniques have not proved adequate in identifying successful recruiters, largely because of the absence of reliable and valid measures of recruiter success. This study applies a relatively new met...

  12. Public appraisal of government efforts and participation intent in medico-ethical policymaking in Japan: a large scale national survey concerning brain death and organ transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Ichiro

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public satisfaction with policy process influences the legitimacy and acceptance of policies, and conditions the future political process, especially when contending ethical value judgments are involved. On the other hand, public involvement is required if effective policy is to be developed and accepted. Methods Using the data from a large-scale national opinion survey, this study evaluates public appraisal of past government efforts to legalize organ transplant from brain-dead bodies in Japan, and examines the public's intent to participate in future policy. Results A relatively large percentage of people became aware of the issue when government actions were initiated, and many increasingly formed their own opinions on the policy in question. However, a significant number (43.3% remained unaware of any legislative efforts, and only 26.3% of those who were aware provided positive appraisals of the policymaking process. Furthermore, a majority of respondents (61.8% indicated unwillingness to participate in future policy discussions of bioethical issues. Multivariate analysis revealed the following factors are associated with positive appraisals of policy development: greater age; earlier opinion formation; and familiarity with donor cards. Factors associated with likelihood of future participation in policy discussion include younger age, earlier attention to the issue, and knowledge of past government efforts. Those unwilling to participate cited as their reasons that experts are more knowledgeable and that the issues are too complex. Conclusions Results of an opinion survey in Japan were presented, and a set of factors statistically associated with them were discussed. Further efforts to improve policy making process on bioethical issues are desirable.

  13. Length Calculation for Vehicle Access of Large Public Buildings%大型公共建筑机动车出入口长度计算

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卓曦; 钱振东; 胡亮

    2012-01-01

    为提高出入口通行能力与城市道路交通安全水平,分析大型公共建筑机动车出入口长度影响因素,考虑大型公共建筑用地出行生成率与城市道路车辆反应视距,建立出入口长度模型.该模型利用建筑交通生成计算出入口道路排队长度,并利用视距三角形计算出入口车辆安全距离,取其中较大值为出入口长度.最后以某市公交枢纽站为例进行试算与仿真.仿真结果表明:应用模型所得出入口长度后,公交站出入口道路与临近城市道路的单车平均延误分别减少5.05s与6.37s,平均车速分别提高5.1 km/h与4.81 km/h.可见研究成果有利于大型公建机动车出入口交通渠化与线形改善.%To increase the access capacity and heighten the urban street traffic safety level, impact factors of the vehicle access length of large public buildings are analyzed. Then considering the land trip generation rate of large public buildings and vehicle decision sight distance of urban streets, the access length model is put forward. The model uses the building trip generation for calculating the access queue length and adopts the sight triangle to calculate the vehicle safety distance in the access, the larger one of which is considered as the access length. Finally, one urban public traffic transfer hub is taken as the example for calculating and simulating. The simulation result indicates that, after applying the access length from the model, the delay per vehicle of the public traffic station driveway and the adjacent urban street separately decreases 5. 05 s and 6. 37 s, while the average speed increases 5. 1 km/h and 4. 81 km/h. It can be seen that, research results are beneficial to improving the vehicle access traffic channelization and alignment of large public buildings.

  14. Obstetric fistula management and predictors of successful closure among women attending a public tertiary hospital in Rwanda: a retrospective review of records

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Background Globally, 50,000–100,000 women develop obstetric fistula annually. At least 33,000 of these women live in Sub-Saharan Africa where limitations in quality obstetric care and fistula corrective repairs are prevalent. Among women with fistula seeking care at public health facilities in resource-limited settings, there is paucity of data on quality of care received. The aim of this study was to characterize obstetric fistula among Rwandan women managed at a public tertiary hospital and...

  15. The high burden of tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV in a large Zambian prison: a public health alert.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    German Henostroza

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV represent two of the greatest health threats in African prisons. In 2010, collaboration between the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, the Zambia Prisons Service, and the National TB Program established a TB and HIV screening program in six Zambian prisons. We report data on the prevalence of TB and HIV in one of the largest facilities: Lusaka Central Prison. METHODS: Between November 2010 and April 2011, we assessed the prevalence of TB and HIV amongst inmates entering, residing, and exiting the prison, as well as in the surrounding community. The screening protocol included complete history and physical exam, digital radiography, opt-out HIV counseling and testing, sputum smear and culture. A TB case was defined as either bacteriologically confirmed or clinically diagnosed. RESULTS: A total of 2323 participants completed screening. A majority (88% were male, median age 31 years and body mass index 21.9. TB symptoms were found in 1430 (62%. TB was diagnosed in 176 (7.6% individuals and 52 people were already on TB treatment at time of screening. TB was bacteriologically confirmed in 88 cases (3.8% and clinically diagnosed in 88 cases (3.8%. Confirmed TB at entry and exit interventions were 4.6% and 5.3% respectively. Smear was positive in only 25% (n = 22 of bacteriologically confirmed cases. HIV prevalence among inmates currently residing in prison was 27.4%. CONCLUSION: Ineffective TB and HIV screening programs deter successful disease control strategies in prison facilities and their surrounding communities. We found rates of TB and HIV in Lusaka Central Prison that are substantially higher than the Zambian average, with a trend towards concentration and potential transmission of both diseases within the facility and to the general population. Investment in institutional and criminal justice reform as well as prison-specific health systems is urgently

  16. The high burden of tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in a large Zambian prison: a public health alert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henostroza, German; Topp, Stephanie M; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Maggard, Katie R; Phiri, Winifreda; Harris, Jennifer B; Krüüner, Annika; Kapata, Nathan; Ayles, Helen; Chileshe, Chisela; Reid, Stewart E

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) represent two of the greatest health threats in African prisons. In 2010, collaboration between the Centre for Infectious Disease Research in Zambia, the Zambia Prisons Service, and the National TB Program established a TB and HIV screening program in six Zambian prisons. We report data on the prevalence of TB and HIV in one of the largest facilities: Lusaka Central Prison. Between November 2010 and April 2011, we assessed the prevalence of TB and HIV amongst inmates entering, residing, and exiting the prison, as well as in the surrounding community. The screening protocol included complete history and physical exam, digital radiography, opt-out HIV counseling and testing, sputum smear and culture. A TB case was defined as either bacteriologically confirmed or clinically diagnosed. A total of 2323 participants completed screening. A majority (88%) were male, median age 31 years and body mass index 21.9. TB symptoms were found in 1430 (62%). TB was diagnosed in 176 (7.6%) individuals and 52 people were already on TB treatment at time of screening. TB was bacteriologically confirmed in 88 cases (3.8%) and clinically diagnosed in 88 cases (3.8%). Confirmed TB at entry and exit interventions were 4.6% and 5.3% respectively. Smear was positive in only 25% (n = 22) of bacteriologically confirmed cases. HIV prevalence among inmates currently residing in prison was 27.4%. Ineffective TB and HIV screening programs deter successful disease control strategies in prison facilities and their surrounding communities. We found rates of TB and HIV in Lusaka Central Prison that are substantially higher than the Zambian average, with a trend towards concentration and potential transmission of both diseases within the facility and to the general population. Investment in institutional and criminal justice reform as well as prison-specific health systems is urgently required.

  17. The How of Successful Citizen Advisory Committee Operation. A Research and Development Project: Citizen Participation in Policy Making for Public Schools in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Lloyd J.; Knell, Kenneth

    As a means of encouraging the formation of school-sponsored, citizen advisory committees, the Illinois Citizens Education Council embarked on a 3-year research and development project. This publication describes this project and thereby serves as a guide for organizing and using citizens' education advisory committees. Specific objectives of the…

  18. Should the moral core of climate issues be emphasized or downplayed in public discourse? Three ways to successfully manage the double-edged sword of moral communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Täuber, Susanne; van Zomeren, Martijn; Kutlaca, Maja

    The main objective of this paper is to identify a serious problem for communicators regarding the framing of climate issues in public discourse, namely that moralizing such an issue can motivate individuals while at the same time defensively lead them to avoid solving the problem. We review recent

  19. Systematic Management of Change Is the Key to Successful Staff Development. An Initial Study of the Bloomfield Public Schools Staff Development Project. Teacher Essentials, Styles & Strategies (TESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celso, Nicholas; Morris, Harold

    Confronted by a maturing staff, lower teacher turnover rates, declining enrollments, and more sophisticated instructional methods, the Bloomfield (New Jersey) Public School District adopted an ambitious staff development initiative in 1983. This paper describes the planning and implementation strategies used to launch Bloomfield's Teaching…

  20. Systematic Management of Change Is the Key to Successful Staff Development. An Initial Study of the Bloomfield Public Schools Staff Development Project. Teacher Essentials, Styles & Strategies (TESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celso, Nicholas; Morris, Harold

    Confronted by a maturing staff, lower teacher turnover rates, declining enrollments, and more sophisticated instructional methods, the Bloomfield (New Jersey) Public School District adopted an ambitious staff development initiative in 1983. This paper describes the planning and implementation strategies used to launch Bloomfield's Teaching…

  1. Should the moral core of climate issues be emphasized or downplayed in public discourse? Three ways to successfully manage the double-edged sword of moral communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Täuber, Susanne; van Zomeren, Martijn; Kutlaca, Maja

    2015-01-01

    The main objective of this paper is to identify a serious problem for communicators regarding the framing of climate issues in public discourse, namely that moralizing such an issue can motivate individuals while at the same time defensively lead them to avoid solving the problem. We review recent s

  2. Possible bradycardic mode of death and successful pacemaker treatment in a large family with features of long QT syndrome type 3 and Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Den Berg, Maarten P.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Viersma, Jan Willem; Brouwer, Jan; Haaksma, Jaap; Van Der Hout, Annemieke H.; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Bezzina, Connie R.; Van Langen, Irene M.; Beaufort-Krol, Gertie C. M.; Hein Cornel, J.A.N.; Crijns, Harry J. G. M.

    2001-01-01

    Introduction: We recently identified a novel mutation of SCN5A (1795insD) in a large family with features of both long QT syndrome type 3 and the Brugada syndrome. The purpose of this study was to detail the clinical features and efficacy of pacemaker therapy in preventing sudden death in this famil

  3. Detection of protozoan and bacterial pathogens of public health importance in faeces of Corvus spp. (large-billed crow).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, H Y; Stephen, A; Sushela, D; Mala, M

    2008-08-01

    Parasites and bacteria are reported in the faeces of birds in the current study. Fresh faecal samples of the large-billed crow (Corvus spp.) were collected from the study site at Bangsar, an urban setting in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. These samples were transported to laboratory and analysed for parasites and bacteria. Pre-prepared XLD agar plates were used for culturing the bacteria in the laboratory. Using the API 20ETM Test Strips, 9 different species of bacteria were identified belonging to the family Enterobacteriacea. They were Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter cloacae, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Kluyvera ascorbata, Salmonella arizonae, Salmonella typhi, Shigella flexneri and Shigella sonnei. The protozoan parasites detected include Cryptosporidium spp., Cyclospora spp., Blastocystis spp., and Capillaria hepatica and Ascaris lumbricoidus ova. Environmental air samples collected on agar plates using an air sampler in the area only produced fungal colonies. Some of these pathogens found in the crows are of zoonotic importance, especially Cryptosporidium, Blastocystis, Cyclopsora, Salmonella, Shigella and Kluyvera. The finding of Kluyvera spp. in crows in our current study highlights its zoonotic potential in an urban setting.

  4. Roman Engineering, Public Works and Importance of Public Objects in Roman Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Ponte-Arrebola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The skill and ability of the Romans in civil engineering and public works largely contributed to the establishment and success of their civilization. Many of the constructed works were built for the possibility of public use and enjoyment by its citizens, known as res publicae in usu publico.

  5. Pulmonary intravascular large B-cell lymphoma successfully treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin and prednisolone immunochemotherapy: Report of a patient surviving for over 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishii-Ito, Shizuka; Izumi, Hiroki; Touge, Hirokazu; Takeda, Kenichi; Hosoda, Yuzuru; Yamasaki, Akira; Kuwamoto, Satoshi; Shimizu, Eiji; Motokura, Toru

    2016-12-01

    A 73-year-old man with a history of lethargy, fever and dyspnea was admitted to Tottori University Hospital. A computed tomography (CT) scan revealed splenomegaly and diffusely spreading ground-glass opacities (GGOs) in both lungs. A video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS)-guided lung biopsy revealed intravascular proliferation of large atypical lymphoid cells in the arteries, veins and alveolar walls. The patient was diagnosed with intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL); he received 6 cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisolone (R-CHOP) immunochemotherapy and has remained in complete remission for >1 year. Although IVLBCL is a rare disease, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of pulmonary diffuse lesions that present with GGOs on CT scans.

  6. Severe intravascular hemolysis after transcatheter closure of a large patent ductus arteriosus using the Amplatzer duct occluder: successful resolution by intradevice coil deployment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, George; Mandalay, Asishkumar; Zacharias, T U; George, Biju

    2002-02-01

    A 21-year-old female developed severe unremitting intravascular hemolysis following closure of a large patent ductus arteriosus using an Amplatzer duct occluder. Percutaneous deployment of fibered platinum coils within the nitinol wire cage of the Amplatzer duct occluder abolished the residual shunt through the device and resulted in cessation of intravascular hemolysis and reversal of its adverse sequelae. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Gestão pública e a questão social na grande cidade Public administration and the social question in the large city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Raichelis

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O artigo oferece subsídios para a análise das novas expressões da questão social e urbana nas grandes metrópoles contemporâneas, especialmente na Cidade de São Paulo, no sentido de identificar conflitos, desafios e novas demandas para a gestão democrática da cidade e das políticas sociais públicas. Traz também ao debate o discurso das agências multilaterais sobre pobreza e desigualdade social, cotejando as propostas de políticas públicas formuladas para o seu enfrentamento, particularmente as voltadas para a problemática urbana das grandes cidades.The article presents some points to the analysis of new expressions of the social and urban issues in today’s large metropolis, especially Sao Paulo, aiming at identifying conflicts, challenges and new demands for the democratic administration of the city and for public social policies. It also seeks to debate the multilateral agencies’ discourse on poverty and social inequality, exploring public policy proposals conceived to target those issues, particularly the ones focused on the urban question in large cities.

  8. Non-pharmaceutical interventions during an outbreak of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus infection at a large public university, April-May 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Tarissa; Dee, Deborah L; Phares, Christina R; Lipman, Harvey B; Gould, L Hannah; Kutty, Preeta; Desai, Mitesh; Guh, Alice; Iuliano, A Danielle; Silverman, Paul; Siebold, Joseph; Armstrong, Gregory L; Swerdlow, David L; Massoudi, Mehran S; Fishbein, Daniel B

    2011-01-01

    Nonpharmaceutical interventions (NPIs), such as home isolation, social distancing, and infection control measures, are recommended by public health agencies as strategies to mitigate transmission during influenza pandemics. However, NPI implementation has rarely been studied in large populations. During an outbreak of 2009 Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) virus infection at a large public university in April 2009, an online survey was conducted among students, faculty, and staff to assess knowledge of and adherence to university-recommended NPI. Although 3924 (65%) of 6049 student respondents and 1057 (74%) of 1401 faculty respondents reported increased use of self-protective NPI, such as hand washing, only 27 (6.4%) of 423 students and 5 (8.6%) of 58 faculty with acute respiratory infection (ARI) reported staying home while ill. Nearly one-half (46%) of student respondents, including 44.7% of those with ARI, attended social events. Results indicate a need for efforts to increase compliance with home isolation and social distancing measures.

  9. Reducing the probability of false positive research findings by pre-publication validation – Experience with a large multiple sclerosis database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Moritz

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Published false positive research findings are a major problem in the process of scientific discovery. There is a high rate of lack of replication of results in clinical research in general, multiple sclerosis research being no exception. Our aim was to develop and implement a policy that reduces the probability of publishing false positive research findings. We have assessed the utility to work with a pre-publication validation policy after several years of research in the context of a large multiple sclerosis database. Methods The large database of the Sylvia Lawry Centre for Multiple Sclerosis Research was split in two parts: one for hypothesis generation and a validation part for confirmation of selected results. We present case studies from 5 finalized projects that have used the validation policy and results from a simulation study. Results In one project, the "relapse and disability" project as described in section II (example 3, findings could not be confirmed in the validation part of the database. The simulation study showed that the percentage of false positive findings can exceed 20% depending on variable selection. Conclusion We conclude that the validation policy has prevented the publication of at least one research finding that could not be validated in an independent data set (and probably would have been a "true" false-positive finding over the past three years, and has led to improved data analysis, statistical programming, and selection of hypotheses. The advantages outweigh the lost statistical power inherent in the process.

  10. Successes, challenges and lessons from a novel deployment of Xpert(®) MTB/RIF at a major South African public event [Short Communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page-Shipp, L; Stevens, W; Clark, D; Scott, L; Olsen, F; Kisbey-Green, H; Mametja, D; Churchyard, G

    2014-04-01

    In a mobile deployment of Xpert(®) MTB/RIF (Xpert) at the public event for 2012 South African World TB Day, Xpert testing was offered to tuberculosis (TB) symptomatic clients from gold mining and surrounding communities. Considerations before implementation included effective TB symptom screening; safe, effective sputum collection; uninterrupted electricity supply; stringent instrument verification and provision of on-site results. Public event Xpert testing is feasible; however, the case-finding rate was very low (0.7%). We recommend exploring enhanced symptom screening algorithms to improve pre-test probability, cost-effectiveness analysis, exploring alternate electrical fail-safes and on-site data connectivity and improving management of client expectations.

  11. Optimal Control for Nonlinear Interconnected Large-scale Systems: A Successive Approximation Approach%非线性互联大系统的最优控制:逐次逼近法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐功友; 孙亮

    2005-01-01

    The optimal control problem for nonlinear interconnected large-scale dynamic systems is considered. A successive approximation approach for designing the optimal controller is proposed with respect to quadratic performance indexes. By using the approach, the high order, coupling,nonlinear two-point boundary value (TPBV) problem is transformed into a sequence of linear decoupling TPBV problems. It is proven that the TPBV problem sequence uniformly converges to the optimal control for nonlinear interconnected large-scale systems. A suboptimal control law is obtained by using a finite iterative result of the optimal control sequence.

  12. [Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma with pontine involvement successfully treated with R-hyper-CVAD/R-MTX-Ara-C regimen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazato, Tomonori; Suzuki, Kazuhito; Mihara, Ai; Sanada, Yukinari; Yoshida, Sachiko; Kakimoto, Tsunayuki

    2010-02-01

    A 47-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital complaining of persistent fever and dry cough in June 2007. CT scan showed hepatosplenomegaly. Laboratory data revealed pancytopenia and increased levels of LDH and soluble interleukin-2 receptor. Malignant lymphoma was suspected, but histological diagnosis was difficult because superficial lymph nodes could not be palpated. Histological examination of the bone marrow biopsy specimen demonstrated the proliferation of large atypical lymphoid cells positive for CD20 and CD79a in the small capillaries, leading to the diagnosis of intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL). Although the results of neurological examination and CSF analysis were normal, head MRI showed a T2-hyperintense lesion in the pons. We chose R-hyper-CVAD/R-MTX-Ara-C alternating therapy with MTX intrathecal injection because CNS involvement in IVLBCL was highly suspected, and she responded well. Head MRI showed the disappearance of the abnormal signal in the pons after one cycle of R-hyper-CVAD. Five cycles of R-hyper-CVAD/R-MTX-Ara-C were performed and complete remission was obtained. R-hyper-CVAD/R-MTX-Ara-C alternating therapy was effective in an IVLBCL patient with CNS involvement.

  13. Reengineering in Australia: factors affecting success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity Murphy

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Business process reengineering (BPR is being used in many organisations worldwide to realign operations. Most of the research undertaken has been focused on North American or European practices. The study reported here replicates a US reengineering study in an Australian context by surveying large public and private sector Australian organisations. The study makes three main contributions by: (1 presenting a picture of BPR practices in Australia, (2 clarifying factors critical to the success of reengineering projects in Australia, and (3 providing a comparison of factors leading to success in Australian BPR projects with those found in the US.

  14. Characterisation of the large-scale production process of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) with the analysis of succession and spatial heterogeneity of lignocellulolytic enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bánfi, Renáta; Pohner, Zsuzsanna; Kovács, József; Luzics, Szabina; Nagy, Adrienn; Dudás, Melinda; Tanos, Péter; Márialigeti, Károly; Vajna, Balázs

    2015-12-01

    Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) lignocellulolytic enzyme activity pattern and variation was investigated in a large-scale facility from spawning until the end of the second flush. In the first cultivation cycle laccase production reached its peak during vegetative growth stage, while manganese-peroxidase showed the highest activity during fruiting body induction. Cellulose and hemicellulose degrading enzymes had maximal activity at the beginning of flush and harvest stage. The enzyme activities showed similar tendencies among five different mushroom substrate blocks representing a production house. The spatial variability analysis of enzyme activities pointed out the within substrate block heterogeneity as the main source if variation. This result was confirmed by Combined Cluster and Discriminant Analysis (CCDA) method showing minimal among block heterogeneity considering the whole investigation period; furthermore in the first cultivation cycle all blocks were grouped into one cluster.

  15. Leadership is Central to the Organizational Success of Libraries. A review of: Mullins, John, and Margaret Linehan. “The Central Role of Leaders in Public Libraries.” Library Management 26.6/7 (2005: 386‐96.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Haley

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To provide an understanding of the concept of leadership as perceived and practised by a group of international public library leaders, thereby contributing to the existing body of literature on this topic.Design – Qualitative study employing in depth, face‐to‐face interviews with 3 subjects and 27 e‐mail interviews based on 30 structured questions formulated from a review of the literature.Setting – Nottingham and Rotherham, two cities in the Public libraries in Ireland, Britain, and the east coast of the United States during 2003/04.Subjects – Thirty senior public library leaders.Methods – Thirty top level library leaders, 50% of whom came from outside Ireland, were selected based on the following rationale concerning their institutions: have a history of providing publicly funded public libraries; are under‐researched; and, accessibility for the authors. Irish librarians were chosen based on their national profile, geographic convenience to the researchers, and availability/cooperation. Only libraryl eaders or deputy leaders were considered. Interviews for 27 candidates where scheduled via e‐mail and 3 were arranged through face‐to‐face meetings. Participants were asked 30 structured questions drawn from the current literature on leadership. Responses were recorded electronically and later transcribed for analysis via a grounded theory approach that categorized the data. This method of analysis endeavours to provide theory based on research observations that begin from qualitative data and then go through a process of sifting and categorization, which leads to a hypothesis.Main results – Nine broad categories emerged from the “grounded theory analysis.” The paper deals with only 1 ‐ the central role of the library leader. In response to queries by the authors, 67% (20 agreed that leadership took precedence over all other factors as a determinant for organizational success. Ten (33% disagreed and

  16. Effects of Hand-Rearing on Reproductive Success in Captive Large Cats Panthera tigris altaica, Uncia uncia, Acinonyx jubatus and Neofelis nebulosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Maja Coulthard; Schwitzer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Species Survival Plans and European Endangered Species Programmes have been developed for several species of endangered felids in order to build up captive reserve populations and support their conservation in the wild. The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), snow leopard (Uncia uncia), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) are managed in such ex situ conservation programmes. Many zoological institutions hand-rear offspring if rearing by the mother fails. Hand-rearing can cause behavioural problems, resulting in decreased copulation and lower breeding success in some species. In this study, studbook data subsets were examined: from 1901 to 2011; and 2000 to 2011. We analysed records from 4273 Siberian tigers, 2045 snow leopards, 3435 cheetahs, and 804 clouded leopards. We assessed the number of offspring produced, litter size, age at first reproduction, longevity, infant mortality and generational rearing of hand-reared versus parent-reared individuals. Hand-reared Siberian tigers (ptigers lived shorter lives, while hand-reared cheetahs lived longer (ptiger and male snow leopard cubs (p = 0.0404; p = 0.0349) in the 2000-2011 dataset. The rearing of the mother and subsequent rearing of offspring showed a significant relationship for all species (ptiger and snow leopard cubs; p<0.001 for cheetah and snow leopard cubs). Taking into account the limited carrying capacity of zoos, the results of this study highlight that careful consideration should be taken when deciding whether or not to hand-rear individuals that are part of Species Survival Plans and European Endangered Species Programmes.

  17. Effects of Hand-Rearing on Reproductive Success in Captive Large Cats Panthera tigris altaica, Uncia uncia, Acinonyx jubatus and Neofelis nebulosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Maja Coulthard; Schwitzer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Species Survival Plans and European Endangered Species Programmes have been developed for several species of endangered felids in order to build up captive reserve populations and support their conservation in the wild. The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica), snow leopard (Uncia uncia), cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) and clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa) are managed in such ex situ conservation programmes. Many zoological institutions hand-rear offspring if rearing by the mother fails. Hand-rearing can cause behavioural problems, resulting in decreased copulation and lower breeding success in some species. In this study, studbook data subsets were examined: from 1901 to 2011; and 2000 to 2011. We analysed records from 4273 Siberian tigers, 2045 snow leopards, 3435 cheetahs, and 804 clouded leopards. We assessed the number of offspring produced, litter size, age at first reproduction, longevity, infant mortality and generational rearing of hand-reared versus parent-reared individuals. Hand-reared Siberian tigers (pcheetahs (pcheetahs lived longer (pcheetahs (p = 0.0395) in the 1901–2011 dataset and lower in hand-reared female Siberian tiger and male snow leopard cubs (p = 0.0404; p = 0.0349) in the 2000–2011 dataset. The rearing of the mother and subsequent rearing of offspring showed a significant relationship for all species (pcheetah and snow leopard cubs). Taking into account the limited carrying capacity of zoos, the results of this study highlight that careful consideration should be taken when deciding whether or not to hand-rear individuals that are part of Species Survival Plans and European Endangered Species Programmes. PMID:27214261

  18. Effects of Hand-Rearing on Reproductive Success in Captive Large Cats Panthera tigris altaica, Uncia uncia, Acinonyx jubatus and Neofelis nebulosa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Coulthard Hampson

    Full Text Available Species Survival Plans and European Endangered Species Programmes have been developed for several species of endangered felids in order to build up captive reserve populations and support their conservation in the wild. The Siberian tiger (Panthera tigris altaica, snow leopard (Uncia uncia, cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus and clouded leopard (Neofelis nebulosa are managed in such ex situ conservation programmes. Many zoological institutions hand-rear offspring if rearing by the mother fails. Hand-rearing can cause behavioural problems, resulting in decreased copulation and lower breeding success in some species. In this study, studbook data subsets were examined: from 1901 to 2011; and 2000 to 2011. We analysed records from 4273 Siberian tigers, 2045 snow leopards, 3435 cheetahs, and 804 clouded leopards. We assessed the number of offspring produced, litter size, age at first reproduction, longevity, infant mortality and generational rearing of hand-reared versus parent-reared individuals. Hand-reared Siberian tigers (p<0.01; p = 0.0113, snow leopards (p<0.01, male cheetahs (p<0.01 and female clouded leopards (p<0.01 produced fewer offspring than parent-reared individuals. Hand-reared snow leopard breeding pairs had larger litters than parent-reared pairs (p = 0.0404. Hand-reared snow leopard females reproduced later in life (p<0.01. Hand-reared female Siberian tigers lived shorter lives, while hand-reared cheetahs lived longer (p<0.01; p = 0.0107. Infant mortality was higher in hand-reared snow leopards (p<0.01 and male cheetahs (p = 0.0395 in the 1901-2011 dataset and lower in hand-reared female Siberian tiger and male snow leopard cubs (p = 0.0404; p = 0.0349 in the 2000-2011 dataset. The rearing of the mother and subsequent rearing of offspring showed a significant relationship for all species (p<0.01 for Siberian tiger and snow leopard cubs; p<0.001 for cheetah and snow leopard cubs. Taking into account the limited carrying capacity of zoos, the

  19. Large-scale synthesis of nearly monodisperse CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals using air-stable reagents via successive ion layer adsorption and reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J Jack; Wang, Y Andrew; Guo, Wenzhuo; Keay, Joel C; Mishima, Tetsuya D; Johnson, Matthew B; Peng, Xiaogang

    2003-10-15

    Successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) originally developed for the deposition of thin films on solid substrates from solution baths is introduced as a technique for the growth of high-quality core/shell nanocrystals of compound semiconductors. The growth of the shell was designed to grow one monolayer at a time by alternating injections of air-stable and inexpensive cationic and anionic precursors into the reaction mixture with core nanocrystals. The principles of SILAR were demonstrated by the CdSe/CdS core/shell model system using its shell-thickness-dependent optical spectra as the probes with CdO and elemental S as the precursors. For this reaction system, a relatively high temperature, about 220-240 degrees C, was found to be essential for SILAR to fully occur. The synthesis can be readily performed on a multigram scale. The size distribution of the core/shell nanocrystals was maintained even after five monolayers of CdS shell (equivalent to about 10 times volume increase for a 3.5 nm CdSe nanocrystal) were grown onto the core nanocrystals. The epitaxial growth of the core/shell structures was verified by optical spectroscopy, TEM, XRD, and XPS. The photoluminescence quantum yield (PL QY) of the as-prepared CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals ranged from 20% to 40%, and the PL full-width at half-maximum (fwhm) was maintained between 23 and 26 nm, even for those nanocrystals for which the UV-vis and PL peaks red-shifted by about 50 nm from that of the core nanocrystals. Several types of brightening phenomena were observed, some of which can further boost the PL QY of the core/shell nanocrystals. The CdSe/CdS core/shell nanocrystals were found to be superior in comparison to the highly luminescent CdSe plain core nanocrystals. The SILAR technique reported here can also be used for the growth of complex colloidal semiconductor nanostructures, such as quantum shells and colloidal quantum wells.

  20. 大型公共场所室内空气净化技术%Indoor Air Purification Technology in Large-sized Publics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈健; 王健

    2012-01-01

      The paper presents the indoor air pol ution, particularly air pol ution problems in large-sized publics, the familiar air purification technology and development. The paper puts forward some suggestions in the field of air pol ution treatment and air purification technology application by analyzing the engineering examples.%  介绍了室内空气污染特别是大型公共场所的空气污染问题,以及常见的空气净化技术及发展情况,通过分析工程实例,提出了空气污染治理及净化技术应用的一些建议。

  1. Factores de éxito en campañas de alimentación saludable: un estudio de casos Success factors in public healthy eating campaigns: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aschemann-Witzel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: Rara vez se ha evaluado la efectividad de las campañas e intervenciones de información pública. Por ello, el estudio de actividades exitosas podría contribuir al desarrollo y puesta en práctica en el futuro de campañas e intervenciones a favor de una alimentación saludable Objetivos: El objetivo del presente estudio de campañas de información sobre alimentación saludable fue primeramente la identificación de los factores de éxito de las mismas, y seguidamente la descripción de sus inter-relaciones. Métodos: Se entrevistaron a 11 representantes de industrias alimentarias cuyas campañas fueron identificadas como exitosas en una etapa previa del estudio. Las entrevistas fueron luego analizadas con respecto a los factores de éxito potenciales. Estos últimos fueron posteriormente utilizados para desarrollar un modelo de factores de éxito y sus interrelaciones. Resultados: El éxito de los casos estudiados fue atribuido primeramente a las características del ambiente macro, o a una colaboración entre los sectores público y privado. Segundo, se identificó al compromiso de las comunidades, elementos de empoderamiento del grupo objetivo y a la ejecución de medidas de marketing social. Tercero, el éxito puede atribuirse a la adopción por parte de la ciudadanía de las campañas y los cambios estructurales consecuentes. Conclusiones: El modelo y los factores de éxito identificados resaltan que el éxito puede originarse en tres fases cruciales, el diseño y montaje de la campaña, su ejecución y finalmente, su interacción con la ciudadanía. El modelo puede servir como guía para el desarrollo de campañas en el futuro.Introduction: Public campaigns and interventions are rarely fully evaluated regarding their effectiveness. The analysis of past, successful activities can contribute to the future development of public campaigns and interventions for healthier eating. Objectives: The study of public campaigns and

  2. Effects of fluctuating flows and a controlled flood on incubation success and early survival rates and growth of age-0 rainbow trout in a large regulated river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korman, Josh; Kaplinski, Matthew; Melis, Theodore S.

    2011-01-01

    Hourly fluctuations in flow from Glen Canyon Dam were increased in an attempt to limit the population of nonnative rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in the Colorado River, Arizona, due to concerns about negative effects of nonnative trout on endangered native fishes. Controlled floods have also been conducted to enhance native fish habitat. We estimated that rainbow trout incubation mortality rates resulting from greater fluctuations in flow were 23-49% (2003 and 2004) compared with 5-11% under normal flow fluctuations (2006-2010). Effects of this mortality were apparent in redd excavations but were not seen in hatch date distributions or in the abundance of the age-0 population. Multiple lines of evidence indicated that a controlled flood in March 2008, which was intended to enhance native fish habitat, resulted in a large increase in early survival rates of age-0 rainbow trout. Age-0 abundance in July 2008 was over fourfold higher than expected given the number of viable eggs that produced these fish. A hatch date analysis indicated that early survival rates were much higher for cohorts that hatched about 1 month after the controlled flood (~April 15) relative to those that hatched before this date. The cohorts that were fertilized after the flood were not exposed to high flows and emerged into better-quality habitat with elevated food availability. Interannual differences in age-0 rainbow trout growth based on otolith microstructure supported this hypothesis. It is likely that strong compensation in survival rates shortly after emergence mitigated the impact of incubation losses caused by increases in flow fluctuations. Control of nonnative fish populations will be most effective when additional mortality is applied to older life stages after the majority of density-dependent mortality has occurred. Our study highlights the need to rigorously assess instream flow decisions through the evaluation of population-level responses.

  3. A success story: how a single targeted-therapy molecule impacted on treatment and outcome of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mian, Michael; Augustin, Florian; Kocher, Florian; Gunsilius, Eberhard; Willenbacher, Wolfgang; Zabernigg, August; Zangerl, Günther; Oexle, Horst; Schreieck, Stefan; Schnallinger, Michael; Fiegl, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a rather aggressive disease and the natural course of this lymphoma is very dismal. However, first the introduction of anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens and then the addition of rituximab were important steps forward. Since no complete real-life analyses have yet been published, we analyzed all patients with DLBCL treated with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone (R-CHOP) in the whole region of Tyrol and compared the results to a historical CHOP(-like)-treated cohort. Two hundred and nineteen consecutive patients underwent R-CHOP and 72% achieved a complete remission (CR); 20% suffered a relapse and 31% died. 5-Year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 56% and 69%, respectively. We identified several parameters influencing PFS and OS significantly in univariate analysis, but only stage III/IV and hemoglobin 60 years for OS. In comparison to the CHOP(-like)-treated group, the CR rate was similar, while the percentage of relapse was nearly twice in the historical cohort, namely 44%. This translated into a dramatically improved PFS and OS for the R-CHOP group. In conclusion, in a real-life setting R-CHOP results in high percentages of response and long-term remission. Moreover we showed that in the rituximab era, factors other than the single parameters of the international prognostic index significantly influence PFS and OS. Finally, we confirm the independent impact of rituximab on the outcome of an unselected population with DLBCL.

  4. Cost-Effective Large-Scale Occupancy-Abundance Monitoring of Invasive Brushtail Possums (Trichosurus Vulpecula on New Zealand's Public Conservation Land.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Gormley

    Full Text Available There is interest in large-scale and unbiased monitoring of biodiversity status and trend, but there are few published examples of such monitoring being implemented. The New Zealand Department of Conservation is implementing a monitoring program that involves sampling selected biota at the vertices of an 8-km grid superimposed over the 8.6 million hectares of public conservation land that it manages. The introduced brushtail possum (Trichosurus Vulpecula is a major threat to some biota and is one taxon that they wish to monitor and report on. A pilot study revealed that the traditional method of monitoring possums using leg-hold traps set for two nights, termed the Trap Catch Index, was a constraint on the cost and logistical feasibility of the monitoring program. A phased implementation of the monitoring program was therefore conducted to collect data for evaluating the trade-off between possum occupancy-abundance estimates and the costs of sampling for one night rather than two nights. Reducing trapping effort from two nights to one night along four trap-lines reduced the estimated costs of monitoring by 5.8% due to savings in labour, food and allowances; it had a negligible effect on estimated national possum occupancy but resulted in slightly higher and less precise estimates of relative possum abundance. Monitoring possums for one night rather than two nights would provide an annual saving of NZ$72,400, with 271 fewer field days required for sampling. Possums occupied 60% (95% credible interval; 53-68 of sampling locations on New Zealand's public conservation land, with a mean relative abundance (Trap Catch Index of 2.7% (2.0-3.5. Possum occupancy and abundance were higher in forest than in non-forest habitats. Our case study illustrates the need to evaluate relationships between sampling design, cost, and occupancy-abundance estimates when designing and implementing large-scale occupancy-abundance monitoring programs.

  5. Detection of Asymptomatic Cardiac Metastasis and Successful Salvage Chemotherapy Comprising a Prednisone, Etoposide, Procarbazine, and Cyclophosphamide Regimen in an Elderly Japanese Patient Suffering from a Delayed Recurrence of Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keita Tagami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of facial diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL associated with recurrent metastasis in the heart and other sites in a 76-year-old Japanese woman. Initially, she developed DLBCL in her left upper eyelid that spread into the left orbit (Ann Arbor classification stage I. The lesion went into clinical regression after 4 cycles of rituximab plus cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy. More than 3 years later, the lymphoma recurred in her facial skin, together with metastases in the mediastinal lymph nodes and the heart; the tumor in the heart was successfully detected by PET/CT and cardiac MRI. To treat the recurrent lesions, we performed a salvage chemotherapy regimen comprising prednisone, etoposide, procarbazine, and cyclophosphamide, which successfully induced tumor regression.

  6. Small(pox) success?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birn, Anne-Emanuelle

    2011-02-01

    The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO) official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata) became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success.

  7. Small(pox success?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Emanuelle Birn

    Full Text Available The 30th anniversary of the World Health Organization's (WHO official certification of smallpox eradication was marked by a slew of events hailing the campaign's dramatic tale of technological and organizational triumph against an ancient scourge. Yet commemorations also serve as moments of critical reflection. This article questions the acclaim showered upon smallpox eradication as the single greatest public health success in history. It examines how and why smallpox eradication and WHO's concurrent social justice-oriented primary health care approach (following from the Declaration of Alma-Ata became competing paradigms. It synthesizes critiques of eradication's shortcomings and debunks some of the myths surrounding the global eradication campaign as a public health priority and necessity, and as a Cold War victory of cooperation. The article concludes with thoughts on integrating technical and social-political aspects of health within the context of welfare states as the means to achieving widespread and enduring global public health success.

  8. HydroShare for iUTAH: Collaborative Publication, Interoperability, and Reuse of Hydrologic Data and Models for a Large, Interdisciplinary Water Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsburgh, J. S.; Jones, A. S.

    2016-12-01

    Data and models used within the hydrologic science community are diverse. New research data and model repositories have succeeded in making data and models more accessible, but have been, in most cases, limited to particular types or classes of data or models and also lack the type of collaborative, and iterative functionality needed to enable shared data collection and modeling workflows. File sharing systems currently used within many scientific communities for private sharing of preliminary and intermediate data and modeling products do not support collaborative data capture, description, visualization, and annotation. More recently, hydrologic datasets and models have been cast as "social objects" that can be published, collaborated around, annotated, discovered, and accessed. Yet it can be difficult using existing software tools to achieve the kind of collaborative workflows and data/model reuse that many envision. HydroShare is a new, web-based system for sharing hydrologic data and models with specific functionality aimed at making collaboration easier and achieving new levels of interactive functionality and interoperability. Within HydroShare, we have developed new functionality for creating datasets, describing them with metadata, and sharing them with collaborators. HydroShare is enabled by a generic data model and content packaging scheme that supports describing and sharing diverse hydrologic datasets and models. Interoperability among the diverse types of data and models used by hydrologic scientists is achieved through the use of consistent storage, management, sharing, publication, and annotation within HydroShare. In this presentation, we highlight and demonstrate how the flexibility of HydroShare's data model and packaging scheme, HydroShare's access control and sharing functionality, and versioning and publication capabilities have enabled the sharing and publication of research datasets for a large, interdisciplinary water research project

  9. Success in Science, Success in Collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, Mariann R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-08-25

    This is a series of four different scientific problems which were resolved through collaborations. They are: "Better flow cytometry through novel focusing technology", "Take Off®: Helping the Agriculture Industry Improve the Viability of Sustainable, Large-Production Crops", "The National Institutes of Health's Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS)", and "Expanding the capabilities of SOLVE/RESOLVE through the PHENIX Consortium." For each one, the problem is listed, the solution, advantages, bottom line, then information about the collaboration including: developing the technology, initial success, and continued success.

  10. Public survey of financial incentives for kidney donation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.W. Kranenburg (Leonieke); A. Schram (Andre); W.C. Zuidema (Wilij); W. Weimar (Willem); M.T. Hilhorst (Medard); E. Hessing (Ellen); J. Passchier (Jan); J.J. van Busschbach (Jan)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground. One of the most fiercely debated strategies to increase the number of kidneys for transplantation is the introduction of financial incentives. As the success of such strategy largely depends on public support, we performed a public survey on this topic. Methods. We developed

  11. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Morten Hillgaard; Söderqvist, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ has set the frame for discourse about contemporary ageing research. Through an analysis of the reception to John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn's launch of the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ in 1987, this article maps out the important themes...... and discussions that have emerged from the interdisciplinary field of ageing research. These include an emphasis on interdisciplinarity; the interaction between biology, psycho-social contexts and lifestyle choices; the experiences of elderly people; life-course perspectives; optimisation and prevention...... strategies; and the importance of individual, societal and scientific conceptualisations and understandings of ageing. By presenting an account of the recent historical uses, interpretations and critiques of the concept, the article unfolds the practical and normative complexities of ‘ successful ageing’....

  12. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, Morten Hillgaard; Söderqvist, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Since the late 1980s, the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ has set the frame for discourse about contemporary ageing research. Through an analysis of the reception to John W. Rowe and Robert L. Kahn's launch of the concept of ‘ successful ageing’ in 1987, this article maps out the important themes...... and discussions that have emerged from the interdisciplinary field of ageing research. These include an emphasis on interdisciplinarity; the interaction between biology, psycho-social contexts and lifestyle choices; the experiences of elderly people; life-course perspectives; optimisation and prevention...... strategies; and the importance of individual, societal and scientific conceptualisations and understandings of ageing. By presenting an account of the recent historical uses, interpretations and critiques of the concept, the article unfolds the practical and normative complexities of ‘ successful ageing’....

  13. Effort-reward and work-life imbalance, general stress and burnout among employees of a large public hospital in Switzerland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämmig, Oliver; Brauchli, Rebecca; Bauer, Georg F

    2012-05-31

    Effort-reward imbalance (ERI) and work-life imbalance (WLI) are recognised risk factors for work stress and burnout but have not been investigated conjointly so far and compared with each other in this regard. The present cross-sectional study provides initial evidence by studying associations of ERI and WLI with general stress and burnout simultaneously. The study was based on survey data collected in 2007 among the personnel of a large public hospital in the canton of Zurich covering a random sample of 502 employees of all professions and positions. Prevalence rates, correlation coefficients, standardised regression coefficients and odds ratios were calculated as measures of association. Concerning the main research question and relating to the entire study sample, WLI was found to be more strongly associated with general stress and burnout than ERI. As stratified analyses with regard to burnout have shown, this applied especially to nursing, technical care and emergency staffs who account for more than three fifths of the study population. But for other professional categories like physicians, therapists and medical-technical personnel the opposite of a stronger association of ERI with burnout was found. Results also suggested that general stress plays a (rather minor) mediating role in the relationships between ERI and burnout and particularly between WLI and burnout. For the prevention of chronic stress and burnout one should consider both high efforts put into work as well as all job demands that are competing and interfering with family responsibilities or other private activities should be considered.

  14. Background culturable bacteria aerosol in two large public buildings using HVAC filters as long term, passive, high-volume air samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Nicholas J; Kuehn, Thomas H; Kim, Seung Won; Raynor, Peter C; Anantharaman, Senthilvelan; Ramakrishnan, M A; Goyal, Sagar M

    2008-04-01

    Background culturable bacteria aerosols were collected and identified in two large public buildings located in Minneapolis, Minnesota and Seattle, Washington over a period of 5 months and 3 months, respectively. The installed particulate air filters in the ventilation systems were used as the aerosol sampling devices at each location. Both pre and final filters were collected from four air handing units at each site to determine the influence of location within the building, time of year, geographical location and difference between indoor and outdoor air. Sections of each loaded filter were eluted with 10 ml of phosphate buffered saline (PBS). The resulting solutions were cultured on blood agar plates and incubated for 24 h at 36 degrees C. Various types of growth media were then used for subculturing, followed by categorization using a BioLog MicroStation (Biolog, Hayward, CA, USA) and manual observation. Environmental parameters were gathered near each filter by the embedded on-site environmental monitoring systems to determine the effect of temperature, humidity and air flow. Thirty nine different species of bacteria were identified, 17 found only in Minneapolis and 5 only in Seattle. The hardy spore-forming genus Bacillus was the most commonly identified and showed the highest concentrations. A significant decrease in the number of species and their concentration occurred in the Minneapolis air handling unit supplying 100% outdoor air in winter, however no significant correlations between bacteria concentration and environmental parameters were found.

  15. AAA application in diagnosis exams in a large public hospital, RS, Brazil; Aplicacao do AAA na realizacao de exames diagnosticos em um hospital publico de grande porte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacelar, A.; Ferret, A.A.; Vanni, S.; Galhardi, M.P.; Lykawka, R., E-mail: abacelar@hepa.ufrgs.br, E-mail: allferret@gmail.com, E-mail: svanni@hepa.ufrgs.br, E-mail: mpgalhardi@gmail.com, E-mail: rlykawka@hepa.ufrgs.br [Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre (HCPA), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-10-01

    Objective: the initiative AAA - Awareness , Appropriateness and Audit , promotes consciousness ( Awareness) , fitness ( Appropriateness ) and Audit ( Audit) . This paper analyzes the application of the concept in the AAA requests and justifications examinations using ionizing radiation within a large public hospital. Materials and methods: we collected and analyzed data between the years 2011 and 2012, concerning the number of exams performed with the use of radiation and their justifications. After, we sought to raise awareness of the clinical team through training on the risks and benefits of the various modalities of the radiology department and the need to justify the use of ionizing radiation on health. After the data were collected again of test requests for verification of the effectiveness of training. Results: the mean requests that need to be appropriate to the AAA in the last quarter of 2011 was 75 % lower than the average demands of the first quarter, matched against the last two months of 2012 increased by up to four times the number requests that require improvements in relation to the excellent results obtained in July 2012. Conclusion: it is shown in this paper the need of implementing this initiative AAA continuously added to the clinical staff awareness about the risk of the use of ionizing radiation, the appropriateness of the requests of these tests , as well as the control of this process in order to optimize use of ionizing radiation on health.

  16. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    affects citations. In regard to author-specific characteristics, male authors, full professors and authors working economics or history departments, and authors employed in Anglo-Saxon countries, are more likely to get cited than others. As a ‘shortcut' to citation success, we find that research diffusion......This study analyses determinants of citation success among authors publishing in economic history journals. Bibliometric features, like article length and number of authors, are positively correlated with the citation rate up to a certain point. Remarkably, publishing in top-ranked journals hardly...

  17. Assessment of temporal trend of radiation dose to the public living in the large area contaminated with radioactive materials after a nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, A Ra; Kim, Min Jun; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Chan; Seol, Jeung Gun [Radiation Safety Team, Korea Electric Power Corporation Nuclear Fuel, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    It has been about 5 years since the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, which contaminated large area with radioactive materials. It is necessary to assess radiation dose to establish evacuation areas and to set decontamination goal for the large contaminated area. In this study, we assessed temporal trend of radiation dose to the public living in the large area contaminated with radioactive materials after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The dose assessment was performed based on Chernobyl model and RESRAD model for two evacuation lift areas, Kawauchi and Naraha. It was reported that deposition densities in the areas were 4.3-96 kBq m{sup -2} for {sup 134}Cs, 1.4-300 kBq m{sup -2} for {sup 137}Cs, respectively. Radiation dose to the residents depended on radioactive cesium concentrations in the soil, ranging 0.11-2.4 mSv y{sup -1} at Kawauchi area and 0.69-1.1 mSv y{sup -1} at Naraha area in July 2014. The difference was less than 5% in radiation doses estimated by two different models. Radiation dose decreased with calendar time and the decreasing slope varied depending on dose assessment models. Based on the Chernobyl dosimetry model, radiation doses decreased with calendar time to about 65% level of the radiation dose in 2014 after 1 year, 11% level after 10 years, and 5.6% level after 30 years. RESRAD dosimetry model more slowly decreased radiation dose with time to about 85% level after 1 year, 40% level after 10 years, and 15% level after 30 years. The decrease of radiation dose can be mainly attributed into radioactive decays and environmental transport of the radioactive cesium. Only environmental transports of radioactive cesium without consideration of radioactive decays decreased radiation dose additionally 43% after 1 year, 72% after 3 years, 80% after 10 years, and 83% after 30 years. Radiation doses estimated with cesium concentration in the soil based on Chernobyl dosimetry model were compared with directly measured radiation doses

  18. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Vaio, Gianfranco; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    This study analyses determinants of citation success among authors publishing in economic history journals. Bibliometric features, like article length and number of authors, are positively correlated with the citation rate up to a certain point. Remarkably, publishing in top-ranked journals hardl...

  19. Citation Success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaio, Gianfranco Di; Waldenström, Daniel; Weisdorf, Jacob Louis

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the determinants of citation success among authors who have recently published their work in economic history journals. Besides offering clues about how to improve one's scientific impact, our citation analysis also sheds light on the state of the field of economic history. Co...

  20. Successful ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusumastuti, Sasmita; Derks, Marloes G. M.; Tellier, Siri;

    2016-01-01

    . METHODS: We performed a novel, hypothesis-free and quantitative analysis of citation networks exploring the literature on successful ageing that exists in the Web of Science Core Collection Database using the CitNetExplorer software. Outcomes were visualized using timeline-based citation patterns...

  1. "Success"ful Reading Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Carol J.

    1986-01-01

    The Success in Reading and Writing Program at a K-2 school in Fort Jackson, South Carolina, teaches children of varied races and abilities to read and write using newspapers, dictionaries, library books, magazines, and telephone directories. These materials help students develop language skills in a failure-free atmosphere. Includes two…

  2. Relationship between neighbourhood socioeconomic position and neighbourhood public green space availability: An environmental inequality analysis in a large German city applying generalized linear models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüle, Steffen Andreas; Gabriel, Katharina M A; Bolte, Gabriele

    2017-06-01

    The environmental justice framework states that besides environmental burdens also resources may be social unequally distributed both on the individual and on the neighbourhood level. This ecological study investigated whether neighbourhood socioeconomic position (SEP) was associated with neighbourhood public green space availability in a large German city with more than 1 million inhabitants. Two different measures were defined for green space availability. Firstly, percentage of green space within neighbourhoods was calculated with the additional consideration of various buffers around the boundaries. Secondly, percentage of green space was calculated based on various radii around the neighbourhood centroid. An index of neighbourhood SEP was calculated with principal component analysis. Log-gamma regression from the group of generalized linear models was applied in order to consider the non-normal distribution of the response variable. All models were adjusted for population density. Low neighbourhood SEP was associated with decreasing neighbourhood green space availability including 200m up to 1000m buffers around the neighbourhood boundaries. Low neighbourhood SEP was also associated with decreasing green space availability based on catchment areas measured from neighbourhood centroids with different radii (1000m up to 3000 m). With an increasing radius the strength of the associations decreased. Social unequally distributed green space may amplify environmental health inequalities in an urban context. Thus, the identification of vulnerable neighbourhoods and population groups plays an important role for epidemiological research and healthy city planning. As a methodical aspect, log-gamma regression offers an adequate parametric modelling strategy for positively distributed environmental variables. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Outcomes of a nurse-managed service for stable HIV-positive patients in a large South African public sector antiretroviral therapy programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsrud, Anna; Kaplan, Richard; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Myer, Landon

    2014-09-01

    Models of care utilizing task shifting and decentralization are needed to support growing ART programmes. We compared patient outcomes between a doctor-managed clinic and a nurse-managed down-referral site in Cape Town, South Africa. Analysis included all adults who initiated ART between 2002 and 2011 within a large public sector ART service. Stable patients were eligible for down-referral. Outcomes [mortality, loss to follow-up (LTFU), virologic failure] were compared under different models of care using proportional hazards models with time-dependent covariates. Five thousand seven hundred and forty-six patients initiated ART and over 5 years 41% (n = 2341) were down-referred; the median time on ART before down-referral was 1.6 years (interquartile range, 0.9-2.6). The nurse-managed down-referral site reported lower crude rates of mortality, LTFU and virologic failure compared with the doctor-managed clinic. After adjustment, there was no difference in the risk of mortality or virologic failure by model of care. However, patients who were down-referred were more likely to be LTFU than those retained at the doctor-managed site (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.36; 95% CI, 1.09-1.69). Increased levels of LTFU in the nurse-managed vs. doctor-managed service were observed in subgroups of male patients, those with advanced disease at initiation and those who started ART in the early years of the programme. Reorganization of ART maintenance by down-referral to nurse-managed services is associated with programme outcomes similar to those achieved using doctor-driven primary care services. Further research is necessary to identify optimal models of care to support long-term retention of patients on ART in resource-limited settings. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Successful overwintering of Aedes albopictus in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluskota, Björn; Jöst, Artur; Augsten, Xenia; Stelzner, Lilith; Ferstl, Ina; Becker, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    The Asian tiger mosquito (Aedes albopictus) is of great concern to public health authorities due to its vector competence and rapid spread across the globe. In 2015, two large local breeding populations of Ae. albopictus were discovered in southwest Germany. In spring 2016, we were able to demonstrate the first evidence of a successful overwintering in Germany of this originally tropical mosquito species in different research projects. Particularly noteworthy is the successful hatching of diapause eggs of an Italian strain (Calabria), which overwintered successfully in the field in St. Georgen im Schwarzwald (Baden-Wuerttemberg) at 820 m above sea level. Furthermore, within the scope of a larvae monitoring, the first larvae that hatched in the field were detected on the April 09, 2016 in a rain barrel within the Heidelberg population. Our first results show that self-extinction due to an unsuccessful overwintering cannot be assumed for populations of the Asian tiger mosquito which settled in Germany in previous years. The evidence of a successful overwintering of a large number of diapause eggs and the hatching of the first larvae in field conditions opens the control year against Ae. albopictus in southwest Germany.

  5. Publicity and public relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosha, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses approaches to using publicity and public relations to meet the goals of the NASA Space Grant College. Methods universities and colleges can use to publicize space activities are presented.

  6. Successful Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufiqurrahman Nasihun

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The emerging concept of successful aging is based on evidence that in healthy individual when they get aged, there are  considerable variations in physiological functions alteration. Some people exhibiting greater, but others very few or no age related alteration. The first is called poor aging and the later is called successful pattern of aging (Lambert SW, 2008. Thus, in the simple words the successful aging concept is define as an opportunity of old people to stay  active and productive condition despite they get aged chronologically. Aging itself might be defined as the progressive accumulation of changes with time associated with or responsible for the ever-increasing susceptibility to disease and death which accompanies advancing age (Harman D, 1981. The time needed to accumulate changes is attributable to aging process. The marked emerging questions are how does aging happen and where does aging start? To answer these questions and because of the complexity of aging process, there are more than 300 aging theories have been proposed to explain how and where aging occured and started respectively. There are too many to enumerate theories and classification of aging process. In summary, all of these aging theories can be grouped into three clusters: 1. Genetics program theory, this theory suggests that aging is resulted from program directed by the genes; 2. Epigenetic theory, in these theory aging is resulted from environmental random events not determined by the genes; 3. Evolutionary theory, which propose that aging is a medium for disposal mortal soma in order to avoid competition between organism and their progeny for food and space, did not try to explain how aging occur, but possibly answer why aging occur (De la Fuente. 2009. Among the three groups of aging theories, the epigenetic theory is useful to explain and try to solve the enigma of aging which is prominently caused by internal and external environmental influences

  7. Splenic irradiation-induced gastric variceal bleeding in a primary splenic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma patient: a rare complication successfully treated by splenectomy with short gastric vein ligation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Ying-Chu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Primary splenic diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is a rare clinical condition, which is generally treated by six to eight cycles of chemotherapy involving a combination of rituximab and the cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, vincristine, and prednisolone (CHOP regimen. However, the treatment for chemorefractory primary splenic DLBCL remains controversial. Therapeutic splenic irradiation (SI might be a reasonable and possibly the only treatment option with curative intention for patients with chemorefractory primary splenic DLBCL. However, the efficacy and safety of therapeutic SI are unclear. Herein, we present the case of a primary splenic DLBCL patient who was refractory to multiple chemotherapy regimens but achieved complete remission after administration of therapeutic SI. However, his condition was complicated with severe gastric variceal bleeding due to splenic venous thrombosis, which was successfully treated via splenectomy and short gastric vein ligation. On the basis of our findings, we concluded that the splenic venous thrombosis-induced gastric variceal bleeding was a rare but life-threatening adverse effect of the therapeutic SI administered for primary splenic DLBCL. Surgical intervention involving splenectomy and short gastric vein ligation is mandatory and should be performed as soon as possible for such patients.

  8. Going public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem...... deal with ethical public relations issues, guided by a norm or maxim of openness. Drawing on and rethinking the CUDOS codification of the scientific ethos, as it was worked out by Robert K. Merton in 1942, we propose that this, which is echoed in current codifications of norms for good scientific...... conduct, contains a tacit maxim of openness which may naturally be extended to cover the public relations of science. Discussing openness as access, accountability, transparency and receptiveness, the argumentation concentrates on the possible prevention of misconduct with respect to, on the one hand...

  9. Going public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem...... deal with ethical public relations issues, guided by a norm or maxim of openness. Drawing on and rethinking the CUDOS codification of the scientific ethos, as it was worked out by Robert K. Merton in 1942, we propose that this, which is echoed in current codifications of norms for good scientific...... conduct, contains a tacit maxim of openness which may naturally be extended to cover the public relations of science. Discussing openness as access, accountability, transparency and receptiveness, the argumentation concentrates on the possible prevention of misconduct with respect to, on the one hand...

  10. Aciertos y errores en la gestión de las crisis de salud pública en España Successes and failures in the management of public health crisis in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Gérvas

    2009-02-01

    response and management of any health crisis. Heterogeneity of management and of health effects-contributing to inequalities in health-is common. The participation and coordination of the health services is crucial in detection of the crisis and in modulating the population reactions. Public health services characterized by their low public profile could gain public influence by their role in coordinating politicians and the media when solving important health problems. Analyzing the mistakes and successes in previous crises together with risk and vulnerability assessments, research and drills are essential to give a quick and adequate response to future crises.

  11. Large-Scale Release of Campylobacter Draft Genomes: Resources for Food Safety and Public Health from the 100K Pathogen Genome Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bihua C.; Storey, Dylan B.; Kong, Nguyet; Chen, Poyin; Arabyan, Narine; Gilpin, Brent; Mason, Carl; Townsend, Andrea K.; Smith, Woutrina A.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Taff, Conor C.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Campylobacter is a food-associated bacterium and a leading cause of foodborne illness worldwide, being associated with poultry in the food supply. This is the initial public release of 202 Campylobacter genome sequences as part of the 100K Pathogen Genome Project. These isolates represent global genomic diversity in the Campylobacter genus. PMID:28057746

  12. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility. Des

  13. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility.

  14. Public private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miranda Sarmento, J.J.

    2014-01-01

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are increasing in number worldwide and are used to build and manage large public infrastructure projects. In PPPs, the private sector plays a role in developing and maintaining public infrastructure and services, which is usually a public sector responsibility. Des

  15. Data for generation of all Tables and Figures for CTEP publication in 2015 pertaining to large-scale diesel gensets tested

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — particulate and gaseous emissions and particle optical properties for emissions from large-scale diesel gensets with and without aftermarket PM controls. This...

  16. Comparison of long-term clinical outcome after successful implantation of FIREBIRD and CYPHER sirolimus-eluting stents in daily clinical practice:analysis of a large single-center registry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Bo; LIU Hai-bo; WU Yong-jian; CHEN Jue; YUAN Jin-qing; YOU Shi-jie; LI Wei; GAO Run-lin; DOU Ke-fei; YANG Yue-jin; CHEN Ji-lin; QIAO Shu-bin; WANG Yang; LI Jian-jun; QIN Xue-wen; YAO Min

    2011-01-01

    Background Recent data have shown that sirolimus-eluting stents (SES) reduced not only the incidences of restenosis but also of target vessel revascularization (TVR). CYPHER and FIREBIRD stents are both widely used SES in China.However,comparative data concerning differences in long-term safety and efficacy regarding CYPHER and FIREBIRD stents in the Chinese population are still not available.Methods From April 2004 to October 2006,3979 consecutive patients who underwent successful SES (FIREBIRD 2274;CYPHER 1705) implantation were prospectively enrolled into this study. All enrolled patients were divided into two groups based on stent type. Follow-up data,including death,myocardial infarction (MI),thrombosis,target lesion revascularization (TLR),TVR,and major adverse cardiac events (MACE,the composite of death,MI,and TVR) were obtained at 24 months. Cox's proportional-hazards models were used to assess relative risks of all the outcomemeasures between the two groups before and after propensity match.Results Unadjusted clinical outcomes demonstrated higher TVR (hazard ratio (HR) 1.78,95%Cl 1.26-2.50) and MACE (HR 1.40,95%C/1.08-1.82) for patients treated with FIREBIRD SES. After propensity match,the results showed a non-significant trend towards superiority of the CYPHER stent in all the analyzed parameters,however,no significant differences were found for all events at 24 months between FIREBIRD and CYPHER groups,and all thrombosis rates by Academic Research Consortium (ARC) definition were comparable between the two groups.Conclusions In this large,real-world population,the use of domestic FIREBIRD SES in China was associated with nearly the same safety and efficacy versus the imported CYPHER SES. FIREBIRD SES can be taken as an alternative for CYPHER SES in daily practice.

  17. Public Value Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, lotte bøgh; Beck Jørgensen, Torben; Kjeldsen, Anne-Mette

    2012-01-01

    Further integration of the public value literature with other strands of literature within Public Administration necessitates a more specific classification of public values. This paper applies a typology linked to organizational design principles, because this is useful for empirical public...... administration studies. Based on an existing typology of modes of governance, we develop a classification and test it empirically, using survey data from a study of the values of 501 public managers. We distinguish between seven value dimensions (the public at large, rule abidance, societal interests, budget...... the integration between the public value literature and other parts of the Public Administration discipline....

  18. PATH TO PERSONAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL BUSINESS SUCCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Stošić Mihajlović

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Success is not a precise term and people have different definitions of success. The first step towards achieving personal success is to decide what it represents to each of us. No matter which version of success is accepted as notoriously, people who want to get to the top you should find out as much detail as possible about the behavior of large and important individuals who have achieved their dream . Neither success nor a business, does not come overnight. The main recommendation is to at least try to be good with more people. One of the processes by which people influence the emotions of others is an emotional "contagion". It is the process by which feeling, facial expressions and behavior of a person transferred to another person or even a group of people . When a person expresses a particular emotion, nonverbal reactions of those around her begin to automatically mimic, mirror image, her facial expressions, body language and tone of voice. For example, when we close colleague cheerfully recounts how he got a raise, it is very likely that we will unconsciously begin smile , take a more open body posture and talk louder. The muscles of the brain to signal our facial expression and posture so that we will soon have to begin to experience the same emotion. But this “transfer" occurs in the case of negative emotions The success of the company is determined by its organizational structure and opportunities in the region. Management measures management company regulated by its organizational structure, but it can not influence the situation in the region. Therefore, the company must adapt to the conditions prevailing in their environment. Organizational Behavior companies is a way to adapt to changes in its environment, and the establishment of interpersonal relationships in its structure. The essence of modern relationships in organizations is based on teamwork, and that means almost perfect functioning of the entire system of business

  19. Public Education, Public Good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, John

    1986-01-01

    Criticizes policies which would damage or destroy a public education system. Examines the relationship between government-provided education and democracy. Concludes that privatization of public education would emphasize self-interest and selfishness, further jeopardizing the altruism and civic mindedness necessary for the public good. (JDH)

  20. Large-scale public transcriptomic data mining reveals a tight connection between the transport of nitrogen and other transport processes in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei He

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Movement of nitrogen to the plant tissues where it is needed for growth is an important contribution to nitrogen use efficiency. However, we have very limited knowledge about the mechanisms of nitrogen transport. Loading of nitrogen into the xylem and/or phloem by transporter proteins is likely important, but there are several families of genes that encode transporters of nitrogenous molecules (collectively referred to as N transporters here, each comprised of many gene members. In this study, we leveraged publicly available microarray data of Arabidopsis to investigate the gene networks of N transporters to elucidate their possible biological roles. First, we showed that tissue-specificity of nitrogen (N transporters was well reflected among the public microarray data. Then, we built coexpression networks of N transporters, which showed relationships between N transporters and particular aspects of plant metabolism, such as phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and carbohydrate metabolism. Furthermore, genes associated with several biological pathways were found to be tightly coexpressed with N transporters in different tissues. Our coexpression networks provide information at the systems-level that will serve as a resource for future investigation of nitrogen transport systems in plants, including candidate gene clusters that may work together in related biological roles.

  1. Determinants of absenteeism in public organizations: A unit-level analysis of work absence in a large Danish municipality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løkke Nielsen, Ann-Kristina

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the determinants of absenteeism in a large Danish municipality. Based on a review of the literature on absence, an integrative model is developed combining the individual, the social psychological and the economic approaches. The model is tested on data from approximately ...

  2. Library Use and Undergraduate Student Outcomes: New Evidence for Students' Retention and Academic Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria, Krista M.; Fransen, Jan; Nackerud, Shane

    2013-01-01

    Academic libraries, like other university departments, are being asked to demonstrate their value to the institution. This study discusses the impact library usage has on the retention and academic success of first-time, first-year undergraduate students at a large, public research university. Usage statistics were gathered at the University of…

  3. Self-Assessment Methods in Writing Instruction: A Conceptual Framework, Successful Practices and Essential Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    Student writing achievement is essential to lifelong learner success, but supporting writing can be challenging for teachers. Several large-scale analyses of publications on writing have called for further study of instructional methods, as the current literature does not sufficiently address the need to support best teaching practices.…

  4. Detection of quantitative trait loci for reproduction and production traits in Large White and French Landrace pig populations (Open Access publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidanel Jean-Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A genome-wide scan was performed in Large White and French Landrace pig populations in order to identify QTL affecting reproduction and production traits. The experiment was based on a granddaughter design, including five Large White and three French Landrace half-sib families identified in the French porcine national database. A total of 239 animals (166 sons and 73 daughters of the eight male founders distributed in eight families were genotyped for 144 microsatellite markers. The design included 51 262 animals recorded for production traits, and 53 205 litter size records were considered. Three production and three reproduction traits were analysed: average backfat thickness (US_M and live weight (LWGT at the end of the on-farm test, age of candidates adjusted at 100 kg live weight, total number of piglets born per litter, and numbers of stillborn (STILLp and born alive (LIVp piglets per litter. Ten QTL with medium to large effects were detected at a chromosome-wide significance level of 5% affecting traits US_M (on SSC2, SSC3 and SSC17, LWGT (on SSC4, STILLp (on SSC6, SSC11 and SSC14 and LIVp (on SSC7, SSC16 and SSC18. The number of heterozygous male founders varied from 1 to 3 depending on the QTL.

  5. Ensuring a successful family business management succession

    OpenAIRE

    Desbois, Joris

    2016-01-01

    Succession is the biggest long-term challenge that most family businesses face. Indeed, leaders ‘disposition to plan for their succession is frequently the key factor defining whether their family business subsists or stops. The research seeks to find out how to manage successfully the business management succession over main principles. This work project aims at researching the key points relevant to almost all family firms, to have a viable succession transition and positioni...

  6. Managing Risk and Uncertainty in Large-Scale University Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sharlissa; Shangraw, R. F., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Both publicly and privately funded research projects managed by universities are growing in size and scope. Complex, large-scale projects (over $50 million) pose new management challenges and risks for universities. This paper explores the relationship between project success and a variety of factors in large-scale university projects. First, we…

  7. 大空间公共建筑消防设计难点及对策探讨%Discuss the Design Difficulties and Countermeasures of Large Space Public Building Fire Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈展

    2014-01-01

    在大空间公共建筑的建设过程当中,消防安全设计一直是一个永恒的课题。本文从大空间建筑的特点出发,简要分析了消防设计中的重点与难点,并针对不同的难点提出了相应的解决措施,希望给我国的大空间公共建筑消防设计带来一定的帮助。%In the construction process of large space public buildings, the fire safety design has always been an eternal subject. This article starts from the characteristics of large spa-ce building, briefly analyzes the emphasizes and difficulties in fire control design, and puts forward corresponding solutions in view of different difficulties, and hope to bring certain help to give Chinese fire system design for large space public bu-ildings.

  8. Diverse small molecule inhibitors of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 identified from a screen of a large public collection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorjbal Dorjsuren

    Full Text Available The major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 plays a pivotal role in the repair of base damage via participation in the DNA base excision repair (BER pathway. Increased activity of APE1, often observed in tumor cells, is thought to contribute to resistance to various anticancer drugs, whereas down-regulation of APE1 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, inhibiting APE1 repair endonuclease function in cancer cells is considered a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic agent resistance. Despite ongoing efforts, inhibitors of APE1 with adequate drug-like properties have yet to be discovered. Using a kinetic fluorescence assay, we conducted a fully-automated high-throughput screen (HTS of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR, as well as additional public collections, with each compound tested as a 7-concentration series in a 4 µL reaction volume. Actives identified from the screen were subjected to a panel of confirmatory and counterscreen tests. Several active molecules were identified that inhibited APE1 in two independent assay formats and exhibited potentiation of the genotoxic effect of methyl methanesulfonate with a concomitant increase in AP sites, a hallmark of intracellular APE1 inhibition; a number of these chemotypes could be good starting points for further medicinal chemistry optimization. To our knowledge, this represents the largest-scale HTS to identify inhibitors of APE1, and provides a key first step in the development of novel agents targeting BER for cancer treatment.

  9. Diverse small molecule inhibitors of human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 identified from a screen of a large public collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorjsuren, Dorjbal; Kim, Daemyung; Vyjayanti, Vaddadi N; Maloney, David J; Jadhav, Ajit; Wilson, David M; Simeonov, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The major human apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease APE1 plays a pivotal role in the repair of base damage via participation in the DNA base excision repair (BER) pathway. Increased activity of APE1, often observed in tumor cells, is thought to contribute to resistance to various anticancer drugs, whereas down-regulation of APE1 sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agents. Thus, inhibiting APE1 repair endonuclease function in cancer cells is considered a promising strategy to overcome therapeutic agent resistance. Despite ongoing efforts, inhibitors of APE1 with adequate drug-like properties have yet to be discovered. Using a kinetic fluorescence assay, we conducted a fully-automated high-throughput screen (HTS) of the NIH Molecular Libraries Small Molecule Repository (MLSMR), as well as additional public collections, with each compound tested as a 7-concentration series in a 4 µL reaction volume. Actives identified from the screen were subjected to a panel of confirmatory and counterscreen tests. Several active molecules were identified that inhibited APE1 in two independent assay formats and exhibited potentiation of the genotoxic effect of methyl methanesulfonate with a concomitant increase in AP sites, a hallmark of intracellular APE1 inhibition; a number of these chemotypes could be good starting points for further medicinal chemistry optimization. To our knowledge, this represents the largest-scale HTS to identify inhibitors of APE1, and provides a key first step in the development of novel agents targeting BER for cancer treatment.

  10. Public Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of public speech in society, noting the power of public speech to create a world and a public. The paper offers a theory of public speech, identifies types of public speech, and types of public speech fallacies. Two ways of speaking of the public and of public life are distinguished. (SM)

  11. 谈析某大型后推式铰接公交车的网络化应用%Discuss about the network application of some large size pushback articulated public bus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李贵平; 张秀芝

    2011-01-01

    Detailed discuss the logical relation of network framework,control strategy of power and starting circuits,function of articulated hinge and control command for Shudu Brand CDK6182CHR large size pushback articulated public bus.%详细地论述了蜀都牌CDK6182CHR大型后推式铰接公交车网络构架、电源和起动电路的控制策略、铰接盘的功能以及控制指令的逻辑关系。

  12. 0222 Night work and breast cancer risk among women in the public Danish health care sector - a short-term follow up of a large scale population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tilma Vistisen, Helene; Helene Garde, Anne; Marie Hansen, Aase

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Experimental evidence suggest a short-term effect of light at night on breast cancer oncogenesis. We studied the short-term effect of night work on breast cancer occurence. METHOD: We established a large, national cohort of employees in the public health care sector with a high...... prevalence of night shift work and with detailed data regarding occupational title and date and hour for beginning and end of every work duty: The Danish Working Hour Database (DWHD). DWHD encompasses payroll data as of 2007 and is updated on an annual basis. For this analysis we defined night work...

  13. Building Successful Relationships in the PLCO Cancer Screening Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Pamela M; Broski, Karen G; Buys, Saundra S; Childs, Jeffery; Church, Timothy R; Gohagan, John K; Gren, Lisa H; Higgins, Darlene; Jaggi, Rachel; Jenkins, Victoria; Johnson, Christine C; Lappe, Karen; O'Brien, Barbara; Ogden, Sheryl L; Prorok, Philip C; Reding, Douglas; Shambaugh, Vicki; Yokochi, Lance A; Yurgalevitch, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical research cannot succeed without funding, knowledgeable staff, and appropriate infrastructure. There are however equally important but intangible factors that are rarely considered in planning large multidisciplinary endeavors or evaluating their success. The Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial required extensive collaborations between individuals from many fields, including clinicians, clinical trialists, and administrators; it also addressed questions across the spectrum of cancer prevention and control. In this manuscript, we examine the experiences and opinions of trial staff regarding the building of successful relationships in PLCO. We summarize, in narrative form, data collected using open-ended questionnaires that were administered to the National Cancer Institute project officers, coordinating center staff, screening center principal investigators, and screening center coordinators in 2015, about 3 years after publication of the final primary trial manuscript. Trust, respect, listening to others, and in-person interaction were frequently mentioned as crucial to building successful relationships.

  14. The neurobiology of successful abstinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garavan, H; Brennan, K L; Hester, R; Whelan, R

    2013-08-01

    This review focuses on the neurobiological processes involved in achieving successful abstinence from drugs of abuse. While there is clinical and public health value in knowing if the deficits associated with drug use correct with abstinence, studying the neurobiology that underlies successful abstinence can also illuminate the processes that enable drug-dependent individuals to successfully quit. Here, we review studies on human addicts that assess the neurobiological changes that arise with abstinence and the neurobiological predictors of successfully avoiding relapse. The literature, while modest in size, suggests that abstinence is associated with improvement in prefrontal structure and function, which may underscore the importance of prefrontally mediated cognitive control processes in avoiding relapse. Given the implication that the prefrontal cortex may be an important target for therapeutic interventions, we also review evidence indicating the efficacy of cognitive control training for abstinence.

  15. Planning farm succession: how to be successful

    OpenAIRE

    Stephens, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Planning farm succession is really good farm planning in its broadest aspect. Unfortunately very few farmers and their families have devoted sufficient time to working out how the farm business will be transferred. After demonstrating the importance of the farm succession issue, this article goes on to explaining a method of successfully tackling the process.

  16. A retrospective analysis of ultrasound-guided large core needle biopsies of breast lesions at a regional public hospital in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schene Bhayroo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Histological confirmation of a breast lesion is an important step to determine the aetiology and direct further management. Evidence supports ultrasound-guided large core needle biopsy (US-LCNB (14 gauge as the preferred diagnostic method over traditional open surgical biopsy.Objective: To assess the influence of technical variables on the diagnostic yield of breast specimens obtained by using US-LCNB, and the sensitivity of detecting malignancy during the study period.Methods: A retrospective chart review was conducted of all patients who had US-LCNBs from March 2011 – September 2012 at Addington Hospital in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal. Histopathological findings were correlated to the size of the breast lesion, rank of the radiologist performing the procedure and the number of cores obtained. The sensitivity of the technique was determined.Results: During the study period, 147 biopsies were performed. The majority of lesions were>5 mm (85.5%. The average number of cores was 4, and 79.5% of the biopsies were performed by the senior radiologist. Of the 147 biopsies, 132 specimens were eligible for inclusion in the study. Histopathology revealed 71 malignant lesions of which 60 were confirmed histologically at excision. In 11 patients, no excision was performed. Therefore, the sensitivity of detecting malignancy was 100%.Conclusion: Although the study did not establish a statistically significant relationship between the above mentioned technical variables and the histological outcome, the overall diagnostic yield and the sensitivity of detecting malignancy using US-LCNB is comparable to other similar international studies. A prospective study with long-term follow-up of patients would be of value.

  17. Enterprise architecture for business success

    CERN Document Server

    Wijegunaratne, Inji; Evans-Greenwood, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Enterprise Architecture (EA) has evolved to become a prominent presence in today's information systems and technology landscape. The EA discipline is rich in frameworks, methodologies, and the like. However, the question of 'value' for business ;professionals remains largely unanswered - that is, how best can Enterprise Architecture and Enterprise Architects deliver value to the enterprise? Enterprise Architecture for Business Success answers this question. Enterprise Architecture for Business Success is primarily intended for IT professionals working in the area of Enterprise Architectu

  18. 当代大空间公共建筑在全球化背景下的地域文化表达%The Expression of Regional Culture of Contemporary Large Space Public Buildings under the Background of Globalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚晓慧

    2014-01-01

    本文通过对全球化时代背景下国内外较有代表性的大空间公共建筑实例的分析,从表达地域文化的造型、空间、材料和技术四个方面,探讨了其设计手法和表达方式,希望对今后的大空间公共建筑设计应对全球化的趋势有所帮助。%Based on the analysis of a typical large space public buildings at home and abroad under the background of globalization and four aspects about the model, space, material and technology to express regional culture, this article disc- usses its design methods and expression way, which hoping to help cope with the trend of globalization in the future to the design of large space public buildings.

  19. [Decentralization and how to conduct it as a revolution or an evolution? County public health and management capacity building as a prerequisite for successful decentralization in the Republic of Croatia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sogorić, Selma; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Polasek, Ozren; Grozić-Zivolić, Sonja; Lang, Slobodan

    2010-12-01

    Based on the results of the first phase of the County Public Health Capacity Building Program named Health-Plan for It, implemented in the Republic of Croatia during the 2002-2008 period, this article analyzes the relationship between training of the county teams and their ability to develop health policy. Our hypothesis was that decentralized model of health planning and management would not occur just by changing legislation alone. Counties in Croatia needed educational support (learning-by-doing training) in order to improve public health practices at the county level. During the 2002-2005 period, the first 15 county teams (so-called first cycle counties) completed their training. The teams consisted of 12 to 15 members, representatives of political and executive component, technical component (public health professionals, representatives of health and social welfare institutions) and community members (non-government sector and media). Teams were trained in cohorts. Three counties passed together through the six-month process of modular training (four education modules, with four days of intensive training and "homework" between modules) at the time. The remaining 5 counties (second-cycle counties) completed the same kind of training in 2007-2008. The Public Health Performance Matrix (the Local Public Health Practice Performance Measures instrument developed by the US CDC Public Health Practice Program Office) was used as an evaluation instrument. Each county team had to fill it out at the beginning of education. Comparison of the Public Health Performance Matrices of first cycle counties (training in 2002-2005) with those of the second cycle counties (trained several years later) yielded no differences. Although training materials were publicly available (accessible through the Croatian Healthy Cities web pages) for years, the second cycle counties did not spontaneously (without training) increase their county-level capacities for participative health needs

  20. Recruiting and retaining geoscience students at a large public university: Balancing the needs of first-time freshman and upper-division transfer students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, D. D.; Clemens-Knott, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Department of Geological Sciences at California State University, Fullerton (CSUF) is one of the largest geology programs in the state. Approximately 4,000 students at CSUF take general education geology classes; this provides a large pool from which to recruit undergraduate students for either the Geology B.S. or Earth Sciences B.A. offered by the department. The department has seen a dramatic increase in majors over the last decade, from a low of 28 majors in 2002 to more than 110 in 2012. This increase does not appear to be driven by growth in the oil industry; in a recent survey of CSUF geoscience (BS or BA) students, 15% of respondents indicated an interest in a career in petroleum. The department has engaged in aggressive recruitment and outreach efforts over the last decade, with activities ranging from earthquake preparedness rallies in conjunction with the annual California ShakeOut, to an emerging high school and community college intern program at the department's paleontology curation facility. Despite these efforts, the majority of CSUF geoscience students declared the geology major after taking an introductory physical geology course either at CSUF or a local community college. Over the last ten years, approximately 50% of the geoscience majors at CSUF transferred from a community college. Among the geoscience students who began their career at CSUF, only one third had declared a geoscience major in their freshman year. Over two thirds of geoscience majors at CSUF declared their major after completing more than 60 units. The strong tendency for students to declare a geoscience major late in their career poses significant challenges to students' ability to graduate in a timely manner. To mitigate this problem, the department has an aggressive advising program, wherein students attend mandatory advising with a faculty member every semester. The department is also working closely with community college partners to improve the preparation of transfer

  1. Public engagement on global health challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minhas Gunjeet S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Experience with public engagement activities regarding the risks and benefits of science and technology (S&T is growing, especially in the industrialized world. However, public engagement in the developing world regarding S&T risks and benefits to explore health issues has not been widely explored. Methods This paper gives an overview about public engagement and related concepts, with a particular focus on challenges and benefits in the developing world. We then describe an Internet-based platform, which seeks to both inform and engage youth and the broader public on global water issues and their health impacts. Finally, we outline a possible course for future action to scale up this and similar online public engagement platforms. Results The benefits of public engagement include creating an informed citizenry, generating new ideas from the public, increasing the chances of research being adopted, increasing public trust, and answering ethical research questions. Public engagement also fosters global communication, enables shared experiences and methodology, standardizes strategy, and generates global viewpoints. This is especially pertinent to the developing world, as it encourages previously marginalized populations to participate on a global stage. One of the core issues at stake in public engagement is global governance of science and technology. Also, beyond benefiting society at large, public engagement in science offers benefits to the scientific enterprise itself. Conclusion Successful public engagement with developing world stakeholders will be a critical part of implementing new services and technologies. Interactive engagement platforms, such as the Internet, have the potential to unite people globally around relevant health issues.

  2. Preferences for care towards the end of life when decision-making capacity may be impaired: A large scale cross-sectional survey of public attitudes in Great Britain and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Gemma; Fistein, Elizabeth; Holland, Anthony; Barclay, Matthew; Theimann, Pia; Barclay, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    There is continuing public debate about treatment preferences at the end of life, and the acceptability and legal status of treatments that sustain or end life. However, most surveys use binary yes/no measures, and little is known about preferences in neurological disease when decision-making capacity is lost, as most studies focus on cancer. This study investigates changes in public preferences for care towards the end of life, with a focus on measures to sustain or end life. Large-scale international public opinion surveys using a six-stage patient vignette, respondents chose a level of intervention for each stage as health and decision-making capacity deteriorated. Cross-sectional representative samples of the general public in Great Britain and the USA (N = 2016). Primary outcome measure: changes in respondents' preferences for care, measured on a four-point scale designed before data collection. The scale ranged from: maintaining life at all costs; to intervention with agreement; to no intervention; to measures for ending life. There were no significant differences between GB and USA. Preference for measures to sustain life at all costs peaked at short-term memory loss (30.2%, n = 610). Respondents selecting 'measures to help me die peacefully' increased from 3.9% to 37.0% as the condition deteriorated, with the largest increase occurring when decision-making capacity was lost (10.3% to 23.0%). Predictors of choosing 'measures to help me die peacefully' at any stage were: previous personal experience (OR = 1.34, pdecision-making capacity was compromised, which increased as dementia progressed. In contrast, a significant number chose preservation of life at all costs, even in end stage dementia. It is challenging to respect the longstanding values of people with dementia concerning either the inviolability of life or personal autonomy, whilst protecting those without decision-making capacity.

  3. Public Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck Jørgensen, Torben; Rutgers, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    administration is approached in terms of processes guided or restricted by public values and as public value creating: public management and public policy-making are both concerned with establishing, following and realizing public values. To study public values a broad perspective is needed. The article suggest......This article provides the introduction to a symposium on contemporary public values research. It is argued that the contribution to this symposium represent a Public Values Perspective, distinct from other specific lines of research that also use public value as a core concept. Public...... a research agenda for this encompasing kind of public values research. Finally the contributions to the symposium are introduced....

  4. Emerging Prospects for Repository Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isaacs, T

    2006-01-12

    Recent events are again raising some old issues and creating new opportunities regarding the future disposition of the used, or spent, fuel from nuclear power plants. Handling these challenges well will not only help set the stage for a robust nuclear energy future, but will reflect the growing linkages among nuclear power, nuclear waste management, international security, and public and political acceptance. The emerging global nuclear regime may make spent fuel management not only more important, but improve chances of success.

  5. Delivering success in Milton Keynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    The national roll out of the new procurement route, for publicly funded health schemes over 1 million Pound, has recently been implemented and NHS Trusts are quite naturally looking to the pilot regions for a demonstration of what can be achieved. One such example is the successful delivery of the new Treatment Centre for Milton Keynes General Hospital NHS Trust by Norwest Hoist Construction and its supply chain.

  6. Italian Succession Procedure

    OpenAIRE

    De Tullio, Giandomenico

    2012-01-01

    Italian inheritance law based on the Roman law of succession including legitimate succession and testamentary succession. The importance of drafting an Italian will and the legal requirements according to Italian Law.

  7. Leadership Succession Planning Guide for Maryland Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Mary; Foran, Jim

    2006-01-01

    This guide presents a unique look at leadership succession issues in the public school sector, particularly the shortage of quality principals. It provides a stimulus for conversation for senior leadership in school systems, an outline for those educators interested in preparing their own leadership succession plan, and an actual leadership…

  8. Research in Public Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coriolan PĂUNESCU

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Research has an important role in public relations (PR being necessary in developing strategies in this area. Therefore, we can speak oftwo types of research, the applied research and theoretical research, both being successfully used in the work of public relations. Applied research,can be strategic (used in programs in order to identify attitudes and opinions of the target public, to develop strategies for formulating andtransmitting messages, to establish the criteria for evaluating the work and evaluative by which it determines the communication efficiency, incarrying out the program of public relations (in fact it is the comparison between the established and achieved objectives.

  9. The Effectiveness of Traditional Admissions Criteria in Predicting College and Graduate Success for American and International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yanfei

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of traditional admissions criteria, including prior GPA, SAT, GRE, and TOEFL in predicting undergraduate and graduate academic success for American and international students at a large public university in the southwestern United States. Included are the admissions and enrollment data for 25,017 undergraduate…

  10. Publication point indicators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elleby, Anita; Ingwersen, Peter

    2010-01-01

    with novel publication point indicators (PPIs) that are formalized and exemplified. Two diachronic citation windows are applied: 2006-07 and 2006-08. Web of Science (WoS) as well as Google Scholar (GS) are applied to observe the cite delay and citedness for the different document types published by DIIS......The paper presents comparative analyses of two publication point systems, The Norwegian and the in-house system from the interdiscplinary Danish Institute for International Studies (DIIS), used as case in the study for publications published 2006, and compares central citation-based indicators......; the Cumulated Publication Point Indicator (CPPI), which graphically illustrates the cumulated gain of obtained vs. ideal points, both seen as vectors; and the normalized Cumulated Publication Point Index (nCPPI) that represents the cumulated gain of publication success as index values, either graphically...

  11. The 'Secret' of success part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Practice success is defined across the four'dimensions' of oral health, patient satisfaction, job satisfaction and financial profit. It is suggested that the 'secret' of success in dental practice is to make patient (customer) satisfaction the primary focus. Not a very earth shattering or surprising'secret' perhaps! This is hardly a new idea, and not a concept restricted to dental practice. This principle applies to all businesses. This series of articles reviews evidence from across a broad spectrum of publications: from populist business publications through to refereed scientific papers, this'secret' seems to be confirmed. The evidence for which aspects of our service are most important in achieving patient satisfaction (and therefore success) is explored. Good oral health outcomes for patients are defined as the primary purpose of dental practice and, therefore, an essential dimension of success. The link between positive patient perceptions of general care and their own oral health to practice success is explored.

  12. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The function of public lighting and the relationship between public lighting and accidents are considered briefly as aspects of effective countermeasures. Research needs and recent developments in installation and operational described. Public lighting is an efficient accident countermeasure, but

  13. Fertility Clinic Success Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Autism 2013 Assisted Reproductive Technology Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir 2013 ART Fertility Clinic Success Rates Report [PDF - 1MB] Bookmarks and thumbnails are ...

  14. Critical Success Factors of Public-private Partnerships in Transport Infrastructure Projects%公私合营模式在交通基础设施项目中关键性成功因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈炳泉; 彭曈

    2010-01-01

    公私合营(public-private partnership,PPP)模式作为近年来逐步兴起的开放式融资模式,能够更加迅速地满足项目融资需求,对促进基础设施建设形成有力的补充.基于研究PPP模式在香港、英国和澳大利亚的应用,通过分析针对18个成功因素的问卷调查结果显示,来自不同地区的受访者均认为良好的私营机构、适当的风险分配和分担、公营部门和私营机构的承诺和责任这三点是最为重要的PPP模式关键性成功因素.基于对这些因素的特点研究与排序,进一步分析各因素间的变量关系、共性特点和差异性特点.由于中国针对PPP模式关键性成功因素分析专题的文献很少,希望本论文能够对中国的PPP学术研究和发展提供参考.

  15. Success factors in technology development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Universities in the U.S. have a significant impact on business through the transfer of technology. This paper describes goals and philosophy of the Technology Licensing Office at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. This paper also relates the critical factors for susscessful technology transfer, particularly relating to new business formation. These critical factors include the quality of the technology, the quality of the management, the quality of the investor, the passion for success, and the image of the company. Descriptions of three different levels of investment are also given and the most successful level of investment for starting a new company is reviewed. Licensing to large companies is also briefly reviewed, as this type of licensing requires some different strategies than that of licensing to start-up companies. High quality critical factors and intelligent investment create rewards for the parties and successful ventures.

  16. Public Broadcasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooshan, Harry M.; Arnheim, Louise

    This paper, the second in a series exploring future options for public policy in the communications and information arenas, examines some of the issues underlying public broadcasting, primarily public television. It advances two reasons why quality local public television programming is scarce: funds for the original production of programming have…

  17. Cumulative Advantage and Success-Breeds-Success: The Value of Time Pattern Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, John C.

    1998-01-01

    For the case of the distribution of papers across authors, the Success-Breeds-Success or Cumulative Advantage model is a popular candidate for informetrics. The method of time pattern of publication for individual authors can be used to discriminate between Cumulative Advantage and non-uniform giftedness models. The non-uniform giftedness model is…

  18. Communication: essential strategies for success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Mary

    2013-06-01

    This department highlights change management strategies that may be successful in strategically planning and executing organizational change initiatives. With the goal of presenting practical approaches helpful to nurse leaders advance organizational change, content includes evidence-based projects, tool, and resources that mobilize and sustain organizational change initiatives. In this article, the author discusses strategies for communication for change processes, whether large or small. Intentional planning and development of a communication strategy alongside, not as an afterthought, to change initiatives are essential.

  19. Discussion on several issues related to fire protection design for large public buildings%大型公共建筑消防设计若干难点问题探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    游宇航; 孙晓乾; 刘壮志

    2012-01-01

    针对目前大型公共建筑消防设计中存在的一些难点问题,根据规范的相关条文,结合工作实践对若干消防设计难点问题提出自己的观点:提出了中庭与环廊排烟的优化设计思路;探讨了不同功能建筑共用疏散楼梯的可行性;论证了相邻防火分区之间借用安全出口问题的前提条件;探讨了“准安全区”的概念和应用场所限制.%Focusing on some difficult fire protection issues for large public buildings, some new opinions were proposed according to the author's work experience and his understanding and analysis of China GB codes. An optimized smoke exhaust strategy was proposed for atrium and its surrounding corridors. The feasibility of common stair issue for different functions was discussed, and the usage of safety door to adjacent fire compartment and its precondition was illustrated in this article. The definition of quasi-safety zone was also cleared as well as its applied scope.

  20. Diabetes self-risk assessment questionnaires coupled with a multimedia health promotion campaign are cheap and effective tools to increase public awareness of diabetes in a large Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y L; Gao, W G; Pang, Z C; Sun, J P; Wang, S J; Ning, F; Song, X; Kapur, A; Qiao, Q

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate costs and effectiveness of implementing a diabetes self-risk assessment (Diabetes Risk Score) questionnaire coupled with a multimedia health promotion campaign on changes in diabetes awareness in a large diabetes prevention programme. Between 2007 and 2010, a multimedia health promotion campaign was conducted targeting the 1.94 million population of Qingdao, China, using newspapers, radio programmes, distribution of free booklets and Diabetes Risk Score flyers. Diabetes awareness questionnaires filled out by people first interviewed in 2006 (survey A), before the initiation of the campaign, were compared with those first interviewed between 2007 and 2010 during the campaign period (survey B). The rates of diabetes awareness in both surveys were studied amongst adults aged 35-74 years without a prior history of diabetes, but with a Diabetes Risk Score of ≥ 14. In survey B, 85, 82 and 76% of the urban participants correctly recognized obesity, family history of diabetes and physical inactivity, respectively, as important risk factors for diabetes; while the awareness rates were 43, 46 and 25%, respectively, in survey A (P Risk Score flyer, €31.3 on the education booklet, €7.7 on the newspaper campaign and €37.5 on radio programmes. The combination of a Diabetes Risk Score questionnaire with a multimedia health promotion campaign is a cheap and effective health promotion tool to raise public awareness of diabetes. © 2012 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2012 Diabetes UK.

  1. PUBLIC DEBT SUSTAINABILITY ANALYSIS: EU CASE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Botoc Claudiu; Pirtea Marilen; Nicolescu Cristina

    2011-01-01

    .... Commonly, public debt sustainability is defined as a sovereign's ability to service debt without large adjustments to public revenue and/or expenditure and without ever-increasing public-debt-to-GDP ratios...

  2. Post-Release Success among Paroled Lifers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liem, M.C.A.; Garcin, J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous research suggests that social relations, in particular the forming of family ties and employment (social factors), self-efficacy (personal factors), and therapeutic interventions (institutional factors) constitute main contributors in post-release success. These studies, however, have large

  3. Choosing Collaboration Partners. How Scientific Success in Physics Depends on Network Positions

    CERN Document Server

    Heiberger, Raphael H

    2016-01-01

    Physics is one of the most successful endeavors in science. Being a prototypic big science it also reflects the growing tendency for scientific collaborations. Utilizing 250,000 papers from ArXiv.org a prepublishing platform prevalent in Physics we construct large coauthorship networks to investigate how individual network positions influence scientific success. In this context, success is seen as getting a paper published in high impact journals of physical subdisciplines as compared to not getting it published at all or in rather peripheral journals only. To control the nested levels of authors and papers, and to consider the time elapsing between working paper and prominent journal publication we employ multilevel eventhistory models with various network measures as covariates. Our results show that the maintenance of even a moderate number of persistent ties is crucial for scientific success. Also, even with low volumes of social capital Physicists who occupy brokerage positions enhance their chances of a...

  4. Success and decisiveness on proper symmetric games

    OpenAIRE

    Freixas Bosch, Josep; Pons Vallès, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    The final publication is available at Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10100-013-0332-5 This paper provides a complete study for the possible rankings of success and decisiveness for individuals in symmetric voting systems, assuming anonymous and independent probability distributions. It is proved that for any pair of symmetric voting systems it is always possible to rank success and decisiveness in opposite order whenever the common probability of voting for “acceptance...

  5. Service, Public Work, and Respectful Public Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youniss, James

    2011-01-01

    Encouragement of service as public work is one strategy higher education can use in fulfilling its civic mission to socialize society's future leaders. The diversity of American higher education includes large land grant state universities, small liberal arts colleges, religiously sponsored institutions, and local community colleges. This array…

  6. Potential for comparative public opinion research in public administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Bouckaert (Geert); S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven); J. K. Kampen (Jarl)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe public administration and public services have always taken a marginal place in the political scientists’ behavioural research. Public administration students on the other hand tend to focus on political and administrative elites and institutions, and largely ignored citizens in

  7. Public Information for Water Pollution Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water Pollution Control Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication is a handbook for water pollution control personnel to guide them towards a successful public relations program. This handbook was written to incorporate the latest methods of teaching basic public information techniques to the non-professional in this area. Contents include: (1) a rationale for a public information program; (2)…

  8. Public Information for Water Pollution Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Water Pollution Control Federation, Washington, DC.

    This publication is a handbook for water pollution control personnel to guide them towards a successful public relations program. This handbook was written to incorporate the latest methods of teaching basic public information techniques to the non-professional in this area. Contents include: (1) a rationale for a public information program; (2)…

  9. Public Schools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This Public Schools feature dataset is composed of all Public elementary and secondary education in the United States as defined by the Common Core of Data, National...

  10. Successful anesthetic management of a large supraglottic cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harshal D Wagh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excision of a huge-sized supraglottic mass nearly obstructing the airway passage is a real challenge to anesthesiologists. Upper airway obstruction due to neoplasm in supraglottic region is traditionally managed by preoperative tracheostomy. However, such a common procedure can potentially have an impact on long-term outcome.

  11. China's first large tanker for icy area successfully launched

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Jianan

    2006-01-01

    @@ On July 10, the 51800 dwt product/chemical tanker developed, designed and built by China for navigating in icy areas was launched at Guangzhou Shipyard International. The tanker is scheduled for delivery at the end of this year. The second follow-on ship will soon be built on the berths. At present, Guangzhou Shipyard International has a backlog order of 11 such tankers.

  12. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Visual perception is very important for road users and in the dark it can be facilitated by public lighting. Public lighting has a mostly positive road safety effect. Installing public lighting on roads that were previously unlit generally results in fewer and less serious crashes. This effect seems

  13. Predicting Classroom Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald P.

    A study was conducted at Rancho Santiago College (RSC) to identify personal and academic factors that are predictive of students' success in their courses. The study examined the following possible predictors of success: language and math test scores; background characteristics; length of time out of high school; high school background; college…

  14. Ingredients for successful partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Pfisterer (Stella)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractFor the development of new cross-sector partnerships it is required to know what the essence of successful partnership projects is. Which factors influence success or failure of partnerships is highly related to the specific context where partnerships operate. The literature on critical

  15. Successful grant writing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koppelman, Gerard H.; Holloway, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Obtaining research funding is central to the research process. However many (clinician-) scientists receive little, or no, training in the process of writing a successful grant application. In an era of reductions in research budgets and application success rates, the ability to construct a well pre

  16. Three Tiers to Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Rhonda; Stepanek, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses a three-tiered, differentiated curriculum in a response to intervention (RTI) framework that has successfully raised achievement at all levels, but is particularly successful with ninth-grade students. Walla Walla (Washington) School District implemented the three-tiered intervention program as a series of differentiated…

  17. What is Success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao; Lifang

    2015-01-01

    <正>Success is actually a feeling.Like confidence and satisfaction,it is a positive feeling which appears after individuals reach their own ideal dreams,fulfill their tasks.But everyone havetheir own opinions so that there are various thoughts on the theme what is success.

  18. Student Success Center Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  19. Exploring MBA Career Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Amanda; Hodgkinson, Myra

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the meaning of career success in relation to the attainment of an MBA degree, for a group of experienced managers. In so doing, the paper aims to consider the adequacy of MBA career success, defined solely in terms of external criteria. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 36 in-depth interviews…

  20. Estimating Large Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  1. An evaluation of perfomance management in the Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport of the North West Privince / S. E Maine

    OpenAIRE

    Maine, S E

    2014-01-01

    Effective performance management is vital in all public and private sectors and contributes to service delivery of the organisations. Research on public-sector performance management, however, points out challenges in the implementation of the systems and questions the effectiveness of policy tools for enhancing the governmental accountability. The Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport is a large institution and its vision is to provide successful infrastructure projects...

  2. Geothermal district heating: basics to success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lunis, B.C.

    1985-01-01

    A district heating system using geothermal energy is a viable and economic option in many locations. A successful system, however, is dependent upon a variety of factors, and it is the purpose of this presentation to accent those items that are proving to have significant impact upon the successful operation of geothermal district heating systems. (These lessons can also apply to other sources of energy.) The six major basics to success that are discussed in this paper are economic viability, an adequate geothermal resource, simplicity of design, a closed loop system, a local champion, and good public relations.

  3. Writing successful UX proposals

    CERN Document Server

    Hass, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Bringing new project funding and business opportunities to your organization is a vital part of UX professionals' growth and success. Writing Successful UX Proposals teaches the proven techniques for assessing proposal requests, writing successful commercial and government funding proposals, and enhancing your business development skills. This book will teach UX practitioners how to succeed in UX business development by mastering the following goals: * Understand how to assess a request for proposals* Understand the "anatomy" of a proposal response * Speak the business language of those who will be evaluating the proposed approach* Recognize the successes of others and build upon their advice Complete with case studies, tricks and tips, and real-world examples throughout, this is a must-have resource for UX professionals interested in honing their proposal writing skills and setting themselves up for success. * Provides unique sales and proposal writing insights tailored to the UX arena (including both resear...

  4. Successful systems sustaining change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullas, Sheila; Bryant, John

    2007-01-01

    Much has been published on the success and particularly the failure of IT projects; still failures are commonplace. This prospective study focused from the outset on assessing risk of failure and addressing critical success factors. The aim was to apply existing methods in a challenging acute care hospital where success demanded rapid achievement of sustainable improvements in clinical and administrative processes. The implementations were part of the English National Programme for IT. The desired outcomes required the integration of accepted tools and techniques to provide a pragmatic approach to systems implementation: Lean, Six Sigma, PRINCE2 and Benefits Management. The outcome and further insights into success and failure of IT projects in healthcare are described. In particular lessons are identified related to the business need for the project and the successful achievement of the required benefits and business change.

  5. Successful treatment of both double minute of C-MYC and BCL-2 rearrangement containing large B-cell lymphoma with subsequent unfortunate development of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia with t(3;3)(q26.2;q21).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, John C; Kubik, Melanie J; Broome, H Elizabeth; Curtin, Peter T; Dell'Aquila, Marie L; Wang, Huan-You

    2015-11-01

    Double minute chromosomes (DMs), although relatively frequently encountered in solid tumors, are rare in hematologic neoplasms such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and even rarer in lymphoid neoplasms. t(3;3)(q26.2;q21) is a very rare genetic alteration observed in myeloid neoplasm. Herein we report an interesting and unique case of concomitant C-MYC DMs and t(14;18)-containing large B-cell lymphoma, which was successfully treated with R-hyper-CVAD; unfortunately, the patient has developed a therapy-related AML (t-AML) 2 years since the start of his lymphoma treatment. His t-AML contains both t(3;3)(q26.2;q21) and monosomy 7, and the patient died of AML 10 months after the initial diagnosis of t-AML despite clinical remission. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of C-MYC DM-containing de novo large B-cell lymphoma, which was successfully treated with complete remission, but unfortunately died of t-AML harboring t(3;3)(q21;q26). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Econometric Analysis Suggests Possible Crowding Out of Public Libraries by Book Superstores among Middle Income Families in the 1990s. A review of: Hemmeter, Jeffrey A. “Household Use of Public Libraries and Large Bookstores.” Library & Information Science Research 28.4 (Sept. 2006: 595–616.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Hall

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To determine the effect of large bookstores (defined as those having 20 or more employees on household library use. Design – Econometric analysis using crosssectional data sets. Setting – The United States of America. Subjects – People in over 55,000 households across the U.S.A. Methods – Data from three 1996 studies were examined using logit and multinomial logit estimation procedures: the NationalCenter for Education Statistics’ National Household Education Survey (NHES and Public Library Survey (PLS, and the U.S. Census Bureau’s County Business Patterns (CBP. The county level results of the NHEStelephone survey were merged with the county level data from the PLS and the CBP. Additionally, data on Internet use at the state level from the Statistical Abstract of the United States were incorporated into the data set. A logit regression model was used to estimate probability of library use based on several independent variables, evaluated at the mean. Main results – In general, Hemmeter found that "with regard to the impact of large bookstores on household library use, largebookstores do not appear to have an effect on overall library use among the general population” (613. While no significant changes in general library use were found among high and low income households where more large bookstores were present, nor in the population taken as a whole, middle income households (between $25,000 and $50,000 in annual income showed notable declines in library use in these situations. These effects were strongest in the areas of borrowing (200% less likely and recreational purposes (161%, but were also present in workrelated use and job searching. Hemmeter also writes that “poorer households use the library more often for job search purposes. The probability of library use for recreation,work, and consumer information increases as income increases. This effect diminishes as households get richer” (611. Finally, home

  7. Successful Climate Science Communication Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, P.

    2016-12-01

    In the past decade, efforts to communicate the facts of global change have not successfully moved political leaders and the general public to action. In response, a number of collaborative efforts between scientists and professional communicators, writers, journalists, bloggers, filmmakers, artists and others have arisen seeking to bridge that gap. As a result, a new cadre of science-literate communicators, and media-savvy scientists have made themselves visible across diverse mainstream, traditional, and social media outlets. Because of these collaborations, in recent years, misinformation, and disinformation have been successfully met with accurate and credible rebuttals within a single news cycle.Examples of these efforts is the Dark Snow Project, a science/communication collaboration focusing initially on accelerated arctic melt and sea level rise, and the Climate Science Rapid Response team, which matches professional journalists with appropriate science experts in order to respond within a single news cycle to misinformation or misunderstandings about climate science.The session will discuss successful examples and suggest creative approaches for the future.

  8. Success in Transdisciplinary Sustainability Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Luthe

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of sustainable development and societal transitions require both analytical understandings of how coupled human-environment systems function and transdisciplinary science-to-practice approaches. The academic discourse has advanced in developing a framework for defining success in transdisciplinary research (TDR. Further empirical evidence is needed to validate the proposed concepts with TDR case studies. This paper applies a widely used TDR framework to test and critically evaluate its design principles and criteria of success with five TDR case studies the author is intimately familiar with. Overall, the design principles of the framework are validated for the five cases. Additional design principles are derived from the case analysis and proposed to complement the applied framework: (1 A project origin from society as opposed to with and for society; (2 Quickly available initiation funding; (3 Flexibility in time, objectives and methods throughout the research process; (4 Acceptance of process vs. project results; (5 Inclusion of public science communication; and (6 A demand-driven transition to a prolonged or new project partnership. The complementing principles are proposed for integration in the applied framework and are subject to further empirical testing. The reflexive empirical approach I have taken in this paper offers a key step towards removing institutional barriers for successful TDR, demonstrating how conceptual frameworks can be applied.

  9. Teaching Very Large Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeRogatis, Amy; Honerkamp, Kenneth; McDaniel, Justin; Medine, Carolyn; Nyitray, Vivian-Lee; Pearson, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The editor of "Teaching Theology and Religion" facilitated this reflective conversation with five teachers who have extensive experience and success teaching extremely large classes (150 students or more). In the course of the conversation these professors exchange and analyze the effectiveness of several active learning strategies they…

  10. Project Success Report, 1974-1975.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arko, Dorothy N.

    Project Success, a program of modified interdisciplinary instruction coordinated with special services, is considered to be consistent with the theory of individual differences and individualized instruction which is inherent in the philosophy of Bloomington Public School's educational goals and objectives. The project, which began as an…

  11. Inside Successful District-Charter Compacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Richard

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the efforts of a school superintendent to bring the best of charter school practices together with public school education in order to begin a program of collaboration and professional development for teachers, as well as a way to measure student success. The superintendent visited YES Prep and KIPP (Knowledge Is Power…

  12. ERP inside Large Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Daniel AVRAM

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Many large companies in Romania are still functioning without an ERP system. Instead they are using traditional application systems built around the strong boundaries of specific functions: finance, selling, HR, production. An ERP will offer lots of advantages among which the integration of functionalities and support for top management decisions. Although the total cost of ownership is not small and there are some risks when implementing an ERP inside large and very large organizations, having such a system is mandatory. Choosing the right product and vendor and using a correct risk management strategy, will ensure a successful implementation.

  13. Institutional Influences on Succession Intentions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, Britta; Fietze, Simon

    International research shows that entrepreneurial intentions (EI) largely depend on the institutional context. Family business research indicates that succession intentions (SI) similarly vary among countries but explanations up to now are mainly based on cultural differences. Especially in Nordic...... welfare countries entrepreneurial but also succession intention are lower than in countries with other welfare models. Therefore we investigate how SI differs in 17 countries with regards to the institutional context by combining the Global University Entrepreneurial Spirit Students’ Survey (GUESSS......) and the Comparative Welfare Entitlements Dataset (CWED). With this study we fill a research gap by analyzing the influence of social policy measured by the total generosity index on SI of students. The regression results show that SI among other variables depends on the welfare model in certain institutional contexts...

  14. Challenges for Success in Startups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, Richard

    2000-03-01

    The basic challenges to a startup company such as IME have stemmed from the need to balance the business world's goal of fast entry into the market place with the necessity for a solid foundation in technology. Our technology base is broad - indeed it has the makings of a new industry - and the lure of quick commercial success in a specific application could easily make IME vulnerable to the R&D might of giant international companies. The essential challenges for success play out in business/technology decision tradeoffs: (i) preserving equity and viability while keeping R&D momentum and establishing intellectual property, (ii) attracting investors while maintaining focus on long-range goals, and (iii) developing a complete team while protecting capital resources. This balancing act keeps the company agile and resilient, qualities that large corporations could emulate with profit.

  15. Successful grant writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppelman, Gerard H; Holloway, John W

    2012-03-01

    Obtaining research funding is central to the research process. However many (clinician-) scientists receive little, or no, training in the process of writing a successful grant application. In an era of reductions in research budgets and application success rates, the ability to construct a well presented, clear, articulate proposal is becoming more important than ever. Obtaining grants is a method to achieve your long term research goals. If you are able to formulate these long term goals, it is relevant to explore the market and investigate all potential grant opportunities. Finally, we will provide an outline of key elements of successful research grants.

  16. Software Maintenance Success Recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Reifer, Donald J

    2011-01-01

    Dispelling much of the folklore surrounding software maintenance, Software Maintenance Success Recipes identifies actionable formulas for success based on in-depth analysis of more than 200 real-world maintenance projects. It details the set of factors that are usually present when effective software maintenance teams do their work and instructs on the methods required to achieve success. Donald J. Reifer--an award winner for his contributions to the field of software engineering and whose experience includes managing the DoD Software Initiatives Office--provides step-by-step guidance on how t

  17. Comparison of sequencing the D2 region of the large subunit ribosomal RNA gene (MicroSEQ®) versus the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions using two public databases for identification of common and uncommon clinically relevant fungal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbefeville, S; Harris, A; Ferrieri, P

    2017-09-01

    Fungal infections cause considerable morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Rapid and accurate identification of fungi is essential to guide accurately targeted antifungal therapy. With the advent of molecular methods, clinical laboratories can use new technologies to supplement traditional phenotypic identification of fungi. The aims of the study were to evaluate the sole commercially available MicroSEQ® D2 LSU rDNA Fungal Identification Kit compared to the in-house developed internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions assay in identifying moulds, using two well-known online public databases to analyze sequenced data. 85 common and uncommon clinically relevant fungi isolated from clinical specimens were sequenced for the D2 region of the large subunit (LSU) of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene with the MicroSEQ® Kit and the ITS regions with the in house developed assay. The generated sequenced data were analyzed with the online GenBank and MycoBank public databases. The D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene identified 89.4% or 92.9% of the 85 isolates to the genus level and the full ITS region (f-ITS) 96.5% or 100%, using GenBank or MycoBank, respectively, when compared to the consensus ID. When comparing species-level designations to the consensus ID, D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene aligned with 44.7% (38/85) or 52.9% (45/85) of these isolates in GenBank or MycoBank, respectively. By comparison, f-ITS possessed greater specificity, followed by ITS1, then ITS2 regions using GenBank or MycoBank. Using GenBank or MycoBank, D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene outperformed phenotypic based ID at the genus level. Comparing rates of ID between D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene and the ITS regions in GenBank or MycoBank at the species level against the consensus ID, f-ITS and ITS2 exceeded performance of the D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene, but ITS1 had similar performance to the D2 region of the LSU rRNA gene using MycoBank. Our results indicated that the MicroSEQ® D2 LSU r

  18. Successful project management

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Trevor L

    2016-01-01

    Successful Project Management, 5th edition, is an essential guide for anyone who wants to improve the success rate of their projects. It will help managers to maintain a balance between the demands of the customer, the project, the team and the organization. Covering the more technical aspects of a project from start to completion it contains practised and tested techniques, covering project conception and start-up, how to manage stake holders, effective risk management, project planning and launch and execution. Also including a brand new glossary of key terms, it provides help with evaluating your project as well as practical checklists and templates to ensure success for any ambitious project manager. With over one million copies sold, the hugely popular Creating Success series covers a wide variety of topic, with the latest editions including new chapters such as Tough Conversations and Treating People Right. This indispensable business skills collection is suited to a variety of roles, from someone look...

  19. Tribes Communities Success Stories

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data describes successful EPA projects and partnerships which are restoring local communities and watersheds within the San Francisco Bay Delta Watershed.

  20. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  1. Human Resource Outsourcing Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasliza Abdul-Halim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The existing literature on partnership seems to take the relationship between partnership quality and outsourcing success for granted. Therefore, this article aims at examining the role of service quality in strengthening the relationship between partnership quality and human resource (HR outsourcing success. The samples were obtained from 96 manufacturing organizations in Penang, Malaysia. The results showed that partnership quality variables such as trust, business understanding, and communication have significant positive impact on HR outsourcing success, whereas in general, service quality was found to partially moderate these relationships. Therefore, comprehending the HR outsourcing relationship in the context of service quality may assist the organizations to accomplish HR outsourcing success by identifying areas of expected benefits and improvements.

  2. Goodbye Career, Hello Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komisar, Randy

    2000-01-01

    Success in today's economy means throwing out the old career rules. The "noncareer" career is driven by passion for the work and has the fluidity and flexibility needed in the contemporary workplace. (JOW)

  3. Predicting Scientific Success Based on Coauthorship Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Sarigöl, Emre; Scholtes, Ingo; Garas, Antonios; Schweitzer, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We address the question to what extent the success of scientific articles is due to social influence. Analyzing a data set of over 100000 publications from the field of Computer Science, we study how centrality in the coauthorship network differs between authors who have highly cited papers and those who do not. We further show that a machine learning classifier, based only on coauthorship network centrality measures at time of publication, is able to predict with high precision whether an article will be highly cited five years after publication. By this we provide quantitative insight into the social dimension of scientific publishing - challenging the perception of citations as an objective, socially unbiased measure of scientific success.

  4. How to create successful partnerships-a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildridge, Valerie; Childs, Sue; Cawthra, Lynette; Madge, Bruce

    2004-06-01

    This literature review covers a wide range of publications (articles, books, reports and government publications) that provide an overview of the wider topic of partnership working. It is not a systematic review, but the authors' personal review, drawing largely on the resources available in the King's Fund Library. Partnership working is a key component of the UK government's modernization agenda, particularly in the health field. However, the principles of achieving successful partnership are generally applicable. The review therefore concentrates on literature that can provide guidance for people planning to set up a partnership, or re-evaluating an existing partnership. The sections of this review comprise: definition of partnership working; types of partnership; partnership initiatives; drivers; critical success factors; barriers; benefits; the process of partnership working; evaluation and assessment tools; demolishing the Berlin Wall: government policy on partnership working; exemplars of library information service partnerships.

  5. Conservation management of large carnivores in Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.G.L. Mills

    1991-09-01

    Full Text Available The conservation management of large carnivores in Africa is reviewed. In large protected areas the complexity of the relations between predators and prey, and between competing predators, indicate that these relationships should not be disturbed, even though, superficially, there may seem to be sound reasons to do so. Management action, however, may have to be taken against carnivores that break out of reserves. The related questions of translocation and re-introduction are also complex. Guidelines for considering whether to and how to implement these strategies are presented. It is stressed that adequate follow-up observations should be made after translocating or re- introducing carnivores, so that more information on the success of these strategies can be obtained. Much of Africa comprises rural areas inhabited by pastoralists. It may be possible to manage some large carnivore species in these areas to the mutual benefit of man and beast, but for this type of program to be successful, a well planned public relations campaign is essential.

  6. Research into Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogomir Novak

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available As competition is becoming ever more fierce, research into the prerequisites for success is gaining ground. By most people, success is perceived as an external phenomenon, but it is in fact the consequence of a person's readiness to perform in the world (of business. In the paper, Novak distinguishes between internal, external and group success. The essence of interna!success, which is the condition for the other two types of success, is assuming responsibility for, and exercising self-control over one's psychic phenomena. This in fact means that one needs to "reprogramme" the old patterns of behaviour and substitute them for the new, which leads to personality changes based on the understanding and acceptance of the self and others as they are. In realizing personal abilities, motives and goals, mental guiding laws must also be taken into account. Nowadays, the overall success of an organization is an important indicator of the quality of gro up work. The working patterns of individuals comply with the patterns used by his or her colleagues. When we do something for ourselves, we do it for others. In certain organizations, through accepted ways of communication all people become successful, and no body needs to be paid off. Employees wholly identify themselves with their organization, and vice versa. This three-part paradigm (I-Others-Community is the basis for various models of practical training for success, which are often idealized, but are primarily aimed at abolishing passivity and flaws in the system and its wider environment.

  7. How to create and terminate a school of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Lennart; Karlberg, Ingvar

    2015-08-01

    The famous preamble to the Constitution of the World Health Organization (WHO) from 1948, stating that health is not only the absence of disease, has been one of the most influential political statements of our time. The follow-up, reaching a position where health is viewed as instrumental to a good life and not as a goal in itself, as set out in the Ottawa Charter of 1986, has likewise been of the utmost importance for the global development of public health, as well as developing the concept of health promotion. The focus on public health sparked by the WHO was paralleled by expansion of the academic interest in the topic, beginning in the USA and successively adopted around the world. In the Nordic countries the pioneering of an academic platform for public health studies and research began in 1953. This was later followed by a stepwise expansion to a full academic institution with postgraduate studies, work-related training, research and development. From the start, the resultant institution called the Nordic School of Public Health (NHV) was a joint Nordic project financed by the Nordic governments. The NHV became a leader in public health studies in Nordic countries and also a role model for the development of an academic community. A large campus and a select and erudite staff, together with thousands of students, paved the way for the NHV having a major impact on public health policy in Nordic countries. One effect of this was increasing awareness of the need for systematic policy supporting public health research and, with this, the founding of institutions of public health in all of the separate Nordic countries. Ironically, the impact made by the NHV in spreading the idea of public health as an important part of academic study has made the NHV superfluous. It is true that courses and programmes in public health are now available at most universities in the five Nordic countries, but they are directed at young students fresh from high school. There is no

  8. Burkitt’s Lymphoma and B-Cell Lymphoma Unclassifiable With Features Intermediate Between Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Burkitt’s Lymphoma in Patients With HIV: Outcomes in a South African Public Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seftel, Matthew; Uldrick, Thomas S.; Esterhuizen, Tonya M.; Mohamed, Nooroudien; Kotze, Danie

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL) is a common HIV-associated lymphoma in South Africa. B-cell lymphoma unclassifiable with features intermediate between diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and Burkitt’s lymphoma (BL/DLBCL) also occurs in HIV infection. Outcomes of HIV-infected patients with BL or BL/DLBCL in a resource-constrained setting are not defined. Methods We performed a retrospective study of HIV-positive patients with BL or BL/DLBCL treated from 2004 to 2012 with curative intent at a publically funded academic medical center in South Africa. Differences between BL and BL/DLBCL, survival outcomes, and factors associated with survival were analyzed. Results There were 35 patients with either HIV-associated BL (24) or BL/DLBCL (11) who met study criteria. Median CD4+ T-lymphocyte count at lymphoma diagnosis was 188 cells/μL (range, 10 to 535 cells/μL). Patients with BL/DLBCL were significantly older and had less bone marrow involvement and lower baseline serum lactase dehydrogenase than patients with BL. Eighty-nine percent of patients presented with advanced disease, and 25% had baseline CNS involvement. Chemotherapy regimens consisted of cytoreduction with low-dose cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and prednisone followed by induction with vincristine, methotrexate, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and prednisone (LMB 86; 57%); hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, dexamethasone, methotrexate, and cytarabine (hyper-CVAD; 20%); cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone and high-dose methotrexate with leucovorin rescue on day 10 with accompanying prophylactic IT chemotherapy (Stanford regimen; 14%); and cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP-like; 9%) regimens. Twenty-three patients received CNS treatment or prophylaxis, and 31 received concurrent combination antiretroviral therapy. Two-year overall survival was 38% (95% CI, 22% to 54%) and 2-year event-free survival was 23% (95% CI, 11% to 38%), with

  9. Adaptive Large Neighbourhood Search

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Stefan

    Large neighborhood search is a metaheuristic that has gained popularity in recent years. The heuristic repeatedly moves from solution to solution by first partially destroying the solution and then repairing it. The best solution observed during this search is presented as the final solution....... This tutorial introduces the large neighborhood search metaheuristic and the variant adaptive large neighborhood search that dynamically tunes parameters of the heuristic while it is running. Both heuristics belong to a broader class of heuristics that are searching a solution space using very large...... neighborhoods. The tutorial also present applications of the adaptive large neighborhood search, mostly related to vehicle routing problems for which the heuristic has been extremely successful. We discuss how the heuristic can be parallelized and thereby take advantage of modern desktop computers...

  10. Public-Private Honors Success at Community Colleges of Spokane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avery, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the steep budget cuts in recent years, and how this has affected the number of honors students that can be served at community colleges in the United States. This was true in Spokane, Washington, where, prior to working with "American Honors," community colleges had struggled for many years to provide…

  11. Developing a Publication Containing Elementary Teachers' Successful Mathematics Instruction Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syster, Susan M.

    Mathematics teachers are trained to assess students' abilities and instruction needs. Many teachers use creative teaching strategies, games, and various media to meet those needs. Teachers, though, are constantly searching for instructional strategies, time savers, games, materials, and other ways to improve teaching in mathematics classrooms.…

  12. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Varadhan, S R S

    2016-01-01

    The theory of large deviations deals with rates at which probabilities of certain events decay as a natural parameter in the problem varies. This book, which is based on a graduate course on large deviations at the Courant Institute, focuses on three concrete sets of examples: (i) diffusions with small noise and the exit problem, (ii) large time behavior of Markov processes and their connection to the Feynman-Kac formula and the related large deviation behavior of the number of distinct sites visited by a random walk, and (iii) interacting particle systems, their scaling limits, and large deviations from their expected limits. For the most part the examples are worked out in detail, and in the process the subject of large deviations is developed. The book will give the reader a flavor of how large deviation theory can help in problems that are not posed directly in terms of large deviations. The reader is assumed to have some familiarity with probability, Markov processes, and interacting particle systems.

  13. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne McNeilly

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson’s School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The “minimal-marking” concept (Haswell, 1983, which requires dramatically more student engagement, resulted in more successful learning outcomes for surface-level knowledge acquisition than the more traditional approach of “teacher-corrects-all.” Results suggest it would be effective, not just for grammar, punctuation, and word usage, the objective here, but for any material that requires rote-memory learning, such as the Associated Press or Canadian Press style rules used by news publications across North America.

  14. Impact of Contractors’ Bidding Strategies on Bid Success in the Nigeria Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolulope Samuel Fawale

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Several types of researches have been carried out prior to the new millennium on the subject of bidding strategies in the construction industry. Today, organizations are faced with a very complex decision of bid/no-bid because it requires the assessment of large number of highly inter-related variables. The study aims at examining different types of Contractors’ Bidding Strategies (CBS with a view to determining their impact on bid success. In line with the aim, the study objectives include; evaluation of different types of CBS and; assessment of the success rate of contractors’ bid. The method of approach elicits information on the number of projects bided and successes recorded over a period of time. A total of one hundred and seventy-one useable responses were retrieved from questionnaire administration. Descriptive statistics, tables and percentages as well as mean item score (MIS were used for data analysis. The study showed that lowest bid, public relations and joint venture bidding strategies have great impact on contractors’ bid success especially on residential, educational and administrative projects in the Nigeria Construction Industry (NCI. Therefore, the study concluded that relationship exists between contractors’ bidding strategies and equivalent successes recorded over a period of time. It is important to also know that lowest bid strategy still remains the most effective bidding strategy for public works contracting in the NCI.

  15. Successful ageing for psychiatrists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peisah, Carmelle

    2016-04-01

    This paper aims to explore the concept and determinants of successful ageing as they apply to psychiatrists as a group, and as they can be applied specifically to individuals. Successful ageing is a heterogeneous, inclusive concept that is subjectively defined. No longer constrained by the notion of "super-ageing", successful ageing can still be achieved in the face of physical and/or mental illness. Accordingly, it remains within the reach of most of us. It can, and should be, person-specific and individually defined, specific to one's bio-psycho-social and occupational circumstances, and importantly, reserves. Successful professional ageing is predicated upon insight into signature strengths, with selection of realistic goal setting and substitution of new goals, given the dynamic nature of these constructs as we age. Other essential elements are generativity and self-care. Given that insight is key, taking a regular stock or inventory of our reserves across bio-psycho-social domains might be helpful. Importantly, for successful ageing, this needs to be suitably matched to the professional task and load. This lends itself to a renewable personal ageing plan, which should be systemically adopted with routine expectations of self-care and professional responsibility. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  16. Conditions underpinning success in joint service-education workforce planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Styles Laureen

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Vancouver Island lies just off the southwest coast of Canada. Separated from the large urban area of Greater Vancouver (estimated population 2.17 million by the Georgia Strait, this geographical location poses unique challenges in delivering health care to a mixed urban, rural and remote population of approximately 730 000 people living on the main island and the surrounding Gulf Islands. These challenges are offset by opportunities for the Vancouver Island Health Authority (VIHA to collaborate with four publicly funded post-secondary institutions in planning and implementing responses to existing and emerging health care workforce needs. In this commentary, we outline strategies we have found successful in aligning health education and training with local health needs in ways that demonstrate socially accountable outcomes. Challenges encountered through this process (i.e. regulatory reform, post-secondary policy reform, impacts of an ageing population, impact of private, for-profit educational institutions have placed demands on us to establish and build on open and collaborative working relationships. Some of our successes can be attributed to evidence-informed decision-making. Other successes result from less tangible but no less important factors. We argue that both rational and "accidental" factors are significant – and that strategic use of "accidental" features may prove most significant in our efforts to ensure the delivery of high-quality health care to our communities.

  17. An Evaluation of a Competency-Based Public Health Training Program for Public Health Professionals in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyrah K; Maryman, JʼVonnah; Collins, Tracie

    Less than one-third of the US public health workforce has formal training in public health. Academic-public health agency partnerships aimed at addressing the nation's workforce challenges have shown great promise. To evaluate the effectiveness of a piloted competency-based public health training program formed out of an academic-public health agency partnership. Mixed-methods design using pre- and postworkshop surveys and quizzes, open-ended questions, and document review. Large, urban local health department located in south central Kansas. Participant satisfaction with training, knowledge change, self-report application of new knowledge, and organizational change. Participants reported high satisfaction with the training program and valued the hands-on, practical approach used. Participation increased knowledge and confidence in public health competency areas covered in the program. At 3-month follow-up, 90% of participants reported applying new knowledge and skills in their primary job duties. At the organizational level, 3 major policy changes aimed at sustaining the program were implemented following its launch. Incorporating tailored, theory-driven approaches to trainings and collaborating with health department leadership to identify policy opportunities that help sustain the training program within the agency is recommended. Findings from this evaluation demonstrate the success of an academic-agency partnership's effort to develop and implement at a large, urban local health department.

  18. Untangling Performance from Success

    CERN Document Server

    Yucesoy, Burcu

    2015-01-01

    Fame, popularity and celebrity status, frequently used tokens of success, are often loosely related to, or even divorced from professional performance. This dichotomy is partly rooted in the difficulty to distinguish performance, an individual measure that captures the actions of a performer, from success, a collective measure that captures a community's reactions to these actions. Yet, finding the relationship between the two measures is essential for all areas that aim to objectively reward excellence, from science to business. Here we quantify the relationship between performance and success by focusing on tennis, an individual sport where the two quantities can be independently measured. We show that a predictive model, relying only on a tennis player's performance in tournaments, can accurately predict an athlete's popularity, both during a player's active years and after retirement. Hence the model establishes a direct link between performance and momentary popularity. The agreement between the performa...

  19. Succeeding with succession planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, C R

    1996-12-01

    Succession planning is the process of identifying people who could presently move into key positions or could do so after specifically targeted development occurs. The process identifies the better people in the organization and takes a consistent approach to assembling, analyzing, and retaining information about potential leaders and planning for their further development. At its simplest level, it is the development of a backup and potential successor to each manager; at is most formal, it is a documented plan for management succession at all levels in the organization. Strongly supportive of a policy of development and promotion from within the organization, succession planning also represents a proactive posture in respect to inevitable management turnover. In these days of rapid change in health care, no modern organization that expects to keep up with increasing competition can afford to drift--or even to let a single department drift--while replacements are recruited for managers who resign, retire, or otherwise leave.

  20. Large deviations

    CERN Document Server

    Hollander, Frank den

    2008-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory and applications of large deviations, a branch of probability theory that describes the probability of rare events in terms of variational problems. By focusing the theory, in Part A of the book, on random sequences, the author succeeds in conveying the main ideas behind large deviations without a need for technicalities, thus providing a concise and accessible entry to this challenging and captivating subject. The selection of modern applications, described in Part B of the book, offers a good sample of what large deviation theory is able to achieve

  1. Political Economy: Success or Failure?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno S. Frey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Political Economy and Public Choice approaches have promoted the study of interactions between the economy and the polity for over 60 years now. The present paper endeavours to provide a critical discussion of this literature and its achievements. In particular, it begins with the different approaches based on empirically tested or politometric models and it then proceeds to discuss different studies of the effects that particular rules of the game have on politico-economic outcomes. The third section of the paper will address studies that take institutions to be endogenous and aims to explain why particular institutions emerge. Finally, the question of whether Political Economy has been a success or a failure will be tackled. While the success in terms of the position it has gained in economic research and teaching is undeniable, a look at one of the most thriving recent areas of economics, happiness research, will reveal that some of its fundamental lessons are all too often disregarded.

  2. China's first family planning publicity month.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G

    1983-05-01

    China conducted its 1st nationwide Family Planning Publicity Month in 1983, from New Year's Day to Spring Festival (February 13). The campaign emphasized the rural areas and focused on explaining why family planning is a state policy. The most noticeable achievements of this campaign were that every household became familiar with the fact that family planning is a basic state policy. The majority of the population take this policy seriously, realizing that strict control of population growth is both a good and imperative policy. More than 1,830,000 propaganda columns and photo exhibitions were displayed, 5,900,000 radio and television programs broadcast, 2,010,000 theatrical performances, movie and slide showings presented, and 97,000,000 copies of materials published for public dissemination. The activities were varied and interesting, vivid and lively, and purposeful and persuasive. 1 of the most effective methods of publicizing population control has been the presentation of comparative statistics. This aspect of the campaign was a specific and lively form of education in population theory and practice. The presentation of statistics that show the relationship among population, land use, grain produce, and income enabled the population to reason out why population growth needs to match economic and social development. Another important accomplishment of the publicity month was that a large number of couples of reproductive age became convinced of the need to use contraception. According to the incomplete statistics, 8,860,000 people had surgical operations for birth control. The universal promotion of ligations by either partner of a reproductive couple who already had given birth to a 2nd child was an important development of family planning technique promoted simultaneously with the promotion of IUDs. The increase in the number of people doing family planning work was another achievement of the publicity month. More than 15,240,000 publicity personnel and 760

  3. MANAGING OPERATIONS IMPROVEMENT IN ROMANIAN PUBLIC SERVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BALOI IONUT-COSMIN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to develop a pleading for the transfer of best practices to improving the operational activity in the Romanian public institutions. The practice of implementation demonstrates that the perception of many executives in the Romanian private enterprises regarding the set of tools to improve processes and assimilation of lean philosophy is not a very favorable and encouraging one. It can be said that only some large enterprises had successfully introduced in their daily practice and organization the improvement principles, the operational optimization and the elimination of waste sources. In the SMEs, and especially in the services the experiences are isolated, but they have demonstrated the usefulness (the frequency of saving goals indicate, indeed, the need for proliferation of continuous improvement principles. Regarding the public organizations, the implementation of the new management system of designing and operating the current practices is pretty unknown, accepted at declarative level, but becomes, when is planned and implemented rather a burden on managers who should take on this challenge. Both in public management and private management, today the focus is on people and relationships (processes and projects, starting of course with the work organization. The good practices successfully proved in the private management in the recent decades are transferred today to public institutions; and the Romanian public organizations tend to adapt, also in terms of processes optimization. The study aims to analyze the functioning of the hypothetical management system of processes improvements, respectively the applying of lean tools and principles within the public Romanian institution. They are treated some dysfunctions observed within the process of understanding the utility aspects and throughout the assuming of operational improvement goals within these organizations. The qualitative observations, the critical interpretations and

  4. Critical Success factors for Enterprise Resource Planning implementation in Indian Retail Industry: An Exploratory study

    CERN Document Server

    Garg, Poonam

    2010-01-01

    Enterprise resource Planning (ERP) has become a key business driver in today's world. Retailers are also trying to reap in the benefits of the ERP. In most large Indian Retail Industry ERP systems have replaced nonintegrated information systems with integrated and maintainable software. Retail ERP solution integrates demand and supply effectively to help improve bottom line. The implementation of ERP systems in such firms is a difficult task. So far, ERP implementations have yielded more failures than successes. Very few implementation failures are recorded in the literature because few companies wish to publicize their implementation failure. This paper explores and validates the existing literature empirically to find out the critical success factors that lead to the success of ERP in context to Indian retail industry. The findings of the results provide valuable insights for the researchers and practitioners who are interested in implementing Enterprise Resource Planning systems in retail industry, how bes...

  5. German Tobacco Industry’s Successful Efforts to Maintain Scientific and Political Respectability to Prevent Regulation of Secondhand Smoke

    OpenAIRE

    Bornhäuser, Annette; McCarthy,, Jennifer; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

    2006-01-01

    EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Germany is one of the few industrialized nations in which the tobacco industry remains a legitimate force in business, government, science and society at large. Though Germany has been an international leader in environmental protection, the German tobacco industry has been successful in preventing the translation of knowledge of the dangers of pollution from secondhand smoke into effective public health policy through a carefully planned collaboration w...

  6. Extraordinary Funding of the War of the Spanish Succession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco ANDÚJAR CASTILLO

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of the Bourbon monarchy encountered one of its main hurdles in the critical situation of the royal treasury inherited from the reign of Charles II, with most of the assets engaged in the payment of public debt. One further obstacle was the start of the War of Succession, which brought about, on the one hand, a reduction in the treasury income and, on the other, a considerable increase in expenses intended to fund the creation of a large new army. To cope with such a situation, the monarchy had to resort to multiple extraordinary resources. This article deals with two of these resources: the income obtained from the sale of positions and honours, and an exceptional loan provided by the clergy in the spring of 1707. It also addresses the monarchy’s extraordinary revenue accounts between June 1705 and June 1707, which reveal the multiple resources employed to fund the war during that critical period.

  7. Public knowledge and public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    As health care applications derived from human genetics research are likely to move increasingly from 'clinic to community', there is growing interest not just in how patients understand and take up health-related genetic information but also in the views of the wider population, as well as a range of professional groups. In this paper, issues relating public knowledge and public trust are raised and discussed in an attempt to move forward debates about public involvement in genomic research and the role of sociologists within interdisciplinary teams. As the field of public understanding of science has developed, we have seen a shift from a focus on the lack of scientific literacy as problem to a recognition of the range of different knowledges that people have and use as they confront science and technology in their everyday lives. As a mood for dialogue pervades many institutions in their relations with 'publics', attention must now be paid to the way in which knowledge and expertise is expressed, heard and acted upon in dialogic encounters. There is increasing concern about public trust in science and calls to increase public confidence, particularly through more open engagement with a range of publics. However, lack of trust or loss of confidence may be constructed as problems rather than reflecting empirical reality, where more complex relationships and attitudes prevail. Lack of trust is often privatized, deeply rooted in lived experience and routinely managed. Trust relations are generally characterized by ambivalence, uncertainty and risk, and are always provisional. Drawing on selected literature and empirical research to review and illustrate this field, this paper argues that scepticism or ambivalence on the part of publics are not necessarily problems to be overcome in the interest of scientific progress, but rather should be mobilized to enhance open and public debates about the nature and direction of genomics research, medicine, and the related

  8. Philosophy + Advocacy = Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutt, Kevin; Townley, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about music advocacy strategies has long been promoted as important for music educators, not only for the benefit of their individual programs but also for the specific benefit of music students and the general public. This article suggests an approach to advocacy grounded in the teacher's professional beliefs, phrased in terms…

  9. Successful aging at work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zacher, Hannes

    2015-01-01

    The expression successful aging at work and related terms such as active, healthy, and productive aging at work are frequently used by organizational researchers and practitioners. However, there are no concrete definitions or theoretical frameworks that explain their meaning, assumptions, and

  10. Successful School Composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahar, Rhea Dawn

    2001-01-01

    School composting programs that have met the challenges inherent in long-term composting have several traits in common: a supportive educational program, schoolwide participation, and a consistent maintenance program. Examines the elements of success, offers examples of incorporating composting into the curriculum, and describes three methods of…

  11. Ensuring Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, James L.

    2006-01-01

    James L. Oblinger, Chancellor of North Carolina State University, argues that higher education must continually evolve new methods of teaching and learning to support students' lifelong skills and impending careers. Part of ensuring students' success lies in finding alternative learning models, such as the Student-Centered Activities for Large…

  12. Success in Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jens; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    What makes a successful entrepreneur? Using Danish register data, we find strong support for the hypothesis that theoretical skills from schooling and practical skills acquired through wage-work are complementary inputs in the human capital earnings function of entrepreneurs. In fact, we find tha...

  13. Pathways to School Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development, 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2006, the University of Pittsburgh Office of Child Development began implementing a multi-year school readiness project in several area schools. Evidence from both research and the field point to several key elements that foster school readiness and create pathways to school success for all children. This paper presents components of a…

  14. Models of Success

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Wu Renbao made national celebrity for his commitment to achieving common prosperity among his co-villagers in Huaxi Village, Jiangsu Province.Wu's recipe for success was to take advantage of collective strength by encouraging mutual assistance between villages and households.

  15. International Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clayton

    2016-01-01

    This article, with a focus on North American postsecondary education, identifies international students as a strategic enrollment management institutional priority; presents themes in the international student retention, satisfaction, and success research literature; and describes related best practices. It also presents the findings from an…

  16. Mindfulness and Student Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Matt

    2015-01-01

    Mindfulness has long been practiced in Eastern spiritual traditions for personal improvement, and educators and educational institutions have recently begun to explore its usefulness in schools. Mindfulness training can be valuable for helping students be more successful learners and more connected members of an educational community. To determine…

  17. FOCUS: Sustainable Mathematics Successes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mireles, Selina V.; Acee, Taylor W.; Gerber, Lindsey N.

    2014-01-01

    The FOCUS (Fundamentals of Conceptual Understanding and Success) Co-Requisite Model Intervention (FOCUS Intervention) for College Algebra was developed as part of the Developmental Education Demonstration Projects (DEDP) in Texas. The program was designed to use multiple services, courses, and best practices to support student completion of a…

  18. Success in Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Jens; Malchow-Møller, Nikolaj; Sørensen, Anders

    2016-01-01

    What makes a successful entrepreneur? Using Danish register data, we find strong support for the hypothesis that theoretical skills from schooling and practical skills acquired through wage-work are complementary inputs in the human capital earnings function of entrepreneurs. In fact, we find...

  19. Ramada, A Successful Example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>After entry into the WTO, China’s hotels are being challenged by the global economy and overseas counterparts. They should seek creation and development to fight against the fierce competition. Ramada Pudong Hotel, managed by the Shanghai Airport Group Civil Aviation Property Company Ltd, has become a successful example in creative management.

  20. Characteristics of Successful Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of characteristics of 12 average and 12 superior small business people in three developing nations (India, Malawi, and Ecuador) found proactive qualities such as initiative and assertiveness, achievement orientation, and commitment to others characteristic of successful entrepreneurs. Other expected qualities (self-confidence,…

  1. Ensuring Students' Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oblinger, James L.

    2006-01-01

    James L. Oblinger, Chancellor of North Carolina State University, argues that higher education must continually evolve new methods of teaching and learning to support students' lifelong skills and impending careers. Part of ensuring students' success lies in finding alternative learning models, such as the Student-Centered Activities for Large…

  2. Characteristics of Successful Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Comparison of characteristics of 12 average and 12 superior small business people in three developing nations (India, Malawi, and Ecuador) found proactive qualities such as initiative and assertiveness, achievement orientation, and commitment to others characteristic of successful entrepreneurs. Other expected qualities (self-confidence,…

  3. Successful Bilingual Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montecel, Maria Robledo; Cortez, Josie

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a research project carried out by the Intercultural Development Research Association (IDRA). IDRA's primary research question for this study was, "What contributed to the success of a bilingual education classroom as evidenced by LEP student academic achievement?" In addition to the student data, qualitative and contextual…

  4. Public Funding of Political Parties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ortuno-Ortin, Ignacio; Schultz, Christian

    This paper concerns public funding of parties. Parteis receive public funds depending on their vote share. Funds finance electoral campaigns. Two cases are investigated. In the first, some voters are policy motivated and some are ?impressionable? ? their vote depends directly on campaign...... expenditures. In the second, campaigning is informative and all voters are policy motivated. Public funds increase policy convergence in both cases. The effect is larger, the more funding depends on vote shares. When campaigns are informative, there may be multiple euqilibria. Intuitively, a large party can...... stay large since it receives large funds...

  5. Public opinion on public services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evelien Eggink; Debbie Verbeek-Oudijk; Evert Pommer

    2013-01-01

    Original titel: Burgers over de kwaliteit van publieke diensten Most citizens come into contact with public services, for example as a patient, as a student or pupil, as a passenger on public transport or as a museum visitor. More and more importance is being attached to the quality of those service

  6. Successful aging: considering non-biomedical constructs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carver LF

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lisa F Carver,1 Diane Buchanan2 1Department of Sociology, Queen’s University Kingston, ON, Canada; 2School of Nursing, Queen’s University Kingston, ON, Canada Objectives: Successful aging continues to be applied in a variety of contexts and is defined using a number of different constructs. Although previous reviews highlight the multidimensionality of successful aging, a few have focused exclusively on non-biomedical factors, as was done here. Methods: This scoping review searched Ovid Medline database for peer-reviewed English-language articles published between 2006 and 2015, offering a model of successful aging and involving research with older adults. Results: Seventy-two articles were reviewed. Thirty-five articles met the inclusion criteria. Common non-biomedical constructs associated with successful aging included engagement, optimism and/or positive attitude, resilience, spirituality and/or religiosity, self-efficacy and/or self-esteem, and gerotranscendence. Discussion: Successful aging is a complex process best described using a multidimensional model. Given that the majority of elders will experience illness and/or disease during the life course, public health initiatives that promote successful aging need to employ non-biomedical constructs, facilitating the inclusion of elders living with disease and/or disability. Keywords: successful aging, resilience, gerotranscendence, engagement, optimism

  7. Public Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What is the role of sociology in society? How can - and should - sociology contribute with insights relevant and useful to the outside world? Is sociology attuned to accommodate the demands of the wider public and of surrounding society? Who benefits from the knowledge produced and provided...... by sociology? What are the social implications and cultural effects of the knowledge sociology provides and creates? All of these questions, and many others, concern and centre on sociology's relationship to the surrounding society, in short to the ‘public'. All of these questions - and many others...... irrelevance and introversion and the Charybdis of public relevancy and extroversion. But what does it mean to be a ‘public sociologist' in contemporary society and are there really any other ways of doing sociology? What are the requirements of sociologists in a social world increasingly informed and shaped...

  8. Miscellaneous Publications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Late 19th century Weather Bureau publications and Congressional reports pertaining to weather. Set of Weather Bureau Snowfall Bulletins for Rocky Mountain states...

  9. Public Airports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set is a vector point digital data structure that contains the locations of General Public Use Airports in the State of New Mexico. It only contains those...

  10. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Do you have questions about the elections to the Staff Council, 2017 MERIT exercise, EVE and School, LD to IC exercise, CHIS, the Pension Fund… Come get informed and ask your questions at our public meetings. These public meetings are also an opportunity to get the more information on current issues. Benefit from this occasion to get the latest news and to discuss with the representatives of the statutory body that is the Staff Association!

  11. Rent dissipation through electricity prices of publicly owned utilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard, J-T.; Roland, M. [Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada)

    1997-11-01

    Pricing policies of Canadian public utilities were examined. It was shown that under the existing set of rules the prices established are frequently below the marginal cost. This appears to be particularly true in the case of provinces that rely principally on hydroelectric resources. Study recommendations to bring electricity prices in line with marginal costs have had little success to date despite overwhelming evidence of large economic losses associated with the current institutional arrangements. This situation remains at the same time that governments apply high tax rates on incomes. By putting together two strands of economic literature, public choice and the theory of public utility pricing, this paper develops a simple model that explains why the median consumer prefers a low electricity price and a high tax rate. Hydro-Quebec survey data is used to confirm that these conditions are satisfied in Quebec. 17 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Styles of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    of business excellence points to a clear agenda for success. Setting clear strategic goals and the ability to take a long-term view of an organization's direction, combined with other leadership attributes such as creativity, teambuilding and learning, are principal keys to creating an excellent organization......Corporate success stories tend to emphasize the "great men" theory of history. But now a European research project established the managerial attributes that can turn an ordinary leader into one ideal for the pursuit of business excellence. The emergence of five leadership styles as crucial drivers...... lower value on the teambuilding and strategic competencies than is required for business excellence. By contrast, their "ideal" leader is heavily characterized by being a creative, inspiring, and active problem-solver....

  13. Styles of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1997-01-01

    Corporate success stories tend to emphasize the "great men" theory of history. But now a European research project established the managerial attributes that can turn an ordinary leader into one ideal for the pursuit of business excellence. The emergence of five leadership styles as crucial drivers...... of business excellence points to a clear agenda for success. Setting clear strategic goals and the ability to take a long-term view of an organization's direction, combined with other leadership attributes such as creativity, teambuilding and learning, are principal keys to creating an excellent organization....... Leaders seeking to achive business excellence must view the high-level attainment of these sets of leadership competencies as their paramount objective. In striving for business excellence, European leaders may encounter resistance among their employees. Crucially, European employees place a markedly...

  14. Profile of success

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlgaard, Jens Jørn; Nørgaard, Anders; Jakobsen, Søren

    1998-01-01

    What management skills must Europe's business leaders improve to achieve business excellence? Which country's leaders are best placed for success? Does the next generation have what it takes to compete? In the second half of their study of the leadership styles that drive business excellence, Jens...... Dahlgaard, Anders Nørgaard and Søren Jakobsen describe an excellent leadership profile that provides the answers....

  15. Successful time management

    CERN Document Server

    Forsyth, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Packed with tips and techniques, Successful Time Management serves as a guide to reviewing and assessing new work practices to improve time management. It includes great time-saving ideas, practical solutions, checklists, and advice on controlling paperwork, delegating and working with others, prioritizing to focus on key issues, and getting and staying organized. This new third edition contains new practical tips on using email in a time effective manner and dealing with other internet-based tools and apps to help productivity.

  16. Principles of successful partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangold, Kara; Denke, Nancy J; Gorombei, Deb; Ostroski, Tammy L; Root, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Health care providers must understand and value the unique contributions of all interdisciplinary professionals, with the goal of optimizing the wellness or illness needs of each patient. Work cannot be done in silos, and the ability to develop and sustain effective professional partnerships is essential. Health care teams must work within a complex environment that depends on the shared efforts of multiple professionals to successfully provide care in a fragmented, highly stressed system. Implementing partnerships that foster relationships through shared interests, vision, and values can aid in the coordination of resources to provide a more positive patient experience and outcome. The development of partnerships requires time and acceptance of shared risks and responsibilities. In return, involved parties will be able to build trust, share rewards, and expand the possibilities of what can be accomplished. The purpose of this review is to describe results-oriented partnerships, which include the attributes of collaboration, coordination, and communication. Essential concepts and practical tools for success are reviewed to offer new and existing partnerships a lens through which to view interdisciplinary interactions that can contribute to organizational success and longevity. Potential pitfalls that may impact patient services and organizational health are also discussed.

  17. Successful Succession in Family Businesses : Individual Level Factors and Succession Planning Models.

    OpenAIRE

    Aleem, Majid; Islam, Md. Shariful

    2009-01-01

    Individual level factors related to the successor have a central role to play in the succession process of the business. When these factors are viewed in relation to succession planning models, these factors have a direct relation to the succession models in terms of success or failure of the succession process. The major contributing factor to the success or failure of the succession process is that of the leadership provided to the organization by the predecessor. These leadership qualities...

  18. Ex ante and ex post control of the public interest in public-private partnership agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirić Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the provisions of public-private partnership agreement (hereinafter: the 'PPP' in the context of control of the public interest in the process of preparing and implementing PPP projects. PPP agreements are a mechanism for defining rights and obligations of public and private partners in the process of realization of a particular PPP project. In spite of being defined as partnership, public and private interests largely remain competitive. However, in case it is not possible to achieve both interests at the same time, the public interest is deemed to have priority. The proper implementation of the supremacy of public interests over the private ones calls for an appropriate contractual definition of conditions and manner for such implementation. The methodology for exercising control of the public interest in PPP projects through agreements on public-private partnership has two aspects. The first aspect is to provide verifiable parameters of legal, economic and technological conditions, as well as the procedure for selecting the best bid for the realization of public-private partnership (ex ante methodological aspect; these conditions are the basis for future PPP agreement. Ex ante methodology has to provide instruments for control of the public interest through pre-established mechanisms aimed at verifying whether the private partner has fulfilled the agreement. If such verification is not possible or if it is considered unreasonable (either financially or otherwise, it may raise an issue whether the public-private partnership is an adequate modality for implementation of the project aimed at promoting the public interest; it further implies that the public partner should resort to other options (employing 'internal' resources or taking a loan for financing the projects of public interests. The second aspect is that the PPP agreements are to provide for the proper implementation of the elements that ensure some flexibility in

  19. Ethics in Public Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Arjeta Hallunovi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to deal with some ethical causes in the public administration, that aim the avoidance of negative phenomenon’s as theft, corruption, etc. In this direction, the debates about ethics are becoming more and more a global tendency, as an implement through which would be found the way to get out of the crisis. The success in the reforms of the public administrations in major part depends, on the public functionaries and their willingness to make fundamental changes in the way they work. In this direction, the State should strengthen and modernize the public service, should realize an employment system, which should reflect more the merits on its service. For this reason, the government’s attempts should be concentrated on the construction of a positive image for the state and its administration as professional objective, which is oriented to the services. Being aware for the practical restrictions of this study, we firstly chose to concentrate on the local public administrations ethics. The study will be focused on the practical comparative analysis of the city of Shkodra and Durres by the realization of a questionnaire by each of these municipalities and the Agency of Legalization and Urbanization of Informal Zones (ALUIZNI in Shkodra.

  20. Mechanism of Large-scale Public-private Partnership:Inspiration of EU Joint Technology Initiatives%建立大范围公私合作的机制:欧盟联合技术促进计划的启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴著; 邓婉君

    2012-01-01

    本文详细介绍了联合技术促进计划的选择机制、组织结构和权责制度,并提出对中国建立大范围公私合作机制的启示.为更好地发挥国家财政资金对产业发展的推动作用,促进官产学研合作,引导公私合作的科技计划要面向关系国家竞争力的重要技术,要扩大公私合作范围,并且要建立基于产业的项目选择机制和适合大范围公私合作的组织结构.%In 2007, EU issued the "Joint Technology Initiatives (JTI)" to promote large-scale public-private partnership in the major areas of science and technology within the European Union. JTI is recognized by the government, industry and academia. This article details the JTFs selection mechanism, organizational structure and responsibilities system, and proposes the inspiration of establishing China large-scale public-private partnership. China may guide the science and technology plan of public-private partnership towards the important technology related to the national competitiveness, expand the scope of public-private partnerships, establish the industry-based project selection mechanism and build the organizational structure for large-scale public-private partnership.