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Sample records for public dose limit

  1. Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

  2. Dose limits to the eye lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sion, N.

    2016-09-15

    Protecting the human body from the effects of ionizing radiation is essential to forestall stochastic effects and require placing limits on the effective dose. Dose limits on specific organs are also necessary to reduce the deterministic effects and tissue reactions. The standard for radiation protection was ISO 15382 (2002) which mainly dealt with beta radiation for nuclear power plant workers. Clearly an update is required to allow for new technology and the proliferative use of radiation in medical practices. There is a need for more explicit radiation monitoring to operators and staff. ICRP118 (International Commission on Radiological Protection), Ref. 1, evolved their recommendations to include eye lens doses as a follow on to their publication 103 and to focus on radiation exposures. It provides updated estimates of 'practical' threshold doses for tissue injury at the level of 1% incidence. This paper discusses the current status and the recommendation for a drastic reduction of the dose limit to the eye lens. (author)

  3. External dose-rate conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This report presents a tabulation of dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons emitted by radionuclides in the environment. This report was prepared in conjunction with criteria for limiting dose equivalents to members of the public from operations of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The dose-rate conversion factors are provided for use by the DOE and its contractors in performing calculations of external dose equivalents to members of the public. The dose-rate conversion factors for external exposure to photons and electrons presented in this report are based on a methodology developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. However, some adjustments of the previously documented methodology have been made in obtaining the dose-rate conversion factors in this report. 42 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  4. 10 CFR 20.1201 - Occupational dose limits for adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Occupational dose limits for adults. 20.1201 Section 20... Limits § 20.1201 Occupational dose limits for adults. (a) The licensee shall control the occupational dose to individual adults, except for planned special exposures under § 20.1206, to the following dose...

  5. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maldonado, Delis [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-06-01

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes

  6. The Role of Age on Dose Limiting Toxicities (DLTs) in Phase I Dose-escalation Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, A; Harris, P. J.; Hunsberger, S.; Deleporte, A.; Smith, G. L.; Vulih, D.; Anderson, B. D.; Ivy, S. P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Elderly oncology patients are not enrolled in early phase trials in proportion to the numbers of geriatric patients with cancer. There may be concern that elderly patients will not tolerate investigational agents as well as younger patients resulting in a disproportionate number of dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs). Recent single-institution studies provide conflicting data on the relationship between age and DLT. Experimental Design We retrospectively reviewed data about patients treated on single-agent, dose-escalation, phase I clinical trials sponsored by the Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP) of the National Cancer Institute. Patients’ dose levels were described as percentage of maximum tolerated dose (%MTD), the highest dose level at which <33% of patients had a DLT, or recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Mixed-effect logistic regression models were used to analyze relationships between the probability of a DLT and age and other explanatory variables. Results Increasing dose, increasing age, and worsening performance status (PS) were significantly related to an increased probability of a DLT in this model (p<0.05). There was no association between dose level administered and age (p=0.57). Conclusions This analysis of phase I dose-escalation trials involving over 500 patients older than 70 years of age, is the largest reported. As age and dose level increased and PS worsened, the probability of a DLT increased. While increasing age was associated with occurrence of DLT, this risk remained within accepted thresholds of risk for phase I trials. There was no evidence of age bias on enrollment of patients on low or high dose levels. PMID:25028396

  7. On the use of age-specific effective dose coefficients in radiation protection of the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocher, D.C.; Eckerman, K.F.

    1998-11-01

    Current radiation protection standards for the public include a limit on effective dose in any year for individuals in critical groups. This paper considers the question of how the annual dose limit should be applied in controlling routine exposures of populations consisting of individuals of all ages. The authors assume that the fundamental objective of radiation protection is limitation of lifetime risk and, therefore, that standards for controlling routine exposures of the public should provide a reasonable correspondence with lifetime risk, taking into account the age dependence of intakes and doses and the variety of radionuclides and exposure pathways of concern. Using new calculations of the per capita (population-averaged) risk of cancer mortality per unit activity inhaled or ingested in the US Environmental Protection Agency`s Federal Guidance Report No. 13, the authors show that applying a limit on annual effective dose only to adults, which was the usual practice in radiation protection of the public before the development of age-specific effective dose coefficients, provides a considerably better correspondence with lifetime risk than applying the annual dose limit to the critical group of any age.

  8. Internal dose conversion factors for calculation of dose to the public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-07-01

    This publication contains 50-year committed dose equivalent factors, in tabular form. The document is intended to be used as the primary reference by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors for calculating radiation dose equivalents for members of the public, resulting from ingestion or inhalation of radioactive materials. Its application is intended specifically for such materials released to the environment during routine DOE operations, except in those instances where compliance with 40 CFR 61 (National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants) requires otherwise. However, the calculated values may be equally applicable to unusual releases or to occupational exposures. The use of these committed dose equivalent tables should ensure that doses to members of the public from internal exposures are calculated in a consistent manner at all DOE facilities.

  9. The Limit of Public Policy : Endogenous Preferences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bar-Gill, O.; Fershtman, C.

    2000-01-01

    In designing public policy it is not enough to consider the possible reaction of individuals to the chosen policy.Public policy may also affect the formation of preferences and norms in a society.The endogenous evolution of preferences, in addition to introducing a conceptual difficulty in

  10. Limitations of the TG-43 formalism for skin high-dose-rate brachytherapy dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero, Domingo, E-mail: dgranero@eresa.com [Department of Radiation Physics, ERESA, Hospital General Universitario, 46014 Valencia (Spain); Perez-Calatayud, Jose [Radiotherapy Department, La Fe University and Polytechnic Hospital, Valencia 46026 (Spain); Vijande, Javier [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100, Spain and IFIC (UV-CSIC), Paterna 46980 (Spain); Ballester, Facundo [Department of Atomic, Molecular and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, Burjassot 46100 (Spain); Rivard, Mark J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: In skin high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy, sources are located outside, in contact with, or implanted at some depth below the skin surface. Most treatment planning systems use the TG-43 formalism, which is based on single-source dose superposition within an infinite water medium without accounting for the true geometry in which conditions for scattered radiation are altered by the presence of air. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the dosimetric limitations of the TG-43 formalism in HDR skin brachytherapy and the potential clinical impact. Methods: Dose rate distributions of typical configurations used in skin brachytherapy were obtained: a 5 cm × 5 cm superficial mould; a source inside a catheter located at the skin surface with and without backscatter bolus; and a typical interstitial implant consisting of an HDR source in a catheter located at a depth of 0.5 cm. Commercially available HDR{sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir sources and a hypothetical {sup 169}Yb source were considered. The Geant4 Monte Carlo radiation transport code was used to estimate dose rate distributions for the configurations considered. These results were then compared to those obtained with the TG-43 dose calculation formalism. In particular, the influence of adding bolus material over the implant was studied. Results: For a 5 cm × 5 cm{sup 192}Ir superficial mould and 0.5 cm prescription depth, dose differences in comparison to the TG-43 method were about −3%. When the source was positioned at the skin surface, dose differences were smaller than −1% for {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir, yet −3% for {sup 169}Yb. For the interstitial implant, dose differences at the skin surface were −7% for {sup 60}Co, −0.6% for {sup 192}Ir, and −2.5% for {sup 169}Yb. Conclusions: This study indicates the following: (i) for the superficial mould, no bolus is needed; (ii) when the source is in contact with the skin surface, no bolus is needed for either {sup 60}Co and {sup 192}Ir. For

  11. Analysis Approach and Data Package for Mayak Public Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2013-09-18

    Historical activities at facilities producing nuclear materials for weapons released radioactivity into the air and water. Past studies in the United States have evaluated the release, atmospheric transport and environmental accumulation of 131I from the nuclear facilities at Hanford in Washington State and the resulting dose to members of the public (Farris et al. 1994). A multi-year dose reconstruction effort (Mokrov et al. 2004) is also being conducted to produce representative dose estimates for members of the public living near Mayak, Russia, from atmospheric releases of 131I at the facilities of the Mayak Production Association. The approach to calculating individual doses to members of the public from historical releases of airborne 131I has the following general steps: • Construct estimates of releases 131I to the air from production facilities. • Model the transport of 131I in the air and subsequent deposition on the ground and vegetation. • Model the accumulation of 131I in soil, water and food products (environmental media). • Calculate the dose for an individual by matching the appropriate lifestyle and consumption data for the individual to the concentrations of 131I in environmental media at their residence location. A number of computer codes were developed to facilitate the study of airborne 131I emissions at Hanford. Of particular interest is DESCARTES code that modeled accumulation of 131I in environmental media (Miley et al. 1994). In addition, the CIDER computer code estimated annual doses to individuals (Eslinger et al. 1994) using the equations and parameters specific to Hanford (Snyder et al. 1994). Several of the computer codes developed to model 131I releases from Hanford are general enough to be used for other facilities. Additional codes have been developed, including the new individual dose code CiderF (Eslinger and Napier 2013), and applied to historical releases of 131I from Mayak. This document provides a data package that

  12. The Limitations of Quantitative Social Science for Informing Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrim, John; de Vries, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative social science (QSS) has the potential to make an important contribution to public policy. However it also has a number of limitations. The aim of this paper is to explain these limitations to a non-specialist audience and to identify a number of ways in which QSS research could be improved to better inform public policy.

  13. The Limitations of Quantitative Social Science for Informing Public Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerrim, John; de Vries, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative social science (QSS) has the potential to make an important contribution to public policy. However it also has a number of limitations. The aim of this paper is to explain these limitations to a non-specialist audience and to identify a number of ways in which QSS research could be improved to better inform public policy.

  14. Probability of causation: Implications for radiological protection and dose limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1987-05-01

    This report on the probability of causation of radiation-induced cancer is an attempt to bring together biology, chemistry, physics and statistics to calculate a value in the form of a ratio expressed as a percentage. In involves the interactions of numerous cancer risk factors, and all are fraught with technical difficulties and uncertainties. It is a computational approach to a societal problem that should be resolved in the political arena by men and women of government and law. But, it must be examined, because at the present, we have no reasonable method to explain the complexity of the mechanism of radiation-induced cancer and the probability of injury to an individual exposed in the past to ionizing radiation, and because society does not know how to compensate such a person who may have been injured by radiation, and particularly low-level radiation. Five questions are discussed that concern probability of causation of radiation-induced cancer. First, what is it and how can we best define the concept? Second, what are the methods of estimation and cancer causation? Third, what are the uncertainties involved? Fourth, what are the strengths and limitation of the computational approach? And fifth, what are the implications for radiological protection and dose-limitation?

  15. Probability of causation: Implications for radiological protection and dose limitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    1987-05-01

    This report on the probability of causation of radiation-induced cancer is an attempt to bring together biology, chemistry, physics and statistics to calculate a value in the form of a ratio expressed as a percentage. In involves the interactions of numerous cancer risk factors, and all are fraught with technical difficulties and uncertainties. It is a computational approach to a societal problem that should be resolved in the political arena by men and women of government and law. But, it must be examined, because at the present, we have no reasonable method to explain the complexity of the mechanism of radiation-induced cancer and the probability of injury to an individual exposed in the past to ionizing radiation, and because society does not know how to compensate such a person who may have been injured by radiation, and particularly low-level radiation. Five questions are discussed that concern probability of causation of radiation-induced cancer. First, what is it and how can we best define the concept Second, what are the methods of estimation and cancer causation Third, what are the uncertainties involved Fourth, what are the strengths and limitation of the computational approach And fifth, what are the implications for radiological protection and dose-limitation

  16. Influence of Background Exposure on TLD Minimum Dose Detection and Determination Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traino, A.C.; Perrone, F.; Luperini, C.; Tana, L.; Lazzeri, M.; D' Errico, F

    1998-07-01

    Thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD) are widely used to monitor personal doses due to photon fields in the radiation protection of workers. For these low dose range applications it is essential to decide whether a single TLD retains an occupational air kerma value above background or not. In other words, it is important to determine the detection limit L{sub D} and the determination limit L{sub Q} of the whole dosimetric system. L{sub D} is the smallest value of air kerma that can be detected at a specified confidence level, L{sub Q} is the minimum value of air kerma that can be measured with a given precision. ICRP 60 recommends an annual dose limit of 1 mSv for the public. Thus it is possible to take this value as the limit between public and exposed workers, as recommended by the European Community Directive and corresponding local laws. Therefore if NL{sub D}({gamma}), the annual detection limit of the TLD system, is considerably less than 1 mSv, TLD evaluation can also be used to decide whether a worker can be considered exposed or not. N is the number of annual TLD readings, L{sub D} is the detection limit of the TLD system. Both N and L{sub D} depend on the monitoring interval time {gamma}. The dependence of L{sub D} and L{sub Q} on the background radiation level and on the monitoring intervals, i.e. on N, is investigated. Assuming that the background air kerma level is approximately constant, it can be shown that the shorter the time of exposure, the higher the annual detection limit. Furthermore, if one considers an annual dose limit of 1 mSv, L{sub D} is seen to be greater than the recording level Lr for short exposure times and the system is not able to evaluate it. A set of 15 TLD-100(LiF: Mg, Ti) dosimetric cards and a Harshaw 6000 TLD automatic card reader have been used in order to determine L{sub D} and L{sub Q}. It has been found that an increase of the monitoring time {gamma} from 30 to 180 days leads to a reduction of the annual detection limit

  17. Dose Limits for Man do not Adequately Protect the Ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higley, Kathryn A.; Alexakhin, Rudolf M.; McDonald, Joseph C.

    2004-08-01

    It has been known for quite some time that different organisms display differing degrees of sensitivity to the effects of ionizing radiations. Some microorganisms such as the bacterium Micrococcus radiodurans, along with many species of invertebrates, are extremely radio-resistant. Humans might be categorized as being relatively sensitive to radiation, and are a bit more resistant than some pine trees. Therefore, it could be argued that maintaining the dose limits necessary to protect humans will also result in the protection of most other species of flora and fauna. This concept is usually referred to as the anthropocentric approach. In other words, if man is protected then the environment is also adequately protected. The ecocentric approach might be stated as; the health of humans is effectively protected only when the environment is not unduly exposed to radiation. The ICRP is working on new recommendations dealing with the protection of the environment, and this debate should help to highlight a number of relevant issues concerning that topic.

  18. Low dose computed tomography of the chest : Applications and limitations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietema, H.A.

    2007-01-01

    In areas with a high intrinsic contrast such as the chest, radiation dose can be reduced for specific indications. Low dose chest CT is feasible and cannot only be applied for lung cancer screening, but also in daily routine and for early detection of lung destruction. We showed in a small sample of

  19. Limitations of analytical dose calculations for small field proton radiosurgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Changran; Daartz, Juliane; Lam-Tin-Cheung, Kimberley; Bussiere, Marc; Shih, Helen A.; Paganetti, Harald; Schuemann, Jan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the work was to evaluate the dosimetric uncertainties of an analytical dose calculation engine and the impact on treatment plans using small fields in intracranial proton stereotactic radiosurgery (PSRS) for a gantry based double scattering system. 50 patients were evaluated including 10 patients for each of 5 diagnostic indications of: arteriovenous malformation (AVM), acoustic neuroma (AN), meningioma (MGM), metastasis (METS), and pituitary adenoma (PIT). Treatment plans followed standard prescription and optimization procedures for PSRS. We performed comparisons between delivered dose distributions, determined by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, and those calculated with the analytical dose calculation algorithm (ADC) used in our current treatment planning system in terms of dose volume histogram parameters and beam range distributions. Results show that the difference in the dose to 95% of the target (D95) is within 6% when applying measured field size output corrections for AN, MGM, and PIT. However, for AVM and METS, the differences can be as great as 10% and 12%, respectively. Normalizing the MC dose to the ADC dose based on the dose of voxels in a central area of the target reduces the difference of the D95 to within 6% for all sites. The generally applied margin to cover uncertainties in range (3.5% of the prescribed range  +  1 mm) is not sufficient to cover the range uncertainty for ADC in all cases, especially for patients with high tissue heterogeneity. The root mean square of the R90 difference, the difference in the position of distal falloff to 90% of the prescribed dose, is affected by several factors, especially the patient geometry heterogeneity, modulation and field diameter. In conclusion, implementation of Monte Carlo dose calculation techniques into the clinic can reduce the uncertainty of the target dose for proton stereotactic radiosurgery. If MC is not available for treatment planning, using MC dose distributions to

  20. Exploring the limits of spatial resolution in radiation dose delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Karl; Clark, Brenda G; Huntzinger, Calvin

    2002-08-01

    Flexibility and complexity in patient treatment due to advances in radiotherapy techniques necessitates a simple method for evaluating spatial resolution capabilities of the dose delivery device. Our purpose in this investigation is to evaluate a model that describes the ability of a radiation therapy device to deliver a desired dose distribution. The model is based on linear systems theory and is analogous to methods used to describe resolution degradation in imaging systems. A qualitative analysis of spatial resolution degradation using the model is presented in the spatial and spatial frequency domains. The ability of the model to predict the effects of geometric dose conformity to treatment volumes is evaluated by varying multileaf collimator leaf width and magnitude of dose spreading. Dose distributions for three clinical treatment shapes, circular shapes of varying diameter and one intensity modulated shape are used in the evaluation. We show that the model accurately predicts the dependence of dose conformity on these parameters. The spatial resolution capabilities of different radiation therapy devices can be quantified using the model, providing a simple method for comparing different treatment machine characteristics. Also, as different treatment sites have different resolution requirements this model may be used to tailor machine characteristics to the specific site.

  1. Historical development of radiation dose calculations for the public in the vicinity of nuclear sites in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettengill, H.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Soldat, J.K.; Swinth, K.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-06-01

    Most Manhattan District (MD) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) sites began environmental monitoring programs in the earliest years of their operation. The results were used to establish trends and to monitor for effluent releases that might be otherwise undetected. Very few data concerning radiation doses to the public in the vicinity of the sites were generated prior to 1960. Authoritative guidelines for controlling doses to the public were issued by national and international bodies beginning in the 1950s. In 1957, the Hanford Site began calculating and reporting maximum potential radiation doses to the public from several environmental pathways of exposure. Shortly thereafter, most AEC sites began programs aimed at either determining public doses, or ensuring that the doses were below the regulatory limits. Calculations of radiation doses to Maximally Exposed Individuals (MEI) at the Hanford Site have been recently completed by the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) project. Collective doses for the public at Hanford were generated for this paper by utilizing the data developed by HEDR and approximate demographic data.

  2. The governance of publicly traded limited liability companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomtsyan, S.

    2014-01-01

    The limited liability company is not only a widespread business form for non-listed firms but also is used by listed companies. There were 20 publicly traded Delaware LLCs in September 2013. Given the policy of the Delaware legislators and courts to give a maximum effect to the principle of freedom

  3. The governance of publicly traded limited liability companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomtsyan, S.

    The limited liability company is not only a widespread business form for non-listed firms but also is used by listed companies. There were 20 publicly traded Delaware LLCs in September 2013. Given the policy of the Delaware legislators and courts to give a maximum effect to the principle of freedom

  4. The governance of publicly traded limited liability companies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gomtsyan, S.

    2014-01-01

    The limited liability company is not only a widespread business form for non-listed firms but also is used by listed companies. There were 20 publicly traded Delaware LLCs in September 2013. Given the policy of the Delaware legislators and courts to give a maximum effect to the principle of freedom

  5. Development of dose-based release limits for unrestricted release of a radiochemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rima, Steven D

    2003-02-01

    Current regulations for unrestricted release are based on annual dose equivalent. Unless one desires to use very conservative "screening levels," dose modeling must be accomplished to derive an areal or volumetric limit or concentration value for release purposes. Such derived limits are referred to as "Derived Concentration Guideline Levels" (DCGL). This paper describes the process employed to derive DCGLs for building surfaces contaminated with uranium and its decay progeny based on annual dose equivalent and the innovative means employed during the derivation.

  6. Doses to nurses by the technetium-99m, in private and public sector; Doses aux infirmieres donnees par le technetium-99m, dans le prive et le public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bied, J.Ch.; Philippon, B. [Hospice Civils de Lyon, 69 (France)

    1999-07-01

    The global body dose due to the technetium is 1.2 and 1.9 mSv for the two nurses of the private sector. In the public sector, the level reached by the personnel is 0.75 mSv for the global body dose, and the only technetium (global body dose 1.4 and 2.1 mSv for the private sector, 0.95 for the public sector) and for the whole of radiations measured by the O.P.R.I. film dosemeter. The doses received at the fingers level present higher levels in the private sector. But these values, 15.2 and 10.7 mSv by month, that is to say 180 mSv by year are the 2/5 of the maximum permissible value. The two persons of the private sector received whole body doses, higher that the doses of the public sector. These doses are about 1.2 to 1.9 these ones received in the public sector. (N.C.)

  7. Beyond dose assessment: using risk with full disclosure of uncertainty in public and scientific communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, F Owen; Kocher, David C; Apostoaei, A Iulian

    2011-11-01

    Evaluations of radiation exposures of workers and the public traditionally focus on assessments of radiation dose, especially annual dose, without explicitly evaluating the health risk associated with those exposures, principally the risk of radiation-induced cancer. When dose is the endpoint of an assessment, opportunities to communicate the significance of exposures are limited to comparisons with dose criteria in regulations, doses due to natural background or medical x-rays, and doses above which a statistically significant increase of disease has been observed in epidemiologic studies. Risk assessment generally addresses the chance (probability) that specific diseases might be induced by past, present, or future exposure. The risk of cancer per unit dose will vary depending on gender, age, exposure type (acute or chronic), and radiation type. It is not uncommon to find that two individuals with the same effective dose will have substantially different risks. Risk assessment has shown, for example, that: (a) medical exposures to computed tomography scans have become a leading source of future risk to the general population, and that the risk would be increased above recently published estimates if the incidence of skin cancer and the increased risk from exposure to x-rays compared with high-energy photons were taken into account; (b) indoor radon is a significant contributor to the baseline risk of lung cancer, particularly among people who have never smoked; and (c) members of the public who were exposed in childhood to I in fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons tests and were diagnosed with thyroid cancer later in life would frequently meet criteria established for federal compensation of cancers experienced by energy workers and military participants at atmospheric weapons tests. Risk estimation also enables comparisons of impacts of exposures to radiation and chemical carcinogens and other hazards to life and health. Communication of risk with

  8. User Guide for GoldSim Model to Calculate PA/CA Doses and Limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-10-31

    A model to calculate doses for solid waste disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and corresponding disposal limits has been developed using the GoldSim commercial software. The model implements the dose calculations documented in SRNL-STI-2015-00056, Rev. 0 “Dose Calculation Methodology and Data for Solid Waste Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) at the Savannah River Site”.

  9. Limits of dose escalation in lung cancer: a dose-volume histogram analysis comparing coplanar and non-coplanar techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Derycke, S.; Van Duyse, B.; Schelfhout, J.; De Neve, W.

    1995-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of dose escalation in radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer, a dose-volume histogram analysis was performed comparing standard coplanar (2D) with non-coplanar (3D) beam arrangements on a non-selected group of 20 patients planned by Sherouse`s GRATISTM 3D-planning system. Serial CT-scanning was performed and 2 Target Volumes (Tvs) were defined. Gross Tumor Volume (GTV) defined a high-dose Target Volume (TV-1). GTV plus location of node stations with > 10% probability of invasion (Minet et al.) defined an intermediate-dose Target Volume (TV-2). However, nodal regions which are incompatible with cure were excluded from TV-2. These are ATS-regions 1, 8, 9 and 14 all left and right as well as heterolateral regions. For 3D-planning, Beam`s Eye View selected (by an experienced planner) beam arrangements were optimised using Superdot, a method of target dose-gradient annihilation developed by Sherouse. A second 3D-planning was performed using 4 beam incidences with maximal angular separation. The linac`s isocenter for the optimal arrangement was located at the geometrical center of gravity of a tetraheder, the tetraheder`s comers being the consecutive positions of the virtual source. This ideal beam arrangement was approximated as close as possible, taking into account technical limitations (patient-couch-gantry collisions). Criteria for tolerance were met if no points inside the spinal cord exceeded 50 Gy and if at least 50% of the lung volume received less than 20Gy. If dose regions below 50 Gy were judged acceptable at TV-2, 2D- as well as 3D-plans allow safe escalation to 80 Gy at TV-1. When TV-2 needed to be encompassed by isodose surfaces exceeding 50Gy, 3D-plans were necessary to limit dose at the spinal cord below tolerance. For large TVs dose is limited by lung tolerance for 3D-plans. An analysis (including NTCP-TCP as cost functions) of rival 3D-plans is being performed.

  10. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil

  11. Estimated Risk Level of Unified Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Dose Tolerance Limits for Spinal Cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Jimm; Sahgal, Arjun; Soltys, Scott G; Luxton, Gary; Patel, Ashish; Herbert, Scott; Xue, Jinyu; Ma, Lijun; Yorke, Ellen; Adler, John R; Gibbs, Iris C

    2016-04-01

    A literature review of more than 200 stereotactic body radiation therapy spine articles from the past 20 years found only a single article that provided dose-volume data and outcomes for each spinal cord of a clinical dataset: the Gibbs 2007 article (Gibbs et al, 2007(1)), which essentially contains the first 100 stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) spine treatments from Stanford University Medical Center. The dataset is modeled and compared in detail to the rest of the literature review, which found 59 dose tolerance limits for the spinal cord in 1-5 fractions. We partitioned these limits into a unified format of high-risk and low-risk dose tolerance limits. To estimate the corresponding risk level of each limit we used the Gibbs 2007 clinical spinal cord dose-volume data for 102 spinal metastases in 74 patients treated by spinal radiosurgery. In all, 50 of the patients were previously irradiated to a median dose of 40Gy in 2-3Gy fractions and 3 patients developed treatment-related myelopathy. These dose-volume data were digitized into the dose-volume histogram (DVH) Evaluator software tool where parameters of the probit dose-response model were fitted using the maximum likelihood approach (Jackson et al, 1995(3)). Based on this limited dataset, for de novo cases the unified low-risk dose tolerance limits yielded an estimated risk of spinal cord injury of ≤1% in 1-5 fractions, and the high-risk limits yielded an estimated risk of ≤3%. The QUANTEC Dmax limits of 13Gy in a single fraction and 20Gy in 3 fractions had less than 1% risk estimated from this dataset, so we consider these among the low-risk limits. In the previously irradiated cohort, the estimated risk levels for 10 and 14Gy maximum cord dose limits in 5 fractions are 0.4% and 0.6%, respectively. Longer follow-up and more patients are required to improve the risk estimates and provide more complete validation.

  12. Impact of reduced dose limits on NRC licensed activities. Major issues in the implementation of ICRP/NCRP dose limit recommendations: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    This report summarizes information required to estimate, at least qualitatively, the potential impacts of reducing occupational dose limits below those given in 10 CFR 20 (Revised). For this study, a questionnaire was developed and widely distributed to the radiation protection community. The resulting data together with data from existing surveys and sources were used to estimate the impact of three dose-limit options; 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (1 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), 20 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (2 rem yr{sup {minus}1}), and a combination of an annual limit of 50 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} (5 rem yr{sup {minus}1}) coupled with a cumulative limit, in rem, equal to age in years. Due to the somewhat small number of responses and the lack of data in some specific areas, a working committee of radiation protection experts from a variety of licensees was employed to ensure the exposure data were representative. The following overall conclusions were reached: (1) although 10 mSv yr{sup {minus}1} is a reasonable limit for many licensees, such a limit could be extraordinarily difficult to achieve and potentially destructive to the continued operation of some licensees, such as nuclear power, fuel fabrication, and medicine; (2) twenty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} as a limit is possible for some of these groups, but for others it would prove difficult. (3) fifty mSv yr{sup {minus}1} and age in 10s of mSv appear reasonable for all licensees, both in terms of the lifetime risk of cancer and severe genetic effects to the most highly exposed workers, and the practicality of operation.

  13. Realistic retrospective dose assessments to members of the public around Spanish nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, M.A., E-mail: majg@csn.es [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Pedro Justo Dorado Dellmans 11, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Martin-Valdepenas, J.M.; Garcia-Talavera, M.; Martin-Matarranz, J.L.; Salas, M.R.; Serrano, J.I.; Ramos, L.M. [Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN), Pedro Justo Dorado Dellmans 11, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-11-15

    In the frame of an epidemiological study carried out in the influence areas around the Spanish nuclear facilities (ISCIII-CSN, 2009. Epidemiological Study of The Possible Effect of Ionizing Radiations Deriving from The Operation of Spanish Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities on The Health of The Population Living in Their Vicinity. Final report December 2009. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovacion, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear. Madrid. Available from: (http://www.csn.es/images/stories/actualidad{sub d}atos/especiales/epidemiologico/epidemiological{sub s}tudy.pdf)), annual effective doses to public have been assessed by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) for over 45 years using a retrospective realistic-dose methodology. These values are compared with data from natural radiation exposure. For the affected population, natural radiation effective doses are in average 2300 times higher than effective doses due to the operation of nuclear installations (nuclear power stations and fuel cycle facilities). When considering the impact on the whole Spanish population, effective doses attributable to nuclear facilities represent in average 3.5 x 10{sup -5} mSv/y, in contrast to 1.6 mSv/y from natural radiation or 1.3 mSv/y from medical exposures. - Highlights: > Most comprehensive dose assessment to public by nuclear facilities ever done in Spain. > Dose to public is dominated by liquid effluent pathways for the power stations. > Dose to public is dominated by Rn inhalation for milling and mining facilities. > Average annual doses to public in influence areas are negligible (10 {mu}Sv/y or less). > Doses from facilities average 3.5 x 10{sup -2} {mu}Sv/y per person onto whole Spanish population.

  14. Mind the gap : Societal limits to public library effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glorieux, Ignace; Kuppens, Toon; Vandebroeck, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    This article focuses on the effectiveness of Flemish (Belgian) public libraries in reaching a large and socially diverse public. A statistical model is developed which incorporates unique data gathered through a large-scale visitor survey, a survey of librarians and municipal demographic information

  15. Mind the gap : Societal limits to public library effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glorieux, Ignace; Kuppens, Toon; Vandebroeck, Dieter

    This article focuses on the effectiveness of Flemish (Belgian) public libraries in reaching a large and socially diverse public. A statistical model is developed which incorporates unique data gathered through a large-scale visitor survey, a survey of librarians and municipal demographic

  16. Evaluation of low-dose limits in 3D-2D rigid registration for surgical guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uneri, A.; Wang, A. S.; Otake, Y.; Kleinszig, G.; Vogt, S.; Khanna, A. J.; Gallia, G. L.; Gokaslan, Z. L.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-09-01

    An algorithm for intensity-based 3D-2D registration of CT and C-arm fluoroscopy is evaluated for use in surgical guidance, specifically considering the low-dose limits of the fluoroscopic x-ray projections. The registration method is based on a framework using the covariance matrix adaptation evolution strategy (CMA-ES) to identify the 3D patient pose that maximizes the gradient information similarity metric. Registration performance was evaluated in an anthropomorphic head phantom emulating intracranial neurosurgery, using target registration error (TRE) to characterize accuracy and robustness in terms of 95% confidence upper bound in comparison to that of an infrared surgical tracking system. Three clinical scenarios were considered: (1) single-view image + guidance, wherein a single x-ray projection is used for visualization and 3D-2D guidance; (2) dual-view image + guidance, wherein one projection is acquired for visualization, combined with a second (lower-dose) projection acquired at a different C-arm angle for 3D-2D guidance; and (3) dual-view guidance, wherein both projections are acquired at low dose for the purpose of 3D-2D guidance alone (not visualization). In each case, registration accuracy was evaluated as a function of the entrance surface dose associated with the projection view(s). Results indicate that images acquired at a dose as low as 4 μGy (approximately one-tenth the dose of a typical fluoroscopic frame) were sufficient to provide TRE comparable or superior to that of conventional surgical tracking, allowing 3D-2D guidance at a level of dose that is at most 10% greater than conventional fluoroscopy (scenario #2) and potentially reducing the dose to approximately 20% of the level in a conventional fluoroscopically guided procedure (scenario #3).

  17. Limits of Ultra-Low Dose CT Attenuation Correction for PET/CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ting; Alessio, Adam M; Kinahan, Paul E

    2010-01-29

    We present an analysis of the effects of ultra-low dose X-ray computerized tomography (CT) based attenuation correction for positron emission tomography (PET). By ultra low dose we mean less than approximately 5 mAs or 0.5 mSv total effective whole body dose. The motivation is the increased interest in using respiratory motion information acquired during the CT scan for both phase-matched CT-based attenuation correction and for motion estimation. Since longer duration CT scans are desired, radiation dose to the patient can be a limiting factor. In this study we evaluate the impact of reducing photon flux rates in the CT data on the reconstructed PET image by using the CATSIM simulation tool for the CT component and the ASIM simulation tool for the PET component. The CT simulation includes effects of the x-ray tube spectra, beam conditioning, bowtie filter, detector noise, and bean hardening correction. The PET simulation includes the effect of attenuation and photon counting. Noise and bias in the PET image were evaluated from multiple realizations of test objects. We show that techniques can be used to significantly reduce the mAs needed for CT based attenuation correction if the CT is not used for diagnostic purposes. The limiting factor, however, is not the noise in the CT image but rather the bias introduced by CT sinogram elements with no detected flux. These results constrain the methods that can be used to lower CT dose in a manner suitable for attenuation correction of PET data. We conclude that ultra-low-dose CT for attenuation correction of PET data is feasible with current PET/CT scanners.

  18. 78 FR 6273 - Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-30

    ... Part 1002 Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions AGENCY: The Presidio... requesting public comment on a proposed public use limit on persons who are walking four or more dogs at one time in Area B of the Presidio of San Francisco for consideration (Commercial Dog Walkers). The...

  19. 77 FR 4030 - Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver Under the... Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ACTION: Notice of limited public interest waiver. SUMMARY... application of section 1605 would be inconsistent with the public interest. On April 25, 2011, the...

  20. 77 FR 69785 - Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... Part 1002 Public Use Limit on Commercial Dog Walking; Revised Disposal Conditions AGENCY: The Presidio... a public use limit on persons who are walking four or more dogs at one time in Area B of the Presidio of San Francisco (Presidio) for consideration (Commercial Dog Walkers). The limit will require...

  1. Investigating the low-dose limits of multidetector CT in lung nodule surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, N S; Siewerdsen, J H; Patsios, D; Chung, T B

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the factors limiting nodule detection in thoracic computed tomography (CT) and to determine whether prior knowledge of nodule size and attenuation, available from a baseline CT study, influences the minimum radiation dose at which nodule surveillance CT scans can be performed while maintaining current levels of nodule detectability. Multiple nodules varying in attenuation (-509 to + 110 HU) and diameter (1.6 to 9.5 mm) were layered in random and ordered sequences within 2 lung cylinders made of Rando lung material and suspended within a custom-built CT phantom. Multiple CT scans were performed at varying kVp (120, 100, and 80), mA (200, 150, 100, 50, 20, and 10), and beam collimation (5, 2.5, and 1.25 mm) on a four-row multidetector scanner (Lightspeed, General Electric, Milwaukee, WI) using 0.8 s gantry rotation. The corresponding range of radiation dose over which images were acquired was 0.3-26.4 mGy. Nine observers independently performed three specific tasks, namely: (1) To detect a 3.2 mm nodule of 23 HU; (2) To detect 3.2 mm nodules of varying attenuation (-509 to -154 HU); and (3) To detect nodules varying in size (1.6-9 mm) and attenuation (-509 to 110 HU). A two-alternative forced-choice test was used in order to determine the limits of nodule detection in terms of the proportion of correct responses (Pcorr, related to the area under the ROC curve) as a summary metric of observer performance. The radiation dose levels for detection of 99% of nodules in each task were as follows: Task 1 (1 mGy); Task 2 (5 mGy); and Task 3 (7 mGy). The corresponding interobserver confidence limits were 1, 5, and 10 mGy for Tasks 1, 2, and 3, respectively. There was a fivefold increase in the radiation dose required for detection of lower-density nodules (Tasks 1 to 2). Absence of prior knowledge of the nodule size and density (Task 3) corresponds to a significant increase in the minimum required radiation dose. Significant image

  2. Estimating the Effects of Astronaut Career Ionizing Radiation Dose Limits on Manned Interplanetary Flight Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Rojdev, Kristina; Valle, Gerard D.; Zipay, John J.; Atwell, William S.

    2013-01-01

    The Hybrid Inflatable DSH combined with electric propulsion and high power solar-electric power systems offer a near TRL-now solution to the space radiation crew dose problem that is an inevitable aspect of long term manned interplanetary flight. Spreading program development and launch costs over several years can lead to a spending plan that fits with NASA's current and future budgetary limitations, enabling early manned interplanetary operations with space radiation dose control, in the near future while biomedical research, nuclear electric propulsion and active shielding research and development proceed in parallel. Furthermore, future work should encompass laboratory validation of HZETRN calculations, as previous laboratory investigations have not considered large shielding thicknesses and the calculations presented at these thicknesses are currently performed via extrapolation.

  3. Development of mathematical pediatric phantoms for internal dose calculations: designs, limitations, and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristy, M.

    1980-01-01

    Mathematical phantoms of the human body at various ages are employed with Monte Carlo radiation transport codes for calculation of photon specific absorbed fractions. The author has developed a pediatric phantom series based on the design of the adult phantom, but with explicit equations for each organ so that organ sizes and marrow distributions could be assigned properly. Since the phantoms comprise simple geometric shapes, predictive dose capability is limited when geometry is critical to the calculation. Hence, there is a demand for better phantom design in situations where geometry is critical, such as for external irradiation or for internal emitters with low energy photons. Recent advances in computerized axial tomography (CAT) present the potential for derivation of anatomical information, which is so critical to development of phantoms, and ongoing developmental work on compuer architecture to handle large arrays for Monte Carlo calculations should make complex-geometry dose calculations economically feasible within this decade.

  4. Radioactive materials in biosolids : national survey, dose modeling, and publicly owned treatment works (POTW) guidance.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastian, R. K.; Bachmaier, J. T.; Schmidt, D. W.; Salomon, S. N.; Jones, A.; Chiu, W. A.; Setlow, L. W.; Wolbarst, A. B.; Yu, C.; Goodman, J.; Lenhart, T.; Environmental Assessment; U.S. EPA; U.S. DOE; U.S. NRC; NJ Dept of Environmental Radiation; NE Ohio Regional Sewer District

    2005-01-01

    Received for publication March 1, 2004. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) announced the availability of three new documents concerning radioactive materials in sewage sludge and ash from publicly owned treatment works (POTW). One of the documents is a report presenting the results of a volunteer survey of sewage sludge and ash samples provided by 313 POTWs. The second document is a dose modeling document, using multiple exposure pathway modeling focused on a series of generic scenarios, to track possible exposure of POTW workers and members of the general public to radioactivity from the sewage sludge or ash. The third document is a guidance report providing recommendations on the management of radioactivity in sewage sludge and ash for POTW owners and operators. This paper explains how radioactive materials enter POTWs, provides criteria for evaluating levels of radioactive material in sludge and ash, and gives a summary of the results of the survey and dose modeling efforts.

  5. Application of Benchmark Dose (BMD) in Estimating Biological Exposure Limit (BEL) to Cadmium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To estimate the biological exposure limit (BEL) using benchmark dose (BMD) based on two sets of data from occupational epidemiology. Methods Cadmium-exposed workers were selected from a cadmium smelting factory and a zinc product factory. Doctors, nurses or shop assistants living in the same area served as a control group. Urinary cadmium (UCd) was used as an exposure biomarker and urinary β2-microgloburin (B2M), N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (NAG) and albumin (ALB) as effect biomarkers. All urine parameters were adjusted by urinary creatinine. Software of BMDS (Version 1.3.2, EPA.U.S.A) was used to calculate BMD. Results The cut-off point (abnormal values) was determined based on the upper limit of 95% of effect biomarkers in control group. There was a significant dose response relationship between the effect biomarkers (urinary B2M, NAG, and ALB) and exposure biomarker (UCd). BEL value was 5 μg/g creatinine for UB2M as an effect biomarker, consistent with the recommendation of WHO. BEL could be estimated by using the method of BMD. BEL value was 3 μg/g creatinine for UNAG as an effect biomarker. The more sensitive the used biomarker is, the more occupational population will be protected. Conclusion BMD can be used in estimating the biological exposure limit (BEL). UNAG is a sensitive biomarker for estimating BEL after cadmium exposure.

  6. The climate challenge: the limits of public policies; Le defi climatique: les limites des politiques publiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourg, D. [Universite de Technologie de Troyes, Centre d' Etudes et de Recherches Interdisciplinaires sur le Developpement Durable, 10 - Troyes (France)

    2003-07-01

    Can democratic societies organize the energy diet imposed by the prevention of climate change? What would be the difficulties to overcome? This challenge could not be met without changing the nature of public policies and without learning how to determine collectively new individual lifestyles, not separable from duties. (author)

  7. Value of public health and safety actions and radiation dose avoided

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01

    The values judged best to reflect the willingness of society to pay for the avoidance or reduction of risk were deduced from studies of costs of health care, transportation safety, consumer product safety, government agency actions, wage-risk compensation, consumer behavior (market) studies, and willingness-to-pay surveys. The results ranged from $1,400,000 to $2,700,000 per life saved. Applying the mean of these values ($2,100,000) and the latest risk per unit dose coefficients used by the ICRP (1991), which take into account risks to the general public, including genetic effects and nonfatal cancers, yields a value of dose avoided of $750 to $1,500 per person-cSv for public exposures. The lower value applies if adjustments are made for years of life lost per fatality. A nominal value of $1,000 per person-cSv seems appropriate in light of the many uncertainties involved in deducing these values. These values are consistent with values recommended by several European countries for individual doses in the region of 1 mSv/y (100 mrem/y). Below this dose rate, most countries have values a factor of 7 to 10 lower, based on the assumption that society is less concerned with fatality risks below about 10{sup {minus}4}/y.

  8. Exploring Public Health's roles and limitations in advancing food security in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seed, Barbara A; Lang, Tim M; Caraher, Martin J; Ostry, Aleck S

    2014-07-22

    This research analyzes the roles and limitations of Public Health in British Columbia in advancing food security through the integration of food security initiatives into its policies and programs. It asks the question, can Public Health advance food security? If so, how, and what are its limitations? This policy analysis merges findings from 38 key informant interviews conducted with government and civil society stakeholders involved in the development of food security initiatives, along with an examination of relevant documents. The Population Health Template is used to delineate and analyze Public Health roles in food security. Public Health was able to advance food security in some ways, such as the adoption of food security as a core public health program. Public Health's leadership role in food security is constrained by a restricted mandate, limited ability to collaborate across a wide range of sectors and levels, as well as internal conflict within Public Health between Food Security and Food Protection programs. Public Health has a role in advancing food security, but it also faces limitations. As the limitations are primarily systemic and institutional, recommendations to overcome them are not simple but, rather, require movement toward embracing the determinants of health and regulatory pluralism. The results also suggest that the historic role of Public Health in food security remains salient today.

  9. Realistic retrospective dose assessments to members of the public around Spanish nuclear facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M A; Martín-Valdepeñas, J M; García-Talavera, M; Martín-Matarranz, J L; Salas, M R; Serrano, J I; Ramos, L M

    2011-11-01

    In the frame of an epidemiological study carried out in the influence areas around the Spanish nuclear facilities (ISCIII-CSN, 2009. Epidemiological Study of The Possible Effect of Ionizing Radiations Deriving from The Operation of Spanish Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities on The Health of The Population Living in Their Vicinity. Final report December 2009. Ministerio de Ciencia e Innovación, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear. Madrid. Available from: http://www.csn.es/images/stories/actualidad_datos/especiales/epidemiologico/epidemiological_study.pdf), annual effective doses to public have been assessed by the Spanish Nuclear Safety Council (CSN) for over 45 years using a retrospective realistic-dose methodology. These values are compared with data from natural radiation exposure. For the affected population, natural radiation effective doses are in average 2300 times higher than effective doses due to the operation of nuclear installations (nuclear power stations and fuel cycle facilities). When considering the impact on the whole Spanish population, effective doses attributable to nuclear facilities represent in average 3.5×10(-5)mSv/y, in contrast to 1.6mSv/y from natural radiation or 1.3mSv/y from medical exposures.

  10. Limited dose warfarin throughout pregnancy in patients with mechanical heart valve prosthesis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassouna, Ahmed; Allam, Hemat

    2014-06-01

    also fewer but rates remained comparable. Limited dose warfarin throughout pregnancy was associated with improved foetal outcomes, without jeopardizing maternal safety. Foetal outcomes were better when patients were followed up prospectively or receiving smaller warfarin doses through targeting a lower INR than recommended (1.5-2.5). Large randomized controlled trials are mandatory to evaluate our findings.

  11. Health conditions and role limitation in three European Regions: a public-health perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Barbaglia

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The contribution of health conditions to role limitation in the three European regions studied is high. Mental disorders are associated with the largest impact in most of the regions. There is a need for mainstreaming disability in the public health agenda to reduce the role limitation associated with health conditions. The cross-regional differences found require further investigation.

  12. [Paradigms in the analysis of public health policies: limitations and challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Zapata, Walter; Ríos-Osorio, Leonardo; Gómez-Arias, Rubén Darío; Alvarez-Del Castillo, Xavier

    2012-07-01

    Research on health policies is considered essential to ensure the effectiveness and efficiency of public policies. Analyses of public health policies have various objectives, including helping to solve the problems for which the policy was originated. That objective faces two large obstacles: (1) the ambiguity and heterogeneity of the models applied for the analysis of public policies, conditions that hinder the selection of analytical methods and the assessment of the scope of the objective; and (2) the traditional methodological approaches that limit the capacity of analyses to help solve the problems detected. This paper reviews the epistemology of the predominant models of public health policy analysis in order to assess their scope and limitations. It concludes that the development of new conceptual approaches could improve the quality of research on public policies and their ability to favorably impact decisions.

  13. Phase I study to determine the maximal tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicities of orally administered idarubicin in dogs with lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, D M; Husbands, B D; Kamerling, S G; Simpson, H; Kurzman, I D; McDonnell, A

    2012-01-01

    Idarubicin, a PO bioavailable anthracycline antibiotic-class chemotherapeutic, could have substantial convenience advantages over currently available similar class agents in use that require IV delivery. The primary objective of this study was to determine the maximally tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs), and basic pharmacokinetic parameters of oral idarubicin exposure in dogs with lymphoma after a single oral dose. A secondary objective was to document preliminary antitumor efficacy in an expanded treatment cohort using the established MTD. Client-owned dogs with measurable lymphoma. Dogs (n = 31) were enrolled in a prospective open label phase I study of oral idarubicin. By means of a 3 + 3 cohort design, dose escalations were made with 3 dogs per dose level, and the MTD was established based on the number of patients experiencing a DLT. Plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol were determined by postdose sampling. Assessment of antitumor efficacy focused on evaluation of accessible, measurable lymph nodes and skin lesions by modified RECIST guidelines. The MTD in dogs > 15 kg body weight was 22 mg/m(2) . Adverse hematologic events (neutropenia and thrombocytopenia) were the predominant DLT and generally correlated with higher plasma concentrations of idarubicin and idarubicinol. PO administered idarubicin was generally well-tolerated and had preliminary antitumor activity in dogs with lymphoma. Furthermore, the potential clinical advantage of a safe and efficacious oral anthracycline alternative supports further investigations of this agent in repeated-dose, randomized clinical trials. Copyright © 2012 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. Sarcopenia predicts early dose-limiting toxicities and pharmacokinetics of sorafenib in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Mir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sorafenib induces frequent dose limiting toxicities (DLT in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Sarcopenia has been associated with poor performance status and shortened survival in cancer patients. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The characteristics of Child Pugh A cirrhotic patients with HCC receiving sorafenib in our institution were retrospectively analyzed. Sorafenib plasma concentrations were determined at each visit. Toxicities were recorded during the first month of treatment, and sarcopenia was determined from baseline CT-scans. RESULTS: Forty patients (30 males were included. Eleven (27.5% were sarcopenic. Eighteen patients (45% experienced a DLT during the first month of treatment. Sarcopenic patients experienced significantly more DLTs than non-sarcopenic patients did (82% versus 31%, p = 0.005. Grade 3 diarrhea was significantly more frequent in sarcopenic patients than in non-sarcopenic patients (45.5% versus 6.9%, p = 0.01, but not grade 3 hand foot syndrome reaction (9% versus 17.2%, p = 1. On day 28, median sorafenib AUC (n = 17 was significantly higher in sarcopenic patients (102.4 mg/l.h versus 53.7 mg/l.h, p = 0.013. CONCLUSIONS: Among cirrhotic Child Pugh A patients with advanced HCC, sarcopenia predicts sorafenib exposure and the occurrence of DLT within the first month of treatment.

  15. Feasibility study of astronaut standardized career dose limits in LEO and the outlook for BLEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna-Lawlor, Susan; Bhardwaj, A.; Ferrari, Franco; Kuznetsov, Nikolay; Lal, A. K.; Li, Yinghui; Nagamatsu, Aiko; Nymmik, Rikho; Panasyuk, Michael; Petrov, Vladislav; Reitz, Guenther; Pinsky, Lawrence; Muszaphar Shukor, Sheikh; Singhvi, A. K.; Straube, Ulrich; Tomi, Leena; Townsend, Lawrence

    2014-11-01

    Cosmic Study Group SG 3.19/1.10 was established in February 2013 under the aegis of the International Academy of Astronautics to consider and compare the dose limits adopted by various space agencies for astronauts in Low Earth Orbit. A preliminary definition of the limits that might later be adopted by crews exploring Beyond Low Earth Orbit was, in addition, to be made. The present paper presents preliminary results of the study reported at a Symposium held in Turin by the Academy in July 2013. First, an account is provided of exposure limits assigned by various partner space agencies to those of their astronauts that work aboard the International Space Station. Then, gaps in the scientific and technical information required to safely implement human missions beyond the shielding provided by the geomagnetic field (to the Moon, Mars and beyond) are identified. Among many recommendations for actions to mitigate the health risks potentially posed to personnel Beyond Low Earth Orbit is the development of a preliminary concept for a Human Space Awareness System to: provide for crewed missions the means of prompt onboard detection of the ambient arrival of hazardous particles; develop a strategy for the implementation of onboard responses to hazardous radiation levels; support modeling/model validation that would enable reliable predictions to be made of the arrival of hazardous radiation at a distant spacecraft; provide for the timely transmission of particle alerts to a distant crewed vehicle at an emergency frequency using suitably located support spacecraft. Implementation of the various recommendations of the study can be realized based on a two pronged strategy whereby Space Agencies/Space Companies/Private Entrepreneurial Organizations etc. address the mastering of required key technologies (e.g. fast transportation; customized spacecraft design) while the International Academy of Astronautics, in a role of handling global international co-operation, organizes

  16. Limiting CT radiation dose in children with craniosynostosis: phantom study using model-based iterative reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaasalainen, Touko; Lampinen, Anniina [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); University of Helsinki, Department of Physics, Helsinki (Finland); Palmu, Kirsi [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); School of Science, Aalto University, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Computational Science, Helsinki (Finland); Reijonen, Vappu; Kortesniemi, Mika [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, HUS Medical Imaging Center, Radiology, POB 340, Helsinki (Finland); Leikola, Junnu [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Plastic Surgery, Helsinki (Finland); Kivisaari, Riku [University of Helsinki and Helsinki University Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Helsinki (Finland)

    2015-09-15

    Medical professionals need to exercise particular caution when developing CT scanning protocols for children who require multiple CT studies, such as those with craniosynostosis. To evaluate the utility of ultra-low-dose CT protocols with model-based iterative reconstruction techniques for craniosynostosis imaging. We scanned two pediatric anthropomorphic phantoms with a 64-slice CT scanner using different low-dose protocols for craniosynostosis. We measured organ doses in the head region with metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) dosimeters. Numerical simulations served to estimate organ and effective doses. We objectively and subjectively evaluated the quality of images produced by adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR) 30%, ASiR 50% and Veo (all by GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Image noise and contrast were determined for different tissues. Mean organ dose with the newborn phantom was decreased up to 83% compared to the routine protocol when using ultra-low-dose scanning settings. Similarly, for the 5-year phantom the greatest radiation dose reduction was 88%. The numerical simulations supported the findings with MOSFET measurements. The image quality remained adequate with Veo reconstruction, even at the lowest dose level. Craniosynostosis CT with model-based iterative reconstruction could be performed with a 20-μSv effective dose, corresponding to the radiation exposure of plain skull radiography, without compromising required image quality. (orig.)

  17. Dose coefficients for radionuclides produced in high energy proton accelerator facilities. Coefficients for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publications

    CERN Document Server

    Kawai, K; Noguchi, H

    2002-01-01

    Effective dose coefficients, the committed effective dose per unit intake, by inhalation and ingestion have been calculated for 304 nuclides, including (1) 230 nuclides with half-lives >= 10 min and their daughters that are not listed in ICRP Publications and (2) 74 nuclides with half-lives < 10 min that are produced in a spallation target. Effective dose coefficients for inhalation of soluble or reactive gases have been calculated for 21 nuclides, and effective dose rates for inert gases have been calculated for 9 nuclides. Dose calculation was carried out using a general-purpose nuclear decay database DECDC developed at JAERI and a decay data library newly compiled from the ENSDF for the nuclides abundantly produced in a spallation target. The dose coefficients were calculated with the computer code DOCAP based on the respiratory tract model and biokinetic model of ICRP. The effective dose rates were calculated by considering both external irradiation from the surrounding cloud and irradiation of the lun...

  18. Opioid rotation: the science and the limitations of the equianalgesic dose table.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knotkova, Helena; Fine, Perry G; Portenoy, Russell K

    2009-09-01

    Opioid rotation refers to a switch from one opioid to another in an effort to improve the response to analgesic therapy or reduce adverse effects. It is a common method to address the problem of poor opioid responsiveness despite optimal dose titration. Guidelines for opioid rotation are empirical and begin with the selection of a safe and reasonably effective starting dose for the new opioid, followed by dose adjustment to optimize the balance between analgesia and side effects. The selection of a starting dose must be based on an estimate of the relative potency between the existing opioid and the new one. Potency, which is defined as the dose required to produce a given effect, differs widely among opioids, and among individuals under varying conditions. To effectively rotate from one opioid to another, the new opioid must be started at a dose that will cause neither toxicity nor abstinence, and will be sufficiently efficacious in that pain is no worse than before the change. The estimate of relative potency used in calculating this starting dose has been codified on "equianalgesic dose tables," which historically have been based on the best science available and have been used with little modification for more than 40 years. These tables, and the clinical protocols used to apply them to opioid rotation, may need revision, however, as the science underlying relative potency evolves. Review of these issues informs the use of opioid rotation in the clinical setting and defines key areas for future research.

  19. Aquatic toxicity testing of liquid hydrophobic chemicals – Passive dosing exactly at the saturation limit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stibany, Felix; Nørgaard Schmidt, Stine; Schäffer, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study were (1) to develop a passive dosing approach for aquatic toxicity testing of liquid substances with very high Kow values and (2) to apply this approach to the model substance dodecylbenzene (DDB, Log Kow = 8.65). The first step was to design a new passive dosing for...

  20. Assessing the role of soil water limitation in determining the Phytotoxic Ozone Dose (PODY) thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Marco, Alessandra; Sicard, Pierre; Fares, Silvano; Tuovinen, Juha-Pekka; Anav, Alessandro; Paoletti, Elena

    2016-12-01

    Phytotoxic Ozone Dose (PODY), defined as the accumulated stomatal ozone flux over a threshold of Y, is considered an optimal metric to evaluate O3 effects on vegetation. PODY is often computed through the DO3SE model, which includes species-specific parameterizations for the environmental response of stomatal conductance. However, the effect of soil water content (SWC) on stomatal aperture is difficult to model on a regional scale and thus often ignored. In this study, we used environmental input data obtained from the WRF-CHIMERE model for 14,546 grid-based forest sites in Southern Europe. SWC was obtained for the upper 10 cm of soil, which resulted in a worst-case risk scenario. PODY was calculated either with or without water limitation for different Y thresholds. Exclusion of the SWC effect on stomatal fluxes caused a serious overestimation of PODY. The difference increased with increasing Y (78%, 128%, 237% and 565% with Y = 0, 1, 2 and 3 nmol O3 m-2 s-1, respectively). This behaviour was confirmed by applying the same approach to field data measured in a Mediterranean Quercus ilex forest. WRF-CHIMERE overestimated SWC at this field site, so under real-world conditions the SWC effect may be larger than modelled. The differences were lower for temperate species (Pinus cembra 50-340%, P. sylvestris 57-363%, Abies alba 57-371%) than for Mediterranean species (P. pinaster 87-356%, P. halepensis 96-429%, P. pinea 107-532%, Q. suber 104-1602%), although a high difference was recorded also for the temperate species Fagus sylvatica with POD3 (524%). We conclude that SWC should be considered in PODY simulations and a low Y threshold should be used for robustness.

  1. Public member dose assessment of Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant under normal operation by modeling the fallout from stack using the HYSPLIT atmospheric dispersion model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zali, A; Shamsaei Zafarghandi, M; Feghhi, S A; Taherian, A M

    2017-05-01

    In this work, public dose resulting from fission products released from Bushehr Nuclear Power Plant (BNPP) under normal operation is assessed. Due to the long range transport of radionuclides in this work (80 km) and considering terrain and meteorological data, HYbrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYsplit) model, which uses three dimensional long-range numerical models, has been employed to calculate atmospheric dispersion. Annual effective dose calculation is carried out for inhalation, ingestion, and external exposure pathways in 16directions and within 80 km around the site for representative person. The results showed the maximum dose of inhalation and external exposure for adults is 3.8 × 10(-8)Sv/y in the SE direction and distance of 600 m from the BNPP site which is less than ICRP 103 recommended dose limit (1 mSv). Children and infants' doses are higher in comparison with adults, although they are less than 1 mSv. Ingestion dose percentage in the total dose is less than 0.1%. The results of this study underestimate the Final Safety Analysis Report ofBNPP-1 (FSAR)data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Dose coefficients for intakes of radionuclides by workers: Coefficients for radionuclides not listed in ICRP Publication 68

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1999-12-01

    Dose coefficients, the committed effective dose per unit intake, have been calculated for 149 radionuclides with half-lives {>=} 10 min that are not listed in ICRP Publication 68 (Publ. 68). Effective dose rates for inert gas have been calculated for 2 radionuclides. The dose coefficients were calculated with the computer program LUDEP that calculates internal doses using the respiratory tract model of ICRP Publ. 66 and the biokinetic models of Publ. 30. Nuclear decay data used for the calculation were newly compiled from decay data sets of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF). In the calculation of the effective dose rates, external irradiation from the surrounding cloud and irradiation of the lung from the gas within it were considered. The calculated results are presented in tables, which are the same forms as those in Publ. 68. The range of the differences in the dose coefficients due to the biokinetic models and nuclear decay data employed was also discussed by comparing the dose coefficients between LUDEP and Publ. 68. The dose coefficients and the effective dose rates will be used for dose calculation for radionuclides produced in high-energy proton accelerator and fusion reactor facilities. (author)

  3. Generic and low dose antiretroviral therapy in adults and children: implication for scaling up treatment in resource limited settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramautarsing Reshmie

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Although access to antiretroviral therapy (ART for the treatment of HIV has increased during the last decade, many patients are still in need of treatment. With limited funds to provide ART to millions of patients worldwide, there is a need for alternative ways to scale up ART in resource limited settings. This review provides an overview of pharmacokinetic, safety and efficacy studies of generic and reduced dose ART. The production of generic ART has greatly influenced the decline in drug prices and the increased in ART access. Generic ART has good pharmacokinetic profile, safety and efficacy. Toxicity is however the main cause for ART discontinuation. Several dose reduction studies have shown adequate pharmacokinetic parameters and short term efficacy with reduced dose ART. Ethnicity may affect drug metabolism; several pharmacokinetic studies have confirmed higher plasma ART concentration in Asians. Randomized efficacy trial of reduced versus standard ART is warranted.

  4. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  5. Facilitators for travelling with local public transport among people with mild cognitive limitations after stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ståhl, Agneta; Månsson Lexell, Eva

    2017-01-24

    Previous research of how people with stroke manage public transport has mainly focused on barriers due to physical limitations whereas the influence of cognitive limitations is scarce. There is also a lack of knowledge of facilitators that can help to overcome these barriers. The aim of this study was to describe facilitators for travelling with public transport, e.g. local buses, among people with mild cognitive limitations after stroke. A multiple case study research design was used, where quantitative and qualitative data were utilized, and analysed according to a mixed methods design. The case descriptions reveal how people with mild cognitive limitations after stroke manage their trips but constantly have to be prepared to solve problems to unexpected events. Personal characteristics and other individual strategies together with support and solutions from society were important facilitators for travelling with bus. This study takes a new approach by specifically describing facilitators for travelling with public transport among people with mild cognitive limitations after stroke. To facilitate participation in society for this particular traveller group, occupational therapists have an important role when new technology and interventions that target bus travels, and other modes of transport are developed.

  6. Forming perceptions and the limits to public participation on ocean commons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadjimichael, Maria; Delaney, Alyne

    2017-01-01

    Public views of, and public participation in, the management of commons are increasingly being recommended and sought after in environmental management processes. Yet, given the limits of today’s liberal democracy, what are the weaknesses? This article presents data from a citizens jury-inspired ......Public views of, and public participation in, the management of commons are increasingly being recommended and sought after in environmental management processes. Yet, given the limits of today’s liberal democracy, what are the weaknesses? This article presents data from a citizens jury......-inspired deliberative workshop held to tease out stakeholder views of management priorities for a section of the North Sea: the Dogger Bank. As this article reveals, the lessons learned from the Dogger Bank workshop advocate not simply what is required for managing one particular ocean commons, but also highlight some...... inherent, yet often unacknowledged, in public participation in environmental management. Stakeholder opinions uncovered through workshop discussions also show how commons are viewed today – as an economic resource-- highlighting the trend of the mainstreaming of the commodification of the commons....

  7. Health conditions and role limitation in three European Regions: a public-health perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaglia, Gabriela; Adroher, Núria D; Vilagut, Gemma; Bruffaerts, Ronny; Bunting, Brentan; Caldas de Almeida, José Miguel; Florescu, Silvia; de Girolamo, Giovanni; de Graaf, Ron; Haro, Josep Maria; Hinkov, Hristo; Kovess-Masfety, Vivianne; Matschinger, Herbert; Alonso, Jordi

    To describe the distribution of role limitation in the European population aged 18-64 years and to examine the contribution of health conditions to role limitation using a public-health approach. Representative samples of the adult general population (n=13,666) aged 18-64 years from 10 European countries of the World Mental Health (WMH) Surveys Initiative, grouped into three regions: Central-Western, Southern and Central-Eastern. The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI 3.0) was used to assess six mental disorders and standard checklists for seven physical conditions. Days with full and with partial role limitation in the month previous to the interview were reported (WMH-WHODAS). Population Attributable Fraction (PAFs) of full and partial role limitation were estimated. Health conditions explained a large proportion of full role limitation (PAF=62.6%) and somewhat less of partial role limitation (46.6%). Chronic pain was the single condition that consistently contributed to explain both disability measures in all European Regions. Mental disorders were the most important contributors to full and partial role limitation in Central-Western and Southern Europe. In Central-Eastern Europe, where mental disorders were less prevalent, physical conditions, especially cardiovascular diseases, were the highest contributors to disability. The contribution of health conditions to role limitation in the three European regions studied is high. Mental disorders are associated with the largest impact in most of the regions. There is a need for mainstreaming disability in the public health agenda to reduce the role limitation associated with health conditions. The cross-regional differences found require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Dose limited reliability of quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy for nano-particle atom-counting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Backer, A.; Martinez, G.T. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); MacArthur, K.E.; Jones, L. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, 16 Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Béché, A. [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Nellist, P.D. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, 16 Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Van Aert, S., E-mail: sandra.vanaert@uantwerpen.be [Electron Microscopy for Materials Science (EMAT), University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, B-2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2015-04-15

    Quantitative annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF STEM) has become a powerful technique to characterise nano-particles on an atomic scale. Because of their limited size and beam sensitivity, the atomic structure of such particles may become extremely challenging to determine. Therefore keeping the incoming electron dose to a minimum is important. However, this may reduce the reliability of quantitative ADF STEM which will here be demonstrated for nano-particle atom-counting. Based on experimental ADF STEM images of a real industrial catalyst, we discuss the limits for counting the number of atoms in a projected atomic column with single atom sensitivity. We diagnose these limits by combining a thorough statistical method and detailed image simulations. - Highlights: • Limited size and beam sensitivity of nano-particles challenge their quantification. • Keeping the electron dose to a minimum is therefore important. • Reliability of quantitative ADF STEM for atom-counting is demonstrated. • Limits for single atom sensitivity are discussed. • Limits are diagnosed by combining simulations and a statistical method.

  9. A sex-specific dose-response curve for testosterone: could excessive testosterone limit sexual interaction in women?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapf, Jill M; Simon, James A

    2017-04-01

    Testosterone treatment increases sexual desire and well-being in women with hypoactive sexual desire disorder; however, many studies have shown only modest benefits limited to moderate doses. Unlike men, available data indicate women show a bell-shaped dose-response curve for testosterone, wherein a threshold dosage of testosterone leads to desirable sexual function effects, but exceeding this threshold results in a lack of further positive sexual effects or may have a negative impact. Emotional and physical side-effects of excess testosterone, including aggression and virilization, may counteract the modest benefits on sexual interaction, providing a possible explanation for a threshold dose of testosterone in women. In this commentary, we will review and critically analyze data supporting a curvilinear dose-response relationship between testosterone treatment and sexual activity in women with low libido, and also explore possible explanations for this observed relationship. Understanding optimal dosing of testosterone unique to women may bring us one step closer to overcoming regulatory barriers in treating female sexual dysfunction.

  10. Publication ethics from the perspective of PhD students of health sciences: a limited experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, Berna

    2012-06-01

    Publication ethics, an important subtopic of science ethics, deals with determination of the misconducts of science in performing research or in the dissemination of ideas, data and products. Science, the main features of which are secure, reliable and ethically obtained data, plays a major role in shaping the society. As long as science maintains its quality by being based on reliable and ethically obtained data, it will be possible to maintain its role in shaping the society. This article is devoted to the presentation of opinions of PhD candidate students in health sciences in Ankara concerning publication ethics. The data obtained from 143 PhD students from the fields of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and veterinary reveal limited but unique experiences. It also shows that plagiarism is one of the worst issues in the publication ethics from the perspective of these young academics.

  11. Public dose calculations in case of accident: major differences between American and German standards and influence on the results; Calculos de dosis al publico en caso de accidente: principales diferencias entre normativas americanas y alemanas e influencia sobre los resultados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz Cervantes, A.

    2010-07-01

    Estimates of the radiological consequences of accidents are part of the safety studies of a nuclear power plant. The criterion used today is the effective dose received by the public as a result of an accident. The country standards set a limit on that dose, and that value can vary significantly from one country to another, as seen in the second chapter of this paper.

  12. Autonomia das escolas públicas: limites e possibilidades/Autonomy in public school: limits and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areta Held Previatti

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo teve como principal problemática o exame da autonomia da escola pública. Procuramos investigar os fatores que influenciam essa autonomia a fim de constatar se existem mais possibilidades ou mais limites. Para isto priorizou-se a pesquisa bibliográfica e, a fim de considerar a prática e ter dados empíricos para análise, foram realizadas duas entrevistas com profissionais da educação de diferentes instituições: um da unidade escolar e outro da Diretoria de Ensino. Os dados mostraram que, apesar da legislação garantir maior autonomia para a escola, esta continua sofrendo um controle exagerado dos órgãos superiores. Conclui-se que a luta por uma escola mais autônoma e igualitária é árdua, porém constitui-se como um processo possível de realização. The present article discusses and analyses the autonomy in Public Schools. We have investigated the factors that influence this autonomy aiming to demonstrate the existence of more limits or possibilities. In order to do that, we prioritized the bibliographic research. Also, to consider the praxis and have real data for the analysis, two interviews were done with professionals from education: one from a school and the other from the “diretoria de ensino”. The data collected indicates that, despite of the fact that brazilian laws guarantee more autonomy to the schools, they continue to suffer an exaggerated control from superior institutions. We Conclude that the fight for a more autonomic and equal school is very hard, but constitutes itself as a process that can happen.

  13. Diversifying the academic public health workforce: strategies to extend the discourse about limited racial and ethnic diversity in the public health academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annang, Lucy; Richter, Donna L; Fletcher, Faith E; Weis, Megan A; Fernandes, Pearl R; Clary, Louis A

    2010-01-01

    While public health has gained increased attention and placement on the national health agenda, little progress has been made in achieving a critical mass of underrepresented minority (URM) academicians in the public health workforce. In 2008, a telephone-based qualitative assessment was conducted with URM faculty of schools of public health to discuss this issue. As a result, we present successful strategies that institutional leaders can employ to extend the discourse about addressing limited diversity in the public health academy.

  14. Estimated dose rates to members of the public from external exposure to patients with {sup 131}I thyroid treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewji, S., E-mail: dewjisa@ornl.gov; Bellamy, M.; Leggett, R.; Eckerman, K. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS-6335, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Hertel, N. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS-6335, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 and Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State Street, Atlanta, Georgia 30332-0745 (United States); Sherbini, S.; Saba, M. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Estimated dose rates that may result from exposure to patients who had been administered iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) as part of medical therapy were calculated. These effective dose rate estimates were compared with simplified assumptions under United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 8.39, which does not consider body tissue attenuation nor time-dependent redistribution and excretion of the administered {sup 131}I. Methods: Dose rates were estimated for members of the public potentially exposed to external irradiation from patients recently treated with {sup 131}I. Tissue attenuation and iodine biokinetics were considered in the patient in a larger comprehensive effort to improve external dose rate estimates. The external dose rate estimates are based on Monte Carlo simulations using the Phantom with Movable Arms and Legs (PIMAL), previously developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission. PIMAL was employed to model the relative positions of the {sup 131}I patient and members of the public in three exposure scenarios: (1) traveling on a bus in a total of six seated or standing permutations, (2) two nursing home cases where a caregiver is seated at 30 cm from the patient’s bedside and a nursing home resident seated 250 cm away from the patient in an adjacent bed, and (3) two hotel cases where the patient and a guest are in adjacent rooms with beds on opposite sides of the common wall, with the patient and guest both in bed and either seated back-to-back or lying head to head. The biokinetic model predictions of the retention and distribution of {sup 131}I in the patient assumed a single voiding of urinary bladder contents that occurred during the trip at 2, 4, or 8 h after {sup 131}I administration for the public transportation cases, continuous first-order voiding for the nursing home cases, and regular periodic voiding at 4, 8, or 12 h after administration for the hotel room cases. Organ

  15. Can exposure limitations for well-known contact allergens be simplified? An analysis of dose-response patch test data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Louise Arup; Menné, Torkil; Voelund, Aage; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2011-06-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is triggered by chemicals in the environment. Primary prevention is aimed at minimizing the risk of induction, whereas secondary and tertiary prevention are aimed at reducing elicitation. To identify the elicitation doses that will elicit an allergic reaction in 10% of allergic individuals under patch test conditions (ED(10) patch test) for different allergens, and to compare the results with those for different allergens and with animal data indicating sensitizing potency from the literature. The literature was searched for patch test elicitation studies that fulfilled six selected criteria. The elicitation doses were calculated, and fitted dose-response curves were drawn. Sixteen studies with eight different allergens-methylchloroisothiazolinone/ methylisothiazolinone, formaldehyde, nickel, cobalt, chromium, isoeugenol, hydroxyiso hexyl 3-cyclohexene carboxaldehyde, and methyldibromo glutaronitrile-were selected. The median ED(10) value was 0.835 µg/cm(2). The ED(10) patch test values were all within a factor of 7 from the lowest to the highest value, leaving out three outliers. No obvious patterns between the sensitization and elicitation doses for the allergens were found. We found a rather small variation in the ED(10) patch test between the allergens, and no clear relationship between induction potency and elicitation threshold of a range of allergens. This knowledge may stimulate thoughts on introducing a generic approach for limitations in exposure to well-known allergens. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. The limitations of atmospheric dispersion data and their contribution to uncertainties in dose assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, B D; Ohr, S Y

    1985-03-01

    The calculation of atmospheric dispersion patterns is often an important component of radiation dose estimates. These dispersion calculations are a possible source of error and such errors or uncertainties need to be quantified. An important source of uncertainty is the meteorological data used in the calculations. Such data may be less than ideal because of constraints imposed by both availability and by the variances associated with population from which the data are obtained. We have studied a simple and much used model of atmospheric dispersion--the Gaussian plume. We discuss the uncertainties on the meteorological data which are input to the model and how these uncertainties could be used to estimate uncertainties for the modeling results. In doing this we have addressed both the uncertainty associated with a recorded climatology and the added uncertainty arising from the year-to-year variability at any given location.

  17. 30 CFR 250.197 - Data and information to be made available to the public or for limited inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... to the public or for limited inspection. MMS will protect data and information that you submit under... section describe what data and information will be made available to the public without the consent of the... available to the public upon submission, except as specified in the following table: On form . . . Data...

  18. Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  19. Some limitations of public sequence data for phylogenetic inference (in plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody E Hinchliff

    Full Text Available The GenBank database contains essentially all of the nucleotide sequence data generated for published molecular systematic studies, but for the majority of taxa these data remain sparse. GenBank has value for phylogenetic methods that leverage data-mining and rapidly improving computational methods, but the limits imposed by the sparse structure of the data are not well understood. Here we present a tree representing 13,093 land plant genera--an estimated 80% of extant plant diversity--to illustrate the potential of public sequence data for broad phylogenetic inference in plants, and we explore the limits to inference imposed by the structure of these data using theoretical foundations from phylogenetic data decisiveness. We find that despite very high levels of missing data (over 96%, the present data retain the potential to inform over 86.3% of all possible phylogenetic relationships. Most of these relationships, however, are informed by small amounts of data--approximately half are informed by fewer than four loci, and more than 99% are informed by fewer than fifteen. We also apply an information theoretic measure of branch support to assess the strength of phylogenetic signal in the data, revealing many poorly supported branches concentrated near the tips of the tree, where data are sparse and the limiting effects of this sparseness are stronger. We argue that limits to phylogenetic inference and signal imposed by low data coverage may pose significant challenges for comprehensive phylogenetic inference at the species level. Computational requirements provide additional limits for large reconstructions, but these may be overcome by methodological advances, whereas insufficient data coverage can only be remedied by additional sampling effort. We conclude that public databases have exceptional value for modern systematics and evolutionary biology, and that a continued emphasis on expanding taxonomic and genomic coverage will play a critical

  20. Strengths and limitations of using repeat-dose toxicity studies to predict effects on fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dent, M P

    2007-08-01

    The upcoming European chemicals legislation REACH (Registration, Evaluation, and Authorisation of Chemicals) will require the risk assessment of many thousands of chemicals. It is therefore necessary to develop intelligent testing strategies to ensure that chemicals of concern are identified whilst minimising the testing of chemicals using animals. Xenobiotics may perturb the reproductive cycle, and for this reason several reproductive studies are recommended under REACH. One of the endpoints assessed in this battery of tests is mating performance and fertility. Animal tests that address this endpoint use a relatively large number of animals and are also costly in terms of resource, time, and money. If it can be shown that data from non-reproductive studies such as in-vitro or repeat-dose toxicity tests are capable of generating reliable alerts for effects on fertility then some animal testing may be avoided. Available rat sub-chronic and fertility data for 44 chemicals that have been classified by the European Union as toxic to fertility were therefore analysed for concordance of effects. Because it was considered appropriate to read across data for some chemicals these data sets were considered relevant for 73 of the 102 chemicals currently classified as toxic to reproduction (fertility) under this system. For all but 5 of these chemicals it was considered that a well-performed sub-chronic toxicity study would have detected pathology in the male, and in some cases, the female reproductive tract. Three showed evidence of direct interaction with oestrogen or androgen receptors (linuron, nonylphenol, and fenarimol). The remaining chemicals (quinomethionate and azafenidin) act by modes of action that do not require direct interaction with steroid receptors. However, both these materials caused in-utero deaths in pre-natal developmental toxicity studies, and the relatively low NOAELs and the nature of the hazard identified in the sub-chronic tests provides an alert

  1. Dose of physical activity, physical functioning and disability risk in mobility-limited older adults: Results from the LIFE study randomized trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guralnik, Jack M.; King, Abby C.; Pahor, Marco; McDermott, Mary M.; Tudor-Locke, Catrine; Manini, Todd M.; Glynn, Nancy W.; Marsh, Anthony P.; Axtell, Robert S.; Hsu, Fang-Chi; Rejeski, W. Jack

    2017-01-01

    Understanding the minimal dose of physical activity required to achieve improvement in physical functioning and reductions in disability risk is necessary to inform public health recommendations. To examine the effect of physical activity dose on changes in physical functioning and the onset of major mobility disability in The Lifestyle Interventions and Independence for Elders (LIFE) Study. We conducted a multicenter single masked randomized controlled trial that enrolled participants in 2010 and 2011 and followed them for an average of 2.6 years. 1,635 sedentary men and women aged 70–89 years who had functional limitations were randomized to a structured moderate intensity walking, resistance, and flexibility physical activity program or a health education program. Physical activity dose was assessed by 7-day accelerometry and self-report at baseline and 24 months. Outcomes included the 400 m walk gait speed, the Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), assessed at baseline, 6, 12, and 24 months, and onset of major mobility disability (objectively defined by loss of ability to walk 400 m in 15 min). When the physical activity arm or the entire sample were stratified by change in physical activity from baseline to 24 months, there was a dose-dependent increase in the change in gait speed and SPPB from baseline at 6, 12, and 24 months. In addition, the magnitude of change in physical activity over 24 months was related to the reduction in the onset of major mobility disability (overall P 48 minutes per week) in regular physical activity participation had significant and clinically meaningful effects on these outcomes. Trial registration: ClinicalsTrials.gov NCT00116194 PMID:28820909

  2. Estimates of committed effective dose and annual limit on intake for radioactive dusts using the new ICRP respiratory tract model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.S. [Australian Radiation Lab., Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1996-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the implications of using the new ICRP 66 respiratory tract model for calculation of the committed effective dose(CED), for a period of 50 years post-intake, together with the annual limit on intake(ALI), for radioactive dusts encountered in the uranium and mineral sand mining and processing industries. Some of the differences between the old ICRP 30 respiratory tract model and the LUDEP 1.1 computer code, which is based on the new ICRP 66 respiratory tract model, are discussed and a comparison of values obtained using both models is given. 4 figs; 8 tabs; 16 refs.

  3. [Public health crises in a developed society. Successes and limitations in Spain. SESPAS report 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérvas, Juan; Meneu, Ricard

    2010-12-01

    The perception, acceptability and management of risks are social construction. Consequently, in managing public health crises, the gap between facts, beliefs and feelings tests the responsiveness of official institutions to health alarms that can be objective, potential, or imaginary. On balance, a strong point of the Spanish experience of health crises is the presence of clinicians and public health officers working in an organization capable of responding adequately, although the quasi-federal Spanish political structure has both advantages and disadvantages. Weaknesses include the low profile given to public health and a management structure that relies too heavily on partitocracy. The management of these crises could be improved by transferring greater scope to health professionals in decisions about crisis identification and management (with transparency) and limiting bureaucratic inertia. For some, health crises involve visibility or business opportunities (not always legitimate). Therefore, the perception of crisis will increasingly rest less in the hands of experts and more in those of groups interested in spreading these crises or in providing solutions. While progress is needed to develop participation in strategies to respond to emerging crises, even more essential is the involvement of all healthcare levels in their preparation and dissemination.

  4. Short, sharp shock public health campaign had limited impact on raising awareness of laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Neeraj; Rafferty, Amy; Rawnsley, Trisha; Jose, Jemy

    2016-09-01

    Laryngeal cancer has poorer outcomes if diagnosed at a later stage. Improving awareness could encourage earlier presentation and improve outcomes. This study aimed to evaluate a public engagement campaign targeted at raising awareness of laryngeal cancer. An epidemiological study identified high-risk populations in the region. A target population as well as a matched control population was selected. A cancer awareness survey combined with focus groups guided the design of a 3-month multimedia campaign. The survey was repeated post-campaign to evaluate the campaign effectiveness. The study identified populations with the highest rates of laryngeal cancer and late stage disease at presentation. The surveys performed revealed a limited effect of the multimedia campaign in raising awareness of the signs and symptoms of laryngeal cancer. Recall of the campaign also faded rapidly. This is the first public awareness campaign aimed at laryngeal cancer carried out in the UK. The results suggest that short-term campaigns have a limited effect and a more prolonged approach should be considered.

  5. Rectal balloon use limits vaginal displacement, rectal dose, and rectal toxicity in patients receiving IMRT for postoperative gynecological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Cheng-Chia; Wuu, Yen-Ruh; Yanagihara, Theodore; Jani, Ashish; Xanthopoulos, Eric P; Tiwari, Akhil; Wright, Jason D; Burke, William M; Hou, June Y; Tergas, Ana I; Deutsch, Israel

    2017-09-01

    Pelvic radiotherapy for gynecologic malignancies traditionally used a 4-field box technique. Later trials have shown the feasibility of using intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) instead. But vaginal movement between fractions is concerning when using IMRT due to greater conformality of the isodose curves to the target and the resulting possibility of missing the target while the vagina is displaced. In this study, we showed that the use of a rectal balloon during treatment can decrease vaginal displacement, limit rectal dose, and limit acute and late toxicities. Little is known regarding the use of a rectal balloon (RB) in treating patients with IMRT in the posthysterectomy setting. We hypothesize that the use of an RB during treatment can limit rectal dose and acute and long-term toxicities, as well as decrease vaginal cuff displacement between fractions. We performed a retrospective review of patients with gynecological malignancies who received postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB from January 1, 2012 to January 1, 2015. Rectal dose constraint was examined as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 1203 and 0418. Daily cone beam computed tomography (CT) was performed, and the average (avg) displacement, avg magnitude, and avg magnitude of vector were calculated. Toxicity was reported according to RTOG acute radiation morbidity scoring criteria. Acute toxicity was defined as less than 90 days from the end of radiation treatment. Late toxicity was defined as at least 90 days after completing radiation. Twenty-eight patients with postoperative IMRT with the use of an RB were examined and 23 treatment plans were reviewed. The avg rectal V40 was 39.3% ± 9.0%. V30 was65.1% ± 10.0%. V50 was 0%. Separate cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images (n = 663) were reviewed. The avg displacement was as follows: superior 0.4 + 2.99 mm, left 0.23 ± 4.97 mm, and anterior 0.16 ± 5.18 mm. The avg magnitude of displacement was superior

  6. ACUTRI a computer code for assessing doses to the general public due to acute tritium releases

    CERN Document Server

    Yokoyama, S; Noguchi, H; Ryufuku, S; Sasaki, T

    2002-01-01

    Tritium, which is used as a fuel of a D-T burning fusion reactor, is the most important radionuclide for the safety assessment of a nuclear fusion experimental reactor such as ITER. Thus, a computer code, ACUTRI, which calculates the radiological impact of tritium released accidentally to the atmosphere, has been developed, aiming to be of use in a discussion of licensing of a fusion experimental reactor and an environmental safety evaluation method in Japan. ACUTRI calculates an individual tritium dose based on transfer models specific to tritium in the environment and ICRP dose models. In this calculation it is also possible to analyze statistically on meteorology in the same way as a conventional dose assessment method according to the meteorological guide of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. A Gaussian plume model is used for calculating the atmospheric dispersion of tritium gas (HT) and/or tritiated water (HTO). The environmental pathway model in ACUTRI considers the following internal exposures: i...

  7. 5 CFR 630.309 - Time limit for use of restored annual leave-extended exigency of the public business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... leave-extended exigency of the public business. 630.309 Section 630.309 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS ABSENCE AND LEAVE Annual Leave § 630.309 Time limit for use of restored annual leave—extended exigency of the public business. (a) Annual leave...

  8. Direct oral anticoagulants in real practice: which doses for which patients. Limitations and bleeding risk compared to vitamin K antagonists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giancarlo Landini

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The new oral direct anticoagulants (DOACs could represent a new frontier for management of thromboembolic diseases. However, the new drugs have limitations that need to be considered. Despite the fact that their efficacy and safety profile are at least not inferior to comparators, bleeding risk represents the most feared complication, as for all the antithrombotic drugs. Bleeding risk increases with conditions that interfere with pharmacokinetics, in addition to the risk strictly linked to patients or their co-morbidities. Since all DOACs are excreted from kidneys (even though at different percentages according to the different molecules, renal impairment represents one of the leading causes of DOACs accumulation and bleeding risk. Moderate renal failure is the main condition in which dose adjustment of DOACs could be required, while severe renal impairment represents an absolute contraindication for their use. Renal function must, therefore, be carefully monitored before prescription and during assumption. The older population is at higher bleeding risk, and dose adjustment of DOACs could be required. Although to a lesser degree than oral anticoagulant vitamin K antagonists, DOACs can have drug interactions, especially with P-glycoprotein and cytochrome P3A4 inducers or inhibitors, and these interactions must be taken into account in real practice to avoid accumulation or under dosage. The concomitant use of other drugs, especially antithrombotics, may expose the patients to bleeding risk by reducing the hemostatic properties.

  9. US public opinion regarding proposed limits on resident physician work hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lurie Peter

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In both Europe and the US, resident physician work hour reduction has been a source of controversy within academic medicine. In 2008, the Institute of Medicine (IOM recommended a reduction in resident physician work hours. We sought to assess the American public perspective on this issue. Methods We conducted a national survey of 1,200 representative members of the public via random digit telephone dialing in order to describe US public opinion on resident physician work hour regulation, particularly with reference to the IOM recommendations. Results Respondents estimated that resident physicians currently work 12.9-h shifts (95% CI 12.5 to 13.3 h and 58.3-h work weeks (95% CI 57.3 to 59.3 h. They believed the maximum shift duration should be 10.9 h (95% CI 10.6 to 11.3 h and the maximum work week should be 50 h (95% CI 49.4 to 50.8 h, with 1% approving of shifts lasting >24 h (95% CI 0.6% to 2%. A total of 81% (95% CI 79% to 84% believed reducing resident physician work hours would be very or somewhat effective in reducing medical errors, and 68% (95% CI 65% to 71% favored the IOM proposal that resident physicians not work more than 16 h over an alternative IOM proposal permitting 30-h shifts with ≥5 h protected sleep time. In all, 81% believed patients should be informed if a treating resident physician had been working for >24 h and 80% (95% CI 78% to 83% would then want a different doctor. Conclusions The American public overwhelmingly favors discontinuation of the 30-h shifts without protected sleep routinely worked by US resident physicians and strongly supports implementation of restrictions on resident physician work hours that are as strict, or stricter, than those proposed by the IOM. Strong support exists to restrict resident physicians' work to 16 or fewer consecutive hours, similar to current limits in New Zealand, the UK and the rest of Europe.

  10. Evaluation of Simplified Models for Estimating Public Dose from Spent Nuclear Fuel Shipments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connolly, Kevin J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Radulescu, Georgeta [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the dose rate as a function of distance from a representative high-capacity SNF rail-type transportation cask. It uses the SCALE suite of radiation transport modeling and simulation codes to determine neutron and gamma radiation dose rates. The SCALE calculated dose rate is compared with simplified analytical methods historically used for these calculations. The SCALE dose rate calculation presented in this paper employs a very detailed transportation cask model (e.g., pin-by-pin modeling of fuel assembly) and a new hybrid computational transport method. Because it includes pin-level heterogeneity and models ample air and soil outside the cask to simulate scattering of gamma and neutron radiation, this detailed SCALE model is expected to yield more accurate results than previously used models which made more simplistic assumptions (e.g., fuel assembly treated as a point or line source, simple 1-D model of environment outside of cask). The results in this paper are preliminary and, as progress is made on developing and validating improved models, results may be subject to change as models and estimates become more refined and better information leads to more accurate assumptions.

  11. "Double-Dosing" in Math in North Carolina Public Schools. REL 2016-140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Gary T.; Barrett, Nathan; Marder, Camille

    2016-01-01

    Double-dosing in math expands the time for students to learn by having them enroll in two (or occasionally more) math courses during the regular school day. Although the practice can take different forms and be used at different grade levels (Chait, Muller, Goldware, & Housman, 2007; Nomi & Allensworth, 2009), most research on…

  12. ACUTRI: a computer code for assessing doses to the general public due to acute tritium releases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Sumi; Noguchi, Hiroshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ryufuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Toshihisa; Kurosawa, Naohiro [Visible Information Center, Inc., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-11-01

    Tritium, which is used as a fuel of a D-T burning fusion reactor, is the most important radionuclide for the safety assessment of a nuclear fusion experimental reactor such as ITER. Thus, a computer code, ACUTRI, which calculates the radiological impact of tritium released accidentally to the atmosphere, has been developed, aiming to be of use in a discussion of licensing of a fusion experimental reactor and an environmental safety evaluation method in Japan. ACUTRI calculates an individual tritium dose based on transfer models specific to tritium in the environment and ICRP dose models. In this calculation it is also possible to analyze statistically on meteorology in the same way as a conventional dose assessment method according to the meteorological guide of the Nuclear Safety Commission of Japan. A Gaussian plume model is used for calculating the atmospheric dispersion of tritium gas (HT) and/or tritiated water (HTO). The environmental pathway model in ACUTRI considers the following internal exposures: inhalation from a primary plume (HT and/or HTO) released from the facilities and inhalation from a secondary plume (HTO) reemitted from the ground following deposition of HT and HTO. This report describes an outline of the ACUTRI code, a user guide and the results of test calculation. (author)

  13. Radiation by the numbers: developing an on-line Canadian radiation dose calculator as a public engagement and education tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalzell, M.T.J. [Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Concerns arising from misunderstandings about radiation are often cited as a main reason for public antipathy towards nuclear development and impede decision-making by governments and individuals. A lack of information about everyday sources of radiation exposure that is accessible, relatable and factual contributes to the problem. As part of its efforts to be a fact-based source of information on nuclear issues, the Sylvia Fedoruk Canadian Centre for Nuclear Innovation has developed an on-line Canadian Radiation Dose Calculator as a tool to provide context about common sources of radiation. This paper discusses the development of the calculator and describes how the Fedoruk Centre is using it and other tools to support public engagement on nuclear topics. (author)

  14. Reference computations of public dose and cancer risk from airborne releases of plutonium. Nuclear safety technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, V.L.

    1993-12-23

    This report presents results of computations of doses and the associated health risks of postulated accidental atmospheric releases from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) of one gram of weapons-grade plutonium in a form that is respirable. These computations are intended to be reference computations that can be used to evaluate a variety of accident scenarios by scaling the dose and health risk results presented here according to the amount of plutonium postulated to be released, instead of repeating the computations for each scenario. The MACCS2 code has been used as the basis of these computations. The basis and capabilities of MACCS2 are summarized, the parameters used in the evaluations are discussed, and results are presented for the doses and health risks to the public, both the Maximum Offsite Individual (a maximally exposed individual at or beyond the plant boundaries) and the population within 50 miles of RFP. A number of different weather scenarios are evaluated, including constant weather conditions and observed weather for 1990, 1991, and 1992. The isotopic mix of weapons-grade plutonium will change as it ages, the {sup 241}Pu decaying into {sup 241}Am. The {sup 241}Am reaches a peak concentration after about 72 years. The doses to the bone surface, liver, and whole body will increase slightly but the dose to the lungs will decrease slightly. The overall cancer risk will show almost no change over this period. This change in cancer risk is much smaller than the year-to-year variations in cancer risk due to weather. Finally, x/Q values are also presented for other applications, such as for hazardous chemical releases. These include the x/Q values for the MOI, for a collocated worker at 100 meters downwind of an accident site, and the x/Q value integrated over the population out to 50 miles.

  15. Religious Symbols in Public Functions: Unveiling State Neutrality. A Comparative Analysis of Dutch, English and French Justifications for Limiting the Freedom of Public Officials to Display Religious Symbols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Religious symbols are loaded with meaning, not only for those who display them. They have generated controversy in many circles, be they religious or secular, public or private, and within or outside academia. Debate has taken place throughout Europe and beyond, at times leading to limitations or

  16. Religious Symbols in Public Functions: Unveiling State Neutrality. A Comparative Analysis of Dutch, English and French Justifications for Limiting the Freedom of Public Officials to Display Religious Symbols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Ooijen, H.

    2012-01-01

    Religious symbols are loaded with meaning, not only for those who display them. They have generated controversy in many circles, be they religious or secular, public or private, and within or outside academia. Debate has taken place throughout Europe and beyond, at times leading to limitations or ba

  17. Dose-response curve slope sets class-specific limits on inhibitory potential of anti-HIV drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Peterson, Susan; Sedaghat, Ahmad R; McMahon, Moira A; Callender, Marc; Zhang, Haili; Zhou, Yan; Pitt, Eleanor; Anderson, Karen S; Acosta, Edward P; Siliciano, Robert F

    2008-07-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) can control HIV-1 replication, but suboptimal treatment allows for the evolution of resistance and rebound viremia. A comparative measure of antiviral activity under clinically relevant conditions would guide drug development and the selection of regimens that maximally suppress replication. Here we show that current measures of antiviral activity, including IC(50) and inhibitory quotient, neglect a key dimension, the dose-response curve slope. Using infectivity assays with wide dynamic range, we show that this slope has noteworthy effects on antiviral activity. Slope values are class specific for antiviral drugs and define intrinsic limitations on antiviral activity for some classes. Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and integrase inhibitors have slopes of approximately 1, characteristic of noncooperative reactions, whereas non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors, protease inhibitors and fusion inhibitors unexpectedly show slopes >1. Instantaneous inhibitory potential (IIP), the log reduction in single-round infectivity at clinical drug concentrations, is strongly influenced by slope and varies by >8 logs for anti-HIV drugs. IIP provides a more accurate measure of antiviral activity and in general correlates with clinical outcomes. Only agents with slopes >1 achieve high-level inhibition of single-round infectivity, a finding with profound implications for drug and vaccine development.

  18. Doses to members of the general public and observed effects on biota: Chernobyl Forum update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, Lynn R

    2007-01-01

    The Chernobyl Forum was organized by the United Nations to examine the health and environmental effects of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station. This paper is concerned with the environmental effects, as determined by Expert Group Environment. The accident resulted in release of a large amount of radioactive materials over a period of 10 days. These materials were deposited throughout Europe with the three more affected countries being Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine. More than 5 million persons lived on territories in these countries judged to be contaminated at >37kBqm(-2). Many countermeasures were employed to mitigate the effects of the accident. The collective effective dose to the residents of the contaminated territories is estimated to be about 55,000 person-Sv. Effects on non-human biota were observed that ranged from minor to lethal; the current increase in the number and diversity of species in the most contaminated area is due to absence of human pressure.

  19. Responsibilities and Limits of Local Government Actions against Users of Public Services of Planning and Sustainable Territorial Development in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Suditu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the changes that have occurred in the Romanian society, the public authorities are required to play a coordinating role in providing the framework for a sustainable and balanced development of the national territory, and to ensure the quality of life of the citizens. In order to achieve these goals of social responsibility, the public administration authorities must build and adapt the tools of public territorial action based on their specificity and within the existing legal framework and resources,. Thus, the study shows the national and European context that frames the actions of public administration for what concerns the sustainable territorial development. It analyzes the characteristics of administrative-territorial structures of Romania, highlighting their socio-demographic diversity and the territorial forms of institutional cooperation. The approach of these issues is based in the first instance on an analysis of the European strategic documents in the field, as well as on the national regulations concerning the organization and functioning of public administration and territorial planning. The implementation of decentralization and local public autonomy has led to the capitalization of the local potential of some administrative divisions and caused a competition and a difficult cooperation between them. By analogy with the provisions of the quality standards regarding the responsibilities of the organizations towards customers, the study illustrates and analyzes the responsibilities and limits of public administration authorities in promoting sustainable development, territorial equity and the quality of life for the users of public services, i.e. the community members.

  20. Lobbying and advocacy for the public's health: what are the limits for nonprofit organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernick, J S

    1999-09-01

    Nonprofit organizations play an important role in advocating for the public's health in the United States. This article describes the rules under US law for lobbying by nonprofit organizations. The 2 most common kinds of non-profits working to improve the public's health are "public charities" and "social welfare organizations." Although social welfare organizations may engage in relatively unlimited lobbying, public charities may not engage in "substantial" lobbying. Lobbying is divided into 2 main categories. Direct lobbying refers to communications with law-makers that take a position on specific legislation, and grassroots lobbying includes attempts to persuade members of the general public to take action regarding legislation. Even public charities may engage in some direct lobbying and a smaller amount of grassroots lobbying. Much public health advocacy, however, is not lobbying, since there are several important exceptions to the lobbying rules. These exceptions include "non-partisan analysis, study, or research" and discussions of broad social problems. Lobbying with federal or earmarked foundation funds is generally prohibited.

  1. Measurement of natural radioactivity in Jordanian building materials and their contribution to the public indoor gamma dose rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharaf, J M; Hamideen, M S

    2013-10-01

    This study is undertaken to determine the activity concentration of (226)Ra, (232)Th and (40)K in samples of commonly used building materials in Jordan. Samples of seven different materials were collected from construction sites and local agencies supplying raw construction materials and analyzed using a HPGe gamma-ray spectrometer, taking into account self-attenuation in bulk samples. The average specific activity concentrations of (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K ranged from 2.84 to 41.52, 0.78 to 58.42. and 3.74 to 897 Bq/kg, respectively. All the samples had radium equivalent activities well below the limit of 370 Bq/kg set by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD, 1979). External and internal hazard indices, absorbed dose and annual effective dose rate associated with the radionuclides of interest were calculated and compared with the international legislation and guidance. In general, most of the activities did not exceed the recommended international limits, except for granite and ceramic samples which are usually used as secondary building materials in Jordan.

  2. Reference computations of public dose and cancer risk from airborne releases of uranium and Class W plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, V.L.

    1995-06-06

    This report presents ``reference`` computations that can be used by safety analysts in the evaluations of the consequences of postulated atmospheric releases of radionuclides from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. These computations deal specifically with doses and health risks to the public. The radionuclides considered are Class W Plutonium, all classes of Enriched Uranium, and all classes of Depleted Uranium. (The other class of plutonium, Y, was treated in an earlier report.) In each case, one gram of the respirable material is assumed to be released at ground leveL both with and without fire. The resulting doses and health risks can be scaled to whatever amount of release is appropriate for a postulated accident being investigated. The report begins with a summary of the organ-specific stochastic risk factors appropriate for alpha radiation, which poses the main health risk of plutonium and uranium. This is followed by a summary of the atmospheric dispersion factors for unfavorable and typical weather conditions for the calculation of consequences to both the Maximum Offsite Individual and the general population within 80 km (50 miles) of the site.

  3. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculations. Data for radionuclides not listed in ICRP publication 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tamura, Tsutomu

    1999-07-01

    Nuclear decay data used for dose calculations were compiled for 162 nuclides with half-lives greater than or equal to 10 min that are not listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and their 28 daughter nuclides. Additional 14 nuclides that are considered to be important in fusion reactor facilities were also included. The data were compiled using decay data sets of the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Investigations of the data sets were performed to check their consistency by referring to recent literature and NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides, and by using the utility programs of ENSDF. Possible revisions of the data sets were made for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. The revised data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to calculate the energies and intensities of {alpha} particles, {beta} particles, {gamma} rays including annihilation photons, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformations of the radionuclides. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt {gamma} rays, delayed {gamma} rays, and {beta} particles were also calculated. The compiled data were presented in two types of format; Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. This report provides the decay data in the Publ. 38 format along with decay scheme drawings. The data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection. (author)

  4. Micropolitics of Public Space: On the Contested Limits of Citizenship as a Locational Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Di Masso

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a social-psychological account of how public space dynamics may be consequential for the daily construction of citizenship. The article is organised around three interrelated ideas that are illustrated by a case study. First, it is argued that certain social-psychological processes that are typically involved in the construction of citizenship can be re-conceptualised as place-based processes that are located in public space. This interest in the ‘locational’ construction of citizenship implies focusing on membership, belonging, status, rights, entitlements and recognition as emplaced practices rather than as dislocated entities. The second idea relates to the troubled nature of citizenship as a place-related psychological category whose boundaries are hotly contested whenever disputes about controversial behaviour in public spaces surface. Accordingly, ‘the citizen’ is constantly re-shaped as everyday place-discourses and territorial practices in the public domain unfold in problematic ways. Finally, it is argued that such ‘locational’ constructions and enactments of citizenship in public space are usually framed by broader ideological dilemmas that are relevant to the maintenance and change of a given socio-political order. The ultimate purpose of the article is to demonstrate the potential for public space to become a possible site for grounding a social psychology of citizenship.

  5. SU-E-T-783: Using Matrixx to Determine Transit Dose Contribution Over Clinically Useful Limits of HDR Source Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhagwat, M; O’Farrell, D; Wagar, M; Buzurovic, I; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Devlin, P; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Most HDR brachytherapy treatment planning systems (TPS) use TG-43 formalism to calculate dose without including transit dose corrections. Historically, measurement of this contribution has required sophisticated apparatus unavailable in most hospitals. We use Matrixx to investigate several scenarios where transit dose contribution may effect a clinical treatment. Methods: Treatment plans were generated using Oncentra Brachy TPS (Version 4.3.0.410, Nucletron ) on a CT scan of a 24-catheter Freiburg applicator (Nucletron ) laid flat on the MatriXX (IBA) detector. This detector is an array of 1020 parallel plate ion chambers. All 24 catheters were digitized and dwells within a central square region of 5×5cm of the applicator were activated. Each of the active catheters had 6 dwells in increments of 1.0cm. The plans were normalized to 10mm. This places the 100% isodose line at the correct effective point of measurement, which lies half-way between the parallel plates of the ion chambers. It is also within the clinically relevant treatment depth for superficial applications. A total of 6 plans were delivered for 3 prescription doses, 1Gy, 2Gy and 4Gy using source activities of 2.9Ci and 11.2Ci. The MatriXX array was operated to capture dosimetric snaps every 500ms and yielded an integral dose at the end of treatment. Results: A comparison of integral dose from 2 different source activities shows that the transit dose contribution is larger when the source activity is higher. It is also observed that the relative transit dose contribution decreases as prescription dose increases. This is quantified by the Gamma analysis. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the Matrixx detector can be used to evaluate the contribution for a HDR source during transit from the HDR afterloader to a dwell location, and between adjacent dwell locations.

  6. Low skeletal muscle mass is a predictive factor for chemotherapy dose-limiting toxicity in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wendrich, Anne W; Swartz, Justin E; Bril, Sandra I; Wegner, Inge; de Graeff, Alexander|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/187695997; Smid, Ernst J; de Bree, Remco; Pothen, Ajit J

    OBJECTIVES: Low skeletal muscle mass (SMM) or sarcopenia is emerging as an adverse prognostic factor for chemotherapy dose-limiting toxicity (CLDT) and survival in cancer patients. Our aim was to determine the impact of low SMM on CDLT in patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell

  7. Implications of the new dose limit crystalline in operational radiation protection in interventional medicine; Implicaciones del nuevo limite de dosis en cristalino en la proteccion radiologica operacional en intervencionismo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roch Gonzalez, M.; Garcia Castanon, P.; Giner Sala, M.; Rodriguez Martin, G.; Espana Lopez, M. L.

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the implications of this new limit of equivalent dose in the lens can be assumed in the radiation protection of cardiologists, radiologists, nursing professionals, etc. that perform their work in units of intervention, both in terms of additional protective measures and the classification of them as workers exposed. (Author)

  8. Feasibility study of computed tomography colonography using limited bowel preparation at normal and low-dose levels study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florie, Jasper; Gelder, Rogier E. van; Schutter, Michiel P.; Randen, Adrienne van; Jager, Steven de; Prent, Anna; Bipat, Shandra [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, G1-230, P.O. Box 22660, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Venema, Henk W. [Academic Medical Center, Department of MedicaPhysics, L0-106, P.O. Box 22660, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Hulst, Victor P.M. van der [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department of Radiology, P.O. BOX 95500, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bossuyt, Patrick M.M. [Academic Medical Center, Department Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, J1b-212, P.O. BOX 22660, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Baak, Lubbertus C. [Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis, Department Gastroenterology, P.O. BOX 95500, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Stoker, Jaap [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, G1-211, P.O. BOX 22660, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-12-15

    The purpose was to evaluate low-dose CT colonography without cathartic cleansing in terms of image quality, polyp visualization and patient acceptance. Sixty-one patients scheduled for colonoscopy started a low-fiber diet, lactulose and amidotrizoic-acid for fecal tagging 2 days prior to the CT scan (standard dose, 5.8-8.2 mSv). The original raw data of 51 patients were modified and reconstructed at simulated 2.3 and 0.7 mSv levels. Two observers evaluated the standard dose scan regarding image quality and polyps. A third evaluated the presence of polyps at all three mSv levels in a blinded prospective way. All observers were blinded to the reference standard: colonoscopy. At three times patients were given questionnaires relating to their experiences and preference. Image quality was sufficient in all patients, but significantly lower in the cecum, sigmoid and rectum. The two observers correctly identified respectively 10/15 (67%) and 9/15 (60%) polyps {>=}10 mm, with 5 and 8 false-positive lesions (standard dose scan). Dose reduction down to 0.7 mSv was not associated with significant changes in diagnostic value (polyps {>=}10 mm). Eighty percent of patients preferred CT colonography and 13% preferred colonoscopy (P<0.001). CT colonography without cleansing is preferred to colonoscopy and shows sufficient image quality and moderate sensitivity, without impaired diagnostic value at dose-levels as low as 0.7 mSv. (orig.)

  9. 76 FR 9766 - Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-22

    ... ancillary solar Photovoltaic (PV) equipment, when this equipment is utilized in solar installations containing domestically manufactured PV cells or modules (panels). This extension of the amended public... as panels or modules. These two terms are synonymous and used interchangeably in this memorandum....

  10. 75 FR 52322 - Nationwide Limited Public Interest Waiver Under Section 1605 (Buy American) of the American...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... incidental and/or ancillary solar Photovoltaic (PV) equipment, when this equipment is utilized in solar installations containing domestically manufactured PV cells or modules (panels). Specifically, this public... assembled into larger groups known as panels or modules. These two terms are synonymous and...

  11. Public assistance, drug testing, and the law: the limits of population-based legal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Player, Candice T

    2014-01-01

    In Populations, Public Health and the Law, legal scholar Wendy Parmet urges courts to embrace population-based legal analysis, a public health inspired approach to legal reasoning. Parmet contends that population-based legal analysis offers a way to analyze legal issues--not unlike law and economics--as well as a set of values from which to critique contemporary legal discourse. Population-based analysis has been warmly embraced by the health law community as a bold new way of analyzing legal issues. Still, population-based analysis is not without its problems. At times, Parmet claims too much territory for the population perspective. Moreover, Parmet urges courts to recognize population health as an important norm in legal reasoning. What should we do when the insights of public health and conventional legal reasoning conflict? Still in its infancy, population-based analysis offers little in the way of answers to these questions. This Article applies population-based legal analysis to the constitutional problems that arise when states condition public assistance benefits on passing a drug test, thereby highlighting the strengths of the population perspective and exposing its weaknesses.

  12. Expansive or limitative strategy? A case study of organizational responses to new public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Annegrete; Knudsen, Morten; Finke, Katrine

    2008-01-01

    Since the emergence of new public health in the 1970s, health has not merely been considered the absence of disease, but physical, mental and social wellbeing. This article seeks to analyzes the implications of this broad concept of health at an organizational level. The broad concept of health...

  13. Unpredictability of intravenous busulfan pharmacokinetics in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for advanced beta thalassemia: limited toxicity with a dose-adjustment policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiesa, Robert; Cappelli, Barbara; Crocchiolo, Roberto; Frugnoli, Ilaria; Biral, Erika; Noè, Anna; Evangelio, Costanza; Fossati, Marco; Roccia, Tito; Biffi, Alessandra; Finizio, Valentina; Aiuti, Alessandro; Broglia, Monica; Bartoli, Antonella; Ciceri, Fabio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Marktel, Sarah

    2010-05-01

    beta-thalassemia is a major health problem worldwide, and stem cell transplantation (SCT) is the only curative option. Oral Busulfan (Bu) based conditioning is widely used in this setting. Due to the variability of Bu systemic exposure, intravenous (i.v.) Bu has been proposed as a standard of care, with no need for drug monitoring and dose adjustment. Patients with beta-thalassemia from countries with limited resources might be at higher risk of erratic Bu metabolism because of liver dysfunction, severe iron overload, and specific ethnic/genetic features. We studied Bu pharmacokinetics in 53 children with advanced beta-thalassemia from Middle Eastern countries who underwent a total of 57 matched related donor SCTs. Forty-two percent of the children required dose adjustment because they did not achieve the therapeutic window after the first dose. With a Bu dose-adjustment policy, regimen-related toxicity was limited. At a median follow-up of 564 days, the probabilities of 2-year survival, current thalassemia-free survival, rejection, and treatment-related mortality were 96%, 88%, 21%, and 4%, respectively. Conditioning with i.v. Bu and dose adjustment is feasible and well tolerated, although recurrence of thalassemia remains an unsolved problem in children with advanced disease. Copyright 2010 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Evaluation of scientific production in different subareas of Public Health: limits of the current model and contributions to the debate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriart, Jorge Alberto Bernstein; Deslandes, Suely Ferreira; Martin, Denise; Camargo Jr, Kenneth Rochel de; Carvalho, Marilia Sá; Coeli, Cláudia Medina

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to discuss the limits of the quantitative evaluation model for scientific production in Public Health. An analysis of the scientific production of professors from the various subareas of Public Health was performed for 2010-2012. Distributions of the mean annual score for professors were compared according to subareas. The study estimated the likelihood that 60% of the professors in the graduate studies programs scored P50 (Very Good) or higher in their area. Professors of Epidemiology showed a significantly higher median annual score. Graduate studies programs whose faculty included at least 60% of Epidemiology professors and fewer than 10% from the subarea Social and Human Sciences in Health were significantly more likely to achieve a "Very Good" classification. The observed inequalities in scientific production between different subareas of Public Health point to the need to rethink their evaluation in order to avoid reproducing iniquities that have harmful consequences for the field's diversity.

  15. Embedding economic relationships through social learning? The limits of patient and public involvement in healthcare governance in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent-Jones, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The strategy for NHS modernization in England is privileging individual choice over collective voice in the governance of healthcare. This paper explores the tension between economic and democratic strands in the current reform agenda, drawing on sociological conceptions of embeddedness and on theories of reflexive governance. Building on a Polanyian account of the disembedding effects of the increasing commercialization of health services, we consider the prospects for re-embedding economic relationships in this field. An analysis is provided of the limits of the present legal and regulatory framework of Patient and Public Involvement (PPI) in establishing the democratic and pragmatist conditions of social learning necessary for effective embedding. We show how the attainment of reflexive governance in the public interest is dependent on such conditions, and on the capacities of patients and the public to contribute to debate and deliberation in decision making, including on fundamental policy questions such as how services are provided and by whom.

  16. Immigration, Statecraft and Public Health: The 1920 Aliens Order, Medical Examinations and the Limitations of the State in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Becky

    2016-01-01

    This article considers the medical measures of the 1920 Aliens Order barring aliens from Britain. Building on existing local and port public health inspection, the requirement for aliens to be medically inspected before landing significantly expanded the duties of these state agencies and necessitated the creation of a new level of physical infrastructure and administrative machinery. This article closely examines the workings and limitations of alien medical inspection in two of England’s major ports—Liverpool and London—and sheds light on the everyday working of the Act. In doing so it reflects on the ambitions, actions and limitations of the state and so extends research by historians of the nineteenth and early twentieth century on the disputed histories of public health and the complexities of statecraft. Overall it suggests the importance of developing nuanced understandings of the gaps and failures arising from the translation of legislation into practice. PMID:27482146

  17. Inverted U-Shaped Dose-Response Curve of the Anxiolytic Effect of Cannabidiol during Public Speaking in Real Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio W. Zuardi

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the anxiolytic effect of cannabidiol (CBD in humans follows the same pattern of an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve observed in many animal studies. Sixty healthy subjects of both sexes aged between 18 and 35 years were randomly assigned to five groups that received placebo, clonazepam (1 mg, and CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg. The subjects were underwent a test of public speaking in a real situation (TPSRS where each subject had to speak in front of a group formed by the remaining participants. Each subject completed the anxiety and sedation factors of the Visual Analog Mood Scale and had their blood pressure and heart rate recorded. These measures were obtained in five experimental sessions with 12 volunteers each. Each session had four steps at the following times (minutes after administration of the drug/placebo, as time 0: -5 (baseline, 80 (pre-test, 153 (speech, and 216 (post-speech. Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that the TPSRS increased the subjective measures of anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. Student-Newman-Keuls test comparisons among the groups in each phase showed significant attenuation in anxiety scores relative to the placebo group in the group treated with clonazepam during the speech phase, and in the clonazepam and CBD 300 mg groups in the post-speech phase. Clonazepam was more sedative than CBD 300 and 900 mg and induced a smaller increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure than CBD 300 mg. The results confirmed that the acute administration of CBD induced anxiolytic effects with a dose-dependent inverted U-shaped curve in healthy subjects, since the subjective anxiety measures were reduced with CBD 300 mg, but not with CBD 100 and 900 mg, in the post-speech phase.

  18. Inverted U-Shaped Dose-Response Curve of the Anxiolytic Effect of Cannabidiol during Public Speaking in Real Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuardi, Antonio W; Rodrigues, Natália P; Silva, Angélica L; Bernardo, Sandra A; Hallak, Jaime E C; Guimarães, Francisco S; Crippa, José A S

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the anxiolytic effect of cannabidiol (CBD) in humans follows the same pattern of an inverted U-shaped dose-effect curve observed in many animal studies. Sixty healthy subjects of both sexes aged between 18 and 35 years were randomly assigned to five groups that received placebo, clonazepam (1 mg), and CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg). The subjects were underwent a test of public speaking in a real situation (TPSRS) where each subject had to speak in front of a group formed by the remaining participants. Each subject completed the anxiety and sedation factors of the Visual Analog Mood Scale and had their blood pressure and heart rate recorded. These measures were obtained in five experimental sessions with 12 volunteers each. Each session had four steps at the following times (minutes) after administration of the drug/placebo, as time 0: -5 (baseline), 80 (pre-test), 153 (speech), and 216 (post-speech). Repeated-measures analyses of variance showed that the TPSRS increased the subjective measures of anxiety, heart rate, and blood pressure. Student-Newman-Keuls test comparisons among the groups in each phase showed significant attenuation in anxiety scores relative to the placebo group in the group treated with clonazepam during the speech phase, and in the clonazepam and CBD 300 mg groups in the post-speech phase. Clonazepam was more sedative than CBD 300 and 900 mg and induced a smaller increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure than CBD 300 mg. The results confirmed that the acute administration of CBD induced anxiolytic effects with a dose-dependent inverted U-shaped curve in healthy subjects, since the subjective anxiety measures were reduced with CBD 300 mg, but not with CBD 100 and 900 mg, in the post-speech phase.

  19. Compilation of nuclear decay data used for dose calculation. Revised data for radionuclides listed in ICRP Publication 38

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-03-01

    New nuclear decay data used for dose calculation have been compiled for 817 radionuclides that are listed in ICRP Publication 38 (Publ. 38) and for 6 additional isomers. The decay data were prepared using decay data sets from the Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF), the latest version in August 1997. Basic nuclear properties in the decay data sets that are particularly important for calculating energies and intensities of emissions were examined and updated by referring to NUBASE, the database for nuclear and decay properties of nuclides. The reviewed and updated data were half-life, decay mode and its branching ratio, spin and parity of the ground and isomeric states, excitation energy of isomers, and Q value. In addition, possible revisions of partial and incomplete decay data sets were done for their format and syntax errors, level schemes, normalization records, and so on. After that, the decay data sets were processed by EDISTR in order to compute the energies and intensities of {alpha} particles, {beta} particles, {gamma} rays, internal conversion electrons, X rays, and Auger electrons emitted in nuclear transformation. For spontaneously fissioning nuclides, the average energies and intensities of neutrons, fission fragments, prompt {gamma} rays, delayed {gamma} rays, and {beta} particles were also calculated. The compiled data were prepared in two different types of format: Publ. 38 and NUCDECAY formats. Comparison of the compiled decay data with those in Publ. 38 was also presented. The decay data will be widely used for internal and external dose calculations in radiation protection and will be beneficial to a future revision of ICRP Publ. 38. (author)

  20. Leveraging limited research and development (R&D) resources in the public sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senglaub, M.

    1995-08-01

    Mission-directed public-sector research facilities are experiencing increasingly severe budget environments while seeing expanding missions and responsibilities. In an effort to identify research leveraging methodologies an information search was conducted in conjunction with some efforts to find the proper links to systems engineering fundamentals. The result is an initial model for use in a preconcept/phase-1 engineering design organization, with a goal of improving the organizations performance.

  1. [Undergraduate on Public Health: limits and possibilities as a professional education strategy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães; Paim, Jairnilson Silva

    2010-07-01

    This article aims to call into question Public Health as a field for professionalization by systematizing theoretical, social and ethical-political bases for undergraduate education. We also attempt to record the trajectory in formulating undergraduate courses in that field and, more recently, the emergence of these projects in Brazilian Universities. In Brazil, the current projects are a result of institutional experience gained in Public Health teaching in different undergraduate courses in the field of health. Additionally, there is also a teaching tradition in non-degree and master's and PhD graduate courses. International experiences from similar courses, as well as orientation from international agencies represent important information for such initiatives. Furthermore, policies targeting social inclusion and the expansion in the number of student places in higher education have been propelling the movement. There is also the realization that the Brazilian Public Health System demands new actors able to provide answers which are both different and complementary to those offered by traditional undergraduate courses. While several institutions are in the stage of offering this education to society, this article presents a set of elements which are derived from reflection in the epistemological, sociological and political-sanitary spheres.

  2. A limitation of the split-dose method for evaluating rCBF changes using {sup 99m}Tc-ECD and SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odano, Ikuo; Takahashi, Makoto; Noguchi, Eikichi; Ohtaki, Hiro; Shibaki, Mitsurou; Kasahara, Tosifumi; Hatano, Masayoshi [Niigata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Ohkubo, Masaki

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of the study is to validate the split-dose method corrected with dose ratio of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD for brain perfusion scan. A dose of 600 MBq of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD was divided into two with various dose ratios from 1 : 1 to 1 : 4, and injected to eleven patients with various cerebral diseases. A lesser dose of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD was injected under a control state for the first SPECT scan, and 15 min SPECT scan was performed 10 min after injection with a triple-head high resolution gamma camera. After the scan, the other dose of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD was injected under the same control state and the second SPECT scan was performed as same as above. A ratio of the activity of the first scan to the net activity of the second scan corrected by dose ratio, defined as K, was measured in brain regions of each subject. Expected value of K was 1, but the value was distributed with large variations in each subject. The mean % error of the K value was 10.4{+-}4.9%. Hence it is considered that activity changes by more than 20% from the control values should be required to detect a significant rCBF change in an activation SPECT study. Then, we proposed a new method in which the activity of both two SPECT scans was normalized by cerebellar or occipital activity and compared. The ratio obtained by the proposed method came closer to 1 with less variations and with less mean % error in comparison with those of K value obtained by the dose-correction method. Although the proposed method has a limitation in the use of an activation study loaded with Diamox, it may be useful to evaluate an alteration of rCBF in the study such as postural testing or finger-moving test. (author)

  3. Occupational and public health considerations for work-hour limitations policy regarding public health workers during response to natural and human-caused disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Murray R

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the occupational health considerations that might impact the health and wellbeing of public health workers during responses to natural (eg, floods and hurricanes) and human-caused (eg, terrorism, war, and shootings) disasters. There are a number of articles in the medical literature that argue the impact of how working long hours by house staff physicians, nurses, and first-responders may pose health and safety concerns regarding the patients being treated. The question examined here is how working long hours may pose health and/or safety concerns for the public health workers themselves, as well as to those in the communities they serve. The health problems related to sleep deprivation are reviewed. Current policies and legislations regarding work-hour limitations are examined. Policy implications are discussed.

  4. 77 FR 43144 - Limitation on Claims Against Proposed Public Transportation Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-23

    ... notice are: 1. Project name and location: Central Bus Operations and Maintenance Facility, Salt Lake City... environmental actions taken by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) for projects in the following locations... the environmental decisions by FTA on the subject projects and to activate the limitation on any...

  5. Private outlets for public limitations: the rise of commercial health insurance in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M A; Barnea, T

    1992-01-01

    In recent years, dissatisfaction with aspects of the Israeli health care system has grown. Labor conflict and unrest, long waits for elective surgery, increases in out-of-pocket payments for health care, and declining government investment have given rise to a new phenomenon: the increasing use of private services. This has led consumers to seek financing sources for their private care and created opportunities for commercial insurers and sick funds to offer new insurance packages to meet this demand. As a result, over the last five years more than twenty commercial health policies and four mandatory supplemental policies provided by the sick funds are currently on the market. The market for these policies is small but growing, with consequences for the cost and quality of care, access, the level and composition of national expenditures, and the allocation of resources to both the public and private health systems. As the balance between private and public financing changes, so too do the trade-offs between differing objectives. Greater private pluralism and competition at the financing level have many advantages but also make it more difficult for government to manage the tradeoffs that occur. Thus, a changed emphasis in government regulation and policy-making is required.

  6. Assessment of temporal trend of radiation dose to the public living in the large area contaminated with radioactive materials after a nuclear power plant accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Go, A Ra; Kim, Min Jun; Kim, Kwang Pyo [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nam Chan; Seol, Jeung Gun [Radiation Safety Team, Korea Electric Power Corporation Nuclear Fuel, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    It has been about 5 years since the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident, which contaminated large area with radioactive materials. It is necessary to assess radiation dose to establish evacuation areas and to set decontamination goal for the large contaminated area. In this study, we assessed temporal trend of radiation dose to the public living in the large area contaminated with radioactive materials after the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident. The dose assessment was performed based on Chernobyl model and RESRAD model for two evacuation lift areas, Kawauchi and Naraha. It was reported that deposition densities in the areas were 4.3-96 kBq m{sup -2} for {sup 134}Cs, 1.4-300 kBq m{sup -2} for {sup 137}Cs, respectively. Radiation dose to the residents depended on radioactive cesium concentrations in the soil, ranging 0.11-2.4 mSv y{sup -1} at Kawauchi area and 0.69-1.1 mSv y{sup -1} at Naraha area in July 2014. The difference was less than 5% in radiation doses estimated by two different models. Radiation dose decreased with calendar time and the decreasing slope varied depending on dose assessment models. Based on the Chernobyl dosimetry model, radiation doses decreased with calendar time to about 65% level of the radiation dose in 2014 after 1 year, 11% level after 10 years, and 5.6% level after 30 years. RESRAD dosimetry model more slowly decreased radiation dose with time to about 85% level after 1 year, 40% level after 10 years, and 15% level after 30 years. The decrease of radiation dose can be mainly attributed into radioactive decays and environmental transport of the radioactive cesium. Only environmental transports of radioactive cesium without consideration of radioactive decays decreased radiation dose additionally 43% after 1 year, 72% after 3 years, 80% after 10 years, and 83% after 30 years. Radiation doses estimated with cesium concentration in the soil based on Chernobyl dosimetry model were compared with directly measured radiation doses

  7. Sustainability at the Edge of Chaos: Its Limits and Possibilities in Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher G. Hudson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper critically reviews the expanding literature on applications of sustainability to healthcare policy and planning. It argues that the concept has been overgeneralized and has become a buzzword masking disparate agendas. It ignores the insights of the newest generation of systems theory on complex systems on the ubiquity of far-from-equilibrium conditions. Yet, a central meaning often ascribed to sustainability is the level continuation of healthcare programs and their institutionalization. Sustainability is only coherent in health care when it is more narrowly delimited to involve public health and treated as only one of several evaluative criteria that informs not only the continuation of programs but more often their expansion or contraction as needs dynamically change.

  8. Sustainability at the Edge of Chaos: Its Limits and Possibilities in Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Christopher G.; Vissing, Yvonne M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper critically reviews the expanding literature on applications of sustainability to healthcare policy and planning. It argues that the concept has been overgeneralized and has become a buzzword masking disparate agendas. It ignores the insights of the newest generation of systems theory on complex systems on the ubiquity of far-from-equilibrium conditions. Yet, a central meaning often ascribed to sustainability is the level continuation of healthcare programs and their institutionalization. Sustainability is only coherent in health care when it is more narrowly delimited to involve public health and treated as only one of several evaluative criteria that informs not only the continuation of programs but more often their expansion or contraction as needs dynamically change. PMID:24058914

  9. Sustainability at the edge of chaos: its limits and possibilities in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Christopher G; Vissing, Yvonne M

    2013-01-01

    This paper critically reviews the expanding literature on applications of sustainability to healthcare policy and planning. It argues that the concept has been overgeneralized and has become a buzzword masking disparate agendas. It ignores the insights of the newest generation of systems theory on complex systems on the ubiquity of far-from-equilibrium conditions. Yet, a central meaning often ascribed to sustainability is the level continuation of healthcare programs and their institutionalization. Sustainability is only coherent in health care when it is more narrowly delimited to involve public health and treated as only one of several evaluative criteria that informs not only the continuation of programs but more often their expansion or contraction as needs dynamically change.

  10. A Contralateral Esophagus-Sparing Technique to Limit Severe Esophagitis Associated With Concurrent High-Dose Radiation and Chemotherapy in Patients With Thoracic Malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Halabi, Hani; Paetzold, Peter; Sharp, Gregory C.; Olsen, Christine; Willers, Henning, E-mail: hwillers@mgh.harvard.edu

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: Severe (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group [RTOG] grade 3 or greater) esophagitis generally occurs in 15% to 25% of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients undergoing concurrent chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CCRT), which may result in treatment breaks that compromise local tumor control and pose a barrier to dose escalation. Here, we report a novel contralateral esophagus-sparing technique (CEST) that uses intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to reduce the incidence of severe esophagitis. Methods and Materials: We reviewed consecutive patients with thoracic malignancies undergoing curative CCRT in whom CEST was used. The esophageal wall contralateral (CE) to the tumor was contoured as an avoidance structure, and IMRT was used to guide a rapid dose falloff gradient beyond the target volume in close proximity to the esophagus. Esophagitis was recorded based on the RTOG acute toxicity grading system. Results: We identified 20 consecutive patients treated with CCRT of at least 63 Gy in whom there was gross tumor within 1 cm of the esophagus. The median radiation dose was 70.2 Gy (range, 63-72.15 Gy). In all patients, ≥99% of the planning and internal target volumes was covered by ≥90% and 100% of prescription dose, respectively. Strikingly, no patient experienced grade ≥3 esophagitis (95% confidence limits, 0%-16%) despite the high total doses delivered. The median maximum dose, V45, and V55 of the CE were 60.7 Gy, 2.1 cc, and 0.4 cc, respectively, indicating effective esophagus cross-section sparing by CEST. Conclusion: We report a simple yet effective method to avoid exposing the entire esophagus cross-section to high doses. By using proposed CE dose constraints of V45 <2.5 cc and V55 <0.5 cc, CEST may improve the esophagus toxicity profile in thoracic cancer patients receiving CCRT even at doses above the standard 60- to 63-Gy levels. Prospective testing of CEST is warranted.

  11. Limitations in dose-response and surrogate species methodologies for risk assessment of Cry toxins on arthropod natural enemies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paula, Débora P; Andow, David A; Bellinati, André; Timbó, Renata Velozo; Souza, Lucas M; Pires, Carmen S S; Sujii, Edison R

    2016-04-01

    Dose-response assays and surrogate species are standard methods for risk analysis for environmental chemicals. These assume that individuals within a species have unimodal responses and that a surrogate species can predict responses of other related taxa. We exposed immature individuals of closely related aphidophagous coccinellid predators, Cycloneda sanguinea and Harmonia axyridis, to Cry1Ac and Cry1F toxins through uniform and constant artificial tritrophic exposure through Myzus persicae aphids. Both toxins were detected in coccinellid pupae, with individual and interspecific variation. Uptake was significantly higher in H. axyridis than in C. sanguinea, both in the proportion of individuals and the concentrations per individual. We also observed bimodal uptake of the Cry toxins by H. axyridis, which indicated that some individuals had low bioaccumulation and some had high bioaccumulation. This suggests that standard dose-response assays need to be interpreted with caution and future assays should examine the modality of the responses. In addition, the similarity in the biological effects of the Cry toxins in the two predators was due to different biological exposure mechanisms. The majority of H. axyridis were exposed both internally and in the gut, while C. sanguinea was exposed primarily in the gut. Thus, despite their close phylogenetic relatedness, these species would not be good surrogates for each other and the surrogate species methodology should be tested more rigorously.

  12. Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Vectored Multi-Antigen Tuberculosis Vaccine Limits Bacterial Proliferation in Mice following a Single Intranasal Dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming; Dong, Chunsheng; Xiong, Sidong

    2017-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a serious health problem worldwide, and an urgent need exists to improve or replace the available vaccine, Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG). Most vaccination protocols adapt two or three doses to induce long-term lasting immunity. Our previous study showed that the naked DNA encoding the triple-antigen fusion TFP846 (Rv3615c-Mtb10.4-Rv2660c) induced robust T cellular immune responses accompanying four inoculations against mycobacteria infection. However, a number of compliance issues exist in some areas lacking the appropriate medical infrastructure with multiple administrations. In this study, a novel vesicular stomatitis virus expressing TFP846 (VSV-846) was developed and the immune responses elicited by VSV-846 were evaluated. We observed that intranasal delivery of VSV-846 induced a potent antigen-specific T cell response following a single dose and VSV-846 efficiently controlled bacterial growth to levels ~10-fold lower than that observed in the mock group 6 weeks post-infection in BCG-infected mice. Importantly, mice immunized with VSV-846 provided long-term protection against mycobacteria infection compared with those receiving p846 or BCG immunization. Increased memory T cells were also observed in the spleens of VSV-846-vaccinated mice, which could be a potential mechanism associated with long-term protective immune response. These findings supported the use of VSV as an antigen delivery vector with the potential for TB vaccine development. PMID:28224119

  13. Systematic study on the radiation exposure of flora and fauna in case of compliance with the dose limits of the StrlSchV (radiation protection regulation) for men. Final report; Systematische Untersuchung der Exposition von Flora und Fauna bei Einhaltung der Grenzwerte der StrlSchV fuer den Menschen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueppers, Christian; Ustohalova, Veronika [Oeko-Institut e.V. - Institut fuer Angewandte Oekologie, Darmstadt (Germany); Ulanovsky, Alexander [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt, Muenchen (Germany). Inst fuer Strahlenschutz

    2012-03-15

    Dose limits for members of the public exposed to the discharge of radioactive substances into the air or water bodies are defined in the German Radiation Protection Ordinance. This study tested whether non-human species are protected within the human dose limits for all 750 radionuclides as compared to a set of reference biota. External and, where possible, internal doses were calculated for the reference biota. In addition new exposure pathways such as submersion and inhalation (for rat and deer) were incorporated. The upper limit as ordered for adequate biota protection is 10 {mu}Gy/h. This study found that radionuclide discharges into the air never exceeded the reference dose rate limit. However, violations were detected for discharges of some very short-lived radionuclides into freshwater or seawater, if the maximum water contamination is assumed. Protection of non-human species is guaranteed for more realistic emission and immission situations. This means that damage to populations living in small water volumes cannot be excluded solely on the basis of regulations for the human dose limit. Therefore, it is necessary to judge the individual case in very unfavourable immission situations. (orig.)

  14. Radiation dose in coronary angiography and intervention: initial results from the establishment of a multi-centre diagnostic reference level in Queensland public hospitals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crowhurst, James A, E-mail: jimcrowhurst@hotmail.com [The Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Queensland (Australia); School of Medicine, University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Whitby, Mark [The Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Queensland (Australia); Biomedical Technology Services, Health Services Support Agency, Queensland Health, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Thiele, David [Biomedical Technology Services, Health Services Support Agency, Queensland Health, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Halligan, Toni [Allied Health Professions' Office of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Westerink, Adam [Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Herston, Queensland (Australia); Crown, Suzanne [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Milne, Jillian [Cardiac Clinical Informatics Unit - Queensland Health, Herston, Queensland (Australia); The Prince Charles Hospital, Chermside, Queensland (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    Radiation dose to patients undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is relatively high. Guidelines suggest that a local benchmark or diagnostic reference level (DRL) be established for these procedures. This study sought to create a DRL for ICA procedures in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for all Cardiac Catheter Laboratories in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for diagnostic coronary angiography (CA) and single-vessel percutaneous intervention (PCI) procedures. Dose area product (P{sub KA}), skin surface entrance dose (K{sub AR}), fluoroscopy time (FT), and patient height and weight were collected for 3 months. The DRL was set from the 75th percentile of the P{sub KA.} 2590 patients were included in the CA group where the median FT was 3.5 min (inter-quartile range = 2.3–6.1). Median K{sub AR} = 581 mGy (374–876). Median P{sub KA} = 3908 uGym{sup 2} (2489–5865) DRL = 5865 uGym{sup 2}. 947 patients were included in the PCI group where median FT was 11.2 min (7.7–17.4). Median K{sub AR} = 1501 mGy (928–2224). Median P{sub KA} = 8736 uGym{sup 2} (5449–12,900) DRL = 12,900 uGym{sup 2}. This study established a benchmark for radiation dose for diagnostic and interventional coronary angiography in Queensland public facilities.

  15. Dental cone-beam CT reconstruction from limited-angle view data based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for fast, low-dose X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je, Uikyu; Cho, Hyosung; Lee, Minsik; Oh, Jieun; Park, Yeonok; Hong, Daeki; Park, Cheulkyu; Cho, Heemoon; Choi, Sungil; Koo, Yangseo [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    Recently, reducing radiation doses has become an issue of critical importance in the broader radiological community. As a possible technical approach, especially, in dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), reconstruction from limited-angle view data (< 360 .deg. ) would enable fast scanning with reduced doses to the patient. In this study, we investigated and implemented an efficient reconstruction algorithm based on compressed-sensing (CS) theory for the scan geometry and performed systematic simulation works to investigate the image characteristics. We also performed experimental works by applying the algorithm to a commercially-available dental CBCT system to demonstrate its effectiveness for image reconstruction in incomplete data problems. We successfully reconstructed CBCT images with incomplete projections acquired at selected scan angles of 120, 150, 180, and 200 .deg. with a fixed angle step of 1.2 .deg. and evaluated the reconstruction quality quantitatively. Both simulation and experimental demonstrations of the CS-based reconstruction from limited-angle view data show that the algorithm can be applied directly to current dental CBCT systems for reducing the imaging doses and further improving the image quality.

  16. Analysis of incidental radiation dose to uninvolved mediastinal/supraclavicular lymph nodes in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer treated without elective nodal irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W; Fulp, William J; Dilling, Thomas J

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI(off)) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI(on)). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 "bins" (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI(on) plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI(off) plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the "1 echelon away" nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to anatomically distant lymph nodes

  17. Analysis of Incidental Radiation Dose to Uninvolved Mediastinal/Supraclavicular Lymph Nodes in Patients with Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated Without Elective Nodal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, Irfan; DeMarco, Marylou; Stevens, Craig W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Fulp, William J. [Biostatistics Core, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Classic teaching states that treatment of limited-stage small cell lung cancer (L-SCLC) requires large treatment fields covering the entire mediastinum. However, a trend in modern thoracic radiotherapy is toward more conformal fields, employing positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) scans to determine the gross tumor volume (GTV). This analysis evaluates the dosimetric results when using selective nodal irradiation (SNI) to treat a patient with L-SCLC, quantitatively comparing the results to standard Intergroup treatment fields. Sixteen consecutive patients with L-SCLC and central mediastinal disease who also underwent pretherapy PET/CT scans were studied in this analysis. For each patient, we created SNI treatment volumes, based on the PET/CT-based criteria for malignancy. We also created 2 ENI plans, the first without heterogeneity corrections, as per the Intergroup 0096 study (ENI{sub off}) and the second with heterogeneity corrections while maintaining constant the number of MUs delivered between these latter 2 plans (ENI{sub on}). Nodal stations were contoured using published guidelines, then placed into 4 'bins' (treated nodes, 1 echelon away, >1 echelon away within the mediastinum, contralateral hilar/supraclavicular). These were aggregated across the patients in the study. Dose to these nodal bins and to tumor/normal structures were compared among these plans using pairwise t-tests. The ENI{sub on} plans demonstrated a statistically significant degradation in dose coverage compared with the ENI{sub off} plans. ENI and SNI both created a dose gradient to the lymph nodes across the mediastinum. Overall, the gradient was larger for the SNI plans, although the maximum dose to the '1 echelon away' nodes was not statistically different. Coverage of the GTV and planning target volume (PTV) were improved with SNI, while simultaneously reducing esophageal and spinal cord dose though at the expense of modestly reduced dose to

  18. Linkage of traffic crash and hospitalization records with limited identifiers for enhanced public health surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conderino, Sarah; Fung, Lawrence; Sedlar, Slavenka; Norton, Jennifer M

    2017-04-01

    these variables. Performing a probabilistic linkage between MVT crash reports and hospitalization records is possible with a limited set of identifying variables. These linked data will inform traffic safety policies by providing new information on how crash circumstances translate to health outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Annual committed effective dose from olive oil (due to 238U, 232Th, and 222Rn) estimated for members of the Moroccan public from ingestion and skin application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misdaq, M A; Touti, R

    2012-03-01

    Olive oil is traditionally refined and widely consumed by Moroccan rural populations. Uranium (238U), thorium (232Th), radon (222Rn), and thoron (220Rn) contents were measured in various locally produced olive oil samples collected in rural areas of Morocco. These radionuclides were also measured inside various bottled virgin olive oils consumed by the Moroccan populations. CR-39 and LR-115 type II solid state nuclear track detectors (SSNTDs) were used. Annual committed effective doses due to 238U, 232Th, and 222Rn from the ingestion of olive oil by the members of the general public were determined. The maximum total committed effective dose due to 238U, 232Th, and 222Rn from the ingestion of olive oil by adult members of Moroccan rural populations was found equal to 5.9 µSv y-1. The influence of pollution due to building material dusts and phosphates on the radiation dose to workers from the ingestion of olive oil was investigated, and it was found that the maximum total committed effective dose due to 238U, 232Th, and 222Rn was on the order of 0.22 mSy y-1. Committed effective doses to skin due to 238U, 232Th, and 222Rn from the application of olive oil masks by rural women were evaluated. The maximum total committed effective dose to skin due to 238U, 232Th, and 222Rn was found equal to 0.07 mSy y-1 cm-2.

  20. Reconstructive dosimetry and radiation doses evaluation of members of the public due to radiological accident in industrial radiography; Dosimetria reconstrutiva e avaliacao de dose de individuos do publico devido a acidente radiologico em radiografia industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Camila Moreira Araujo de

    2016-07-01

    Radiological accidents have occurred mainly in the practices recognized as high risk radiological and classified by the IAEA as Categories 1 and 2, and highlighted the radiotherapy, industrial irradiators and industrial radiography. In Brazil, since there were five major cases in industrial radiography, which involved 7 radiation workers and 19 members of the public, causing localized radiation lesions on the hands and fingers. One of these accidents will be the focus of this work. In this accident, a {sup 192}Ir radioactive source was exposed for more than 8 hours in the workplace inside a company, exposing radiation workers, individuals of the public and people from the surrounding facilities, including children of a school. The radioactive source was also handled by a security worker causing severe radiation injuries in the hand and fingers. In this paper, the most relevant and used techniques of reconstructive dosimetry internationally are presented. To estimate the radiation doses received by exposed individuals in various scenarios of radiological accident in focus, the following computer codes were used: Visual Monte Carlo Dose Calculation (VMC), Virtual Environment for Radiological and Nuclear Accidents Simulation (AVSAR) and RADPRO Calculator. Through these codes some radiation doses were estimated, such as, 33.90 Gy in security worker's finger, 4.47 mSv in children in the school and 55 to 160 mSv for workers in the company during the whole day work. It is intended that this work will contribute to the improvement of dose reconstruction methodology for radiological accidents, having then more realist radiation doses. (author)

  1. Breeding programmes to improve male reproductive performance and efficiency of insemination dose production in paternal lines: feasibility and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Piles

    2013-06-01

    correlated to male fertility, could be considered as potential traits to select for in order to genetically improving this trait. However, only the semen pH has been checked for this purpose, and a negative result has been obtained. Other traits can be studied in the future but bearing in mind that the required experiments will need large number of bucks for an accurate estimation of the genetic correlation of the trait with male fertility. This means that these experiments will be expensive and difficult to set up. The most common criterion to select paternal lines, average daily gain, seems not to be genetically correlated to male fertility and seminal traits. Thus, selection for average daily gain has no detrimental consequences on these traits, and a multi-trait selection, including growth rate and seminal traits directly related to an efficient AI semen dose production, is feasible in paternal lines. The male contribution to fertility after natural mating and after AI with semen doses with high concentration is negligible, but it has been found that, under more restrictive conditions of AI, male contributions to fertility and litter size are low but higher in magnitude than the ones obtained after natural mating. The genetic correlation between the female and male contributions to fertility has been found to be moderate to high and positive.

  2. Estimation of the fetal dose by dose measurement during an irradiation of a parotid tumor; Estimation de la dose foetale par mesure de dose lors d'une irradiation d'une tumeur de la parotide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marchesi, V.; Graff-Cailleaud, P.; Peiffert, D. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Noel, A. [Institut National Polytechnique de Lorraine, CRAN CNRS UMR-7039, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2006-11-15

    The irradiation of a five months pregnant patient has been made for a right parotid attack. In conformation with the legislative texts relative to radiation protection ( publication 84 of the ICRP) an estimation of the dose received for the fetus has been led by dose measurement on phantom. With the dose limit ( 100 mGy) recommended in the publication 84 of the ICRP neither modification of the treatment nor abortion was necessary. (N.C.)

  3. Publication bias and the limited strength model of self-control: has the evidence for ego depletion been overestimated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Evan C; McCullough, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Few models of self-control have generated as much scientific interest as has the limited strength model. One of the entailments of this model, the depletion effect, is the expectation that acts of self-control will be less effective when they follow prior acts of self-control. Results from a previous meta-analysis concluded that the depletion effect is robust and medium in magnitude (d = 0.62). However, when we applied methods for estimating and correcting for small-study effects (such as publication bias) to the data from this previous meta-analysis effort, we found very strong signals of publication bias, along with an indication that the depletion effect is actually no different from zero. We conclude that until greater certainty about the size of the depletion effect can be established, circumspection about the existence of this phenomenon is warranted, and that rather than elaborating on the model, research efforts should focus on establishing whether the basic effect exists. We argue that the evidence for the depletion effect is a useful case study for illustrating the dangers of small-study effects as well as some of the possible tools for mitigating their influence in psychological science.

  4. Limits and risks of the cross-cultural research in Public Relations and Communication management. The increase in macro surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Humanes

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available As consequence of the growth of the public relations and the strategic communication there has been increased the interest to know the professional practice across the world. Diverse studies have been realized in the last decades from the perspective of international public relations and specifically from the contextual level. Nevertheless, only in the last years there are developing quantitative macrosurveys that take the comparison as an aim between countries and regions. In this article we discuss the limitations and methodological risks that face the above mentioned researches at present.Como consecuencia del crecimiento de las Relaciones Públicas y la Comunicación estratégica se ha acrecentado el interés por conocer la práctica profesional a través del mundo. Diversos estudios se han realizado en las últimas décadas desde la perspectiva de Relaciones Públicas internacionales y específicamente desde la perspectiva contextual. Sin embargo, sólo en los últimos años se están desarrollando macroencuestas cuantitativas que tienen por objetivo la comparación entre países y regiones. En este artículo discutimos las limitaciones y riesgos metodológicos que enfrentan dichas investigaciones en la actualidad.

  5. A semi-physiologically based pharmacokinetic pharmacodynamic model for glycyrrhizin-induced pseudoaldosteronism and prediction of the dose limit causing hypokalemia in a virtual elderly population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruijuan Xu

    Full Text Available Glycyrrhizin (GL is a widely used food additive which can cause severe pseudoaldosteronism at high doses or after a long period of consumption. The aim of the present study was to develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK pharmacodynamic (PD model for GL-induced pseudoaldosteronism to improve the safe use of GL. Since the major metabolite of GL, glycyrrhetic acid (GA, is largely responsible for pseudoaldosteronism via inhibition of the kidney enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroiddehydrogenase 2 (11β-HSD 2, a semi-PBPK model was first developed in rat to predict the systemic pharmacokinetics of and the kidney exposure to GA. A human PBPK model was then developed using parameters either from the rat model or from in vitro studies in combination with essential scaling factors. Kidney exposure to GA was further linked to an Imax model in the 11β-HSD 2 module of the PD model to predict the urinary excretion of cortisol and cortisone. Subsequently, activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor in the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-electrolyte system was associated with an increased cortisol level. Experimental data for various scenarios were used to optimize and validate the model which was finally able to predict the plasma levels of angiotensin II, aldosterone, potassium and sodium. The Monte Carlo method was applied to predict the probability distribution of the individual dose limits of GL causing pseudoaldosteronism in the elderly according to the distribution of sensitivity factors using serum potassium as an indicator. The critical value of the dose limit was found to be 101 mg with a probability of 3.07%.

  6. Radiation dose in coronary angiography and intervention: initial results from the establishment of a multi-centre diagnostic reference level in Queensland public hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowhurst, James A; Whitby, Mark; Thiele, David; Halligan, Toni; Westerink, Adam; Crown, Suzanne; Milne, Jillian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Radiation dose to patients undergoing invasive coronary angiography (ICA) is relatively high. Guidelines suggest that a local benchmark or diagnostic reference level (DRL) be established for these procedures. This study sought to create a DRL for ICA procedures in Queensland public hospitals. Methods Data were collected for all Cardiac Catheter Laboratories in Queensland public hospitals. Data were collected for diagnostic coronary angiography (CA) and single-vessel percutaneous intervention (PCI) procedures. Dose area product (PKA), skin surface entrance dose (KAR), fluoroscopy time (FT), and patient height and weight were collected for 3 months. The DRL was set from the 75th percentile of the PKA. Results 2590 patients were included in the CA group where the median FT was 3.5 min (inter-quartile range = 2.3–6.1). Median KAR = 581 mGy (374–876). Median PKA = 3908 uGym2 (2489–5865) DRL = 5865 uGym2. 947 patients were included in the PCI group where median FT was 11.2 min (7.7–17.4). Median KAR = 1501 mGy (928–2224). Median PKA = 8736 uGym2 (5449–12,900) DRL = 12,900 uGym2. Conclusion This study established a benchmark for radiation dose for diagnostic and interventional coronary angiography in Queensland public facilities. PMID:26229649

  7. Late Toxicity After Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: An Exploration of Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters to Limit Genitourinary and Gastrointestinal Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pederson, Aaron W.; Fricano, Janine; Correa, David; Pelizzari, Charles A. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Liauw, Stanley L., E-mail: sliauw@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, Pritzker School of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for prostate cancer patients treated with intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and propose dose-volume histogram (DVH) guidelines to limit late treatment-related toxicity. Methods and Materials: In this study 296 consecutive men were treated with IMRT for adenocarcinoma of the prostate. Most patients received treatment to the prostate with or without proximal seminal vesicles (90%), to a median dose of 76 Gy. Concurrent androgen deprivation therapy was given to 150 men (51%) for a median of 4 months. Late toxicity was defined by Common Toxicity Criteria version 3.0 as greater than 3 months after radiation therapy completion. Four groupings of DVH parameters were defined, based on the percentage of rectal or bladder tissue receiving 70 Gy (V{sub 70}), 65 Gy (V{sub 65}), and 40 Gy (V{sub 40}). These DVH groupings, as well as clinical and treatment characteristics, were correlated to maximal Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity. Results: With a median follow-up of 41 months, the 4-year freedom from maximal Grade 2+ late toxicity was 81% and 91% for GU and GI systems, respectively, and by last follow-up, the rates of Grade 2+ GU and GI toxicity were 9% and 5%, respectively. On multivariate analysis, whole-pelvic IMRT was associated with Grade 2+ GU toxicity and age was associated with Grade 2+ GI toxicity. Freedom from Grade 2+ GI toxicity at 4 years was 100% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}10%, V{sub 65} {<=}20%, and V{sub 40} {<=}40%; 92% for men with rectal V{sub 70} {<=}20%, V{sub 65} {<=}40%, and V{sub 40} {<=}80%; and 85% for men exceeding these criteria (p = 0.13). These criteria were more highly associated with GI toxicity in men aged {>=}70 years (p = 0.07). No bladder dose-volume relationships were associated with the risk of GU toxicity. Conclusions: IMRT is associated with low rates of severe GU or GI toxicity after treatment for prostate cancer. Rectal dose constraints

  8. High Dose MicroCT Does Not Contribute Toward Improved MicroPET/CT Image Quantitative Accuracy and Can Limit Longitudinal Scanning of Small Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy A. McDougald

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining accurate quantitative measurements in preclinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT imaging is of paramount importance in biomedical research and helps supporting efficient translation of preclinical results to the clinic. The purpose of this study was two-fold: (1 to investigate the effects of different CT acquisition protocols on PET/CT image quality and data quantification; and (2 to evaluate the absorbed dose associated with varying CT parameters.Methods: An air/water quality control CT phantom, tissue equivalent material phantom, an in-house 3D printed phantom and an image quality PET/CT phantom were imaged using a Mediso nanoPET/CT scanner. Collected data was analyzed using PMOD software, VivoQuant software and National Electric Manufactures Association (NEMA software implemented by Mediso. Measured Hounsfield Unit (HU in collected CT images were compared to the known HU values and image noise was quantified. PET recovery coefficients (RC, uniformity and quantitative bias were also measured.Results: Only less than 2 and 1% of CT acquisition protocols yielded water HU values < −80 and air HU values < −840, respectively. Four out of 11 CT protocols resulted in more than 100 mGy absorbed dose. Different CT protocols did not impact PET uniformity and RC, and resulted in <4% overall bias relative to expected radioactive concentration.Conclusion: Preclinical CT protocols with increased exposure times can result in high absorbed doses to the small animals. These should be avoided, as they do not contributed toward improved microPET/CT image quantitative accuracy and could limit longitudinal scanning of small animals.

  9. Optimal Labeling Dose, Labeling Time, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Detection Limits of Ultrasmall Superparamagnetic Iron-Oxide Nanoparticle Labeled Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Bruun Mathiasen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Regenerative therapy is an emerging treatment modality. To determine migration and retention of implanted cells, it is crucial to develop noninvasive tracking methods. The aim was to determine ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide (USPIO labeled mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs. Materials and Methods. 248 gel-phantoms were constructed and scanned on a 1.5T MRI-scanner. Phantoms contained human MSCs preincubated with USPIO nanoparticles for 2, 6, or 21 hours using 5 or 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs. In addition, porcine hearts were scanned after injection of USPIO labeled MSCs. Results. Using 21 h incubation time and 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs, labeled cells were clearly separated from unlabeled cells on MRI using 250.000 (P<0.001, 500.000 (P=0.007, and 1.000.000 MSCs (P=0.008. At lower incubation times and doses, neither labeled nor unlabeled cells could be separated. In porcine hearts labeled, but not unlabeled, MSCs were identified on MRI. Conclusions. As few as 250.000 MSCs can be detected on MRI using 21 h incubation time and 10 μg USPIO/105 MSCs. At lower incubation times and doses, several million cells are needed for MRI detection. USPIO labeled cells can be visualized by MRI in porcine myocardial tissue.

  10. Beyond the dose-limiting toxicity period: Dermatologic adverse events of patients on phase 1 trials of the Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drilon, Alexander; Eaton, Anne A; Schindler, Katja; Gounder, Mrinal M; Spriggs, David R; Harris, Pamela; Ivy, S Percy; Iasonos, Alexia; Lacouture, Mario E; Hyman, David M

    2016-04-15

    Dermatologic adverse events (AEs) can be key determinants of overall drug tolerability and of the maximum tolerated and recommended phase 2 doses in phase 1 trials. The authors present the largest dedicated analysis of dermatologic AEs on phase 1 trials to date. Data from a prospectively maintained database of patients with solid tumors who were enrolled onto Cancer Therapeutics Evaluation Program (CTEP)-sponsored phase 1 trials of cytotoxic or molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) from 2000 to 2010 were analyzed. Cumulative incidence, site, and type of drug-related dermatologic AEs were described and compared. The timing of worst drug-related dermatologic AEs was summarized. In total, 3517 patients with solid tumors and 6165 unique, drug-related dermatologic AEs were analyzed, including 1545 patients on MTA-only trials, 671 on cytotoxic-only trials, and 1392 on combination MTA and cytotoxic trials. Of 1270 patients who had drug-related dermatologic events, the timing of the worst AE was as follows: 743 (cycle 1), 303 (cycle 2), and 224 (cycle 3 or later). Although the cumulative incidence of grade ≥3 drug-related AEs increased to 2.4% by cycle 6, it was only 1.6% at the end of cycle 1. The cumulative incidence of drug-related AEs was highest in patients who received MTA-only therapy (P dermatologic AEs occur after the traditional dose-limiting toxicity monitoring period of phase 1 clinical trials. Future designs should account for late toxicities. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  11. Measurement of the radon concentration in an underground public facility and dose assessment. Fukuoka Tenjin Shopping Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narazaki, Yukinori [Fukuoka Inst. of Health and Environmental Sciences, Dazaifu (Japan); Tokonami, Shinji; Sanada, Tetsuya; Kanno, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Yuji

    2000-12-01

    Radon concentrations were measured with a passive radon detector from April 1998 through June 1999 in the Fukuoka Tenjin Underground Shopping Center to assess the dose affecting workers because of radon progeny inhalation. The radon concentration during the period was distributed from a range of 1.9 to 13.6 Bq/m{sup 3}. The arithmetic average concentration was estimated to be 6.9{+-}2.4 Bq/{sup 3}. The radon level was lower than that in dwellings in Japan and other countries. No spatial distribution of radon concentration was found in that area. From continuous measurement, the radon concentration was found to be high from midnight to noon and low in the afternoon. Little difference was noted between the daily average radon concentration and that during working hours. There was no seasonal variation. The equilibrium factor of 0.21{+-}0.10 was obtained during working hours. The activity-weighted size distribution of radon progeny was evaluated by using the number distribution of ambient aerosols and the classical attachment theory. Consequently, the activity median diameter was 150 nm. The unattached fraction of radon progeny was estimated to be 0.025 with an empirical equation. The annual effective dose of workers at the Tenjin center was calculated with the dose conversion factor from the UNSCEAR 1993 report and estimated to be 0.024 mSv/y. (author)

  12. NESHAP Area-Specific Dose-Release Factors for Potential Onsite Member-of-the-Public Locations at SRS using CAP88-PC Version 4.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trimor, P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-09

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires the use of the computer model CAP88-PC to estimate the total effective doses (TED) for demonstrating compliance with 40 CFR 61, Subpart H (EPA 2006), the National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) regulations. As such, CAP88 Version 4.0 was used to calculate the receptor dose due to routine atmospheric releases at the Savannah River Site (SRS). For estimation, NESHAP dose-release factors (DRFs) have been supplied to Environmental Compliance and Area Closure Projects (EC&ACP) for many years. DRFs represent the dose to a maximum receptor exposed to 1 Ci of a specified radionuclide being released into the atmosphere. They are periodically updated to include changes in the CAP88 version, input parameter values, site meteorology, and location of the maximally exposed individual (MEI). In this report, the DRFs were calculated for potential radionuclide atmospheric releases from 13 SRS release points. The three potential onsite MEI locations to be evaluated are B-Area, Three Rivers Landfill (TRL), and Savannah River Ecology Lab Conference Center (SRELCC) with TRL’s onsite workers considered as members-of-the-public, and the potential future constructions of dormitories at SRELCC and Barracks at B-Area. Each MEI location was evaluated at a specified compass sector with different area to receptor distances and was conducted for both ground-level and elevated release points. The analysis makes use of area-specific meteorological data (Viner 2014). The resulting DRFs are compared to the 2014 NESHAP offsite MEI DRFs for three operational areas; A-Area, H-Area, and COS for a release rate of 1 Ci of tritium oxide at 0 ft. elevation. CAP88 was executed again using the 2016 NESHAP MEI release rates for 0 and 61 m stack heights to determine the radionuclide dose at TRL from the center-of-site (COS).

  13. The impact of assumptions regarding vaccine-induced immunity on the public health and cost-effectiveness of hepatitis A vaccination: Is one dose sufficient?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Desmond; de Ridder, Marc; Van Effelterre, Thierry

    2016-11-01

    Hepatitis A vaccination stimulates memory cells to produce an anamnestic response. In this study, we used a mathematical model to examine how long-term immune memory might convey additional protection against clinical/icteric infections. Dynamic and decision models were used to estimate the expected number of cases, and the costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), respectively. Several scenarios were explored by assuming: (1) varying duration of vaccine-induced immune memory, (2) and/or varying levels of vaccine-induced immune memory protection (IMP), (3) and/or varying levels of infectiousness in vaccinated individuals with IMP. The base case analysis assumed a time horizon of 25 y (2012 - 2036), with additional analyses over 50 and 75 y. The analyses were conducted in the Mexican public health system perspective. In the base case that assumed no vaccine-induced IMP, the 2-dose hepatitis A vaccination strategy was cost-effective compared with the 1-dose strategy over the 3 time horizons. However, it was not cost-effective if we assumed additional IMP durations of at least 10 y in the 25-y horizon. In the 50- and 75-y horizons, the 2-dose strategy was always cost-effective, except when 100% reduction in the probability of icteric Infections, 75% reduction in infectiousness, and mean durations of IMP of at least 50 y were assumed. This analysis indicates that routine vaccination of toddlers against hepatitis A virus would be cost-effective in Mexico using a single-dose vaccination strategy. However, the cost-effectiveness of a second dose depends on the assumptions of additional protection by IMP and the time horizon over which the analysis is performed.

  14. Threshold limit values of the cadmium concentration in rice in the development of itai-itai disease using benchmark dose analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogawa, Kazuhiro; Sakurai, Masaru; Ishizaki, Masao; Kido, Teruhiko; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Suwazono, Yasushi

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the benchmark dose (BMD) as the threshold limit level of the cadmium (Cd) concentration in rice for itai-itai disease and/or suspected disease; it was based on the data that previously evaluated the association for such diseases with the Cd concentration in rice by using a logistic regression model. From 1971 to 1976, a total of 2446 rice samples were analyzed across the 88 hamlets in the Jinzu river basin. The mean Cd concentration in rice in each hamlet was used as the index of external Cd exposure of the entire population of the hamlet. We employed the incidence of itai-itai disease and/or suspected disease obtained from the available 55 hamlets. As the threshold, the lower limit of the BMD (BMDL) of the Cd concentration in rice for itai-itai disease and/or suspected disease was estimated using a logistic model, setting the benchmark response at 1% or 2%. The estimated BMDLs of the Cd concentration in rice for itai-itai disease and/or suspected disease were 0.62-0.76 and 0.27-0.56 mg kg(-1) in men and women, respectively. The lowest BMDL was 0.27 mg kg(-1) in women. In the present study, the threshold limit level of the Cd concentration in rice for itai-itai disease, which is the most severe form of chronic Cd poisoning, was estimated for the first time. This result provides important information about the worldwide standard for the Cd concentration in rice. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Folic acid fortification and public health: Report on threshold doses above which unmetabolised folic acid appear in serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McPartlin Joseph

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All flour in the USA is fortified with folic acid at a level of 140 μg/100 g which is estimated to supply an extra 100 μg daily to the average diet. Some researchers have advocated that this be increased to double and even four times this amount. Based on previous research these higher levels are likely to lead to the appearance of unmetabolised vitamin in the circulation, which may have safety implications for sub-groups of the population. The UK and the Republic of Ireland will likely introduce mandatory fortification also in the next year or so. The aim of this study was to capture the short-term effect of folic acid fortification on unmetabolised folic acid in serum after chronic consumption of folic acid. Methods After pre-saturation with 400 μg folic acid supplements daily for 14-weeks, healthy folate replete adults (n = 20 consumed folic acid fortified bread, at three different levels (400 μg, 200 μg, 100 μg over a period of one week each. The dose was administered in two-equal sized slices consumed at 09.00 hrs and 13.00 hrs. Serum samples for total folate and folic acid were collected at baseline, after 14-weeks of supplementation, and pre and post (at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours each dose tested. Results Unmetabolised folic acid was detected after the 14-week supplementation period. Folic acid was not detected in either the 200 μg or 100 μg (current US regime doses tested but was present at the highest level (400 μg tested. Conclusion Our findings suggest that persons exposed to the current US fortification programme supplying an average of 100 μg per day or less are unlikely to have unmetabolised folic acid in serum. It also seems that daily consumption of the higher level of 200 μg or less is unlikely to be problematic. Increasing the level however to 400 μg on the other hand is likely to lead to unmetabolised folic acid appearance.

  16. Folic acid fortification and public health: report on threshold doses above which unmetabolised folic acid appear in serum.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sweeney, Mary Rose

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: All flour in the USA is fortified with folic acid at a level of 140 microg\\/100 g which is estimated to supply an extra 100 microg daily to the average diet. Some researchers have advocated that this be increased to double and even four times this amount. Based on previous research these higher levels are likely to lead to the appearance of unmetabolised vitamin in the circulation, which may have safety implications for sub-groups of the population. The UK and the Republic of Ireland will likely introduce mandatory fortification also in the next year or so. The aim of this study was to capture the short-term effect of folic acid fortification on unmetabolised folic acid in serum after chronic consumption of folic acid. METHODS: After pre-saturation with 400 microg folic acid supplements daily for 14-weeks, healthy folate replete adults (n = 20) consumed folic acid fortified bread, at three different levels (400 microg, 200 microg, 100 microg) over a period of one week each. The dose was administered in two-equal sized slices consumed at 09.00 hrs and 13.00 hrs. Serum samples for total folate and folic acid were collected at baseline, after 14-weeks of supplementation, and pre and post (at 1, 2, 3 and 4 hours) each dose tested. RESULTS: Unmetabolised folic acid was detected after the 14-week supplementation period. Folic acid was not detected in either the 200 microg or 100 microg (current US regime) doses tested but was present at the highest level (400 microg) tested. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that persons exposed to the current US fortification programme supplying an average of 100 microg per day or less are unlikely to have unmetabolised folic acid in serum. It also seems that daily consumption of the higher level of 200 microg or less is unlikely to be problematic. Increasing the level however to 400 microg on the other hand is likely to lead to unmetabolised folic acid appearance.

  17. Beyond the margin recipe: the probability of correct target dosage and tumor control in the presence of a dose limiting structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Marnix G.; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Siebers, Jeffrey; Deasy, Joseph O.; van Herk, Marcel

    2017-10-01

    In the past, hypothetical spherical target volumes and ideally conformal dose distributions were analyzed to establish the safety of planning target volume (PTV) margins. In this work we extended these models to estimate how alternative methods of shaping dose distributions could lead to clinical improvements. Based on a spherical clinical target volume (CTV) and Gaussian distributions of systematic and random geometrical uncertainties, idealized 3D dose distributions were optimized to exhibit specific stochastic properties. A nearby spherical organ at risk (OAR) was introduced to explore the benefit of non-spherical dose distributions. Optimizing for the same minimum dose safety criterion as implied by the generally accepted use of a PTV, the extent of the high dose region in one direction could be reduced by half provided that dose in other directions is sufficiently compensated. Further reduction of this unilateral dosimetric margin decreased the target dose confidence, however the actual minimum CTV dose at 90% confidence typically exceeded the minimum PTV dose by 20% of prescription. Incorporation of smooth dose-effect relations within the optimization led to more concentrated dose distributions compared to the use of a PTV, with an improved balance between the probability of tumor cell kill and the risk of geometrical miss, and lower dose to surrounding tissues. Tumor control rate improvements in excess of 20% were found to be common for equal integral dose, while at the same time evading a nearby OAR. These results were robust against uncertainties in dose-effect relations and target heterogeneity, and did not depend on ‘shoulders’ or ‘horns’ in the dose distributions.

  18. Publications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Fabienne Blaise« L'expérience délirante de la raison divine : les Bacchantes d'Euripide », Methodos 3 (Figures de l'irrationel, 2003, p. 35-60.Jean Bollack– L'écrit. Une poétique dans l'oeuvre de Celan, Paris (PUF, « Perspectives germaniques », 2003, 231 p.– Empédocle. Les purifications. Un projet de paix universelle, édité, traduit et commenté par J. Bollack, Paris (Seuil, « Points. Essais », 2003, 144p.– « Une autre Antigone et un autre Œdipe », dans C. Botella, Penser les limites. Écrit...

  19. Entrance surface dose and image quality: comparison of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in general practitioner clinics, public and private hospitals in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambali, Ahmad Shariff; Ng, Kwan-Hoong; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Wang, Hwee-Beng; Jamal, Noriah; Spelic, David C; Suleiman, Orhan H

    2009-01-01

    This study was undertaken to compare the entrance surface dose (ESD) and image quality of adult chest and abdominal X-ray examinations conducted at general practitioner (GP) clinics, and public and private hospitals in Malaysia. The surveyed facilities were randomly selected within a given category (28 GP clinics, 20 public hospitals and 15 private hospitals). Only departmental X-ray units were involved in the survey. Chest examinations were done at all facilities, while only hospitals performed abdominal examinations. This study used the x-ray attenuation phantoms and protocols developed for the Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends (NEXT) survey program in the United States. The ESD was calculated from measurements of exposure and clinical geometry. An image quality test tool was used to evaluate the low-contrast detectability and high-contrast detail performance under typical clinical conditions. The median ESD value for the adult chest X-ray examination was the highest (0.25 mGy) at GP clinics, followed by private hospitals (0.22 mGy) and public hospitals (0.17 mGy). The median ESD for the adult abdominal X-ray examination at public hospitals (3.35 mGy) was higher than that for private hospitals (2.81 mGy). Results of image quality assessment for the chest X-ray examination show that all facility types have a similar median spatial resolution and low-contrast detectability. For the abdominal X-ray examination, public hospitals have a similar median spatial resolution but larger low-contrast detectability compared with private hospitals. The results of this survey clearly show that there is room for further improvement in performing chest and abdominal X-ray examinations in Malaysia.

  20. Study of dose levels absorbed by members of the public in the nuclear medicine departments; Estudo dos niveis de dose em individuos do publico nos servicos de medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral, Geovanna Oliveira de Mello

    2001-03-01

    In nuclear Medicine, radioisotopes are bound to various compounds (called radiopharmaceuticals) for use in various diagnostic and therapeutic applications. These unsealed sources are administered in various forms to patients, who remain radioactive for hours or days, and represent a source of potential radiation exposure for others. Thus, in nuclear medicine departments, radiation protection of workers and members of the public, especially persons accompanying patients, must consider, this exposure. In Brazil, the Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) establishes that, in nuclear medicine departments, the patients and persons accompanying should be separated each other. However, this rule is not always followed due to many factors such as physical and emotional conditions of patients. In this context, the aim of this study was the investigation of dose levels, which the persons accompanying patients are exposed to. For monitoring, thermoluminescent dosimeters were employed. The dosimeters were given to 380 persons who were accompanying patients in nuclear medicine departments. Exposure results were lower than 1 mSv. On the basis of CNEN rules, issues regarding stay conditions for members of the public in these departments are discussed. (author)

  1. Performance of ultralow-dose CT with iterative reconstruction in lung cancer screening: limiting radiation exposure to the equivalent of conventional chest X-ray imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, Adrian [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); University Hospital Pitie-Salpetriere, Department of Polyvalent and Oncological Radiology, Paris (France); Landau, Julia; Buetikofer, Yanik; Leidolt, Lars; Brela, Barbara; May, Michelle; Heverhagen, Johannes; Christe, Andreas [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Ebner, Lukas [University Hospital Inselspital Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Paediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Duke University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Durham, NC (United States)

    2016-10-15

    To investigate the detection rate of pulmonary nodules in ultralow-dose CT acquisitions. In this lung phantom study, 232 nodules (115 solid, 117 ground-glass) of different sizes were randomly distributed in a lung phantom in 60 different arrangements. Every arrangement was acquired once with standard radiation dose (100 kVp, 100 references mAs) and once with ultralow radiation dose (80 kVp, 6 mAs). Iterative reconstruction was used with optimized kernels: I30 for ultralow-dose, I70 for standard dose and I50 for CAD. Six radiologists examined the axial 1-mm stack for solid and ground-glass nodules. During a second and third step, three radiologists used maximum intensity projection (MIPs), finally checking with computer-assisted detection (CAD), while the others first used CAD, finally checking with the MIPs. The detection rate was 95.5 % with standard dose (DLP 126 mGy*cm) and 93.3 % with ultralow-dose (DLP: 9 mGy*cm). The additional use of either MIP reconstructions or CAD software could compensate for this difference. A combination of both MIP reconstructions and CAD software resulted in a maximum detection rate of 97.5 % with ultralow-dose. Lung cancer screening with ultralow-dose CT using the same radiation dose as a conventional chest X-ray is feasible. (orig.)

  2. Low-dose ionizing radiation limitations to seed germination: Results from a model linking physiological characteristics and developmental-dynamics simulation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Hu, Dawei; Dong, Chen; Fu, Yuming; Liu, Guanghui; Qin, Youcai; Sun, Yi; Liu, Dianlei; Li, Lei; Liu, Hong

    2017-08-01

    There is much uncertainty about the risks of seed germination after repeated or protracted environmental low-dose ionizing radiation exposure. The purpose of this study is to explore the influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on wheat seed germination using a model linking physiological characteristics and developmental-dynamics simulation. A low-dose ionizing radiation environment simulator was built to investigate wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) seeds germination process and then a kinetic model expressing the relationship between wheat seed germination dynamics and low-dose ionizing radiation intensity variations was developed by experimental data, plant physiology, relevant hypotheses and system dynamics, and sufficiently validated and accredited by computer simulation. Germination percentages were showing no differences in response to different dose rates. However, root and shoot lengths were reduced significantly. Plasma governing equations were set up and the finite element analysis demonstrated H2O, CO2, O2 as well as the seed physiological responses to the low-dose ionizing radiation. The kinetic model was highly valid, and simultaneously the related influence mechanism of low-dose ionizing radiation on wheat seed germination proposed in the modeling process was also adequately verified. Collectively these data demonstrate that low-dose ionizing radiation has an important effect on absorbing water, consuming O2 and releasing CO2, which means the risk for embryo and endosperm development was higher. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Limited partnership: the lack of sustainable development in relation to participation in Hungarian public-private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeczi, David

    2005-01-01

    Public-private partnerships represent a new form of network governance, potentially offering flexibility, economic efficiencies and non-governmental participation in policy development. Such partnerships can be viewed in terms of sustainable development, achieving two of its three tenets - economic

  4. 78 FR 67118 - Notice of Limited, Program-Wide, Public Interest Waivers of Section 1605(a) (Buy American...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... existing safety and security systems. Both program-wide, public interest waivers of the Buy American... construction project into the recipient's existing safety and security systems (Safety and Security Systems... incidental items, the country of manufacture and the availability of domestic alternatives are not...

  5. Limited partnership: The lack of sustainable development in relation to participation in Hungarian public-private partnerships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeczi, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    Public-private partnerships represent a new form of network governance, potentially offering flexibility, economic efficiencies and non-governmental participation in policy development. Such partnerships can be viewed in terms of sustainable development, achieving two of its three tenets - economic

  6. Just telling and selling: current limitations in the use of digital media in public health: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clar, C; Dyakova, M; Curtis, K; Dawson, C; Donnelly, P; Knifton, L; Clarke, A

    2014-12-01

    To undertake a scoping review and to map research in the area of digital media use in public health. Scoping review. PubMed, PsycINFO, Google and major textbooks of public health communication and health psychology were searched for primary studies or systematic reviews examining the use of digital media in a health context. Searches focussed on studies published between the start of 2000 and the end of June 2013. Abstracts of reviews of public health interventions were examined with respect to target groups, health topic, intervention characteristics, media used, study design, issues of quality and ethics, and outcomes. To map this area of work fully, this information was supplemented by adding information from primary studies. Areas were identified where systematic review evidence was scarce or non-existent by comparing the final map with information from the reviews analysed. 221 systematic reviews related to digital media use in a public health context were included. Most reviews included studies with an experimental design and general 'at risk' target populations. Specific settings were not specified in the majority of reviews. A large variety of health topics were covered. About a quarter of reviews did not specify a health topic but were concerned with broader issues of health promotion, disease prevention, or health education. Over half of the reviews focussed on eHealth and telemedicine, and another third were concerned with mass media - social marketing. Reviews most frequently reported behaviour-related outcomes or conducted some form of content analysis or analysis of the use of particular media. Research gaps were identified relating to community-based research, participation and empowerment, active media use (especially with respect to visual media und use of specific visual methodologies), and the use of salutogenic or assets-based approaches. The available research relating to digital media use in public health is dominated by studies relating to e

  7. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ettinger, David S. [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Langer, Corey J. [Thoracic Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sause, William T. [Radiation Center, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  8. Effect of high-dose phytase and citric acid, alone or in combination, on growth performance of broilers given diets severely limited in available phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, H R; Jabbari, Z; Adibnia, S; Shahir, M H; Hosseini, S A

    2015-01-01

    1. Two trials were conducted to evaluate the effect of high-dose phytase alone or in combination with citric acid (CA) in the diet severely limited in available phosphorus (P) on performance, plasma P and plasma Ca of broilers from 22 to 42 d of age. 2. In Trial 1, 297 21-d-old female chicks were placed into 27 pens and allocated to 9 maize-soybean meal-based dietary treatments, which were a positive control [PC, 4.23 g/kg non-phytate P (NPP)] and 8 negative control (NC, 1.35 g/kg NPP) groups consisting of two concentrations of CA (0 and 20 g/kg) and 4 concentrations of phytase (0, 1000, 2000 and 4000 U/kg) in a 2 × 4 factorial arrangement. In Trial 2, 192 21-d-old male chicks were placed into 24 pens and allocated to 6 wheat-canola meal-based dietary treatments, which were a PC (4.2 g/kg NPP), a NC (1.68 g/kg NPP) and 4 NC groups consisting of two concentrations of CA (0 and 20 g/kg) and two concentrations of phytase (2000 and 4000 U/kg) in a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement. 3. In both trials, birds fed on the PC had significantly higher average daily gain (ADG), average daily feed intake (ADFI), plasma P and lower feed conversion ratio (FCR) and plasma Ca than those of birds fed on the NC. CA supplementation significantly increased ADG and ADFI. There was a significant interaction between CA and phytase on plasma P where CA improved the effect of phytase on plasma P. In Trial 1, phytase addition improved ADG, ADFI, FCR and plasma Ca linearly. 4. Briefly, this research showed the interaction effect between CA and phytase on plasma P when broilers were fed on diets based on maize-soybean meal or wheat-canola meal. The results showed that CA supplementation lowered the concentration of phytase that is needed in low NPP diets to increase plasma P.

  9. Analysis of operational, institutional and international limitations for alternative fuel vehicles and technologies: Means/methods for implementing changes. [Public fleet groups--information needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-07-01

    This project focused upon the development of an approach to assist public fleet managers in evaluating the characteristics and availability of alternative fuels (AF's) and alternative fuel vehicles (AFV's) that will serve as possible replacements for vehicles currently serving the needs of various public entities. Also of concern were the institutional/international limitations for alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles. The City of Detroit and other public agencies in the Detroit area were the particular focus for the activities. As the development and initial stages of use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles proceeds, there will be an increasing need to provide information and guidance to decision-makers regarding differences in requirements and features of these fuels and vehicles. There wig be true differences in requirements for servicing, managing, and regulating. There will also be misunderstanding and misperception. There have been volumes of data collected on AFV'S, and as technology is improved, new data is constantly added. There are not, however, condensed and effective sources of information for public vehicle fleet managers on vehicle and equipment sources, characteristics, performance, costs, and environmental benefits. While theoretical modeling of public fleet requirements has been done, there do not seem to be readily available practical''. There is a need to provide the best possible information and means to minimize the problems for introducing the effective use of alternative fuels and alternative fuel vehicles.

  10. 26 CFR 1.167(l)-1 - Limitations on reasonable allowance in case of property of certain public utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., for example, the straight line method or a unit of production method or machine-hour method. The term... limitations on the use of certain methods of computing a reasonable allowance for depreciation under section... general, the use of a method of depreciation other than a subsection (l) method is not prohibited...

  11. 17 CFR 250.41 - Exemption of public utility subsidiaries with respect to limited acquisition of utility assets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... utility assets already owned and operated by the acquiring company, excluding connections over lines not operated by the acquiring company. (b) Gas utility assets. Any gas utility assets to be acquired are... operated by the acquiring company are located. (c) Limit in amount. The total consideration paid...

  12. The ethics of limiting informed debate: censorship of select medical publications in the interest of organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Michael; Verheijde, Joseph L; Rady, Mohamed Y; Evans, David W

    2013-12-01

    Recently, several articles in the scholarly literature on medical ethics proclaim the need for "responsible scholarship" in the debate over the proper criteria for death, in which "responsible scholarship" is defined in terms of support for current neurological criteria for death. In a recent article, James M. DuBois is concerned that academic critiques of current death criteria create unnecessary doubt about the moral acceptability of organ donation, which may affect the public's willingness to donate. Thus he calls for a closing of the debate on current death criteria and for journal editors to publish only critiques that "substantially engage and advance the debate." We argue that such positions as DuBois' are a threat to responsible scholarship in medical ethics, especially scholarship that opposes popular stances, because it erodes academic freedom and the necessity of debate on an issue that is literally a matter of life and death, no matter what side a person defends.

  13. Corporate and public governances in transition: the limits of property rights and the significance of legal institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Nivet

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-socialist transition raises crucial issues about the institutional setting of a market economy. The priority has been given to property rights, and privatization has been advocated as a means to depoliticize economic activities. The dismissal of external interventions, allied with the attraction to the American model and Hayekian ideas, often led to the introduction of minimal laws and wait for their evolutionary development. The failure of corporate and public governance, notably in Russia, helps to show why, on the contrary, democratically established legal rules are essential. Legislation should not only protect corporate shareholders and stakeholders, but more fundamentally all citizens against predatory collusive behavior of political, economic and criminal elites

  14. Estimation of Polonium-210 activity in marine and terrestrial samples and computation of ingestion dose to the public in and around Kanyakumari coast, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Macklin Rani

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The brown mussel Perna perna, an effective bioindicator species for monitoring radioactive pollution, was used to evaluate the concentration of 210Po in and around the coastal areas of Kanyakumari, a Monazite rich region. 210Po concentration in P. perna collected from ten different locations in this region exhibited values ranging between 78.09 ± 5.5 and 320.00 ± 18.1 Bq/kg (wet. Kalluvilai recorded the maximum concentration of 210Po (320.00 ± 18.1 Bq/kg, and hence further studies involving the activity of 210Po in other marine organisms and terrestrial samples were carried out from this site. The annual intake of 210Po by the population residing in this location via dietary sources was estimated. Similarly, the total annual committed effective dose to the public was found to be 2.24 mSv/year. The results obtained were compared to the values reported by earlier studies in India and also in other countries.

  15. Government’s Obligations and Limitations of Administrative Penalty Information Publicity%行政处罚中政府信息公开义务与限制

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐信贵; 康勇

    2015-01-01

    Administrative penalty information publicity is government’s inevitable duty,but this kind of duty should also be limited to a certain degree.The reasons of limitation are not based on the power of government but the rights and inter-ests of the punished people.The publicity scope of administrative penalty information should be involved in social issues of the public domain and common concern to the public.Government should distinguish between different public figures so as to handle public administrative penalty information about social public figures .The government should refrain from illegal information,which has not been clearly confirmed and involves the public interest.Generally,the administrative penalty information which is based on application should not include the punished personal basic information.Govern-ment should not violate state secrets,commercial secrets and personal privacy.In addition,the government’s publicity obligations should be restricted by legal norms (Related law clearly stipulates the publicity scope)and procedures (Process control to the information publicity)and they are effective tools which protect the legitimate rights and interests of the punished people.%行政处罚信息公开是政府不可逃避的义务,但是这种义务也应当存在某种程度的限制。限制的缘由不是基于政府的权力而是被处罚人的权益。行政处罚信息的公开范围应当是涉及公共领域以及社会公众普遍关注的事项。政府对社会公众人物行政处罚信息的公开应当区分不同的公众人物而作区别对待。政府对还未明确证实的涉及公共利益的违法信息的公开应当保持克制。依申请公开的行政处罚信息一般情况下不应包括被处罚人的个人基本信息。行政处罚信息的公开不应当侵犯国家秘密、商业秘密以及个人隐私。此外,对政府的公开义务进行法律规范限制(相关法律对公开范围作明确规定)

  16. Simplification of antiretroviral therapy: a necessary step in the public health response to HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitoria, Marco; Ford, Nathan; Doherty, Meg; Flexner, Charles

    2014-01-01

    The global scale-up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) over the past decade represents one of the great public health and human rights achievements of recent times. Moving from an individualized treatment approach to a simplified and standardized public health approach has been critical to ART scale-up, simplifying both prescribing practices and supply chain management. In terms of the latter, the risk of stock-outs can be reduced and simplified prescribing practices support task shifting of care to nursing and other non-physician clinicians; this strategy is critical to increase access to ART care in settings where physicians are limited in number. In order to support such simplification, successive World Health Organization guidelines for ART in resource-limited settings have aimed to reduce the number of recommended options for first-line ART in such settings. Future drug and regimen choices for resource-limited settings will likely be guided by the same principles that have led to the recommendation of a single preferred regimen and will favour drugs that have the following characteristics: minimal risk of failure, efficacy and tolerability, robustness and forgiveness, no overlapping resistance in treatment sequencing, convenience, affordability, and compatibility with anti-TB and anti-hepatitis treatments.

  17. The use and value of polling to determine public opinion on GMOs in Europe: limitations and ways forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desaint, Nilsy; Varbanova, Mariana

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review and assess existing surveys that attempt to gauge public opinion about GM crops. This review shows that consumer surveys can be something of a blunt instrument. Questionnaires, however well-constructed and professionally delivered, are answered in a vacuum of knowledge and elicit misleading responses. People recurrently admit they lack information on the technology behind GM food. It is a part of the general unfamiliarity with the food production process with which people show equal, if not greater, concern. Lacking control over a process involving such an emotive subject like food makes people uneasy and reluctant to accept "unknowns". In addition, if people give answers to hypothetical questions, they do so as "cautious citizens" rather than consumers and this is not a good guide to actual behavior in real life. Qualitative studies using focus groups can be a much better guide to how people really feel about issues, but they also need expert facilitation and analysis to be of real value. An even better guide to acceptance and purchasing behavior (if that is the objective) is to put people in a situation where they are actually making a choice of whether or not to buy GM products.

  18. EMP Attachment 3 DOE-SC PNNL Site Dose Assessment Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Sandra F.

    2011-12-21

    This Dose Assessment Guidance (DAG) describes methods to use to determine the Maximally-Exposed Individual (MEI) location and to estimate dose impact to that individual under the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP). This guidance applies to public dose from radioactive material releases to the air from PNNL Site operations. This document is an attachment to the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) and describes dose assessment guidance for radiological air emissions. The impact of radiological air emissions from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) PNNL Site is indicated by dose estimates to a maximally exposed member of the public, referred to as the maximally exposed individual (MEI). Reporting requirements associated with dose to members of the public from radiological air emissions are in 40 CFR Part 61.94, WAC 246-247-080, and DOE Order 458.1. The DOE Order and state standards for dose from radioactive air emissions are consistent with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) dose standards in 40 CFR 61.92 (i.e., 10 mrem/yr to a MEI). Despite the fact that the current Contract Requirements Document (CRD) for the DOE-SC PNNL Site operations does not include the requirement to meet DOE CRD 458.1, paragraph 2.b, public dose limits, the DOE dose limits would be met when EPA limits are met.

  19. The Effects and Limits on Network Public Opinion%网络民意表达的效应及其限度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕华; 周瑜

    2014-01-01

    网络已经成为人们关注公共事件、表达民意诉求的重要渠道。但是,网络是一把双刃剑,承载了人们厚重期望的网络民意表达既给社会带来了积极效应,也造成了消极的影响,这是我们必须面对和解决的现实而紧迫的课题。由于网络民意表达的效应终究要通过现实社会来呈现或落实,这就必须从网络角色的真实主体和参与者入手,反思其在网络空间的民意表达边界与限度。%The network has become an important channel for people to focus on public events and express public opinion and demands .However ,the network is a double-edged sword .The network public opinion expression which carries people's heavy expectations has brought positive and negative effects to social ,so it is a practical and urgent task we must face and solve . As the effect of network public opinion will eventually be rendered and implemented in the social reality ,we must analyses the real subjects and participants ,reflect on the boundaries and limits of the public opinion in the cyberspace .

  20. Allo-reactivity of mesenchymal stem cells in rhesus macaques is dose and haplotype dependent and limits durable cell engraftment in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna A Isakova

    Full Text Available The emerging paradigm that MSCs are immune privileged has fostered the use of "off-the-shelf" allogeneic MSC-based therapies in human clinical trials. However, this approach ignores studies in experimental animals wherein transplantation of MSCs across MHC boundaries elicits measurable allo-immune responses. To determine if MSCs are hypo-immunogeneic, we characterized the immune response in rhesus macaques following intracranial administration of allogeneic vs. autologous MSCs. This analysis revealed unambiguous evidence of productive allo-recognition based on expansion of NK, B and T cell subsets in peripheral blood and detection of allo-specific antibodies in animals administered allogeneic but not autologous MSCs. Moreover, the degree of MHC class I and II mismatch between the MSC donor and recipient significantly influenced the magnitude and nature of the allo-immune response. Consistent with these findings, real-time PCR analysis of brain tissue from female recipients administered varying doses of male, allogeneic MSCs revealed a significant inverse correlation between MSC engraftment levels and cell dose. Changes in post-transplant neutrophil and lymphocyte counts also correlated with dose and were predictive of overall MSC engraftment levels. However, secondary antigen challenge failed to elicit a measurable immune response in allogeneic recipients. Finally, extensive behavior testing of animals revealed no main effect of cell dose on motor skills, social development, or temperament. Collectively, these data indicate that allogeneic MSCs are weakly immunogenic when transplanted across MHC boundaries in rhesus macaques and this negatively impacts durable engraftment levels. Therefore the use of unrelated donor MSCs should be carefully evaluated in human patients.

  1. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: add an anti-ulcer drug for patients at high risk only. Always limit the dose and duration of treatment with NSAIDs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    In addition to their cardiac, renal, hepatic, cutaneous and neuropsychological adverse effects, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) can have severe effects on the entire gastrointestinal tract, including bleeding, perforation and occlusion. Which anti-ulcer drugs reduce the risk of the severe gastrointestinal adverse effects of NSAIDs, and which patients should receive them? To answer these questions, we conducted a review of the literature, using the standard Prescrire methodology. The main risk factors for severe gastrointestinal adverse effects during NSAID therapy are: a high dose regimen; age over 65 years; a history of gastric or duodenal ulcer or gastrointestinal bleeding; heavy use of both alcohol and tobacco; and concomitant treatment with a corticosteroid, antiplatelet drug, anticoagulant, or selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant. Gastrointestinal symptoms and ulceration (on endoscopy) are poor predictors of severe gastrointestinal reactions. A meta-analysis examined randomised placebo-controlled trials of misoprostol in more than 11 000 patients. The results were mainly based on a large trial including about 9000 rheumatoid arthritis patients with an average age of 68 years. Misoprostol (400 microg to 800 microg/day, in 4 doses) prevented about 4 severe gastroduodenal events when 1000 patients over 60 years of age were treated for 6 months. Diarrhoea and other mild gastrointestinal disorders were frequent. There are no randomised trials comparing proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine H2 receptor antagonists versus misoprostol or versus placebo therapy for the prevention of severe adverse effects associated with NSAIDs. PPIs and H2 antagonists both reduce the incidence of gastric or duodenal ulceration detected by routine endoscopy. A randomised trial compared an H2 antagonist (famotidine) versus a PPI (pantoprazole) in 128 patients with an average age of 69 years who had a very high risk of serious gastrointestinal

  2. [The evaluation of pharmacological drugs, medical devices, and non-pharmacological or public health interventions: Experimental design limitations. Moving towards new methods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeval, M; Carayol, M; Lamy, S; Lepage, B; Lang, T

    2016-12-01

    In the field of health, evidence-based medicine and associated methods like randomised controlled trials (RCTs) have become widely used. RCT has become the gold standard for evaluating causal links between interventions and health results. Originating in pharmacology, this method has been progressively expanded to medical devices, non-pharmacological individual interventions, as well as collective public health interventions. Its use in these domains has led to the formulation of several limits, and it has been called into question as an undisputed gold standard. Some of those limits (e.g. confounding biases and external validity) are common to these four different domains, while others are more specific. This paper describes the different limits, as well as several research avenues. Some are methodological reflections aiming at adapting RCT to the complexity of the tested interventions, and at overcoming some of its limits. Others are alternative methods. The objective is not to remove RCT from the range of evaluation methodologies, but to resituate it within this range. The aim is to encourage choosing between different methods according to the features and the level of the intervention to evaluate, thereby calling for methodological pluralism.

  3. A Probabilistic Approach to Assess External Doses to the Public Considering Spatial Variability of Radioactive Contamination and Interpopulation Differences in Behavior Pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahara, Shogo; Iijima, Masashi; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko

    2017-09-08

    Dose assessment is an important issue from the viewpoints of protecting people from radiation exposure and managing postaccident situations adequately. However, the radiation doses received by people cannot be determined with complete accuracy because of the uncertainties and the variability associated with any process of defining individual characteristics and in the dose assessment process itself. In this study, a dose assessment model was developed based on measurements and surveys of individual doses and relevant contributors (i.e., ambient dose rates and behavior patterns) in Fukushima City for four population groups: Fukushima City Office staff, Senior Citizens' Club, Contractors' Association, and Agricultural Cooperative. In addition, probabilistic assessments were performed for these population groups by considering the spatial variability of contamination and interpopulation differences resulting from behavior patterns. As a result of comparison with the actual measurements, the assessment results for participants from the Fukushima City Office agreed with the measured values, thereby validating the model and the approach. Although the assessment results obtained for the Senior Citizens' Club and the Agricultural Cooperative differ partly from the measured values, by addressing further considerations in terms of dose reduction effects due to decontamination and the impact of additional exposure sources in agricultural fields, these results can be improved. By contrast, the measurements obtained for the participants from the Contractors' Association were not reproduced well in the present study. To assess the doses to this group, further investigations of association members' work activities and the related dose reduction effects are needed. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  4. Ethnic disparities among food sources of energy and nutrients of public health concern and nutrients to limit in adults in the United States: NHANES 2003–2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol E. O'Neil

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Identification of current food sources of energy and nutrients among US non-Hispanic whites (NHW, non-Hispanic blacks (NHB, and Mexican American (MA adults is needed to help with public health efforts in implementing culturally sensitive and feasible dietary recommendations. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the food sources of energy and nutrients to limit [saturated fatty acids (SFA, added sugars, and sodium] and nutrients of public health concern (dietary fiber, vitamin D, calcium, and potassium by NHW, NHB, and MA adults. Design: This was a cross-sectional analysis of a nationally representative sample of NWH (n=4,811, NHB (2,062, and MA (n=1,950 adults 19+ years. The 2003–2006 NHANES 24-h recall (Day 1 dietary intake data were analyzed. An updated USDA Dietary Source Nutrient Database was developed using current food composition databases. Food grouping included ingredients from disaggregated mixtures. Mean energy and nutrient intakes from food sources were sample-weighted. Percentages of total dietary intake contributed from food sources were ranked. Results: Multiple differences in intake among ethnic groups were seen for energy and all nutrients examined. For example, energy intake was higher in MA as compared to NHB; SFA, added sugars, and sodium intakes were higher in NHW than NHB; dietary fiber was highest in MA and lowest in NHB; vitamin D was highest in NHW; calcium was lowest in NHB; and potassium was higher in NHW as compared to NHB. Food sources of these nutrients also varied. Conclusion: Identification of intake of nutrients to limit and of public health concern can help health professionals implement appropriate dietary recommendations and plan interventions that are ethnically appropriate.

  5. Cost-Effectiveness of High, Moderate and Low-Dose Statins in the Prevention of Vascular Events in the Brazilian Public Health System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Antonini Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Statins have proven efficacy in the reduction of cardiovascular events, but the financial impact of its widespread use can be substantial. Objective: To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of three statin dosing schemes in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS perspective. Methods: We developed a Markov model to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs of low, intermediate and high intensity dose regimens in secondary and four primary scenarios (5%, 10%, 15% and 20% ten-year risk of prevention of cardiovascular events. Regimens with expected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction below 30% (e.g. simvastatin 10mg were considered as low dose; between 30-40%, (atorvastatin 10mg, simvastatin 40mg, intermediate dose; and above 40% (atorvastatin 20-80mg, rosuvastatin 20mg, high-dose statins. Effectiveness data were obtained from a systematic review with 136,000 patients. National data were used to estimate utilities and costs (expressed as International Dollars - Int$. A willingness-to-pay (WTP threshold equal to the Brazilian gross domestic product per capita (circa Int$11,770 was applied. Results: Low dose was dominated by extension in the primary prevention scenarios. In the five scenarios, the ICER of intermediate dose was below Int$10,000 per QALY. The ICER of the high versus intermediate dose comparison was above Int$27,000 per QALY in all scenarios. In the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, intermediate dose had a probability above 50% of being cost-effective with ICERs between Int$ 9,000-20,000 per QALY in all scenarios. Conclusions: Considering a reasonable WTP threshold, intermediate dose statin therapy is economically attractive, and should be a priority intervention in prevention of cardiovascular events in Brazil.

  6. Cost-Effectiveness of High, Moderate and Low-Dose Statins in the Prevention of Vascular Events in the Brazilian Public Health System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, Rodrigo Antonini, E-mail: rodrigo.ribeiro@htanalyze.com [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Epidemiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Duncan, Bruce Bartholow [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Epidemiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Cardiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Ziegelmann, Patricia Klarmann [Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Departamento de Estatística da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Stella, Steffan Frosi [Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Cardiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Vieira, Jose Luiz da Costa [Instituto de Cardiologia / Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Restelatto, Luciane Maria Fabian [Serviço de Medicina Interna do Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Polanczyk, Carisi Anne [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Epidemiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Instituto de Avaliação de Tecnologia em Saúde, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Cardiologia da Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Statins have proven efficacy in the reduction of cardiovascular events, but the financial impact of its widespread use can be substantial. To conduct a cost-effectiveness analysis of three statin dosing schemes in the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) perspective. We developed a Markov model to evaluate the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) of low, intermediate and high intensity dose regimens in secondary and four primary scenarios (5%, 10%, 15% and 20% ten-year risk) of prevention of cardiovascular events. Regimens with expected low-density lipoprotein cholesterol reduction below 30% (e.g. simvastatin 10mg) were considered as low dose; between 30-40%, (atorvastatin 10mg, simvastatin 40mg), intermediate dose; and above 40% (atorvastatin 20-80mg, rosuvastatin 20mg), high-dose statins. Effectiveness data were obtained from a systematic review with 136,000 patients. National data were used to estimate utilities and costs (expressed as International Dollars - Int$). A willingness-to-pay (WTP) threshold equal to the Brazilian gross domestic product per capita (circa Int$11,770) was applied. Low dose was dominated by extension in the primary prevention scenarios. In the five scenarios, the ICER of intermediate dose was below Int$10,000 per QALY. The ICER of the high versus intermediate dose comparison was above Int$27,000 per QALY in all scenarios. In the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves, intermediate dose had a probability above 50% of being cost-effective with ICERs between Int$ 9,000-20,000 per QALY in all scenarios. Considering a reasonable WTP threshold, intermediate dose statin therapy is economically attractive, and should be a priority intervention in prevention of cardiovascular events in Brazil.

  7. Optimal labeling dose, labeling time, and magnetic resonance imaging detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticle labeled mesenchymal stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiasen, Anders Bruun; Hansen, Louise; Friis, Tina;

    2013-01-01

    Background. Regenerative therapy is an emerging treatment modality. To determine migration and retention of implanted cells, it is crucial to develop noninvasive tracking methods. The aim was to determine ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detection limits of ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron...

  8. Dose-dependent Toxicity of Humanized Renilla reniformis GFP (hrGFP Limits Its Utility as a Reporter Gene in Mouse Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay M Wallace

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy has historically focused on delivering protein-coding genes to target cells or tissues using a variety of vectors. In recent years, the field has expanded to include gene-silencing strategies involving delivery of noncoding inhibitory RNAs, such as short hairpin RNAs or microRNAs (miRNAs. Often called RNA interference (RNAi triggers, these small inhibitory RNAs are difficult or impossible to visualize in living cells or tissues. To circumvent this detection problem and ensure efficient delivery in preclinical studies, vectors can be engineered to coexpress a fluorescent reporter gene to serve as a marker of transduction. In this study, we set out to optimize adeno-associated viral (AAV vectors capable of delivering engineered miRNAs and green fluorescent protein (GFP reporter genes to skeletal muscle. Although the more broadly utilized enhanced GFP (eGFP gene derived from the jellyfish, Aequorea victoria was a conventional choice, we were concerned about some previous studies suggesting this protein was myotoxic. We thus opted to test vectors carrying the humanized Renilla reniformis-derived GFP (hrGFP gene, which has not seen as extensive usage as eGFP but was purported to be a safer and less cytotoxic alternative. Employing AAV6 vector dosages typically used in preclinical gene transfer studies (3×1010 –1 × 1011 particles, we found that hrGFP caused dose-dependent myopathy when delivered to wild-type (wt mouse muscle, whereas identical titers of AAV6 carrying eGFP were relatively benign. Dose de-escalation at or below 8 × 109 AAV particles effectively reduced or eliminated hrGFP-associated myotoxicity, but also had dampening effects on green fluorescence and miRNA-mediated gene silencing in whole muscles. We conclude that hrGFP is impractical for use as a transduction marker in preclinical, AAV-based RNA interference therapy studies where adult mouse muscle is the target organ. Moreover, our data support that eGFP is superior

  9. Postgraduate and research programmes in Medicine and Public Health in Rwanda: an exciting experience about training of human resources for health in a limited resources country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakoma, Jean Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    The area of Human Resources for Health (HRH) is the most critical challenge for the achievement of health related development goals in countries with limited resources. This is even exacerbated in a post conflict environment like Rwanda. The aim of this commentary is to report and share the genesis and outcomes of an exciting experience about training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health as well as setting - up of a research culture for the last nine years (2006 - 2014) in Rwanda. Many initiatives have been taken and concerned among others training of qualified health workers in medicine and public health. From 2006 to 2014, achievements were as follows: launching and organization of 8 Master of Medicine programmes (anesthesiology, family and community medicine, internal medicine, obstetrics & gynecology, otorhinolaryngology, pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery) and 4 Master programmes in public health (MPH, MSc Epidemiology, MSc Field Epidemiology & Laboratory Management, and Master in Hospital and Healthcare Administration); training to completion of more than 120 specialists in medicine, and 200 MPH, MSc Epidemiology, and MSc Field Epidemiology holders; revival of the Rwanda Medical Journal; organization of graduate research training (MPhil and PhD); 3 Master programmes in the pipeline (Global Health, Health Financing, and Supply Chain Management); partnerships with research institutions of great renown, which contributed to the reinforcement of the institutional research capacity and visibility towards excellence in leadership, accountability, and self sustainability. Even though there is still more to be achieved, the Rwanda experience about postgraduate and research programmes is inspiring through close interactions between main stakeholders. This is a must and could allow Rwanda to become one of the rare examples to other more well-to-do Sub - Saharan countries, should Rwanda carry on doing that.

  10. Current limitations of SNP data from the public domain for studies of complex disorders: a test for ten candidate genes for obesity and osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Peng

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public SNP databases are frequently used to choose SNPs for candidate genes in the association and linkage studies of complex disorders. However, their utility for such studies of diseases with ethnic-dependent background has never been evaluated. Results To estimate the accuracy and completeness of SNP public databases, we analyzed the allele frequencies of 41 SNPs in 10 candidate genes for obesity and/or osteoporosis in a large American-Caucasian sample (1,873 individuals from 405 nuclear families by PCR-invader assay. We compared our results with those from the databases and other published studies. Of the 41 SNPs, 8 were monomorphic in our sample. Twelve were reported for the first time for Caucasians and the other 29 SNPs in our sample essentially confirmed the respective allele frequencies for Caucasians in the databases and previous studies. The comparison of our data with other ethnic groups showed significant differentiation between the three major world ethnic groups at some SNPs (Caucasians and Africans differed at 3 of the 18 shared SNPs, and Caucasians and Asians differed at 13 of the 22 shared SNPs. This genetic differentiation may have an important implication for studying the well-known ethnic differences in the prevalence of obesity and osteoporosis, and complex disorders in general. Conclusion A comparative analysis of the SNP data of the candidate genes obtained in the present study, as well as those retrieved from the public domain, suggests that the databases may currently have serious limitations for studying complex disorders with an ethnic-dependent background due to the incomplete and uneven representation of the candidate SNPs in the databases for the major ethnic groups. This conclusion attests to the imperative necessity of large-scale and accurate characterization of these SNPs in different ethnic groups.

  11. Limiting the financial risks of electricity generation capital investments under carbon constraints: Applications and opportunities for public policies and private investments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Adam

    Increasing demand for electricity and an aging fleet of generators are the principal drivers behind an increasing need for a large amount of capital investments in the US electric power sector in the near term. The decisions (or lack thereof) by firms, regulators and policy makers in response to this challenge have long lasting consequences, incur large economic and environmental risks, and must be made despite large uncertainties about the future operating and business environment. Capital investment decisions are complex: rates of return are not guaranteed; significant uncertainties about future environmental legislation and regulations exist at both the state and national levels---particularly about carbon dioxide emissions; there is an increasing number of shareholder mandates requiring public utilities to reduce their exposure to potentially large losses from stricter environmental regulations; and there are significant concerns about electricity and fuel price levels, supplies, and security. Large scale, low carbon electricity generation facilities using coal, such as integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facilities coupled with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies, have been technically proven but are unprofitable in the current regulatory and business environment where there is no explicit or implicit price on carbon dioxide emissions. The paper examines two separate scenarios that are actively discussed by policy and decision makers at corporate, state and national levels: a future US electricity system where coal plays a role; and one where the role of coal is limited or nonexistent. The thesis intends to provide guidance for firms and policy makers and outline applications and opportunities for public policies and for private investment decisions to limit financial risks of electricity generation capital investments under carbon constraints.

  12. Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerner, A. J. [IEAVP, ORISE, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Maldonado, D. G. [IEAVP, ORISE, Oak Ridge, TN (United States; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

    2012-06-01

    This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for the DOE Paducah C-746-U Landfill. A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines. The ORISE-derived soil guidelines are specifically applicable to the Landfill at the end of its operational life. A suggested 'upper bound' multiple of the derived soil guidelines for individual shipments is provided.

  13. In vivo erythrocyte micronucleus assay III. Validation and regulatory acceptance of automated scoring and the use of rat peripheral blood reticulocytes, with discussion of non-hematopoietic target cells and a single dose-level limit test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Makoto; MacGregor, James T; Gatehouse, David G; Blakey, David H; Dertinger, Stephen D; Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne; Krishna, Gopala; Morita, Takeshi; Russo, Antonella; Asano, Norihide; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Ohyama, Wakako; Gibson, Dave

    2007-02-03

    , but a consensus regarding acceptability for regulatory purposes could not be reached at that time. Subsequent validation efforts, combined with accumulated published data, demonstrate that blood-derived reticulocytes from rats as well as mice are acceptable when young reticulocytes are analyzed under proper assay protocol and sample size. The working group reviewed the results of micronucleus assays using target cells/tissues other than hematopoietic cells. We also discussed the relevance of the liver micronucleus assay using young rats, and the importance of understanding the maturation of enzyme systems involved in the processes of metabolic activation in the liver of young rats. Although the consensus of the group was that the more information with regard to the metabolic capabilities of young rats would be useful, the published literature shows that young rats have sufficient metabolic capacity for the purposes of this assay. The use of young rats as a model for detecting MN induction in the liver offers a good alternative methodology to the use of partial hepatectomy or mitogenic stimulation. Additional data obtained from colon and skin MN models have been integrated into the data bases, enhancing confidence in the utility of these models. A fourth topic discussed by the working group was the regulatory acceptance of the single-dose-level assay. There was no consensus regarding the acceptability of a single dose level protocol when dose-limiting toxicity occurs. The use of a single dose level can lead to problems in data interpretation or to the loss of animals due to unexpected toxicity, making it necessary to repeat the study with additional doses. A limit test at a single dose level is currently accepted when toxicity is not dose-limiting.

  14. Evaluation of the occupational doses in the ward room of a public hospital of Sergipe, Brazil, during chest X-rays examination;Avaliacao das doses ocupacionais no leito da enfermaria durante exames radiograficos de torax em um hospital publico de Sergipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, W.S.; Maia, A.F. [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (DF/UFS), Sao Cristovao, SE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2009-07-01

    Radiology is one of the main tools for medical diagnosis. The substantial growth in the number of radiological interventions is being accompanied by the interest with the patient, technical and clinical body's safety. The use of portable X rays equipment for medical diagnosis in hospitals is a common practice different types of examinations. At ward room, the chest radiography is one of the most requested. During this X ray examination, besides the technical team involved, in the room are also exposed to the scattered radiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate and to quantify the kerma rates, in the air, at different distances of the equipment and to evaluate the doses received by the workers in the ward room of a public hospital. Besides, safe distances were determined for two radiography techniques. Different exams were evaluated and the typical parameters for performing the examination were determined. From that, the kerma rates were measured in the air using a chest phantom. By the results, it was possible to draw a dose map of a ward room of a public hospital of Sergipe. The knowledge of the dose maps allows the technical body to execute the radiological procedures in a safer way, minimizing the risks for them and for the general public. (author)

  15. Effect of high-dose phytase supplementation in broilers from 22 to 42 days post-hatch given diets severely limited in available phosphorus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taheri, H R; Heidari, A; Shahir, M H

    2015-01-01

    1. Two trials were conducted from 22 to 42 d post-hatch to evaluate the effectiveness of high concentrations of supplemental phytase in maize-soya bean meal-based diets severely limited in available phosphorus (P). Growth performance, plasma P and tibia ash (TA) were measured. 2. Each trial used 220 21-d-old male broilers in 20 pens with 11 birds per pen. Dietary treatments included a positive control [PC, 4.3 g/kg nonphytate P (NPP)], negative control [NC, 2.3 g/kg NPP (Trial 1) or 1.4 g/kg NPP (Trial 2)] and NC plus 1000, 2000 or 4000 phytase U/kg of the diet. 3. Birds fed on the PC diet had higher average daily gain (ADG), gain to feed ratio (G:F), plasma P (Trials 1 and 2) and TA (Trial 2) than those fed on the NC. 4. In Trial 1, ADG and G:F values of the NC plus 1000, 2000 or 4000 phytase U/kg reached those of the PC. Plasma P values of the NC plus 2000 or 4000 phytase U/kg reached that of the PC. Although TA values of the NC, NC + 1000 or NC + 2000 reached that of the PC, TA of the NC + 4000 was more than that of the PC. 5. In Trial 2, ADG and G:F values of the NC plus 4000 phytase U/kg reached those of the PC; nevertheless, plasma P values of the NC diets did not come up to that of the PC. While TA values of the NC, NC + 1000 or NC + 2000 did not reach that of the PC, TA of the NC + 4000 was greater than that of the PC. 6. Results of this study showed that, in the diets with 2.3 and 1.4 g/kg NPP, respectively, 1000 and 4000 phytase U/kg can be sufficient to obtain a comparable performance in broilers to those given diets adequate in available P.

  16. Dose conversion coefficients for high-energy photons, electrons, neutrons and protons

    CERN Document Server

    Sakamoto, Y; Sato, O; Tanaka, S I; Tsuda, S; Yamaguchi, Y; Yoshizawa, N

    2003-01-01

    In the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) 1990 Recommendations, radiation weighting factors were introduced in the place of quality factors, the tissue weighting factors were revised, and effective doses and equivalent doses of each tissues and organs were defined as the protection quantities. Dose conversion coefficients for photons, electrons and neutrons based on new ICRP recommendations were cited in the ICRP Publication 74, but the energy ranges of theses data were limited and there are no data for high energy radiations produced in accelerator facilities. For the purpose of designing the high intensity proton accelerator facilities at JAERI, the dose evaluation code system of high energy radiations based on the HERMES code was developed and the dose conversion coefficients of effective dose were evaluated for photons, neutrons and protons up to 10 GeV, and electrons up to 100 GeV. The dose conversion coefficients of effective dose equivalent were also evaluated using quality fact...

  17. Representative Doses to Members of the Public from Atmospheric Releases of 131I at the Mayak Production Association Facilities from 1948 through 1972

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Napier, Bruce A.; Anspaugh, Lynn R.

    2014-04-03

    Scoping epidemiologic studies performed by researchers from the Southern Urals Biophysics Institute revealed an excess prevalence of thyroid nodules and an increased incidence of thyroid cancer among residents of Ozersk, Russia, who were born in the early 1950s. Ozersk is located about 5 km from the facilities where the Mayak Production Association produced nuclear materials for the Russian weapons program. Reactor operations began in June 1948 and chemical separation of plutonium from irradiated fuel began in February 1949. The U.S.–Russia Joint Coordinating Committee on Radiation Effects Research conducted a series of projects over a 10-year period to assess the radiation risks in the Southern Urals. This paper uses data collected under Committee projects to reconstruct individual time-dependent thyroid doses to reference individuals living in Ozersk from 131I released to the atmosphere. Between 3.22×1016 and 4.31×1016 Bq of 131I released may have been released during the 1948–1972 time period, and a best estimate is 3.76×1016 Bq. A child born in 1947 is estimated to have received a cumulative thyroid dose of 2.3 Gy for 1948–1972, with a 95% confidence interval of 0.51–7.3 Gy. Annual doses were the highest in 1949 and a child who was 5 years old in 1949 is estimated to have a received an annual thyroid dose of 0.93 Gy with a 95% confidence interval of 0.19–3.5 Gy.

  18. Derived limits for surface contamination

    CERN Document Server

    Wrixon, A D; Linsley, G S; White, D F

    1979-01-01

    Derived limits (DLs) for surface contamination were first established for use in the nuclear energy industry where a wide variety of radionuclides is encountered. They were later used in factories, hospitals, and universities, where the radionuclides used are normally fewer in number, either known or readily identifiable, and often of low toxicity. In these situations the current limits are frequently over-restrictive. This report describes a reassessment of the values in the light of more recent information on the possible pathways of exposure and the dose equivalent limits given in ICRP Publication 26. The reassessment is prompted also by the introduction of SI units. The results of the reassessment are used to produce a classification of DLs for all radionuclides for active and inactive area surfaces and for skin.

  19. Measurement of activity concentrations of {sup 40}K, 2{sup 32T}h and {sup 238}U in TSP aerosols and the associated inhalation annual effective radiation dose to the public in Gosan site, Jeju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Chung Hun; Park, Youn Hyun; Park, Jae Woo [Jeju National University, Jeju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Gamma radiation emitted from naturally occurring radioisotopes, such as 40K and the radionuclides from the {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U series and their decay products, which exist at trace levels in all ground formations, represents the main external source of irradiation to the human body. The objective of the current study is to determine the activity concentrations of 40K, {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U in airborne TSP and the associated internal radiation dose to the public due to inhalation in Gosan site, Jeju Island, Korea. The atmospheric total suspended particulates (TSP) aerosols were collected at Gosan site of Jeju Island, which is one of the background sites of Korea, during January to April 2013. This study analyzed using ICP-DRC-MS the concentrations of potassium, uranium and thorium, and evaluated the annual effective dose by breathing from the results. The correlations between the studied natural isotopes is a good positive correlation between {sup 232}Th and {sup 238}U, supporting the conclusion that they originated from the same source, mostly the crust. The backward trajectory analysis has confirmed that the 40K, {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th are delivered as the air masses have moved from the China continent. The inhalation annual effective radiation dose (default mode F) to the public due to natural isotopes of the airborne TSP was in the range 16.195 - 77.051 nSv/y, depending on the age group. Jeju Island with less pollution source and low population density is also one of the best places as a background area in Asia.

  20. Public radiation exposures from a CANDESAL Co-generation Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaloo, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, ON (Canada); Simanjuntak, A. [PRSG-BATAN, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    1998-07-01

    As part of an evaluation of the practical and economic viability of using the CANDESAL (CANDU DESALINATION) approach to desalinate water in an Indonesian environment, radiation doses to members of the public were conservatively calculated. The calculations show there is a negligible radiological impact on the public. Conservative radiation doses to members of the critical group (an adult male and a 1-year-old infant) were calculated, according to the CAN/CSA N288.1-M87 compartmental pathways analysis methodology, and show that use of the desalinated water supply would increase the dose to a member of the critical group (adult or infant) by less than 20 {mu}Sv{center_dot}a{sup -1}. About 99% of the dose from the CANDESAL facility is from tritiated heavy water (DTO or HTO) and the rest is from trace concentrations of beta and gamma emitters. The doses to a member of the critical group from a combined CANDU 6 and CANDESAL Co-generation Facility will be less than 4% of the ICRP-60 recommended effective dose limit of 1000 {mu}Sv{center_dot}a{sup -1} to a member of the public. These doses are not only a small fraction of the regulatory dose limits, but are also within the normal variations of natural background radiation levels. (author)

  1. Open and fast available dose rate data for the public. Challenges and opportunities of internet based communication; Offene und schnelle Verfuegbarkeit von ODL-Messwerten in der Oeffentlichkeit. Herausforderungen und Chancen durch internetbasierte Kommunikationsformen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaehringer, M.; Luff, R.; Schiesewitz, M. [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Salzgitter (Germany)

    2014-01-20

    The BfS website ''ODLInfo'' had been operational for many years when it suddenly became frequently visited by the public due to the Fukushima accident. BfS responded with increased polling frequency of the gamma probes in the network and a higher frequency in update of the web site. Not yet validated data were also published. The web site was extended by explanatory text and additional functionalities, including a complete translation into english language. Many questions directed to BfS by E-mail and related to this web site had to be answered. This was used as a valuable feedback for improving the its design. Additional services were implemented for providers of special applications of smartphones. The market is characterized by a great variability between serious and lurid apps. BfS seeks to support providers in giving explanatory help. Similar websites exist on European and international level. The EU is publishing data from member states on the EURDEP site. NGOs established platforms for uploading and visualizing private dose rate measurements in Japan after 11 march 2011. This development has important implication for emergency preparedness. Information platforms must be authentic and timely. They must compete with alternative data sources in contents and presentation. Data must be presented understandable. Ideally, the public can understand the data and set it into relation to reference values. Often people want to compare their own measurements - sometimes collected with low quality equipment - with official data. Radiation issues are much better understood by the lay public if visible effects in the variability of the measured dose rate are explained.

  2. Aircraft Ground Operation, Servicing, Fluid Lines and Fittings, Mechanics Privileges and Limitations, and Maintenance Publications, Forms and Records (Course Outline), Aviation Mechanics 1 (Power and Frame): 9073.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    The course outline consists of five instructional blocks of several units each: (1) Aircraft Ground Operation and Servicing; (2) Fluid Lines and Fittings; (3) Mechanics Requirements, Privileges and Limitations; (4) Maintenance Publications; and, (5) Maintenance forms and Records. It is a basic course of knowledge and skills necessary to any…

  3. Clinical and Pharmacokinetic Data Support Once-Daily Low-Dose Boosted Saquinavir (1,200 Milligrams Saquinavir with 100 Milligrams Ritonavir) in Treatment-Naive or Limited Protease Inhibitor-Experienced Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin-Niebla, Ana; Lopez-Cortes, Luis Fernando; Ruiz-Valderas, Rosa; Viciana, Pompeyo; Mata, Rosario; Gutierrez, Alicia; Pascual, Rosario; Rodriguez, Magdalena

    2007-01-01

    We evaluated the plasma and intracellular pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, and safety of once-daily low-dose boosted saquinavir (SQVr; 1,200 of saquinavir [SQV] with 100 mg of ritonavir) plus two nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors in treatment-naive or limited protease inhibitor (PI)-experienced human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients. A prospective study without entry restrictions on the plasma HIV-RNA (VL) or CD4 cell count was carried out. Plasma and intracellular SQV levels were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Efficacy was evaluated by an intention-to-treat analysis; treatment failure was defined as virological failure (a VL of >50 copies/ml after 24 weeks or a confirmed rebound to >50 copies/ml) or interruption for any reason. A total of 151 patients were included in the study (106 of them either had never received PI or had no previous virological failure on PIs) and could be characterized as follows: previous C3 stage, 28.9%; injection-drug users, 69.1%; subjects with chronic viral hepatitis, 53%; and subjects with cirrhosis, 10%. The median baseline CD4 level was 184/μl, and the median VL was 4.8 log10 copies/ml. Median Cmax, area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h, and Cmin plasma and intracellular SQV levels were 3,672 and 10,105 ng/ml, 34,283 and 99,535 ng·h/ml, and 359 and 1,062 ng/ml, respectively. The efficacy as determined by intention to treat at 52 weeks was 69.7% (96% in the on-treatment analysis), with similar results regardless of the baseline VL and CD4 counts. Only five patients had virological failure despite adequate Cmin levels, but with a poor adherence (the only variable related to virological failure). Adverse events caused the withdrawal of the treatment in four patients (2.6%). In conclusion, given the pharmacokinetic profile, efficacy, and tolerability of this regimen, once-daily low-dose SQVr may be considered a treatment option in treatment-naive or limited PI

  4. Development of environmental dose calculation program TEDII-60 and its application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Sang Ho; Chung, Chan Young [KOPEC, Yongin City (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    Korean nuclear regulations have introduced new laws regarding dose limits to the public. These laws have adopted dose limits and radiological protection guides as prescribed in the International Commission on Radiation Protection Publication 60 (ICRP-60). These new public dose limits should be applied and implemented to the design of nuclear plants by using radiation protection data provided in ICRP-60. As a result of these new regulations, KOPEC developed a new offsite dose assessment computer code called TEDII-60 (Totally Visualized Environmental Dose Assessment Code System Incorporating ICRP-60 Recommendations). While ensuring compliance with ICRP-60 recommendations, this new code integrated all the related processes in the code such as; meteorological data processing, atmospheric and oceanographic dispersion analysis, and expected annual effluent estimation. TEDII-60 uses graphic I/O display to do offsite dose analyses. Pathway analyses are executed for a maximum of 27 tissues or organs of 6 age groups for both maximally exposed individuals including a population within 80 km of the site. This code uses dose coefficients from recent ICRP publications and US EPA reports that include about 800 radionuclides. TEDII-60 can assess doses from all the chemical forms and particle sizes from the 0.001-10 {mu}m AMAD of any nuclide. This code has been verified and benchmarked against other similar codes used in the nuclear industry. TEDII-60 will be used to prepare calculations dealing with offsite dose assessments to be incorporated into safety analysis reports and environmental reports for new NPPs; and plants that are currently in operation when administrative procedures are implemented. (author). 24 refs., 5 tabs., 13 figs.

  5. Dose coefficients for inhalation of radionuclides generated through the nuclear spallation reaction by high-energy protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Endo, Akira; Takada, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Yasuhiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-10-01

    Dose coefficients have been calculated for inhalation of radionuclides generated in spallation neutron targets and not listed in ICRP Publication 68. Eleven radionuclides, generated in large quantities in the targets and having half-lives more than 10 minutes, were selected for the present calculation. The calculation of the dose coefficients was performed with LUDEP, a program implementing the ICRP Publication 66 respiratory tract model, and NUDAT, a decay radiation database processed from ENSDF. Comparisons were made between the dose coefficients calculated by LUDEP and those listed in ICRP Publication 68 in order to validate the calculated dose coefficients. For 228 cases that vary inhaled particle diameters and biokinetic models of 66 radionuclides, the dose coefficients calculated by LUDEP agreed with those of ICRP Publication 68 within {+-} 25% for 213 cases. Discrepancies that exceed the ICRP`s coefficients by {+-} 25% were mainly attributable to the difference of radiation data employed. It was confirmed from the comparisons that the dose coefficients calculated by the present method are reliable ones. Annual limits on intake and derived air concentrations were calculated on the basis of the dose coefficients. It can be concluded that the dose coefficients and limits calculated here are useful from viewpoints of the design of ventilation system and the evaluation of internal exposures in high energy proton accelerator facilities. (author)

  6. Lack of proportionality. Seven specifications of public interest that override post-approval commercial interests on limited access to clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strech Daniel

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract For the protection of commercial interests, licensing bodies such as the EMA and health technology assessment institutions such as NICE restrict full access to unpublished evidence. Their respective policies on data transparency, however, lack a systematic account of (1 what kinds of commercial interests remain relevant after market approval has been granted, (2 what the specific types of public interest are that may override these commercial interests post approval, and, most importantly, (3 what criteria guide the trade-off between public interest and legitimate measures for the protection of commercial interest. Comparing potential commercial interests with seven specifications of relevant public interest reveals the lack of proportionality inherent in the current practices of EMA and NICE.

  7. Evaluation of occupational and patient dose in cerebral angiography procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neuri Antonio Lunelli

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The present study was aimed at estimating the doses received by physicians and patients during cerebral angiography procedures in a public hospital of Recife, PE, Brazil. Materials and Methods The study sample included 158 adult patients, and during the procedures the following parameters were evaluated: exposure parameters (kV, mAs, number of acquired images, reference air kerma value (Ka,r and air kerma-area product (PKA. Additionally, the physicians involved in the procedures were evaluated as for absorbed dose in the eyes, thyroid, chest, hands and feet. Results The results demonstrated that the doses to the patients' eyes region were relatively close to the threshold for cataract occurrence. As regards the physicians, the average effective dose was 2.6 µSv, and the highest effective dose recorded was 16 µSv. Conclusion Depending on the number of procedures, the doses received by the physicians may exceed the annual dose limit for the crystalline lenses (20 mSv established by national and international standards. It is important to note that the high doses received by the physicians are due to the lack of radiation protection equipment and accessories, such as leaded curtains, screens and protective goggles.

  8. Controllable dose; Dosis controlable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez R, J.T.; Anaya M, R.A. [ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: jtar@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    With the purpose of eliminating the controversy about the lineal hypothesis without threshold which found the systems of dose limitation of the recommendations of ICRP 26 and 60, at the end of last decade R. Clarke president of the ICRP proposed the concept of Controllable Dose: as the dose or dose sum that an individual receives from a particular source which can be reasonably controllable by means of any means; said concept proposes a change in the philosophy of the radiological protection of its concern by social approaches to an individual focus. In this work a panorama of the foundations is presented, convenient and inconveniences that this proposal has loosened in the international community of the radiological protection, with the purpose of to familiarize to our Mexican community in radiological protection with these new concepts. (Author)

  9. Effective dose and dose to crystalline lens during angiographic procedures; Dose effective et dose au cristallin lors de procedures angiographiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pages, J. [QUARAD and Radiology Dept., Vvije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

    1998-07-01

    The highest radiation doses levels received by radiologists are observed during interventional procedures. Doses to forehead and neck received by a radiologist executing angiographic examinations at the department of radiology at the academic hospital (AZ-VUB) have been measured for a group of 34 examinations. The doses to crystalline lens and the effective doses for a period of one year have been estimated. For the crystalline lens the maximum dose approaches the ICRP limit, that indicates the necessity for the radiologist to use leaded glasses. (N.C.)

  10. Dose evaluation due to the effluent liberation by medical installations at city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Avaliacao de doses devido a liberacao de efluentes por instalacoes medicas na cidade do Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu, Jane; Rochedo, Elaine R.R., E-mail: jshu@cnen.gov.b, E-mail: erochedo@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CODIN/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Instalacoes Nucleares; Heilbron, Paulo F.L., E-mail: paulo@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (COREJ/CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao de Rejeitos; Crispim, Verginia R., E-mail: verginia@con.ufrj.b [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-10-26

    This paper, the city of Rio de Janeiro was taken as a case study. It was processed deterministic and probabilistic simulations vor evaluation of the dose in two exposure sceneries, one of them referring to public members exposure and the other relative to exposure of sewage sanitary treatment plant workers. The results showed that at present the doses for inhabitants of the city and operators of treatment station are lower to dose limit established for the public, the approach presently in use in Brazil is not sufficient to accomplish whit international requirements and the regulation should be revised to be adopted specific values for each radionuclide

  11. Potential radiation doses from 1994 Hanford Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J.K.; Antonio, E.J.

    1995-06-01

    This section of the 1994 Hanford Site Environmental Report summarizes the potential radiation doses to the public from releases originating at the Hanford Site. Members of the public are potentially exposed to low-levels of radiation from these effluents through a variety of pathways. The potential radiation doses to the public were calculated for the hypothetical MEI and for the general public residing within 80 km (50 mi) of the Hanford Site.

  12. Offsite radiation doses summarized from Hanford environmental monitoring reports for the years 1957-1984. [Contains glossary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldat, J.K.; Price, K.R.; McCormack, W.D.

    1986-02-01

    Since 1957, evaluations of offsite impacts from each year of operation have been summarized in publicly available, annual environmental reports. These evaluations included estimates of potential radiation exposure to members of the public, either in terms of percentages of the then permissible limits or in terms of radiation dose. The estimated potential radiation doses to maximally exposed individuals from each year of Hanford operations are summarized in a series of tables and figures. The applicable standard for radiation dose to an individual for whom the maximum exposure was estimated is also shown. Although the estimates address potential radiation doses to the public from each year of operations at Hanford between 1957 and 1984, their sum will not produce an accurate estimate of doses accumulated over this time period. The estimates were the best evaluations available at the time to assess potential dose from the current year of operation as well as from any radionuclides still present in the environment from previous years of operation. There was a constant striving for improved evaluation of the potential radiation doses received by members of the public, and as a result the methods and assumptions used to estimate doses were periodically modified to add new pathways of exposure and to increase the accuracy of the dose calculations. Three conclusions were reached from this review: radiation doses reported for the years 1957 through 1984 for the maximum individual did not exceed the applicable dose standards; radiation doses reported over the past 27 years are not additive because of the changing and inconsistent methods used; and results from environmental monitoring and the associated dose calculations reported over the 27 years from 1957 through 1984 do not suggest a significant dose contribution from the buildup in the environment of radioactive materials associated with Hanford operations.

  13. The ICRP protection quantities, equivalent and effective dose: their basis and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.D. [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Streffer, C. [Institute for Science and Ethics, University Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Equivalent and effective dose are protection quantities defined by the The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). They are frequently referred to simply as dose and may be misused. They provide a method for the summation of doses received from external sources and from intakes of radionuclides for comparison with dose limits and constraints, set to limit the risk of cancer and hereditary effects. For the assessment of internal doses, ICRP provides dose coefficients (Sv Bq{sup -1}) for the ingestion or inhalation of radionuclides by workers and members of the public, including children. Dose coefficients have also been calculated for in utero exposures following maternal intakes and for the transfer of radionuclides in breast milk. In each case, values are given of committed equivalent doses to organs and tissues and committed effective dose. Their calculation involves the use of defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including the use of reference phantoms representing the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used as a simple representation of the different effectiveness of different radiations in causing stochastic effects at low doses. A single set of tissue weighting factors is used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, despite age- and gender-related differences in estimates of risk and contributions to risk. The results are quantities that are not individual specific but are reference values for protection purposes, relating to doses to phantoms. The ICRP protection quantities are not intended for detailed assessments of dose and risk to individuals. They should not be used in epidemiological analyses or the assessment of the possibility of occurrence and severity of tissue reactions (deterministic effects) at higher doses. Dose coefficients are published as reference values and as such have no associated uncertainty. Assessments of

  14. Graduação em Saúde Coletiva: limites e possibilidades como estratégia de formação profissional Undergraduate on Public Health: limits and possibilities as a professional education strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lúcia Magalhães Bosi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo problematiza a Saúde Coletiva como âmbito de profissionalização, sistematizando alguns fundamentos teóricos, sociais e ético-políticos de uma formação em nível de graduação. Para tanto, recupera a trajetória em que se vem dando a formulação desses cursos e, mais recentemente, sua emergência nas instituições de ensino superior brasileiras. No Brasil, tais projetos resultam do acúmulo no ensino da Saúde Coletiva em diferentes cursos de graduação na área da saúde, acrescido da tradição na pós- graduação lato e stricto sensu, tendo dentre os seus desdobramentos o reconhecimento da pertinência de fomentar novas estratégias de formação. Mais recentemente, políticas voltadas à inclusão social e à expansão do ensino superior vêm impulsionando o movimento, ao que se soma a constatação de que o Sistema Único de Saúde demanda novos atores, com capacidade de dar respostas diferenciadas e complementares àquelas possibilitadas pelas graduações tradicionais. No momento em que diversas instituições se encontram em fase de oferta dessa formação à sociedade, este artigo apresenta um conjunto de elementos derivados da reflexão nos planos epistemológico, sociológico e político-sanitário, visando a contribuir para um diálogo acerca da emergência desse projeto no contexto brasileiro.This article aims to call into question Public Health as a field for professionalization by systematizing theoretical, social and ethical-political bases for undergraduate education. We also attempt to record the trajectory in formulating undergraduate courses in that field and, more recently, the emergence of these projects in Brazilian Universities. In Brazil, the current projects are a result of institutional experience gained in Public Health teaching in different undergraduate courses in the field of health. Additionally, there is also a teaching tradition in non-degree and master's and PhD graduate courses

  15. 胸部低剂量CT定量指标与肺气流受限的相关性分析%Correlation between the parameters quantified by chest low-dose CT scan and airflow limitation examined by spirometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈淑靖; 白春学; 顾宇彤; 张静; 余勇夫; 计海婴; 王桂芳; 李丽; 龚颖; 陈刚

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨胸部低剂量CT(LDCT)定量指标和肺气流受限及其严重程度的相关性,建立初步相关模型.方法 纳入2008年7月至2012年2月在我院同步完成LDCT和肺功能检查的48例40岁以上有吸烟史的患者,对LDCT定量指标和肺功能指标进行相关性分析,并结合年龄、性别等因素建立回归模型.通过绘制受试者工作特征曲线(ROC曲线)确定对气流受限的判断作用最佳的LDCT定量指标.结果 经调整年龄、性别及BMI校正后,EV和El与FEV1、FEV1% pred、FEV1/FVC和TLC% pred呈负相关(P<0.05).但与RV/TLC% pred则无明显相关性(P>0.05);确定最佳回归模型为FEV1/FVC%=94.17+25.31×性别(gender)-0.58×年龄(age)-l0.84×In(El(%));FEV1% pred=141.76-0.78×年龄(age)-14.07×In(EI(%)).经ROC曲线确定对气流受限的判断作用最佳的LDCT定量指标为El.结论 El可用于判别有无气流受限,通过回归方程计算可估测气流受限和肺气肿严重程度.LDCT有望用于COPD的早期诊断.%Objective The purpose of the current study was to deternmine the correlation between the parameters quantified by chest low-dose CT scan (LDCT) and airflow limitation examined by spirometry.Methods This study included 48 patients above 40 years old and with smoking history who underwent LDCT and spirometry on the same day.The regression model was generated on the base of the LDCT value which correlated best to airflow limitation using ROC curve.Results With age,gender and body mass index adjusted,EV and El significantly correlated negatively with FEV1,FEV1%predieted,FEV1/FVC and TLC% predicted (P<0.05),but had no correlation with RV/TLC% predicted ( P>0.05).The regression model were FEV1/FVC%=94.17+25.31 X<gender-0.58×age-10.84×In (EI (%)),FEV1%predicted=141.76-0.78×age-14.07×In (EI(%)).The best LDCT value for airflow limitation estimation was EI.Conclusions El may be used to estimate whether airflow limitation exited and to

  16. Principios bioéticos en salud pública: limitaciones y propuestas Bioethical principles in public health: limitations and proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fermin Roland Schramm

    2001-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo intenta caracterizar la especificidad de los problemas morales en salud pública y analizar la aplicabilidad del modelo principialista como padrón para dirimir sus conflictos. Aunque considerado pertinente para la bioética clínica, este modelo no es aplicable sin más a los dilemas en salud pública, puesto que se fundamenta en la moral de las interrelaciones médico-paciente. Se analiza la pertinencia de los principios de "solidaridad", de "responsabilidad óntica" según Jonas, y de "responsabilidad diacónica" según Lévinas, destacando la inaplicabilidad del primero y la posible adaptación de los otros dos a la salud pública. A ese respecto se discute la posibilidad de vincular la preocupación ontológica de Jonas y la trascendental de Lévinas, proponiendo un principio de protección que sería más adecuado a los propósitos de una ética de la salud pública, permitiendo identificar claramente los objetivos y los actores implicados en una implementación de políticas públicas moralmente correctas y pragmáticamente efectivas.We propose to analyze the specificity of ethical problems in public health issues and to elucidate the applicability of principlism as a problem-solving strategy in this realm. Although well-established in clinical ethics, principlism is not an adequate model to be used in public health, since it is basically intended to serve as a moral guide in the physician-patient encounter. We discuss the possible adequacy of principles like "solidarity", "ontic responsibility" (as proposed by Jonas, and "caring or diaconal responsibility" as presented by Lévinas. Solidarity appears to be insufficiently specified, whereas the other two perspectives may be adapted to public health issues by bringing together Jonas´ ontological and Lévinas´ transcendental concerns to form a principle of protection that might better serve the purposes of such an ethics. This principle would help to identify more clearly

  17. [Anti-doping control and public health: limits to the exposure of human health to risk in the name of sporting glory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aith, Fernando Mussa Abujamra

    2013-10-01

    Given the current regulatory environment surrounding doping in the world, and in view of the recurring scandals linking leading athletes in a variety of sports with doping, this paper aims to provide some thoughts on the relationship between doping and public health, taking as base reference the risks doping poses to health and considering the regulatory options that have been adopted by the international community and the sports federations to control and supervise this unsporting and risky practice. The text seeks to reflect on the necessary balance between sport and health, as well as on the role of the state in preserving this balance.

  18. A model to optimize public health care and downstage breast cancer in limited-resource populations in southern Brazil. (Porto Alegre Breast Health Intervention Cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomazzi Juliana

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer (BC is a major public health problem, with rising incidence in many regions of the globe. Although mortality has recently dropped in developed countries, death rates are still increasing in some developing countries, as seen in Brazil. Among the reasons for this phenomenon are the lack of structured screening programs, a long waiting period between diagnosis and treatment, and lack of access to health services for a large proportion of the Brazilian population. Methods and design Since 2004, an intervention study in a cohort of women in Southern Brazil, denominated Porto Alegre Breast Health Intervention Cohort, is being conducted in order to test the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of a model for BC early detection and treatment. In this study, over 4,000 women from underserved communities aged 40 to 69 years are being screened annually with mammography and clinical breast examination performed by a multidisciplinary team, which also involves nutritional counseling and genetic cancer risk assessment. Risk factors for BC development are also being evaluated. Active search of participants by lay community health workers is one of the major features of our program. The accrual of new participants was concluded in 2006 and the study will last for 10 years. The main goal of the study is to demonstrate significant downstaging of BC in an underserved population through proper screening, attaining a higher rate of early-stage BC diagnoses than usually seen in women diagnosed in the Brazilian Public Health System. Preliminary results show a very high BC incidence in this population (117 cases per 100,000 women per year, despite a low prevalence of classical risk factors. Discussion This study will allow us to test a model of BC early diagnosis and treatment and evaluate its cost-effectiveness in a developing country where the mortality associated with this disease is very high. Also, it might contribute to the

  19. Radiation dose monitoring in the clinical routine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guberina, Nika [UK Essen (Germany). Radiology

    2017-04-15

    Here we describe the first clinical experiences regarding the use of an automated radiation dose management software to monitor the radiation dose of patients during routine examinations. Many software solutions for monitoring radiation dose have emerged in the last decade. The continuous progress in radiological techniques, new scan features, scanner generations and protocols are the primary challenge for radiation dose monitoring software systems. To simulate valid dose calculations, radiation dose monitoring systems have to follow current trends and stay constantly up-to-date. The dose management software is connected to all devices at our institute and conducts automatic data acquisition and radiation dose calculation. The system incorporates 18 virtual phantoms based on the Cristy phantom family, estimating doses in newborns to adults. Dose calculation relies on a Monte Carlo simulation engine. Our first practical experiences demonstrate that the software is capable of dose estimation in the clinical routine. Its implementation and use have some limitations that can be overcome. The software is promising and allows assessment of radiation doses, like organ and effective doses according to ICRP 60 and ICRP 103, patient radiation dose history and cumulative radiation doses. Furthermore, we are able to determine local diagnostic reference doses. The radiation dose monitoring software systems can facilitate networking between hospitals and radiological departments, thus refining radiation doses and implementing reference doses at substantially lower levels.

  20. Case study on implementation of the dose constraint concept in optimization in working environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajewska, Grazyna; Krajewski, Pawel [Central Laboratory for Radiological Protection, PL-03194, Warsaw (Poland)

    2014-07-01

    A case study of already fixed dose constrain values in nuclear medicine sector, indicated that, the practical implementation of ICRP principle of optimization ( Publication 103, ICRP, 2007) still hit on methodology problems due to lack of adequate numerous monitoring data of internal contamination and complicated mathematical formalism. In practice, to ensure that 'the likelihood of incurring exposure, the number of people exposed, and the magnitude of their individual doses are kept as low as reasonably achievable', the baseline of effective doses together with statistical distribution is required. Furthermore, as it has revealed in this study, doses PHP's generated with MC methods had un-regularly shapes, depending on random operations rather than routine procedures. The role of dose constraints for occupational exposures, was further elaborated in Publication 101 (ICRP, 2006) as 'the dose constraint is a value of individual dose used to limit the range of options considered in the process of optimization'. The revisions of the International Basic Safety Standards as well as the Euratom Basic Safety Standard Directive both aim to implement new ICRP recommendations and have requirements to use dose constraints, defined broadly along the lines provided by the ICRP, and suggest that values be selected from the bands recommended by the ICRP. These will be obligatory adopted in the national regulations by regulatory authorities of EU countries. However, due to accidental characteristics of monitoring data, the 95% confidence tail of the doses for the most highly exposed individuals is near the limit of 20 mSv per year. This is apparently observed in the particular endocrinology units dealing with I-131 therapy. One might concluded that dose limitation and optimization are viewed as sufficient for the management of occupational exposures and reasonably be achieved. (authors)

  1. 刍议公共自行车对城市居民健康的有限影响%Discussion on the Limited Influence of Public Bicycles on the Health Condi-tion of Urban Inhabitants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2013-01-01

    To handle the problems of road congestion and air pollution ,public bicycles emerged in many cities in the 21st century .In many cities ,the official documents had affirmed the health function of the public bicycles .However ,there was no favorable traveling environment for the public bicycles and the administration department had not built the policy supporting system for this environmental trip mode .So ,the“health”concept of the public bicycles cannot be promoted and developed .Now the influence of public bicycles on the health condition of urban inhabitants was limited .Furthermore ,there were more dislocations between its text orientation and actual effect .Within the vicious circle of road congestion and air pollution ,the influence of public bicy-cles on the health condition of urban inhabitants will be limited and the sustainable development of public bicycles project will be affected .%  公共自行车成为21世纪许多城市应对道路拥堵、大气污染的产物。在其诸多功能中,关于公共自行车的健康功能,这些城市出台的文件中都有明确的定位。然而事实上,由于公共自行车出行环境较差,主管部门对公共自行车没有制度和政策的倾斜以及对公共自行车承载的“健康”理念的认同得不到提升,目前公共自行车对居民产生的健康影响十分有限,出现了文本定位与实际效应的错位。在道路拥堵、空气污染恶性循环之下,不仅城市公共自行车对居民的健康影响持续受限,公共自行车项目持续发展也终将受到很大影响。

  2. Publicity and public relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosha, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    This paper addresses approaches to using publicity and public relations to meet the goals of the NASA Space Grant College. Methods universities and colleges can use to publicize space activities are presented.

  3. Utirik Atoll Dose Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robison, W.L.; Conrado, C.L.; Bogen, K.T

    1999-10-06

    On March 1, 1954, radioactive fallout from the nuclear test at Bikini Atoll code-named BRAVO was deposited on Utirik Atoll which lies about 187 km (300 miles) east of Bikini Atoll. The residents of Utirik were evacuated three days after the fallout started and returned to their atoll in May 1954. In this report we provide a final dose assessment for current conditions at the atoll based on extensive data generated from samples collected in 1993 and 1994. The estimated population average maximum annual effective dose using a diet including imported foods is 0.037 mSv y{sup -1} (3.7 mrem y{sup -1}). The 95% confidence limits are within a factor of three of their population average value. The population average integrated effective dose over 30-, 50-, and 70-y is 0.84 mSv (84, mrem), 1.2 mSv (120 mrem), and 1.4 mSv (140 mrem), respectively. The 95% confidence limits on the population-average value post 1998, i.e., the 30-, 50-, and 70-y integral doses, are within a factor of two of the mean value and are independent of time, t, for t > 5 y. Cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is the radionuclide that contributes most of this dose, mostly through the terrestrial food chain and secondarily from external gamma exposure. The dose from weapons-related radionuclides is very low and of no consequence to the health of the population. The annual background doses in the U. S. and Europe are 3.0 mSv (300 mrem), and 2.4 mSv (240 mrem), respectively. The annual background dose in the Marshall Islands is estimated to be 1.4 mSv (140 mrem). The total estimated combined Marshall Islands background dose plus the weapons-related dose is about 1.5 mSv y{sup -1} (150 mrem y{sup -1}) which can be directly compared to the annual background effective dose of 3.0 mSv y{sup -1} (300 mrem y{sup -1}) for the U. S. and 2.4 mSv y{sup -1} (240 mrem y{sup -1}) for Europe. Moreover, the doses listed in this report are based only on the radiological decay of {sup 137}Cs (30.1 y half-life) and other

  4. Tenofovir stock shortages have limited impact on clinic- and patient-level HIV treatment outcomes in public sector clinics in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Alana T; Bor, Jacob; Davies, Mary-Ann; Conradie, Francesca; Maskew, Mhairi; Long, Lawrence; Sanne, Ian; Fox, Matthew P

    2017-02-01

    Using data from four public sector clinics in South Africa, we sought to investigate provider- and patient-level outcomes, to understand how the 2012 tenofovir stock shortage affected the HIV care and monitoring of ART patients. Prospective cohort analysis of ART-naïve, non-pregnant, HIV-infected patients >18 years initiating first-line ART between 1 July 2011-31 March 2013. Linear regression was used for all outcomes (number of ART initiates, days between pharmacy visits, transfers, single-drug substitutions, treatment interruptions, missed pharmacy visits, loss to follow-up and elevated viral load). We fit splines to smooth curves with knots at the beginning (1 February 2012) and end (31 August 2012) of the stock shortage and displayed results graphically by clinic. Difference-in-difference models were used to evaluate the effect of the stock shortage on outcomes. Results suggest a potential shift in the management of patients during the shortage, mainly fewer average days between visits during the shortage vs. before or after at all four clinics, and a significant difference in the proportion of patients missing visits during vs. before (RD: 1.2%; 95% CI: 0.5%, 2.0%). No significant difference was seen in other outcomes. While South Africa has made great strides to extend access to ART and increase the quality of the health services provided, patient care can be affected when stock shortages/outs occur. While our results show little effect on treatment outcomes, this most likely reflects the clinics' ability to mitigate the crisis by continuing to keep patient care and treatment as consistent as possible. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Límites a los derechos en el espacio público: mujeres, velos y convivencia || Limiting rights in public space: women, veils and conviviality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ángeles Solanes

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available RESUMEN. El uso de los velos, en cuanto vestimenta con connotaciones religiosas, en el espacio público, conlleva múltiples discursos marcadamente simbólicos, cuestiona el papel que el ordenamiento jurídico está llamado a cumplir en una sociedad democrática y, al mismo tiempo, condiciona la relación entre diferentes derechos que se ven afectados. Este trabajo analiza, de modo crítico, el desarrollo normativo de esta cuestión en diferentes Estados Europeos, incidiendo en el caso español, y ahondando en la jurisprudencia del Tribunal Europeo de Derechos Humanos. Con ello se pretende evidenciar, por una parte, el necesario control multidimensional que es exigible al establecer límites a los derechos, entre ellos, a la libertad religiosa, y por otra, el riesgo de justificar las restricciones a las libertades en conceptos jurídicos indeterminados, sin amparo legal o convencional, como el de la convivencia.  ABSTRACT. The public use of veils, as religiously connoted garments, conjures up multiple and markedly symbolic discourses, raises questions on the role that the legal order must fulfil in a democratic society and, at the same time, challenges the relationship between the rights at stake. This paper critically analyses legal developments pertaining to this issue in different European states, addressing the Spanish case and scrutinising the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights. The aim is to highlight, on the one hand, the necessarily multidimensional control that must accompany restrictions on fundamental rights, including the right to religious freedom, and on the other hand, the risk of justifying restrictions on individual liberties through abstract legal concepts, devoid of legal or conventional basis, such as “living together”.

  6. Doses from radiation exposure

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Practical implementation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection's (ICRP) system of protection requires the availability of appropriate methods and data. The work of Committee 2 is concerned with the development of reference data and methods for the assessment of internal and external radiation exposure of workers and members of the public. This involves the development of reference biokinetic and dosimetric models, reference anatomical models of the human body, and reference anatomical and physiological data. Following ICRP's 2007 Recommendations, Committee 2 has focused on the provision of new reference dose coefficients for external and internal exposure. As well as specifying changes to the radiation and tissue weighting factors used in the calculation of protection quantities, the 2007 Recommendations introduced the use of reference anatomical phantoms based on medical imaging data, requiring explicit sex averaging of male and female organ-equivalent doses in the calculation of effecti...

  7. Evolution of radon dose evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujimoto Kenzo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The historical change of radon dose evaluation is reviewed based on the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR reports. Since 1955, radon has been recognized as one of the important sources of exposure of the general public. However, it was not really understood that radon is the largest dose contributor until 1977 when a new concept of effective dose equivalent was introduced by International Commission on Radiological Protection. In 1982, the dose concept was also adapted by UNSCEAR and evaluated per caput dose from natural radiation. Many researches have been carried out since then. However, lots of questions have remained open in radon problems, such as the radiation weighting factor of 20 for alpha rays and the large discrepancy of risk estimation among dosimetric and epidemiological approaches.

  8. Genetic variability and discrimination of low doses of Toxocara spp. from public areas soil inferred by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay as a field-friendly molecular tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ozlati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: One of the main diagnostic problems of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR is indiscrimination of low parasitic loads in soil samples. The aim of this study is to determine the genetic diversity and identification of Toxocara spp. from public areas soil inferred by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay. Materials and Methods: A total of 180 soil samples were collected from various streets and public parks of northwest Iran. The DNA of recovered Toxocara eggs were extracted and amplified by PCR and LAMP following ZnSO4 flotation technique. The amplicons of internal transcribed spacer-2 gene were sequenced to reveal the heterogeneity traits of Toxocara spp. In addition, Toxocara canis sequences of southwest Iran were directly retrieved to compare gene flow between two distinct populations. Results: Toxocara spp. eggs were found in 57, 14 and 77 of soil samples using the microscopy, PCR and LAMP (detection limit 1-3 eggs/200 g soil, respectively. 7.7% of isolates were identified as T. canis by PCR method, while LAMP was able to detect 27.2%, 15.5% and 12.2% as Toxocara cati, T. canis and mixed infections, respectively. The kappa coefficient between LAMP and microscopy indicated a strong agreement (0.765 but indicated a faint agreement among LAMP-PCR (0.203 and PCR-microscopy (0.308 methods. A pairwise fixation index (Fst as a degree of gene flow was generally low (0.02156 among Toxocara populations of northwest and southwest Iran. Conclusions: The statistically significant Fst value indicates that the T. canis populations are not genetically well differentiated between northwest and southwest Iran. This shows that here is possibly an epidemiological drift due to the transfer of alleles. The LAMP assay because of its shorter reaction time, more sensitivity, and simultaneous detection of environmental contamination to be appears as valuable field diagnosis compared to PCR. Therefore, the detection of low Toxocara spp. loads

  9. Genetic variability and discrimination of low doses of Toxocara spp. from public areas soil inferred by loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay as a field-friendly molecular tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozlati, Maryam; Spotin, Adel; Shahbazi, Abbas; Mahami-Oskouei, Mahmoud; Hazratian, Teimour; Adibpor, Mohammad; Ahmadpour, Ehsan; Dolatkhah, Afsaneh; Khoshakhlagh, Paria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: Aim: One of the main diagnostic problems of conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is indiscrimination of low parasitic loads in soil samples. The aim of this study is to determine the genetic diversity and identification of Toxocara spp. from public areas soil inferred by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay. Materials and Methods: A total of 180 soil samples were collected from various streets and public parks of northwest Iran. The DNA of recovered Toxocara eggs were extracted and amplified by PCR and LAMP following ZnSO4 flotation technique. The amplicons of internal transcribed spacer-2 gene were sequenced to reveal the heterogeneity traits of Toxocara spp. In addition, Toxocara canis sequences of southwest Iran were directly retrieved to compare gene flow between two distinct populations. Results: Toxocara spp. eggs were found in 57, 14 and 77 of soil samples using the microscopy, PCR and LAMP (detection limit 1-3 eggs/200 g soil), respectively. 7.7% of isolates were identified as T. canis by PCR method, while LAMP was able to detect 27.2%, 15.5% and 12.2% as Toxocara cati, T. canis and mixed infections, respectively. The kappa coefficient between LAMP and microscopy indicated a strong agreement (0.765) but indicated a faint agreement among LAMP-PCR (0.203) and PCR-microscopy (0.308) methods. A pairwise fixation index (Fst) as a degree of gene flow was generally low (0.02156) among Toxocara populations of northwest and southwest Iran. Conclusions: The statistically significant Fst value indicates that the T. canis populations are not genetically well differentiated between northwest and southwest Iran. This shows that here is possibly an epidemiological drift due to the transfer of alleles. The LAMP assay because of its shorter reaction time, more sensitivity, and simultaneous detection of environmental contamination to be appears as valuable field diagnosis compared to PCR. Therefore, the detection of low Toxocara spp. loads

  10. [Head and neck intensity-modulated radiation therapy: Normal tissues dose constraints. Pharyngeal constrictor muscles and larynx].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P; Woisard, V; Racadot, S; Thariat, J; Pointreau, Y

    2016-10-01

    Radio-induced pharyngolaryngeal chronic disorders may challenge the quality of life of head and neck cancer long survivors. Many anatomic structures have been identified as potentially impaired by irradiation and responsible for laryngeal edema, dysphonia and dysphagia. Some dose constraints might be plausible such as keeping the mean dose to the pharyngeal constrictor muscles under 50 to 55Gy, the mean dose to the supra-glottic larynx under 40 to 45Gy and, if feasible, the mean dose to the glottic larynx under 20Gy. A reduction of the dose delivered to the muscles of the floor of the mouth and the cervical esophagus would be beneficial as well. Nevertheless, the publications available do not provide an extensive enough level of proof. One should consider limiting as low as possible the dose delivered to these structures without compromising the quality of irradiation of the target tumor volumes.

  11. Twitter and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Catherine; Wurtz, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    Twitter can serve as a powerful communication modality to both "push" and "pull" public health data; each user is a potential public health sensor and actor. However, in 2012, only 8% of local health departments had Twitter accounts. We outline how Twitter works, describe how to access public tweets for public health surveillance purposes, review the literature on Twitter's current and potential role supporting public health's essential services, summarize Twitter's limitations, and make recommendations for health department use.

  12. Estimation of the contribution of neutrons to the equivalent dose for personnel occupationally exposed and public in medical facilities: X-ray with energy equal or greater than 10MV; Estimacion de la contribucion por neutrones a la dosis equivalente para personal ocupacionalmente expuesto y publico en instalaciones de uso medico: rayos X de energia igual y/o superior a 10MV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, Alfonso Mayer; Jimenez, Roberto Ortega; Sanchez, Mario A. Reyes, E-mail: amgesfm@hotmail.com, E-mail: rojimenez@cnsns.gob.mx [Comision Nacional de Seguridad Nuclear y Salvaguardias (CNSNS), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Moranchel y Mejia, Mario, E-mail: mmoranchel@ipn.mx [Instituto Politecnico Nacional (ESFM/IPN), Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas. Departamento de lngenieria Nuclear

    2013-07-01

    In Mexico the use of electron accelerators for treating cancerous tumors had grown enormously in the last decade. When the treatments are carried out with X-ray beam energy below 10 MV the design of the shielding of the radioactive facility is determined by analyzing the interaction of X-rays, which have a direct impact and dispersion, with materials of the facility. However, when it makes use of X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV the neutrons presence is imminent due to their generation by the interaction of the primary beam X-ray with materials head of the accelerator and of the table of treatment, mainly. In these cases, the design and calculation of shielding considers the generation of high-energy neutrons which contribute the equivalent dose that public and Occupationally Staff Exposed (POE) will receive in the areas surrounding the facility radioactive. However, very few measurements have been performed to determine the actual contribution to the neutron dose equivalent received by POE and public during working hours. This paper presents an estimate of the actual contribution of the neutron dose equivalent received by public and POE facilities in various radioactive medical use, considering many factors. To this end, measurements were made of the equivalent dose by using a neutron monitor in areas surrounding different radioactive installations (of Mexico) which used electron accelerators medical use during treatment with X-ray beam energy equal to or greater than 10 MV. The results are presented after a statistical analysis of a wide range of measures in order to estimate more reliability real contribution of the neutron dose equivalent for POE and the public. (author)

  13. Limiting value definition in radiation protection physics, legislation and toxicology. Fundamentals, contrasts, perspectives; Grenzwertbildung im Strahlenschutz. Physik, Recht, Toxikologie. Grundlagen, Kontraste, Perspektiven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeddinck, Ulrich; Koenig, Claudia (eds.)

    2016-07-01

    The volume is the documentation of an ENTRIA workshop discussion on limiting value definition in radiation protection including the following contributions: Introduction in radiation protection -fundamentals concepts of limiting values, heterogeneity; evaluation standards for dose in radiation protection in the context of final repository search; definition of limiting values in toxicology; public participation to limiting value definition - a perspective for the radiation protection regulation; actual developments in radiation protection.

  14. Translation of dose coefficients From ICRP 53 to ICRP 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Hanna M; Melanson, Mark A

    2013-02-01

    The effective dose coefficients tabulated in Publication 80 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) for the radiopharmaceuticals addressed earlier in ICRP Publication 53 are based on the tissue weighting factors of ICRP Publication 60. Presumably these values are derived from the tissue dose coefficients tabulated in Publication 53; however, no details regarding their derivation are provided. The tissue weighting factors of Publication 60 explicitly address tissue for which no dose coefficients were tabulated in Publication 53; for example, esophagus and a number of tissues comprising the remainder. In the absence of guidance, the authors have defined a set of rules for the translation and have undertaken an effort to derive the effective dose coefficients of Publication 80 starting with the organ/tissue dose coefficient of Publication 53.

  15. Public Education, Public Good.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, John

    1986-01-01

    Criticizes policies which would damage or destroy a public education system. Examines the relationship between government-provided education and democracy. Concludes that privatization of public education would emphasize self-interest and selfishness, further jeopardizing the altruism and civic mindedness necessary for the public good. (JDH)

  16. Public Relations in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    of the Excellence Project in Public Relations and thus applies a research instrument similar to that used in other international scholarly investigations in public relations. The population comprises civil servants working in information and communication activities for Italian public administrations. Findings...... relations. Research limitations: Due to a lack of information on the exact number of public communication officers working in the Italian public administration and a too small number of respondents in one of the respondent groups, it is not possible to draw inferences or general conclusions from...... the findings. The study also suffers from the limits of a quantitative research approach, which provides less elaborate accounts of public communication officers’ perceptions of the strategic role of communication in the public sector. Originality/value of paper: This study contributes to the existing...

  17. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. (comps.)

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  18. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  19. The Lessons of QUANTEC: Recommendations for reporting and gathering data on dose-volume dependencies of treatment outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Andrew; Marks, Laurence B; Bentzen, Søren M; Eisbruch, Avraham; Yorke, Ellen D; Haken, Randal K Ten; Constine, Louis S; Deasy, Joseph O

    2010-01-01

    The 16 clinical articles in this issue review the dose volume dependence of toxicities of external beam radiotherapy. They are limited by the difficulty of synthesizing results from different publications. The major problems stem from incomplete reporting of results and use of incompatible or ambiguous endpoints. Here we specify these problems, give recommendations to authors, editors, and reviewers on standards of reporting, and, provide methods of defining endpoints suitable for the dose-volume analysis of toxicity. Adopting these recommendations will facilitate meta-analysis and increase the utility of individual studies of the dependence of complications on dose distributions. PMID:20171512

  20. PRECEDENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CONTENTS USING DOSE RATE MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-06-05

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  1. Performance analysis for KALIMER containment dome and offsite dose evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Do Hee; Lee, Y. B.; Kang, C. S.; Cho, Y. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2002-03-01

    In case HCDA (Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accident) occurs, large amount of radionuclide is released and causes significant hazards to environment and public health. To prevent and mitigate the accident consequences, KALIMER containment is designed to constrain release of radionuclide. In this study, performance analysis for KALIMER containment was made to determine whether the containment could maintain its integrity and achieve its purpose in case of HCDA. Performance analysis of KALIMER containment was also made through evaluating radiation dose at site boundary. The performance analysis showed that KALIMER containment could maintain its integrity and achieve its purpose in case of HCDA. Also, it was proved that sodium spray fire can be more important menace to containment integrity than sodium pool fire. Results of dose assessment was different from those of performance analysis. Sodium pool fire caused higher radiation doses than sodium spray fire. But, dose values evaluated for HCDA were much lower than dose limit values for both sodium pool fire and sodium spray fire. 23 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  2. Public Relations in the Public Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    of the Excellence Project in Public Relations and thus applies a research instrument similar to that used in other international scholarly investigations in public relations. The population comprises civil servants working in information and communication activities for Italian public administrations. Findings...... relations. Research limitations: Due to a lack of information on the exact number of public communication officers working in the Italian public administration and a too small number of respondents in one of the respondent groups, it is not possible to draw inferences or general conclusions from...... knowledge on strategic public relations and public communication by offering a specific analysis of the strategic management of information and communication programs in the Italian public administration....

  3. Assessment of prospective foodchain doses from radioactive discharges from BNFL Sellafield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ould-Dada, Z. E-mail: zitouni.ould-dada@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk; Tucker, S.; Webbe-Wood, D.; Mondon, K.; Hunt, J

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents the method used by the UK Food Standards Agency (FSA) to assess the potential impact of proposed radioactive discharges from the Sellafield nuclear site on food and determine their acceptability. It explains aspects of a cautious method that has been adopted to reflect the UK government policy and uncertainties related to people's habits with regard to food production and consumption. Two types of ingestion doses are considered in this method: 'possible' and 'probable' doses. The method is specifically applied to Sellafield discharge limits and calculated possible and probable ingestion doses are presented and discussed. Estimated critical group ingestion doses are below the dose limit and constraint set for members of the public. The method may be subject to future amendments to take account of changes in government policy and the outcome of a recent Consultative Exercise on Dose Assessments carried out by FSA. Uncertainties inherent in dose assessments are discussed and quantified wherever possible.

  4. A Commentary on: "A History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Antone L

    2015-04-01

    This commentary provides a very brief overview of the book "A History of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Research Program: 1998-2008" ( http://lowdose.energy.gov ). The book summarizes and evaluates the research progress, publications and impact of the U.S. Department of Energy Low Dose Radiation Research Program over its first 10 years. The purpose of this book was to summarize the impact of the program's research on the current thinking and low-dose paradigms associated with the radiation biology field and to help stimulate research on the potential adverse and/or protective health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation. In addition, this book provides a summary of the data generated in the low dose program and a scientific background for anyone interested in conducting future research on the effects of low-dose or low-dose-rate radiation exposure. This book's exhaustive list of publications coupled with discussions of major observations should provide a significant resource for future research in the low-dose and dose-rate region. However, because of space limitations, only a limited number of critical references are mentioned. Finally, this history book provides a list of major advancements that were accomplished by the program in the field of radiation biology, and these bulleted highlights can be found in last part of chapters 4-10.

  5. Individual dose due to radioactivity accidental release from fusion reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Baojie; Ni, Muyi; Wei, Shiping

    2017-04-05

    As an important index shaping the design of fusion safety system, evaluation of public radiation consequences have risen as a hot topic on the way to develop fusion energy. In this work, the comprehensive public early dose was evaluated due to unit gram tritium (HT/HTO), activated dust, activated corrosion products (ACPs) and activated gases accidental release from ITER like fusion reactor. Meanwhile, considering that we cannot completely eliminate the occurrence likelihood of multi-failure of vacuum vessel and tokamak building, we conservatively evaluated the public radiation consequences and environment restoration after the worst hypothetical accident preliminarily. The comparison results show early dose of different unit radioactivity release under different conditions. After further performing the radiation consequences, we find it possible that the hypothetical accident for ITER like fusion reactor would result in a level 6 accident according to INES, not appear level 7 like Chernobyl or Fukushima accidents. And from the point of environment restoration, we need at least 69 years for case 1 (1kg HTO and 1000kg dust release) and 34-52years for case 2 (1kg HTO and 10kg-100kg dust release) to wait the contaminated zone drop below the general public safety limit (1mSv per year) before it is suitable for human habitation.

  6. Exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation and public health : review of safety levels; Exposicion a radiaciones no ionizantes ambientales y salud publica: Una revision de las bases biomedicas de los limites de seguridad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubeda, A.; Trillo, M. A.

    2005-07-01

    The potential health effects of the exposure to non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation are a source of increasing interest on the part of the public and the authorities. This article summarizes the theoretical-experimental basis supporting the safety levels proposed by international committees, and reviews the recent scientific literature on non-ionizing radiation's bioeffects that are relevant to the validation or modification of the present exposure limits. Because of its social interest, special consideration is given to power frequency fields (50-60Hz) and to the radio communication signals of mobile telephony. The paper also describes how interpretations of the scientific evidence, other than those of the international committees, have generated some controversy and have provided a basis for more restrictive limits, like those adopted in Europe by Switzerland and Italy. The article also identifies some gaps in the present scientific knowledge on the bioelectromagnetics discipline and proposes that additional research is needed to complete our present knowledge on the biological responses to non-ionizing radiation. (Author) 80 refs.

  7. Public Speech.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Thomas F.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the importance of public speech in society, noting the power of public speech to create a world and a public. The paper offers a theory of public speech, identifies types of public speech, and types of public speech fallacies. Two ways of speaking of the public and of public life are distinguished. (SM)

  8. Current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loescher, D.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Systems Surety Assessment Dept.; Noren, K. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    1996-09-01

    The current that flows between the electrical test equipment and the nuclear explosive must be limited to safe levels during electrical tests conducted on nuclear explosives at the DOE Pantex facility. The safest way to limit the current is to use batteries that can provide only acceptably low current into a short circuit; unfortunately this is not always possible. When it is not possible, current limiters, along with other design features, are used to limit the current. Three types of current limiters, the fuse blower, the resistor limiter, and the MOSFET-pass-transistor limiters, are used extensively in Pantex test equipment. Detailed failure mode and effects analyses were conducted on these limiters. Two other types of limiters were also analyzed. It was found that there is no best type of limiter that should be used in all applications. The fuse blower has advantages when many circuits must be monitored, a low insertion voltage drop is important, and size and weight must be kept low. However, this limiter has many failure modes that can lead to the loss of over current protection. The resistor limiter is simple and inexpensive, but is normally usable only on circuits for which the nominal current is less than a few tens of milliamperes. The MOSFET limiter can be used on high current circuits, but it has a number of single point failure modes that can lead to a loss of protective action. Because bad component placement or poor wire routing can defeat any limiter, placement and routing must be designed carefully and documented thoroughly.

  9. Appropriate Use of Effective Dose in Radiation Protection and Risk Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Darrell R; Fahey, Frederic H

    2017-08-01

    Effective dose was introduced by the ICRP for the single, over-arching purpose of setting limits for radiation protection. Effective dose is a derived quantity or mathematical construct and not a physical, measurable quantity. The formula for calculating effective dose to a reference model incorporates terms to account for all radiation types, organ and tissue radiosensitivities, population groups, and multiple biological endpoints. The properties and appropriate applications of effective dose are not well understood by many within and outside the health physics profession; no other quantity in radiation protection has been more confusing or misunderstood. According to ICRP Publication 103, effective dose is to be used for "prospective dose assessment for planning and optimization in radiological protection, and retrospective demonstration of compliance for regulatory purposes." In practice, effective dose has been applied incorrectly to predict cancer risk among exposed persons. The concept of effective dose applies generally to reference models only and not to individual subjects. While conceived to represent a measure of cancer risk or heritable detrimental effects, effective dose is not predictive of future cancer risk. The formula for calculating effective dose incorporates committee-selected weighting factors for radiation quality and organ sensitivity; however, the organ weighting factors are averaged across all ages and both genders and thus do not apply to any specific individual or radiosensitive subpopulations such as children and young women. Further, it is not appropriate to apply effective dose to individual medical patients because patient-specific parameters may vary substantially from the assumptions used in generalized models. Also, effective dose is not applicable to therapeutic uses of radiation, as its mathematical underpinnings pertain only to observed late (stochastic) effects of radiation exposure and do not account for short-term adverse

  10. Organ doses from computerized tomography examinations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janeczek, J.

    1995-12-31

    Estimates of mean organs doses from five typical computerized tomography (CT) examinations were obtained. Measurements were done using Rando-Alderson anthropomorphic phantom and thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD). Radiation dose distributions within a phantom has been measured for each examination and results were used for organ dose calculation. Doses to organs specified by ICPR 60 Recommendations were measured for five CT scanners (CT/T8800, CT 9800, CT MAX - made by General Electric; CT 1200 SX - made by Picker; SOMATOM 2 - made by Siemens). Dose distributions from scattered radiation were measured and indicate that scattered radiation dose to thyroid and eye lens can be reduced by proper examination limits setting. The lowest mean organ doses were obtained from CT/T8800 scanner. More advanced scanners using high intensity continuous radiation were giving higher organ doses. (author). 23 refs, 6 figs, 13 tabs.

  11. Effective dose in the manufacturing process of rutile covered welding electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herranz, M; Rozas, S; Pérez, C; Idoeta, R; Núñez-Lagos, R; Legarda, F

    2013-03-01

    Shielded metal arc welding using covered electrodes is the most common welding process. Sometimes the covering contains naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORMs). In Spain the most used electrodes are those covered with rutile mixed with other materials. Rutile contains some detectable natural radionuclides, so it can be considered a NORM. This paper mainly focuses on the use of MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code) as a predictive tool to obtain doses in a factory which produces this type of electrode and assess the radiological impact in a specific facility after estimating the internal dose.To do this, in the facility, areas of highest radiation and positions of workers were identified, radioactive content of rutile and rutile covered electrodes was measured, and, considering a worst possible scenario, external dose at working points has been calculated using MCNP. This procedure has been validated comparing the results obtained with those from a pressurised ionisation chamber and TLD dosimeters. The internal dose has been calculated using DCAL (dose and risk calculation). The doses range between 8.8 and 394 μSv yr(-1), always lower than the effective dose limit for the public, 1 mSv yr(-1). The highest dose corresponds to the mixing area.

  12. Low doses controversy; La controverse des faibles doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R. [Office de Protection contre les Rayonnements Ionisants, 78 -le Vesinet (France); Carde, C. [EDF, 75 - Paris (France)

    1997-12-31

    In this article is studied the question of low dose irradiation. From this question, the risk assessment and how it is perceived in public opinion is studied. Then, it is more generally, the question of public opinion and the information made by the media which is discussed. Different events and how they were related in press are reviewed: leukemia around La Hague, human guinea-pigs for plutonium, Chernobyl consequences, survivors from Hiroshima, nuclear nomads ( for temporary workers and their bad medical surveillance ), radioactive effluents releases from La Hague, Valduc or Cattenom. (N.C.).

  13. Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.; Tebes, C.L. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    A preliminary radiological dose assessment of equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in production waste streams. The assessment estimated maximum individual dose equivalents for workers and the general public. Sensitivity analyses of certain input parameters also were conducted. On the basis of this assessment, it is concluded that (1) regulations requiring workers to wear respiratory protection during equipment cleaning operations are likely to result in lower worker doses, (2) underground injection and downhole encapsulation of NORM wastes present a negligible risk to the general public, and (3) potential doses to workers and the general public related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment can be controlled by limiting the contamination level of the initial feed. It is recommended that (1) NORM wastes be further characterized to improve studies of potential radiological doses; (2) states be encouraged to permit subsurface disposal of NORM more readily, provided further assessments support this study; results; (3) further assessment of landspreading NORM wastes be conducted; and (4) the political, economic, sociological, and nonradiological issues related to smelting NORM-contaminated equipment be studied to fully examine the feasibility of this disposal option.

  14. Influence of particle size distribution on inhalation doses to workers in the Florida phosphate industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Pyo; Wu, Chang-Yu; Birky, Brian K; Bolch, Wesley E

    2006-07-01

    Previous studies have indicated that inhalation exposures to TENORM aerosols are potentially a major contributor to the annual total effective dose to workers in the Florida phosphate industry. Further research was deemed necessary to characterize the particle size distribution of these aerosols containing various radionuclides of the U decay series. In the present study, individualized assessments of worker committed effective doses are reported in which detailed information is used on the particle size distribution, particle density, particle shape, and radioactivity concentrations from sampled aerosols at 6 different phosphate facilities and at various worker areas within these facilities. Inhalation dose assessments are calculated using the ICRP 66 human respiratory tract model as implemented within the LUDEP and IMBA computer codes. Under the least conservative assumptions of radionuclide-specific lung solubility, the annual total effective doses are shown to be 0.31+/-0.12, 0.27+/-0.07, and 0.22+/-0.02 mSv at granulator, storage, and shipping areas, respectively, and thus all annual doses are below the annual limits to the members of the general public (1 mSv y). In contrast, the most conservative assumptions of lung solubility by radionuclide yield annual total effective doses of 2.24+/-2.53 mSv at granulator areas, 1.26+/-1.19 mSv at storage areas, and 0.56+/-0.36 mSv at shipping areas. In this later case, some 44%, 31%, and 15% of individual dose assessments yield worker doses above the annual dose limit. The study thus demonstrates the importance of facility- and area-specific particle solubility data in dose assessments for regulatory compliance and for making decisions regarding worker respiratory protection.

  15. 45 CFR 5.35 - Time limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time limits. 5.35 Section 5.35 Public Welfare... Denial of Records § 5.35 Time limits. (a) General. FOIA sets certain time limits for us to decide whether... time limits, but if it appears that processing your request may take longer than we would wish, we...

  16. 45 CFR 3.26 - Speed limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed limit. 3.26 Section 3.26 Public Welfare... INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Traffic Regulations § 3.26 Speed limit. The speed limit is 25 miles per hour, unless otherwise posted. A driver of a vehicle may not exceed the speed limit....

  17. Acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duck, Francis

    2009-10-01

    Acoustic dose is defined as the energy deposited by absorption of an acoustic wave per unit mass of the medium supporting the wave. Expressions for acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate are given for plane-wave conditions, including temporal and frequency dependencies of energy deposition. The relationship between the acoustic dose-rate and the resulting temperature increase is explored, as is the relationship between acoustic dose-rate and radiation force. Energy transfer from the wave to the medium by means of acoustic cavitation is considered, and an approach is proposed in principle that could allow cavitation to be included within the proposed definitions of acoustic dose and acoustic dose-rate.

  18. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  19. Limiting Skepticism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendricks, Vincent Fella; Symons, John

    2011-01-01

    Skeptics argue that the acquisition of knowledge is impossible given the standing possibility of error. We present the limiting convergence strategy for responding to skepticism and discuss the relationship between conceivable error and an agent’s knowledge in the limit. We argue that the skeptic...

  20. Limited Neutrality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten Ebbe Juul

    2006-01-01

    Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."......Article Concerning the prospect of a kind of limited neutrality in place of the standard liberal egalitarian "neutrality of justification."...

  1. Modeling Complex Time Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg Svatos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyze complexity of time limits we can find especially in regulated processes of public administration. First we review the most popular process modeling languages. There is defined an example scenario based on the current Czech legislature which is then captured in discussed process modeling languages. Analysis shows that the contemporary process modeling languages support capturing of the time limit only partially. This causes troubles to analysts and unnecessary complexity of the models. Upon unsatisfying results of the contemporary process modeling languages we analyze the complexity of the time limits in greater detail and outline lifecycles of a time limit using the multiple dynamic generalizations pattern. As an alternative to the popular process modeling languages there is presented PSD process modeling language, which supports the defined lifecycles of a time limit natively and therefore allows keeping the models simple and easy to understand.

  2. Inverse Limits

    CERN Document Server

    Ingram, WT

    2012-01-01

    Inverse limits provide a powerful tool for constructing complicated spaces from simple ones. They also turn the study of a dynamical system consisting of a space and a self-map into a study of a (likely more complicated) space and a self-homeomorphism. In four chapters along with an appendix containing background material the authors develop the theory of inverse limits. The book begins with an introduction through inverse limits on [0,1] before moving to a general treatment of the subject. Special topics in continuum theory complete the book. Although it is not a book on dynamics, the influen

  3. Analysis of Cumulative Dose to Implanted Pacemaker According to Various IMRT Delivery Methods: Optimal Dose Delivery Versus Dose Reduction Strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Woo; Hong, Se Mie [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Cancer patients with implanted cardiac pacemaker occasionally require radiotherapy. Pacemaker may be damaged or malfunction during radiotherapy due to ionizing radiation or electromagnetic interference. Although radiotherapy should be planned to keep the dose to pacemaker as low as possible not to malfunction ideally, current radiation treatment planning (RTP) system does not accurately calculate deposited dose to adjacent field border or area beyond irradiated fields. In terms of beam delivery techniques using multiple intensity modulated fields, dosimetric effect of scattered radiation in high energy photon beams is required to be detailed analyzed based on measurement data. The aim of this study is to evaluate dose discrepancies of pacemaker in a RTP system as compared to measured doses. We also designed dose reduction strategy limited value of 2 Gy for radiation treatment patients with cardiac implanted pacemaker. Total accumulated dose of 145 cGy based on in-vivo dosimetry was satisfied with the recommendation criteria to prevent malfunction of pacemaker in SS technique. However, the 2 mm lead shielder enabled the scattered doses to reduce up to 60% and 40% in the patient and the phantom, respectively. The SS technique with the lead shielding could reduce the accumulated scattered doses less than 100 cGy. Calculated and measured doses were not greatly affected by the beam delivery techniques. In-vivo and measured doses on pacemaker position showed critical dose discrepancies reaching up to 4 times as compared to planned doses in RTP. The current SS technique could deliver lower scattered doses than recommendation criteria, but use of 2 mm lead shielder contributed to reduce scattered doses by 60%. The tertiary lead shielder can be useful to prevent malfunction or electrical damage of implanted pacemakers during radiotherapy. It is required to estimate more accurate scattered doses of the patient or medical device in RTP to design proper dose reduction strategy.

  4. Dose mapping for documentation of radiation sterilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1999-01-01

    The radiation sterilization standards EN 552 and ISO 11137 require that dose mapping in real or simulated product be carried in connection with the process qualification. This paper reviews the recommendations given in the standards and discusses the difficulties and limitations of practical dose...... mapping. The paper further gives recommendations for effective dose mapping including traceable dosimetry, documented procedures for placement of dosimeters, and evaluation of measurement uncertainties. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  5. Committed effective dose determination in cereal flours by gamma-ray spectrometry; Determinacao das doses efetivas por ingestao de farinhas de cereais atraves da espectrometria de raios gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheibel, Viviane

    2006-07-01

    The health impact from radionuclides ingestion of foodstuffs was evaluated by the committed effective doses determined in commercial samples of South-Brazilian cereal flours (soy, wheat, corn, manioc, rye, oat, barley and rice flour). The radioactivity traces of {sup 228}Th, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 40}K, {sup 7}Be and {sup 137}Cs were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry employing a 66% relative efficiency HPGe detector. The energy resolution for the 1332.46 keV line of {sup 60}Co was 2.03 keV. The committed effective doses were calculated with the activities analyzed in the present flour samples, the foodstuff rates of consumption (Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics) and the ingestion dose coefficients (International Commission of Radiological Protection). The reliability median activities were verified with {chi}{sup 2} tests, assuring the fittings quality. The highest concentration levels of {sup 228}Th and {sup 40}K were 3.5 {+-} 0.4 and 1469 {+-} 17 Bq.kg{sup -1} for soy flour, respectively, with 95% of confidence level. The lower limit of detection for {sup 137}Cs ranged from 0.04 to 0.4 Bq.kg{sup -1}. The highest committed effective dose was 0.36 {mu}Sv.y{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra in manioc flour (adults). All committed effective doses determined at the present work were lower than the UNSCEAR limits of 140 {mu}Sv.y{sup -1} and much lower than the ICRP (1991) limits of 1 mSv.y{sup -1}, for general public. There are few literature references for natural and artificial radionuclides in foodstuffs and mainly for committed effective doses. This work brings the barley flour data, which is not present at the literature and {sup 7}Be data which is not encountered in foodstuffs at the literature, besides all the other flours data information about activities and committed effective doses. (author)

  6. Occupational eye dose in interventional cardiology procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, Yoshihiro; Chida, Koichi; Kaga, Yuji; Sota, Masahiro; Meguro, Taiichiro; Zuguchi, Masayuki

    2017-04-03

    It is important to measure the radiation dose [3-mm dose equivalent, Hp(3)] in the eye. This study was to determine the current occupational radiation eye dose of staff conducting interventional cardiology procedures, using a novel direct eye dosimeter. We measured the occupational eye dose [Hp(3)] in physicians and nurses in a catheterization laboratory for 6-months. The eye doses [Hp(3)] of 12 physicians (9 with Pb glasses, 3 without), and 11 nurses were recorded using a novel direct eye dosimeter, the DOSIRIS(TM). We placed dosimeters above and under the glasses. We also estimated the eye dose [0.07-mm dose equivalent] using a neck personal dosimeter. The eye doses among interventional staff ranked in the following order: physicians without Pb glasses > physicians with Pb glasses > nurses. The shielding effect of the glasses (0.07-mm Pb) in a clinical setting was approximately 60%. In physicians who do not wear Pb glasses, the eye dose may exceed the new regulatory limit for IR staff. We found good correlations between the neck dosimeter dose and eye dosimeter dose (inside or outside glasses, R(2) = 0.93 and R(2) = 0.86, respectively) in physicians. We recommend that interventional physicians use an eye dosimeter for correct evaluation of the lens dose.

  7. Public Values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck Jørgensen, Torben; Rutgers, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    administration is approached in terms of processes guided or restricted by public values and as public value creating: public management and public policy-making are both concerned with establishing, following and realizing public values. To study public values a broad perspective is needed. The article suggest......This article provides the introduction to a symposium on contemporary public values research. It is argued that the contribution to this symposium represent a Public Values Perspective, distinct from other specific lines of research that also use public value as a core concept. Public...... a research agenda for this encompasing kind of public values research. Finally the contributions to the symposium are introduced....

  8. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M. (comp.)

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assembles, evaluates, and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. In addition to population and demographic data, the food and water resources and consumption patterns for populations are estimated because they provide a primary pathway for the intake of radionuclides. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task use the information produced by the other tasks to estimate the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford radiation. Project progress is documented in this monthly report, which is available to the public. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Benchmark Dose Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finite doses are employed in experimental toxicology studies. Under the traditional methodology, the point of departure (POD) value for low dose extrapolation is identified as one of these doses. Dose spacing necessarily precludes a more accurate description of the POD value. ...

  10. Establishment of a Dose-response Curve for X-ray-Induced Micronuclei in Human Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusiyanti, Yanti; Alatas, Zubaidah; Syaifudin, Mukh; Purnami, Sofiati

    2016-01-01

    The cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay in peripheral blood lymphocytes is an established technique for biodosimetry. The aim of this project was to generate a X-ray induced micronuclei (MN) curve for peripheral blood lymphocytes taken from five healthy donors. The blood samples were irradiated with X-rays of 122 KeV at a dose rate of 0.652 Gy/min to doses of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, and 4 Gy. The blood samples were then cultured for 72 h at 37°C and processed following the International Atomic Energy Agency standard procedure with slight modifications. The result showed that the yields of MN frequencies were increased with the increase of radiation dose. Reconstruction of the relationship of MN with dose was fitted to a linear-quadratic model using Chromosome Aberration Calculation Software version 2.0. Due to their advantages, mainly, the dependence on radiation dose and dose rate, despite their limitation, these curves will be useful as alternative method for in vitro dose reconstruction and can support the preparedness for public or occupational radiation overexposure and protection. The results reported here also give us confidence to apply the obtained calibration curve of MN for future biological dosimetry requirements in Indonesia.

  11. Public regulators and CSR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    2016-01-01

    for responsible business conduct, connecting to social expectations and bridging to public regulation. This UN guidance has had a significant bearing on how public regulators seek to influence business conduct beyond Human Rights to broader Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) concerns. Drawing on examples...... of such public regulatory governance, this article explores and explains developments towards a juridification of CSR entailing efforts by public regulators to reach beyond jurisdictional and territorial limitations of conventional public law to address adverse effects of transnational economic activity. Through...

  12. Multifamily Tax Subsidy Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — Multifamily Tax Subsidy Projects (MTSP) Income Limits were developed to meet the requirements established by the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (Public...

  13. Radiological environmental dose assessment methods and compliance dose results for 2015 operations at the Savannah River Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2015 Savannah River Site (SRS) atmospheric and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios - such as the consumption of deer meat, fish, and goat milk.

  14. Radiological environmental dose assessment methods and compliance dose results for 2015 operations at the savannah river site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jannik, G. T. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Dixon, K. L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-01

    This report presents the environmental dose assessment methods and the estimated potential doses to the offsite public from 2015 Savannah River Site (SRS) atmospheric and liquid radioactive releases. Also documented are potential doses from special-case exposure scenarios - such as the consumption of deer meat, fish, and goat milk.

  15. Evaluation of radioprotection conditions and patient dose in thorax exams carried out in a public children's hospital in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil; Avaliacao das condicoes de radioprotecao e dose paciente em exames de torax realizados em um hospital publico infantil de Belo Horizonte, MG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Marco A.S.; Silva, Teogenes A. da; Guedes, Elton C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Khoury, Helen J. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Azevedo, Ana C.P. [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (ENSP-CESTEH), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    We conducted a survey of the conditions of radiation protection, radiographic techniques, dose and risk for pediatric patients undergoing chest X-rays exams in a children's hospital in Belo Horizonte-MG, Brazil. From a total of 125 chest exams (projections AP and PA) were noted the patient data (gender, weight, and age) and parameters of radiographic technique (kV, mAs and distance focus-skin). I was also evaluated the working procedures and the conditions of radiation protection. The values of input air kerma (K{sub a,e}) and effective dose (E) were determined using the DoseCal software developed by Radiological Protection Center of Saint Georges's Hospital in London. With respect to the procedures and conditions for radiation protection, many aspects of Portaria 453 are not considered. The use of radiographic techniques with high values of mAs and low voltage values are not according with the quality criteria adopted by the European Community (EC). The values of Ka for patients aged 1 to 5 years varied between 51 {mu}Gy and 64 {mu}Gy, below the reference levels proposed by the EC. For patients over 5 years old, the values of Ka were substantially higher than those for other patients. The results allow to conclude that there is a need for optimization of the procedures adopted in order to reduce the dose and the risk to patients.

  16. 42 CFR 93.105 - Time limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time limitations. 93.105 Section 93.105 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES ON...

  17. Can digoxin dose requirements be predicted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, S M; Mawer, G E; Rodgers, M; Woodcock, B G; Lucas, S B

    1976-04-01

    A search for patient variables relevant to digoxin dose requirements was made in fourty-three patients with a wide range of renal and hepatic function. The daily dose of digoxin to achieve a mean serum concentration of 1.5 ng/ml, the standardized dose, was calculated for each patient. The standardized dose correlated significantly with the following variables, in descending order of correlation coefficient; creatinine clearance, serum creatinine concentration, body weight and serum albumin concentration. An equation containing the two independent variables, creatinine clearance and serum albumin concentration, had a significantly stronger correlation with standardized dose than creatinine clearance alone. Attempts were made in each patient to predict the standardized dose using both empirical prescribing methods and the published nomograms. Although a maximum of 70% of the variance of the standardized dose was explained, this corresponded approximately to one patient in three having a predicted dose outside the 95% confidnece limits for the standardized dose. There remain important sources of individual variation in digoxin dose requirements yet to be identified. Future application of empirical prescribing methods, such as multiple linear regression and Bayes' theorem, to prescription for large, defined patient groups may improve dose prediction for individual patients.

  18. Dose response biology: the case of resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J; Mattson, Mark P; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2010-12-01

    Resveratrol often displays hormesis-like biphasic dose responses. This occurs in a broad range of biological models and for numerous endpoints of biomedical interest and public health concern. Recognition of the widespread occurrence of the hormetic nature of many of the responses of resveratrol is important on multiple levels. It can help optimize study design protocols by investigators, create a dose-response framework for better addressing dose-related biological complexities and assist in the development of public health and medical guidance with respect to considerations for what is an optimal dose not just for an agent such as resveratrol, but also for the plethora of agents that also act via hormetic mechanisms.

  19. Public Sector Expatriate Managers:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenner, Charles, R., Jr.; Selmer, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Although public sector expatriates are becoming increasingly common, research on them is very limited. There is reason to believe that the situation for expatriates from the public sector may be different than for those from the private sector. This study investigated U.S. Department of Defense a...

  20. Vertical distribution and estimated doses from artificial radionuclides in soil samples around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the Semipalatinsk nuclear testing site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Yasuyuki; Hayashida, Naomi; Tsuchiya, Rimi; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Kazlovsky, Alexander; Urazalin, Marat; Rakhypbekov, Tolebay; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2013-01-01

    For the current on-site evaluation of the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) and the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS), the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Four artificial radionuclides ((241)Am, (134)Cs, (137)Cs, and (60)Co) were detected in surface soil around CNPP, whereas seven artificial radionuclides ((241)Am, (57)Co, (137)Cs, (95)Zr, (95)Nb, (58)Co, and (60)Co) were detected in surface soil around SNTS. Effective doses around CNPP were over the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1991). These levels in a contaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 were high, whereas levels in a decontaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 and another contaminated area 15 km from Unit 4 were comparatively low. On the other hand, the effective doses around SNTS were below the public dose limit. These findings suggest that the environmental contamination and effective doses on the ground definitely decrease with decontamination such as removing surface soil, although the effective doses of the sampling points around CNPP in the present study were all over the public dose limit. Thus, the remediation of soil as a countermeasure could be an extremely effective method not only for areas around CNPP and SNTS but also for areas around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP), and external exposure levels will be certainly reduced. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP, SNTS, and FNPP, as well as evaluation of the health effects in the population residing around these areas, could contribute to radiation safety and reduce unnecessary exposure to the public.

  1. Vertical distribution and estimated doses from artificial radionuclides in soil samples around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant and the Semipalatinsk nuclear testing site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Taira

    Full Text Available For the current on-site evaluation of the environmental contamination and contributory external exposure after the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP and the nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Testing Site (SNTS, the concentrations of artificial radionuclides in soil samples from each area were analyzed by gamma spectrometry. Four artificial radionuclides ((241Am, (134Cs, (137Cs, and (60Co were detected in surface soil around CNPP, whereas seven artificial radionuclides ((241Am, (57Co, (137Cs, (95Zr, (95Nb, (58Co, and (60Co were detected in surface soil around SNTS. Effective doses around CNPP were over the public dose limit of 1 mSv/y (International Commission on Radiological Protection, 1991. These levels in a contaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 were high, whereas levels in a decontaminated area 12 km from Unit 4 and another contaminated area 15 km from Unit 4 were comparatively low. On the other hand, the effective doses around SNTS were below the public dose limit. These findings suggest that the environmental contamination and effective doses on the ground definitely decrease with decontamination such as removing surface soil, although the effective doses of the sampling points around CNPP in the present study were all over the public dose limit. Thus, the remediation of soil as a countermeasure could be an extremely effective method not only for areas around CNPP and SNTS but also for areas around the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP, and external exposure levels will be certainly reduced. Long-term follow-up of environmental monitoring around CNPP, SNTS, and FNPP, as well as evaluation of the health effects in the population residing around these areas, could contribute to radiation safety and reduce unnecessary exposure to the public.

  2. 36 CFR 4.21 - Speed limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 4.21 Section 4... TRAFFIC SAFETY § 4.21 Speed limits. (a) Park area speed limits are as follows: (1) 15 miles per hour... superintendent may designate a different speed limit upon any park road when a speed limit set forth in...

  3. Public Entrepreneurship

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    on the entrepreneurship–society relationship. SE, as all entrepreneurship practices, operates by social and economic forces (limiting ourselves to those here), and generates social and economic outcomes (amongst others). Its second half, however, dominates the concept of SE, and our analysis seek to remedy this imbalance......In this paper we want to affirm the desiring-social-change that we find in practices presently represented by theorists and policy-makers as examples of ‘social entrepreneurship’ (SE). We do this as an attempt to intensify the presence of the social and sociality in today's discourse...... by focusing on the social productivity of entrepreneurship, on entrepreneurship desiring social change. We suggest ‘public entrepreneurship’ might grasp this as a more balanced concept that will also support a more precise analysis of the entrepreneurship–society relationship....

  4. Postmarketing review of intravenous acetaminophen dosing based on Food and Drug Administration prescribing guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dela Cruz Ubaldo, Catherine; Hall, Natalie Semaan; Le, Brenden

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the appropriateness of intravenous acetaminophen dosing-prescribed dose, frequency, duration, and indication-based on United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved prescribing guidelines and to evaluate the adverse effect profile of intravenous acetaminophen. Retrospective chart review. United States Navy medical center. Three hundred patients who received intravenous acetaminophen from August 1, 2011, to August 1, 2012. The indications, dose, frequency, and duration of intravenous acetaminophen were recorded for each patient. Adverse effects of intravenous acetaminophen were analyzed by thoroughly reviewing any adverse effects documented, including nausea, vomiting, headache, or any symptom specifically attributed to the drug. Baseline liver function tests, including aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, and elevations 3 times the upper limit of normal during intravenous acetaminophen therapy were recorded. The average patient weight was 78±21 kg, with 12 patients (4%) weighing less than 50 kg and 288 (96%) patients weighing 50 kg or greater. Two hundred forty-one patients (80%) were appropriately dosed, whereas 59 (20%) patients were not appropriately dosed based on the FDA-approved dosing. No patients exceeded the FDA-approved maximum daily dosing recommendations for intravenous acetaminophen (4 g). Sixty-five patients (22%) received intravenous acetaminophen for longer than 24 hours. Intravenous acetaminophen was well tolerated, without any reported adverse effects, including the commonly reported adverse effects of nausea, vomiting, headache, and insomnia. Ten patients (3%) had a documented history of liver disease and did not experience any adverse effects or increases in liver function tests after the administration of intravenous acetaminophen. Intravenous acetaminophen appeared to be a safe and effective analgesic and antipyretic agent. Dosing for patients weighing less than 50 kg needs to be appropriately

  5. Effective dose: a radiation protection quantity

    CERN Document Server

    Menzel, H G

    2012-01-01

    Modern radiation protection is based on the principles of justification, limitation, and optimisation. Assessment of radiation risks for individuals or groups of individuals is, however, not a primary objective of radiological protection. The implementation of the principles of limitation and optimisation requires an appropriate quantification of radiation exposure. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has introduced effective dose as the principal radiological protection quantity to be used for setting and controlling dose limits for stochastic effects in the regulatory context, and for the practical implementation of the optimisation principle. Effective dose is the tissue weighted sum of radiation weighted organ and tissue doses of a reference person from exposure to external irradiations and internal emitters. The specific normalised values of tissue weighting factors are defined by ICRP for individual tissues, and used as an approximate age- and sex-averaged representation of th...

  6. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schreuder, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The function of public lighting and the relationship between public lighting and accidents are considered briefly as aspects of effective countermeasures. Research needs and recent developments in installation and operational described. Public lighting is an efficient accident countermeasure, but

  7. Limits on $\

    CERN Document Server

    Perego, D L

    2002-01-01

    A limit on the tau neutrino mass is obtained using all the $Z^{0} \\to \\tau^{+} \\tau^{-}$ data collected at LEP by the DELPHI detector between 1992 and 1995. In this analysis events in which one of the taus decays into one charged particle, while the second $\\tau$ decays into f{}ive charged pions (1-5 topology) have been used. The neutrino mass is determined from a bidimensional \\fit ~on the invariant mass $m^{*}_{5 \\pi}$ and on the energy $E_{5 \\pi}$ of the f{}ive $\\pi^{\\pm}$ system. The result found is $m_{\

  8. Dose Titration Algorithm Tuning (DTAT) should supersede 'the' Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) in oncology dose-finding trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, David C

    2017-01-01

    Background. Absent adaptive, individualized dose-finding in early-phase oncology trials, subsequent 'confirmatory' Phase III trials risk suboptimal dosing, with resulting loss of statistical power and reduced probability of technical success for the investigational therapy. While progress has been made toward explicitly adaptive dose-finding and quantitative modeling of dose-response relationships, most such work continues to be organized around a concept of 'the' maximum tolerated dose (MTD). The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate concretely how the aim of early-phase trials might be conceived, not as 'dose-finding', but as dose titration algorithm (DTA)-finding. Methods. A Phase I dosing study is simulated, for a notional cytotoxic chemotherapy drug, with neutropenia constituting the critical dose-limiting toxicity. The drug's population pharmacokinetics and myelosuppression dynamics are simulated using published parameter estimates for docetaxel. The amenability of this model to linearization is explored empirically. The properties of a simple DTA targeting neutrophil nadir of 500 cells/mm (3) using a Newton-Raphson heuristic are explored through simulation in 25 simulated study subjects. Results. Individual-level myelosuppression dynamics in the simulation model approximately linearize under simple transformations of neutrophil concentration and drug dose. The simulated dose titration exhibits largely satisfactory convergence, with great variance in individualized optimal dosing. Some titration courses exhibit overshooting. Conclusions. The large inter-individual variability in simulated optimal dosing underscores the need to replace 'the' MTD with an individualized concept of MTD i . To illustrate this principle, the simplest possible DTA capable of realizing such a concept is demonstrated. Qualitative phenomena observed in this demonstration support discussion of the notion of tuning such algorithms. Although here illustrated specifically in relation to

  9. Antimicrobial Doses in Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Comparison of Dosing Strategies

    OpenAIRE

    Anna P. Kempke; Leino, Abbie S.; Farzad Daneshvar; John Andrew Lee; Mueller, Bruce A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Drug dose recommendations are not well defined in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) due to limited published data. Several guidelines and pharmacokinetic equations have been proposed as tools for CRRT drug dosing. Dose recommendations derived from these methods have yet to be compared or prospectively evaluated. Methods. A literature search of PubMed, Micromedex, and Embase was conducted for 40 drugs commonly used in the ICU to gather pharmacokinetic dat...

  10. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  11. Applicability of dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 to Asian adult males: Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choonsik [Department of Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-8300 (United States)]. E-mail: choonsiklee@gmail.com; Lee, Choonik [Anderson Cancer Center Orlando, Orlando, FL 32806 (United States); Lee, Jai-Ki [Department of Nulcear Engineering, Hanyang University, Haengdang, Sungdong 133-791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-05-15

    International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) reported comprehensive dose conversion coefficients for adult population, which is exposed to external photon sources in the Publication 74. However, those quantities were calculated from so-called stylized (or mathematical) phantoms composed of simplified mathematical surface equations so that the discrepancy between the phantoms and real human anatomy has been investigated by several authors using Caucasian-based voxel phantoms. To address anatomical and racial limitations of the stylized phantoms, several Asian-based voxel phantoms have been developed by Korean and Japanese investigators, independently. In the current study, photon dose conversion coefficients of ICRP 74 were compared with those from a total of five Asian-based male voxel phantoms, whose body dimensions were almost identical. Those of representative radio-sensitive organs (testes, red bone marrow, colon, lungs, and stomach), and effective dose conversion coefficients were obtained for comparison. Even though organ doses for testes, colon and lungs, and effective doses from ICRP 74 agreed well with those from Asian voxel phantoms within 10%, absorbed doses for red bone marrow and stomach showed significant discrepancies up to 30% which was mainly attributed to difference of phantom description between stylized and voxel phantoms. This study showed that the ICRP 74 dosimetry data, which have been reported to be unrealistic compared to those from Caucasian-based voxel phantoms, are also not appropriate for Asian population.

  12. Antimicrobial Doses in Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Comparison of Dosing Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempke, Anna P; Leino, Abbie S; Daneshvar, Farzad; Lee, John Andrew; Mueller, Bruce A

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Drug dose recommendations are not well defined in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) due to limited published data. Several guidelines and pharmacokinetic equations have been proposed as tools for CRRT drug dosing. Dose recommendations derived from these methods have yet to be compared or prospectively evaluated. Methods. A literature search of PubMed, Micromedex, and Embase was conducted for 40 drugs commonly used in the ICU to gather pharmacokinetic data acquired from patients with acute and chronic kidney disease as well as healthy volunteers. These data and that obtained from drug package inserts were gathered for use in three published CRRT drug dosing equations. Doses calculated for a model patient using each method were compared to doses suggested in a commonly used dosing text. Results. Full pharmacokinetic data was available for 18, 31, and 40 agents using acute kidney injury, end stage renal disease, and normal patient data, respectively. On average, calculated doses differed by 30% or more from the doses recommended by the renal dosing text for >50% of the medications. Conclusion. Wide variability in dose recommendations for patients undergoing CRRT exists when these equations are used. Alternate, validated dosing methods need to be developed for this at-risk patient population.

  13. Antimicrobial Doses in Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy: A Comparison of Dosing Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna P. Kempke

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Drug dose recommendations are not well defined in patients undergoing continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT due to limited published data. Several guidelines and pharmacokinetic equations have been proposed as tools for CRRT drug dosing. Dose recommendations derived from these methods have yet to be compared or prospectively evaluated. Methods. A literature search of PubMed, Micromedex, and Embase was conducted for 40 drugs commonly used in the ICU to gather pharmacokinetic data acquired from patients with acute and chronic kidney disease as well as healthy volunteers. These data and that obtained from drug package inserts were gathered for use in three published CRRT drug dosing equations. Doses calculated for a model patient using each method were compared to doses suggested in a commonly used dosing text. Results. Full pharmacokinetic data was available for 18, 31, and 40 agents using acute kidney injury, end stage renal disease, and normal patient data, respectively. On average, calculated doses differed by 30% or more from the doses recommended by the renal dosing text for >50% of the medications. Conclusion. Wide variability in dose recommendations for patients undergoing CRRT exists when these equations are used. Alternate, validated dosing methods need to be developed for this at-risk patient population.

  14. Clase social: entre los alcances y limitaciones de la salud mental laboral y la salud pública/Social class: between the scope and limitations of mental health at work and public health

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luz A F Pérez; Jairo E G Luna

    2014-01-01

      This essay arises a thesis on the failure of traditional theoretical models that address mental health at work, presented from a public health perspective on the subject in order to propose in this...

  15. [Absorbed doses in dental radiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, S D; Roccuzzo, M; Albrito, F; Ragona, R; Anglesio, S

    1996-01-01

    The growing use of dento-maxillo-facial radiographic examinations has been accompanied by the publication of a large number of studies on dosimetry. A thorough review of the literature is presented in this article. Most studies were carried out on tissue equivalent skull phantoms, while only a few were in vivo. The aim of the present study was to evaluate in vivo absorbed doses during Orthopantomography (OPT). Full Mouth Periapical Examination (FMPE) and Intraoral Tube Panoramic Radiography (ITPR). Measurements were made on 30 patients, reproducing clinical conditions, in 46 anatomical sites, with 24 intra- and 22 extra-oral thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDS). The highest doses were measured, in orthopantomography, at the right mandibular angle (1899 mu Gy) in FMPE on the right naso-labial fold (5640 mu Gy and in ITPR on the palatal surface of the left second upper molar (1936 mu Gy). Intraoral doses ranged from 21 mu Gy, in orthopantomography, to 4494 mu Gy in FMPE. Standard errors ranged from 142% in ITPR to 5% in orthopantomography. The highest rate of standard errors was found in FMPE and ITPR. The data collected in this trial are in agreement with others in major literature reports. Disagreements are probably due to different exam acquisition and data collections. Such differences, presented comparison in several sites, justify lower doses in FMPE and ITPR. Advantages and disadvantages of in vivo dosimetry of the maxillary region are discussed, the former being a close resemblance to clinical conditions of examination and the latter the impossibility of collecting values in depth of tissues. Finally, both ITPR and FMPE required lower doses than expected, and can be therefore reconsidered relative to their radiation risk.

  16. Public Broadcasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shooshan, Harry M.; Arnheim, Louise

    This paper, the second in a series exploring future options for public policy in the communications and information arenas, examines some of the issues underlying public broadcasting, primarily public television. It advances two reasons why quality local public television programming is scarce: funds for the original production of programming have…

  17. Confidence bounds for nonlinear dose-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baayen, C; Hougaard, P

    2015-11-30

    An important aim of drug trials is to characterize the dose-response relationship of a new compound. Such a relationship can often be described by a parametric (nonlinear) function that is monotone in dose. If such a model is fitted, it is useful to know the uncertainty of the fitted curve. It is well known that Wald confidence intervals are based on linear approximations and are often unsatisfactory in nonlinear models. Apart from incorrect coverage rates, they can be unreasonable in the sense that the lower confidence limit of the difference to placebo can be negative, even when an overall test shows a significant positive effect. Bootstrap confidence intervals solve many of the problems of the Wald confidence intervals but are computationally intensive and prone to undercoverage for small sample sizes. In this work, we propose a profile likelihood approach to compute confidence intervals for the dose-response curve. These confidence bounds have better coverage than Wald intervals and are more precise and generally faster than bootstrap methods. Moreover, if monotonicity is assumed, the profile likelihood approach takes this automatically into account. The approach is illustrated using a public dataset and simulations based on the Emax and sigmoid Emax models. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Determining the applicability of the Landauer nanoDot as a general public dosimeter in a research imaging facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Michael A; Thoreson, Kelly F; Cerecero, Jennifer A

    2012-11-01

    The Research Imaging Institute (RII) building at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) houses two cyclotron particle accelerators, positron emission tomography (PET) machines, and a fluoroscopic unit. As part of the radiation protection program (RPP) and meeting the standard for achieving ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable), it is essential to minimize the ionizing radiation exposure to the general public through the use of controlled areas and area dose monitoring. Currently, thirty-four whole body Luxel+ dosimeters, manufactured by Landauer, are being used in various locations within the RII to monitor dose to the general public. The intent of this research was to determine if the nanoDot, a single point dosimeter, can be used as a general public dosimeter in a diagnostic facility. This was tested by first verifying characteristics of the nanoDot dosimeter including dose linearity, dose rate dependence, angular dependence, and energy dependence. Then, the response of the nanoDot dosimeter to the Luxel+ dosimeter when placed in a continuous, low dose environment was investigated. Finally, the nanoDot was checked for appropriate response in an acute, high dose environment. Based on the results, the current recommendation is that the nanoDot should not replace the Luxel+ dosimeter without further work to determine the energy spectra in the RII building and without considering the limitation of the microStar reader, portable on-site OSL reader, at doses below 0.1 mGy (10 mrad).

  19. Dose estimation to the public and biota resulting from the use of {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 131}I in nuclear medicine in the city of Rio de Janeiro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Daniele Santos de; Lauria, Dejanira da Costa; Sa, Lidia Vasconcellos de; Bellido, Luis Fernando, E-mail: danisantos@ird.gov.br, E-mail: dejanira@ird.gov.br, E-mail: lidia@ird.gov.br, E-mail: lbellido@cnen.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    In Brazil there are around 340 Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS), 30 of them, are located in the city of Rio de Janeiro. The most widely used radionuclides in the country are {sup 131}I and {sup 99m}Tc, but among them, {sup 99m}Tc is the most concern, because it has a short half-life (6 hours) and decays to {sup 99}Tc, which is a beta emitter with a long half-life (214,000 years). It is estimated that 80% of radiopharmaceuticals administered to the patients are excreted still on the NMS, and then discharged to the city sewer system. In Rio de Janeiro the Alegria Station receives most of the sewage from the NMS, and after passing through all stages of treatment, the effluent is discharged into the Canal do Cunha and flows into the Guanabara Bay. The aim of this study is to perform a survey to estimate the {sup 131}I and {sup 99}Tc discharged levels at the Canal do Cunha and evaluate the radiological impact to non-human biota and to the populations exposed to these radionuclides. It was estimated based on data supplied by the national regulatory body that the treatment plant receives approximately 10{sup 14} Bq of {sup 99}Tc and 10{sup 12} Bq of {sup 131}I per year. Considering a conservative approach, in which all the radionuclides received by the station are released from it, the activity concentration of {sup 131}I at the discharge point (DP) is around 63 Bq/L in river water and 3 Bq/kg in the bottom sediments. The estimated activity concentration for {sup 99}Tc is 32 Bq/L in water and 6 Bq/kg in the sediment. For the community located downstream at 1200 meters from the DP, the activity concentration values in water and sediments are 18 Bq/L and 1 Bq/kg for {sup 131}I and 9 Bq/L and 2 Bq/kg for {sup 99}Tc, respectively. The annual effective dose for adult bathers near the DP is estimated to be 10{sup -3} mSv/y for {sup 131}I and 10{sup -7} mSv/y for {sup 99}Tc and, for local swimmers and fish consumers living along the Canal do Cunha, the annual effective dose is

  20. Assessing dose rate distributions in VMAT plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackeprang, P.-H.; Volken, W.; Terribilini, D.; Frauchiger, D.; Zaugg, K.; Aebersold, D. M.; Fix, M. K.; Manser, P.

    2016-04-01

    Dose rate is an essential factor in radiobiology. As modern radiotherapy delivery techniques such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) introduce dynamic modulation of the dose rate, it is important to assess the changes in dose rate. Both the rate of monitor units per minute (MU rate) and collimation are varied over the course of a fraction, leading to different dose rates in every voxel of the calculation volume at any point in time during dose delivery. Given the radiotherapy plan and machine specific limitations, a VMAT treatment plan can be split into arc sectors between Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine control points (CPs) of constant and known MU rate. By calculating dose distributions in each of these arc sectors independently and multiplying them with the MU rate, the dose rate in every single voxel at every time point during the fraction can be calculated. Independently calculated and then summed dose distributions per arc sector were compared to the whole arc dose calculation for validation. Dose measurements and video analysis were performed to validate the calculated datasets. A clinical head and neck, cranial and liver case were analyzed using the tool developed. Measurement validation of synthetic test cases showed linac agreement to precalculated arc sector times within  ±0.4 s and doses  ±0.1 MU (one standard deviation). Two methods for the visualization of dose rate datasets were developed: the first method plots a two-dimensional (2D) histogram of the number of voxels receiving a given dose rate over the course of the arc treatment delivery. In similarity to treatment planning system display of dose, the second method displays the dose rate as color wash on top of the corresponding computed tomography image, allowing the user to scroll through the variation over time. Examining clinical cases showed dose rates spread over a continuous spectrum, with mean dose rates hardly exceeding 100 cGy min-1 for conventional

  1. Age Limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antfolk, Jan

    2017-03-01

    Whereas women of all ages prefer slightly older sexual partners, men-regardless of their age-have a preference for women in their 20s. Earlier research has suggested that this difference between the sexes' age preferences is resolved according to women's preferences. This research has not, however, sufficiently considered that the age range of considered partners might change over the life span. Here we investigated the age limits (youngest and oldest) of considered and actual sex partners in a population-based sample of 2,655 adults (aged 18-50 years). Over the investigated age span, women reported a narrower age range than men and women tended to prefer slightly older men. We also show that men's age range widens as they get older: While they continue to consider sex with young women, men also consider sex with women their own age or older. Contrary to earlier suggestions, men's sexual activity thus reflects also their own age range, although their potential interest in younger women is not likely converted into sexual activity. Compared to homosexual men, bisexual and heterosexual men were more unlikely to convert young preferences into actual behavior, supporting female-choice theory.

  2. Development of Landscape Dose Factors for dose assessments in SR-Can

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders [Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden); Kautsky, Ulrik [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2006-08-15

    In previous safety assessments Ecosystem Dose Factors (EDFs), were derived from estimates of doses to the most exposed group resulting from constant unit radionuclide release rates over 10,000 years to various ecosystem types, e.g. mires, agricultural lands, lakes and marine ecosystems. A number of limitations of the EDF approach have been identified. The objectives of this report is to further develop the EDF approach, in order to resolve the identified limitations, and to use the improved approach for deriving Dose Conversion Factors for use in the SR-Can risk assessments. The Dose Conversion Factors derived in this report are named Landscape Dose Factors (LDFs). It involves modelling the fate of the radionuclides in the whole landscape, which develops from a sea to a inland situation during 20,000 years. Both candidate sites studies in SR-Can, Forsmark and Laxemar, are included in the study. As a basis for the modelling, the period starting at the beginning of the last interglacial (8,000 BC) is used, over which releases from a hypothetical repository were assumed to take place. For the present temperate period, the overall development of the biosphere at each site is outlined in a 1,000 year perspective and beyond, essentially based on the ongoing shoreline displacement and the understanding on the impact this has on the biosphere. The past development, i.e. from deglaciation to the present time, is inferred from geological records and associated reconstructions of the shore-line. For each time step of 1,000 years, the landscape at the site is described as a number of interconnected biosphere objects constituting an integrated landscape model of each site. The water fluxes through the objects were estimated from the average run-off at the site, the areas of the objects and their associated catchment areas. Radionuclides in both dissolved and particulate forms were considered in the transport calculations. The transformation between ecosystems was modelled as

  3. Dose assessments for SFR 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, Ulla (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Avila, Rodolfo; Ekstroem, Per-Anders; Cruz, Idalmis de la (Facilia AB, Bromma (Sweden))

    2008-06-15

    Following a review by the Swedish regulatory authorities of the safety analysis of the SFR 1 disposal facility for low and intermediate level waste, SKB has prepared an updated safety analysis, SAR-08. This report presents estimations of annual doses to the most exposed groups from potential radionuclide releases from the SFR 1 repository for a number of calculation cases, selected using a systematic approach for identifying relevant scenarios for the safety analysis. The dose estimates can be used for demonstrating that the long term safety of the repository is in compliance with the regulatory requirements. In particular, the mean values of the annual doses can be used to estimate the expected risks to the most exposed individuals, which can then be compared with the regulatory risk criteria for human health. The conversion from doses to risks is performed in the main report. For one scenario however, where the effects of an earthquake taking place close to the repository are analysed, risk calculations are presented in this report. In addition, prediction of concentrations of radionuclides in environmental media, such as water and soil, are compared with concentration limits suggested by the Erica-project as a base for estimating potential effects on the environment. The assessment of the impact on non-human biota showed that the potential impact is negligible. Committed collective dose for an integration period of 10,000 years for releases occurring during the first thousand years after closure are also calculated. The collective dose commitment was estimated to be 8 manSv. The dose calculations were carried out for a period of 100,000 years, which was sufficient to observe peak doses in all scenarios considered. Releases to the landscape and to a well were considered. The peaks of the mean annual doses from releases to the landscape are associated with C-14 releases to a future lake around year 5,000 AD. In the case of releases to a well, the peak annual doses

  4. The cost and benefit analysis of a contaminated area remediation: case study of dose level selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lauria, D.C. [Instituto de Radioproteccion e Dosimetria- IRD/CNEN, Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Barra de Tijuca, Rio de Janeiro- RJ (Brazil)]. e-mail: dejanira@ird.gov.br

    2006-07-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing awareness of the radiological impact of non-nuclear industries that extract and/or process ores and minerals containing naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). Without radiological rules, these industrial activities may result in significant radioactive contamination of installations and sites. Depending on the potential hazardous to the environment and public health, the radioactive contaminated sites may require remediation. The extent of the site cleanup is a function of the size, localization, complexity, potential risks and on possible future uses envisioned for the site. Since worker and public health, public anxiety and economics factors are involved; the selection of an appropriate dose level can be quite complicated. This paper discusses the selection of a dose level criterion to remedy a site, which was contaminated by wastes from monazite processing. The site is located in the Sao Paulo city; the most densely populated Brazilian City. In its 60,000 square meters of area, a preliminary survey showed contaminated zones covering an area of 6,500 square meters. In some places, contamination was found below the superficial layer of the soil, being the radionuclide vertical distribution not uniform. The {sup 228} Ra soil activity concentration reached values up to 33,000 Bq/kg while those for {sup 226} Ra reached values up to 6,700 Bq/kg. Based on pathway analysis model and considering both the current land use and a hypothetical residential scenario, the residual contamination levels of radionuclides in soil have been derived for dose values of 10 mSv/y (dose level for intervention), 5 mSv/y, 3 mSv/y, 1 mSv/y (dose limit for practices) and 0.3 mSv/y (dose constraint for practices). An optimized value o f annual dose of about 5 mSv/y would be a good option for intervention level, but taking into account the public concern and anxiety, the site location and size, and the remediation costs, it is suggested

  5. Dose and dose rate effects of irradiation on blood count and cytokine assay in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joong Sun [Research center, Dongnam institute of radiological and Medical Sciences (DIRAMS), Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-15

    The possible role of exposure to radiation as a risk factor for human health has been of increasing public concern in the series of explosions at earthquake damaged nuclear reactors on the Japan. Current events throughout the world underscore the growing threat of different forms of accidental exposure to radiation including nuclear accidents, atomic weapons use and testing, and the side effects of cancer therapy. A large range of dose rates of ionizing radiations could be encountered in accidental radiation situations. Nevertheless, most of the studies related to radiation effects have only examined a high dose rate. In this study, we investigated the blood count and the cytokine levels in the serum of mice exposed to a high or low dose rate of radiation. In this study, the precise molecular mechanism underlying the low dose rate of radiation remains unclear, but differential hematopoietic effects of radiation exposed at a high dose rate versus low dose rate were observed using the number of peripheral blood count and serum cytokines. These data suggest that chronic low dose rate exposure caused a stimulation of heamatopoietic system occurrence, unlike those observed after higher dose rate exposure. Our data suggest that the dose rate, rather than the total dose, may be more critical in causing damage to the cellular hematopoietic compartments of the body.

  6. Modeling Dose-response at Low Dose: A Systems Biology Approach for Ionization Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchao; Ricci, Paolo F

    2010-03-18

    For ionization radiation (IR) induced cancer, a linear non-threshold (LNT) model at very low doses is the default used by a number of national and international organizations and in regulatory law. This default denies any positive benefit from any level of exposure. However, experimental observations and theoretical biology have found that both linear and J-shaped IR dose-response curves can exist at those very low doses. We develop low dose J-shaped dose-response, based on systems biology, and thus justify its use regarding exposure to IR. This approach incorporates detailed, molecular and cellular descriptions of biological/toxicological mechanisms to develop a dose-response model through a set of nonlinear, differential equations describing the signaling pathways and biochemical mechanisms of cell cycle checkpoint, apoptosis, and tumor incidence due to IR. This approach yields a J-shaped dose response curve while showing where LNT behaviors are likely to occur. The results confirm the hypothesis of the J-shaped dose response curve: the main reason is that, at low-doses of IR, cells stimulate protective systems through a longer cell arrest time per unit of IR dose. We suggest that the policy implications of this approach are an increasingly correct way to deal with precautionary measures in public health.

  7. 淋巴瘤化疗后行受侵区域PET-CT扫描评价疗效的可行性研究%Minimizing radiation dose with PET-CT limited to involved sites in the assessment of postchemotherapy lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁颖; 吴宁; 耿建华; 方艳; 郑容; 张雯杰; 刘瑛; 张瀚; 李小萌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess PET-CT scanning limited to involved sites in postchemotherapy lymphoma and explore possible radiation dose reductions.Methods Fifty-three lymphoma patients with prechemotherapy and postchemotherapy whole-body PET-CT were analyzed retrospectively.The involved sites were determined on prechemotherapy PET-CT scanning.Whole-body PET-CT scanning and hypothetical PET-CT limited to involved sites were compared in assessing clinical response to chemotherapy.The potential reductions in effective dose and total acquisition time achieved with PET-CT scanning limited to involved sites were calculated.Results Whole-body PET-CT scanning revealed CR in 37 cases,PR in 13 cases and PD in 3 cases in postchemotherapy lymphoma patients,while PET-CT scanning limited to involved sites revealed CR in 37 cases,PR in 14 cases and PD in 2 cases.The mean effective dose was(15.0 ± 1.7)mSv for per patients of CR with whole-body PET-CT scanning,and was (12.0 ± 2.5)mSv for per patients of CR with PET-CT scanning limited in involved sites(Z=-5.307,P<0.05).The mean acquisition time was(19.5 ±2.6)s for per patients of CR with whole-body PET-CT scanning,and(11.3 ± 4.4)s for per patient of CR with PET-CT scanning limited in involved sites(Z=-5.324,P<0.05).Conclusions Response assessment with PET-CT scanning limited in involved sites has good agreement with whole-body PET-CT scanning in postchemotherapy lymphoma patients with CR.Lymphoma patients with CR may benefit from reduced radiation dose and total acquisition time.PET-CT scanning limited in involved sites is not advisable in patients with PR or PD for poor agreement with whole-body PET-CT scanning in response assessment.%目的 为降低辐射剂量,探讨淋巴瘤化疗后采用受侵区域PET-CT扫描评价疗效的可行性.方法 回顾性分析53例化疗前、后均行全身PET-CT扫描的淋巴瘤初诊患者.将化疗前PET-CT所示的淋巴瘤侵犯范围定义为受侵区域,化疗后假设采用受侵区

  8. Some comments on space flight and radiation limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornton, W.E.

    1997-04-30

    Setting limits on human exposure to space-related radiation involves two very different processes - the appropriate hard science, and certain emotional aspects and expectations of the groups involved. These groups include the general public and their elected politicians, the astronauts and flight crews, and NASA managers, each group with different expectations and concerns. Public and political views of human space flight and human radiation exposures are often poorly informed and are often based on emotional reactions to current events which may be distorted by {open_quotes}experts{close_quotes} and the media. Career astronauts` and cosmonauts` views are much more realistic about the risks involved and there is a willingness on their part to accept increased necessary risks. However, there is a concern on their part about career-threatening dose limits, the potential for overexposures, and the health effects from all sources of radiation. There is special concern over radiation from medical studies. This last concern continues to raise the question of {open_quotes}voluntary{close_quotes} participation in studies involving radiation exposure. There is greatly diversity in spaceflight crews and their expectations; and {open_quotes}official{close_quotes} Astronaut Office positions will reflect strong management direction. NASA management has its own priorities and concerns and this fact will be reflected in their crucial influence on radiation limits. NASA, and especially spaceflight crews, might be best served by exposure limits which address all sources of spaceflight radiation and all potential effects from such exposure.

  9. Charpak, Garwin, propose unit for radiation dose

    CERN Multimedia

    Feder, Toni

    2002-01-01

    Becquerels, curries, grays, rads, rems, roentgens, sieverts - even for specialists the units of radiation can get confusing. That's why two eminent physicists, Georges Charpak of France, and Richard Garwin, are proposing the DARI as a unit of radiation dose they hope will help the public evaluate the risks associated with low-level radiation exposure (1 page)

  10. Historical Doses from Tritiated Water and Tritiated Hydrogen Gas Released to the Atmosphere from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Part 6. Summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, S

    2007-09-05

    Throughout fifty-three years of operations, an estimated 792,000 Ci (29,300 TBq) of tritium have been released to the atmosphere at the Livermore site of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); about 75% was tritium gas (HT) primarily from the accidental releases of 1965 and 1970. Routine emissions contributed slightly more than 100,000 Ci (3,700 TBq) HT and about 75,000 Ci (2,800 TBq) tritiated water vapor (HTO) to the total. A Tritium Dose Reconstruction was undertaken to estimate both the annual doses to the public for each year of LLNL operations and the doses from the few accidental releases. Some of the dose calculations were new, and the others could be compared with those calculated by LLNL. Annual doses (means and 95% confidence intervals) to the potentially most exposed member of the public were calculated for all years using the same model and the same assumptions. Predicted tritium concentrations in air were compared with observed mean annual concentrations at one location from 1973 onwards. Doses predicted from annual emissions were compared with those reported in the past by LLNL. The highest annual mean dose predicted from routine emissions was 34 {micro}Sv (3.4 mrem) in 1957; its upper confidence limit, based on very conservative assumptions about the speciation of the release, was 370 {micro}Sv (37 mrem). The upper confidence limits for most annual doses were well below the current regulatory limit of 100 {micro}Sv (10 mrem) for dose to the public from release to the atmosphere; the few doses that exceeded this were well below the regulatory limits of the time. Lacking the hourly meteorological data needed to calculate doses from historical accidental releases, ingestion/inhalation dose ratios were derived from a time-dependent accident consequence model that accounts for the complex behavior of tritium in the environment. Ratios were modified to account for only those foods growing at the time of the releases. The highest dose from an

  11. 36 CFR 1004.21 - Speed limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Speed limits. 1004.21 Section... limits. (a) Speed limits in the area administered by the Presidio Trust are as follows: (1) 15 miles per... Presidio Trust roads. (b) The Board may designate a different speed limit upon any Presidio Trust road...

  12. 45 CFR 1160.13 - Indemnification limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Indemnification limits. 1160.13 Section 1160.13... ACT § 1160.13 Indemnification limits. The dollar amounts of the limits described below are found in the guidelines referred to in § 1160.1 and are based upon the statutory limits in the Arts...

  13. TU-C-18A-01: Models of Risk From Low-Dose Radiation Exposures: What Does the Evidence Say?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bushberg, J [UC Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Boreham, D [McMaster University, Ontario, CA (Canada); Ulsh, B

    2014-06-15

    At dose levels of (approximately) 500 mSv or more, increased cancer incidence and mortality have been clearly demonstrated. However, at the low doses of radiation used in medical imaging, the relationship between dose and cancer risk is not well established. As such, assumptions about the shape of the dose-response curve are made. These assumptions, or risk models, are used to estimate potential long term effects. Common models include 1) the linear non-threshold (LNT) model, 2) threshold models with either a linear or curvilinear dose response above the threshold, and 3) a hormetic model, where the risk is initially decreased below background levels before increasing. The choice of model used when making radiation risk or protection calculations and decisions can have significant implications on public policy and health care decisions. However, the ongoing debate about which risk model best describes the dose-response relationship at low doses of radiation makes informed decision making difficult. This symposium will review the two fundamental approaches to determining the risk associated with low doses of ionizing radiation, namely radiation epidemiology and radiation biology. The strengths and limitations of each approach will be reviewed, the results of recent studies presented, and the appropriateness of different risk models for various real world scenarios discussed. Examples of well-designed and poorly-designed studies will be provided to assist medical physicists in 1) critically evaluating publications in the field and 2) communicating accurate information to medical professionals, patients, and members of the general public. Equipped with the best information that radiation epidemiology and radiation biology can currently provide, and an understanding of the limitations of such information, individuals and organizations will be able to make more informed decisions regarding questions such as 1) how much shielding to install at medical facilities, 2) at

  14. ALTERNATIVES OF MACCS2 IN LANL DISPERSION ANALYSIS FOR ONSITE AND OFFSITE DOSES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, John HC [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-01

    In modeling atmospheric dispersion to determine accidental release of radiological material, one of the common statistical analysis tools used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2). MACCS2, however, has some limitations and shortfalls for both onsite and offsite applications. Alternative computer codes, which could provide more realistic calculations, are being investigated for use at LANL. In the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), the suitability of MACCS2 for the calculation of onsite worker doses was a concern; therefore, ARCON96 was chosen to replace MACCS2. YMP's use of ARCON96 provided results which clearly demonstrated the program's merit for onsite worker safety analyses in a wide range of complex configurations and scenarios. For offsite public exposures, the conservatism of MACCS2 on the treatment of turbulence phenomena at LANL is examined in this paper. The results show a factor of at least two conservatism in calculated public doses. The new EPA air quality model, AERMOD, which implements advanced meteorological turbulence calculations, is a good candidate for LANL applications to provide more confidence in the accuracy of offsite public dose projections.

  15. Doses from intakes of radionuclides by adults and young people

    CERN Document Server

    Greenhalgh, J R; Fell, T P

    1985-01-01

    This report describes a methodology for calculating doses from ingestion and inhalation of radionuclides by adults, children (aged 10) and infants (aged 1). The calculation scheme follows the procedures and uses the models described in ICRP Publication 30, except in a few instances which are discussed in detail. The methods described in this report have been used to calculate organ doses and effective doses per unit intake for a wide variety of nuclides and compounds. A selection of these doses is given in this report. It is intended that the full dose data base should be made generally available in due course.

  16. Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

  17. 42 CFR 403.508 - Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitations. 403.508 Section 403.508 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND PROJECTS Beneficiary Counseling and Assistance Grants § 403.508 Limitations. (a)...

  18. Limitations Of Infrared Thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, John R.

    1983-03-01

    The state of the art of quantitative infrared thermography is addressed. We are asking more and more of thermography in the field of energy conservation. An energy and dollar conscious public wants to know how much heat is being lost and how much money can be saved by retrofit. Many mission oriented approaches have been developed to address these questions. However, many fundamental questions about how thermography works and how far its capabilities can be pushed have not been addressed. In addition, the theoretical and practical limits of doing benefit cost studies with thermography have not been seriously addressed. This paper discusses the limitations of the current technology and describes many unanswered but important questions facing the future use of thermography for quantitative heat loss analysis.

  19. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M. [comps.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  20. Public Schools

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — This Public Schools feature dataset is composed of all Public elementary and secondary education in the United States as defined by the Common Core of Data, National...

  1. Inhalation dose due to radon, thoron, and progenies in dwellings of a hill station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, R

    2017-02-01

    The general public spends a major portion of their time in an indoor environment and hence receives a considerable amount of radiation. Knowledge about indoor radiation is important in order to arrive at the actual effective dose received by residents. The indoor radon, thoron, and progeny concentrations observed in the present study were found to vary with seasons of a given year. The highest and lowest indoor average radon, thoron, and progeny levels were observed during winter and summer seasons, respectively. The concentrations of indoor radon, thoron, and progenies were found to vary with the type of houses. The highest (222)Rn, (220)Rn, and progeny concentrations were observed in mud houses and the lowest values were recorded in wooden houses. The indoor (222)Rn concentration correlated well with concentration of its grandparent (238)U in underlying soil with a correlation coefficient of 0.87. The correlation between indoor (220)Rn and (232)Th in the underlying soil was found to be 0.64. The estimated effective doses received by the general public in the present study due to indoor radon and thoron were 1.49 ± 0.49 and 1.30 ± 0.53 mSv/year, respectively. The annual effective doses due to radon and thoron progenies were estimated as 0.76 ± 0.27 and 0.47 ± 0.23 mSv/year, respectively. The contributions from (222)Rn, (220)Rn, and corresponding progenies to the annual effective doses received were 37, 32, 19, and 12%, respectively. The general public living in the study area receives an inhalation dose of 4.02 mSv/year due to indoor radon, thoron, and progenies, which were found to be less than the action limit of ICRP 2009.

  2. Public lighting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2011-01-01

    Visual perception is very important for road users and in the dark it can be facilitated by public lighting. Public lighting has a mostly positive road safety effect. Installing public lighting on roads that were previously unlit generally results in fewer and less serious crashes. This effect seems

  3. Simple benchmark for complex dose finding studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Ying Kuen

    2014-06-01

    While a general goal of early phase clinical studies is to identify an acceptable dose for further investigation, modern dose finding studies and designs are highly specific to individual clinical settings. In addition, as outcome-adaptive dose finding methods often involve complex algorithms, it is crucial to have diagnostic tools to evaluate the plausibility of a method's simulated performance and the adequacy of the algorithm. In this article, we propose a simple technique that provides an upper limit, or a benchmark, of accuracy for dose finding methods for a given design objective. The proposed benchmark is nonparametric optimal in the sense of O'Quigley et al. (2002, Biostatistics 3, 51-56), and is demonstrated by examples to be a practical accuracy upper bound for model-based dose finding methods. We illustrate the implementation of the technique in the context of phase I trials that consider multiple toxicities and phase I/II trials where dosing decisions are based on both toxicity and efficacy, and apply the benchmark to several clinical examples considered in the literature. By comparing the operating characteristics of a dose finding method to that of the benchmark, we can form quick initial assessments of whether the method is adequately calibrated and evaluate its sensitivity to the dose-outcome relationships.

  4. Dose Response for Radiation Cataractogenesis: A Meta-Regression of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Matthew D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E., E-mail: schultheiss@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Smith, David D. [Division of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Nguyen, Khanh H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Bayhealth Cancer Center, Dover, Delaware (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a meta-regression on published data and to model the 5-year probability of cataract development after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with and without total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies reporting cataract incidence after HSCT with TBI were identified by a PubMed search. Seventeen publications provided complete information on radiation dose schedule, fractionation, dose rate, and actuarial cataract incidence. Chemotherapy-only regimens were included as zero radiation dose regimens. Multivariate meta-regression with a weighted generalized linear model was used to model the 5-year cataract incidence and contributory factors. Results: Data from 1386 patients in 21 series were included for analysis. TBI was administered to a total dose of 0 to 15.75 Gy with single or fractionated schedules with a dose rate of 0.04 to 0.16 Gy/min. Factors significantly associated with 5-year cataract incidence were dose, dose times dose per fraction (D•dpf), pediatric versus adult status, and the absence of an ophthalmologist as an author. Dose rate, graft versus host disease, steroid use, hyperfractionation, and number of fractions were not significant. Five-fold internal cross-validation showed a model validity of 83% ± 8%. Regression diagnostics showed no evidence of lack-of-fit and no patterns in the studentized residuals. The α/β ratio from the linear quadratic model, estimated as the ratio of the coefficients for dose and D•dpf, was 0.76 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-1.55). The odds ratio for pediatric patients was 2.8 (95% CI, 1.7-4.6) relative to adults. Conclusions: Dose, D•dpf, pediatric status, and regimented follow-up care by an ophthalmologist were predictive of 5-year cataract incidence after HSCT. The low α/β ratio indicates the importance of fractionation in reducing cataracts. Dose rate effects have been observed in single institution studies but not in the

  5. Measurement of doses to aviator pilots using thermoluminescent dosemeters; Medicion de la dosis a pilotos aviadores usando dosimetros termoluminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azorin N, J.; Cruz C, D. [UAM-I, 09340 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Rivera M, T. [IPN, ESIME Culhuacan (Mexico)]. e-mail: azorin@xanum.uam.mx

    2004-07-01

    During the development of their work, the aviator pilots are exposed at high levels of natural radiation of bottom caused mainly by the cosmic radiation of galactic origin and lot. For such reason, the Metropolitan Autonomous University (UAM) and the Union Association of Aviator Pilots (ASPA), subscribed an agreement with the purpose of to measure the doses of ionizing radiation received by the aviator pilots of diverse air companies that man different types of airships and to determine if these doses surpass the one limit of 0.11 mSv/h settled down by the IAEA for the public in general; and if therefore, these workers should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. In this work the obtained results when measuring the absorbed dose received by Mexican civil aviator pilots during the development of their work, using thermoluminescent dosemeters of LiF:Mg,Cu,P + Ptfe of national production are presented. The obtained results during the years of 2001 and 2002 show that the monthly doses received by the pilots surpass the one it limits established for the public in general, for what they should be considered as personnel occupationally exposed. (Author)

  6. Fully automated treatment planning for head and neck radiotherapy using a voxel-based dose prediction and dose mimicking method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, Chris; Welch, Mattea; McNiven, Andrea; Jaffray, David A.; Purdie, Thomas G.

    2017-08-01

    Recent works in automated radiotherapy treatment planning have used machine learning based on historical treatment plans to infer the spatial dose distribution for a novel patient directly from the planning image. We present a probabilistic, atlas-based approach which predicts the dose for novel patients using a set of automatically selected most similar patients (atlases). The output is a spatial dose objective, which specifies the desired dose-per-voxel, and therefore replaces the need to specify and tune dose-volume objectives. Voxel-based dose mimicking optimization then converts the predicted dose distribution to a complete treatment plan with dose calculation using a collapsed cone convolution dose engine. In this study, we investigated automated planning for right-sided oropharaynx head and neck patients treated with IMRT and VMAT. We compare four versions of our dose prediction pipeline using a database of 54 training and 12 independent testing patients by evaluating 14 clinical dose evaluation criteria. Our preliminary results are promising and demonstrate that automated methods can generate comparable dose distributions to clinical. Overall, automated plans achieved an average of 0.6% higher dose for target coverage evaluation criteria, and 2.4% lower dose at the organs at risk criteria levels evaluated compared with clinical. There was no statistically significant difference detected in high-dose conformity between automated and clinical plans as measured by the conformation number. Automated plans achieved nine more unique criteria than clinical across the 12 patients tested and automated plans scored a significantly higher dose at the evaluation limit for two high-risk target coverage criteria and a significantly lower dose in one critical organ maximum dose. The novel dose prediction method with dose mimicking can generate complete treatment plans in 12-13 min without user interaction. It is a promising approach for fully automated treatment

  7. BUDGET AND PUBLIC DEBT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morar Ioan Dan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of public budgeting is an important issue for public policy of the state, for the simple reason that no money from the state budget can not promote public policy. Budgetary policy is official government Doctrine vision mirror and also represents a starting point for other public policies, which in turn are financed by the public budget. Fiscal policy instruments at its disposal handles the public sector in its structure, and the private sector. Tools such as grant, budgetary allocation, tax, welfare under various forms, direct investments and not least the state aid is used by the state through their budgetary policies to directly and indirectly infuence sector, and the private. Fiscal policies can be grouped according to the structure of the public sector in these components, namely fiscal policy, budgeting and resource allocation policies for financing the budget deficit. An important issue is the financing of the budget deficit budgetary policies. There are two funding possibilities, namely, the higher taxes or more axles site and enter the second call to public loans. Both options involve extra effort from taxpayers in the current fiscal year when they pay higher taxes or a future period when public loans will be repaid. We know that by virtue of "fiscal pact" structural deficits of the member countries of the EU are limited by the European Commission, according to the macro structural stability and budget of each Member State. This problem tempers to some extent the governments of the Member States budgetary appetite, but does not solve the problem of chronic budget deficits. Another issue addressed in this paper is related to the public debt, the absolute amount of its relative level of public datoriri, about the size of GDP, public debt financing and its repayment sources. Sources of public debt issuance and monetary impact on the budget and monetary stability are variables that must underpin the justification of budgetary

  8. LESSONS LEARNED FROM THE EURADOS SURVEY ON INDIVIDUAL MONITORING DATA AND INTERNAL DOSE ASSESSMENTS OF FOREIGNERS EXPOSED IN JAPAN FOLLOWING THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NPP ACCIDENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M A; Fojtik, P; Franck, D; Osko, J; Gerstmann, U; Scholl, C; Lebacq, A L; Breustedt, B; Del Risco Norrlid, L

    2016-09-01

    European Radiation Dosimetry Group e.V. (EURADOS) survey on individual monitoring data and dose assessment has been carried out for 550 foreigners returning home after being exposed in Japan to intakes of radionuclides (mainly (131)I, (132)I, (132)Te, (134)Cs and (137)Cs) as a consequence of the Fukushima Daiichi NPP accident. In vivo and in vitro measurements were performed in their respective countries at an early stage after that accident. Intakes of radionuclides were detected in 208 persons from Europe and Canada, but the committed effective dose E(50) was below the annual dose limit for the public (<1 mSv) in all the cases. Lessons learned from this EURADOS survey are presented here regarding not only internal dosimetry issues, but also the management of the emergency situation, the perception of the risk of health effects due to radiation and the communication with exposed persons who showed anxiety and lack of trust in monitoring data and dose assessments.

  9. Methodology of dose calculation for the SRS SAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, J.B.

    1991-07-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Safety Analysis Report (SAR) covering K reactor operation assesses a spectrum of design basis accidents. The assessment includes estimation of the dose consequences from the analyzed accidents. This report discusses the methodology used to perform the dose analysis reported in the SAR and also includes the quantified doses. Doses resulting from postulated design basis reactor accidents in Chapter 15 of the SAR are discussed, as well as an accident in which three percent of the fuel melts. Doses are reported for both atmospheric and aqueous releases. The methodology used to calculate doses from these accidents as reported in the SAR is consistent with NRC guidelines and industry standards. The doses from the design basis accidents for the SRS reactors are below the limits set for commercial reactors by the NRC and also meet industry criteria. A summary of doses for various postulated accidents is provided.

  10. 45 CFR 95.19 - Exceptions to time limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exceptions to time limits. 95.19 Section 95.19...-GRANT PROGRAMS (PUBLIC ASSISTANCE, MEDICAL ASSISTANCE AND STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS) Time Limits for States To File Claims § 95.19 Exceptions to time limits. The time limits in §§ 95.7...

  11. Differential dose contributions on total dose distribution of (125)I brachytherapy source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camgöz, B; Yeğin, G; Kumru, M N

    2010-01-01

    This work provides an improvement of the approach using Monte Carlo simulation for the Amersham Model 6711 (125)I brachytherapy seed source, which is well known by many theoretical and experimental studies. The source which has simple geometry was researched with respect to criteria of AAPM Tg-43 Report. The approach offered by this study involves determination of differential dose contributions that come from virtual partitions of a massive radioactive element of the studied source to a total dose at analytical calculation point. Some brachytherapy seeds contain multi-radioactive elements so the dose at any point is a total of separate doses from each element. It is momentous to know well the angular and radial dose distributions around the source that is located in cancerous tissue for clinical treatments. Interior geometry of a source is effective on dose characteristics of a distribution. Dose information of inner geometrical structure of a brachytherapy source cannot be acquired by experimental methods because of limits of physical material and geometry in the healthy tissue, so Monte Carlo simulation is a required approach of the study. EGSnrc Monte Carlo simulation software was used. In the design of a simulation, the radioactive source was divided into 10 rings, partitioned but not separate from each other. All differential sources were simulated for dose calculation, and the shape of dose distribution was determined comparatively distribution of a single-complete source. In this work anisotropy function was examined also mathematically.

  12. Public health law research: exploring law in public health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Jennifer K; Burris, Scott; Hays, Scott

    2012-11-01

    The importance of law in the organization and operation of public health systems has long been a matter of interest to public health lawyers and practitioners, but empirical research on law as a factor in health system performance has been limited in quantity and sophistication. The emergence of Public Health Law Research and Public Health Systems and Services Research within a coordinated effort to strengthen public health research and practice has dramatically changed matters. This article introduces Public Health Law Research as an integral part of Public Health Systems and Services Research, discusses the challenges of integrating the 2 fields, and highlights 2 examples of current research that demonstrate the benefits of an integrated approach to improve the use of law in public health practice.

  13. Megagray Dosimetry (or Monitoring of Very Large Radiation Doses)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Uribe, R.M.; Miller, Arne

    1983-01-01

    A number of suitably calibrated plastic and dyed films and solid-state systems can provide mapping of very intense radiation fields with high spatial resolution and reasonable limits of uncertainty of absorbed dose assessment. Although most systems of this type suffer from rate dependence...... and temperature dependence of response when irradiated with charged particle beams at high dose rates, a few are stable, easily calibrated, and capable of faithful imaging of detailed dose profiles, even at doses up to 106 Gy and dose rates up to 108 Gy·s−1. Candidates include certain undyed plastic films (e...

  14. Study on Limited Liability Partnership of Chinese Certified Public Accountants Firms%我国会计师事务所有限责任合伙制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳明

    2011-01-01

    随着社会经济的不断发展,会计师事务所普遍采用的有限责任公司制与其承担的社会责任严重失衡,会计师事务所制度改革不断提上日程。通过对我国会计师事务所现有组织形式的研究与分析,有限责任合伙制会计师事务所具有明显优势,为此,我国应创造条件尽快实行会计师事务所有限责任合伙制改造。%With the development of economy,the limited responsibility system of CPA in our country did not conform to the social responsibility they borne.Thus,the reform of the current CPA system is being put on the agenda.The paper analyzes the current operations of the CPA system and indicates the comparative advantages of the limited liability partnership of CPA.At the same time some measures should be taken to reform the limited liability partnership of CPA.

  15. 47 CFR 15.315 - Conducted limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conducted limits. 15.315 Section 15.315... Communications Service Devices § 15.315 Conducted limits. An unlicensed PCS device that is designed to be connected to the public utility (AC) power line must meet the limits specified in § 15.207....

  16. 12 CFR 24.4 - Investment limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... ENTITIES, COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS, AND OTHER PUBLIC WELFARE INVESTMENTS § 24.4 Investment limits. (a) Limits on aggregate outstanding investments. A national bank's aggregate outstanding investments under... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Investment limits. 24.4 Section 24.4 Banks and...

  17. A Roadmap to Individualized Irinotecan Dosing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.A. de Jong (Floris)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractEver since its introduction to the drug-market in the late eighties, early nineties of the last century, irinotecan is fighting its image. Particularly, the unpredictable occurrence and severity of delayed-type diarrhea, its main dose-limiting adverse effect, remains a serious co

  18. Strategy for stochastic dose-rate induced enhanced elimination of malignant tumour without dose escalation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Subhadip; Roy, Prasun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    The efficacy of radiation therapy, a primary modality of cancer treatment, depends in general upon the total radiation dose administered to the tumour during the course of therapy. Nevertheless, the delivered radiation also irradiates normal tissues and dose escalation procedure often increases the elimination of normal tissue as well. In this article, we have developed theoretical frameworks under the premise of linear-quadratic-linear (LQL) model using stochastic differential equation and Jensen's inequality for exploring the possibility of attending to the two therapeutic performance objectives in contraposition-increasing the elimination of prostate tumour cells and enhancing the relative sparing of normal tissue in fractionated radiation therapy, within a prescribed limit of total radiation dose. Our study predicts that stochastic temporal modulation in radiation dose-rate appreciably enhances prostate tumour cell elimination, without needing dose escalation in radiation therapy. However, constant higher dose-rate can also enhance the elimination of tumour cells. In this context, we have shown that the sparing of normal tissue with stochastic dose-rate is considerably more than the sparing of normal tissue with the equivalent constant higher dose-rate. Further, by contrasting the stochastic dose-rate effects under LQL and linear-quadratic (LQ) models, we have also shown that the LQ model over-estimates stochastic dose-rate effect in tumour and under-estimates the stochastic dose-rate effect in normal tissue. Our study indicates the possibility of utilizing stochastic modulation of radiation dose-rate for designing enhanced radiation therapy protocol for cancer.

  19. Occupational Doses and the Contribution to the Population Dose in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Seung Jae; Kyu, Hwan Jeong [KINS, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the occupational exposure records in terms of the control of exposure for radiation workers and dose reduction. The study includes the estimates of the number of people exposed occupationally, the effective collective doses and mean doses to those exposed. In addition, the study includes an estimate of the contribution of occupational exposure to the Korean population dose. The exposure of radiation workers in occupational field includes medical radiology, industrial applications such as radiography, nuclear power, and some research activities. Occupational exposure from medical radiology practices includes the contributions from diagnostic x-ray procedures, dental radiography, nuclear medicine and radiation therapy. The control of exposure for radiation workers, and the measures necessary to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) are specified in Subparagraph 3 and Subparagraph 4 of Article 91 (1) of the Korea Nuclear Safety Act (KNSA), respectively. Therefore, from a regulatory perspective, the exposure data of the workers are primarily for verification of the adequacy of the control of exposure, radiation protection and implementation of ALARA. The number of people exposed occupationally, the effective collective doses and mean doses to those exposed, and average effective doses from occupational exposure during the period of 2009 to 2013 have been evaluated. In general, radiation workers were increasing in number annually, but the mean doses for those exposed each year showed the control of exposures were mostly considered met within the dose limit in KNSA. Nevertheless, it was shown that the continuous efforts would be needed to reduce doses and thus to implement ALARA regulatory requirements. In radiation occupations, the application of ICRP radiation protection principles will ensure good practice and decreasing exposures. Over the period of 5 years, the contributions of the annual

  20. Clinical limitations of Invisalign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phan, Xiem; Ling, Paul H

    2007-04-01

    Adult patients seeking orthodontic treatment are increasingly motivated by esthetic considerations. The majority of these patients reject wearing labial fixed appliances and are looking instead to more esthetic treatment options, including lingual orthodontics and Invisalign appliances. Since Align Technology introduced the Invisalign appliance in 1999 in an extensive public campaign, the appliance has gained tremendous attention from adult patients and dental professionals. The transparency of the Invisalign appliance enhances its esthetic appeal for those adult patients who are averse to wearing conventional labial fixed orthodontic appliances. Although guidelines about the types of malocclusions that this technique can treat exist, few clinical studies have assessed the effectiveness of the appliance. A few recent studies have outlined some of the limitations associated with this technique that clinicians should recognize early before choosing treatment options.

  1. Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma: single dose and cumulative dose studies

    OpenAIRE

    Vally, H; Thompson, P.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Wine appears to be a significant trigger for asthma. Although sulfite additives have been implicated as a major cause of wine induced asthma, direct evidence is limited. Two studies were undertaken to assess sulfite reactivity in wine sensitive asthmatics. The first study assessed sensitivity to sulfites in wine using a single dose sulfited wine challenge protocol followed by a double blind, placebo controlled challenge. In the second study a cumulative dose su...

  2. Procedures, activities and doses in nuclear medicine cycle in Brazil; Procedimentos, atividades e doses no ciclo da medicina nuclear no Brasil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Silvia Maria Velasques de

    2005-07-01

    With the aim of characterizing nuclear medicine procedures performed in Brazil, activities of radiopharmaceuticals used and effective doses to patients, data was collected from nuclear medicine institutions in three regions of the country, namely the Southeast, the Northeast and the South regions, representing public hospitals, university hospitals, private and philanthropic institutions with low, medium and high levels of consumption of radiopharmaceuticals. The three chosen regions are responsible for 92% of radiopharmaceutical consumption and imaging equipment in the country. Accordingly, it was requested of some participating institutions to fulfill manually from individual patients data, to record gender, age, weight, height and activities used, for each type of exam as well as the equipment used. In others, the researcher collected data personally. Per institution, nuclear medicine diagnostic procedures ranged from 700 to 13,000 per year, most of which are myocardial and bone imaging procedures, and imaging equipment ranged, from 1 to 8 machines, one or two head SPECT's (hybrid or not). 26.782 patients protocols were analysed, 24.371 adults and 2.411 children and teenagers. For adult patients, differences were observed in the amount of activities used in diagnostic procedures between public and private institutions, with lower average activities used in public institutions. Activities administered to children and their effective doses were difficult to evaluate due to the incompleteness of individual records. Appropriate individual patient records could be adopted without affecting hospitals routine and contributing for a comprehensive evaluation of the radiation protection of nuclear medicine patients. Data from 8.881 workers were analysed, 346 working at nuclear medicine institutions. For monitored workers and measurably exposed workers in nuclear medicine, the values 2.3 mSv and 5.4 mSv, respectively, for effective annual doses are greater than data

  3. Uncertainties on lung doses from inhaled plutonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, Matthew; Birchall, Alan; Bull, Richard K

    2011-10-01

    In a recent epidemiological study, Bayesian uncertainties on lung doses have been calculated to determine lung cancer risk from occupational exposures to plutonium. These calculations used a revised version of the Human Respiratory Tract Model (HRTM) published by the ICRP. In addition to the Bayesian analyses, which give probability distributions of doses, point estimates of doses (single estimates without uncertainty) were also provided for that study using the existing HRTM as it is described in ICRP Publication 66; these are to be used in a preliminary analysis of risk. To infer the differences between the point estimates and Bayesian uncertainty analyses, this paper applies the methodology to former workers of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority (UKAEA), who constituted a subset of the study cohort. The resulting probability distributions of lung doses are compared with the point estimates obtained for each worker. It is shown that mean posterior lung doses are around two- to fourfold higher than point estimates and that uncertainties on doses vary over a wide range, greater than two orders of magnitude for some lung tissues. In addition, we demonstrate that uncertainties on the parameter values, rather than the model structure, are largely responsible for these effects. Of these it appears to be the parameters describing absorption from the lungs to blood that have the greatest impact on estimates of lung doses from urine bioassay. Therefore, accurate determination of the chemical form of inhaled plutonium and the absorption parameter values for these materials is important for obtaining reliable estimates of lung doses and hence risk from occupational exposures to plutonium.

  4. Public policy and regulatory strategies in the global climate change context: opportunities and limitations of programmatic CDM; Politicas publicas e estrategias regulatorias no contexto das mudancas climaticas globais: oportunidades e limitacoes do MDL programatico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romeiro, Viviane; Simoes, Andre Felipe; Januzzi, Gilberto M. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (FEM/UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Planejamento de Sistemas Energeticos

    2008-07-01

    Carbon Market and its implications to reduce green house effect has been broadly discussed in the context of global climate change. This paper intends to analyze the new regulation of global climate change since Programmatic CDM was created, describing the proceeds to its implementation and discussing limitations and opportunities analyzes of this mechanism as a tool to obtain alternative energy source. It is discussed the challenges and opportunities about CDM programs in the international legal system in which Kyoto Protocol is based, as well as its contribution to attain benefits to global climate system and quality of social life. (author)

  5. Public knowledge and public trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham-Burley, Sarah

    2006-01-01

    As health care applications derived from human genetics research are likely to move increasingly from 'clinic to community', there is growing interest not just in how patients understand and take up health-related genetic information but also in the views of the wider population, as well as a range of professional groups. In this paper, issues relating public knowledge and public trust are raised and discussed in an attempt to move forward debates about public involvement in genomic research and the role of sociologists within interdisciplinary teams. As the field of public understanding of science has developed, we have seen a shift from a focus on the lack of scientific literacy as problem to a recognition of the range of different knowledges that people have and use as they confront science and technology in their everyday lives. As a mood for dialogue pervades many institutions in their relations with 'publics', attention must now be paid to the way in which knowledge and expertise is expressed, heard and acted upon in dialogic encounters. There is increasing concern about public trust in science and calls to increase public confidence, particularly through more open engagement with a range of publics. However, lack of trust or loss of confidence may be constructed as problems rather than reflecting empirical reality, where more complex relationships and attitudes prevail. Lack of trust is often privatized, deeply rooted in lived experience and routinely managed. Trust relations are generally characterized by ambivalence, uncertainty and risk, and are always provisional. Drawing on selected literature and empirical research to review and illustrate this field, this paper argues that scepticism or ambivalence on the part of publics are not necessarily problems to be overcome in the interest of scientific progress, but rather should be mobilized to enhance open and public debates about the nature and direction of genomics research, medicine, and the related

  6. Dose reduction during CT coronary angiography; La reduction de dose en coroscanographie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willoteaux, S.; Sibileau, E.; Caroff, J.; Nedelcu, C.; Thouveny, F. [Service de Radiologie, Hopital Larrey, CHU d' Angers, 49 - Angers (France); Abi Kalil, W.; Delepine, S. [Service de Cardiologie, Hopital Larrey, CHU d' Angers, 49 - Angers (France)

    2010-11-15

    Dose delivery during CT coronary angiography with retrospective ECG gating is high especially due to the important slice overlapping. Optimization of the acquisition parameters is necessary to reduce patient exposure. First, the height of the scan field should be limited to the heart. Both kV and mA should be adjusted based on patient morphology. ECG gated exposure modulation with mA reduction during systole, a technique most applicable for patients with slow and regular heart rate, can result in a dose reduction up to 50%. The use of prospective ECG gating can also reduce patient dose. This technique also requires patients with slow and regular heart rate. (authors)

  7. Brachytherapy dose measurements in heterogeneous tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paiva F, G.; Luvizotto, J.; Salles C, T.; Guimaraes A, P. C.; Dalledone S, P. de T.; Yoriyaz, H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares / CNEN, Av. Lineu Prestes 2242, Cidade Universitaria, 05508-000 Sao Paulo (Brazil); Rubo, R., E-mail: gabrielpaivafonseca@gmail.com [Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05403-900 Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    Recently, Beau lieu et al. published an article providing guidance for Model-Based Dose Calculation Algorithms (MBDCAs), where tissue heterogeneity considerations are addressed. It is well-known that T G-43 formalism which considers only water medium is limited and significant dose differences have been found comparing both methodologies. The aim of the present work is to experimentally quantify dose values in heterogeneous medium using different dose measurement methods and techniques and compare them with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. Experiments have been performed using a Nucletron micro Selectron-Hdr Ir-192 brachytherapy source and a heterogeneous phantom composed by PMMA and different tissue equivalent cylinders like bone, lungs and muscle. Several dose measurements were obtained using tissue equivalent materials with height 1.8 cm and 4.3 cm positioned between the radiation source and the detectors. Radiochromic films, TLDs and MOSFET S have been used for the dose measurements. Film dosimetry has been performed using two methodologies: a) linearization for dose-response curve based on calibration curves to create a functional form that linearize s the dose response and b) 177 multichannel analysis dosimetry where the multiple color channels are analyzed allowing to address not only disturbances in the measurements caused by thickness variation in the film layer, but also, separate other external influences in the film response. All experiments have been simulated using the MCNP5 Monte Carlo radiation transport code. Comparison of experimental results are in good agreement with calculated dose values with differences less than 6% for almost all cases. (Author)

  8. Uncertainty analysis of doses from ingestion of plutonium and americium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puncher, M; Harrison, J D

    2012-02-01

    Uncertainty analyses have been performed on the biokinetic model for americium currently used by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), and the model for plutonium recently derived by Leggett, considering acute intakes by ingestion by adult members of the public. The analyses calculated distributions of doses per unit intake. Those parameters having the greatest impact on prospective doses were identified by sensitivity analysis; the most important were the fraction absorbed from the alimentary tract, f(1), and rates of uptake from blood to bone surfaces. Probability distributions were selected based on the observed distribution of plutonium and americium in human subjects where possible; the distributions for f(1) reflected uncertainty on the average value of this parameter for non-specified plutonium and americium compounds ingested by adult members of the public. The calculated distributions of effective doses for ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am were well described by log-normal distributions, with doses varying by around a factor of 3 above and below the central values; the distributions contain the current ICRP Publication 67 dose coefficients for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public. Uncertainty on f(1) values had the greatest impact on doses, particularly effective dose. It is concluded that: (1) more precise data on f(1) values would have a greater effect in reducing uncertainties on doses from ingested (239)Pu and (241)Am, than reducing uncertainty on other model parameter values and (2) the results support the dose coefficients (Sv Bq(-1) intake) derived by ICRP for ingestion of (239)Pu and (241)Am by adult members of the public.

  9. Assessment of internal doses

    CERN Document Server

    Rahola, T; Falk, R; Isaksson, M; Skuterud, L

    2002-01-01

    There is a definite need for training in dose calculation. Our first course was successful and was followed by a second, both courses were fully booked. An example of new tools for software products for bioassay analysis and internal dose assessment is the Integrated Modules for Bioassay Analysis (IMBA) were demonstrated at the second course. This suite of quality assured code modules have been adopted in the UK as the standard for regulatory assessment purposes. The intercomparison measurements are an important part of the Quality Assurance work. In what is known as the sup O utside workers ' directive it is stated that the internal dose measurements shall be included in the European Unions supervision system for radiation protection. The emergency preparedness regarding internal contamination was much improved by the training with and calibration of handheld instruments from participants' laboratories. More improvement will be gained with the handbook giving practical instructions on what to do in case of e...

  10. Management et nouvelle gestion publique : limites et paradoxes de l’imitation du privé Management and New Public Management: the limits and paradoxes of imitating the private sector Management y nueva gestión pública: límites y paradojas de la imitación de los mecanismos privados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Alber

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available En s’appuyant sur des données quantitatives permettant des comparaisons public/privé (l’enquête Coi 2006, l’article cherche à faire le point sur la diffusion des principales méthodes managériales promues par la nouvelle gestion publique au sein du secteur public. Sont ainsi étudiés l’assignation d’objectifs chiffrés, les entretiens individuels d’évaluation et les parts salariales variables en comparant à chaque fois leur fréquence et leurs publics dans les deux secteurs. Dans un contexte de fortes remises en cause de l’organisation administrative, il s’agit de faire le point sur le supposé « retard » du secteur public. Les résultats montrent une situation pour le moins nuancée, à la fois caractérisée par une large diffusion des différentes pratiques managériales dans le secteur public, à des niveaux cependant moindres à ceux du secteur privé, mais il est surtout montré que celles-ci débouchent beaucoup moins fréquemment sur des conséquences concrètes. Le tableau d’ensemble est donc celui d’une forme de management des agents du public assez paradoxale, essentiellement symbolique, encore partiellement neutralisé par les résistances à l’individualisation que permet le statut.The article uses quantitative data (the Coi 2006 survey to compare the French public and private sectors and assess the spread of New Public Management policies in French administrative bodies. Mechanisms such as annual assessment talks, individual targets and incentivizing bonuses are studied in both sectors in terms of frequencies and audiences. At a time when the state sector has come under fire for ostensibly being behind the curve, findings reveal a contradictory situation characterized by different managerial practices being broadly diffused across the public sector, albeit less than in the private sector. Above all, it showed a much lesser achievement of concrete outcomes. All in all, a relatively paradoxical

  11. Comparison and Suggestion of Public Exposure Limits of Power Frequency Electromagnetic Fields in International Standards%国际标准工频电磁场公众曝露限值比较及启示

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李妮; 邬雄; 刘兴发; 路遥

    2013-01-01

    为了促进我国电磁场控制限值国家标准的出台,针对输变电工程的工频电场和磁场,介绍了世界卫生组织推荐的国际非电离辐射防护委员会(ICNIRP)导则和电气与电子工程师学会(IEEE)标准在电磁场基本限值、参考水平以及最大允许曝露等方面的规定和变化,比较分析曝露限值的应用原则、制定依据及防护措施,由此提出对我国电磁场控制限值的具体建议,得到结论:IEEE标准较ICNIRP导则更多地考虑了具体工程环境下的限值处理问题;用参考水平或最大允许曝露来确定是否符合或者超过基本限值;建议国家标准同时采用4kV/m和10kV/m两个电场控制限值,保留100μT作为磁场控制限值.%For the issuance of national standard on control limits of electric and magnetic fields,the regulations and their variations on such aspects as basic restrictions,reference levels and maximum permissible exposure of electric and magnetic fields in the International Commission on NonIonizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines and The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)standard recommended by World Health Organization are introduced as regard to power frequency electric and magnetic fields produced by power transmission and transformation engineering in the paper.Then,application principles,development basis and the corresponding protective measures of these exposure limits are compared,and the detailed suggestions for developing national standard on control limits of electric and magnetic fields are put forward.The conclusions are drawn that the limits under the specific project environment are more considered in IEEE standard than that in ICNIRP guidelines,the reference levels or maximum permissible exposure could be applied to determine whether the basis restrictions are satisfied or not,and the control limits are suggested with both of 4 kV/m and 10 kV/m for electric field,and 100 μT for magnetic

  12. Public opinion on public services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evelien Eggink; Debbie Verbeek-Oudijk; Evert Pommer

    2013-01-01

    Original titel: Burgers over de kwaliteit van publieke diensten Most citizens come into contact with public services, for example as a patient, as a student or pupil, as a passenger on public transport or as a museum visitor. More and more importance is being attached to the quality of those service

  13. Dose Reduction Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WAGGONER, L.O.

    2000-05-16

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

  14. Calculation of Ambient (H*(10)) and Personal (Hp(10)) Dose Equivalent from a 252Cf Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traub, Richard J.

    2010-03-26

    The purpose of this calculation is to calculate the neutron dose factors for the Sr-Cf-3000 neutron source that is located in the 318 low scatter room (LSR). The dose factors were based on the dose conversion factors published in ICRP-21 Appendix 6, and the Ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) and Personal dose equivalent (Hp(10)) dose factors published in ICRP Publication 74.

  15. Pediatric computed tomography dose of head and chest exams: a bibliography revision; Dose em exames de cranio e torax de tomografia computadorizada pediatrica: uma revisao bibliografica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Barbara Q.; Capaverde, Alexandre S.; Vanni, Stefania; Mazzola, Carolina F.S.; Silva, Ana M. Marques da, E-mail: barbara.friedrich@acad.pucrs.br [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Computed Tomography (CT) imaging diagnosis it is responsible for over 34% of the radiation dose given to society, only in Brazil there is around 3833 CT equipment. There are two dose index in CT, the CTDI{sub vol} and DLP that represents the Computed Tomography dose index and the product of the CTDI{sub vol} by the length of irradiation. This paper has as objective describe the values of CTDI{sub vol} e DLP for pediatric exams of chest and head. This is an exploratory study of bibliography revision on the PubMed data base using the index terms with the following crossing: Computed Tomography AND Reference Levels AND Dose. The search was limited by published studies on the last 5 years with patients among 0 and 15 years, in English or Portuguese. Besides that, were included references guides suggest by scientific and governmental organizations on the last 5 years. The data analysis was made using the four readings of Gil: exploratory, selective, analytic and interpretative. By the Exploratory Reading were located 23 articles. On the Selective Reading were excluded 4 articles and on the Analytic Reading 9 articles. The Interpretative Reading was made using 7 publications. Regarding the references guides were includes 3 guides. The Portaria MS453/98 was included for being the only national publication. All data were characterized between practical levels and reference levels. The conclusion is that there is no consensus between the reference levels for the selected articles, for pediatric exams. Besides that, the national legislation do not have reference levels for pediatric CT. (author)

  16. Public Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What is the role of sociology in society? How can - and should - sociology contribute with insights relevant and useful to the outside world? Is sociology attuned to accommodate the demands of the wider public and of surrounding society? Who benefits from the knowledge produced and provided...... by sociology? What are the social implications and cultural effects of the knowledge sociology provides and creates? All of these questions, and many others, concern and centre on sociology's relationship to the surrounding society, in short to the ‘public'. All of these questions - and many others...... irrelevance and introversion and the Charybdis of public relevancy and extroversion. But what does it mean to be a ‘public sociologist' in contemporary society and are there really any other ways of doing sociology? What are the requirements of sociologists in a social world increasingly informed and shaped...

  17. Miscellaneous Publications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Late 19th century Weather Bureau publications and Congressional reports pertaining to weather. Set of Weather Bureau Snowfall Bulletins for Rocky Mountain states...

  18. Public Airports

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This data set is a vector point digital data structure that contains the locations of General Public Use Airports in the State of New Mexico. It only contains those...

  19. Political Parody and Public Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Parody and related forms of political humor are essential resources for sustaining democratic public culture. They do so by exposing the limits of public speech, transforming discursive demands into virtual images, setting those images before a carnivalesque audience, and celebrating social leveling while decentering all discourses within the…

  20. Political Parody and Public Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariman, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Parody and related forms of political humor are essential resources for sustaining democratic public culture. They do so by exposing the limits of public speech, transforming discursive demands into virtual images, setting those images before a carnivalesque audience, and celebrating social leveling while decentering all discourses within the…

  1. Oak Ridge Reservation Environmental Protection Rad Neshaps Radionuclide Inventory Web Database and Rad Neshaps Source and Dose Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, Patricia A; Smith, Linda L; Johnson, David N

    2017-07-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency promulgated national emission standards for emissions of radionuclides other than radon from US Department of Energy facilities in Chapter 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61, Subpart H. This regulatory standard limits the annual effective dose that any member of the public can receive from Department of Energy facilities to 0.1 mSv. As defined in the preamble of the final rule, all of the facilities on the Oak Ridge Reservation, i.e., the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, East Tennessee Technology Park, and any other U.S. Department of Energy operations on Oak Ridge Reservation, combined, must meet the annual dose limit of 0.1 mSv. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory, there are monitored sources and numerous unmonitored sources. To maintain radiological source and inventory information for these unmonitored sources, e.g., laboratory hoods, equipment exhausts, and room exhausts not currently venting to monitored stacks on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory campus, the Environmental Protection Rad NESHAPs Inventory Web Database was developed. This database is updated annually and is used to compile emissions data for the annual Radionuclide National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (Rad NESHAPs) report required by 40 CFR 61.94. It also provides supporting documentation for facility compliance audits. In addition, a Rad NESHAPs source and dose database was developed to import the source and dose summary data from Clean Air Act Assessment Package-1988 computer model files. This database provides Oak Ridge Reservation and facility-specific source inventory; doses associated with each source and facility; and total doses for the Oak Ridge Reservation dose.

  2. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Do you have questions about the elections to the Staff Council, 2017 MERIT exercise, EVE and School, LD to IC exercise, CHIS, the Pension Fund… Come get informed and ask your questions at our public meetings. These public meetings are also an opportunity to get the more information on current issues. Benefit from this occasion to get the latest news and to discuss with the representatives of the statutory body that is the Staff Association!

  3. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  4. Dose Reduction Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Waggoner, L O

    2000-01-01

    As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the sm...

  5. T dose Vaccine Policy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    National Programme of Immunization (NPI), measles remains a disturbing cause ... or as a supplement is expected to offer a second opportunity to children who ... available in 1963, the world welcomed it with joy .... one dose of vaccine were not always protected from .... begins a long story Starting now is still early enough.

  6. Required accuracy and dose thresholds in individual monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, P.; Griffith, R.V.

    1994-01-01

    this uncertainty factor, a value of 21% can be evaluated for the allowable maximum overall standard deviation for dose measurements at dose levels near the annual dose limits increasing to 45% for dose levels at the lower end of the dose range required to be monitored. A method is described for evaluating...... the overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system by combining random and systematic uncertainties in quadrature, and procedures are also given for determining each individual uncertainty connected to the dose measurement. In particular, attention is paid to the evaluation of the combined uncertainty due...... to energy and angular dependencies of the dosemeter. In type testing of personal dosimetry systems, the estimated overall standard deviation of the dosimetry system is the main parameter to be tested. An important characteristic of a personal dosimetry system is its capability of measuring low doses...

  7. Misonidazole with dexamethasone rescue: an escalating dose toxicity study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanasichuk, H.; Urtasun, R.C.; Fulton, D.S.; Raleigh, J.

    1984-09-01

    Neurotoxicity induced by misonidazole (MISO) and desmethylmisonidazole (DMM) has become the dose limiting factor in clinical work. In 1981, the authors reported a preliminary study suggestive that Dexamethasone (DEXA) does have a protective effect against peripheral neuropathies (PN) resulting from toxicity of misonidazole. The authors are presently investigating the use of DEXA, with escalating doses of MISO in an attempt to modify its neurotoxicity. To date, 16 patients have been registered to receive total doses of MISO given in 9 equally divided doses over 3 weeks. DEXA is given 3 days prior to the first dose and continues for the duration of therapy. All patients receive palliative radiation. No toxicity was seen at the total dose of 13.5 gm/M/sub 2/. One grade I PN occurred in the first four patients receiving 15.5 gm/M/sub 2/. Six additional patients were entered at this dose level and no further incidence of PN was observed.

  8. The Dose Makes The Cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Cetin, Uzay

    2016-01-01

    Explaining cooperation is one of the greatest challenges for basic scientific research. We proposed an agent-based model to study co-evolution of memory and cooperation. In our model, reciprocal agents with limited memory size play Prisoner's Dilemma Game iteratively. The characteristic of the environment, whether it is threatening or not, is embedded in the payoff matrix. Our findings are as follows. (i) Memory plays a critical role in the protection of cooperation. (ii) In the absence of threat, subsequent generations loose their memory and are consequently invaded by defectors. (iii) In contrast, the presence of an appropriate level of threat triggers the emergence of a self-protection mechanism for cooperation within subsequent generations. On the evolutionary level, memory size acts like an immune response of the population against aggressive defection. (iv) Even more extreme threat results again in defection. Our findings boil down to the following: The dose of the threat makes the cooperation.

  9. Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Baum, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Occupational dose reduction developments and data collected at nuclear power plants have been described. Written descriptions of repetitive high dose jobs, their collective dose equivalent ranges and list of dose reduction techniques will aid in reducing collective dose equivalents from these dose-reduction targets. Knowing which components contribute to high maintenance or repair dose will aid in reducing routine maintenance collective dose equivalents. The radwaste dose reduction improvements will aid in reducing radwaste operations collective dose equivalent and reduce the number of radwaste workers who exceed their administrative dose limits. The identification and rating of managers' and workers' ALARA incentives will provide the basis for recommendations to improve dose reduction incentives. Lastly, the identification and rating of the key components of an ALARA program will aid in

  10. Monte Carlo dose distributions for radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perucha, M.; Leal, A.; Rincon, M.; Carrasco, E. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica; Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica]|[Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain). Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica; Nunez, L. [Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Radiofisica; Arrans, R.; Sanchez-Calzado, J.A.; Errazquin, L. [Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain). Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica; Sanchez-Nieto, B. [Royal Marsden NHS Trust (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics]|[Inst. of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The precision of Radiosurgery Treatment planning systems is limited by the approximations of their algorithms and by their dosimetrical input data. This fact is especially important in small fields. However, the Monte Carlo methods is an accurate alternative as it considers every aspect of particle transport. In this work an acoustic neurinoma is studied by comparing the dose distribution of both a planning system and Monte Carlo. Relative shifts have been measured and furthermore, Dose-Volume Histograms have been calculated for target and adjacent organs at risk. (orig.)

  11. Agriculture-related radiation dose calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furr, J.M.; Mayberry, J.J.; Waite, D.A.

    1987-10-01

    Estimates of radiation dose to the public must be made at each stage in the identification and qualification process leading to siting a high-level nuclear waste repository. Specifically considering the ingestion pathway, this paper examines questions of reliability and adequacy of dose calculations in relation to five stages of data availability (geologic province, region, area, location, and mass balance) and three methods of calculation (population, population/food production, and food production driven). Calculations were done using the model PABLM with data for the Permian and Palo Duro Basins and the Deaf Smith County area. Extra effort expended in gathering agricultural data at succeeding environmental characterization levels does not appear justified, since dose estimates do not differ greatly; that effort would be better spent determining usage of food types that contribute most to the total dose; and that consumption rate and the air dispersion factor are critical to assessment of radiation dose via the ingestion pathway. 17 refs., 9 figs., 32 tabs.

  12. Radiation Dose Risk and Diagnostic Benefit in Imaging Investigations

    CERN Document Server

    Dobrescu, Lidia

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents many facets of medical imaging investigations radiological risks. The total volume of prescribed medical investigations proves a serious lack in monitoring and tracking of the cumulative radiation doses in many health services. Modern radiological investigations equipment is continuously reducing the total dose of radiation due to improved technologies, so a decrease in per caput dose can be noticed, but the increasing number of investigations has determined a net increase of the annual collective dose. High doses of radiation are cumulated from Computed Tomography investigations. An integrated system for radiation safety of the patients investigated by radiological imaging methods, based on smart cards and Public Key Infrastructure allow radiation absorbed dose data storage.

  13. Radiotherapy Dose-Volume Effects on Salivary Gland Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Joseph O.; Moiseenko, Vitali; Marks, Lawrence; Chao, K. S. Clifford; Nam, Jiho; Eilsbruch, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    Publications relating parotid dose-volume characteristics to radiotherapy-induced salivary toxicity were reviewed. Late salivary dysfunction has been correlated to the mean parotid gland dose, with recovery occurring with time. Severe xerostomia (defined as long-term salivary function of <25% of baseline) is usually avoided if at least one parotid gland is spared to a mean dose of less than ≈20 Gy or if both glands are spared to less than ≈25 Gy (mean dose). For complex, partial-volume RT patterns (e.g., intensity-modulated radiotherapy), each parotid mean dose should be kept as low as possible, consistent with the desired clinical target volume coverage. A lower parotid mean dose usually results in better function. Submandibular gland sparing also significantly decreases the risk of xerostomia. The currently available predictive models are imprecise, and additional study is required to identify more accurate models of xerostomia risk. PMID:20171519

  14. The effect of manufacturing variables on radiation doses from porcelain tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, J H; Strydom, R

    2008-06-01

    Previous studies have focused on the radiological properties of glazed ceramic tiles. This study was conducted to describe the radiological properties of porcelain tiles and how they were affected by variations in the manufacturing parameters. The data showed that the majority of the uranium in the tiles was attributable to the addition of zircon while less than half of the thorium in the tile was attributable to the added zircon, and the remainder came from other minerals in the formulation. The effects of firing temperatures and compressive strengths of the tiles are presented and show that higher firing temperatures increase radon emanation, while higher compressive strengths reduce radon emanation. The study also described how the addition of zircon to the tile formulation affected the radiological exposures that could be received by a member of the public from the use of such porcelain tiles. A dose assessment was conducted based on 23 different types of tile formulation. Screening procedures for building materials have been described in European Commission documents, and these limit the addition of zircon in a porcelain tile to approximately 9% by mass. The dose assessment reported in this study showed that 20% zircon could be added to a porcelain tile without exceeding the prescribed dose limits.

  15. Skin dose mapping for fluoroscopically guided interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Perry B.; Borrego, David; Balter, Stephen; Johnson, Kevin; Siragusa, Daniel; Bolch, Wesley E. [Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Radiology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032 (United States); Radiology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32209 (United States); Radiology, Division of Vascular Interventional Radiology, University of Florida, Jacksonville, Florida 32209 (United States); Biomedical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    Purpose: To introduce a new skin dose mapping software system for interventional fluoroscopy dose assessment and to analyze the benefits and limitations of patient-phantom matching. Methods: In this study, a new software system was developed for visualizing patient skin dose during interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The system works by translating the reference point air kerma to the location of the patient's skin, which is represented by a computational model. In order to orient the model with the x-ray source, geometric parameters found within the radiation dose structured report (RDSR) are used along with a limited number of in-clinic measurements. The output of the system is a visual indication of skin dose mapped onto an anthropomorphic model at a resolution of 5 mm. In order to determine if patient-dependent and patient-sculpted models increase accuracy, peak skin dose was calculated for each of 26 patient-specific models and compared with doses calculated using an elliptical stylized model, a reference hybrid model, a matched patient-dependent model and one patient-sculpted model. Results were analyzed in terms of a percent difference using the doses calculated using the patient-specific model as the true standard. Results: Anthropometric matching, including the use of both patient-dependent and patient-sculpted phantoms, was shown most beneficial for left lateral and anterior-posterior projections. In these cases, the percent difference using a reference model was between 8 and 20%, using a patient-dependent model between 7 and 15%, and using a patient-sculpted model between 3 and 7%. Under the table tube configurations produced errors less than 5% in most situations due to the flattening affects of the table and pad, and the fact that table height is the main determination of source-to-skin distance for these configurations. In addition to these results, several skin dose maps were produced and a prototype display system was placed on the in

  16. Authorized Limit Evaluation of Spent Granular Activated Carbon Used for Vapor-Phase Remediation at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devany, R; Utterback, T

    2007-01-11

    This report provides a technical basis for establishing radiological release limits for granular activated carbon (GAC) containing very low quantities of tritium and radon daughter products generated during environmental remediation activities at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). This evaluation was conducted according to the Authorized Limit procedures specified in United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment (DOE, 1993) and related DOE guidance documents. The GAC waste is currently being managed by LLNL as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) mixed waste. Significant cost savings can be achieved by developing an Authorized Limit under DOE Order 5400.5 since it would allow the waste to be safely disposed as a hazardous waste at a permitted off-site RCRA treatment and disposal facility. LLNL generates GAC waste during vapor-phase soil remediation in the Trailer 5475 area. While trichloroethylene and other volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are the primary targets of the remedial action, a limited amount of tritium and radon daughter products are contained in the GAC at the time of disposal. As defined in DOE Order 5400.5, an Authorized Limit is a level of residual radioactive material that will result in an annual public dose of 100 milliroentgen-equivalent man per year (mrem/year) or less. In 1995, DOE issued additional release requirements for material sent to a landfill that is not an authorized low-level radioactive waste disposal facility. Per guidance, the disposal site will be selected based on a risk/benefit assessment under the As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable (ALARA) process while ensuring that individual doses to the public are less than 25 mrem in a year, ground water is protected, the release would not necessitate further remedial action for the disposal site, and the release is coordinated with all appropriate authorities. The 1995 release requirements also state

  17. [An investigation of ionizing radiation dose in a manufacturing enterprise of ion-absorbing type rare earth ore].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W F; Tang, S H; Tan, Q; Liu, Y M

    2016-08-20

    Objective: To investigate radioactive source term dose monitoring and estimation results in a manufacturing enterprise of ion-absorbing type rare earth ore and the possible ionizing radiation dose received by its workers. Methods: Ionizing radiation monitoring data of the posts in the control area and supervised area of workplace were collected, and the annual average effective dose directly estimated or estimated using formulas was evaluated and analyzed. Results: In the control area and supervised area of the workplace for this rare earth ore, α surface contamination activity had a maximum value of 0.35 Bq/cm(2) and a minimum value of 0.01 Bq/cm(2); β radioactive surface contamination activity had a maximum value of 18.8 Bq/cm(2) and a minimum value of 0.22 Bq/cm(2). In 14 monitoring points in the workplace, the maximum value of the annual average effective dose of occupational exposure was 1.641 mSv/a, which did not exceed the authorized limit for workers (5 mSv/a) , but exceeded the authorized limit for general personnel (0.25 mSv/a) . The radionuclide specific activity of ionic mixed rare earth oxides was determined to be 0.9. Conclusion: The annual average effective dose of occupational exposure in this enterprise does not exceed the authorized limit for workers, but it exceeds the authorized limit for general personnel. We should pay attention to the focus of the radiation process, especially for public works radiation.

  18. FY 1991 project plan for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project was designed to develop and demonstrate a method for estimating radiation doses people may have received from Hanford Site operations since 1944. The method researchers developed relied on a variety of measured and reconstructed data as input to a modular computer model that generates dose estimates and their uncertainties. As part of Phase 1, researchers used the reconstructed data and computer model to calculate preliminary dose estimates for populations in a limited geographical area and time period. Phase 2, now under way, is designed to evaluate the Phase 1 data and model and improve them to calculate more accurate and precise dose estimates. Phase 2 will also be used to obtain preliminary estimates of two categories of doses: for Native American tribes and for individuals included in the pilot phase of the Hanford Thyroid Disease Study (HTDS). TSP Directive 90-1 required HEDR staff to develop Phase 2 task plans for TSP approval. Draft task plans for Phase 2 were submitted to the TSP at the October 11--12, 1990 public meeting, and, after discussions of each activity and associated budget needs, the TSP directed HEDR staff to proceed with a slate of specific project activities for FY 1991 of Phase 2. This project plan contains detailed information about those activities. Phase 2 is expected to last 15--18 months. In mid-FY 1991, project activities and budget will be reevaluated to determine whether technical needs or priorities have changed. Separate from, but related to, this project plan, will be an integrated plan for the remainder of the project. HEDR staff will work with the TSP to map out a strategy that clearly describes end products'' for the project and the work necessary to complete them. This level of planning will provide a framework within which project decisions in Phases 2, 3, and 4 can be made.

  19. 41 CFR 105-70.047 - Limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Limitations. 105-70.047 Section 105-70.047 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION Regional Offices-General Services Administration...

  20. 42 CFR 82.13 - What sources of information may be used for dose reconstructions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What sources of information may be used for dose... § 82.13 What sources of information may be used for dose reconstructions? NIOSH will use the following sources of information for dose reconstructions, as necessary: (a) DOE and its contractors, including...

  1. 42 CFR 82.14 - What types of information could be used in dose reconstructions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What types of information could be used in dose... § 82.14 What types of information could be used in dose reconstructions? NIOSH will obtain the types of information described in this section for dose reconstructions, as necessary and available: (a) Subject...

  2. Emissies en doses door bronnen van ioniserende straling in Nederland - Jaarrapport 2001 'Beleidsmonitoring straling'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eleveld H; Blaauboer RO; Gorts PC; Janssen MPM; Kwakman PJM; Pruppers MJM; LSO

    2002-01-01

    This first annual report on 'Radiation policy monitoring' gives an overview of the human-induced radiation doses in the Netherlands. Also investigated are the course in time and the effect of policy on the radiation dose of members of the public. Radiation doses are attributed to the enterprises res

  3. Maximizing antimalarial efficacy and the importance of dosing strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beeson, James G; Boeuf, Philippe; Fowkes, Freya J I

    2015-01-01

    .... Without new drugs to replace artemisinins, it is essential to define dosing strategies that maximize therapeutic efficacy, limit the spread of resistance, and preserve the clinical value of ACTs...

  4. Methodology of high dose research in medical radiodiagnostic; Metodologia de investigacao de doses elevadas em radiodiagnostico medico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barboza, Adriana E.; Martins, Cintia P. de S., E-mail: ird@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-11-01

    This work has as main purpose to study occupational exposure in diagnostic radiology in medical cases of high doses recorded in 2011 at the national level . These doses were recorded by monitoring individual of the occupationally exposed individuals (OEI's). This monitoring of the doses received by ionizing radiation has as main objective to ensure that the principle of dose limitation is respected. In this study it were evaluated doses of 372 OEI's radiology in different Brazilian states. Doses were extracted from the database of Sector Management Doses of the Institute for Radioprotection and Dosimetry - IRD/CNEN-RJ, Brazil. The information from the database provide reports of doses from several states, which allows to quantify statistically, showing those with the highest doses in four areas: dose greater than or equal to 20 mSv apron and chest and dose greater than or equal to 100 mSv apron and chest. The identification of these states allows the respective Sanitary Surveillance (VISA), be aware of the events and make plans to reduce them. This study clarified the required procedures when there is a record of high dose emphasizing the importance of using protective radiological equipment, dosimeter and provide a safety environment work by maintaining work equipment. Proposes the ongoing training of professionals, emphasizing the relevance of the concepts of radiation protection and the use of the questionnaire with their investigative systematic sequence, which will allow quickly and efficiently the success the investigations.

  5. 42 CFR 93.311 - Investigation time limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Investigation time limits. 93.311 Section 93.311 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH ASSESSMENTS AND HEALTH EFFECTS STUDIES OF HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCES RELEASES AND FACILITIES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE POLICIES...

  6. Doses received by organs in interventional cardiology; Les doses recues aux organes en cardiologie interventionnelle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maccia, C. [Centre d' Assurance de qualite des Applications Technologiques dans le domaine de la Sante, (CAATS) - 43, Bd du Marechal Joffre, 92 - Bourg-La-Reine (France)

    2009-07-01

    After a discussion of several publications about patient dosimetry in interventional cardiology, the author recalls that the in vivo assessment of the dose received by some organs is uneasy because invasive. Therefore, the assessment requires the use of physical or mathematical dosimetric phantoms which simulate patient morphology as well as the incident photon attenuation phenomenon. He evokes some characteristics and applications of these phantoms. He outlines the different sources and origins of the dose received by the patient, and discusses results obtained by collecting data from 177 patients submitted to diagnosis or therapeutic procedures

  7. Effects of proton radiation dose, dose rate and dose fractionation on hematopoietic cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, J.H.; Rusek, A.; Sanzari, J.; Avery, S.; Sayers, C.; Krigsfeld, G.; Nuth, M.; Wan, X.S.; Kennedy, A.R.

    2010-09-01

    The present study evaluated the acute effects of radiation dose, dose rate and fractionation as well as the energy of protons in hematopoietic cells of irradiated mice. The mice were irradiated with a single dose of 51.24 MeV protons at a dose of 2 Gy and a dose rate of 0.05-0.07 Gy/min or 1 GeV protons at doses of 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2 Gy delivered in a single dose at dose rates of 0.05 or 0.5 Gy/min or in five daily dose fractions at a dose rate of 0.05 Gy/min. Sham-irradiated animals were used as controls. The results demonstrate a dose-dependent loss of white blood cells (WBCs) and lymphocytes by up to 61% and 72%, respectively, in mice irradiated with protons at doses up to 2 Gy. The results also demonstrate that the dose rate, fractionation pattern and energy of the proton radiation did not have significant effects on WBC and lymphocyte counts in the irradiated animals. These results suggest that the acute effects of proton radiation on WBC and lymphocyte counts are determined mainly by the radiation dose, with very little contribution from the dose rate (over the range of dose rates evaluated), fractionation and energy of the protons.

  8. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information

  9. Going public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem...... deal with ethical public relations issues, guided by a norm or maxim of openness. Drawing on and rethinking the CUDOS codification of the scientific ethos, as it was worked out by Robert K. Merton in 1942, we propose that this, which is echoed in current codifications of norms for good scientific...... conduct, contains a tacit maxim of openness which may naturally be extended to cover the public relations of science. Discussing openness as access, accountability, transparency and receptiveness, the argumentation concentrates on the possible prevention of misconduct with respect to, on the one hand...

  10. Going public

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Gitte; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The paper addresses issues of scientific conduct regarding relations between science and the media, relations between scientists and journalists, and attitudes towards the public at large. In the large and increasing body of literature on scientific conduct and misconduct, these issues seem...... deal with ethical public relations issues, guided by a norm or maxim of openness. Drawing on and rethinking the CUDOS codification of the scientific ethos, as it was worked out by Robert K. Merton in 1942, we propose that this, which is echoed in current codifications of norms for good scientific...... conduct, contains a tacit maxim of openness which may naturally be extended to cover the public relations of science. Discussing openness as access, accountability, transparency and receptiveness, the argumentation concentrates on the possible prevention of misconduct with respect to, on the one hand...

  11. Public Sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trenz, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    of the collective will of the people in the act of democratic self-government. The concept of the public sphere is used across the fields of media and communication research, cultural studies and the humanities, the history of ideas, legal and constitutional studies as well as democracy studies. Historically......In modern societies, the public sphere represents the intermediary realm that supports the communication of opinions, the discovery of problems that need to be dealt with collectively, the channeling of these problems through the filter of the media and political institutions, and the realization......, public spheres have undergone structural transformations that were closely connected to the emergence of different mass media. More recently, they are subject to trends of transnationalization and digitalization in politics and society....

  12. Public Sphere

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trenz, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    In modern societies, the public sphere represents the intermediary realm that supports the communication of opinions, the discovery of problems that need to be dealt with collectively, the channeling of these problems through the filter of the media and political institutions, and the realization......, public spheres have undergone structural transformations that were closely connected to the emergence of different mass media. More recently, they are subject to trends of transnationalization and digitalization in politics and society....... of the collective will of the people in the act of democratic self-government. The concept of the public sphere is used across the fields of media and communication research, cultural studies and the humanities, the history of ideas, legal and constitutional studies as well as democracy studies. Historically...

  13. China Rare Earth Holdings Limited

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    China Rare Earth Holdings Limited is a large trans-area corporation and a public company listed in Hong Kong Stock Exchange (Name: China Rare Earth, Code: 0769), with headquarter in Hong Kong. Located on the bank of beautiful Taihu Lake, the subsidiary in Yinxing covers area of 200,000 m2. It has nearly 1,000 employees, 30% of whom are technical staffs. After self-administration and effort, the company passed ISO 9001: 2000 and ISO 14000 Certificaitons.

  14. public spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grigoryeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The topic of this issue is PUBLIC SPACES. It is familiar and clear to every citizen. The streets and courtyards as childhood experiences remain with us forever. And these are the places where we come with our parents at weekends, where we meet friends, where we have dates and where we already come for a walk with our children.The history of public spaces is long and captivating. It was the main city squares where the most important events took place in history. The Agoras of Ancient Greece and the Roman Forums, the squares of Vatican, Paris and London, Moscow and Saint Petersburg… Greve, Trafalgar, Senate, Palace, Red, Bolotnaya – behind every name there is life of capitals, countries and nations.Public spaces, their shapes, image and development greatly influence the perception of the city as a whole. Both visitors and inhabitants can see in public spaces not only the visage but the heart, the soul and the mind of the city.Unfortunately, sometimes we have to prove the value of public spaces and defend them from those who consider them nothing but a blank space, nobody’s land destined for barbarous development.What should happen to make citizens perceive public spaces as their own and to make authorities consider development and maintenance of squares and parks their priority task against the  background of increasing competition between cities and the fight for human capital? Lately they more often say about “a high-quality human capital”. And now, when they say “the city should be liveable” they add “for all groups of citizens, including the creative class”.

  15. Entrance surface dose according to dose calculation: Head and wrist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Ho Jin [Dept. Radiology, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Han, Jae Bok; Song, Jong Nam; Choi, Nam Gil [Dept. of Radiological Science, Dongshin University, Naju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    This study were compared with the direct measurement and indirect dose methods through various dose calculation in head and wrist. And, the modified equation was proposed considering equipment type, setting conditions, tube voltage, inherent filter, added filter and its accompanied back scatter factor. As a result, it decreased the error of the direct measurement than the existing dose calculation. Accordingly, diagnostic radiography patient dose comparison would become easier and radiographic exposure control and evaluation will become more efficient. The study findings are expected to be useful in patients' effective dose rate evaluation and dose reduction.

  16. Comparison of open-access vancomycin dosing websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fewel, N P

    2017-04-01

    There are many methods for dosing vancomycin. The purpose of this commentary was to compare open-access vancomycin dosing websites with Vancomycin-Calculator.com and describe how body weight can affect their pharmacokinetic (PK) calculations. A vancomycin dosing website, Vancomycin-Calculator.com, was developed to improve the dosing practice at our health system. Nine other vancomycin dosing calculators were identified, including three open-access websites. Each website uses a different dosing method. Most of the websites calculated similar doses for patients with normal body weight. Vancomycin-Calculator.com was the only website to calculate practical doses for obese patients, and it calculated higher daily doses for underweight patients compared to other websites. Vancomycin-Calculator.com is an open-access vancomycin dosing website that was developed using the Bauer PK method. Compared with three other websites, PK calculations resulted in significant differences for underweight and obese patients. Published 2016. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. First dose in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Du er blevet ansat som læge i et lægemiddelfirma med ansvar for planlægning og sikkerhed i fase 1 forsøg. Firmaet har udviklet tre dopamin D2-receptor antagonister til behandling af skizofreni. Lægemidlerne har undergået et omfattende farmakologisk, toksikologisk og farmaceutisk afprøvningsprogra...... fase 1 forsøg alias »First dose in man«....

  18. Radioactive Substances Act 1993 - annex document. To accompany the explanatory document and draft authorisation prepared by the Environment Agency to assist public consultation on the application by Devonport Royal Dockyard Limited to dispose of radioactive wastes from Devonport Royal Dockyard Plymouth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    - to which MoD retains title - are managed through treatment, storage and eventual disposal by DML. Best practicable means (BPM) are employed to minimise the volumes and activities (where possible) of the various wastes that arise, and to prevent the spread of radioactive material from specified waste streams. The unavoidable discharge and disposal of radioactive waste is consistent with Best Practicable Environmental Options (BPEO), and is carried out in a suitable and safe manner in a way that results in the least overall harm to the environment. The most radiologically significant radionuclide (radioactive atom) that needs to be removed is cobalt-60, although other radionuclides such as tritium (a radioactive form of hydrogen), carbon-14 and argon-41 are also considered in detail in this document. Appropriate materials and methods are employed to minimise the quantity of radioactive material/waste generated in normal conditions although this has to be consistent with nuclear and radiological safety requirements, and operational needs. However, there are no reasonably practicable methods for removing tritium from the water that comprises the main effluent waste streams. A detailed study of the environmental impact of DML's radioactive liquid discharges to the marine environment has shown that the additional radiation doses to. members of the public and to marine life are extremely low. In addition, the discharge of treated low level liquid effluent to sea constitutes the best overall environmental option available. The liquids are stored in tanks and discharged on occasions to take full advantage of the tides and achieve the maximum natural dispersion. The level of tritium in the surrounding marine areas rapidly falls to the background. Cobalt-60 - the most radiologically significant nuclide - and other metal ion radionuclides can be removed from the liquid waste streams by methods such as filtration and ion-exchange. In the ion-exchange process, dissolved metal

  19. Dependence of radiation dose on the behavioral patterns among school children: a retrospective analysis 18 to 20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Shuhei; Tsubokura, Masaharu; Furutani, Tomoyuki; Hayano, Ryugo S; Kami, Masahiro; Kanazawa, Yukio; Oikawa, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    After radioactive incidents, the exposure risk in daily activities among children is a major public concern. However, there are limited methods available for evaluation of this risk, which is essential to future health risk management. To this end, this study assessed the relationship between behavioral patterns of school children and radiation exposure for a period of 18-20 months following the 2011 Fukushima nuclear incident. The assessed population comprised 520 school children from Minamisoma city, located 20 km north of the nuclear plant. Data for the doses were obtained using individual dosimeters and from results of a behavior survey administered by the City Office. The mean value of the doses in the study period was 0.34 mSv, with a standard deviation of 0.14 mSv, indicating an annual dose of ∼1.36 mSv, which includes doses from natural sources. Our results showed that behavior with respect to outdoor activities had no statistically significant relationship to the dose. A 0.1 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate at home was associated with a 10% increase in the dose; however, a 0.01 μSv/h increase in the air dose rate on the school grounds was associated with a 2% increase in the dose. This study indicates that the air contamination levels at the places where children spend most of their day are the significant predictors of the dose, as opposed to the levels at those outdoor locations in which short periods of time spent. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  20. Brachytherapy source characterization for improved dose calculations using primary and scatter dose separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kellie R; Tedgren, Asa K Carlsson; Ahnesjö, Anders

    2005-09-01

    In brachytherapy, tissue heterogeneities, source shielding, and finite patient/phantom extensions affect both the primary and scatter dose distributions. The primary dose is, due to the short range of secondary electrons, dependent only on the distribution of material located on the ray line between the source and dose deposition site. The scatter dose depends on both the direct irradiation pattern and the distribution of material in a large volume surrounding the point of interest, i.e., a much larger volume must be included in calculations to integrate many small dose contributions. It is therefore of interest to consider different methods for the primary and the scatter dose calculation to improve calculation accuracy with limited computer resources. The algorithms in present clinical use ignore these effects causing systematic dose errors in brachytherapy treatment planning. In this work we review a primary and scatter dose separation formalism (PSS) for brachytherapy source characterization to support separate calculation of the primary and scatter dose contributions. We show how the resulting source characterization data can be used to drive more accurate dose calculations using collapsed cone superposition for scatter dose calculations. Two types of source characterization data paths are used: a direct Monte Carlo simulation in water phantoms with subsequent parameterization of the results, and an alternative data path built on processing of AAPM TG43 formatted data to provide similar parameter sets. The latter path is motivated of the large amounts of data already existing in the TG43 format. We demonstrate the PSS methods using both data paths for a clinical 192Ir source. Results are shown for two geometries: a finite but homogeneous water phantom, and a half-slab consisting of water and air. The dose distributions are compared to results from full Monte Carlo simulations and we show significant improvement in scatter dose calculations when the collapsed

  1. Estimation of the Dose and Dose Rate Effectiveness Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, L.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2013-01-01

    Current models to estimate radiation risk use the Life Span Study (LSS) cohort that received high doses and high dose rates of radiation. Transferring risks from these high dose rates to the low doses and dose rates received by astronauts in space is a source of uncertainty in our risk calculations. The solid cancer models recommended by BEIR VII [1], UNSCEAR [2], and Preston et al [3] is fitted adequately by a linear dose response model, which implies that low doses and dose rates would be estimated the same as high doses and dose rates. However animal and cell experiments imply there should be curvature in the dose response curve for tumor induction. Furthermore animal experiments that directly compare acute to chronic exposures show lower increases in tumor induction than acute exposures. A dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) has been estimated and applied to transfer risks from the high doses and dose rates of the LSS cohort to low doses and dose rates such as from missions in space. The BEIR VII committee [1] combined DDREF estimates using the LSS cohort and animal experiments using Bayesian methods for their recommendation for a DDREF value of 1.5 with uncertainty. We reexamined the animal data considered by BEIR VII and included more animal data and human chromosome aberration data to improve the estimate for DDREF. Several experiments chosen by BEIR VII were deemed inappropriate for application to human risk models of solid cancer risk. Animal tumor experiments performed by Ullrich et al [4], Alpen et al [5], and Grahn et al [6] were analyzed to estimate the DDREF. Human chromosome aberration experiments performed on a sample of astronauts within NASA were also available to estimate the DDREF. The LSS cohort results reported by BEIR VII were combined with the new radiobiology results using Bayesian methods.

  2. Doctoral Writing for Publication at a Leading African University: Publication Patterns and Pedagogies

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Mathilde

    2015-01-01

    Writing-for-publication is a practice that doctoral students should acquire for integration into international research culture. Publication rates and forms of pedagogy supporting the development of publication skills for doctoral students, however, remain inadequate worldwide. Limited data of doctoral student publication from African universities…

  3. Dose reduction in evacuation proctography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hare, C.; Halligan, S.; Bartram, C.I.; Gupta, R.; Walker, A.E.; Renfrew, I. [Intestinal Imaging Centre, St. Mark' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2001-03-01

    The goal of this study was to reduce the patient radiation dose from evacuation proctography. Ninety-eight consecutive adult patients referred for proctography to investigate difficult rectal evacuation were studied using a digital imaging system with either a standard digital program for barium examinations, a reduced dose digital program (both with and without additional copper filtration), or Video fluoroscopy. Dose-area products were recorded for each examination and the groups were compared. All four protocols produced technically acceptable examinations. The low-dose program with copper filtration (median dose 382 cGy cm{sup 2}) and Video fluoroscopy (median dose 705 cGy cm{sup 2}) were associated with significantly less dose than other groups (p < 0.0001). Patient dose during evacuation proctography can be reduced significantly without compromising the diagnostic quality of the examination. A digital program with added copper filtration conveyed the lowest dose. (orig.)

  4. Analysis of offsite dose calculation methodology for a nuclear power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Donna Smith [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1995-01-01

    This technical study reviews the methodology for calculating offsite dose estimates as described in the offsite dose calculation manual (ODCM) for Pennsylvania Power and Light - Susquehanna Steam Electric Station (SSES). An evaluation of the SSES ODCM dose assessment methodology indicates that it conforms with methodology accepted by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Using 1993 SSES effluent data, dose estimates are calculated according to SSES ODCM methodology and compared to the dose estimates calculated according to SSES ODCM and the computer model used to produce the reported 1993 dose estimates. The 1993 SSES dose estimates are based on the axioms of Publication 2 of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP). SSES Dose estimates based on the axioms of ICRP Publication 26 and 30 reveal the total body estimates to be the most affected.

  5. Aspects of the Relationship Between Drug Dose and Drug Effect

    OpenAIRE

    Peper, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    It is generally assumed that there exists a well-defined relationship between drug dose and drug effect and that this can be expressed by a dose-response curve. This paper argues that there is no such clear relation and that the dose-response curve provides only limited information about the drug effect. It is demonstrated that tolerance development during the measurement of the dose-response curve may cause major distortion of the curve and it is argued that the curve may only be used to ind...

  6. Public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Agnes van den Berg wrote an essay about human health and nature, establishing that subject as an important policy argument in developing (urban) nature in the Netherlands. She studied the public balance of fear and fascination for nature, summarising benefits on human health. In this chapter, she ad

  7. Public Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, C. P.

    In this book effects of technological developments on world conditions are discussed on the basis of the author's public statements made between 1959-70. A total of seven pieces is presented under the headings: The Two Cultures and the Scientific Revolution, The Two Cultures: A Second Look, The Case of Leavis and the Serious Case, Science and…

  8. Public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berg, van den A.E.

    2007-01-01

    Agnes van den Berg wrote an essay about human health and nature, establishing that subject as an important policy argument in developing (urban) nature in the Netherlands. She studied the public balance of fear and fascination for nature, summarising benefits on human health. In this chapter, she

  9. Publication Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Roy Paul

    This book is designed to solve the problem of coordinating art and typography with content in publications. Through text and illustrations, this book suggests ways to make pages and spreads in magazines, newspapers, and books attractive and readable. As a book of techniques, it is directed at potential and practicing art directors, designers, and…

  10. Publication Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Roy Paul

    This book is designed to solve the problem of coordinating art and typography with content in publications. Through text and illustrations, this book suggests ways to make pages and spreads in magazines, newspapers, and books attractive and readable. As a book of techniques, it is directed at potential and practicing art directors, designers, and…

  11. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, John [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Day, Philip [School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.harrison@hpa.org.uk, E-mail: philip.day@manchester.ac.uk

    2008-06-01

    This review updates material prepared for the UK Government Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters (CERRIE) and also refers to the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and other recent developments. Two conclusions from CERRIE were that ICRP should clarify and elaborate its advice on the use of its dose quantities, equivalent and effective dose, and that more attention should be paid to uncertainties in dose and risk estimates and their implications. The new ICRP recommendations provide explanations of the calculation and intended purpose of the protection quantities, but further advice on their use would be helpful. The new recommendations refer to the importance of understanding uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk, although methods for doing this are not suggested. Dose coefficients (Sv per Bq intake) for the inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are published as reference values without uncertainty. The primary purpose of equivalent and effective dose is to enable the summation of doses from different radionuclides and from external sources for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to stochastic risks of whole-body radiation exposure. Doses are calculated using defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including reference anatomical data for the organs and tissues of the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used to adjust for the different effectiveness of different radiation types, per unit absorbed dose (Gy), in causing stochastic effects at low doses and dose rates. Tissue weighting factors are used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, providing a simple set of rounded values chosen on the basis of age- and sex-averaged values of relative detriment. While the definition of absorbed dose has the scientific rigour required of a basic physical quantity

  12. Monitoring the eye lens: which dose quantity is adequate?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrens, R [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Dietze, G, E-mail: rolf.behrens@ptb.d [Paracelsusstrasse 7, D-38116 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-21

    Recent epidemiological studies suggest a rather low dose threshold (below 0.5 Gy) for the induction of a cataract of the eye lens. Some other studies even assume that there is no threshold at all. Therefore, protection measures have to be optimized and current dose limits for the eye lens may be reduced in the future. The question of which personal dose equivalent quantity is appropriate for monitoring the dose to the eye lens arises from this situation. While in many countries dosemeters calibrated in terms of the dose equivalent quantity H{sub p}(0.07) have been seen as being adequate for monitoring the dose to the eye lens, this might be questionable in the case of reduced dose limits and, thus, it may become necessary to use the dose equivalent quantity H{sub p}(3) for this purpose. To discuss this question, the dose conversion coefficients for the equivalent dose of the eye lens (in the following eye lens dose) were determined for realistic photon and beta radiation fields and compared with the values of the corresponding conversion coefficients for the different operational quantities. The values obtained lead to the following conclusions: in radiation fields where most of the dose comes from photons, especially x-rays, it is appropriate to use dosemeters calibrated in terms of H{sub p}(0.07) on a slab phantom, while in other radiation fields (dominated by beta radiation or unknown contributions of photon and beta radiation) dosemeters calibrated in terms of H{sub p}(3) on a slab phantom should be used. As an alternative, dosemeters calibrated in terms of H{sub p}(0.07) on a slab phantom could also be used; however, in radiation fields containing beta radiation with the end point energy near 1 MeV, an overestimation of the eye lens dose by up to a factor of 550 is possible.

  13. Radiation dose assessment of ACP hot cell in accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kook, D. H.; Jeong, W. M.; Koo, J. H.; Jeo, I. J.; Lee, E. P.; Ryu, K. S. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The Advanced spent fuel Condition in Process(ACP) is under development for the effective management of spent fuel which had been generated in nuclear plants. The ACP needs a hot cell where most operations will be performed. To give priority to the environments safety, radiation doses evaluations for the radioactive nuclides in accident cases were preliminarily performed with the meteorological data around facility site. Fire accident prevails over several accidnets. Internal Dose and External Dose evaluation according to short dispersion data for that case show a safe margin for regulation limits and SAR limit of IMEF where this facility will be constructed.

  14. Contralateral breast dose from partial breast brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R Cole; Nelson, Christopher L; Bloom, Elizabeth S; Kisling, Kelly D; Mason, Bryan E; Fisher, Gary D; Kirsner, Steven M

    2015-11-08

    The purpose of this study was to determine the dose to the contralateral breast during accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare it to external beam-published values. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) packets were used to measure the dose to the most medial aspect of the contralateral breast during APBI simulation, daily quality assurance (QA), and treatment. All patients in this study were treated with a single-entry, multicatheter device for 10 fractions to a total dose of 34 Gy. A mark was placed on the patient's skin on the medial aspect of the opposite breast. Three TLD packets were taped to this mark during the pretreatment simulation. Simulations consisted of an AP and Lateral scout and a limited axial scan encompassing the lumpectomy cavity (miniscan), if rotation was a concern. After the simulation the TLD packets were removed and the patients were moved to the high-dose-rate (HDR) vault where three new TLD packets were taped onto the patients at the skin mark. Treatment was administered with a Nucletron HDR afterloader using Iridium-192 as the treatment source. Post-treatment, TLDs were read (along with the simulation and QA TLD and a set of standards exposed to a known dose of 6 MV photons). Measurements indicate an average total dose to the contralateral breast of 70 cGy for outer quadrant implants and 181 cGy for inner quadrant implants. Compared to external beam breast tangents, these results point to less dose being delivered to the contralateral breast when using APBI.

  15. Dose estimate of inhaled hafnium tritide using the ICRP 66 lung model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung-Sung; Zhou, Yue; Wang, Yang-Sheng; Inkret, William C; Wermer, Joseph R

    2002-06-01

    Metal tritide is widely used for research, purification, compression, and storage of tritium. The current understanding of metal tritide and its radiation dosimetry for internal exposure is limited, and ICRP publications do not provide the tritium dosimetry for hafnium tritide. The current radiation protection guidelines for metal tritide particles (including hafnium tritide) are based on the assumption that their biological behavior is similar to tritiated water, which is completely absorbed by the body. However, the solubility of metal tritide particles depends on the chemical form of the material. The biological half-live of hafnium tritide particles and the dosimetry of an inhalation exposure to those particles could be quite different from tritiated water. This paper describes experiments on the dissolution rate of hafnium tritide particles in a simulated lung fluid. The results showed that less than 1% of the tritium was dissolved in the simulated lung fluid for hafnium tritide particles after 215 d. The short-term and long-term dissolution half times were 46 and 4.28 x 10(5) d, respectively. This indicates that hafnium tritide is an extremely insoluble material. Self-absorption of beta rays in the hafnium tritide particles was estimated by a numerical method. The dose coefficients were calculated as a function of particle size using in vitro solubility data and a calculated self-absorption factor. The dose coefficient decreased with aerodynamic diameters in the range of 0.25 to 10 microm, mainly because the self-absorption factor decreased with increasing particle size. For a particle 1 microm in aerodynamic diameter, the dose coefficient of a hafnium tritide particle was about 10 times higher than that of tritiated water but was about 1.4 times lower than that calculated by ICRP Publication 71 for Type S tritiated particles. The ICRP estimate did not include a self-absorption factor and thus might have overestimated the dose. This finding has significant

  16. Radiation dose and protection in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Okano

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiographic examinations play an essential part of dental practice. Because a certain amount of radiation is inevitably delivered to patients, it should be as low as reasonably achievable. The purposes of this article are to review the definition of the dose, the concept of the radiation protection, the measurement of the dose in dental radiography, and means to reduce dose through effective selection of patients and the management of radiographic equipment. The effective dose from some dental radiographic examinations is high enough to warrant reconsideration of means to reduce patient exposure. By using digital sensors or F-speed film, instead of D-speed film, combined with rectangular collimation instead of round collimation, dentists can reduce patient's exposure by a factor of 10 for bitewing and full-mouth radiographs. Justification and optimization of a procedure along with dose limitations are essential in clinical practice. It is prudent to establish diagnostic reference levels for dental radiography in Japan. In addition, dentists should remain informed about safety updates and availability of new equipment, supplies and techniques that would further improve the diagnostic ability of radiographs and simultaneously decrease patient exposure.

  17. The Response of Rats to Cutaneous Dosing with Trichothecene Mycotoxins,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-01

    trichothecene absorption by human skin is unknown. We have found no synergism between T-2 and DAS, but to test all aspects of synergism and of solvent...AD Al39 548 THE RESPONSE OF RATS TO CUTANEOUS DOSING WITH TRICHOTHECENE MYCOTOXINSIU) MATERIALS RESEARCH LABS ASCOT VALE IAUSTRALIA) H 0 CRONE OCT 83...902 de THE RESPONSE OF RATS TO CUTANEOUS DOSING WITH TRICHOTHECENE MYCOTOXINS 4 H.D. Crone TDTI Approved for Public Rlelease 2 004 Cmmealth of

  18. Distinctive research patterns on public sector performance measurement of public administration and accounting disciplines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Helden, G. Jan; Johnsen, Age; Vakkuri, Jarmo

    2008-01-01

    This article explores distinctive research patterns of public administration and accounting disciplines concerning public sector performance measurement (PSPM). Our review shows that accounting researchers from Europe investigate reasons for limited PM use and factors explaining a rational or symbol

  19. Dose estimation in the crystalline lens of industrial radiography personnel using Monte Carlo Method; Estimativa de dose nos cristalinos de operadores de gamagrafia industrial usando o metodo de Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Alexandre Roza de

    2014-07-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection, ICRP, in its publication 103, reviewed recent epidemiological evidence and indicated that, for the eye lens, the absorbed dose threshold for induction of late detriment is around 0.5 Gy. On this basis, on April 21, 2011, the ICRP recommended changes to the occupational dose limit in planned exposure situations, reducing the eye lens equivalent dose limit from 150 mSv to 20 mSv per year, on average, during the period of 5 years, with exposure not to exceed 50 mSv in a single year. This paper presents the dose estimation to eye lens, H{sub p}(10), effective dose and doses to important organs in the body, received by industrial gamma radiography workers, during planned or accidental exposure situations. The computer program Visual Monte Carlo was used and two relevant scenarios were postulated. The first is a planned exposure situation scenario where the operator is directly exposed to radiation during the operation. 12 radiographic exposures per day for 250 days per year, which leads to an exposure of 36,000 seconds or 10 hours per year were considered. The simulation was carried out using the following parameters: a {sup 192}Ir source with 1.0 TBq of activity, the source/operator distance varying from 5 m to 10 m at three different heights of 0.2 m, 1.0 m and 2.0 m. The eyes lens doses were estimated as being between 16.9 mSv/year and 66.9 mSv/year and for H{sub p}(10) the doses were between 17.7 mSv/year and 74.2 mSv/year. For the accidental exposure situation scenario, the same radionuclide and activity were used, but in this case the doses were calculated with and without a collimator. The heights above ground considered were 1.0 m, 1.5 m e 2.0 m, the source/operator distance was 40 cm and, the exposure time 74 seconds. The eyes lens doses, for 1.5 m, were 12.3 mGy and 0.28 mGy without and with a collimator, respectively. Three conclusions resulted from this work. The first was that the estimated doses show

  20. Psychology, psychologists, and public policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKnight, Katherine M; Sechrest, Lee; McKnight, Patrick E

    2005-01-01

    Evidence-based policy is being encouraged in all areas of public service ( Black 2001 ). Unprecedented federal legislation reflects a faith in science "as a force for improved public policy" ( Feuer et al. 2002 ). The objective of evidence-based policy is to use scientific research to drive decision making. Thus, the link between social science research and public policy seems to be a natural one. The purpose of this chapter is to address how psychological science in general, and clinical psychology in particular, can be of use to public policy makers. We discuss how psychological science can be relevant and applicable to informing policy, and we describe the role clinical scientists might play in generating, disseminating, and implementing that information. We also note distinct limitations on the usefulness of psychological research in driving public policy. We discuss some pitfalls and recommend areas where clinical psychology might best serve public policy.

  1. Contemporary radiation doses to mice and voles inhabiting East-Ural Radioactive Trace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malinovsky, Georgy P.; Yarmoshenko, Ilia V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, 620219, 20, Sophy Kovalevskoy St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Starichenko, Vera I.; Chibiryak, Mikhail V. [Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology UB RAS, 620144, 202, 8 Marta St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    East-Ural Radioactive Trace (EURT) is the radioactively contaminated territory formed after accidental explosion at nuclear waste storage facility of Mayak nuclear plant in 1957. Contemporary doses were estimated for the mice and voles, that were trapped by staff of IPAE at two sites in 2000-s. The site 1 is situated directly close to the territory of the plant. Contemporary surface {sup 90}Sr contamination is 24-40 MBq/m{sup 2}. The site 2 is located as far as 6 km to the north-east from the site 1 (3.1-8.1 MBq/m{sup 2}). Fifty years after accident long-lived {sup 90}Sr is most significant contributor to terrestrial animal's exposure. Skeletal activity concentration of {sup 90}Sr was measured utilising developed nondestructive method of bone beta-radiometry. To estimate radiation doses the strontium biokinetic model and dosimetric model for mouse-like rodent were designed. Skeletal activity concentration of {sup 90}Sr for animals trapped at site 1: 44-1249 Bq/g, mean 592 Bq/g; at site 2: 4-124 Bq/g, mean 32 Bq/g. Following parameters were selected as indicators of exposure: whole body dose (WBD) accumulated during 45 days, skeletal dose accumulated during 45 days and WBD rate on the last day before trapping. As can be seen in the table, there is a full agreement of the radiation dose and the level of surface contamination. For the animals inhabiting the most contaminated site mean WBD rate is close to 1 mGy/day. It can be reliably concluded that considering both internal and external exposures the dose rate exceeds 1 mGr/day in average. Publication 108 ICRP suggests derived consideration reference level (DCRL) for small mammals in a range 0.1-1 mGy/day. Thus in the most contaminated part of the EURT WBD rate exceeds the upper limit of the DCRL. Radiation doses on the second site are significantly lower. Mean WBD rate is below 0.1 mGy/day. At the same time, the WBD rate exceeds 0.1 mGy/day (lower limit of the DCRL) for approximately 40 % of animals from the

  2. Dose distributions around selectron applicators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pla, C.; Evans, M.D.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1987-11-01

    Measured and calculated dose distributions around selectron applicators, loaded with /sup 60/Co high dose rate pellets, are presented. The effect of the stopping screw, spacers, pellets themselves and the applicator wall on the dose distribution is discussed. The measured dose distribution is in almost perfect agreement with the calculated distribution in planes perpendicular to the applicator axis and containing a source. On the applicator axis directly below the applicator the measured dose amounts to about 75% of the calculated value, when only the stopping screw attenuates the beam from a pellet. When the beam is attenuated by spacers in addition to the stopping screw, the discrepancy between the calculated and measured dose may exceed 50%. Clinically relevant source geometries are also discussed. It is shown that for most regions around the applicator the method of a simple addition of dose contributions from individual point sources is an acceptable approximation for the calculation of dose distributions around the selectron applicators.

  3. Evaluating dose response from flexible dose clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baron David

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The true dose effect in flexible-dose clinical trials may be obscured and even reversed because dose and outcome are related. Methods To evaluate dose effect in response on primary efficacy scales from 2 randomized, double-blind, flexible-dose trials of patients with bipolar mania who received olanzapine (N = 234, 5–20 mg/day, or patients with schizophrenia who received olanzapine (N = 172, 10–20 mg/day, we used marginal structural models, inverse probability of treatment weighting (MSM, IPTW methodology. Dose profiles for mean changes from baseline were evaluated using weighted MSM with a repeated measures model. To adjust for selection bias due to non-random dose assignment and dropouts, patient-specific time-dependent weights were determined as products of (i stable weights based on inverse probability of receiving the sequence of dose assignments that was actually received by a patient up to given time multiplied by (ii stable weights based on inverse probability of patient remaining on treatment by that time. Results were compared with those by unweighted analyses. Results While the observed difference in efficacy scores for dose groups for the unweighted analysis strongly favored lower doses, the weighted analyses showed no strong dose effects and, in some cases, reversed the apparent "negative dose effect." Conclusion While naïve comparison of groups by last or modal dose in a flexible-dose trial may result in severely biased efficacy analyses, the MSM with IPTW estimators approach may be a valuable method of removing these biases and evaluating potential dose effect, which may prove useful for planning confirmatory trials.

  4. Collective dose IRSN view on its indications and contraindications

    CERN Document Server

    Supervil, S

    2002-01-01

    The concept of collective protection appeared in 1959 in the first report of the international commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). During the course of the next decades, ICRP gave details on the use of collective dose, in particular on its role in the process of optimization of protection. The collective dose, effective and /or equivalent, may be used to assess the dosimetric impact of an activity or a source over a group of people, to assess the number of stochastic effects that could result from the exposure of a group of people. The methods of calculating the collective dose are considered, assessment of the levels of exposure, assessment of the health effects. I.R.S.N. reminds that the collective dose constitutes an indicator of the risk of stochastic effects for example in the field of regulatory dose limits. Consequently, the collective dose cannot in any case constitute an indicator of the deterministic effects. (N.C.)

  5. Public Sociology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    What is the role of sociology in society? How can - and should - sociology contribute with insights relevant and useful to the outside world? Is sociology attuned to accommodate the demands of the wider public and of surrounding society? Who benefits from the knowledge produced and provided...... by sociology? What are the social implications and cultural effects of the knowledge sociology provides and creates? All of these questions, and many others, concern and centre on sociology's relationship to the surrounding society, in short to the ‘public'. All of these questions - and many others...... - will be addressed in this book.   Sociology, as the self-proclaimed ‘the science of society', finds itself in an exceptional position within the scientific community in that it studies a universe it itself is part and parcel of. This means that sociology and sociologists are inextricably connected and linked...

  6. Scientific publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getulio Teixeira Batista

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The necessary work for developing a scientific publication is sometimes underestimated and requires the effective participation of many players to obtain a result in good standard. Initially it depends upon the determination of the authors that decide to write the scientific article. Scientific writing is a very challenging and time consuming task, but at the same time essential for any scientist. A published scientific article is unquestionably one of the main indicators of scientific production, especially if published in a qualified scientific journal with highly qualified editorial committee and strict peer review procedure. By looking at evaluation criteria for scientific production of the several Thematic Scientific Committees of the Brazilian Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq it becomes clear publications in scientific journals that has certified quality is the most important item in the evaluation of a scientist production.

  7. Public opinion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, A

    2013-04-01

    This opinion-based article aims to highlight the worrying decline in support for dental public health as a specialty. Not only is this specialty important for its role in commissioning services, it is crucial for the identification of vulnerable groups in society and ensuring dental services are acceptable and assessable for these populations. Dental public health also addresses the social determinants of health in its approach, acknowledging the impact of these in perpetuating inequalities and looking for multisectoral approaches to their management. This article also looks at the lack of appreciation for these determinants in dental foundation training and how a change in the structure of the programme could both address this and the current shortage of places.

  8. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    MARS PENSIONS CONTRACT POLICY GENERAL INFORMATION   PUBLIC MEETINGS COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Monday 15 Oct. 2 pm Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Wednesday 17 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Thursday 18 Oct. 10 am Salle du Conseil/ Council Chamber 503-1-001 Meyrin Thursday 18 Oct. 2 pm Filtration Plant, 222-R-001(in English) Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2012 : lessons learned Pension Fund Capital preservation policy : what is it ? Contract policy LC2IC statistics SA proposal General information CVI 2013 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS)  

  9. Should we routinely remove the dose delivered by the images of control?; Faut-il systematiquement retirer la dose delivree par les images de controle?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goasduff, G. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Morvan, Service de Radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France); Pene Baverez, D.; Pradier, O.; Bouchekoua, M. [Service de Radiotherapie, 29 - Brest (France)

    2009-10-15

    The constraints of doses fixed by the international commission on radiation units and measurements (ICRU) for the target volume (95-107% of the prescribed dose) are respected. for the hypo fractionated treatments, it is necessary to control the impact of the dose delivered by the control images for every patient. The dose delivered at the isocenter is estimated between 1 and 3 Gy by control image: this dose depends on the beams size and on the distance-source-skin. Protocols of the patient positioning checking must be implemented on optimizing their frequency to limit the dose received by the patient. (N.C.)

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. (comps.)

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  11. Assessing patient dose in interventional fluoroscopy using patient-dependent hybrid phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Perry Barnett

    Interventional fluoroscopy uses ionizing radiation to guide small instruments through blood vessels or other body pathways to sites of clinical interest. The technique represents a tremendous advantage over invasive surgical procedures, as it requires only a small incision, thus reducing the risk of infection and providing for shorter recovery times. The growing use and increasing complexity of interventional procedures, however, has resulted in public health concerns regarding radiation exposures, particularly with respect to localized skin dose. Tracking and documenting patient-specific skin and internal organ dose has been specifically identified for interventional fluoroscopy where extended irradiation times, multiple projections, and repeat procedures can lead to some of the largest doses encountered in radiology. Furthermore, inprocedure knowledge of localized skin doses can be of significant clinical importance to managing patient risk and in training radiology residents. In this dissertation, a framework is presented for monitoring the radiation dose delivered to patients undergoing interventional procedures. The framework is built around two key points, developing better anthropomorphic models, and designing clinically relevant software systems for dose estimation. To begin, a library of 50 hybrid patient-dependent computational phantoms was developed based on the UF hybrid male and female reference phantoms. These phantoms represent a different type of anthropomorphic model whereby anthropometric parameters from an individual patient are used during phantom selection. The patient-dependent library was first validated and then used in two patient-phantom matching studies focused on cumulative organ and local skin dose. In terms of organ dose, patient-phantom matching was shown most beneficial for estimating the dose to large patients where error associated with soft tissue attenuation differences could be minimized. For small patients, inherent difference

  12. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-20

    This report summarizes the water pathway portion of the first phase of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, conducted by Battelle staff at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel. The HEDR Project is estimating radiation doses that could have been received by the public from the Department of Energy's Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the water-pathway dose reconstruction sought to determine whether dose estimates could be calculated for populations in the area from above the Hanford Site at Priest Rapids Dam to below the site at McNary Dam from January 1964 to December 1966. Of the potential sources of radionuclides from the river, fish consumption was the most important. Later phases of the HEDR Project will address dose estimates for periods other than 1964--1966 and for populations downstream of McNary Dam. 17 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

  13. How Public Is Public Administration? A Constitutional Approach of Publicness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeling, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Both in Public Administration and in practice, there is a loss of the concept of public. A view became dominant in which markets were superior to governments and public to private. Not only did the esteem of the public sphere diminish, but also its significance in our reasoning and teaching. It became less clear what the public sphere stood for.…

  14. How Public Is Public Administration? A Constitutional Approach of Publicness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringeling, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Both in Public Administration and in practice, there is a loss of the concept of public. A view became dominant in which markets were superior to governments and public to private. Not only did the esteem of the public sphere diminish, but also its significance in our reasoning and teaching. It became less clear what the public sphere stood for.…

  15. The effect of dose fractionation on overall survival in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer%局限期小细胞肺癌不同剂量分割模式放疗的疗效分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏冰; 陈桂园; 蔡旭伟; 赵建东; 杨焕军; 樊旼; 赵快乐; 傅小龙

    2010-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of different dose fractionation on overall survival in patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer (LS-SCLC). Methods LS-SCLC patients treated with radical combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) between January 2001 and Dec 2007 were analyzed retrospectively. According to the dose fractionation schemes, patients were divided into three groups:conventional fractionated RT (1. 8 -2.0 Gy,once daily), hyperfractionated RT (1.4 Gy, twice daily) and hypofractionated RT (2. 5 Gy,once daily). Overall survival, disease free survival and pattern of failures of the three groups were compared. A total of 177 patients were enrolled, including 63 patients in conventional fractionated RT group, 79 in hyperfractionated RT group and 35 in hypofractionated RT group. Results The overall follow-up rate was 96. 6%. The patient numbers with follow-up of more than 2 and 5 years were 153 and 92, respectively. The median survival time of the entire group was 22. 4 months, and the 2-and 5-year survival rates were 43.4% and 23. 5%, respectively. The 2-year survival rates for three groups were 31%, 46% and 59% (x2 =7.94,P=0.019), respectively. The 2-year disease free survival for three groups were 20%, 31% and 40% ( x2 = 4. 86, P = 0. 088 ), respectively. In the pairwise comparisons,patients in hypofractionated RT group have better survival than those in conventional fractionated RT group ( x2 = 7. 81, P = 0. 005 ), the effect of hyperfractionated RT group lies between the hypo-and the conventional fractionated RT groups, but no significant differences were detected ( x2 = 2. 31, P = 0. 128; x2 = 2. 95, P =0. 086). The mildest side effect was found in the hypofractionated RT group. No statistically significant differences were found in the patterns of first failure. Conclusion The hypofractionated RT scheme showed potential survival benefits for patients with LS-SCLC and should be considered in the setting of randomized clinical trials.%目的 比较

  16. HOME Income Limits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOME Income Limits are calculated using the same methodology that HUD uses for calculating the income limits for the Section 8 program. These limits are based on HUD...

  17. Radiation Doses and Associated Risk From the Fukushima Nuclear Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo

    2017-03-01

    The magnitude of dose due to the Fukushima Daiichi Accident was estimated by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2013 report published in April 2014. Following this, the UNSCEAR white paper, which comprises a digest of new information for the 2013 Fukushima report, was published in October 2015. Another comprehensive report on radiation dose due to the accident is the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) report on the Fukushima Daiichi Accident published in August 2015. Although the UNSCEAR and IAEA publications well summarize doses received by residents, they review only literature published before the end of December 2014 and the end of March 2015, respectively. However, some studies on dose estimation have been published since then. In addition, the UNSCEAR 2013 report states it was likely that some overestimation had been introduced generally by the methodology used by the Committee. For example, effects of decontamination were not considered in the lifetime external dose estimated. Decontamination is in progress for most living areas in Fukushima Prefecture, which could reduce long-term external dose to residents. This article mainly reviews recent English language articles that may add new information to the UNSCEAR and IAEA publications. Generally, recent articles suggest lower doses than those presented by the UNSCEAR 2013 report.

  18. Monitoring of doses in hemodynamic medical team with dosemeters calibrated to measure the personal dose equivalent; Monitoracao das doses na equipe medica de hemodinamica com dosimetro calibrado em equivalente de dose pessoal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alonso, T.C. [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Curso de Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares]. E-mail: alonso@cdtn.br; Silva, T.A. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: silvata@cdtn.br

    2005-07-01

    In hemodynamic, the exposure time of the workers to the radiation are larger than in the conventional one. Consequently, the received doses are larger. The dose of the medical team is also affected significantly by the uniqueness of the exams that are accomplished in two ways of irradiation and several angles of incidences, what stands out the need of the dosimeters use with metrologic reliability adapted for such situations. The individual monitoring of the doses received by individuals occupationally exposed to the radiation is accomplished with films dosimeters or thermo luminescent ones, with the main objective to guarantee that the limits of doses are not surpassed. The used in the system Brazilian metrologic system is still the individual dose for photons, in spite of the international recommendations for the use of the equivalent personal dose, that is the greatness adapted to assess the equivalent dose and the effective dose. In this work, the dosimeter composed by the Harshaw-Bicron badge and the detecting thermoluminescent of lithium fluoride was tested and adapted to measure the equivalent of personal dose in the depths 0,07 mm and 10 mm. It was applied in the hemodynamics practices and the doses were compared with those obtained by the routine film dosimeter. The results suggest, for daily use of the interventional services, the indication of the new dosimeter in substitution to the of the type films. (author)

  19. Assessment of potential doses to workers during postulated accident conditions at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoover, M.D.; Farrell, R.F. [DOE, Carlsbad, NM (United States); Newton, G.J.

    1995-12-01

    The recent 1995 WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR) Update provided detailed analyses of potential radiation doses to members of the public at the site boundary during postulated accident scenarios at the U.S. Department of Energy`s Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The SAR Update addressed the complete spectrum of potential accidents associated with handling and emplacing transuranic waste at WIPP, including damage to waste drums from fires, punctures, drops, and other disruptions. The report focused on the adequacy of the multiple layers of safety practice ({open_quotes}defense-in-depth{close_quotes}) at WIPP, which are designed to (1) reduce the likelihood of accidents and (2) limit the consequences of those accidents. The safeguards which contribute to defense-in-depth at WIPP include a substantial array of inherent design features, engineered controls, and administrative procedures. The SAR Update confirmed that the defense-in-depth at WIPP is adequate to assure the protection of the public and environment. As a supplement to the 1995 SAR Update, we have conducted additional analyses to confirm that these controls will also provide adequate protection to workers at the WIPP. The approaches and results of the worker dose assessment are summarized here. In conformance with the guidance of DOE Standard 3009-94, we emphasize that use of these evaluation guidelines is not intended to imply that these numbers constitute acceptable limits for worker exposures under accident conditions. However, in conjunction with the extensive safety assessment in the 1995 SAR Update, these results indicate that the Carlsbad Area Office strategy for the assessment of hazards and accidents assures the protection of workers, members of the public, and the environment.

  20. Phase 1 of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The work described in this report was prompted by the public's concern about potential effect from the radioactive materials released from the Hanford Site. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project was established to estimate radiation dose the public might have received from the Hanford Site since 1944, when facilities began operating. Phase 1 of the HEDR Project is a pilot'' or demonstration'' phase. The objectives of this initial phase were to determine whether enough historical information could be found or reconstructed to be used for dose estimation and develop and test conceptual and computational models for calculating credible dose estimates. Preliminary estimates of radiation doses were produced in Phase 1 because they are needed to achieve these objectives. The reader is cautioned that the dose estimates provided in this and other Phase 1 HEDR reports are preliminary. As the HEDR Project continues, the dose estimates will change for at least three reasons: more complete input information for models will be developed; the models themselves will be refined; and the size and shape of the geographic study area will change. This is one of three draft reports that summarize the first phase of the four-phased HEDR Project. This, the Summary Report, is directed to readers who want a general understanding of the Phase 1 work and preliminary dose estimates. The two other reports -- the Air Pathway Report and the Columbia River Pathway Report -- are for readers who understand the radiation dose assessment process and want to see more technical detail. Detailed descriptions of the dose reconstruction process are available in more than 20 supporting reports listed in Appendix A. 32 refs., 46 figs.

  1. The usefulness of metal markers for CTV-based dose prescription in high-dose-rate interstitial brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ken; Mitomo, Masanori [Osaka National Hospital (Japan); Nose, Takayuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Nishiyama, Kinji [Osaka Prefectural Center for Adult Diseases (Japan); Yoshida, Mineo [Sanda City Hospital, Hyogo (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    We employ a clinical target volume (CTV)-based dose prescription for high-dose-rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy. However, it is not easy to define CTV and organs at risk (OAR) from X-ray film or CT scanning. To solve this problem, we have utilized metal markers since October 1999. Moreover, metal markers can help modify dose prescription. By regulating the doses to the metal markers, refining the dose prescription can easily be achieved. In this research, we investigated the usefulness of the metal markers. Between October 1999 and May 2001, 51 patients were implanted with metal markers at Osaka Medical Center for Cancer and Cardiovascular Diseases (OMCC), Osaka National Hospital (ONH) and Sanda City Hospital (SCH). Forty-nine patients (head and neck: 32; pelvis: 11; soft tissue: 3; breast: 3) using metal markers were analyzed. During operation, we implanted 179 metal markers (49 patients) to CTV and 151 markers (26 patients) to OAR. At treatment planning, CTV was reconstructed judging from the metal markers, applicator position and operation records. Generally, we prescribed the tumoricidal dose to an isodose surface that covers CTV. We also planned to limit the doses to OAR lower than certain levels. The maximum normal tissue doses were decided 80%, 150%, 100%, 50% and 200% of the prescribed doses for the rectum, the urethra, the mandible, the skin and the large vessel, respectively. The doses to the metal markers using CTV-based dose prescription were generated. These were compared with the doses theoretically calculated with the Paris system. Treatment results were also investigated. The doses to the 158 metal markers (42 patients) for CTV were higher than ''tumoricidal dose''. In 7 patients, as a result of compromised dose prescription, 9 markers were lower than the tumoricidal dose. The other 12 markers (7%) were excluded from dose evaluation because they were judged as miss-implanted. The doses to the 142 metal markers (24 patients

  2. Ecotoxicologically based environmental risk limits for several volatile aliphatic hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong FMW de; Posthuma-Doodeman CJAM; Verbruggen EMJ; SEC

    2007-01-01

    This report describes ecotoxicological environmental risk limits derived for a number of volatile aliphatic hydrocarbons. On the basis of evaluated literature, the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) proposes ecotoxicological environmental risk limits for these compounds

  3. 77 FR 15003 - Passive Activity Losses and Credits Limited; Hearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-14

    ... definition of an ``interest in a limited partnership as a limited partner'' for purposes of determining.... These proposed regulations affect individuals who are partners in partnerships. DATES: The public...

  4. Conditioning in Stuttering Therapy: Applications and Limitations. Publication No. 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkweather, C. Woodruff, Ed.

    Presented are seven papers given at a conference on the application of behavior modification techniques to the treatment of stuttering. An introduction to the papers gives an overview of behavior modification. The two papers of Part I present two approaches to stuttering therapy, one of which is based on operant conditioning and the other on…

  5. Managing Public Accountability : How Public Managers Manage Public Accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schillemans, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Accountability is of growing importance in contemporary governance. The academic literature on public accountability is fraught with concerned analyses, suggesting that accountability is a problematic issue for public managers. This article investigates how public managers experience accountability

  6. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      MARS 2015 FIVE YEARLY REVIEW CONTRACT POLICY PENSION FUND GENERAL INFORMATION   COME AND BE INFORMED! PUBLIC MEETINGS Friday 3rd October at 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Friday 3rd October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Monday 6th October at 10 am Kjell Johnsen Auditorium, 30-7-018 Meyrin Monday 6th October at 2 pm Salle du Conseil / Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin  

  7. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Public meetings : Come and talk about your future employment conditions !   The Staff Association will come and present the results of our survey on the 2015 five-yearly review. Following the survey, the topics discussed, will be contract policy, recognition of merit (MARS), working time arrangements and family policy. After each meeting and around a cup of coffee or tea you will be able to continue the discussions. Do not hesitate to join us, the five-yearly review, it is with YOU!

  8. A public world without public relations?

    OpenAIRE

    Nayden, Nikolay

    2015-01-01

    The term "public relations" (PR) has long gained currency as meaning the practice of producing a positive public image. This article argues that public relations should be released from the prison of "PR" and, instead, reconceptualised as relations which define the public realm much as economic relations define the economy. From this point of view, three main levels of public relations can be distinguished: (1) relations between public institutions, (2) relations between citizens and public i...

  9. A public world without public relations?:

    OpenAIRE

    Nayden, Nikolay

    2009-01-01

    The term "public relations" (PR) has long gained currency as meaning the practice of producing a positive public image. This article argues that public relations should be released from the prison of "PR" and, instead, reconceptualised as relations which define the public realm much as economic relations define the economy. From this point of view, three main levels of public relations can be distinguished: (1) relations between public institutions, (2) relations between citizens and public i...

  10. Radiation protection policies to protect public health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muckerheide, J. [Commonwealth Massachusetts, Needham, MA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Scientific data from plant, animal, and human populations more strongly find radiation essential to life, i.e., suppressing background radiation is debilitating and that moderately enhanced radiation doses have positive effects, than that low-moderate radiation dose has adverse effects. {close_quote} Federal radiation protection policy will be in the public interest and save hundreds of billions of dollars at no public health cost when known dose effects to exposed populations are applied to ensure no adverse health effects, with safety margins, and when appropriate research is funded (and public benefits from new radiation and nuclear science and technology applications are enabled) at the sole cost of reduced federal power and influence.

  11. Detector photon response and absorbed dose and their applications to rapid triage techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Shannon Prentice

    As radiation specialists, one of our primary objectives in the Navy is protecting people and the environment from the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Focusing on radiological dispersal devices (RDD) will provide increased personnel protection as well as optimize emergency response assets for the general public. An attack involving an RDD has been of particular concern because it is intended to spread contamination over a wide area and cause massive panic within the general population. A rapid method of triage will be necessary to segregate the unexposed and slightly exposed from those needing immediate medical treatment. Because of the aerosol dispersal of the radioactive material, inhalation of the radioactive material may be the primary exposure route. The primary radionuclides likely to be used in a RDD attack are Co-60, Cs-137, Ir-192, Sr-90 and Am-241. Through the use of a MAX phantom along with a few Simulink MATLAB programs, a good anthropomorphic phantom was created for use in MCNPX simulations that would provide organ doses from internally deposited radionuclides. Ludlum model 44-9 and 44-2 detectors were used to verify the simulated dose from the MCNPX code. Based on the results, acute dose rate limits were developed for emergency response personnel that would assist in patient triage.

  12. Natural radioactivity, dose assessment and uranium uptake by agricultural crops at Khan Al-Zabeeb, Jordan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kharouf, Samer J. [Royal Scientific Society, Amman 11941 (Jordan); Al-Hamarneh, Ibrahim F. [Prince Abdullah Bin Ghazi Faculty of Science and IT, Al-Balqa Applied University (BAU), Salt 19117 (Jordan)], E-mail: hamarnehibrahim@yahoo.com; Dababneh, Munir [Prince Abdullah Bin Ghazi Faculty of Science and IT, Al-Balqa Applied University (BAU), Salt 19117 (Jordan)

    2008-07-15

    Khan Al-Zabeeb, an irrigated cultivated area lies above a superficial uranium deposits, is regularly used to produce vegetables and fruits consumed by the public. Both soil and plant samples collected from the study area were investigated for their natural radioactivity to determine the uranium uptake by crops and hence to estimate the effective dose equivalent to human consumption. Concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 235}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 40}K in nine soil profiles were measured by gamma-ray spectrometry whereas watermelon and zucchini crops were analyzed for their uranium content by means of alpha spectrometry after radiochemical separation. Correlations between measured radionuclides were made and their activity ratios were determined to evaluate their geochemical behavior in the soil profiles. Calculated soil-plant transfer factors indicate that the green parts (leaves, stems and roots) of the studied crops tend to accumulate uranium about two orders of magnitude higher than the fruits. The maximum dose from ingestion of 1 kg of watermelon pulp was estimated to be 3.1 and 4.7 nSv y{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and {sup 234}U, respectively. Estimations of the annual effective dose equivalent due to external exposure showed extremely low values. Radium equivalent activity and external hazard index were seen to exceed the permissible limits of 370 Bq kg{sup -1} and 1, respectively.

  13. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of intensive-dose and standard-dose statin treatment for stroke prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Chen, Dan; Li, Da-Bing; Yu, Xin; Shi, Guo-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Previous study indicated that high-dose statin treatment might increase the risk of hemorrhagic stroke and adverse reactions. We aim to compare the efficacy and safety of intensive-dose and standard-dose statin treatment for preventing stroke in high-risk patients. Methods: A thorough search was performed of multiple databases for publications from 1990 to June 2015. We selected the randomized clinical trials comparing standard-dose statin with placebo and intensive-dose statin with standard-dose statin or placebo for the prevention of stroke events in patients. Duplicate independent data extraction and bias assessments were performed. Data were pooled using a fixed-effects model or a random-effects model if significant heterogeneity was present. Results: For the all stroke incidences, intensive-dose statin treatment compared with placebo treatment and standard-dose statin treatment compared with placebo treatment showed a significant 21% reduction in relative risk (RR) (RR 0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) [0.71, 0.87], P statin treatment compared with standard dose or placebo was effective reducing fatal stroke (RR 0.61, 95% CI [0.39, 0.96], P = 0.03) and the RR was 1.01 (95% CI [0.85, 1.20], P = 0.90) in standard-dose statin treatment compared with placebo. Conclusion: The results of this meta-analysis suggest that intensive-dose statin treatment might be more favorable for reducing the incidences of all strokes than standard-dose statin treatment, especially for patients older than 65 years in reducing the incidences of all stroke incidences. PMID:27684837

  14. In vitro performance of three combinations of spacers and pressurized metered dose inhalers for treatment in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, E; Madsen, J; Bisgaard, H

    1998-01-01

    The performance of pressurized metered dose inhalers (pMDIs) and spacers in correct dose recommendations is important, but limited information on dose delivery and fine-particle dose from different combinations of spacers and pMDIs is available. In this study, three combinations of spacers and pM...

  15. Characteristic limits of two dosimetric systems used in individual monitoring; Limites caracteristicos de dois sistemas dosimetricos utilizados em monitoracao individual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meireles, L.S.; Meira-Belo, L.C.; Lacerda, M.A.S., E-mail: masl@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Oliveira, P.M.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The characteristic limits: Decision Threshold (y⁎*), Detection Limit (y⧣) and Limits of the Confidence Interval ( y ⊲ and y⊳), were determined for two TLD-100 dosimetric systems, used for individual monitoring. We perform a critical analysis of the suitability of utilizing a dosimetric system for low dose range applications, based on these characteristic values. (author)

  16. 10 CFR 20.1208 - Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. 20.1208 Section 20... Limits § 20.1208 Dose equivalent to an embryo/fetus. (a) The licensee shall ensure that the dose equivalent to the embryo/fetus during the entire pregnancy, due to the occupational exposure of a...

  17. Passive immitance limiters

    OpenAIRE

    Filinyuk N. A.; Lischinskaya L. B.; Chekhmestruk R. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents quadripole R, L, C immittance limiters, in which output immittance to the certain value depends on the input immittance. A classification of immittance limiters is given. Basic parameters are considered: low and high levels of output immittance limiters; low and high values of input immittance, corresponding to low and high levels of limitation, accordingly; range of possible values of output immittance; steepness of immittance limiters; time of wearing-out (or delay); high...

  18. PABLM. Accumulated Environment Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, B.A.; Kennedy, W.E.Jr.; Soldat, J.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1981-04-01

    PABLM calculates internal radiation doses to man from radionuclides in food products and external radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment. Radiation doses from radionuclides in the environment may be calculated from deposition on the soil or plants during an atmospheric or liquid release, or from exposure to residual radionuclides after the releases have ended. Radioactive decay is considered during the release, after deposition, and during holdup of food after harvest. The radiation dose models consider exposure to radionuclides deposited on the ground or crops from contaminated air or irrigation water, radionuclides in contaminated drinking water, aquatic foods raised in contaminated water, and radionuclides in bodies of water and sediments where people might fish, boat, or swim. For vegetation, the radiation dose model considers both direct deposition and uptake through roots. Doses may be calculated for either a maximum-exposed individual or for a population group. The program is designed to calculate accumulated radiation doses from the chronic ingestion of food products that contain radionuclides and doses from the external exposure to radionuclides in the environment. A first-year committed dose is calculated as well as an integrated dose for a selected number of years.

  19. Microbial Biofilms: Persisters, Tolerance and Dosing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, N. G.

    2005-03-01

    Almost all moist surfaces are colonized by microbial biofilms. Biofilms are implicated in cross-contamination of food products, biofouling, medical implants and various human infections such as dental cavities, ulcerative colitis and chronic respiratory infections. Much of current research is focused on the recalcitrance of biofilms to typical antibiotic and antimicrobial treatments. Although the polymer component of biofilms impedes the penetration of antimicrobials through reaction-diffusion limitation, this does not explain the observed tolerance, it merely delays the action of the agent. Heterogeneities in growth-rate also slow the eradication of the bacteria since most antimicrobials are far less effective for non-growing, or slowly growing bacteria. This also does not fully describe biofilm tolerance, since heterogeneities arr primairly a result of nutrient consumption. In this investigation, we describe the formation of `persister' cells which neither grow nor die in the presence of antibiotics. We propose that the cells are of a different phenotype than typical bacterial cells and the expression of the phenotype is regulated by the growth rate and the antibiotic concentration. We describe several experiments which describe the dynamics of persister cells and which motivate a dosing protocol that calls for periodic dosing of the population. We then introduce a mathematical model, which describes the effect of such a dosing regiment and indicates that the relative dose/withdrawal times are important in determining the effectiveness of such a treatment. A reduced model is introduced and the similar behavior is demonstrated analytically.

  20. Social media in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass-Hout, Taha A; Alhinnawi, Hend

    2013-01-01

    While social media interactions are currently not fully understood, as individual health behaviors and outcomes are shared online, social media offers an increasingly clear picture of the dynamics of these processes. Social media is becoming an increasingly common platform among clinicians and public health officials to share information with the public, track or predict diseases. Social media can be used for engaging the public and communicating key public health interventions, while providing an important tool for public health surveillance. Social media has advantages over traditional public health surveillance, as well as limitations, such as poor specificity, that warrant additional study. Social media can provide timely, relevant and transparent information of public health importance; such as tracking or predicting the spread or severity of influenza, west nile virus or meningitis as they propagate in the community, and, in identifying disease outbreaks or clusters of chronic illnesses. Further work is needed on social media as a valid data source for detecting or predicting diseases or conditions. Also, whether or not it is an effective tool for communicating key public health messages and engaging both, the general public and policy-makers.

  1. SUSTAINABILITY OF DIGITAL PUBLIC SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Hudák

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Modern digital public spaces are evolving from being mostly the provider of ICT and internet connection to institutions that provide complex range of services and support for the community. With this shift in their focus new challenges are emerging, among others their sustainability.Methodology/Approach: We build on and extend the methodology of Digital Cooperatives project. Within this project, survey on 59 digital public spaces from 12 EU countries was conducted. These digital public spaces were examined in 21 areas, some of them relating to their sustainability. We further analyse the sustainability issue of these digital public spaces.Findings: We identified three main issues affecting sustainability of digital public spaces – budgeting, services and community. Digital public spaces mostly rely on public funding and have limited diversification of their funds, which increases a risk when one source of funding drops out. They also have to build a strong community of users, supporters, which will make use of their capacities and helps co-create new services and thus strengthen and improve the community itself.Originality/Value of paper: Research in this paper is based on the collection of best practices from various EU countries in the field of digital public spaces. Recommendations based on these practices could help the creation of new, and in current digital public spaces.

  2. Public hospitals: the legal obstacles of entering into joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J N

    1986-03-01

    Public hospitals, as public entities, are limited in many of their activities by state constitutions and statutes. One area where activity can be particularly limited is the joint venture. Constitutional and statutory limitations can influence several aspects of the joint venture: scope of activities, geographic boundaries, authority to enter into joint ventures, gift of public funds prohibition, and stock ownership. Therefore, public hospitals must be aware of possible legal obstacles and carefully consider their options.

  3. Public policy, rationality and reason

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Canto Sáenz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This work suggests the incorporation of practical reason in the design, implementation and evaluation of public policies, alongside instrumental rationality. It takes two proposals that today point in this direction: Rawls distinction between reasonable (practical reason and rational (instrumental reason and what this author calls the CI Procedure (categorical imperative procedure and Habermas model of deliberative democracy. The main conclusion is that the analysis of public policies can not be limited to rather narrow limits of science, but requires the contribution of political and moral philosophy.

  4. Limited Regulation of Lake Erie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-11-01

    Ontario,, Cedar Point in Ohio, Presque Isle in Pennsylvania and Hamlin in New York. Recreational boating is a significant activity on Lake Erie . Along...RD-Al47 936 LIMITED REGULATION OF LAKE ERIE (U) INTERNATIONAL LAKE i/i ERIE REGULATION STUDY BOARD NOV 83 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 13/2 N lhhhhh..hEmhhI...o lake Erie ’Governmen of 4,- % * L CTE " 84100400 .- Canad Unite Stte INTRNAIONL OIN COMISIO 4WD’ This document hais been ow for public rleoe and so

  5. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    Dear Colleagues, I am pleased to invite you to a public meeting which will be held on Thursday 11 November 2010 at 2:30 p.m., in the Main Auditorium (welcome coffee from 2 p.m.) In this meeting Sigurd Lettow, Director for Administration and General Infrastructure will present the Management’s proposals towards restoring full funding of the Pension Fund. The meeting will follow discussions which took place with the Staff Association, at the Standing Concertation Committee (CCP) of 1 November 2010 and will be held with the Members States, at the Tripartite Employment Conditions Forum (TREF) of 4 November 2010. You will be able to attend this presentation in the Main Auditorium or via the webcast. The Management will also be available to reply to your questions on this subject. Best regards, Anne-Sylvie Catherin

  6. Public meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    MARS SURVEY 5YR 2015 GENERAL INFORMATION ELECTIONS 2013   COME AND BE INFORMED! Public meetings Tuesday 1st Oct. 10 am Amphi IT, 31-3-004 Meyrin Tuesday 1st Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 Meyrin Friday 4 Oct. 10 am Amphi BE, 864-1-D02 Prévessin Monday 7 Oct. 2 pm Council Chamber, 503-1-001 (in English) Meyrin Tuesday 8 Oct. 10 am Amphi Kjell Johnsen, 30-7-018 Meyrin   Overview of the topics to be discussed Recognition of Merit – MARS Outcome of last exercise 2007 to 2013: lessons learned Survey: five-yearly review, give us your opinion General information CVI 2014 Voluntary programmes (PRP, SLS) Elections 2013 Renewal of the Staff Council 2014 - 2015  

  7. Aspects of the relationship between drug dose and drug effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peper, Abraham

    2009-02-09

    It is generally assumed that there exists a well-defined relationship between drug dose and drug effect and that this can be expressed by a dose-response curve. This paper argues that there is no such clear relation and that the dose-response curve provides only limited information about the drug effect. It is demonstrated that tolerance development during the measurement of the dose-response curve may cause major distortion of the curve and it is argued that the curve may only be used to indicate the response to the first administration of a drug, before tolerance has developed. The precise effect of a drug on an individual depends on the dynamic relation between several variables, particularly the level of tolerance, the dose anticipated by the organism and the actual drug dose. Simulations with a previously published mathematical model of drug tolerance demonstrate that the effect of a dose smaller than the dose the organism has developed tolerance to is difficult to predict and may be opposite to the action of the usual dose.

  8. Dosimetric accuracy of tomotherapy dose calculation in thorax lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangili Paola

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To analyse limits and capabilities in dose calculation of collapsed-cone-convolution (CCC algorithm implemented in helical tomotherapy (HT treatment planning system for thorax lesions. Methods The agreement between measured and calculated dose was verified both in homogeneous (Cheese Phantom and in a custom-made inhomogeneous phantom. The inhomogeneous phantom was employed to mimic a patient's thorax region with lung density encountered in extreme cases and acrylic inserts of various dimensions and positions inside the lung cavity. For both phantoms, different lung treatment plans (single or multiple metastases and targets in the mediastinum using HT technique were simulated and verified. Point and planar dose measurements, both with radiographic extended-dose-range (EDR2 and radiochromic external-beam-therapy (EBT2 films, were performed. Absolute point dose measurements, dose profile comparisons and quantitative analysis of gamma function distributions were analyzed. Results An excellent agreement between measured and calculated dose distributions was found in homogeneous media, both for point and planar dose measurements. Absolute dose deviations Conclusions Very acceptable accuracy was found for complex lung treatment plans calculated with CCC algorithm implemented in the tomotherapy TPS even in the heterogeneous phantom with very low lung-density.

  9. Application of maximum values for radiation exposure and principles for the calculation of radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The guide sets out the mathematical definitions and principles involved in the calculation of the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and the instructions concerning the application of the maximum values of these quantities. further, for monitoring the dose caused by internal radiation, the guide defines the limits derived from annual dose limits (the Annual Limit on Intake and the Derived Air Concentration). Finally, the guide defines the operational quantities to be used in estimating the equivalent dose and the effective dose, and also sets out the definitions of some other quantities and concepts to be used in monitoring radiation exposure. The guide does not include the calculation of patient doses carried out for the purposes of quality assurance.

  10. ionizing radiation measurements and assay of corresponding dose ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PUBLICATIONS1

    Measurements of ionizing radiation and corresponding dose rate around bottling and pharma- ceutical facilities in ... be monitored closely to protect the public from adverse health effects. Keywords: Gamma ... natural environment that we experience today. (Oke 2004 ... This decay is a phenomenon by which large number of ...

  11. Radiation Dose-Volume Effects In the Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Yorke, Ellen; Deasy, Joseph; Nam, Jiho; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2013-01-01

    Publications relating esophageal radiation toxicity to clinical variables and to quantitative dose and dose–volume measures derived from three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for non–small-cell lung cancer are reviewed. A variety of clinical and dosimetric parameters have been associated with acute and late toxicity. Suggestions for future studies are presented. PMID:20171523

  12. Dose from slow negative muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siiskonen, T

    2008-01-01

    Conversion coefficients from fluence to ambient dose equivalent, from fluence to maximum dose equivalent and quality factors for slow negative muons are examined in detail. Negative muons, when stopped, produce energetic photons, electrons and a variety of high-LET particles. Contribution from each particle type to the dose equivalent is calculated. The results show that for the high-LET particles the details of energy spectra and decay yields are important for accurate dose estimates. For slow negative muons the ambient dose equivalent does not always yield a conservative estimate for the protection quantities. Especially, the skin equivalent dose is strongly underestimated if the radiation-weighting factor of unity for slow muons is used. Comparisons to earlier studies are presented.

  13. 42 CFR 480.114 - Limitation on data collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on data collection. 480.114 Section 480.114 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Access to Information § 480.114 Limitation on data collection. A QIO or any agent, organization,...

  14. Phase I dose intensification study of 2-weekly epirubicin with GM-CSF in advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, M; Toner, G C; Olver, I N; Fenessy, A; Bishop, J F

    1997-06-01

    This study investigated dose intensification of epirubicin administered as a 2-weekly regimen with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) support. The aim was to define the maximally tolerated dose of epirubicin and to assess the efficacy of GM-CSF to ameliorate its toxicity. Patients with anthracycline-responsive advanced malignancies were eligible. Six dose levels, commencing at 90 mg/m2, of epirubicin administered every 2 weeks for four courses were planned with GM-CSF 10 micrograms/kg/day administered for 10 days from the second day of each course. Six patients were to be entered at each dose level, and escalation to the next level was based upon toxicity criteria. Twelve patients were entered, six at dose level 1 (90 mg/m2) and six at dose level 2 (120 mg/m2). Prospectively defined haematological dose-limiting toxicities were noted in one patient at dose level 1 and in five patients at dose level 2. Further dose escalation was not attempted. Significant nonhaematological toxicities included febrile neutropenia in two and four patients at dose levels 1 and 2, respectively. This study has demonstrated that epirubicin can be safely administered at 2 week intervals with GM-CSF at a dose of 90 mg/m2, equivalent to the previously reported maximum tolerated dose intensity of 45 mg/m2/week. Neutropenia was dose-limiting despite the use of GM-CSF.

  15. Organ Doses and Effective Doses in Pediatric Radiography: Patient-Dose Survey in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiljunen, T.; Tietaevaeinen, A.; Parviainen, T.; Viitala, A.; Kortesniemi, M. (Radiation Practices Regulation, Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland))

    2009-01-15

    Background: Use of the effective dose in diagnostic radiology permits the radiation exposure of diverse diagnostic procedures to be quantified. Fundamental knowledge of patient doses enhances the implementation of the 'as low as reasonably achievable' (ALARA) principle. Purpose: To provide comparative information on pediatric examination protocols and patient doses in skull, sinus, chest, abdominal, and pelvic radiography examinations. Material and Methods: 24 Finnish hospitals were asked to register pediatric examination data, including patient information and examination parameters and specifications. The total number of examinations in the study was 1916 (1426 chest, 228 sinus, 96 abdominal, 94 skull, and 72 pelvic examinations). Entrance surface dose (ESD) and dose-area products (DAP) were calculated retrospectively or DAP meters were used. Organ doses and effective doses were determined using a Monte Carlo program (PCXMC). Results: There was considerable variation in examination protocols between different hospitals, indicating large variations in patient doses. Mean effective doses of different age groups ranged from 5 muSv to 14 muSv in skull and sinus examinations, from 25 muSv to 483 muSv in abdominal examinations, and from 6 muSv to 48 muSv in chest examinations. Conclusion: In chest and sinus examinations, the amount of data was extensive, allowing national pediatric diagnostic reference levels to be defined. Parameter selection in pediatric examination protocols should be harmonized in order to reduce patient doses and improve optimization

  16. Public History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Gouveia de Oliveira Rovai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como proposta apresentar o conceito e as práticas de História Pública como um novo posicionamento da ciência histórica em diálogo com profissionais da comunicação, no sentido de produzir e divulgar as experiências humanas. Para isso, discute-se a origem do conceito de História Pública e as diferentes formas de educação histórica que a utilização das novas tecnologias podem proporcionar (dentre elas a internet. Nesse sentido, convida-se o leitor para a reflexão sobre as possibilidades de publicização e de democratização do conhecimento histórico e da cultura, ampliando-se a oportunidade de produção, de divulgação e de acesso do público a diferentes formas experiências no tempo. O artigo também intenciona chamar atenção dos profissionais que lidam com a História e com a Comunicação para os perigos de produções exclusivamente submetidas ao mercado que transformam a popularização da História no reforço de estigmas culturais.   PALAVRAS-CHAVE: História Pública; Educação histórica e Comunicação; democratização e estigmatização.     ABSTRACT This article aims to present the concept and practices of Public History as a new positioning of historical science in dialogue with communication professionals, in the sense of producing and disseminating human experiences. For this, the origin of the concept of Public History and the different forms of historical education that the use of the new technologies can provide (among them the Internet is discussed. In this sense, the reader is invited to reflect on the possibilities of publicizing and democratizing historical knowledge and culture, expanding the opportunity for production, dissemination and public access to different forms of experience in time. The article also intends to draw attention from professionals dealing with History and Communication to the dangers of exclusively commercialized productions that transform the popularization

  17. Drug dosing during continuous renal replacement therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A Jill

    2008-04-01

    Continuous renal replacement therapies (CRRT) are used to manage fluid overload and/or renal failure. The continuous nature of the fluid and solute removal has less impact on hemodynamic variables in critically ill patients, making CRRT preferred over intermittent hemodialysis for some patients in the intensive care arena. The impact of CRRT on drug removal is variable depending on the CRRT modality, the ultrafiltrate and dialysate flow rates, the filter, and the patient's residual renal function; all of these may change from patient to patient or even in the same patient depending on the clinical status. However, CRRT modalities are generally more efficient than intermittent hemodialysis at drug removal, in some cases approximating or even exceeding normal renal function, resulting in a significant risk of subtherapeutic dosing if conventional hemodialysis dosing recommendations are followed. This annotated bibliography provides a summary of publications analyzing drug removal during CRRT, including CRRT settings and drug clearance values found in each study. Caution is warranted as findings from one study may not be generalizable to all patients due to the many factors that influence drug removal. Serum drug concentrations should be monitored when available, and patient clinical status is exceedingly important for following expected and unexpected responses to drug therapies. Reviews on general drug dosing calculations in CRRT are available elsewhere.

  18. Dose calculations for intakes of ore dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Brien, R.S

    1998-08-01

    This report describes a methodology for calculating the committed effective dose for mixtures of radionuclides, such as those which occur in natural radioactive ores and dusts. The formulae are derived from first principles, with the use of reasonable assumptions concerning the nature and behaviour of the radionuclide mixtures. The calculations are complicated because these `ores` contain a range of particle sizes, have different degrees of solubility in blood and other body fluids, and also have different biokinetic clearance characteristics from the organs and tissues in the body. The naturally occurring radionuclides also tend to occur in series, i.e. one is produced by the radioactive decay of another `parent` radionuclide. The formulae derived here can be used, in conjunction with a model such as LUDEP, for calculating total dose resulting from inhalation and/or ingestion of a mixture of radionuclides, and also for deriving annual limits on intake and derived air concentrations for these mixtures. 15 refs., 14 tabs., 3 figs.

  19. Dose response problems in carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, K S

    1979-03-01

    The estimation of risks from exposure to carcinogens is an important problem from the viewpoint of protection of human health. It also poses some very difficult dose-response problems. Two dose-response models may fit experimental data about equally well and yet predict responses that differ by many orders of magnitude at low doses. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis are not sufficiently understood so that the shape of the dose-response curve at low doses can be satisfactorily predicted. Mathematical theories of carcinogenesis and statistical procedures can be of use with dose-reponse problems such as this and, in addition, can lead to a better understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis. In this paper, mathematical dose-response models of carcinogenesis are considered as well as various proposed dose-response procedures for estimating carcinogenic risks at low doses. Areas are suggested in which further work may be useful. These areas include experimental design problems, statistical procedures for use with time-to-occurrence data, and mathematical models that incorporate such biological features as pharmacokinetics of carcinogens, synergistic effects, DNA repair, susceptible subpopulations, and immune reactions.

  20. Biological effects and equivalent doses in radiotherapy: a software solution

    CERN Document Server

    Voyant, Cyril; Roustit, Rudy; Biffi, Katia; Marcovici, Celine Lantieri

    2013-01-01

    The limits of TDF (time, dose, and fractionation) and linear quadratic models have been known for a long time. Medical physicists and physicians are required to provide fast and reliable interpretations regarding the delivered doses or any future prescriptions relating to treatment changes. We therefore propose a calculation interface under the GNU license to be used for equivalent doses, biological doses, and normal tumor complication probability (Lyman model). The methodology used draws from several sources: the linear-quadratic-linear model of Astrahan, the repopulation effects of Dale, and the prediction of multi-fractionated treatments of Thames. The results are obtained from an algorithm that minimizes an ad-hoc cost function, and then compared to the equivalent dose computed using standard calculators in seven French radiotherapy centers.

  1. Calculation of the dose caused by internal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    For the purposes of monitoring radiation exposure it is necessary to determine or to estimate the dose caused by both external and internal radiation. When comparing the value of exposure to the dose limits, account must be taken of the total dose incurred from different sources. This guide explains how to calculate the committed effective dose caused by internal radiation and gives the conversion factors required for the calculation. Application of the maximum values for radiation exposure is dealt with in ST guide 7.2, which also sets out the definitions of the quantities and concepts most commonly used in the monitoring of radiation exposure. The monitoring of exposure and recording of doses are dealt with in ST Guides 7.1 and 7.4.

  2. Dose equivalent rate constants and barrier transmission data for nuclear medicine facility dose calculations and shielding design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Maggie; Caldwell, Curtis B

    2014-07-01

    A primary goal of nuclear medicine facility design is to keep public and worker radiation doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA). To estimate dose and shielding requirements, one needs to know both the dose equivalent rate constants for soft tissue and barrier transmission factors (TFs) for all radionuclides of interest. Dose equivalent rate constants are most commonly calculated using published air kerma or exposure rate constants, while transmission factors are most commonly calculated using published tenth-value layers (TVLs). Values can be calculated more accurately using the radionuclide's photon emission spectrum and the physical properties of lead, concrete, and/or tissue at these energies. These calculations may be non-trivial due to the polyenergetic nature of the radionuclides used in nuclear medicine. In this paper, the effects of dose equivalent rate constant and transmission factor on nuclear medicine dose and shielding calculations are investigated, and new values based on up-to-date nuclear data and thresholds specific to nuclear medicine are proposed. To facilitate practical use, transmission curves were fitted to the three-parameter Archer equation. Finally, the results of this work were applied to the design of a sample nuclear medicine facility and compared to doses calculated using common methods to investigate the effects of these values on dose estimates and shielding decisions. Dose equivalent rate constants generally agreed well with those derived from the literature with the exception of those from NCRP 124. Depending on the situation, Archer fit TFs could be significantly more accurate than TVL-based TFs. These results were reflected in the sample shielding problem, with unshielded dose estimates agreeing well, with the exception of those based on NCRP 124, and Archer fit TFs providing a more accurate alternative to TVL TFs and a simpler alternative to full spectral-based calculations. The data provided by this paper should assist

  3. VT Limited Access Highways

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — A limited-access road, known by various terms worldwide, including limited-access highway, dual carriageway, expressway, and partial controlled access highway, is a...

  4. Occupational doses simulation in industrial radiography; Simulacao de doses ocupacionais em radiografia industrial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Pedro B.; Falcao, Rossana C.; Facure, Alexandre [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: pbarbosa@cnen.gov.br; ross@cnen.gov.br; afsoares@cnen.gov.br; Hunt, John [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: john@ird.gov.br; Silva, Ademir X. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia. Programa de Engenharia Nuclear]. E-mail: ademir@com.ufrj.br

    2005-07-01

    The application of ionizing radiation in industrial processes is assuming an important role in the national scenario. Industrial radiography is one of the more used techniques in the nondestructive assays. This type of radiography can be carried out through X or gamma rays, and in about ninety percent of the cases this procedure it is carried out using 192 Ir sources, which is a gamma with average energy of 380 keV. This practice is called Gammagraphy. The Brazilian regulation Norm CNEN-NN-6.04 of the Nuclear National Energy Commission (CNEN), determines that works of Industrial Radiography in urban, suburban and agricultural areas, where there is presence of the public in general, to follow the recommendations of an specific radioprotection guide. The operations in these urban zones cannot cause over expositions to the operators as well as to the public. The present work presents the first step in order to simulate occupational doses in urban zones. Occupational doses were simulated and an intercomparison was made between the Monte Carlo Codes VMC and MCNP, with the objective of testing the viability of using the first code, which was developed at CNEN, to simulate values of occupational doses in situations of routine and emergency exposures, in real time. (author)

  5. Authorized limits for disposal of PCB capacitors from Buildings 361 and 391 at Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, J.-J.; Chen, S.-Y.; Environmental Science Division

    2009-12-22

    analyzed. Based on the dose assessment results, it is indicated that, if the disposition activities are completed within a year, the maximum individual dose would be about 0.021 mrem/yr, which is about 0.02% of the primary dose limit of 100 mrem/yr set by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for members of the public. The maximum individual dose was associated with a conservative and unlikely scenario involving a hypothetical farmer who intruded the landfill area to set up a subsistence living above the disposal area 30 years after burial of the incineration residue. Potential collective dose for worker and the general public combined was estimated to be less than 4 x 10{sup -4} person-rem/yr, about 0.004% of the DOE authorized release objective of 10 person-rem/yr for collective exposure. In reality, the actual radiation doses incurred by workers and the general public are expected to be at least two orders of magnitude lower than the estimated values. To follow the ALARA (as low as reasonably achievable) principle of reducing potential radiation exposures associated with authorized release of the PCB capacitors, a dose constraint of 1 mrem/yr, corresponding to a small fraction of the 25 mrem/yr limit set by DOE, was initially used as a reference to derive the authorized release limits. On the basis of the dose assessment results, the following authorized release limits are proposed - 0.6 pCi/g for Mn-54, 0.6 pCi/g for Na-22, 0.1 pCi/g for Co-57, and 2.3 pCi/g for Co-60, with a corresponding maximum individual dose of 0.21 mrem/yr. This maximum dose, about 0.2% of the DOE primary dose limit of 100 mrem/yr for members of the public from all sources and exposure pathways, was then selected as the final dose constraint for releasing the PCB capacitors through the authorized process. The proposed authorized release limits would satisfy the DOE requirements for the release of non-real properties to a commercial treatment and disposal facility. In addition, due to the relatively

  6. Robust test limits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albers, Willem/Wim; Kallenberg, W.C.M.; Otten, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    Because of inaccuracies of the measurement process inspection of manufactured parts requires test limits which are more strict than the given specification limits. Test limits derived under the assumption of normality for product characteristics turn out to violate the prescribed bound on the

  7. Public meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Last Monday at 9 a.m. the Council Chamber was full, with several people standing, for the public meeting of the Staff Association. Simultaneously, many of our colleagues followed the presentations in the Amphitheatre in Prévessin. We would like to thank all of you for the interest you have shown and for your feedback. In the introduction we explained how the Staff Association represents the staff in its discussions with Management and Member States, and how the staff itself defined, by its participation in the 2013 staff survey, the priority assigned to various points related to the employment conditions. The position of the Staff Association regarding the new contract policy, to be implemented as of 31 March 2015 after approval by Council, was stated. Then, in the framework of the 2015 five-yearly review, the general approach that we would like to see for the new career structure, was explained. Concerning diversity, based on what we know about the situation in other international organiza...

  8. Correlation between effective dose and radiological risk: general concepts*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Nersissian, Denise Yanikian; Melo, Camila Souza

    2016-01-01

    The present review aims to offer an educational approach related to the limitations in the use of the effective dose mgnitude as a tool for the quantification of doses resulting from diagnostic applications of ionizing radiation. We present a critical analysis of the quantities accepted and currently used for dosimetric evaluation in diagnostic imaging procedures, based on studies published in the literature. It is highlighted the use of these quantities to evaluate the risk attributed to the procedure and to calculate the effective dose, as well as to determine its correct use and interpretation. PMID:27403018

  9. Correlation between effective dose and radiological risk: general concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Paulo Roberto; Yoshimura, Elisabeth Mateus; Nersissian, Denise Yanikian; Melo, Camila Souza, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica

    2016-05-15

    The present review aims to offer an educational approach related to the limitations in the use of the effective dose magnitude as a tool for the quantification of doses resulting from diagnostic applications of ionizing radiation. We present a critical analysis of the quantities accepted and currently used for dosimetric evaluation in diagnostic imaging procedures, based on studies published in the literature. It is highlighted the use of these quantities to evaluate the risk attributed to the procedure and to calculate the effective dose, as well as to determine its correct use and interpretation. (author)

  10. Plastic film materials for dosimetry of very large absorbed doses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, W.L.; Miller, Arne; Abdel-Rahim, F.

    1985-01-01

    Most plastic films have limited response ranges for dosimetry because of radiation-induced brittleness, degradation, or saturation of the signal used for analysis (e.g. spectrophotometry) at high doses. There are, however, a few types of thin plastic films showing linearity of response even up...... to doses as high as 2 × 106 Gy (200 Mrad) without severe loss of mechanical properties. Among many candidate film types tested, those showing such resistance to radiation damage and continued response at such high doses are polyethylene terephthalate, high-density polyethylene, dyed polyvinylchloride...

  11. Prostatic carcinoma: limited field irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rounsaville, M.C.; Green, J.P.; Vaeth, J.M.; Purdon, R.P.; Heltzel, M.M.

    1987-07-01

    This is a retrospective study of 251 patients with histologically proven adenocarcinoma treated primarily with limited field radiotherapy techniques, under the principle direction of authors JMV and JPG, between 1968 and 1981 in San Francisco, California. All patients are followed for a minimum of 3 years; mean follow-up is 7.3 years. Routine clinical staging procedures included: HandP, digital prostate exam, cystoscopy, biopsy, blood studies including serum acid phosphatase, and imaging studies including chest X ray, IVP, bone survey or radionucleotide bone scan, and in recent years, pelvic CT scans. Twelve patients are Stage A1, 37-Stage A2, 50-Stage B, 140-Stage C1 and 12-Stage C2. Ninety percent of all cases and 85% of Stage C patients were treated with limited fields to the prostate and periprostatic volume only. Total doses were prescribed at midplane or isocenter and were generally 6500-7000 cGy, daily doses of 180-200 cGy, 5 days per week. Actuarial 5- and 10-year survival rates are: entire population-69% and 47%; Stage A1-74% and 50%; Stage A2-81% and 67%; Stage B-84% and 53%; Stage C1-63% and 42%; Stage C2-32% and 11%. The 5- and 10-year disease-free actuarial survivals are: entire population-71% and 50%; Stage A1-89% and 74%; Stage A2-82% and 69%; Stage B-71% and 52%; Stage C1-67% and 44%; Stage C2-0%. Sites of recurrence, alone or as a component of the failure pattern are: 37 (15%) local, 11 (4%) symptomatic regional recurrence (lower extremity edema, pelvic pain/sciatica, hydroureteronephrosis), and 87 (35%) distant metastasis. Seven (3%) had unknown sites of failure. Local-regional failure occurred in 42% of Stage C2 patients.

  12. Personal dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for 1252 radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Dose conversion coefficients for radionuclides are useful for routine calculations in radiation protection in industry, medicine and research. They give a simple and often sufficient estimate of dose rates during production, handling and storage of radionuclide sources, based solely on the source's activity. The latest compilation of such conversion coefficients dates from 20 y ago, based on nuclear decay data published 30 y ago. The present publication provides radionuclide-specific conversion coefficients to personal dose based on the most recent evaluations of nuclear decay data for 1252 radionuclides and fluence-to-dose-equivalent conversion coefficients for monoenergetic radiations. It contains previously unknown conversion coefficients for >400 nuclides and corrects those conversion coefficients that were based on erroneous decay schemes. For the first time, estimates for the protection quantity Hp(3) are included.

  13. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project. Monthly report, December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H. [comps.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representa