WorldWideScience

Sample records for public care institutions

  1. 10 CFR 455.141 - Grant awards for units of local government, public care institutions, and coordinating agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grant awards for units of local government, public care... CONSERVATION GRANT PROGRAMS FOR SCHOOLS AND HOSPITALS AND BUILDINGS OWNED BY UNITS OF LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC CARE INSTITUTIONS Grant Awards § 455.141 Grant awards for units of local government, public...

  2. Lived experiences of student nurses caring for intellectually disabled people in a public psychiatric institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Temane

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caring for intellectually disabled people can be demanding for student nurses who are novices in the nursing profession. To ensure that quality nursing care is provided, student nurses should have an understanding of and a positive attitude towards intellectually disabled people. Nursing intellectually disabled people can be a challenge for the student nurses. Therefore, student nurses need to be able to deal with challenges of caring for intellectually disabled people.Objective: This article aims to explore and describe experiences of student nurses caring for intellectually disabled people in a public psychiatric institution.Design and method: A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Data were collected through individual in-depth phenomenological interviews, naïve sketches and field notes. Thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the collected data. Results were contextualised within the literature and measures to ensure trustworthiness were adhered to. Ethical principals were also applied throughout the research process.Results: Five themes emerged from the data. Student nurses experienced a profoundly unsettling impact on their whole being when caring for intellectually disabled people; they developed a sense of compassion and a new way of looking at life, and experienced a need for certain physical, mental and spiritual needs to be met.Conclusion: From the results, it is evident that student nurses were challenged in caring for intellectually disabled people. However, they developed a sense of awareness that intellectually disabled people have a need to be cared for like any other person.Keywords: experiences, student nurses, caring, intellectually disabled people, public psychiatric institution

  3. Lived experiences of student nurses caring for intellectually disabled people in a public psychiatric institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temane, Annie; Simelane, Lizzie; Poggenpoel, Marie; Myburgh, C P H

    2016-06-30

    Caring for intellectually disabled people can be demanding for student nurses who are novices in the nursing profession. To ensure that quality nursing care is provided, student nurses should have an understanding of and a positive attitude towards intellectually disabled people. Nursing intellectually disabled people can be a challenge for the student nurses. Therefore, student nurses need to be able to deal with challenges of caring for intellectually disabled people. This article aims to explore and describe experiences of student nurses caring for intellectually disabled people in a public psychiatric institution. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive and contextual research design was used. Data were collected through individual in-depth phenomenological interviews, naïve sketches and field notes. Thematic analysis was utilised to analyse the collected data. Results were contextualised within the literature and measures to ensure trustworthiness were adhered to. Ethical principals were also applied throughout the research process. Five themes emerged from the data. Student nurses experienced a profoundly unsettling impact on their whole being when caring for intellectually disabled people; they developed a sense of compassion and a new way of looking at life, and experienced a need for certain physical, mental and spiritual needs to be met. From the results, it is evident that student nurses were challenged in caring for intellectually disabled people. However, they developed a sense of awareness that intellectually disabled people have a need to be cared for like any other person.

  4. A self-efficacy education programme on foot self-care behaviour among older patients with diabetes in a public long-term care institution, Malaysia: a Quasi-experimental Pilot Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siti Khuzaimah Ahmad Sharoni; Hejar Abdul Rahman; Halimatus Sakdiah Minhat; Sazlina Shariff Ghazali; Mohd Hanafi Azman Ong

    2017-01-01

    ... behaviour among older patients with diabetes in a public long-term care institution. Method A prequasi-experimental and postquasi-experimental study was conducted in a public long-term care institution in Selangor, Malaysia...

  5. Financial institutions as an example of institutions of public trust

    OpenAIRE

    Agata Jakubowska

    2013-01-01

    Financial institutions are commonly known as institutions of public trust and they are fundamental for activities of other economic entities. The level of trust determines the competitive position of financial institutions. That is why care about the best standards is the most important task for these institutions. Financial institutions are called institutions of public trust and thus high professionalism and more responsibility is demanded from them. This article presents basic problems con...

  6. [The experience of a public institution in the training of health professionals to work in primary care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carácio, Flávia Cristina Castilho; Conterno, Lucieni de Oliveira; Oliveira, Maria Amélia de Campos; de Oliveira, Ana Claudia Heiras; Marin, Maria José Sanches; Braccialli, Luzmarina Aparecida Doretto

    2014-07-01

    This scope of this paper is to analyze the training of nurses and physicians to work in primary care at a public institution in the municipality of Marilia, duly identifying the concepts of professors, coordinators and graduates in relation to the formation of health professionals. It is a qualitative, exploratory study with interviews conducted with 21 individuals. The results revealed that according to the individuals interviewed, both courses prepare professionals to work in primary care, albeit with limitations in relation to actions in management collective and care. The interviewees believe that the use of active methodologies has been important in the teaching and learning process. Also, the fact that from the first year of undergraduate studies the students participate in primary health care broadens their knowledge of this reality. The study highlights the need to enhance the teaching-service partnership and strategies to improve the training physicians to work in primary health care.

  7. Knowledge and utilization of partograph among obstetric care givers in public health institutions of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yisma Engida

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Globally, there was an estimated number of 287,000 maternal deaths in 2010. Eighty five percent (245,000 of these deaths occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia. Among the causes of these deaths were obstructed and prolonged labour which could be prevented by cost effective and affordable health interventions like the use of the partograph. The Use of the partograph is a well-known best practice for quality monitoring of labour and subsequent prevention of obstructed and prolonged labour. However, a number of cases of obstructed labour do happen in health facilities due to poor quality of intrapartum care. Methods A cross-sectional quantitative study assessed knowledge and utilization of partograph among obstetric care givers in public health institutions of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia using a structured interviewer administered questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with knowledge and use of partograph among obstetric care givers. Results Knowledge about the partograph was fair: 189 (96.6% of all the respondents correctly mentioned at least one component of the partograph, 104 (53.3% correctly explained the function of alert line and 161 (82.6% correctly explained the function of action line. The study showed that 112 (57.3% of the obstetric care givers at public health institutions reportedly utilized partograph to monitor mothers in labour. The utilization of the partograph was significantly higher among obstetric care givers working in health centres (67.9% compared to those working in hospitals (34.4% [Adjusted OR = 3.63(95%CI: 1.81, 7.28]. Conclusions A significant percentage of obstetric care givers had fair knowledge of the partograph and why it is necessary to use it in the management of labour and over half of obstetric care givers reported use of the partograph to monitor mothers in labour. Pre-service and

  8. Provision of Private Care by Doctors Employed in Public Health Institutions: Ethical Considerations and Implications for Clinical Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbassat, Jochanan

    2015-06-01

    This paper summarizes the difficulties that may emerge when the same care-provider attends to private and public patients within the same or different clinical settings. First, I argue that blurring the boundaries between public and private care may start a slippery slope leading to "black" under-the-table payments for preferential patient care. Second, I question whether public hospitals that allow their doctors to attend to private patients provide an appropriate learning environment for medical students and residents. Finally, I propose a way to both maintain the advantages of private care and avoid its negative consequences: complete separation between the public and the private health care systems.

  9. Determinants of and opportunities for continuing education among health care professionals in public health care institutions in Jimma township, Southwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fentahun N

    2012-09-01

    advanced education.Conclusion: Participation of health care professionals in continuing education is low in Jimma township. The hospital management and town health office should support health care professionals in pursuing advanced education.Keywords: health care professionals, continuing education, public health institution

  10. Public relations effectiveness in public health institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springston, Jeffrey K; Weaver Lariscy, Ruth Ann

    2005-01-01

    This article explores public relations effectiveness in public health institutions. First, the two major elements that comprise public relations effectiveness are discussed: reputation management and stakeholder relations. The factors that define effective reputation management are examined, as are the roles of issues and crisis management in building and maintaining reputation. The article also examines the major facets of stakeholder relations, including an inventory of stakeholder linkages and key audiences, such as the media. Finally, methods of evaluating public relations effectiveness at both the program level and the institutional level are explored.

  11. Comparison of the epidemiologic features and patterns of initial care for prostate cancer between public and private institutions: a survey by the Brazilian Society of Urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguinaldo Cesar Nardi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the epidemiological features and patterns of initial care for prostate cancer at public and private institutions in the State of Sao Paulo, Brazil. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1,082 physicians affiliated to the Sao Paulo Section of the Brazilian Society of Urology were invited to participate in this cross-sectional, web-based survey. Between September 2004 and September 2005, participating urologists entered data on demographic, clinical and pathological characteristics of patients diagnosed with prostate cancer in their practice. Data on patients attended at public institutions were analyzed and compared with those patients attended at private practice. RESULTS: One hundred and ten society members contributed with data from 1915 patients, 1026 (53.6% of whom from public institutions. When compared with patients attended at private institutions, those attended at public institutions were older and more likely to be black, had higher serum prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, had a higher probability of being diagnosed with metastatic disease, but were less likely to undergo prostatectomy (all P < 0.001. In multivariate analysis, age, biopsy Gleason score, and being attended at a public institution were independently associated with metastatic disease upon diagnosis. The significant predictors of nonsurgical treatment were age, black race, and higher serum levels of PSA. CONCLUSIONS: A statewide registry provides valuable information regarding patient demographics, clinical features, and patterns of care. The results of this study suggest that significant disparities exist for patients with prostate cancer attended at different health-care systems. The relative contribution of biological versus socioeconomic features remains uncertain.

  12. FUNDING PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florin-Constantin, DIMA

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of this article started from the fact that in the field of public institutions accounting there have been many changes and it aims to capture the essential aspects of their financing. Thus the article covers a series of issues related to the credit officers, to employment, to settlement and payment of public institutions expenditure, to the budgeting and budgetary credits accounting. It also presents a brief classification of the public institutions according to several criteria, as well as their financing sources. The paper also practically presents the accounting of the budgetary credits and their sharing mechanism between the principal, secondary and tertiary budgetary credits officers.

  13. THE ANALYSIS OF TRAINING NEEDS IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS OPERATING IN HEALTH CARE SECTOR IN THE PODKARPACIE PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Skica

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is an attempt at diagnosing training needs of the employees of units operating in health care sector in the Podkarpacie Province. In times of permanent changes affecting each sphere of economy, providers of health care services cannot afford to remain outside this trend. Improving qualifications, adaptability of the offer, influencing its quality, and above all, the awareness of the necessity of these changes, have become an element which is fully integrated also with this sphere of public sector operations. Taking into account the above, the article verifies not only training needs articulated by employees of Health Care Centers (HCC operating in the Podkarpacie Province, but also the way they are perceived by the managers of these centers, the ability to define training needs and their compatibility with characteristic features of analyzed HCCs. Therefore special emphasis has been placed on demonstrating the variety of diagnosed training needs with reference to such criteria as the size of analyzed centers, the market serviced by them, and their location. These determinants allowed us to conduct a complex analysis of conditions and structure of voiced need for subject training, and as a consequence, contributed to diagnosing the expectations of the health care sector concerning initiatives improving the quality of public services in the health care services area.

  14. [Eduard Lent (1831-1911): founder and supporter of public health care, social institutions, and physician self-management].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, V

    2014-06-01

    Modern urology owes much to our predecessors. Researchers in the 20th century were able to develop their specialist techniques and their professional independence on the basis of the fundamental studies and measures carried out by their predecessors in the 19th century. As a medical practitioner, Eduard Lent provided pioneering solutions to the three major sociomedical problems of his time, namely wide-spread epidemics like cholera, social inequalities, and lack of organization of the medical profession. His answer are to be found in the organization of public healthcare, establishment of suitable social institutions, and the promotion of self-government of the medical profession. These achievements have left their imprint on many fields, including urology.

  15. The Concept of Performance Management in Payments from Revenues of Primary Care and Inpatient Public Health Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşegül YILDIRIM KAPTANOĞLU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is intended to identify supplementary payment systems based on performance in health services provided by public hospitals via revolving fund revenues. For this purpose, all relevant legislation about the regulation of performance-based supplementary payment system in health services was examined in detail. Health legislation analysis is exemplified. A simplified method is followed to help physicians and health care workers to grasp the issue in detail with examples. The performance management implemented for additional payments from revolving funds in hospitals is considered as payments given for every procedure performed by physicians and nurses. In fact, only 50% of the hospitals’ monthly income is distributed according to some conditions, no matter how much procedure is done. The packages in Health Care Implementation Notification do not include expenses of depreciation, electricity, water, heating and etc. 50% of the total amount of the revolving fund is multiplied by the hospital’s quality factor; the resulting amount is distributed to health personnel. The average score is taken for all physicians working in the hospital for making an additional payment of performance. Although there are not performance-based payment systems in Family Medicine Center and the Community Health Center yet, in the near future it is expected to be put in practice at least for some applications.

  16. A self-efficacy education programme on foot self-care behaviour among older patients with diabetes in a public long-term care institution, Malaysia: a Quasi-experimental Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharoni, Siti Khuzaimah Ahmad; Abdul Rahman, Hejar; Minhat, Halimatus Sakdiah; Shariff Ghazali, Sazlina; Azman Ong, Mohd Hanafi

    2017-06-08

    A pilot self-efficacy education programme was conducted to assess the feasibility, acceptability and potential impact of the self-efficacy education programme on improving foot self-care behaviour among older patients with diabetes in a public long-term care institution. A prequasi-experimental and postquasi-experimental study was conducted in a public long-term care institution in Selangor, Malaysia. Patients with diabetes aged 60 years and above who fulfilled the selection criteria were invited to participate in this programme. Four self-efficacy information sources; performance accomplishments, vicarious experience, verbal persuasion and physiological information were translated into programme interventions. The programme consisted of four visits over a 12-week period. The first visit included screening and baseline assessment and the second visit involved 30 min of group seminar presentation. The third and fourth visits entailed a 20-min one-to-one follow-up discussion and evaluation. A series of visits to the respondents was conducted throughout the programme. The primary outcome was foot self-care behaviour. Foot self-efficacy (efficacy-expectation), foot care outcome expectation, knowledge of foot care, quality of life, fasting blood glucose and foot condition were secondary outcomes. Data were analysed with descriptive and inferential statistics (McNemar's test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test) using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences V.20.0. Fifty-two residents were recruited but only 31 met the inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis at baseline and at 12 weeks postintervention. The acceptability rate was moderately high. At postintervention, foot self-care behaviour (p<0.001), foot self-efficacy (efficacy-expectation), (p<0.001), foot care outcome expectation (p<0.001), knowledge of foot care (p<0.001), quality of life (physical symptoms) (p=0.003), fasting blood glucose (p=0.010), foot hygiene (p=0.030) and anhydrosis (p=0

  17. Unit Cost Analysis of PET-CT at an Apex Public Sector Health Care Institute in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajuryal, SH; Daga, A; Siddharth, V; Bal, CS; Satpathy, S

    2017-01-01

    Context: PET/CT scan service is one of the capital intensive and revenue-generating centres of a tertiary care hospital. The cost associated with the provisioning of PET services is dependent upon the unit costs of the resources consumed. Aims: The study aims to determine the cost of providing PET/CT Scan services in a hospital. Methods and Material: This descriptive and observational study was conducted in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at a tertiary apex teaching hospital in New Delhi, India in the year 2014-15. Traditional costing methodology was used for calculating the unit cost of PET/CT scan service. The cost was calculated under two heads that is capital and operating cost. Annualized cost of capital assets was calculated using methodology prescribed by WHO and operating costs was taken on an actual basis. Results: Average number of PET/CT scan performed in a day is 30. The annual cost of providing PET/CT scan services was calculated to be 65,311,719 Indian Rupees (INR) (US$ 1,020,496), while the unit cost of PET scan was calculated to be 9625.92 INR (US$ 150). 3/4th cost was spent on machinery and equipment (75.3%) followed by healthcare personnel (11.37%), electricity (5%), consumables and supplies (4%) engineering maintenance (3.24%), building, furniture and HVAC capital cost (0.76%), and manifold cost (0.05%). Of the total cost, 76% was capital cost while the remaining was operating cost. Conclusions: Total cost for establishing PET/CT scan facility with cyclotron and chemistry module and PET/CT scan without cyclotron and chemistry module was calculated to be INR 610,873,517 (US$9944899) and 226,745,158 (US$3542893), respectively. (US$ 1=INR 64) PMID:28242974

  18. Unit Cost Analysis of PET-CT at an Apex Public Sector Health Care Institute in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajuryal, S H; Daga, A; Siddharth, V; Bal, C S; Satpathy, S

    2017-01-01

    PET/CT scan service is one of the capital intensive and revenue-generating centres of a tertiary care hospital. The cost associated with the provisioning of PET services is dependent upon the unit costs of the resources consumed. The study aims to determine the cost of providing PET/CT Scan services in a hospital. This descriptive and observational study was conducted in the Department of Nuclear Medicine at a tertiary apex teaching hospital in New Delhi, India in the year 2014-15. Traditional costing methodology was used for calculating the unit cost of PET/CT scan service. The cost was calculated under two heads that is capital and operating cost. Annualized cost of capital assets was calculated using methodology prescribed by WHO and operating costs was taken on an actual basis. Average number of PET/CT scan performed in a day is 30. The annual cost of providing PET/CT scan services was calculated to be 65,311,719 Indian Rupees (INR) (US$ 1,020,496), while the unit cost of PET scan was calculated to be 9625.92 INR (US$ 150). 3/4th cost was spent on machinery and equipment (75.3%) followed by healthcare personnel (11.37%), electricity (5%), consumables and supplies (4%) engineering maintenance (3.24%), building, furniture and HVAC capital cost (0.76%), and manifold cost (0.05%). Of the total cost, 76% was capital cost while the remaining was operating cost. Total cost for establishing PET/CT scan facility with cyclotron and chemistry module and PET/CT scan without cyclotron and chemistry module was calculated to be INR 610,873,517 (US$9944899) and 226,745,158 (US$3542893), respectively. (US$ 1=INR 64).

  19. Private Operating Public Elder Care Institutions:the Status Quo,Characteristics and Problems%养老机构公建民营:现状、特征及问题

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    方浩

    2016-01-01

    养老机构公建民营是中国公办养老机构的改革方向。本文通过对47个国内养老机构公建民营案例的分析,梳理了养老机构公建民营的简要历程,认为当前养老机构公建民营具有改革实践时间短、参与社会组织较为多样、民营机构参与方式集中、承包期限灵活、社会组织参与要求高等基本特征。本文进一步分析了养老机构公建民营面临的公建民营实践形式界定困难、公办养老机构定位不清、政府养老职能错位、服务对象不明确等主要问题,并提出了相应的政策建议。%Private operating public elder care institutions are the reform direction of public elder care Institutions. Based on analysis of 47 domestic cases,the brief history of private operating public elder care institutions is reviewed. Private operatiny public elder care institutions have five characteristics:(1 )the short time of reform practice;(2 )diverse participation of social organizations;(3)private institutions involved in concentration;(4)flexible term contract;(5)high requirement for social organizations participation.The article analyzes several problems of private operating public elder care institutions and gives the corresponding policy suggestions.

  20. CONTROL ENVIRONMENT IN KOSOVO PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaqir M. REXHEPI

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The study on how is Internal Control System developed in public institutions is of a special importance for modalities, forms and the manner of the application of relevant strategies for the functioning of internal control environment in public institutions. In this paper, there is treated the existing situation of internal control system environment of public finances and its implementation in public sector. For internal control system environment in public finances to function effectively, there should exist a coherent control environment which includes responsibilities for financial management from managers of Publicly Owned Enterprises and with complete functioning of internal audit, which exists in the function of development to add value. In Kosovo public institutions, this framework is offered by legislation and by institutional mechanism for the implementation of legislation according to these parameters.

  1. Institute for International Public Policy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Office of Postsecondary Education, US Department of Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Institute for International Public Policy program provides a single grant to assist a consortia of institutions of higher education in establishing an institute designed to increase the representation of minorities in international service, including private international voluntary organizations and the Foreign Service of the United States. A…

  2. PLANNING CAREERS IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CÎRNU DORU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Planning careers, in any organization, but especially in the public ones, is a process of great importance. Today, in modern society, there is virtually no person who does not need a public service provided by trained staff, helpful, kind and involved. By judiciously prepared career plans, public organizations develop their employees. As a result, the administrative career planning is currently one issue that do not admit any delay.

  3. Event Attention, Environmental Sensemaking, and Change in Institutional Logics: An Inductive Analysis of the Effects of Public Attention to Clinton's Health Care Reform Initiative.

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam, A; Ocasio, W.

    2010-01-01

    We explore attention to Clinton's health care reform proposal, ongoing debates, and its political demise to develop theory that explains how events create opportunities for cognitive realignment and transformation in institutional logics. Our case analysis illustrates how a bottom-up process of environmental sensemaking led to the emergence and adoption of a logic of managed care, which provided new organizing principles in the hospitals' organizational field. In addition to theorization, hig...

  4. Public Debt Policy: Credibility and Institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Petr Pavelek

    2003-01-01

    The paper considers modern frameworks of public debt management from a credibility perspective. It focuses on the institutional and operational arrangements of effective debt management. In particular, the author seeks to shed light upon the contemporary problems of Czech debt manager compared with OECD and EU debt managers. The author calls for a broader public debate of public debt management in the Czech Republic, citing the country?s increasing level of public debt and accession to the EU...

  5. Entrepreneurship in a Finnish public institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Burcea

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades the idea of entrepreneurship in public institutions has been the subject of intense debates, activities and academic research. The scopes of our article are to briefly underline the importance of developing an entrepreneurial spirit by presenting a case study from a Finnish local public administration and making aware the proactive aspect in the process of managing public institutions in Romania. Our hypotheses have been mainly of an interrogative nature. Hypothesis testing was achieved through the analysis of statistical data and conducting a set of sociological interviews with key people from Finnish institutions which were used in the survey. The results of the research emphasize that where there is an entrepreneurial behaviour with the local administration management, the community undergoes a process of conservation and development. The way in which they relate to community partners (such as entrepreneurs, non-profit organizations, citizens is essential to the entrepreneurial spirit within the local public institution.

  6. Education in Young Offender Institutions and Secure Youth Care Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeets, Ed

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to gain a better insight into efforts made to provide optimum education to juveniles in young offender institutions and in secure youth care institutions, and into barriers with which educators are confronted in this process. Results show that for a substantial number of juveniles insufficient information is…

  7. Public Relations and Neo-institutional theory

    OpenAIRE

    Fredriksson, Magnus; Pallas, Josef; Wehmeier, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    This special section seeks to enrich research on the field by using neo-institutional theory to describe, explain and understand the activities, processes and dynamics of public relations. By this we open up for a wider understanding of public relations, its preconditions, its performances and its consequences for shaping the social. We argue that public relations could be analyzed as an institutionalized practice with certain set of governing mechanisms including taken-for-granted activities...

  8. Designing for Participation in Public Knowledge Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalsgaard, Peter; Dindler, Christian; Eriksson, Eva

    2008-01-01

    grounded in pragmatist philosophy. We then present design work carried out in three different settings, namely a museum, a combined aquarium and science centre, and a municipal library. Based on a discussion of these design cases, we offer six design considerations for designing for participation in public......We address the challenges facing designers of interactive technologies for public knowledge institutions such as museums, libraries and science centres. We argue that visitor participation is a key concern for these institutions and present a theoretical framework for understanding participation...

  9. Understanding Higher Education Institutions' Publicness: Do Public Universities Produce More Public Outcomes than Private Universities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Higher education institutions produce a broad array of public outcomes. However, little is known about the varying levels of their contribution to the public good and what explains the variation among institutions. This study uses the theory of organisational publicness and examines how these institutions' ownership status and resource publicness…

  10. THE NEW CHALLENGES OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS ACCOUNTING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DINA IONELA-CLAUDIA

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Accounting of public institutions is an area in the middle of change, at the beginning of the year 2104 being recorded changes are consistent with significant impact on such areas, general, accounting. Given that the transformation process of how reporting is in progress, I found it helpful to attend a study aiming at the transformation imposed by the new legislative package, but what are the main issues that might affect implementation of the project. We have identified three directions by which the Ministry of public finance requires changing, such as: adaptation of the chart of accounts used by public entities, the creation of a national system of monitoring, reporting, verification and control of the financial statements, legal commitments and budgets of public entities and increasing training of Heads of financial and accounting departments. This structure is designed and realized study.

  11. Social Public Care Ahead

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Liqin

    2008-01-01

    @@ China faces toughest after-quake reconstruction since 1976. In contrast with neighbouring Myanmar's lethargic and secre-tive handling of its cyclone ten days earlier, China responded to the earthquake rapidly and with uncharacteristic openness. Within hours Premier Wen Jiabao was on a plane, and appeared in almost all the strategic plac-es in the earthquake-hit areas in the follow-ing days; President Hu Jintao was chairing an emergency meeting of Standing Com-mittee and thousands of soldiers and police were being dispatched. China is moved and moves. For the most impressive time, we read the social care from all works of lives.

  12. 关于界定医疗卫生机构为公共场所的探讨%Exploration of the Definition of Health Care Institutions for Public Spaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宁超; 苏天照; 李淼; 王蓉

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzed the relevant laws and regulations to define the concept of public places.According to the relevant information from the "Hospital Workplace Violence Survey Report on medical injury" of Chinese Hospital Association,to explore the necessity and feasibility of defining health care institutions as public spaces;pro-posing five ways to protect the medical order and then build a harmonious doctor-patient relationship.The five ways were legislation to improve,health care reform,institutional reform,scientific communication,medical education and publicity,respectively.%分析相关法律法规,对公共场所的概念进行界定;依据中国医院协会《医院场所暴力伤医情况调研报告》中的相关资料,探讨界定医疗卫生机构为公共场所的必要性和可行性;提出了完善立法、审视医改、制度改革、科学沟通、医教宣传等5个途径保障医疗秩序,构建和谐医患关系。

  13. Factors Influencing the Choice of a Public or Private Health Institution for Childbirth in Chandigarh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trusty Khumukcham

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Knowledge of factors affecting the choice of place for delivery may help in developing a user friendly maternity program. Hence, this study aimed at finding out factors influencing women’s choice about the type of health institutions for delivery. Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was conducted in selected communities of Chandigarh city in India during 2010-11. A consecutive sample of 300 women (150 in public and 150 in private institutions who had delivered a baby in previous three months were interviewed using a pre-tested interview schedule. Chi square test was used to find association of socio-demographic, maternal, and institutional factors with the type of institution selected for delivery. Results: Women from lower socio-economic status delivered more frequently in public sector institutions (47.3% than in private institutions (16.7%  (p<0.01. In private institutions 30% of the women were delivered through Caesarean Section compared to 17.3% in public institutions (p<0.05. Physical infrastructure was better in private institutions. Cost was lower in public (Rs. 4,630 than in private institutions (Rs 21,676. Most women were satisfied with quality of care received in public and private institutions. However, some reported that public institution staff needs to be more polite. Quality of infrastructure in health facility, quality of care, and socio-economic status were associated with the choice of institution for delivery. Conclusions: Public sector health institutions are a major source of maternity care in Chandigarh, hence, care providers should be trained in handling clients gently. Regulations for adherence to protocols, e.g., indications for Caesarean Section and fee structure etc. need to be implemented in private institutions.

  14. Funding child care and public education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zigler, E F; Finn-Stevenson, M

    1996-01-01

    Ensuring the availability of high-quality, affordable child care to all families who need it is a goal of national importance. The authors suggest that a comprehensive financing and service delivery system for child care is needed to achieve this goal, and the system should ideally be grounded in an existing institution, already present in every community--the public school. The linkage of child care with the public education system would eliminate the false distinction between child care and education, and would create a universally accessible system of child care services for children. The School of the 21st Century is an example of such a system. Initially conceptualized by Zigler, it has now been implemented in 400 schools across 13 states, with the leadership and direction of Finn-Stevenson. This article describes how school districts that have implemented the program employ a mixture of parent fees and local, state, federal, and private dollars to fund it, and then proposes an ideal financing model for the program. In the ideal model, the same mix of funding sources would be retained, but a per-pupil expenditure of about $9,000 per year is advocated to deliver child care and other social services to three- and four-year-olds. Funds for initial start-up could be derived from reallocation of existing dollars, especially state prekindergarten programs, but eventually new funds would be needed to support ongoing operations.

  15. [Institutional psychotherapy, caring for patients and the place of care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogoul, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Institutional psychotherapy was developed in the specific context of the "assassination" of the Spanish revolution. There are two distinct movements or two periods. The first, based around Georges Daumézon and Henri Ey gave birth to the sector. The second, around FrançoisTosquelles and Jean Oury emphasised the asylum as the place of care. The function of institutional psychotherapy is to care not only for the patients but also the place of treatment. To fulfil this function, it has a tool box: transfer, the fight against the overvaluation of hierarchy as well as the function of the therapeutic club.

  16. Visibility, accessibility and quality of Italian public health institutional websites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Chiadò Piat

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Background: Since the large volume of health information available on the Web has the potential to improve health, Public Health institutions must represent a strong Internet presence with accessible and scientific information. The aims of the study were to verify the presence and visibility of Italian Institutions on the Web and to evaluate the accessibility and quality of the information provided.

    Methods: In a focus group setting, 21 keywords were generated, and launched in search-engines Google and MSN. Researchers noted the first 30 results found and determined the position of institutional websites. The accessibility of 303 Public Health websites was assessed in relation to the logo presence and web validation of XHTML, CSS and WAI indicators. Regarding the quality of information, the presence of the HONcode logo in the websites’ homepage was checked.

    Results: A high percentage of the keywords selected did not lead to any institutional website in the first three pages of Google (19.0% and MSN (42.8%. Few institutional websites presented the logo indicator and a full web validation. Considering the XHTML indicator, only for 34.0% of the websites there was concordance between the logo presence/absence and results of direct validation, 50.2% for CSS. The quality level seemed to be extremely low.

    Conclusions:In order to achieve a larger visibility and guarantee accessibility, Public Health websites have to be correctly designed, edited and maintained. Common and strict European laws about health information on the Web have to be arranged, deeply monitored and carefully adjourned in order to guarantee and support the positive role of institutional websites.

  17. Alternate Level of Care Patients in Public General Hospital Psychiatry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, Luis R.; Gil, Rosa M.

    1984-01-01

    Analyzes the interaction between psychiatric services in public general hospitals and in other institutional settings. A one-day census of patients in a New York general hospital showed the hospital was providing care to a large number of patients in need of other, less intensive institutional settings. (BH)

  18. Firms’ maneuvering between institutional logics in the public sector for commercializing welfare innovations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Helle Aarøe; Clarke, Ann Højbjerg; Evald, Majbritt Rostgaard

    projects focus on developing innovative solutions to the public health care system through a joint innovation process between public and private actors, which afterwards potentially can be commercialized in the public health care market. The preliminary findings show that private firms, who succeed...... their welfare solutions. The bottom-up approach exemplify that private firms handle institutional logics embedded in actors of health professionals by generating a need for new solutions from below and by gaining access to a network of health professionals in the broader public health care market. The mixed...... solutions developed through Public Private Innovation (PPI). Institutional logics are socially constructed patterns of taken-for-granted practices and belief systems that provide actors meaning. Therefore, knowing how to handle institutional logics becomes essential for private firm actors as institutional...

  19. Chiropractic care and public health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Claire; Rubinstein, Sidney M; Côté, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    through the lifespan, and effective participation in community health issues. The questions that are addressed include: Is spinal manipulative therapy for neck and low-back pain a public health problem? What is the role of chiropractic care in prevention or reduction of musculoskeletal injuries...... in children? What ways can doctors of chiropractic stay updated on evidence-based information about vaccines and immunization throughout the lifespan? Can smoking cessation be a prevention strategy for back pain? Does chiropractic have relevance within the VA Health Care System for chronic pain and comorbid...... of prevention and public health? What role do citizen-doctors of chiropractic have in organizing community action on health-related matters? How can our future chiropractic graduates become socially responsible agents of change?...

  20. Examining Citizens’ Contact to Local Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florina Bente

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This study aims to explore the communication process within local public administration as a determinant of citizens` satisfaction. Prior work - Several authors had examined if having contact with certain service providers will affect people’s attitudes toward the service quality, but the researchers have not focused yet on the effect of citizens` contact to local authorities on satisfaction. Approach - This research seeks to address this field using an exploratory approach. Following a quantitative methodological approach, a survey was applied to a sample of 380 citizens within Western Romanian. Findings - By analyzing data it was possible to determine citizen satisfaction and to assess its relationship with costumer contact. In addition it was revealed that in Crisana Region city hall is the most frequented local public institution. Implications – The results showed a negative effect of frequency of access to local authorities on overall customer satisfaction. The effect of citizens` contact to local authorities received less attention from the academic researchers, as a need in the literature is to expand this field. Value - This research is the first to specifically examine the contact to local authorities and the effect of frequency of addressing on citizen satisfaction within Crisana Region.

  1. [Dental care and oral hygiene practices in long-term geriatric care institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Raquel Conceição; Schwambach, Carolina Wolff; de Magalhães, Cláudia Silami; Moreira, Allyson Nogueira

    2011-04-01

    This study evaluated the activities of dentists, dental care and oral hygiene practices in the long-term care institutions of Belo Horizonte (Minas Gerais, Brazil). A semi-structured questionnaire was handed out to the coordinators of 37 philanthropic and 30 private institutions. The data was compared by the chi-square and Fisher's Exact Tests. 81% of the questionnaires were answered. The majority of the private (74.2%) and philanthropic institutions (87%) do not have a dentist (p=0.21). The location, period of existence, type institution kind and number of residents weren't factors regarding the presence of a dentist (p>0.05). 67% of the philanthropic institutions with equipped consultation rooms had dentists, though there were none when there was no consultation room. Even without consultation rooms, 13% of the private institutions had dentists. When necessary, 69.6% of the philanthropic institutions refer the elderly to public health centers, while 58.1% of the private institutions refer them to their family dentists. A higher percentage of the private institutions adopted systematic oral hygiene procedures (p=0.01), with a considerable divergence of treatment reported. There is a need to include a dentist on the health staff in the institutions and for systematization of oral hygiene practices.

  2. Team work of care workers in residential care institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Mišković, Svjetlana

    2014-01-01

    In my diploma thesis special attention is given to care workers that work with a group of youth in extrafamilial residential institutions. They are defined as a team or work group, depending on the work structure. I am aware of the difficulty of educational team work and that is why I want to define and research their experiencing team or group work. At the beginning of the theoretical part I define educational work in educational institutions and youth homes, then continue with the definitio...

  3. Digital technologies in Day-care institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Vibeke; Søndergaard, Steen

    2016-01-01

    , in part by new technologies designed with an intuitive and inviting user interface. In a one-year research project ’Digital tools in day-care-institutions’ (2015) financed by The Danish Agency for Digitisation and The Ministry of Education we have investigated the role of digital technologies in relation......Digital technologies are gaining an ever increasing access into the activities in Danish and Nordic day-care institutions. The traditional critical viewpoint of technologies as being opposed to the well-being of children is challenged in part by substantial access to digital tools in infant life...... environments including digital technologies. From this follows a focus on the preferred activity of children: playing. In the paper we will elaborate on two – preliminary - interrelated - findings: 1) Children and adults are handling technologies in substantially different ways 2) The professionals...

  4. General Issues Concerning Needs Analysis in Local Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica JUNJAN

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Needs assessment in local public institutions was not very present so far in a systematic manner in Romanian specialized literature on administrative reform. Current study uses interviews with candidates for a public administration master program to investigate civil servants motivation of pursuing graduatelevel studies and their perception on current needs of the work in local public institutions. Motivation for pursuing graduate studies is located mainly on the need to update and diversify their professional knowledge, and not as much on promotion-related reasons. The perceived needs are related to management of public institutions, structure of information system, legislation and European integration, human resource management and public relations.

  5. Managing conscientious objection in health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicclair, Mark R

    2014-09-01

    It is argued that the primary aim of institutional management is to protect the moral integrity of health professionals without significantly compromising other important values and interests. Institutional policies are recommended as a means to promote fair, consistent, and transparent management of conscience-based refusals. It is further recommended that those policies include the following four requirements: (1) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient's/surrogate's timely access to information, counseling, and referral. (2) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if a requested accommodation will not impede a patient's timely access to health care services offered within the institution. (3) Conscience-based refusals will be accommodated only if the accommodation will not impose excessive burdens on colleagues, supervisors, department heads, other administrators, or the institution. (4) Whenever feasible, health professionals should provide advance notification to department heads or supervisors. Formal review may not be required in all cases, but when it is appropriate, several recommendations are offered about standards and the review process. A key recommendation is that when reviewing an objector's reasons, contrary to what some have proposed, it is not appropriate to adopt an adversarial approach modelled on military review boards' assessments of requests for conscientious objector status. According to the approach recommended, the primary function of reviews of objectors' reasons is to engage them in a process of reflecting on the nature and depth of their objections, with the objective of facilitating moral clarity on the part of objectors rather than enabling department heads, supervisors, or ethics committees to determine whether conscientious objections are sufficiently genuine.

  6. Frequency and Correlates of Campus Crime: Missouri Public Postsecondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2012-01-01

    Data from 34 public postsecondary institutions in Missouri showed liquor- and drug-related offenses and burglary as the most frequent campus crimes. Four-year institutions, institutions with a greater number of students, full-time students, younger students, out-of-state students, and a larger percentage of program completion were positively…

  7. 42 CFR 403.764 - Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Basis and purpose of religious nonmedical health care institutions providing home service. 403.764 Section 403.764 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE... Religious Nonmedical Health Care Institutions-Benefits, Conditions of Participation, and Payment §...

  8. Institution animal care and use committees need greater ethical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Lawrence Arthur

    2013-03-01

    In response to public outrage stemming from exposés of animal abuse in research laboratories, the US Congress in 1985 mandated Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees (IACUCs) to oversee animal use at institutions receiving federal grants. IACUCs were enjoined to respect public concern about the treatment of animals in research, but they were not specifically instructed whether or not to perform ethical cost-benefit analyses of animal research protocols that IACUCs have chosen, with approval contingent upon a balancing of animal pain and suffering against a reasonable expectation of resultant human benefit. IACUCs have chosen not to make such ethical judgments but, rather, restrict themselves to an advisory role, often tweaking the details of animal-use protocols, but eventually approving all of them. This disinclination by IACUCs to take a broader ethical view of their authority and responsibilities may reflect a membership composition highly skewed towards animal researchers themselves (67%) and institutional veterinarians (15%), both with vested interests in continuing animal research. The resultant ethical monoculture may impair IACUC's ability to meet public concern for laboratory animal welfare. Psychological research has established that unconscious bias affects us all, that deliberations among the like-minded lead to adapting extremist positions, and that groupthink blinds organisations to alternatives that might be obvious to outsiders. Taken together, skewed IACUC membership composition and psychological research insights into unconscious bias and groupthink suggest that an infusion of ethical diversity by increasing the percentage of institutionally unaffiliated members on IACUCs would broaden their ethical perspectives and enable them to better address public concerns about laboratory animal welfare.

  9. Institutional Entrepreneurs and Social Innovation in Danish Senior Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Harboesgaard; Fersch, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    This article discusses the social, political, and administrative dynamics behind shifting welfare policies and social innovations in the senior care provided by Danish municipalities. The main argument is that institutional entrepreneurs are key agents of change and that institutional...

  10. Selecting Channels for Institutional Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Donald F.; Glynn, Carroll J.

    1989-01-01

    Examines communication decision-making in organizations by looking at the extent to which public relations executives have control over channel selection for the media mix in an overall public relations program. Shows a variety of structures and procedures for channel selection decisions in United States organizations. (SR)

  11. Main academic institutions conducting research in the public transport area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, B.E. [Lund Inst. of Tech. (Sweden). Dept. of Traffic Planning and Engineering

    1997-12-01

    The international exchange of knowledge is becoming increasingly important for all activities. Within Europe, the need for simple reviews of institutions within one and the same subject area has become more tangible since the European Union started its public transport research program. The survey has been carried out in two stages. First a questionnaire was sent to those institutions, public transport authorities, public transport associations and individuals within the subject area that were known to the Department. In this questionnaire we asked for the names and addresses of institutions at colleges and universities where significant research on public transport is carried out. In a second stage, a list was compiled of the 48 institutions that were named in the results of the first questionnaire. This list was sent to these institutions with the request for a brief presentation of their research within the public transport sector and information on any institution they felt were missing in the list. We found further interesting institutions on the Internet. The final list contains more than 60 institutions outside the Nordic area. Within the Nordic countries we have exclusively followed our own address list of institutions with long-term research work within the subject area

  12. Using Horticulture As Therapy in Public Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, George; Dillon, Roy D.

    1974-01-01

    Horticultural activities to bring about desired changes in individual behavior are being developed in many psychiatric hospitals, rehabilitation centers, senior citizen homes, correctional institutions, and centers for the mentally handicapped. The authors provide some examples of greenhouse-oriented projects appropriate for therapy. (EA)

  13. MARKETING STRATEGIES IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS – FASHION OR NECESSITY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SICA STANCIU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The marketing strategy, as core of the marketing policy, in the contemporary society and in the public institution, becomes a necessity not just a fashion. We undertake to reinforce this statement by arguments and to outline the specificity of the marketing strategy in the public institution of the modern society. Although public institutions are created and supported only if there is a large amount of social needs to be met during a certain period of time, the adoption of adequate marketing strategies and tactics is a must in order to achieve their efficiency.

  14. Public procurement of innovation; endogenous institutions in user producer interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda

    2013-01-01

    and the participants in this interaction need a common code of communication to efficiently work together. The institutions that govern user-producer interaction have therefore been seen as a possible explanation for success or failure in public procurement of innovation. Endogenous institutions were found......This article sets out to explore endogenous institutions as the rules that govern the interaction between users and producers in public procurement of innovation in a regional context. It further aims to study how this interaction influences the results of the procurement process by investigating...... possible institutional barriers and what can be done to fence against them. The article addresses the question: How do endogenous institutions in the context of user-producer interaction affect performance in public procurement of innovation? Innovation is an interactive learning process...

  15. Comparison of long-term care in an acute care institution and in a long-term care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, R; Kalant, N

    1998-11-03

    Acute care hospitals in Quebec are required to reserve 10% of their beds for patients receiving long-term care while awaiting transfer to a long-term care facility. It is widely believed that this is inefficient because it is more costly to provide long-term care in an acute care hospital than in one dedicated to long-term care. The purpose of this study was to compare the quality and cost of long-term care in an acute care hospital and in a long-term care facility. A concurrent cross-sectional study was conducted of 101 patients at the acute care hospital and 102 patients at the long-term care hospital. The 2 groups were closely matched in terms of age, sex, nursing care requirements and major diagnoses. Several indicators were used to assess the quality of care: the number of medical specialist consultations, drugs, biochemical tests and radiographic examinations; the number of adverse events (reportable incidents, nosocomial infections and pressure ulcers); and anthropometric and biochemical indicators of nutritional status. Costs were determined for nursing personnel, drugs and biochemical tests. A longitudinal study was conducted of 45 patients who had been receiving long-term care at the acute care hospital for at least 5 months and were then transferred to the long-term care facility where they remained for at least 6 months. For each patient, the number of adverse events, the number of medical specialist consultations and the changes in activities of daily living status were assessed at the 2 institutions. In the concurrent study, no differences in the number of adverse events were observed; however, patients at the acute care hospital received more drugs (5.9 v. 4.7 for each patient, p cost per patient-year was $7580 higher at the acute care hospital, attributable to the higher cost of drugs ($42), the greater use of laboratory tests ($189) and, primarily, the higher cost of nursing ($7349). For patients requiring 3.00 nursing hours/day, the acute care

  16. Accounting Public Institutions From Classic To Modern

    OpenAIRE

    TATIANA UŢA; NARCISA COMAN (ANDREI-COMAN)

    2010-01-01

    Local communities in Romania and around the world, faced with extensive decentralization of public services have turned into real management units which must meet the needs of increasingly diverse individuals, the insurance fund with limited resources . This has led to the identification of resource management budget and transparency in their use, on one hand, and secondly the criteria of efficiency, effectiveness and economy.

  17. Writing for publication: institutional support provides an enabling environment

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Background Due to the excessive service delivery loads in public hospitals supported by academic institutions in developing environments, researchers at these institutions have little time to develop scientific writing skills or to write up their research. It is imperative to expand the writing skills of researchers and train the next generation of health sciences academics in order to disseminate research findings. This study reports on the implementation of approaches for writing and public...

  18. ACCOUNTING PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS FROM CLASSIC TO MODERN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATIANA UŢA

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Local communities in Romania and around the world, faced with extensive decentralization of public services have turned into real management units which must meet the needs of increasingly diverse individuals, the insurance fund with limited resources . This has led to the identification of resource management budget and transparency in their use, on one hand, and secondly the criteria of efficiency, effectiveness and economy.

  19. Values and Values Education in Estonian Preschool Child Care Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülavere, Pärje; Veisson, Marika

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to provide an outline of the values that principals, teachers and parents of preschool child care institutions consider important to be taught to children, and which activities, in their estimation, should be used to implement values education in child care institutions. A total of 978 respondents from all 15…

  20. Public Health Law and Institutional Vaccine Skepticism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parasidis, Efthimios

    2016-08-16

    Vaccine-hesitant parents are often portrayed as misinformed dilettantes clinging to unscientific Internet chatter and a debunked study that linked vaccines and autism. While this depiction may be an accurate portrayal of a small (but vocal) subset, scholars have unearthed a more complex picture that casts vaccine hesitancy in the context of broader notions of lack of trust in government and industry. At the same time, commentators have highlighted limitations of the vaccine injury compensation program and US Supreme Court Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Ruth Bader Ginsburg have argued that preemption laws that provide vaccine manufacturers with broad legal immunities create "a regulatory vacuum in which no one ensures that vaccine manufacturers adequately take account of scientific and technological advancements when designing or distributing their products." In short, the discussions surrounding vaccine hesitancy that dominate public discourse detract from serious debate as to whether amendments to vaccine-related laws can address the limitations of the existing framework governing immunizations. This commentary examines these issues through a public health law lens.

  1. Ranking Institutional Settings Based on Publications in Community Psychology Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A.; Pokorny, Steven B.; Patka, Mazna; Adams, Monica; Morello, Taylor

    2007-01-01

    Two primary outlets for community psychology research, the "American Journal of Community Psychology" and the "Journal of Community Psychology", were assessed to rank institutions based on publication frequency and scientific influence of publications over a 32-year period. Three specific periods were assessed (1973-1983, 1984-1994, 1995-2004).…

  2. A Generic Information Factory for a National Public Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Faur

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In Romania a public institution have to cope with gathering, analyzing and use of large amounts of data. For this issue, having in mind that almost all institutions subordinated to the government handle the data in the same way, we will try to define a generic information factory at a higher level of abstraction in a manner in which it could be applied to a large number of national public institutions. For accomplish this task we have studied the structure of a national public institution, namely Labor Inspection. The case study reveals the actual informational chaos and a way to put some order in gathering, analyzing and use of data and information by management level competencies.

  3. Adoption of information security measures in public research institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Eduardo de Albuquerque Junior

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There are several Information Security measures recommended by international standards and literature, but the adoption by the organizations should be buoyed by specific needs identified by Information Security Governance structure of each organization, although it may be influenced by forces of the institutional environment in which organizations are inserted. In public research institutes, measures may be adopted as a result of pressure from Government and other organizations that regulate their activities, or by the influence of Information Security professionals, or simply adopting the same measures of leading organizations in the organizational field. This study aimed to investigate whether in public research institutes the adoption of Information Security measures is influenced by organizational factors relating to the Information Security Governance, and by external factors relating to its institutional environment. The results show that these organizations are subject to institutional influences more than organizational influences.

  4. Innovation public procurement in Russia: problems of institutional arrangements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korytcev Maxim, A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper explores the problems of public procurement in innovation sphere in Russia, its institutional organization. In international practice, some strategies of innovation stimulation (by public procurement are developing. There is necessity to use more elements of these strategies in Russian National Procurement System. The active National Public Procurement System has no enough effective methods and instruments for stimulating innovation development now.

  5. PUBLIC SECTOR INTER-INSTITUTIONAL COMBINATIONS - AN INTERDISCIPLINARY PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina MITU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the recent research litarature regarding public sector inter-institutional combinations. Based upon a sample of 51 articles published in 2010-2013 in four databases (Science Direct, Springer Link, Wiley Online Library and Sage, this study summarizes and analyses the approaches found. In the light of an in-depth empirical research the article looks at the issues raised by the public sector inte-institutional combinationsbygrouping the sample usingthe folowing criteria: year of publication, research methodology, field, the mentioning of New Public Management(NPM concept, theory and geographical area studied.The results reveal the fact that the predominant research methods used are: case study and statistical methods. The vast majority of papers analyze public institutions combinations of local public administration and investigate public sector combinations from Europe. Additionally, the majority of studies from the sample mention the concept of NPM and the institutional theory is mentioned in five articles.

  6. Facebook – Public Communication Media for the Romanian Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Farcaş

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For the public institutions, social networks represent a communication channel completing what represents the professional public communication, so the role of the professional communicator does not end or diminish and neither does the role of traditional mass-media. It is about an evolution, a modification, an adaptation of public communication and not a replacement of the way of achieving such communication. By this study, I proposed myself to identify the way in which the public institutions in Romania have adapted to the new trends imposed to public communication. To this end, I conducted an analysis of the structure, content, presentation and visibility in the online media of the Facebook pages of the 21 ministries composing the Romanian Government. I chose ministries as a subject of this study because, as institutions representing the central public administration of Romania, they exercise their competence at the level of the entire national territory and, generating public policies, have a major impact on the socio-economic environment, addressing a large number of beneficiaries. I noticed that all the ministries have an official Facebook page, these pages are updated and, by the published information, they are constituted as key elements in all representation media for these institutions.

  7. Exploring Space Management Goals in Institutional Care Facilities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jiankun

    2017-01-01

    Space management has been widely examined in commercial facilities, educational facilities, and hospitals but not in China's institutional care facilities. Poor spatial arrangements, such as wasted space, dysfunctionality, and environment mismanagement, are increasing; in turn, the occupancy rate is decreasing due to residential dissatisfaction. To address these problems, this paper's objective is to explore the space management goals (SMGs) in institutional care facilities in China. Systematic literature analysis was adopted to set SMGs' principles, to identify nine theoretical SMGs, and to develop the conceptual model of SMGs for institutional care facilities. A total of 19 intensive interviews were conducted with stakeholders in seven institutional care facilities to collect data for qualitative analysis. The qualitative evidence was analyzed through open coding, axial coding, and selective coding. As a result, six major categories as well as their interrelationships were put forward to visualize the path diagram for exploring SMGs in China's institutional care facilities. Furthermore, seven expected SMGs that were explored from qualitative evidence were confirmed as China's SMGs in institutional care facilities by a validation test. Finally, a gap analysis among theoretical SMGs and China's SMGs provided recommendations for implementing space management in China's institutional care facilities.

  8. Social innovation in public elder care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilfeldt, Annette; Andersen, John

    2013-01-01

    The chapter addresses the role of action research in social innovation related to elder care work at public nursing homes in Denmark. It is shown how critical utopian action research can contribute to the development of humanity in elder care to the benefit of the residents life quality...

  9. Social innovation in public elder care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bilfeldt, Annette; Andersen, John

    2013-01-01

    The chapter addresses the role of action research in social innovation related to elder care work at public nursing homes in Denmark. It is shown how critical utopian action research can contribute to the development of humanity in elder care to the benefit of the residents life quality...... and the employees working life....

  10. Public Participation and Institutional Fit: A Social-Psychological Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A. DeCaro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Public participation plays a role in the development and long-term maintenance of environmental institutions that are well-matched to local social-ecological conditions. However, the means by which public participation impacts such institutional fit remains unclear. We argue that one major reason for this lack of clarity is that analysts have not clearly outlined how humankind's sense of agency, or self-determination, influences institutional outcomes. Moreover, the concept of institutional fit is ambiguous as to what constitutes a good fit and how such fit could be diagnosed or improved. This is especially true for "social fit," or how well institutions match human expectations and local behavioral patterns. We develop an interdisciplinary framework based on principles of human agency and institutional analysis from social psychology to address these problems. Using the concept of "institutional acceptance" as an indicator of social fit, we show how analysts can define, diagnose, and improve social fit of participatory programs. We also show how such fit emerges and is sustained over time. This interdisciplinary perspective on fit and participation has important implications for participatory approaches to environmental management and the scientific study of institutional evolution.

  11. Sexual Harassment of Newcomers in Elder Care. An Institutional Practice?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jo Krøjer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sexual harassment is illegal and may have very damaging effects on the people exposed to it. One would expect organizations, employers, and institutions to take very good care to prevent employees from exposure to sexual harassment from anyone in their workplace. And yet, many people, mostly women, are exposed to sexual harassment at work. In care work, such behaviour is often directed toward their female caregiver by elderly citizens in need of care. Contemporary Nordic studies of working life and work environment have primarily investigated the interpersonal dimensions of sexual harassment, thus focusing on the relation between elderly citizens in need of care and their professional caregivers. In this article, we argue that sexual harassment from the elderly toward newcomers in elder care should also be seen as an effect of institutional practices. Based upon a Foucauldianinspired notion of practice-making, the article carries out a secondary analysis of three different empirical studies in order to explore how sexual harassment is produced and maintained through institutional practices in elder care. The term institution in this perspective includes three dimensions; a political, an educational (educational institutions in health and elder care, and a work organizational dimension. By examining elder care in these different dimensions, we identify how sexual harassment of professional caregivers is produced and maintained through institutional practice-making in elder care. The article thus contributes to our knowledge on working life by expanding and qualifying the understanding of the problematic working environment in care work, and by offering an alternative theoretical and analytical approach to the study of sexual harassment. Together, these insights suggest how elder care institutions might act to prevent sexual harassment toward caregivers.

  12. Quality systems in Dutch health care institutions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casparie, A.F.; Sluijs, E.M.; Wagner, C.; Bakker, D.H. de

    1997-01-01

    The implementation of quality systems in Dutch health care was supervised by a national committee during 1990-1995. To monitor the progress of implementation a large survey was conducted in the beginning of 1995. The survey enclosed all subsectors in health care. A postal questionnaire-derived fr

  13. Perceptions on the Effectiveness of Communication between Public Institutions and Journalists through Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Păun

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the challenges and opportunities of social media for public institutions and argues that the designing and implementing government public relations using social media involves more than merely having another communication channel for publics. I will explain the “social media”, the differences between social media and electronic-Public Relations - E-PR, and the communication between public institutions and journalists. The interviews with journalists or with PR specialists in public institutions were focused on the use, the extent of this use, and the perceived value of various social media as sources contributing to agenda building (Cobb, Elder 1983. If journalists are regularly monitoring sites and forums for story ideas and information, it is necessary for PR professionals within each industry to carefully monitor the information placed there and perhaps engage content producers. In this paper, I conclude that social media is an alternative instrument to encourage a two-way communication channel between government and publics. In public relations, the emergence of social media challenges the traditional instruments of government public relations. Responding to the development of information and communication technology (ICT, social media is considered as an alternative communication channel of government public relations efforts.

  14. Temporal trends in pharmacology publications by pharmacy institutes: A deeper dig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Parloop Amit; Patel, Zarana

    2016-10-01

    Publications in Indian Journal of Pharmacology (IJP) are the face of contemporary pharmacology practices followed in health-care profession - a knowledge-based profession. It depicts trends in terms of quantity (proportions), quality, type (preclinical/clinical), thrust areas, etc., of pharmacology followed by biomedical community professions both nationally and internationally. This article aims to establish temporal trends in pharmacology research by pharmacy institutes in light of its publications to IJP from 2010 to 2015. The website of IJP was searched for publications year and issue wise for contributing authors from pharmacy institutions and analyzed for types of publications, their source and the categories of research documented in these publications. A total of 1034 articles were published, of which 189 (18%) articles were published by pharmacy institutes, of which 90% (n = 170) were contributed from pharmacy institutes within India whereas 10% (n = 19) from international pharmacy institutes. 75% of these were research publication, the majority of which (65%) were related to preclinical screening of phytochemical constituents from plants. With multi and interdisciplinary collaborations in pharmacy profession the trend needs to improve toward molecular and cellular pharmacology and clinical studies.

  15. Quality of Institutional Care and Early Childhood Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Paula Salgado; Fearon, R. M. Pasco; Belsky, Jay; Fachada, Inês; Soares, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Institutional rearing adversely affects children's development, but the extent to which specific characteristics of the institutional context and the quality of care provided contribute to problematic development remains unclear. In this study, 72 preschoolers institutionalised for at least 6 months were evaluated by their caregiver using the…

  16. Fostering institutional practices in support of public engagement by scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, K. M.

    2016-12-01

    Scientists are increasingly called on to communicate the findings of their research outside the scientific sphere, to members of the public, media, and/or policymakers eager for information about topics at the intersections of science and society. While all scientists share a desire for a more informed public, and for the development of evidence-based public policy, there are profound hurdles that prevent most scientists from meaningfully engaging the public. Here, I identify and discuss both internal (i.e. finite time, discomfort in public speaking and interview settings, etc) and external (metrics for promotion and tenure, scholarly reputation, etc) obstacles for public engagement. At the same time, I also discuss how recent trends in scientific practice provide clear, concrete, and compelling rewards for public engagement. Specifically, institutions of higher education have a vested interest in fostering and rewarding greater public engagement by scientists across all academic ranks. I review a variety of innovative mechanisms, both informal and formal, that institutions are employing to achieve this goal, and assess their potential impact on the engagement levels of scientists.

  17. Redistributive effects in public health care financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honekamp, Ivonne; Possenriede, Daniel

    2008-11-01

    This article focuses on the redistributive effects of different measures to finance public health insurance. We analyse the implications of different financing options for public health insurance on the redistribution of income from good to bad health risks and from high-income to low-income individuals. The financing options considered are either income-related (namely income taxes, payroll taxes, and indirect taxes), health-related (co-insurance, deductibles, and no-claim), or neither (flat fee). We show that governments who treat access to health care as a basic right for everyone should consider redistributive effects when reforming health care financing.

  18. Institutions of Civil Society Participating in Public Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga S. Belokrylova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The degree of maturity of the civil society of a country is now seen as an important indicator of the development of a socially oriented market economy. The authors explore two forms of state and civil society relations - qualitative, characterized by the diffusion of a relationship of trust in society, and quantitative, in the system of public procurement corruption identifiable pace of localization. Institutional capacity development of civil society in public relations is the simultaneous modernization of the qualitative and quantitative scope of its relationship with the state. The paper presents the mechanism of transition to a partnership model relations between the state and civil society, the most important form of which is the realization of public control, rapid formal institutionalization which has provided detection and elimination of large-scale irregularities in public procurement. Its swift formal institutionalization provided by representatives of civil society to identify and eliminate large-scale irregularities in public procurement. The experience of NGO Fund "Sodeistvie - XXI vek" to identify "blind" purchases, is offered as a tool to improve the efficiency of public control conduct free training of potential public controlles by institutions engaged in training of civil officials for the course "Management of state and municipal procurement".

  19. Institutions and Regulation for Economic Growth ? : public interests versus public incentives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wubben, E.F.M.

    2011-01-01

    Realizing institutions and regulations that foster economic growth is an essential asset for contemporary economies. This book investigates practices and options for steering individual and firm behaviour that prevents unacceptable externalities and boosts public interests. These multi-dimensional

  20. Public Action and Innovationsupport Institutions in New Technological Agglomerations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borras, Susana; Bacaria, Jordi; Fernandez-Ribas, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    In all industrial and technological agglomerations several types of public and semi-public actors coexist. The same happens with the levels of government. Consequently, the daily reality of agglomerations is characterized by a wide diversity of innovation-support institutions more or less actively...... on the major efforts of different public actors in the territory since the 1980s, mainly through the establishment and enhancement of innovation-support institutions, and analyses succinctly their effects through selected successful and failed cases. Two normative statements are suggested from the analysis...... into an open explicit option for the economic performance of the territory. The conclusions include a final plea for further research about the industrial dynamics and knowledge flows in the Vallès Occidental County, an important growth pole of Catalonia....

  1. New constitutionalism and the social reproduction of caring institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Stephen; Bakker, Isabella

    2006-01-01

    This essay analyzes neo-liberal economic agreements and legal and political frameworks or what has been called the "new constitutionalism," a governance framework that empowers market forces to reshape economic and social development worldwide. The article highlights some consequences of new constitutionalism for caring institutions specifically, and for what feminists call social reproduction more generally: the biological reproduction of the species; the reproduction of labor power; and the reproduction of social institutions and processes associated with the creation and maintenance of communities. New constitutional governance frameworks fundamentally reshape conditions under which the care of human beings takes place. Caring institutions once governed by enabling professions geared to universal care are now determined increasingly by market values and private forces, and driven directly by the profit motive. This is one of the reasons why neo-liberalism is increasingly contested in both the North and the global South.

  2. Rehabilitation between institutional and non-institutional forensic psychiatric care: important influences on the transition process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, E; Holm, M; Flensner, G

    2012-10-01

    All patients cared for in forensic psychiatric care (FPC) have some kind of psychiatric disorder and most of them have committed one or more criminal acts. One part of the patient's rehabilitation is the transition from institutional to non-institutional FPC, but a number of patients do not succeed. The aim of this study was to elucidate different caregivers' experiences of aspects that influence the patients' ability to manage this rehabilitation. A qualitative approach was chosen. Data were collected by interviews in two focus groups, each group comprising of six caregivers representing both institutional and non-institutional FPC. The transcribed interviews were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. Important aspects influencing the patients' transition described were a well-planned care plan, together with a suitable non-institutional dwelling and a tailored occupation. Other important areas were having a well-functioning and trusting social network and a good relationship with a contact person/advocate. A major barrier to a successful transition was whether the patients managed their own finances or not. It was stated that it is important that the patients participate in the care and that different authorities create individual conditions and flexible solutions. All of these factors are important to focus on when caring for patients during their stay in the institutional FPC.

  3. Public trust in Dutch health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straten, G.F.M.; Friele, R.D.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the development of a valid and reliable instrument to measure different dimensions of public trust in health care in the Netherlands. This instrument is needed because the concept was not well developed,or operationalized in earlier research. The new instrument will be used in

  4. Public trust in Dutch health care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Straten, G.F.M.; Friele, R.D.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes the development of a valid and reliable instrument to measure different dimensions of public trust in health care in the Netherlands. This instrument is needed because the concept was not well developed, or operationalized in earlier research. The new instrument will be used i

  5. Health care quality improvement publication trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gordon H; MacEachern, Mark P; Perla, Rocco J; Gaines, Jean M; Davis, Matthew M; Shrank, William H

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the extent of academic interest in quality improvement (QI) initiatives in medical practice, annual publication trends for the most well-known QI methodologies being used in health care settings were analyzed. A total of 10 key medical- and business-oriented library databases were examined: PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ABI/INFORM, and Business Source Complete. A total of 13 057 articles were identified that discuss at least 1 of 10 well-known QI concepts used in health care contexts, 8645 (66.2%) of which were classified as original research. "Total quality management" was the only methodology to demonstrate a significant decline in publication over time. "Continuous quality improvement" was the most common topic of study across all publication years, whereas articles discussing Lean methodology demonstrated the largest growth in publication volume over the past 2 decades. Health care QI publication volume increased substantially beginning in 1991.

  6. Evaluation acting: the experience of a public research institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guimaraes, Regia Ruth Ramirez; Ferreira, Hudson Rubio; Filgueiras, Sergio A. Cunha [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Planejamento Estrategico e Qualidade - PE]. E-mail: rrg@cdtn.br; hrf@cdtn.br; sacf@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    Innovation and knowledge management are central questions of the modern world economy where the incorporation of new knowledge is determining for competition. In this context, there is a movement of pression under public research institutions for a more dynamic participation on the local innovation system. The institutions of C and T should prepare to help the companies to insert in the context of open economies and also to compete in the global market. The modernity requires flexibility and organizational changes in the research institutions. Redefinitions of their practices in relation to other aspects such as: financing sources; partnership with other organizations; definition and planning of the objectives; evaluation, diffusion and valorization of the results and the establishing of a measuring system and performance indicators. Aiming at having an effective institutional insertion on the national and regional systems of innovation, the Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN reformulated its strategical planning, incorporating the view of the researchers of the Center and external experts. As part of the evaluation process, CDTN organizes an annual seminar for evaluating its projects, focused on presenting the results and also on the analysis of the performance indicators. The result of this pairs review are widely informed to the Institution and is an important tool for the critical analysis of the institutional performance and for corrections to be made by the high direction. This paper presents the methodology for evaluating the results, as well as the difficulties and improvements incorporated to the process, which has been applied for three years. (author)

  7. Evaluation of alternative institutional arrangements in public utilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermishina Anna, V.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Since early 2000s a policy of attracting private operators to public utilities, which should help to increase productivity, reduce costs, and as a result, reduce utility prices takes place in Russia. The aim of the study is to identify the relationship between institutional arrangements and pricing for water and wastewater services. Applying statistical and cluster analysis to empirical data on water utilities in 13 largest cities has revealed the differences in the level and dynamics of prices for water and wastewater services in the group of public utilities and public private water utilities. In 2011-2014 the level and growth price rates in the group of public private partnerships were higher than in group of municipal water utilities. Thus, the involvement of private operators has not yet lead to the expected reduction in prices.

  8. Institutional public private partnerships for core health services: evidence from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappellaro, Giulia; Longo, Francesco

    2011-04-19

    Public-private partnerships (PPPs) are potential instruments to enable private collaboration in the health sector. Despite theoretical debate, empirical analyses have thus far tended to focus on the contractual or project dimension, overlooking institutional PPPs, i.e., formal legal entities run by proper corporate-governance mechanisms and jointly owned by public and private parties for the provision of public-health goods. This work aims to fill this gap by carrying out a comparative analysis of the reasons for the adoption of institutional PPPs and the governance and managerial features necessary to establish them as appropriate arrangements for public-health services provisions. A qualitative analysis is carried out on experiences of institutional PPPs within the Italian National Health Service (Sistema Sanitario Nazionale, SSN). The research question is addressed through a contextual and comparative embedded case study design, assuming the entire population of PPPs (4) currently in force in one Italian region as the unit of analysis: (i) a rehabilitation hospital, (ii), an orthopaedic-centre, (iii) a primary care and ambulatory services facility, and (iv) a health- and social-care facility. Internal validity is guaranteed by the triangulation of sources in the data collection phase, which included archival and interview data. Four governance and managerial issues were found to be critical in determining the positive performance of the case examined: (i) a strategic market orientation to a specialised service area with sufficient potential demand, (ii) the allocation of public capital assets and the consistent financial involvement of the private partner, (iii) the adoption of private administrative procedures in a regulated setting while guaranteeing the respect of public administration principles, and (iv) clear regulation of the workforce to align the contracts with the organisational culture. Findings suggests that institutional PPPs enable national health

  9. Institutional public private partnerships for core health services: evidence from Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longo Francesco

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public-private partnerships (PPPs are potential instruments to enable private collaboration in the health sector. Despite theoretical debate, empirical analyses have thus far tended to focus on the contractual or project dimension, overlooking institutional PPPs, i.e., formal legal entities run by proper corporate-governance mechanisms and jointly owned by public and private parties for the provision of public-health goods. This work aims to fill this gap by carrying out a comparative analysis of the reasons for the adoption of institutional PPPs and the governance and managerial features necessary to establish them as appropriate arrangements for public-health services provisions. Methods A qualitative analysis is carried out on experiences of institutional PPPs within the Italian National Health Service (Sistema Sanitario Nazionale, SSN. The research question is addressed through a contextual and comparative embedded case study design, assuming the entire population of PPPs (4 currently in force in one Italian region as the unit of analysis: (i a rehabilitation hospital, (ii, an orthopaedic-centre, (iii a primary care and ambulatory services facility, and (iv a health- and social-care facility. Internal validity is guaranteed by the triangulation of sources in the data collection phase, which included archival and interview data. Results Four governance and managerial issues were found to be critical in determining the positive performance of the case examined: (i a strategic market orientation to a specialised service area with sufficient potential demand, (ii the allocation of public capital assets and the consistent financial involvement of the private partner, (iii the adoption of private administrative procedures in a regulated setting while guaranteeing the respect of public administration principles, and (iv clear regulation of the workforce to align the contracts with the organisational culture. Conclusions Findings

  10. Ethics of caring and the institutional ethics committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sichel, B A

    1990-01-01

    Institutional ethics committees (IECs) in health care facilities now create moral policy, provide moral education, and consult with physicians and other health care workers. After sketching reasons for the development of IECs, this paper first examines the predominant moral standards it is often assumed IECs are now using, these standards being neo-Kantian principles of justice and utilitarian principles of the greatest good. Then, it is argued that a feminine ethics of care, as posited by Carol Gilligan and Nel Noddings, is an unacknowledged basis for IEC discussions and decisions. Further, it is suggested that feminine ethics of care can and should provide underlying theoretical tools and standards for IECs.

  11. Does informal care reduce public care expenditure on elderly care? Estimates based on Finland's Age Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehusmaa, Sari; Autti-Rämö, Ilona; Helenius, Hans; Rissanen, Pekka

    2013-08-15

    To formulate sustainable long-term care policies, it is critical first to understand the relationship between informal care and formal care expenditure. The aim of this paper is to examine to what extent informal care reduces public expenditure on elderly care. Data from a geriatric rehabilitation program conducted in Finland (Age Study, n = 732) were used to estimate the annual public care expenditure on elderly care. We first constructed hierarchical multilevel regression models to determine the factors associated with elderly care expenditure. Second, we calculated the adjusted mean costs of care in four care patterns: 1) informal care only for elderly living alone; 2) informal care only from a co-resident family member; 3) a combination of formal and informal care; and 4) formal care only. We included functional independence and health-related quality of life (15D score) measures into our models. This method standardizes the care needs of a heterogeneous subject group and enabled us to compare expenditure among various care categories even when differences were observed in the subjects' physical health. Elder care that consisted of formal care only had the highest expenditure at 25,300 Euros annually. The combination of formal and informal care had an annual expenditure of 22,300 Euros. If a person received mainly informal care from a co-resident family member, then the annual expenditure was only 4,900 Euros and just 6,000 Euros for a person living alone and receiving informal care. Our analysis of a frail elderly Finnish population shows that the availability of informal care considerably reduces public care expenditure. Therefore, informal care should be taken into account when formulating policies for long-term care. The process whereby families choose to provide care for their elderly relatives has a significant impact on long-term care expenditure.

  12. What drives public health care expenditure growth? Evidence from Swiss cantons, 1970-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braendle, Thomas; Colombier, Carsten

    2016-09-01

    A better understanding of the determinants of public health care expenditures is key to designing effective health policies. We integrate demand and supply-side determinants and factors from political economy into an empirical analysis of the highly decentralized Swiss health care system and control for major health care finance reforms. We compile a novel data set of the cantonal health care expenditure in Switzerland, which currently amounts to about one fifth of total health care expenditure. We analyze the period 1970-2012 and use dynamic panel estimation methods. We find that per capita income, the unemployment rate and the share of foreigners are positively related to public health care expenditure growth. With regard to political economy aspects, public health care expenditures increase with the share of women elected to parliament. However, institutional restrictions for politicians, such as fiscal rules, do not appear to limit public health care expenditure growth. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Public-Private Partnership as Incentive Institution of Entrepreneurship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena S. Averkieva

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The interaction system of national public and private sectors institutions is becoming increasingly important in the conditions that characterize the current stage of economic development (such as globalization and post-industrialization trends, geopolitical threats, transformation of production and financial processes. Instability and the dependence of national economies from external environment factors, exposure to systemic crises increase the vulnerability of national business and require the state institutions’ activation in order to support and promote national business initiatives. In these circumstances, one of the most adequate to modern realities forms of entrepreneurial activity stimulation is the public-private partnership model, which proved to be highly effective, both in foreign countries and in Russia. The author reveals potential of public-private partnership as an institution to stimulate entrepreneurial activity by analyzing features of its organizational and management mechanism in the Russian Federation. The practical aspects of the introduction of the public-private partnership model are studied on the example of the Rostov region. The author shows that the implemented programs to encourage entrepreneurship through PPP projects have a positive effect, but at the same time remain a number of problems in the development of the business sector in Russia. The improving ways of the interaction mechanism between government and business at the regional level are identified based on the assessing results of the PPP level in Russia as a whole and in separate regions, implemented by the Association "Center for PPP development".

  14. Discrete Institutional Alternatives of Public Administration Reforms in Countries with Developed and Developing Institutional Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A. Kapoguzov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an approach to evaluation the impact of the level of development of institutional environment on the success of the reforms of public administration. The indicators that characterize the degree of development of the institutional environment, in particular, the level of protection of property rights, the development of political competition, civil society, corruption, and trust in society are shown. Depending on the elements of the political-administrative system, socio-economic features, that determine the trajectories of reforms, showing alternative purposes and characterized some indicators, that characterizing the results of reforms for the OECD-counties. Showing institutional problems is implementing reforms in the transition countries, depending on the elements of the political and administrative systems, and socio-cultural factors that determine the path of reform, showing alternative purposes and characterized by individual indicators characterizing the results of the OECD reform. From the point of view of the classification results, the emphasis is made on quantitative results of the operational type, in particular, the dynamics of the general government expenditure and the level of employment of civil servants in relation to employment in the economy as a whole. Showing institutional problems in the implementation of reforms in the transition countries, in particular the gap of development of the bureaucratic ethos, the weakness of the market environment and the insufficient level of external pressure on the quality of public services. The significance for the success of reform and systemic cultural change within the state apparatus, which affects the quality of citizens' satisfaction with public services is observed. It is noted that the preliminary formalization of the public sector, the formation of Weberian bureaucracy type is essential for successful implementation of the New Public Management. The factors that

  15. [Guideline 'Medicinal care for drug addicts in penal institutions'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Michel; de Haan, Hein A; Arends, Marleen T; van Everdingen, Jannes J E; Klazinga, Niek S

    2009-01-01

    In the Netherlands, the policy on care for prisoners who are addicted to opiates is still heterogeneous. The recent guidelines entitled 'Medicinal care for drug addicts in penal institutions' should contribute towards unambiguous and more evidence-based treatment for this group. In addition, it should improve and bring the care pathways within judicial institutions and mainstream healthcare more into line with one another. Each rational course of medicinal treatment will initially be continued in the penal institution. In penal institutions the help on offer is mainly focused on abstinence from illegal drugs while at the same time limiting the damage caused to the health of the individual user. Methadone is regarded at the first choice for maintenance therapy. For patient safety, this is best given in liquid form in sealed cups of 5 mg/ml once daily in the morning. Recently a combination preparation containing buprenorphine and naloxone - a complete opiate antagonist - has become available. On discontinuation of opiate maintenance treatment intensive follow-up care is necessary. During this period there is considerable risk of a potentially lethal overdose. Detoxification should be coupled with psychosocial or medicinal intervention aimed at preventing relapse. Naltrexone is currently the only available opiate antagonist for preventing relapse. In those addicted to opiates, who also take benzodiazepines without any indication, it is strongly recommended that these be reduced and discontinued. This can be achieved by converting the regular dosage into the equivalent in diazepam and then reducing this dosage by a maximum of 25% a week.

  16. Residents′ Acceptance of Basic Public Health Services Offered by Community Health Care Institutions in Changzhou%常州市居民对基层卫生机构提供基本公共卫生服务的接受情况调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昊翰; 励晓红; 郝超; 吕军; 薛娅; 陈珉惺; 徐汉波; 张引; 郝模

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解常州居民对基层医疗卫生机构提供基本公共卫生服务的接受情况.方法 采用立意抽样调查,询问常州市城乡居民对各级医疗卫生机构在费用、可及性、服务态度、与医生的熟悉程度以及医疗技术五个维度上的评价,对基层机构提供基本公共卫生服务的接受意愿,对社区卫生服务站提供基本公共卫生服务的参与程度等.结果 居民对基层机构在费用、可及性、服务态度、与医生的熟悉程度四个维度的评价最好;90%以上的居民对基层机构所提供基本公共卫生服务的接受意向较好;86.00%的居民曾较好地参与社区卫生服务站所提供的基本公共卫生服务.结论 基层机构已具备提供基本公共卫生服务所需要的特征,居民对基层机构提供基本公共卫生服务的接受情况较好,但城乡居民间存在差别,基层机构和部分服务还有完善的空间.%Objective To find out the acceptance situation of the residents to basic public health services offered by community health care institutions in Changzhou. Methods The purposive sampling was taken to investigate 629 residents about their evaluation on different level of medical institutions in terms of health cost, accessibility, service attitude, acquaintance with doctors and medical skills; and their acceptance of and participation in the basic public health services offered by community health care institutions. Results The residents' evaluation on community health care institutions in terms of health cost, accessibility, service attitude, and acquaintance with doctors was the best; and more than 90% of the residents had a better intention to accept the basic public health services, and 86.00% of the residents had ever accepted the basic public health services. Conclusion Community health care institutions already have the advantages to offer the public health services, and basic public health services are well accepted by the

  17. Institutional and Individual Autonomy: Investigating Predictors of Attitudes toward Institutional Care in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xinping; Zhan, Heying Jenny; Liu, Guangya

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the institutional and attitudinal changes in elder care homes in Tianjin, China. Based on a survey conducted in 2001 with 61 elder home managers and 265 elder residents, this study examines 1) factors that influence elder home managers' views about elder home development and 2) elders' evaluation of elder home quality and their…

  18. Developing a Comprehensive Animal Care Occupational Health and Safety Program at a Land-Grant Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodly, Lyndon J; Jarrell, Vickie L; Miller, Monica A; Banks, Maureen C; Anderson, Thomas J; Branson, Katherine A; Woodward, Robert T; Peper, Randall L; Myers, Sara J

    2016-01-01

    The Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals and sound ethical practices require institutions to provide safe working environments for personnel working with animals; this mandate is achieved in part by establishing an effective animal care Occupational Health and Safety Program (OHSP). Land-grant institutions often face unique organizational challenges in fulfilling this requirement. For example, responsibilities for providing health and safety programs often have historically been dispersed among many different divisions scattered around the campus. Here we describe how our institutional management personnel overcame organizational structure and cultural obstacles during the formation of a comprehensive campus-wide animal care OHSP. Steps toward establishing the animal care OHSP included assigning overall responsibility, identifying all stakeholders, creating a leadership group, and hiring a fulltime Animal Care OHSP Specialist. A web-based portal was developed, implemented, and refined over the past 7 y and reflected the unique organizational structures of the university and the needs of our research community. Through this web-based portal, hazards are identified, risks are assessed, and training is provided. The animal care OHSP now provides easy mandatory enrollment, supports timely feedback regarding hazards, and affords enrollees the opportunity to participate in voluntary medical surveillance. The future direction and development of the animal care OHSP will be based on the research trends of campus, identification of emerging health and safety hazards, and ongoing evaluation and refinement of the program.

  19. Public trust in health care: a comparison of Germany, the Netherlands, and England and Wales.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schee, E. van der; Braun, B.; Calnan, M.; Schnee, M.; Groenewegen, P.P.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes public trust in health care in three European countries. Public trust is a generalised attitude, influenced by people's experiences in contacts with representatives of institutions, in its turn influencing how people enter these contacts. In general, people in Germany have les

  20. Institutional regime of public-private participation in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Schiavi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently enacted legislation on Public Private Partnerships in Uruguay provides a new institutional framework for the designing, structuring and subscription of contracts in ppp projects. Among its provisions, the new statute allocates competences to different administrative bodies for the execution, regulation and control of PPP s. Later administrative regulations were also adopted to facilitate the implementation and execution of this type of contracts. The present article studies these reforms, in order to provide a better understanding of the role played by the Technical Commission of the PPP Unit.

  1. No Policy for Public Private Partnership? PPP, Collaboration and Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup Christensen, Lene; Greve, Carsten

    infrastructure projects and public service provision contracts in the transport sector within roads and busses, bridges and tunnels, rail, airports and aviation and harbors. The projects will be categorized in relation to organizational and financial models and it leads to a. discussion of types of policy...... choices across the sector and the reasons behind whether or not PPP was chosen. The final part of the paper presents an institutional historical account of the Danish case, and focuses on the more general question of how PPP policy planning evolves. There is no direct step from privatization...

  2. Perceptions on the Effectiveness of Communication between Public Institutions and Journalists through Social Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mihaela Păun

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the challenges and opportunities of social media for public institutions and argues that the designing and implementing government public relations using social media involves...

  3. 75 FR 10561 - Request for Public Comment: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, Community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... Community Development Financial Institutions Fund Request for Public Comment: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund, Community Development Financial and Technical Assistance Awards, Native Initiatives, and Bank Enterprise Awards AGENCY: Community Development Financial Institutions Fund,...

  4. Opportunities for Palliative Care in Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lima, Liliana; Pastrana, Tania

    2016-01-01

    In May 2014, the World Health Assembly, of the World Health Organization (WHO), unanimously adopted a palliative care (PC) resolution, which outlines clear recommendations to the United Nations member states, such as including PC in national health policies and in the undergraduate curricula for health care professionals, and highlights the critical need for countries to ensure that there is an adequate supply of essential PC medicines, especially those needed to alleviate pain. This resolution also carries great challenges: Every year over 20 million patients (of which 6% are children) need PC at the end of life (EOL). However, in 2011, approximately three million patients received PC, and only one in ten people in need is currently receiving it. We describe this public health situation and systems failure, the history and evolution of PC, and the components of the WHO public health model. We propose a role for public health for PC integration in community settings to advance PC and relieve suffering in the world.

  5. Public trust in health care : Exploring the mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schee, E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to investigate how public trust in health care is formed, by studying the mechanisms behind it, addressing the following research question: ‘Which mechanisms explain differences in public trust in health care?’. Public trust in health care is important. Low levels of trust

  6. Workforce diversity and community-responsive health-care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nivet, Marc A; Berlin, Anne

    2014-01-01

    While the levers for the social determinants of health reside largely outside institutional walls, this does not absolve health professional schools from exercising their influence to improve the communities in which they are located. Fulfilling this charge will require a departure from conventional thinking, particularly when it comes to educating future health professionals. We describe efforts within medical education to transform recruitment, admissions, and classroom environments to emphasize diversity and inclusion. The aim is to cultivate a workforce with the perspectives, aptitudes, and skills needed to fuel community-responsive health-care institutions.

  7. Framing the Problem of Radioactive Waste: Public and Institutional Perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, Jane [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom). Centre for the Study of Environmental Change

    2001-07-01

    Public acceptability has been the rock on which radioactive waste management plans have foundered in many countries. As a response to this, public consultation, information provision, and transparency have been recognised as necessary elements for successful development and implementation of management plans. However, the actual practice of public consultation, in many cases, fails to adequately incorporate the significance of questioning the ways in which the problem is defined, the issues that are important, and the overall 'framing' of the problem. Public framing generally differs substantially from the way in which the problem is understood by those institutions responsible for its management; further, there are differences in the ways in which different publics frame issues. These public differences may or may not be attributable to demographic factors, but are closely related to the problem context - that is, the history of relationships, structural conditions, and the cultural resources available to make sense of the issues. The author argues that it is crucial that public framing(s) are adequately taken into account in developing management initiatives, so that policies reflect these different understandings, and thus have more social purchase, in line with Grove-White and Wynne's argument that in order for radioactive waste management to become a solvable problem, it is necessary to generate social ownership of the problem. However, traditional, and even many novel, consultation processes do not comprehensively address the issue of framing, but reproduce assumptions about the nature of the problem and how it should be addressed. These assumptions are present in, for example, the institutional arrangements and scientific and technical agendas. The author reports on a project undertaken this year with Nirex entitled 'The Front of the Front End' which used repeat focus groups to directly elicit the ways in which different publics

  8. Research and Policv Suggestions on Division and Cooperation Mechanism between Public Hospitals and Grass-roots Health Care Institutions%公立医院与基层医疗卫生机构分工协作机制研究及政策建议

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆琳; 马进

    2011-01-01

    运用参与式快速评估方法.探索如何建立连续、协调的两级医疗卫生服务体系,以提升卫生资源的整体利用效率,并就推动公立医院与基层医疗卫生机构有效开展分工和协作提出政策建议.%Through using participative rapid assessment, the effective ways of establishing integrated and coordinated two-tiered health care system are explored for the purpose of improving utilization efficiency of overall health resources. Policy suggestions on promoting division and cooperation between public hospitals and grass-roots health care institutions are proposed.

  9. Public trust in health care : a performance indicator?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schee, Evelien van der; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Friele, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – If public trust in health care is to be used as a performance indicator for health care systems, its measurement has to be sensitive to changes in the health care system. For this purpose, this study has monitored public trust in health care in The Netherlands over an eight-year period, fr

  10. Quality of Health Care Activity in Educational Institutions: Conceptual Aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Tretyakova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with one of the priority tasks of Russian educational system – developing the health responsibility. The recent health deterioration trend among children and adolescents calls for the complex health care measures, equally affecting the learning outcomes. The authors argue that there is a need for proper definition and specification of the key term of health care quality. However, the analysis of the available scientific and documentary recourses demonstrates the absence of such unified definition. The authors describe the existing approaches to defining the health care quality, and examine structural components of the health care activity, their interrelations and interdependence. In authors’ opinion, the synthesis of the available research materials provides the basis for further studies in the theory and practice of quality management activities regarding the health protection of children, adolescents and young adults in educational institutions

  11. Quality of Health Care Activity in Educational Institutions: Conceptual Aspect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Tretyakova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with one of the priority tasks of Russian educational system – developing the health responsibility. The recent health deterioration trend among children and adolescents calls for the complex health care measures, equally affecting the learning outcomes. The authors argue that there is a need for proper definition and specification of the key term of health care quality. However, the analysis of the available scientific and documentary recourses demonstrates the absence of such unified definition. The authors describe the existing approaches to defining the health care quality, and examine structural components of the health care activity, their interrelations and interdependence. In authors’ opinion, the synthesis of the available research materials provides the basis for further studies in the theory and practice of quality management activities regarding the health protection of children, adolescents and young adults in educational institutions

  12. Can Internationalisation Really Lead to Institutional Competitive Advantage?--A Study of 16 Dutch Public Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haan, Haijing

    2014-01-01

    Public higher education institutions (PHEIs) have widely acknowledged a positive relationship between internationalization and their institutional competitive advantage enhancement. Although some concerns have been raised by practitioners and researchers about whether institutional competitive advantage can be enhanced given the current ways of…

  13. Can Internationalisation Really Lead to Institutional Competitive Advantage?--A Study of 16 Dutch Public Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Haan, Haijing

    2014-01-01

    Public higher education institutions (PHEIs) have widely acknowledged a positive relationship between internationalization and their institutional competitive advantage enhancement. Although some concerns have been raised by practitioners and researchers about whether institutional competitive advantage can be enhanced given the current ways of…

  14. Social media in public health care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kim Normann; Medaglia, Rony; Henriksen, Helle Zinner

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the impacts of social media use in Danish public health care with respect to capabilities, interactions, orientations, and value distribution. Taking an exploratory approach, the paper draws on an array of quantitative and qualitative data, and puts forward four propositions......: social media transform the access to health-related information for patients and general practitioners, the uptake of social media can be a cost driver rather than a cost saver, social media provide empowerment to patients, and the uptake of social media is hindered by legal and privacy concerns...

  15. Online Communication And PR in Romanian Public Administration. The Case Study of Public Institutions From Transylvania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delia Cristina BALABAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available New technologies such as Internet and new media introduce new challenges for public communication. Private companies from Romania use in a very creative way the new tools of Web 2.0, such as social media. In the Romanian public sector, especially in the public administration there are important steps taken towards a modern communication. Based on the example of over 40 city halls, city councils, prefectures and county councils from Transylvania, the present paper analyzes the use of new media tools in public communication by applying content analysis and in-depth interviews with the PR representatives in those institutions in two stages, 2011 and 2015. The most important advantages of online communication in public administration are high speed, cost reduction, reaching young audiences, etc. Nevertheless, there are also critical voices that express possible risks such as exclusion of audience groups that have no online media literacy.

  16. The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute: Building Competencies for Public Health Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luck, Jeff; Yoon, Jangho; Bernell, Stephanie; Tynan, Michael; Alvarado, Carla Sarai; Eversole, Tom; Mosbaek, Craig; Beathard, Candice

    2015-08-01

    The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute (PHPI) was designed to enhance public health policy competencies among state and local health department staff. The Oregon Health Authority funded the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University to develop the PHPI curriculum in 2012 and offer it to participants from 4 state public health programs and 5 local health departments in 2013. The curriculum interspersed short instructional sessions on policy development, implementation, and evaluation with longer hands-on team exercises in which participants applied these skills to policy topics their teams had selected. Panel discussions provided insights from legislators and senior Oregon health experts. Participants reported statistically significant increases in public health policy competencies and high satisfaction with PHPI overall.

  17. The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute: Building Competencies for Public Health Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jangho; Bernell, Stephanie; Tynan, Michael; Alvarado, Carla Sarai; Eversole, Tom; Mosbaek, Craig; Beathard, Candice

    2015-01-01

    The Oregon Public Health Policy Institute (PHPI) was designed to enhance public health policy competencies among state and local health department staff. The Oregon Health Authority funded the College of Public Health and Human Sciences at Oregon State University to develop the PHPI curriculum in 2012 and offer it to participants from 4 state public health programs and 5 local health departments in 2013. The curriculum interspersed short instructional sessions on policy development, implementation, and evaluation with longer hands-on team exercises in which participants applied these skills to policy topics their teams had selected. Panel discussions provided insights from legislators and senior Oregon health experts. Participants reported statistically significant increases in public health policy competencies and high satisfaction with PHPI overall. PMID:26066925

  18. Alternative financing sources. ECRI. Emergency Care Research Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    A number of new capital sources have been developed and used by health care institutions unable to finance high-tech projects with equity or conventional tax-exempt debt instruments; these include REITs, MLPs, per-use rentals, venture capital, and banks as brokers. However, there are no magic capital acquisition solutions. Institutions with good credit will continue to find a number of doors open to them; poorer credit risks will have fewer options, and those available will carry greater risk, allow for less provider control over projects, and limit potential return on investment to some extent. It is essential to examine carefully the drawbacks inherent in each type of alternative financing source. Venture capital in particular requires specific analysis because of the wide variety of possible arrangements that exist. If you cannot find either traditional or alternative sources of funding for a proposed project, you should reexamine the project and its underlying utilization projections and reimbursement assumptions.

  19. Value-added service in health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umiker, W

    1996-12-01

    In today's highly competitive atmosphere, the survival of health care institutions depends largely on the ability to provide value-added services (VAS) at the lowest possible cost. Managers must identify their customers and delineate the needs and expectation of those customers. A strategy for satisfying these needs and expectations is essential. While technical advances and reasonable charges are important, a successful "high-tech," "high touch" approach demands the combination of process reengineering and employee training in customer relations.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Public and Private Educational Institutions: A Case Study of District Vehari-Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awan, Abdul Ghafoor; Zia, Asma

    2015-01-01

    Education is necessary for the personality grooming of individual. There are different types of institutions available like private and public institutions, technical institutions, and madrasas (religious institutions). These institutes are having the triangle of three main pillars; consisted of Teachers, Students, and Curriculum. There are two…

  1. Health care, quality certification and institutional support: a focus on primary health care in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Thomaz Gonzaga da Matta-Machado

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To provide an overview of the distribution of institutional support in primary care in Brazil and to identify associations between the activities of institutional support and the outcome of the certification of the National Programme for Improving Access and Quality in Primary Health Care (PMAQ. Materials and methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted through interviews with 16 960 profes- sionals in Brazil in 2012. To examine the relationship between the received support and the quality of health care it was made a multiple binary logistic regression. Results. A positive relationship between high-level support and certification in the sub-dimensions analyzed was observed: women and child care, diabetes mellitus/ hypertension and mental health. The support activities which contributed most were: self-assessment, shared assessment, targeted workshops and training. Conclusion. Institutional support activities have helped to improve the quality and access of the population to healthcare in the country.

  2. Public Engagement with the Lunar and Planetary Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaner, Andrew; Shupla, Christine; Smith Hackler, Amanda; Buxner, Sanlyn; Wenger, Matthew; Joseph, Emily C. S.

    2016-10-01

    The Lunar and Planetary Institute's (LPI) public engagement programs target audiences of all ages and backgrounds; in 2016 LPI has expanded its programs to reach wider, more diverse audiences. The status, resources, and findings of these programs, including evaluation results, will be discussed in this poster. LPI's Cosmic Explorations Speaker Series (CESS) is an annual public speaker series to engage the public in space science and exploration. Each thematic series includes four to five presentations held between September and May. Past series' titles have included "Science" on the Silver Screen, The Universe is Out to Get Us and What We Can (or Can't) Do About It, and A User's Guide to the Universe: You Live Here. Here's What You Need to Know. While the presentations are available online after the event, they are now being livestreamed to be accessible to a broader national, and international, audience. Sky Fest events, held four to five times a year, have science content themes and include several activities for children and their parents, night sky viewing through telescopes, and scientist presentations. Themes include both planetary and astronomy topics as well as planetary exploration topics (e.g., celebrating the launch or landing of a spacecraft). Elements of the Sky Fest program are being conducted in public libraries serving audiences underrepresented in STEM near LPI. These programs take place as part of existing hour-long programs in the library. During this hour, young people, typically 6-12 years old, move through three stations where they participate in hands-on activities. Like Sky Fest, these programs are thematic, centered on one over-arching topic such as the Moon or Mars. Beginning in Fall 2016, LPI will present programs at a revitalized park in downtown Houston. Facilities at this park will enable LPI to bring both the Sky Fest and CESS programs into the heart of Houston, which is one of the most diverse cities in the US and the world.

  3. Perceptions on the Effectiveness of Communication between Public Institutions and Journalists through Social Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mihaela Păun

    2009-01-01

    ... more than merely having another communication channel for publics. I will explain the “social media”, the differences between social media and electronic-Public Relations - E-PR, and the communication between public institutions and journalists...

  4. PARTICULARITIES CONCERNING THE CREATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARKETING MIX IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Sica STANCIU

    2010-01-01

    The marketing mix is the essential instrument in implementing marketing in the public sector. This paper brings into evidence the particularities of conceiving, elaborating and applying the marketing mix in public institutions. The particularities of the marketing mix that is applied in public institutions are imposed, on one hand, by the role played by the public institution and the place it occupies in the contemporary society and, on the other hand, by the objectives it defines by its mark...

  5. PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS IN MALAYSIA: COMPETING, COMPLEMENTARY OR CROSSBREEDS AS EDUCATION PROVIDERS

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Chang Da

    2007-01-01

    Delivery of higher education used to be exclusive to the public sector in Malaysia. However, legislative changes made in 1996 led to the coexistence of public and private higher education institutions. In 2007, there were 20 public universities compared to more than 500 private institutions, of which 30 are currently categorised as universities or university colleges. Looking at their respective roles as higher education providers, public and private institutions display characteristics of be...

  6. The public finance of medical and dental care in Newfoundland--some historical and economic considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, M C

    1981-04-01

    The article discusses the evolution of Newfoundland's health care system from the turn of the century to the present. During this time there were considerable changes in social conditions, political arrangements and the availability of public monies, all of which influenced the structure of the health care sector. In general terms, Newfoundland's health care system shifted from one involving low expenditures and many British type institutions to one involving high expenditures and American type institutions. The evidence suggests that the changes have been particularly beneficial for Newfoundland's merchant class, including the doctors and dentists, although some benefits have also accrued to patients and fishermen.

  7. Inventory of drug samples in a health care institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Geneviève; Bussières, Jean-François; Tardif, Lyne; Bailey, Benoît

    2009-07-01

    Few data exist on the presence of drug samples in health care facilities. Although the use of drug samples has potential benefits, this practice is also controversial, as it can contribute to non-optimal drug use. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inventory of drug samples in a health care institution and to determine compliance with existing policies and procedures. This descriptive observational study was conducted in a university hospital centre from October 18 to November 1, 2007. A standardized data collection form was used for a physical inventory, which was intended to identify all drug samples available in the institution. The following information was recorded: number of locations where drug samples were found, primary patient care activity performed at each location, number of storage areas in the location, type of storage, presence of a lock, location of the key (if a lock was present), medical specialty, number of physicians and nurses likely to use the samples, reasons given for handing out samples, presence of a designated person to manage the samples, physical inventory (i.e., various details for each distribution unit), and declaration of samples to the pharmacy department. The inventory was conducted by 2 research assistants during day shifts. A total of 84 locations were included in the inventory, and drug samples were found in 21 locations (with a total of 31 storage areas). All of the locations were intended for ambulatory patients (outpatient clinics and day centres). No drug samples were found in inpatient care units. The drug samples, which came from 62 different pharmaceutical companies, represented a total of 159 generic entities and 266 different brands. Of the distribution units for drug samples that were identified during this inventory, 59% were not on the hospital's local formulary. Furthermore, only 3.5% of the distribution units had been declared to the pharmacy department, in accordance with established policy. The

  8. Reliability of public institutions in the transition of Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonida Drogu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The problem of dishonesty and distrust is often unclear phenomena in Eastern Europe. These are common issues discussed not only in print media and television, but also social environments as well. Corruption, so unfair advantage, lies, deceit and abuse of trust are mentioned frequently during the last decades a" er the change of system in the region, especially in Balkan Peninsula. Although dishonesty and distrust (+ corruption have existed in the previous system, however, they have been hidden phenomena or issues for which there is talk in this system. Research in terms of honesty and trust include a more areas in different sectors. International literature on the subject focuses on two fundamental topics. One of which is his faith and relationship with social capital. What do some of these concepts mean in our perception? What are the benefits and harmful effects of faith and are those connected with social equity and democratic consolidation? The search for this topic is interdisciplinary because it includes political sciences, social sciences, political, legal or sociologic-and those of anthropology. As a result this thesis will provide comparative scale impasse that creates two realities of different social complexity, from the countries that have experienced the post-socialist transition, belief in family and society that retains a holding in the operations of public institutions and may create difficulties to succeed the efforts to implement the law impartially. In conclusion: Corruption is an unreliable source, which comprises behavior and violates the trust placed on official- and public officials. It includes the use of public positions for personal benefit and it creates an ill infrastructure for fragile democracies.

  9. The effectiveness of institutional youth care over the past three decades: a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J.W. de Swart; H. van den Broek; G.J.J.M. Stams; J.J. Asscher; P.H. van der Laan; G.A. Holsbrink-Engels; G.H.P. van der Helm

    2012-01-01

    A meta-analysis of 27 controlled studies, including 17,038 youth, was conducted to examine the effectiveness of institutional youth care over the past three decades. We compared institutional evidence-based treatment (EBT) with non-institutional EBT, institutional care as usual (CAU) with non-instit

  10. 9 CFR 2.31 - Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Institutional Animal Care and Use..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ANIMAL WELFARE REGULATIONS Research Facilities § 2.31 Institutional Animal Care and... Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC), qualified through the experience and expertise of...

  11. 77 FR 59222 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: NPS Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-26

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: NPS Institutional Animal Care and... Submission) used by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (NPS IACUC/the Committee) to ensure... in use without an OMB Control Number. Title: NPS Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee...

  12. 78 FR 9729 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: NPS Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... National Park Service Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request: NPS Institutional Animal Care and... Submission, Exhibitor, Annual Review, and Amendment Forms) used by the Institutional Animal Care and Use... collection is currently in use without an OMB Control Number. Title: NPS Institutional Animal Care and...

  13. PARTICULARITIES CONCERNING THE CREATION AND IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MARKETING MIX IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sica STANCIU

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The marketing mix is the essential instrument in implementing marketing in the public sector. This paper brings into evidence the particularities of conceiving, elaborating and applying the marketing mix in public institutions. The particularities of the marketing mix that is applied in public institutions are imposed, on one hand, by the role played by the public institution and the place it occupies in the contemporary society and, on the other hand, by the objectives it defines by its marketing strategy. The tactic by which the marketing strategy is applied refers to the optimum combination of at least four controllable variables (service/product, tariff/price, distribution and promotion accomplished by the public institution. The analysis of the classic marketing mix components – used in the public institution – allows the underlining of the significant aspects that improve the public institution activity, as well as its image in the future.

  14. Determinants of institutional care at older ages in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elina Einiö

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available With growing pressure from an ageing population on social and health-care expenditure, it is of policy importance to analyze the reasons for admission to long-term institutional care at older ages. Although there is increasing evidence that cognitive and functional disabilities are not the only major risk factors, and that the social situation and the lack of family members play an important role in explaining admissions, further research is needed. There is a lack of evidence on the effects of a spouse’s death, and previous findings on how income is associated with institutional care are inconsistent, and results on poor housing are seldom available. Furthermore, there is little systematic evidence showing how chronic medical conditions other than dementia affect the risk of admission in the general older population. This study used population-based register data on Finnish older adults aged 65 and over (n=280,722 to analyse individual-level determinants of admission to long-term institutional care from January 1998 to September 2003. The main focus was on how chronic medical conditions, household income and other socio-economic factors, living with a spouse, and the death of a spouse were associated with admissions. The results of the study indicated that dementia, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, depressive symptoms, other mental-health problems, hip fracture, and diabetes were strongly associated with an increased risk of admission when socio-demographic confounders and co-morbid conditions were controlled for. It was also shown that older men and women in the lowest household-income quintile group were more likely to be admitted to institutional care than those in the highest group, when age, first language, and area characteristics were accounted for. Controlling further for living arrangements and other socio-economic and chronic medical conditions markedly reduced these income differences in admission, but they still remained significant

  15. Research into care quality criteria for long-term care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Liang; Chang, Hong-Jer; Liu, An-Chi; Chen, Yu-Wen

    2007-12-01

    The purpose of this paper was to determine the criteria that reflect the quality of care provided by long-term care institutions. Research was conducted using a two-step procedure that first utilized the SERVQUAL model with Fuzzy Delphi Method to establish the proper criteria by which service quality could be measured. A total of 200 questionnaires were mailed to expert respondents, of which 89 were returned and 77 deemed valid for use in this study. We then applied the Multi-Criteria Decision Making Process to determine the degree of importance of each criterion to long-term care institution service quality planning work. Secondly, 200 questionnaires were distributed and 74 valid responses were returned. Based on the 5 SERVQUAL model constructs, this study found 17 of the 28 criteria, to be pertinent to nursing care quality, with those in the Responsiveness and Empathy domains being the ones most critical.

  16. Identification of patient's requirements in quality management system in health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaźmierczak, Daniel; Bogusz-Czerniewicz, Marta

    2011-12-16

    To present the solutions implemented in health care institution in the context of identification of patient's requirements, and evaluation of the level of patients' satisfaction in accordance with the requirements of ISO norm 9001:2008 based on the experience of GPCC. The fundamental mechanisms behind the free market, such as competition, start applying also to the public health sector. Health service providers are gradually realising that patients are actual clients of health care institutions, with physicians, nurses, supporting personnel, registration officers and other staff responding to patients demand for medical and auxiliary services (e.g. exam registration, provision of information). PN-EN ISO 9001:2009 "Quality Management Systems. Requirements", relevant literature and documentation of quality management system from the GPCC. The review of relevant literature and legal requirements; interpretation of provisions in relation to the functioning of health care institutions. Model of identification of patient's requirements and satisfaction in accordance with the requirements of ISO 9001:2008 has been elaborated and implemented in the GPCC. The identification of patient's requirements is much more complicated than evaluating the same parameters in manufacturing companies. In the context of medical services one should be aware of the subjectivity of patient's feelings, the psycho-social status and the general state of health during his or her treatment. Therefore, the identification of patient's requirements and satisfaction must be carefully thought out, implemented and regularly improved.

  17. Ensuring due process in the IACUC and animal welfare setting: considerations in developing noncompliance policies and procedures for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Barbara C; Gografe, Sylvia; Pritt, Stacy; Jen, Kai-Lin Catherine; McWhirter, Camille A; Barman, Susan M; Comuzzie, Anthony; Greene, Molly; McNulty, Justin A; Michele, Daniel Eugene; Moaddab, Naz; Nelson, Randall J; Norris, Karen; Uray, Karen D; Banks, Ron; Westlund, Karin N; Yates, Bill J; Silverman, Jerald; Hansen, Kenneth D; Redman, Barbara

    2017-08-15

    Every institution that is involved in research with animals is expected to have in place policies and procedures for the management of allegations of noncompliance with the Animal Welfare Act and the U.S. Public Health Service Policy on the Humane Care and Use of Laboratory Animals. We present here a model set of recommendations for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials to ensure appropriate consideration of allegations of noncompliance with federal Animal Welfare Act regulations that carry a significant risk or specific threat to animal welfare. This guidance has 3 overarching aims: 1) protecting the welfare of research animals; 2) according fair treatment and due process to an individual accused of noncompliance; and 3) ensuring compliance with federal regulations. Through this guidance, the present work seeks to advance the cause of scientific integrity, animal welfare, and the public trust while recognizing and supporting the critical importance of animal research for the betterment of the health of both humans and animals.-Hansen, B. C., Gografe, S., Pritt, S., Jen, K.-L. C., McWhirter, C. A., Barman, S. M., Comuzzie, A., Greene, M., McNulty, J. A., Michele, D. E., Moaddab, N., Nelson, R. J., Norris, K., Uray, K. D., Banks, R., Westlund, K. N., Yates, B. J., Silverman, J., Hansen, K. D., Redman, B. Ensuring due process in the IACUC and animal welfare setting: considerations in developing noncompliance policies and procedures for institutional animal care and use committees and institutional officials. © FASEB.

  18. Polarized stakeholders and institutional vulnerabilities: the enduring politics of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Daniel; Rocco, Philip; Waddan, Alex

    2015-04-01

    We conducted a comparative study of how state-level political stakeholders affected the implementation of 3 major reforms within the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Our goal was to analyze the effects of policy legacy, institutional fragmentation, and public sentiments on state obstruction of the reform. We gathered quantitative and qualitative evidence to generate cross-case comparisons of state implementation of 3 reform streams within the ACA: health insurance exchanges, Medicaid expansion, and regulatory reform. Our sources included secondary literature, analysis of official decisions, and background interviews with experts and public officials. We found that state-level opponents of the ACA were most likely to be successful in challenging reforms with few preexisting policy legacies, high institutional fragmentation, and negative public sentiments. Reforms that built on existing state legislation, avoided state veto points or offered lucrative fiscal incentives, and elicited less negative public reaction were less likely to be contested. Our findings point to the importance of institutional design for the role of political stakeholders in implementing reforms to improve the cost, quality, and availability of medical treatments. Although other research has found that political polarization has shaped early ACA outcomes, comparative analysis suggests political stakeholders have had the highest effect on reforms that were particularly vulnerable. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Institutional Care for Long-Term Mechanical Ventilation in Canada: A National Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Rose

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: No national Canadian data define resource requirements and care delivery for ventilator-assisted individuals (VAIs requiring long-term institutional care. Such data will assist in planning health care services to this population.

  20. Multiple Institutional Logics in Health Care : 'Productive Ward: Releasing Time to Care'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Judith; Boselie, Paul|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/177012277; Paauwe, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    Health care organizations are often confronted with multiple institutional logics. In this study, a longitudinal case study method was used to gain insights into the adoption decision-making and implementation process of an apparently hybrid innovative practice when multiple logics are present. The

  1. Patenting and the Transfer of Knowledge from Public Research Institutions to Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Marie F

    2006-01-01

    This thesis has its point of departure in the changes in research policy that have happened in Europe lately. The focus is on the Danish Act on inventions at public research institutions, which provide public research institutions with an opportunity to patent research results. The objective of the Act is to increase the transfer of research results to industry. This thesis investigates if patents of public research institutions have a positive impact on technology transfer, an assumption tha...

  2. Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicine Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-06-2-0031 TITLE: Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A... Diabetes Institute of the Walter Reed Health Care System and Joslin Telemedicie PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Robert A. Vigersky, COL MC...COVERED (From - To) 10 Mar 2006 – 9 Mar 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Diabetes Care and Treatment Project: A Diabetes Institute

  3. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  4. Comparing Academic Library Spending with Public Libraries, Public K-12 Schools, Higher Education Public Institutions, and Public Hospitals between 1998-2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzi, John J.

    2012-01-01

    This study compares the overall spending trends and patterns of growth of Academic Libraries with Public Libraries, K-12 schools, higher education institutions, and hospitals in the period of 1998 to 2008. Academic Libraries, while showing a growth of 13% over inflation for the period, far underperformed the growth of the other public institutions…

  5. Medicaid managed care for mental health services: the survival of safety net institutions in rural settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willging, Cathleen E; Waitzkin, Howard; Nicdao, Ethel

    2008-09-01

    Few accounts document the rural context of mental health safety net institutions (SNIs), especially as they respond to changing public policies. Embedded in wider processes of welfare state restructuring, privatization has transformed state Medicaid systems nationwide. We carried out an ethnographic study in two rural, culturally distinct regions of New Mexico to assess the effects of Medicaid managed care (MMC) and the implications for future reform. After 160 interviews and participant observation at SNIs, we analyzed data through iterative coding procedures. SNIs responded to MMC by nonparticipation, partnering, downsizing, and tapping into alternative funding sources. Numerous barriers impaired access under MMC: service fragmentation, transportation, lack of cultural and linguistic competency, Medicaid enrollment, stigma, and immigration status. By privatizing Medicaid and contracting with for-profit managed care organizations, the state placed additional responsibilities on "disciplined" providers and clients. Managed care models might compromise the rural mental health safety net unless the serious gaps and limitations are addressed in existing services and funding.

  6. [Ethical dilemmas in public health care organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda Vicandi, M

    2014-01-01

    Today you can ask if you can apply ethics to organizations because much of the greater overall impact decisions are not made by private individuals, are decided by organizations. Any organization is legitimate because it satisfies a need of society and this legitimacy depends if the organization does with quality. To offer a good service, quality service, organizations know they need to do well, but seem to forget that should do well not only instrumental level, must also make good on the ethical level. Public health care organizations claim to promote attitudes and actions based on ethics, level of their internal functioning and level of achievement of its goals, but increased awareness and analysis of its inner workings can question it. Such entities, for its structure and procedures, may make it difficult for ethical standards actually govern its operation, also can have negative ethical consequences at the population level. A healthcare organization must not be organized, either structurally or functionally, like any other organization that offers services. In addition, members of the organization can not simply be passive actors. It is necessary that operators and users have more pro-ethical behaviors. Operators from the professionalism and users from liability. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Institutional Accountability and Competition for Resources in Undergraduate Education among U.S. Public Four-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akey, Lynn D.

    2012-01-01

    With a growing concern that society's needs are not being met, there are heightened expectations for accountability for public purposes. At the same time higher education institutions are experiencing increasing competition, as well as decreasing state support for public higher education. The concern is that competition for resources is overtaking…

  8. Foster care as a viable alternative to institutional care in the Middle East: community acceptance and stigma across type of placement in Jordan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Michael J; Brewer, Kathryne B; Schwalbe, Craig S J; Gearing, Robin E; Ibrahim, Rawan W; Batayneh, Jude; Darwish, Dua'a M; Al-Kharabsheh, Jihad; Al-Zu'bi, Mu'ayad H

    2012-07-01

    Utilizing an experimental vignette design, this study assessed attitudes in the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan toward the implementation of foster care as an alternative to institutions for children in need of care and protection. A sample of 111 adults were surveyed in Amman and presented with a vignette describing a 14-year-old boy who came into the care of the Ministry of Social Development when he was a baby after being placed by the grandfather because of shame surrounding the mother being unwed. The vignettes systematically varied as to whether the child was described as raised in an orphanage, with a relative in a kinship foster placement, or with a nonkin foster family. Participants were then asked a series of questions about their acceptance of the child, stigma that the community might attach to the child, and potential outcomes for the child. We found no differences across the acceptance and stigma questions between the kinship and non-kin foster conditions. The 2 foster care options were at least as acceptable as current institutional models across all domains, and participants were more likely to accept the child going to school with or being friends with their child if they were in foster care rather than an institution. These results represent the first evidence of public acceptance of foster care as a model of care in Jordan and may inform the process of local stakeholders implementing alternatives to institutional care on a meaningful and sustainable scale in the Kingdom and regionally.

  9. Postneoliberal Public Health Care Reforms: Neoliberalism, Social Medicine, and Persistent Health Inequalities in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Christopher

    2016-12-01

    Several Latin American countries are implementing a suite of so-called "postneoliberal" social and political economic policies to counter neoliberal models that emerged in the 1980s. This article considers the influence of postneoliberalism on public health discourses, policies, institutions, and practices in Bolivia, Ecuador, and Venezuela. Social medicine and neoliberal public health models are antecedents of postneoliberal public health care models. Postneoliberal public health governance models neither fully incorporate social medicine nor completely reject neoliberal models. Postneoliberal reforms may provide an alternative means of reducing health inequalities and improving population health.

  10. Evaluation of leadership competencies of executives in Lithuanian public health institutions.

    OpenAIRE

    Stankūnas, Mindaugas; Sauliūnė, Skirmantė; Smith, Tony; Mark Avery, -; Šumskas, Linas; Czabanowska, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objective. Lithuanian and international public health experts emphasize the importance of leadership in public health. The aim of this study was to explore the self-assessed level of leadership competencies of executives in Lithuanian public health institutions. Material and Methods. Data were collected in a cross-sectional survey of executives of Lithuanian public health institutions in 2010. The total number of returned questionnaires was 55 (response rate, 58.5%). Respondent...

  11. Institutional delivery in public and private sectors in South Asia: A comparative analysis of prospective data from four demographic surveillance sites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Das (Sushmita); G. Alcock (Glyn); K. Azad (Kishwar); A. Kuddus (Abdul); A. Manandhar; B. Shrestha (Bhim); N. Nair (Nirmala); S. Rath (Santosh); N.S. More (Neena Shah); N. Saville (Naomi); A.J. Houweling (Tanja); D. Osrin (David)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Maternity care in South Asia is available in both public and private sectors. Using data from demographic surveillance sites in Bangladesh, Nepal and rural and urban India, we aimed to compare institutional delivery rates and public-private share. __Methods:__ We us

  12. Violation of ethical principles in institutional care for older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bužgová, Radka; Ivanová, Kateřina

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on issues of elder abuse in residential settings. Violation of ethical principles is shown in the results of this quantitative study aimed at defining the extent, nature and causes of such abuse by employees' unethical conduct towards clients in senior homes (i.e. residential nursing homes) in the Moravian-Silesian region of the Czech Republic. The research sample comprised 454 employees and 488 clients from 12 residential homes for older people. The data were collected from interviews with clients, who also received a questionnaire concerning their satisfaction with the institution. Two questionnaires were administered to the employees, one based on a pilot qualitative study and a second to investigate burnout. Outcomes were assessed according to the extent and form of elder abuse, the causes of elder abuse and the violation of basic ethical principles. The responses, in particular those of employees, revealed both psychological and physical abuse of older clients, and thus violation of two basic principles: respect for the person and non-maleficence. The group at risk of elder abuse comprised aggressive and dissatisfied clients, as well as those with mental problems and dementia. The employees most at risk of being abusers were those who had been employed in institutional care for more than five years, had inadequate knowledge about social services and suffered from burnout. The prevention of elder abuse is recommended to be through education focused on ethical principles, increasing employees' satisfaction by promoting a friendly and safe organizational culture, and providing adequate working conditions.

  13. Injuries in Norwegian Early Childhood and Care (ECEC Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Johan Sando

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Children’s play and exploration involves risk and a possibility for being injured. Early childhood and care institutions (ECECs should provide children with physical challenges in a safe environment. Over the past years, the attention towards playground safety and injuries in ECECs has increased. Norwegian practitioners have a liberal approach to children’s risk taking in play, raising questions on injury prevalence in Norwegian ECECs. The aim for this study was to gain knowledge about the injury prevalence and characteristics of the injuries in Norwegian ECECs. Managers from 2105 institutions completed an electronic questionnaire retrospectively asking the managers to report injuries and accidents the past year. The results indicate that injuries are rare in Norwegian ECECs, and that most of the injuries are minor and do not require a follow-up from professional medical personnel. The moderate and severe injuries are very rare, and often mishaps. There are some indications that boys experience injuries more often than girls do. The main cause of moderate injuries is falling, both outdoors and indoors.

  14. Health care rationing and the ethics of publicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Gerald R.

    1995-10-01

    The need to set reasonable limits on expenditures for health care has led to increased discussion of rationing. Given the fact that no single vision of justice will dominate the allocation of health care, it is becoming increasingly important to establish open, democratic procedures for setting limits. Public awareness of the need for limits and public participation in establishing the limits is essential to the development of a just health care system.

  15. The integration of public health in European primary care systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kringos, D.S.; Bolibar, Y.; Bourgueil, T.; Cartier, T.; Dedeum, T.; Hasvold, A.; Hutchinson, M.; Lember, M.; Oleszczyk, D.; Rotar Pavlick, I.; Svab, P.; Tedeschi, A.; Wilson, S.; Wilm, A.; Windak, A.; Boerma, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A strong primary care (PC) system provides accessible, comprehensive care in an ambulatory setting on a continuous basis and by coordinated care processes. These features give PC the opportunity to play a key role in providing public health (PH) services to their practice population. Th

  16. The integration of public health in European primary care systems.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kringos, D.S.; Bolibar, Y.; Bourgueil, T.; Cartier, T.; Dedeum, T.; Hasvold, A.; Hutchinson, M.; Lember, M.; Oleszczyk, D.; Rotar Pavlick, I.; Svab, P.; Tedeschi, A.; Wilson, S.; Wilm, A.; Windak, A.; Boerma, W.

    2010-01-01

    Background: A strong primary care (PC) system provides accessible, comprehensive care in an ambulatory setting on a continuous basis and by coordinated care processes. These features give PC the opportunity to play a key role in providing public health (PH) services to their practice population. Th

  17. Older adults’ networks and public care receipt : Do partners and adult children substitute for unskilled public care?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schenk, N.; Dykstra, Pearl; Maas, Ineke; van Gaalen, R.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates how (a) the reliance on public care and (b) the type of public care received by older people in the Netherlands depends on the availability of partners and adult children. Older people aged 65 years and older were surveyed in the Netherlands Kinship Panel Study at two time-po

  18. Home or foster home care versus institutional long-term care for functionally dependent older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Camilla; Hall, Amanda M; Gonçalves-Bradley, Daniela C; Quinn, Terry J; Hooft, Lotty; van Munster, Barbara C; Stott, David J

    2017-04-03

    Changing population demographics have led to an increasing number of functionally dependent older people who require care and medical treatment. In many countries, government policy aims to shift resources into the community from institutional care settings with the expectation that this will reduce costs and improve the quality of care compared. To assess the effects of long-term home or foster home care versus institutional care for functionally dependent older people. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) via the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and two trials registers to November 2015. We included randomised and non-randomised trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies complying with the EPOC study design criteria and comparing the effects of long-term home care versus institutional care for functionally dependent older people. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. We reported the results narratively, as the substantial heterogeneity across studies meant that meta-analysis was not appropriate. We included 10 studies involving 16,377 participants, all of which were conducted in high income countries. Included studies compared community-based care with institutional care (care homes). The sample size ranged from 98 to 11,803 (median N = 204). There was substantial heterogeneity in the healthcare context, interventions studied, and outcomes assessed. One study was a randomised trial (N = 112); other included studies used designs that had potential for bias, particularly due lack of randomisation, baseline imbalances, and non-blinded outcome assessment. Most studies did not select (or exclude) participants for any specific disease state, with the exception of one study that only included patients if they had a stroke. All studies had methodological limitations, so readers should interpret results with caution.It is uncertain

  19. FINANCIAL REPORTING IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS AND NON-FINANCIAL ENTITIES. SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Vitan

    2011-01-01

    The present paperwork contains issues regarding financial reporting at the public institutions and non – financial entities. The main aspects are regarding the obligation of all entities to present the financial statements, the content of financial statements in public institutions and non-financial entities. Also, is presented the similarities and the differences aspects between financial reporting of these two patrimonial entities.

  20. 11 CFR 110.12 - Candidate appearances on public educational institution premises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... educational institution exempt from federal taxation under 26 U.S.C. 115, such as a school, college or... normal charge. An unincorporated public educational institution exempt from federal taxation under 26 U.S...'s academic community or the general public (whichever is invited) on the educational...

  1. FINANCIAL REPORTING IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS AND NON-FINANCIAL ENTITIES. SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES

    OpenAIRE

    Daniela Vitan

    2011-01-01

    The present paperwork contains issues regarding financial reporting at the public institutions and non – financial entities. The main aspects are regarding the obligation of all entities to present the financial statements, the content of financial statements in public institutions and non-financial entities. Also, is presented the similarities and the differences aspects between financial reporting of these two patrimonial entities.

  2. Respectful maternity care in Ethiopian public health facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sheferaw, Ephrem D.; Bazant, Eva; Gibson, Hannah; Fenta, Hone B.; Ayalew, Firew; Belay, Tsigereda B.; Worku, Maria M.; Kebebu, Aelaf E.; Woldie, Sintayehu A.; Kim, Young-Mi; van den Akker, T.; Stekelenburg, Jelle

    2017-01-01

    Background: Disrespect and abuse of women during institutional childbirth services is one of the deterrents to utilization of maternity care services in Ethiopia and other low- and middle-income countries. This paper describes the prevalence of respectful maternity care (RMC) and mistreatment of

  3. Investigating the health care delivery system in Japan and reviewing the local public hospital reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang X

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Xing Zhang, Tatsuo Oyama National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Japan's health care system is considered one of the best health care systems in the world. Hospitals are one of the most important health care resources in Japan. As such, we investigate Japanese hospitals from various viewpoints, including their roles, ownership, regional distribution, and characteristics with respect to the number of beds, staff, doctors, and financial performance. Applying a multivariate analysis and regression model techniques, we show the functional differences between urban populated prefectures and remote ones; the equality gap among all prefectures with respect to the distribution of the number of beds, staff, and doctors; and managerial differences between private and public hospitals. We also review and evaluate the local public hospital reform executed in 2007 from various financial aspects related to the expenditure and revenue structure by comparing public and private hospitals. We show that the 2007 reform contributed to improving the financial situation of local public hospitals. Strategic differences between public and private hospitals with respect to their management and strategy to improve their financial situation are also quantitatively analyzed in detail. Finally, the remaining problems and the future strategy to further improve the Japanese health care system are described. Keywords: health care system, health care resource, public hospital, multivariate regression model, financial performance

  4. History of the Public Health Institute of Semmelweis Medical University, Budapest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahin, E; Morava, E

    2000-05-01

    The science of public health of the XVIIIth century named politia medica together with medicina forensis became an independent obligatory subject in 1793 at the Medical Faculty of the Hungarian Royal University of Science. The independent Public Health Institute of the Medical Faculty was established in 1874. The first professor of public health was József Fodor who attained international reputation during his professorship. He organized training for school physicians and health teachers first in Europe and he organized courses for medical officers and for military doctors. He held courses for law-, engineer- and architect-students. He promoted all fields of the public health. His research on the bactericide effect of serum places him among the founders of immunology. Fodor's successors at the Chair of Public Health were Leó Liebermann whose research activities included physico-chemistry, biochemistry, microbiology and social hygiene; Gusztáv Rigler who focused on the epidemiology of communicable diseases, on the health effects of spa treatment and mineral waters. The next famous professor was Gyula Darányi. His scientific field was public health bacteriology and public health chemistry. They were followed by József Melly and László Dabis (Scheff). After the Second World War fundamental changes took place in the life of the university. The Faculty of Medicine was separated from the University of Science on February 1, 1951 and became an independent university under the control of the Ministry of Health. In 1953 the Institute of Public Health was cut into two separate institutes: Institute of Public Health and Institute for the Organization of Health Service. The Institute of Public Health was transformed to Institute of Public Health and Epidemiology in 1973. The Institute for the Organization of Health Service was transformed into Institute of Social Medicine and History of Medicine in 1985 and later into Institute of History of Medicine and Social Medicine

  5. Dynamic reform of public institutions: a model of motivated agents and collective reputation

    OpenAIRE

    Valasek, Justin

    2016-01-01

    State capacity is optimized when public institutions are staffed by individuals with public-service motivation. However, when motivated agents value the collective reputation of their place of employment, steady-state equilibria with both high and low aggregate motivation (reputation) in the mission-oriented sector exist. Reforming a low-motivation institution requires a non-monotonic wage path: since the effect of higher wages on motivation is negative for a highreputation institution, but p...

  6. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care – a feasibility study with caregivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharin eHermenau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Institutionalized children in low-income countries often face maltreatment and inadequate caregiving. In addition to prior traumatization and other childhood adversities in the family of origin, abuse and neglect in institutional care are linked to various mental health problems. By providing a manualized training workshop for caregivers, we aimed at improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care. In Study 1, 29 participating caregivers rated feasibility and efficacy of the training immediately before, directly after, and three months following the training workshop. The results showed high demand, good feasibility, high motivation and acceptance of caregivers. They reported improvements in caregiver-child relationships, as well as in the children’s behavior. Study 2 assessed exposure to maltreatment and the mental health of 28 orphans living in one institution in which all caregivers had been trained. The children were interviewed 20 months before, one month before, and three months after the training. Children reported a decrease in physical maltreatment and assessments showed a decrease in mental health problems. Our approach seems feasible under challenging circumstances and provides first hints for its efficacy. These promising findings call for further studies testing the efficacy and sustainability of this maltreatment prevention approach.

  7. Introduction; Public transcripts: Entextualization and linguistic representation in institutional contextsx

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    The articles in this special issue argue that entextualization - the process by which circulable texts are produced by extracting discourse from its original context and reifying it as a bounded object - is an indispensable mechanism for the construction of institutional authority. More specifically, they demonstrate that one particular mode of entextualization, that involving the inscription of speech into writing, plays an especially important role in modern institutions, as the transfixing...

  8. Inter-institutional Cooperation for Achieving Public Order and Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Gisca

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In the area governed by the authority of the Romanian state, the public order is part both of the national security and of the European public order. The actions of defining and making clear theconcept of public order drew the attention of many specialists and researchers in the field; therefore, there are countless ways of defining this concept. The spheres of this concept connect continuously to the spheres of other concepts: the state, the executive power, the state of legality, the national dimension of the public order etc. Essentially the public order represents a minimum of important conditions for a convenient social life. Its content varies with the stage of social trust and mirrors the state of legality, equilibrium and social peace, being omnipresent when, according to the Constitution, the order forces ensure the public peace, the safety of person, collectivities and goods, the publichealth and moral principles.

  9. Take Good Care of Public Facilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冰; 金业祥

    2004-01-01

    However,it is a great pity that in many places,some of the public facilities have been purposely damaged.Some electric bulbs were smashed; some traffic signs were damaged beyond recognition,some public telephones cannot work; some statues stand there without an arm or a leg.What's worse,some people even stole the covers of the sewers.

  10. Facilitating Corporate Entrepreneurship in Public Sector Higher Education Institutions: A Conceptual Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed Nayyar Malik

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a conceptual model of public sector corporate entrepreneurship for the state government higher education institutions. The proposed model is intended to depict the main antecedents that relate to corporate entrepreneurship within the public sector higher education institution  and the impact of corporate entrepreneurship on public sector HEI’s performance, as well as factors influencing its continuous performance.

  11. Management of information security risks in a federal public institution: a case study

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson Gomes Soares Souza; Carlos Hideo Arima; Renata Maria Nogueira de Oliveira; Getulio Akabane; Napoleão Verardi Galegale

    2016-01-01

    Public institutions bound to the Brazilian federal public sector must apply security measures, policies, procedures and guidelines as information assets protection measures. This case study sought to determine whether the management of information security risks is applied in a federal public institution according to Information Technology (I.T.) managers perceptions and the results expose the importance of the roles played by people, responsibilities, policies, standards, procedures and thei...

  12. Colonising the academy? Organisational mediatisation and public research institutions in Norway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torgeir Uberg Nærland

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Public research institutions increasingly find themselves operating in a media environment. At the same time there is a growing body of research finding that public institutions and organisations are undergoing processes of mediatisation, which potentially threaten their autonomy. Based on interviews with communication staff at six major Norwegian universities and research centres, this study explores the extent to which these institutions have adapted to and internalised media logic. This study finds that the public research institutions to a significant degree are adapting to their media environments in terms of both organisational structure and communication practise. However, in terms of key operational areas such as research dissemination, the execution of research projects and managerial decision making, this study finds little evidence suggesting that public research institutions internalise media logic to such an extent that it critically impinges on their own processes and prioritisations.

  13. Comparative Study on Educational Management in Public and Private Institutions in the Twin Cities of Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Muhammad

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research paper is to compare the quality of education delivered at the undergraduate level in the public and private institutions of the Twin Cities (Islamabad and Rawalpindi in Pakistan. Data is collected with the help of questionnaires from 246 students. The data was collected from three public and three private educational institutions of the Twin Cities, and the age of students ranged from 18 to 27 years. The research instrument used in this paper is the independent sample t-test to find the difference between the three private and three public educational institutions selected in Rawalpindi and Islamabad in terms of different variables that are very important in measuring the quality of education. For analysis, Levene’s test was adopted, which reflects the variations in educational quality with respect to academic staff availability in the twin cities. The differences in close supervision of students by academic staff between public and private sector educational institutions were also analysed, and the results reflected a difference between private and public educational institutions with respect to close supervision of students. The results also highlighted the factors that are involved in higher performance of students in private institutes as compared to that of students in public institutes. These factors can be implemented in the public sector to increase student performance.

  14. Re-use of public sector information in cultural heritage institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, P.; Margoni, T.; Rybicka, K.; Tarkowski, A.

    2014-01-01

    In 2013 the European Union amended the Directive on Public Sector Information, establishing the principle that all available information produced and collected by public sector institutions must be made available for reuse under open terms and conditions. The amended Directive also brings publicly f

  15. The Role of Senior Public Relations Administrators in Institutional Decision Making: Are They at the Table?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyronel, Anthony C.

    2000-01-01

    This study examined the role of senior public relations administrators in institutional decision making through a survey of presidents and senior public relations officers at the 14 universities in the Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education (SSHE). Findings indicated that SSHE senior public relations administrators are often not included in…

  16. Assessment of CEPH accredited institutions offering Public Health programs in the United States: A Short Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish eJoshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Examine the distribution of the CEPH accredited institutions offering public health educational programs in the United States, and characterize their various attributes.Methods: A search was conducted during the period of June 2014, using the Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health database (ASPPH, and individual university websites to obtain a complete list of CEPH accredited institutions offering programs in Public Health at the Certificate, Masters, and Doctoral levels in the United States. Detailed information were abstracted from the various programs offerings including: school/program information, school type, geographic location, admission cycle, education delivery format, public health concentration, number of credits, presence of a global component, joint programs and tuition. The data was analyzed in August 2014. Results: A total of 85 CEPH accredited institutions designated as either Schools of Public Health, or individual Programs of Public Health were present in the ASPPH database at the time of this data collection (2014. These institutions offer programs in public health at the Certificate (61%, n=52, Masters (100%, n=85 and Doctoral (44%, n=37 levels in the US. More than half of the programs offered were provided by schools of public health (58%, N=49, which were mostly public universities (75%, n=64, concentrated in the Northeast (22%, n=19 and mainly admitted students during the fall semester. Ninety three concentrations of Public Health currently exist, of which 25 concentrations are predominant. Conclusion: To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study which examines the distribution of existing CEPH accredited Public Health educational programs offered by US institutions. We suggest future areas of research to assess existing Public Health workforce demands, and map them to the curriculums and competencies provided by institutions offering Public Health educational programs in the United States

  17. The Affordable Care Act and hospital chaplaincy: re-visioning spiritual care, re-valuing institutional wholeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frierdich, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on the institutional dimensions of spiritual care within hospital settings in the context of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA), applying policy information and systems theory to re-imagine the value and function of chaplaincy to hospital communities. This article argues that chaplaincy research and practice must look beyond only individual interventions and embrace chaplain competencies of presence, ritual, and communication as foundational tools for institutional spiritual care.

  18. International Financial Institution Policies of Conditionality and Public Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, Scott; McGray, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Conditionalities are most broadly defined as the provisos that are to be met by a country when borrowing money from the International Financial Institutions (IFIs). Increasingly, they have proven to have far reaching consequences for countries entering into agreements with The World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade…

  19. International Financial Institution Policies of Conditionality and Public Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhail, Scott; McGray, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Conditionalities are most broadly defined as the provisos that are to be met by a country when borrowing money from the International Financial Institutions (IFIs). Increasingly, they have proven to have far reaching consequences for countries entering into agreements with The World Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Trade…

  20. Critical Interactives: Improving Public Understanding of Institutional Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Duncan A.; Cooley, Heidi Rae

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 3 years, the authors have pursued unique cross-college collaboration. They have hosted a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)-funded Humanities Gaming Institute and team-taught a cross-listed course that brought together students from the humanities and computer science. Currently, they are overseeing the development of an…

  1. Industrial and Institutional Pest Control. Sale Publication 4073.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wamsley, Mary Ann, Ed.; Vermeire, Donna M., Ed.

    This guide gives information needed to meet Environmental Protection Agency standards on industrial and institutional pest control, and to help prepare for certification. It gives descriptions and pictures of general insect pests, parasitic pests of man, occasional invaders, wood-destroying pests, stored product pests, vertebrates, and weeds. The…

  2. Critical Interactives: Improving Public Understanding of Institutional Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Duncan A.; Cooley, Heidi Rae

    2012-01-01

    Over the past 3 years, the authors have pursued unique cross-college collaboration. They have hosted a National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH)-funded Humanities Gaming Institute and team-taught a cross-listed course that brought together students from the humanities and computer science. Currently, they are overseeing the development of an…

  3. The image of the public institutions and new technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Mihaela PĂUN; Coman, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    During the recent past decades, a new technology and a new kind of media emerged: the social media. It created a huge communication area that houses the interactions and debate between creators of social images and messages. In public relations, the emergence of social media challenges the traditional instruments of government public relations. Responding to development of information and communication technology (ICT), social media is considered as an alternative communication channel of gov...

  4. Adequacy of public maternal care services in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background In Brazil, hospital childbirth care is available to all, but differences in access and quality of care result in inequalities of maternal health. The objective of this study is to assess the infrastructure and staffing of publicly financed labor and birth care in Brazil and its adequacy according to clinical and obstetric conditions potentially associated with obstetric emergencies. Methods Nationwide cross-sectional hospital-based study “Birth in Brazil: national survey i...

  5. Staff and Institutional Factors Associated with Substandard Care in the Management of Postpartum Hemorrhage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Rousseau

    Full Text Available to identify staff and institutional factors associated with substandard care by midwives managing postpartum hemorrhage (PPH.A multicenter vignette-based study was e-mailed to a random sample of midwives at 145 French maternity units that belonged to 15 randomly selected perinatal networks. Midwives were asked to describe how they would manage two case-vignettes about PPH and to complete a short questionnaire about their individual (e.g., age, experience, and full- vs. part-time practice and institutional (private or public status and level of care characteristics. These previously validated case-vignettes described two different scenarios: vignette 1, a typical immediate, severe PPH, and vignette 2, a severe but gradual hemorrhage. Experts consensually defined 14 criteria to judge adherence to guidelines. The number of errors (possible range: 0 to 14 for the 14 criteria quantified PPH guideline adherence, separately for each vignette.450 midwives from 87 maternity units provided complete responses. Perfect adherence (no error for any of the 14 criteria was low: 25.1% for vignette 1 and 4.2% for vignette 2. After multivariate analysis, midwives' age remained significantly associated with a greater risk of error in guideline adherence in both vignettes (IRR 1.19 [1.09; 1.29] for vignette 1, and IRR 1.11 [1.05; 1.18] for vignette 2, and the practice of mortality and morbidity reviews in the unit with a lower risk (IRR 0.80 [0.64; 0.99], IRR 0.78 [0.66; 0.93] respectively. Risk-taking scores (IRR 1.41 [1.19; 1.67] and full-time practice (IRR 0.83 [0.71; 0.97] were significantly associated with adherence only in vignette 1.Both staff and institutional factors may be associated with substandard care in midwives' PPH management.

  6. [Factors affecting access to health care institutions by the internally displaced population in Colombia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogollón-Pérez, Amparo Susana; Vázquez, María Luisa

    2008-04-01

    In Colombia, the on-going armed conflict causes displacement of thousands of persons that suffer its economic, social, and health consequences. Despite government regulatory efforts, displaced people still experience serious problems in securing access to health care. In order to analyze the institutional factors that affect access to health care by the internally displaced population, a qualitative, exploratory, and descriptive study was carried out by means of semi-structured individual interviews with a criterion sample of stakeholders (81). A narrative content analysis was performed, with mixed generation of categories and segmentation of data by themes and informants. Inadequate funding, providers' problems with reimbursement by insurers, and lack of clear definition as to coverage under the Social Security System in Health pose barriers to access to health care by the internally displaced population. Bureaucratic procedures, limited inter- and intra-sector coordination, and scarce available resources for public health service providers also affect access. Effective government action is required to ensure the right to health care for this population.

  7. Managed behavioral health care: an instrument to characterize critical elements of public sector programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, M Susan; Giard, Julienne; Shern, David; Mulkern, Virginia; Burnam, M Audrey

    2002-08-01

    To develop an instrument to characterize public sector managed behavioral health care arrangements to capture key differences between managed and "unmanaged" care and among managed care arrangements. The instrument was developed by a multi-institutional group of collaborators with participation of an expert panel. Included are six domains predicted to have an impact on access, service utilization, costs, and quality. The domains are: characteristics of the managed care plan, enrolled population, benefit design, payment and risk arrangements, composition of provider networks, and accountability. Data are collected at three levels: managed care organization, subcontractor, and network of service providers. Data are collected through contract abstraction and key informant interviews. A multilevel coding scheme is used to organize the data into a matrix along key domains, which is then reviewed and verified by the key informants. This instrument can usefully differentiate between and among Medicaid fee-for-service programs and Medicaid managed care plans along key domains of interest. Beyond documenting basic features of the plans and providing contextual information, these data will support the refinement and testing of hypotheses about the impact of public sector managed care on access, quality, costs, and outcomes of care. If managed behavioral health care research is to advance beyond simple case study comparisons, a well-conceptualized set of instruments is necessary.

  8. 77 FR 30306 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection for Public Comment: Hispanic Serving Institutions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-22

    ...: SF-425, HUD-40077, and HUD-96010. Members of the Affected Public: Nonprofit Hispanic-Serving Institutions ] that meet the definition of an HSI established in Title V of the 1998 Amendments to the...

  9. Public Hospitals as the Main Agent of Institutional Elderly Care Junlian Nursing Home and Rehabilitation Center for Elderly with Dementia, Shanghai%公立医院为主体的机构养老探索 上海君莲养老院及失智老人康复治疗中心方案介绍

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王斌

    2012-01-01

    作为中国三大养老模式之一的机构养老是中国社会养老体系的重要组成部分,养老机构的健康和创新发展是未来机构养老的重要保障。文章介绍了上海市闵行区中心医院率先以公立医院的主体身份开设了君莲养老院及失智老人康复治疗中心,并且在服务上发挥了医院背景的优势,指出这是对中国当下机构养老模式探索的一次重要尝试。%As one of the three main models of elderly care, institutional elderly care is a crucial component of China's social elderly care system. The healthy and innovative development of elderly care agents is the guarantee for the future of institutional care. The Minhang Central Hospital in Shanghai will open a nursing home and rehabilitation center for elderly people with dementia, fully exploiting the advantage of an on-site hospital. It is an important exploration in the model of institutional elderly care in the Chinese context.

  10. Understanding the Transition of Public Universities to Institutional Autonomy in Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagintayeva, Aida; Kurakbayev, Kairat

    2015-01-01

    Although institutional autonomy has recently received significant attention from scholars and policy-makers in much of the world, few studies have been made of the universities in transition towards institutional autonomy in post-Soviet countries. Autonomy and its related concept of public accountability are relatively new phenomena in…

  11. Public Policy and Hispanic-Serving Institutions: From Invention to Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental premise for creating the Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) designation assumes that a critical mass of students motivates an institution to change how it operates to better serve these students to degree attainment. Increasing Hispanic degree attainment is in the national interest, and programs created by public policy to support…

  12. Public Education and Community Development: The Shared Mission of Libraries and Cultural Heritage Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Carmine J.

    This paper illustrates how libraries, museums, and other cultural heritage institutions are natural allies in developing and delivering public education and community service programs for lifelong learners of all ages. The paper opens by discussing how Robert S. Martin, Director of the National Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS), has…

  13. Movement Among B.C. Public Post-Secondary Institutions. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Joanne

    2008-01-01

    The Student Transitions Project (STP) is a collaborative effort of British Columbia's (BC's) Ministries of Education and Advanced Education and Labour Market Development and BC's public post-secondary institutions. STP research is helping school districts, post-secondary institutions and the Ministries of Education and Advanced Education and…

  14. Public Policy and Hispanic-Serving Institutions: From Invention to Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Deborah A.

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental premise for creating the Hispanic-Serving Institution (HSI) designation assumes that a critical mass of students motivates an institution to change how it operates to better serve these students to degree attainment. Increasing Hispanic degree attainment is in the national interest, and programs created by public policy to support…

  15. Institutes, Foundations and Think Tanks: Neoconservative Influences on U.S. Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Philip; Boyles, Deron

    2005-01-01

    This paper introduces the reader to think tanks, institutes, foundations, and their roles in shaping U.S. educational policy. Quite simply, think tanks, institutes, and foundations are nonprofit organizations that both produce and rely on research and expertise to aggressively influence the public, political leaders, and policy. Via an analysis of…

  16. Public health emergencies and the public health/managed care challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Sara; Skivington, Skip; Praeger, Sandra

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between insurance and public health is an enduring topic in public health policy and practice. Insurers share certain attributes with public health. But public health agencies operate in relation to the entire community that they are empowered by public law to serve and without regard to the insurance status of community residents; on the other hand, insurers (whether managed care or otherwise) are risk-bearing entities whose obligations are contractually defined and limited to enrolled members and sponsors. Public insurers such as Medicare and Medicaid operate under similar constraints. The fundamental characteristics that distinguish managed care-style insurance and public health become particularly evident during periods of public health emergency, when a public health agency's basic obligations to act with speed and flexibility may come face to face with the constraints on available financing that are inherent in the structure of insurance. Because more than 70% of all personal health care in the United States is financed through insurance, public health agencies effectively depend on insurers to finance necessary care and provide essential patient-level data to the public health system. Critical issues of state and federal policy arise in the context of the public health/insurance relations during public health emergencies. These issues focus on coverage and the power to make coverage decisions, as well as the power to define service networks and classify certain data as exempt from public reporting. The extent to which a formal regulatory approach may become necessary is significantly affected by the extent to which private entities themselves respond to the problem with active efforts to redesign their services and operations to include capabilities and accountability in the realm of public health emergency response.

  17. PUBLIC AND PRIVATE HIGHER EDUCATION INSTITUTIONS IN MALAYSIA: COMPETING, COMPLEMENTARY OR CROSSBREEDS AS EDUCATION PROVIDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Chang Da

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivery of higher education used to be exclusive to the public sector in Malaysia. However, legislative changes made in 1996 led to the coexistence of public and private higher education institutions. In 2007, there were 20 public universities compared to more than 500 private institutions, of which 30 are currently categorised as universities or university colleges. Looking at their respective roles as higher education providers, public and private institutions display characteristics of being substitutes while at the same time serving complementary roles to one another. This dichotomy between public and private higher education institutions can, in fact, be seen as inclining towards a hybrid model that allows both to operate within a single system of higher education provision in the country. Such a hybrid model is evident in how the clientele is being divided between public and private higher institutions. It is also evident in the different roles played by the respective faculty members as well as in the programmes being made available in either type of institutions.

  18. The Role of Public Institutions for Innovation Support in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Brito Silva Cirani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to present a brief description of the main public instruments for innovation support in Brazil. We also show a preliminary assessment of the use of these instrument s in innovativ e companies. W e conducted a two - step analysis. In the first part we conducted a quantitative descriptive analysis of historical series about resources allocat ion available by FINEP. In the second part we performed a qualitative in - depth analy sis of six companies that used the financial benefits offered by FINEP and BNDES to support innovative projects. The responses of the interviews were used to identify the perception of the attractiveness of public instruments for innovation support and pos sible limitations to their use, while other information was used to present the main public instruments for innovation s timulus in Brazil. T he results showed that the investigated companies are interested in using the instruments; however, they face diffic ulties for their adoption, due to excessive bureaucracy, high costs of innovation, and legal i nsecurity.

  19. LOCAL RURAL DEVELOPMENT, INSTITUTIONAL INACTION AND THE TRAGEDY OF LOCAL PUBLIC GOODS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo CANNARELLA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Empirical observation can confirm that not all rural communities enjoy an optimal level of local public goods: some public goods are provided more often and in a better quality than others. Given the vital importance of public goods for the welfare of local communities (among which the management of the local natural resource base for sustainable development plays a relevant role, the relation between existing local political institutions and their competences represents a critical issue for the concrete possibilities to properly produce, manage and provide local public goods. A better understanding of the nature of local public goods may increase the awareness of interdependence between local economic, environmental and social development not only in order to stop their continuing eroding but also to increase the possibility to produce local public goods and to design the institutional setting to overcome generic problems of public goods provision.

  20. Co-existing institutional logics and agency among top-level public servants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke

    2011-01-01

    to address parts of this void. This study examines the agency exerted by top-level public servants through their everyday strategy and policy work in face of co-existing logics of public administration. The findings illustrate how their action strategies span from more passive strategies of coping...... with coexisting logics of administration to more skilled agency of combining logics aimed at enhancing their opportunity and action space. The study suggests that the interplay between co-existing institutional logics, action strategies and the practical skills of top-level public servants provides the basis...... for both coping and more proactive strategies in pluralistic public administrations. Findings illustrate the role of public servants' practical sense of realizable opportunities that inform such strategies of handling co-existing institutional logics. Implications for institutional studies of organizations...

  1. Partnering with governments and other institutions: driving change in diabetes care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberti, K G M M; Bailey, C J; Blonde, L; Felton, A M; Zimmet, P

    2007-12-01

    The human and material cost of type 2 diabetes is a cause of increasing concern for health professionals, representative organisations and governments worldwide. The scale of morbidity and mortality has led the United Nations to issue a resolution on diabetes, calling for national policies for prevention, treatment and care. There is clearly an urgent need for a concerted response from all interested parties at the community, national and international level to work towards the goals of the resolution and create effective, sustainable treatment models, care systems and prevention strategies. Action requires both a 'bottom-up' approach of public awareness campaigns and pressure from healthcare professionals, coupled with a 'top-down' drive for change, via partnerships with governments, third sector (non-governmental) organisations and other institutions. In this review, we examine how existing collaborative initiatives serve as examples for those seeking to implement change in health policy and practice in the quest to alleviate the health and economic burden of diabetes. Efforts are underway to provide continuous and comprehensive care models for those who already have type 2 diabetes; in some cases, national plans extend to prevention strategies in attempts to improve overall public health. In the spirit of partnership, collaborations with governments that incorporate sustainability, long-term goals and a holistic approach continue to be a driving force for change. It is now critical to maintain this momentum and use the growing body of compelling evidence to educate, inform and deliver a long-term, lasting impact on patient and public health worldwide.

  2. Improving Midwifery Care in Ugandan Public Hospitals: The Midwives’ Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabirye, Rose C.; Beinempaka, Florence; Okene, Cindrella; Groves, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Background A serious shortage of nurses and midwives in public hospitals has been reported in Uganda. In addition, over 80% of the nurses and midwives working in public hospitals have been found to have job stress and only 17% to be satisfied on the job. Stress and lack of job satisfaction affect quality of nursing and midwifery care and puts patients’ lives at risk. This is coupled with rampant public outcry about the deteriorating nursing and midwifery care in Ugandan public hospitals. Objective To explore factors that result in poor quality of midwifery care and strategies to improve this care from the perspective of the midwives. Method It was a qualitative exploratory design. Participants were midwives and their supervisors working in four Regional Referral hospitals in Uganda. Data was collected by FGDs and KIIs. Content analysis was used to analyze the transcribed data from the voice recordings. Results Four major themes emerged from the study. They were organizational (poor work environment and lack of materials/equipment), professional (midwives’ attitudes, lack of supervision), public/consumer issues (interference) and policy issues (remuneration, promotion and retirement). Conclusions and implications for Practice Midwives love their work but they need support to provide quality care. Continuous neglect of midwives’ serious concerns will lead to more shortages as more dissatisfied midwives leave service.

  3. Prevalence of maltreatment among youths in public sectors of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elizabeth A; Green, Amy E; Fettes, Danielle L; Aarons, Gregory A

    2011-08-01

    Few studies have investigated the prevalence of maltreatment among youths in public sectors of care despite the critical public health concern and the burden of suffering on such youths. The current study examined the prevalence of multiple types of maltreatment across five public sectors of care. Youths aged 11-18 (n = 1,135) enrolled in one of five public sectors of care reported on their maltreatment history using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Across all sectors, 78% of youth reported experiencing at least moderate levels of maltreatment with the majority (58%) reporting multiple types of maltreatment. The prevalence of maltreatment was highest for youths involved in the alcohol/drug (86%) and child welfare (85%) sectors, and lowest in the serious emotional disturbance sector (72%). Logistic regressions were conducted to examine differences in the likelihood of multiple types of maltreatment by sector affiliation, controlling for the effects of gender, race/ethnicity, and age. The results indicate that rates of maltreatment across sectors do not differ greatly from those in child welfare. The high incidence of maltreatment across all sectors, not solely child welfare, indicates that all youth in public sectors of care should be screened for a history of maltreatment when they enter into care.

  4. Public finance policy strategies to increase access to preconception care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kay A

    2006-09-01

    Policy and finance barriers reduce access to preconception care and, reportedly, limit professional practice changes that would improve the availability of needed services. Millions of women of childbearing age (15-44) lack adequate health coverage (i.e., uninsured or underinsured), and others live in medically underserved areas. Service delivery fragmentation and lack of professional guidelines are additional barriers. This paper reviews barriers and opportunities for financing preconception care, based on a review and analysis of state and federal policies. We describe states' experiences with and opportunities to improve health coverage, through public programs such as Medicaid, Medicaid waivers, and the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP). The potential role of Title V and of community health centers in providing primary and preventive care to women also is discussed. In these and other public health and health coverage programs, opportunities exist to finance preconception care for low-income women. Three major policy directions are discussed. To increase access to preconception care among women of childbearing age, the federal and state governments have opportunities to: (1) improve health care coverage, (2) increase the supply of publicly subsidized health clinics, and (3) direct delivery of preconception screening and interventions in the context of public health programs.

  5. Primary care careers among recent graduates of research-intensive private and public medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Phillip A; Xu, Shuai; Ayanian, John Z

    2013-06-01

    Despite a growing need for primary care physicians in the United States, the proportion of medical school graduates pursuing primary care careers has declined over the past decade. To assess the association of medical school research funding with graduates matching in family medicine residencies and practicing primary care. Observational study of United States medical schools. One hundred twenty-one allopathic medical schools. The primary outcomes included the proportion of each school's graduates from 1999 to 2001 who were primary care physicians in 2008, and the proportion of each school's graduates who entered family medicine residencies during 2007 through 2009. The 25 medical schools with the highest levels of research funding from the National Institutes of Health in 2010 were designated as "research-intensive." Among research-intensive medical schools, the 16 private medical schools produced significantly fewer practicing primary care physicians (median 24.1% vs. 33.4%, p private schools. In contrast, the nine research-intensive public medical schools produced comparable proportions of graduates pursuing primary care careers (median 36.1% vs. 36.3%, p = 0.87) and matching in family medicine residencies (median 7.4% vs. 10.0%, p = 0.37) relative to the other 66 public medical schools. To meet the health care needs of the US population, research-intensive private medical schools should play a more active role in promoting primary care careers for their students and graduates.

  6. Incarcerated adolescents. The need for the development of professional ethical standards for institutional health care providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, E J

    1989-11-01

    Large numbers of children are incarcerated in juvenile correctional facilities each year in the United States. These children suffer from a wide range of physical and psychiatric illnesses and are in critical need of professional health care services. This article summarizes the health care needs of these children and documents the ethical problems faced by health care professionals who work in juvenile institutions. The adequacy of current ethical standards as a source of guidance and support for institutional health care professionals is reviewed and a series of recommendations for the development of comprehensive health care standards is set forth.

  7. Collective Labour Conflicts in Companies and Public Institutions: Some Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca DIMITRIU

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Participation of the employees and of the public servants in collective labor conflicts constitutes a significant chapter regarding the concrete way in which the Romanian legislator implements the concept of flexicurity and re-defines labor relations. Indeed, the entire Romanian legislation on labor relations and dispute resolution has been tremendously changed in May 2011, and the impact of these changes is about to be very intense. The new law on collective labor conflicts, currently at crossroads, is rather susceptible to discourage the initiation of such conflicts and even to limit the freedom of strike. The legislator adopted a unified regulation, applicable to both employees and public servants; as such individuals who work under an employment contract are governed by the same dispute resolution norms as those individuals who perform their professional activity under an administrative act. Beyond the theoretical aspects that the new view of the Romanian laws on the labor conflict resolution raises, there are many direct, practical consequences, as well as difficulties that courts face since the entering into force of the new legislation. This study aims to analyze some of these practical consequences.

  8. A Critical Reflection: Foster Care Youth Experiences at a Four Year Postsecondary Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Renada D.

    2016-01-01

    Foster care youth face significant challenges to postsecondary educational success, especially while enrolled at four-year institutions. Foster care youth are absent of family support that their non-foster peers receive throughout the college experience. Without family support, foster care youth encounter greater challenges to persevere through…

  9. Institutional Barriers to Doing Public Sociology: Experiences of Feminists in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Joey; Laube, Heather

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the discipline of sociology has seen an increased discussion of public sociology, but the discussion has focused on whether or not it is a good idea for sociologists to become more engaged with their various publics. A different question motivates this research: What are the institutional arrangements that make doing public…

  10. Factors Affecting Teachers' Motivation: An HRM Challenge for Public Sector Higher Educational Institutions of Pakistan (HEIs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Muhammad Imran; Humayon, Asad Afzal; Awan, Usama; Ahmed, Affan ud Din

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore/investigate various issues of teachers ' motivation in public sector Higher Educational Institutions of Pakistan. Design/methodology/approach: This is an exploratory research where surveys have been conducted in the well known public sector Universities of Pakistan; primary data have been collected…

  11. An Examination of Integrated Marketing Communication in U.S. Public Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston-Strasser, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    This research examined the strategic process of integrated marketing communication and its application in U.S. public institutions of higher education. A quantitative survey analyzed 42 leading U.S. public colleges and universities as ranked by "U.S. News & World Report." To further examine the findings of the survey, qualitative interviews were…

  12. Institutional Barriers to Doing Public Sociology: Experiences of Feminists in the Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Joey; Laube, Heather

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, the discipline of sociology has seen an increased discussion of public sociology, but the discussion has focused on whether or not it is a good idea for sociologists to become more engaged with their various publics. A different question motivates this research: What are the institutional arrangements that make doing public…

  13. An Examination of Integrated Marketing Communication in U.S. Public Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston-Strasser, Dawn M.

    2009-01-01

    This research examined the strategic process of integrated marketing communication and its application in U.S. public institutions of higher education. A quantitative survey analyzed 42 leading U.S. public colleges and universities as ranked by "U.S. News & World Report." To further examine the findings of the survey, qualitative interviews were…

  14. Flexibility for Survival: State Funding and Contingent Faculty Employment at Public Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Joanna R.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of state funding for public higher education in the United States are changing. Per-student state appropriations to higher education have decreased over the past few decades and have become increasingly volatile from year to year. As public higher education institutions seek ways to educate more students with fewer and less…

  15. An Examination of Integrated Marketing Communication in US Public Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmiston, Dawn

    2008-01-01

    This research analyzes the strategic process of integrated marketing communication (IMC) and its current application in US public institutions of higher education (IHEs). The basis for this research was a survey questionnaire that analyzed the impact of IMC on 42 leading US public colleges and universities (as ranked by "U.S. News & World…

  16. Optimal administrative scale for planning public services: a social cost model applied to Flemish hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart

    2015-01-01

    In choosing the scale of public services, such as hospitals, both economic and public administrative considerations play important roles. The scale and the corresponding spatial distribution of public institutions have consequences for social costs, defined as the institutions' operating costs and the users' travel costs (which include the money and time costs). Insight into the relationship between scale and spatial distribution and social costs provides a practical guide for the best possible administrative planning level. This article presents a purely economic model that is suitable for deriving the optimal scale for public services. The model also reveals the corresponding optimal administrative planning level from an economic perspective. We applied this model to hospital care in Flanders for three different types of care. For its application, we examined the social costs of hospital services at different levels of administrative planning. The outcomes show that the social costs of rehabilitation in Flanders with planning at the urban level (38 areas) are 11% higher than those at the provincial level (five provinces). At the regional level (18 areas), the social costs of rehabilitation are virtually equal to those at the provincial level. For radiotherapy, there is a difference of 88% in the social costs between the urban and the provincial level. For general care, there are hardly any cost differences between the three administrative levels. Thus, purely from the perspective of social costs, rehabilitation should preferably be planned at the regional level, general services at the urban level and radiotherapy at the provincial level.

  17. Challenges in Implementing FP7 Projects in the Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel VULTURESCU

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available National Authority for Scientific Research (ANCS and Executive Unit for Higher Education, Research and Development and Innovation Funding (UEFISCDI participate to several projects funded under the Framework Programmes, since 1998. The staff from each the two organisations participating in projects are merely the same, typically from “international cooperation” departments. In each of the two organisations, dedicated teams were set and a distinct specialization emerged. In this respect, dedicated procedures and good practices in project management were developed. Even the Framework Programs had different structures and the focused was different (e.g. knowledge creation, EU problem solving, scientific support for policies and programs, etc., the funding instruments (projects were not radically different from a Framework Program to another, so the staff could gain experience in managing this type of projects. Experience and expertise gained during this long period of time led to definition of a general framework within the two institutions and setting up of a general guideline for participation to this type of projects. The main dimensions of this framework are: project team organization, project management process, managing results and risk, organisational framework, good practices, factors which ensure success in project implementation.The paper presents a specific framework for FP 7 project implementation and how this framework is applied by both organisations, a set of rules and procedures that should be followed by any organisation, in particular governmental ones, participating in FP 7 projects and a set of good practices developed by ANCS and UEFISCDI.

  18. Providing Care for the People Who Walked out of the Institutions – Solidarity and Freedoom Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreja Rafaelič

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available After the Walk-out care had to be organised for the walkers that decided not to return to the institutions. Enabling public pressure and advocacy has been one of the tasks of the movement. Negotiations with the Ministry of labour, family and social affairs, special care homes, nongovernmental organizations and local authorities had started. Agency IN has been the only nongovernmental organization that has been willing to provide care for the walkers. The lives of the walkers have changed dramatically. The resettlement to Ljubljana has been a challenge for the walkers, their social workers and volunteers. The solidarity that has been created during the movement provided them with enough support and help to realise most of their goals. The movement enabled them to make friends and live in the community. While experiencing a lot of successes in their lives, obstacles have been encountered. Inadequate laws and the passivity of the ministry of social affairs has been one of the most oblivious.

  19. Why public health services? Experiences from profit-driven health care reforms in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Göran

    2014-01-01

    Market-oriented health care reforms have been implemented in the tax-financed Swedish health care system from 1990 to 2013. The first phase of these reforms was the introduction of new public management systems, where public health centers and public hospitals were to act as private firms in an internal health care market. A second phase saw an increase of tax-financed private for-profit providers. A third phase can now be envisaged with increased private financing of essential health services. The main evidence-based effects of these markets and profit-driven reforms can be summarized as follows: efficiency is typically reduced but rarely increased; profit and tax evasion are a drain on resources for health care; geographical and social inequities are widened while the number of tax-financed providers increases; patients with major multi-health problems are often given lower priority than patients with minor health problems; opportunities to control the quality of care are reduced; tax-financed private for-profit providers facilitate increased private financing; and market forces and commercial interests undermine the power of democratic institutions. Policy options to promote further development of a nonprofit health care system are highlighted.

  20. Management of information security risks in a federal public institution: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson Gomes Soares Souza

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Public institutions bound to the Brazilian federal public sector must apply security measures, policies, procedures and guidelines as information assets protection measures. This case study sought to determine whether the management of information security risks is applied in a federal public institution according to Information Technology (I.T. managers perceptions and the results expose the importance of the roles played by people, responsibilities, policies, standards, procedures and their implementation aiming greater control of information security risks and opportunities related to information technology security.

  1. Quest for Equality; the Story of How Six Institutions Opened Their Doors to Serve Negro Children and Their Families. Children's Bureau Publication No. 441-1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gula, Martin

    The Federal government publication is designed to help child care institutions to desegregate their services. Part of the document discusses the impetus for change, methods of desegregation, and the needed initiatives. Described are such steps as establishment of board policy, the roles of administrators and staff, as well as coordination with…

  2. The institutional logic of integrated care: an ethnography of patient transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, James A; Kontos, Pia; Martin, Wendy; Victor, Christina

    2017-03-20

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to use theories of institutional logics and institutional entrepreneurship to examine how and why macro-, meso-, and micro-level influences inter-relate in the implementation of integrated transitional care out of hospital in the English National Health Service. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted an ethnographic case study of a hospital and surrounding services within a large urban centre in England. Specific methods included qualitative interviews with patients/caregivers, health/social care providers, and organizational leaders; observations of hospital transition planning meetings, community "hub" meetings, and other instances of transition planning; reviews of patient records; and analysis of key policy documents. Analysis was iterative and informed by theory on institutional logics and institutional entrepreneurship. Findings Organizational leaders at the meso-level of health and social care promoted a partnership logic of integrated care in response to conflicting institutional ideas found within a key macro-level policy enacted in 2003 (The Community Care (Delayed Discharges) Act). Through institutional entrepreneurship at the micro-level, the partnership logic became manifest in the form of relationship work among health and social care providers; they sought to build strong interpersonal relationships to enact more integrated transitional care. Originality/value This study has three key implications. First, efforts to promote integrated care should strategically include institutional entrepreneurs at the organizational and clinical levels. Second, integrated care initiatives should emphasize relationship-building among health and social care providers. Finally, theoretical development on institutional logics should further examine the role of interpersonal relationships in facilitating the "spread" of logics between macro-, meso-, and micro-level influences on inter-organizational change.

  3. INCLUSION OF CHILDREN WITH DEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS IN DAY CARE INSTITUTION ESTREA MARA IN BITOLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SOTIROVSKA-SIRVINI

    1997-09-01

    Full Text Available The Day Care Institutions for children are forms of organized protection for improvement of the psycho-physical, emotional and social development of children. In this period, the growth and development are in their most intensive phase when the outside influence plays an extraordinary role both in a positive and in negative a direction. Directed and well-organized protection is of a great importance. By inclusion of children with developmental disorders in the group and with special, individual treatment of each child by adequate specialized staff, their socialization and stimulus for developmental acceleration is achieved.Many years ago, by recommendation of the Advisory Institution for Development, the doctors from the Advisory Institution for small children, the public-health nurses or by the parents initiative, the kindergartens accept children with Down syndrome, children with limited and lower level backwardness, with disharmonious development, with lower level forms of cerebral paralysis and with speech disorders.Children at the earliest age of one month are resided at the Advisory Institu­­tion for Development and receive treatment until they are categorized and are ready to start school, but certain children are sent to the kindergartens at the age of 3.In the previous years, out of five children with Down syndrome treated in the Advisory Institution for Development, four were sent to the kindergarten. Now, one of these children attends the fifth grade and two attend the first grade in a regular elementary school and one attends the special school. Three children with Spastic dyplegia, four children with lower level of retardation, two with surdomutitas and four with disharmonious development are still in the kindergarten.

  4. Public perceptions of health care professionals' participation in pharmaceutical marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crigger, Nancy J; Courter, Laura; Hayes, Kristen; Shepherd, K

    2009-09-01

    Trust in the nurse-patient relationship is maintained not by how professionals perceive their actions but rather by how the public perceives them. However, little is known about the public's view of nurses and other health care professionals who participate in pharmaceutical marketing. Our study describes public perceptions of health care providers' role in pharmaceutical marketing and compares their responses with those of a random sample of licensed family nurse practitioners. The family nurse practitioners perceived their participation in marketing activities as significantly more ethically appropriate than did the public responders. Further research is warranted before conclusions can be drawn, but these early findings suggest that nurse practitioners should consider a conservative approach to participating in pharmaceutical marketing.

  5. The Public Manager, the Structure of Public Institution, and Implementation: The 2002-2012 Finnish Senior Bureaucratic Manager Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhtar, Mohammed Ibn

    2015-01-01

    Public management and administration today is about crafting, structuring and instituting. Structuration is a very integral part of all organisations. Unlike the gradualist approach, structural reform transforms the dominant system touching on main elements. Structural reform had largely come and gone without necessarily touching on some public…

  6. The construction and legitimation of workplace bullying in the public sector: insight into power dynamics and organisational failures in health and social care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Marie; Jackson, Debra

    2015-03-01

    Health-care and public sector institutions are high-risk settings for workplace bullying. Despite growing acknowledgement of the scale and consequence of this pervasive problem, there has been little critical examination of the institutional power dynamics that enable bullying. In the aftermath of large-scale failures in care standards in public sector healthcare institutions, which were characterised by managerial bullying, attention to the nexus between bullying, power and institutional failures is warranted. In this study, employing Foucault's framework of power, we illuminate bullying as a feature of structures of power and knowledge in public sector institutions. Our analysis draws upon the experiences of a large sample (n = 3345) of workers in Australian public sector agencies - the type with which most nurses in the public setting will be familiar. In foregrounding these power dynamics, we provide further insight into how cultures that are antithetical to institutional missions can arise and seek to broaden the debate on the dynamics of care failures within public sector institutions. Understanding the practices of power in public sector institutions, particularly in the context of ongoing reform, has important implications for nursing.

  7. Towards a Comprehensive and Up-To-Date Institutional Repository: Development of a Publications Tracking Process

    KAUST Repository

    Baessa, Mohamed

    2016-06-15

    As our repository matured we found that a concerted effort was needed to establish it as a resource that institutional stakeholders knew they could turn to for reliable information about the research outputs produced by researchers affiliated with or funded by our institution. The initial impetus for this project was the adoption of an institutional open access policy, which necessitated a process to track the publications of institutional authors, deposit items with applicable open access licenses, and notify authors when an accepted manuscript was needed. To support this process we developed a local publications tracking system independent of our hosted DSpace repository that regularly queries publisher and indexer APIs for new publications, checks for relevant permissions policies, identifies institutional authors and helps us send manuscript request emails. We also harvested records for past items and modified our repository to accommodate metadata-only records. The success of these tracking and harvesting services in making our repository comprehensive and up-to-date has allowed us to rely on our repository as the key source of publications information for additional integrations that update ORCID records with publication information, populate a PlumX metrics dashboard and, most recently, support the implementation of a current research information system (CRIS).

  8. Living in institutional care: residents' experiences and coping strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timonen, Virpi; O'Dwyer, Ciara

    2009-01-01

    Insights into daily living in residential care settings are rare. This article draws on a qualitative dataset (semi-structured interviews and recordings of residents' council meetings) that gives a glimpse of the experiences and coping strategies of (older) people living in residential care. The data highlight the range of unmet needs of the residents, similar to the categories of physiological, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization needs in Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory. Our analysis indicates that "higher" and "lower" needs are closely intertwined and mutually reinforcing and should therefore be accorded equal emphasis by professionals (including social workers) employed within residential care settings.

  9. Reluctant rationers: public input to health care priorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, J

    1997-04-01

    Members of the public can adopt any one of at least three roles when providing input to public decision-making: taxpayer, collective community decision-maker, or patient. Each of these potential roles can be mapped onto three areas of public policy decision-making in health care: funding levels and organization for the system, the services we choose to offer under public funding, and the characteristics of those who should receive the offered services. The increasing desire to involve the public across the spectrum of health care decision-making has yet to result in a clear delineation of either which of the areas are most appropriate for public input or which of the roles we wish individual participants to adopt. The average citizen (as opposed to the self-interested patient, the provider or the manager) has so far shown little interest in contributing and rarely has the requisite skills for most of the tasks asked of him or her. The widespread motivation of governments and others for seeking public input appears to be to get the public to take or share ownership in the tough rationing choices consequent on fiscal retrenchment in health care. Evaluation of existing literature leads to the conclusion that there are only limited areas where we might wish to obtain significant public input if we adopt this widespread policy motivation. Specifically, the general public should be asked to give input to, but not determine, priorities across the broad service categories that could potentially be publicly funded. Members of the public have neither the interest nor the skills to do this at the level of specific services. The role expected of such members of the public should be made explicit and should focus on collective views of the community good rather than self-interested views of individual benefit. Groups of patients, however, should be the source of input when socio-demographic characteristics are being used to decide who should receive offered services. The role

  10. Doctor-Patient Relationship Between Individuals With Fibromyalgia and Rheumatologists in Public and Private Health Care in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares-Roa, Tirsa; Huerta-Sil, Gabriela; Infante-Castañeda, Claudia; Lino-Pérez, Leticia; Alvarez-Hernández, Everardo; Peláez-Ballestas, Ingris

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this article was to describe and analyze the doctor-patient relationship between fibromyalgia patients and rheumatologists in public and private health care contexts within the Mexican health care system. This medical anthropological study drew on hospital ethnography and patients' illness narratives, as well as the experiences of rheumatologists from both types of health care services. The findings show how each type of medical care subsystem shape different relationships between patients and doctors. Patient stigmatization, overt rejection, and denial of the disease's existence were identified. In this doctor-patient-with-fibromyalgia relationship, there are difficult encounters, rather than difficult patients. These encounters are more fluid in private consultations compared with public hospitals. The doctor-centered health care model is prevalent in public institutions. In the private sector, we find the characteristics of the patient-centered model coexisting with the traditional physician-centered approach.

  11. Feeding newborns after hospital discharge from a Baby-Friendly Health Care Institution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vivancos, Raquel Bosquim Zavanella; Leite, Adriana Moraes; Furtado, Maria Cândida de Carvalho; Góes, Fernanda dos Santos Nogueira de; Haas, Vanderlei José; Scochi, Carmen Gracinda Silvan

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterize how babies are fed during their hospital stay and after hospital discharge from a Baby-Friendly Health Care Institution, using indicators proposed by the World Health Organization. METHODS...

  12. The interdependence of public witness and institutional unity in the Dutch Reformed family of churches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D E de Villiers

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The Belhar Confession of the then Dutch Reformed Mission Church officially approved in 1986 confesses that the unity of the church should be made visible. Very little has since then come of this visible unity in the family of Dutch Reformed churches. Since 1996, however, new impetus has been given to the effort to bring about institutional unity. It has especially been in their ministries of public witness and service that these churches succeeded to a large extent to give visible and institutional expression to their unity. This would hopefully enable the churches of the Dutch Reformed family to play a more effective public role in the present South African society. They, however, face two serious restrictions in this regard: the limited scope for churches to play a public role within the new liberal democratic dispensation in South Africa and the limited motivation to play a transforming public role in the churches of the Dutch Reformed family. In the article a few pre-conditions for playing an effective public role the churches of the Dutch Reformed family have to meet are discussed. The most important one is that these churches should achieve full institutional unity as soon as possible. The conclusion of the article is therefore that the interdependence of institutional unity and public witness is a reality they will have to deal with effectively if they want to move forward.

  13. Development of the ITHACA Toolkit for monitoring human rights and general health care in psychiatric and social care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, J; Thornicroft, G; Burti, L; Katschnig, H; Lewis, O; Russo, J; Shaw, T; Wahlbeck, K; Rose, D

    2013-09-01

    Background. Human rights violations are commonly experienced by people in psychiatric and social care institutions. States and private organizations providing such health and social services must comply with international human rights law. Monitoring of such compliance is increasingly recognized as a vital component in ensuring that rights are respected and violations are brought out in the open, remedied and prevented. Aims. The Institutional Treatment, Human Rights and Care Assessment (ITHACA) project produced a method to document violations and good practice with the aim of preventing human rights violations and improving general health care practice in psychiatric and social care institutions (www.ithacastudy.eu). Methods. A methodological and implementation study conducted across 15 European countries developed and assessed the ITHACA Toolkit in monitoring visits to 87 mental health organizations. Results. The toolkit is available in 13 European languages and has demonstrated applicability in a range of contexts and conditions. The information gathered through monitoring visits can document both good practice and areas for improvement. Conclusions. The ITHACA Toolkit is an acceptable and feasible method for the systematic monitoring of human rights and general health care in psychiatric and social care institutions that explicitly calls for the participation of service users in the monitoring of human rights violations and general health care practice.

  14. Quality of Health Care Activity in Educational Institutions: Conceptual Aspect

    OpenAIRE

    N. V. Tretyakova; V. A. Fedorov

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with one of the priority tasks of Russian educational system – developing the health responsibility. The recent health deterioration trend among children and adolescents calls for the complex health care measures, equally affecting the learning outcomes. The authors argue that there is a need for proper definition and specification of the key term of health care quality. However, the analysis of the available scientific and documentary recourses demonstrates the absence of suc...

  15. Factors influencing women's utilization of public health care services ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Maternal mortality remains a public health challenge claiming ... across many developing countries around the world. .... 19.8. Community Factors place of residence. Rural. 13.0. 14.0. 13.3. Urban .... hood among women who were exposed to either radio or ..... maternal health care services in Southern India.

  16. Old age, disability and care in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2015-12-01

    Aging of the population profoundly changes the scope of action of public health, altering the profile of morbidity-mortality and increasing the demand for chronic care. In the aging population, disability serves as an indicator of health and a guideline for actions and policies. This enquiry, with a qualitative approach, based on interpretative anthropology and the emic perspective, aims to understand the way of thinking and acting of old people in the face of 'old age with disability' and their relationships with public health. Individual interviews were held at the subject's homes, using a semi-structured script, with 57 old people living in the city, including participants from the cohort of Bambuí. Collection and analysis of the data was oriented by the methodology of Signs, Meanings and Actions, making possible anthropological investigation of the representations and concrete behaviors associated with disability in old age in the local culture. Two categories relating to the relationships between old age, disability and public healthcare emerged from the analysis: (i) experience of care in old age with disability; and (ii) the fear of lack of care. The results reveal that public health needs to review its concepts about disability in old age and incorporate disability into the agenda of the functional dimension of health and care for old age.

  17. Pharmaceutical services in a Mexican pain relief and palliative care institute

    OpenAIRE

    Escutia Gutierrez R; Cortéz Alvarez CR; Álvarez Alvarez RM; Flores Hernandez JL; Gutiérrez Godinez J; López y Lopez JG

    2007-01-01

    Neither the purchase nor the distribution of pharmaceuticals in hospitals and community pharmacies in Mexico is under the care of pharmacists. Some are under control of physicians.This report presents the results of the implementation of somef pharmaceutical services for the Jalisco Pain Relief, and Palliative Care Institute (Palia Institute), under the direction of the Secretary of Health, Government of Jalisco. The services implemented were drug distribution system, Drug Information Service...

  18. Cooperation between parents and professional services during child's staying in institutional care

    OpenAIRE

    Kramar, Tjaša

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis I focus on the experience of cooperation between parents, Centre for Social Work and the residential treatment institution during a child’s stay in residential care. In the theoretical part of the thesis I present characteristics and vulnerability of those families where the majority of the youth placed in residential care come from. Later on, I explain the role of involved professional services and their methods of work with family before, during and in the time of institution...

  19. Self-Regulation in Children and Minors in Institutional Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrbackova, Karla; Vavrova, Sona

    2015-01-01

    The study deals with self-regulation in children and minors (aged 11 to 19 years) living in so-called "total institutions". It examines the degree of self-regulation of behaviour from the perspective of the children and minors themselves and from the perspective of their key workers. Children and minors and their key workers differ…

  20. Science on the net: an analysis of the websites of the European public research institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Massoli

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a study on the websites of several European public research institutions that aims at identifying the science communication model chosen and implemented online with the purpose of reaching different target publics. The analytical approach takes into account a number of indicators: from the institutional identity to the scientific features, from the interactive services to the internationalisation level, in order to evaluate whether the web provides an added value in the adopted communication model and in building a relation with the users. Lights and shades emerge from this study in which good practices side examples of a much weaker science communication approach, outlining a general context where a public research institution website has been still used as a presentation tool and its interactive opportunities have not been capitalised.

  1. ROLE OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS IN THE PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion POTLOG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Public-Private Partnership represents institutional and organizational alliance of the state and business, consisting of financial actors interaction, legal, social and policy oriented joint public and private resources from different sources into a single complex to solve strategic socio-economic problems of country. The aim of the research is to demonstrate the importance of financial institutions in publicprivate partnership projects implementation. Research methodology – in order to achieve the expected results, author applied recognized methods and techniques applied as economic investigations: comparative method, statistical method, logical analysis method. The research results, expressed by knowledge through mentioned field can be applied to improve the process of attracting local and international financial institutions to ensure success in public-private partnerships projects in Republic of Moldova.

  2. Real estate capitalization of Public Administration Institutions - a chance to stimulate investment and increase economic competitiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionut Constantin

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The divide in the development of the different European space regions, is exemplified by the different ability to attract investments between rural and urban areas. Urban areas usually assure to investors a broad availability of structures and services that rural areas cannot offer. Another limiting factor for rural areas is the difficulty the enterprises which want to localize their structures outside the urban area meet when they try to find information about the quantity and the quality of the available structures. This penalization affects also the unused real estates of the public administration institutions; these real estates could represent for the investors an important opportunity to improve area’s resources, meeting some forms of converging collaboration with the public administration institutions. POLYINVEST project aims at improving conditions for investment in the rural areas, directly tackling the development gap between the regions of the South East Europe and to develop an information system useful for those public administration institutions.

  3. A comparative study of institutional frameworks for local public service partnerships in Finland and Scotland

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Paula Sonja; Valkama, Pekka; Asenova, Darinka

    2015-01-01

    This research presents a cross-national comparative review of the institutional arrangements for how local public service partnerships are regulated and governed in Finland and Scotland.Both legal and administrative differences of partnership policies are analysed in order to explain the nature of the incentives and obligations for local governments to collaborate with external partners. Institutional theory and conceptual partnership approaches are utilised in the analysis. The Scottish inst...

  4. Ethnic monitoring and social control: Descriptions from juveniles in juvenile care institutions

    OpenAIRE

    Basic, Goran

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has emphasized the institutional racism in total institutions. Researchers have highlighted the importance of narratives but have not focused on narratives about ethnic monitoring and social control. This article tries to fill this gap by analysing stories related to descriptions of ethnic monitoring and social control as told by juveniles of non-Swedish ethnicity in Swedish juvenile care institutions. A juvenile’s ethnicity was highlighted by drawing attention to the staff’...

  5. Gender and Leadership. The Impact of Organizational Culture of Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Cornelia MACARIE

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study approaches the public organizations and their organizational culture by taking into account the gender factor. More specifically, it will approach women’s presence in the leadership of public organizations, the influence of the public organizational culture in the promotion of women in middle and top management positions, and it will finally identify the defining characteristics of the organizational culture of the institutions led by women in comparison to those led by men. Our study is based on a research conducted in Bistriţa-Năsăud County, Romania, by applying a survey in 12 public organizations. The survey comprises 16 questions, seven of which are open questions; 25 women with different positions in the medium and the top management of public institutions were surveyed. The conclusions of the research confirm the existence of some clear differences in the organizational culture of womenled and respectively, men-led public institutions. At the same time, the study identifies possible causes for the low presence of women in the public top management in contrast to their high presence in the execution positions.

  6. Who wants to deliver public service? Do institutional antecedents of public service motivation provide an answer?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenabeele, W.V.

    2011-01-01

    Public service motivation has rapidly become one of the important concepts in contemporary public administration research. However, until now, research has mainly focused on its measurement and its consequences, whereas relatively ignoring its origins. This study investigates where the antecedents o

  7. Public Procurement of Innovation; Endogenous Institutions in User-Producer Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjaltadóttir, Rannveig Edda

    2013-01-01

    Introduction 2010 government expenditure on works, goods and services in EU 19.7% of GDP - 2.406,98€ billion. Can be used to stimulate innovation Focus on public procurement of innovation in EU maintain competitive advantage and welfare Governments are important first users for high technology...... (Urban & von Hippel, 1988). Need interaction in public procurement of innovation (PPI). The aim of this research is to investigate the institutions that govern this interaction and how they influence performance in PPI. Institutions are “the rules of the game” (North, 1990)...

  8. THEORETICAL APPROACH ON THE ROLE OF MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATION IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin PAUN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Romanian Government has faced extensive changes in the last period regarding its operating plan, in what was meant to accomplish and the actions of the political representatives and citizens, their tasks and responsibilities. In this paper we have attempted to identify the main factors with direct influence on management of public institutions starting from the communication management. The result of the research showed that leaving aside and not taking into account the strategic perspectives, preparation in terms of poor management of administrative factors are elements that detract from public institutions and from here the lack of initiative and flexibility needed for their operation.

  9. Supply and demand for long-term care services from the perspective of leaders of health care institutions1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoliński, Bolesław

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Poland's transition into the stage of intensive population aging imposes changes in demand for different forms of care (including long-term). The proportion of dependent persons (requiring care) in the population continues to increase. The number of people aged 80 and above (in 2013 – 1.48 million) will double by 2050 and reach 3.54 million. The research objective was to gain knowledge on the supply and demand of different institutionalized forms of care services from the healthcare system perspective. Material and methods A computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI) survey was carried out on a Poland-wide quota sample of health care and nursing centres operating within the healthcare system. The respondent group consisted of 96 directors of health care facilities. Results In the opinion of more than a half of surveyed directors, supply of health care and nursing centres in their region is insufficient in terms of the needs of both patients and elderly people. In the context of patients, the deficit is observed primarily in health care and treatment centres, long-term nursing care and health care institutions, whereas for the elderly people the main concern is availability of nursing care, day care or social aid centres. More than half of surveyed institutions admit patients requiring care on an ongoing basis; however, in the case of health care and treatment centres more than a year-long waiting time proved to be a frequent phenomenon. In the opinion of the surveyed directors, the key factors influencing the number of available places and waiting time are insufficient financing and personnel deficit. Conclusions Introduction of multiple changes to the operation of the care system in Poland is necessary in order to improve its availability, effectiveness and quality. Achievement of this objective requires implementation of a cohesive and integrated system dedicated to monitoring and diagnosing both the supply and demand for different forms of care

  10. A randomized controlled trial comparing foster care and institutional care for children with signs of reactive attachment disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyke, Anna T; Zeanah, Charles H; Gleason, Mary Margaret; Drury, Stacy S; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A; Guthrie, Donald

    2012-05-01

    The authors examined signs of emotionally withdrawn (inhibited type) and indiscriminately social (disinhibited type) reactive attachment disorder in Romanian children enrolled in a randomized trial of foster care compared with institutional care and in a comparison group of never-institutionalized children. At baseline and when children were ages 30, 42, and 54 months and 8 years, caregivers were interviewed with the Disturbances of Attachment Interview to assess changes in signs of reactive attachment disorder in three groups of children: those receiving care as usual (including continued institutional care) (N=68); those placed in foster care after institutional care (N=68); and those who were never institutionalized (N=72). The impact of gender, ethnicity, and baseline cognitive ability was also examined. On the Disturbances of Attachment Interview, signs of the inhibited type of reactive attachment disorder decreased after placement in foster care, and scores were indistinguishable from those of never-institutionalized children after 30 months. Signs of the disinhibited type were highest in the usual care group, lower in the foster care group, and lowest in the never-institutionalized group. Early placement in foster care (before age 24 months) was associated with fewer signs of the disinhibited type. Lower baseline cognitive ability was associated with more signs of the inhibited type in the usual care group and more signs of the disinhibited type in both groups. Signs of the inhibited type of reactive attachment disorder responded quickly to placement in foster care; signs of the disinhibited type showed less robust resolution with foster placement. Lower baseline cognitive ability was linked to signs of reactive attachment disorder.

  11. 7 CFR 240.4 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... and adult care institutions. 240.4 Section 240.4 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of... LIEU OF DONATED FOODS § 240.4 Cash in lieu of donated foods for nonresidential child and adult care... or adult care institutions participating in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. FNS shall pay...

  12. Age at Adoption from Institutional Care as a Window into the Lasting Effects of Early Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Megan M.

    2013-01-01

    One of the major questions of human development is how early experience impacts the course of development years later. Children adopted from institutional care experience varying levels of deprivation in their early life followed by qualitatively better care in an adoptive home, providing a unique opportunity to study the lasting effects of early…

  13. Comparing public and private hospital care service quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, D; O'Callaghan, M

    1998-01-01

    The study applies the principles behind the SERVQUAL model and uses Donabedian's framework to compare and contrast Malta's public and private hospital care service quality. Through the identification of 16 service quality indicators and the use of a Likert-type scale, two questionnaires were developed. The first questionnaire measured patient pre-admission expectations for public and private hospital service quality (in respect of one another). It also determined the weighted importance given to the different service quality indicators. The second questionnaire measured patient perceptions of provided service quality. Results showed that private hospitals are expected to offer a higher quality service, particularly in the "hotel services", but it was the public sector that was exceeding its patients' expectations by the wider margin. A number of implications for public and private hospital management and policy makers were identified.

  14. Violent, caring, unpredictable: public views on survivors of brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linden, M A; Crothers, I R

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate how members of the public perceived survivors of brain injury. A 20-item list of attributes that could be used to describe characteristics of survivors of brain injury were given to 323 participants. One hundred and sixty-nine psychology students and 154 members of the public agreed to take part in the study. The effects of group (student and public), gender and socioeconomic status (low, moderate and high) on the attributes were assessed. Multivariate analysis of variance showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups with students holding more positive perceptions on 15 out of the 20 attributes. No effects of gender or socioeconomic status were found. The research suggests that members of the public hold less positive views on survivors of brain injury in respect to intellectual competency, ability to care and trustworthiness when compared to students.

  15. Role of pharmacogenetics in public health and clinical health care: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapoor, Ritika; Tan-Koi, Wei Chuen; Teo, Yik-Ying

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacogenomics has been lauded as an important innovation in clinical medicine as a result of advances in genomic science. As one of the cornerstones in precision medicine, the vision to determine the right medication in the right dosage for the right treatment with the use of genetic information has not exactly materialised, and few genetic tests have been implemented as the standard of care in health systems worldwide. Here we review the findings from a SWOT analysis to examine the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats around the role of pharmacogenetics in public health and clinical health care, at the micro, meso and macro levels corresponding to the perspectives of the individuals (scientists, patients and physicians), the health-care institutions and the health systems, respectively.

  16. Using data warehousing and OLAP in public health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristovski, D; Rogac, M; Markota, M

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes the possibilities of using data warehousing and OLAP technologies in public health care in general and then our own experience with these technologies gained during the implementation of a data warehouse of outpatient data at the national level. Such a data warehouse serves as a basis for advanced decision support systems based on statistical, OLAP or data mining methods. We used OLAP to enable interactive exploration and analysis of the data. We found out that data warehousing and OLAP are suitable for the domain of public health and that they enable new analytical possibilities in addition to the traditional statistical approaches.

  17. Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Local Food Procurement in Publicly Funded Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew J.; Chopra, Hema

    2013-01-01

    Community-Based Social Marketing is presented as a technique to add to Extension's community economic development toolbox by examining perceived benefits and barriers to local food procurement at publicly funded institutions. Data were gathered through 86 in-person interviews with representatives across the supply chain. The findings revealed that…

  18. The Rationalizing Logics of Public School Reform: How Cultural Institutions Matter for Classroom Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridwell-Mitchell, E. N.

    2013-01-01

    The research herein uses a mixed methods approach to examine how organizational phenomena at the macro level of analysis translate into phenomena at the micro level. Specifically, the research attempts to explain how cultural institutions may translate into individual attitudes and actions, such as public school teachers' decisions about using…

  19. Showing and telling : film heritage institutes and their performance of public accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    This PhD expands on 12 previously published film historical and -archival articles and essays. An extensive introductory text was written to string these articles and essays together and forge them into an argument for improving the performance of film heritage institutes vis-a-vis the public. In th

  20. Evidence of Hybrid Institutional Logics in the US Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Stevie; Warshaw, Jarrett B.

    2017-01-01

    While the ascendancy of market behaviours in public research universities is well documented, the extent to which universities have transformed themselves into industry-like organisations has been called into question. So to what extent are universities displaying transformation in their core values? The concept of institutional logics, with its…

  1. Education for Public Policy and Management: Views from the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des); J.W. Björkman (James Warner); V. Moharir (Vasant); M.E. Wuyts (Marc)

    2000-01-01

    markdownabstractIntroduction When the Institute of Social Studies, ISS, was founded in 1952 in The Hague as a postgraduate centre for teaching and research on social and economic development, it established the first Masters programme in public administration and the first professorial chair in th

  2. Education for Public Policy and Management: Views from the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des); J.W. Björkman (James Warner); V. Moharir (Vasant); M.E. Wuyts (Marc)

    2000-01-01

    markdownabstractIntroduction When the Institute of Social Studies, ISS, was founded in 1952 in The Hague as a postgraduate centre for teaching and research on social and economic development, it established the first Masters programme in public administration and the first professorial chair in

  3. Public and Tribal Community College Institutional Review Boards: A National Descriptive Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocean, Mia; Hirschi, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    It is currently unknown how many Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) exist at community colleges. This study investigates the percentage of public and Tribal community colleges that have active IRBs. It also examines the potential relationships between states that allow community colleges to confer baccalaureate degrees, or that have articulation…

  4. Prior Learning Assessment Portfolio Completion: Improved Outcomes at a Public Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rust, Dianna Z.; Ikard, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Prior learning assessment (PLA) is the process of evaluating learning, regardless of when or where the learning occurred, and, if the learning is at the college level, awarding college credit to the possessor of that learning. This article provides an overview of the PLA program at a large public U.S. institution and presents the findings of the…

  5. New Media Institute – Personal Public Service Announcement Project

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-05-15

    In this podcast, Erin Edgerton, CDC, and Scott Shamp, New Media Institute, University of Georgia, discuss new media and the personal public service announcement project.  Created: 5/15/2009 by National Center for Health Marketing (NCHM), Division of eHealth Marketing (DeHM).   Date Released: 2/10/2010.

  6. Opportunities for Improvement and Implementation of Management Accounting in Public Cultural Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Andreescu

    2016-01-01

    Therefore it becomes essential to know not the cost of the service but more important its cost ofsupply. Extent that a public cultural institution achieves its objectives are reflected through aseveral financial indicators of which is determined largely based on data from managementaccounting.

  7. Education for Public Policy and Management: Views from the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Gasper (Des); J.W. Björkman (James Warner); V. Moharir (Vasant); M.E. Wuyts (Marc)

    2000-01-01

    markdownabstractIntroduction When the Institute of Social Studies, ISS, was founded in 1952 in The Hague as a postgraduate centre for teaching and research on social and economic development, it established the first Masters programme in public administration and the first professorial chair in th

  8. Evidence of Hybrid Institutional Logics in the US Public Research University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Stevie; Warshaw, Jarrett B.

    2017-01-01

    While the ascendancy of market behaviours in public research universities is well documented, the extent to which universities have transformed themselves into industry-like organisations has been called into question. So to what extent are universities displaying transformation in their core values? The concept of institutional logics, with its…

  9. [Public relations in institutions and establishments of the health administration system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynenko, A V

    2002-01-01

    The article is dedicated to development of directions and specific functions of the health system bodies/institutions public relations (PR) activities. Priorities are set forth depending on the form of property thereof. A complex use of approaches toward carrying out of PR activities permits optimizing work both within the system itself and relations with the society as a whole.

  10. Showing and telling : film heritage institutes and their performance of public accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Klerk, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    This PhD expands on 12 previously published film historical and -archival articles and essays. An extensive introductory text was written to string these articles and essays together and forge them into an argument for improving the performance of film heritage institutes vis-a-vis the public. In th

  11. [Professional Master's in Public Health: from legal precepts to experience in a research and education institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Gideon Borges; Hortale, Virginia Alonso

    2014-07-01

    This study is about the discourses that prevailed over the course of time in Brazilian legislation for the Master's Course in Public Health, and how a Brazilian research and education institution in the area of Public Health appropriated these discourses in the creation of its course proposals. Discourse analysis techniques were applied to legal documents and to sixteen master's programs developed in the institution under scrutiny. The results revealed that with respect to legislation, analysis of the historical timeline makes it possible to say that the initial lack of definition progressively gave rise to the understanding that the identity of such post-graduate education presupposes pedagogical practices that promote the strengthening of ties between academia and the workplace. And, in relation to the master's course proposals for public health in the institutions under scrutiny, they still operate with traditionally consolidated training schemes and tend to standardize their proposals with those of the academic model. It was assumed in this study that the series of proposals would clearly mirror the intentions and, above all, the vision of the training institutions in the area of public health on this stricto sensu model, the identity of which also appears poorly defined.

  12. Predicting Public Confidence in Higher Education Institutions: An Analysis of Social Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunsaker, B. Tom; Thomas, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Research indicates that there are two primary aims of the higher education institution: (a) scientific and scholarly inquiry, and (b) the instruction of students (Veblen, 1918). This aim has been reified consistently for nearly a century. By 2002, the pursuit of higher education had reached record levels. However, more recently, public confidence…

  13. Factors Affecting Persistence and Transfer of Low-Income Students at Public Two-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamiseishvili, Ketevan; Deggs, David M.

    2013-01-01

    The study utilized the Beginning Postsecondary Students Longitudinal Study (BPS:04/06) data set to examine persistence outcomes over a 3-year period across the national sample of students from low socioeconomic backgrounds at public 2-year institutions in the United States. More specifically, the purpose of our study was to investigate how…

  14. Efficiency at Faculties of Economics in the Czech Public Higher Education Institutions: Two Different Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flégl, Martin; Vltavská, Kristýna

    2013-01-01

    The paper evaluates research and teaching efficiency at faculties of economics in the public higher education institutions in the Czech Republic. Evaluation is provided in two periods between the years 2006-2010 and 2007-2011. For this evaluation the Data Envelopment Analysis and Index approach are used. Data Envelopment Analysis measures research…

  15. Governing Boards in Public Higher Education Institutions: A Perspective from the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, James S.; Machado, Maria de Lourdes

    2008-01-01

    Governing boards have a long tradition and prominent role in U.S. higher education. The diversity of institutional types, and thus governing boards, represents a multifaceted tapestry of functions, roles, and responsibilities. This paper will attempt to define the parameters of public higher education governing boards in the USA and offer critical…

  16. Productivity, Performance and Return on Investment: A Baseline Analysis of Tennessee Public Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennessee Higher Education Commission, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Tennessee needs to continuously increase its degree productivity by four percent every year from now until 2025. In the midst of this need for increased degree production, the state's current economic realities indicate public institutions will receive little to no new state appropriated revenues for the foreseeable future. The Master Plan Annual…

  17. Food Safety Attitude of Culinary Arts Based Students in Public and Private Higher Learning Institutions (IPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patah, Mohd Onn Rashdi Abd; Issa, Zuraini Mat; Nor, Khamis Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Food safety issue is not new in Malaysia as problems such as unsafe food handling, doubtful food preparation, food poisoning outbreaks in schools and education institutions and spreading of infectious food borne illness has been discussed by the public more often than before. The purpose of this study is to examine the food safety knowledge and…

  18. Factors Affecting Academic Achievement in Single Mothers Attending Public Two-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Shakebra L.

    2012-01-01

    This quantitative, cross-sectional, correlation research study explored the relationships between self-efficacy, social support, and academic achievement among single mothers aged 18 and older attending Mississippi public two-year institutions. A total of 82 single mothers provided data for this study by completing the following research…

  19. Organizational Learning in the Public Health Institutions through knowledge of ICT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wentzer, Helle

    2004-01-01

    The following paper is a presentation of an empirical study on ICT [1] -implementation in a public health institution. The methodology of the empirical research is briefly touched upon, as well as the theoretical background for the study of learning - not in the classroom, but in the workplace...

  20. Caring for terminal AIDS patients: The experiences of caregivers in a palliative care institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essie Ricks

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available

    This research focused on the lived experiences of caregivers working with AIDS patients, particularly patients who die from this disease whilst resident in a formal institution. A qualitative, exploratory, descriptive, and contextual research design with a phenomenological approach to inquiry was utilised. Thirteen unstructured interviews, which were audio-taped, were conducted with caregivers working full-time in a formal institution caring for patients who are dying from AIDS. The transcribed interviews were analysed using Tesch’s method of descriptive analysis (in Creswell 1994:115.

    One central theme emerged, namely that in their daily duty (at their place of work, caregivers experienced various challenges as a result of having to deal with the death of their patients suffering from AIDS, and five sub-themes were formulated from further analysis. The five subthemes were:

    • Caregivers experienced emotional challenges in caring for patients dying of AIDS;

    • Caregivers experienced a difference in death and dying of adults as apposed to children;

    • Caregivers experienced the rationalisation of death and dying differently;

    • Caregivers experienced that faith in God give them strength to cope with death and dying;

    • Caregivers experienced caring for patients as fulfilling and meaningful to them despite the sadness of death and dying.

    The participants face the death of their patients daily, from a disease that causes untold suffering to the patients, family members and to the caregivers themselves, who wish they could prevent the anguish, the pain and the inability of the medical profession to do more than they are at present towards curing this disease. They described their emotional experiences, which included the various challenges that they face as a result of having to deal with the death and dying of their patients suffering from AIDS. The information shared by these participants formed

  1. Difficulties in accessing and availing of public health care systems among rural population in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Lakshmi Sreerama

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Despite policies to make health care accessible to all, it is not universally accessible. Frequent evaluation of barriers to accessibility of health care services paves path for improvement. Hence, present study is undertaken to evaluate the factors and public health policies influencing health care access to rural people in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh, which can be interpolated for other regions. Aims: To assess knowledge, perceptions, availing of public health care services, barriers to health care access in Chittoor District, Andhra Pradesh. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional, hospital-based survey in the Government Maternity Hospital (GMH, Tirupati, a tertiary care center. Materials and Methods: Fifty women delivered normally in GMH through convenient sampling technique. Data collected on standardized pro forma as per IMS Institute of Healthcare Informatics. Statistical Analysis Used: Is done through MS Excel 2007, Epi Info 7 (of Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, USA and frequencies were described. Results: Distance, waiting hours, societal responsibility, nature of the illness, presumed commercialization of Medicare system, attitudes of health care providers, and loss of wages were not barriers for accessing health care. Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA and availability of ambulance services made great improvements in health care accessibility. Absenteeism of health care providers is a problem. Conclusions: Expanding the ambulance services and ASHA network will be an effective measure for further accessibility to health care. Absenteeism of health care providers needs correction.

  2. Basic principles of information technology organization in health care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, J A

    1997-01-01

    This paper focuses on the basic principles of information technology (IT) organization within health sciences centers. The paper considers the placement of the leader of the IT effort within the health sciences administrative structure and the organization of the IT unit. A case study of the University of Missouri-Columbia Health Sciences Center demonstrates how a role-based organizational model for IT support can be effective for determining the boundary between centralized and decentralized organizations. The conclusions are that the IT leader needs to be positioned with other institutional leaders who are making strategic decisions, and that the internal IT structure needs to be a role-based hybrid of centralized and decentralized units. The IT leader needs to understand the mission of the organization and actively use change-management techniques.

  3. New Public Management, Care and Struggles about Recognition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Hanne Marlene

    2009-01-01

    New Public Management (NPM) is usually perceived as a homogeneous discourse. However, when we examine it by looking at micro-politics in municipalities and understand its consequences drawing on the voices of home helpers, the picture is more complex and ambiguous. NPM is seen as disciplining paid...... of resistance. The analysis applies feminist theories of recognition and care, and its findings are based on focus group interviews and feminist discourse analysis...

  4. Public private partnerships for emergency obstetric care: Lessons from Maharashtra

    OpenAIRE

    Sarika Chaturvedi; Bharat Randive

    2011-01-01

    Background: The National Rural Health Mission of India advocates public private partnerships (PPPs) to meet its "service guarantee" of Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) provision. The Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) has a provision of Rs. 1500 for contracting in obstetric specialists. Objectives: The study aimed to understand the issues in the design and implementation of the PPPs for EmOC under the JSY in Maharashtra and how they affect the availability of EmOC services to women. Materials and Me...

  5. 19 CFR 206.3 - Institution of investigations; publication of notice; and availability for public inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION NONADJUDICATIVE INVESTIGATIONS INVESTIGATIONS RELATING TO GLOBAL AND BILATERAL... imported article that is the subject of the investigation and its tariff subheading, the nature and timing... Commission motion available for public inspection (with the exception of confidential business information)....

  6. Co-existing institutional logics and agency among top-level public servants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke

    2011-01-01

    While institutional organization research to some extent has neglected the micro agency of organization members, parts of the strategy-as-practice research have tended to bracket off wider societal environments shaping the practices-in-use of top-level strategy practitioners. This article attempts...... to address parts of this void. This study examines the agency exerted by top-level public servants through their everyday strategy and policy work in face of co-existing logics of public administration. The findings illustrate how their action strategies span from more passive strategies of coping...... with coexisting logics of administration to more skilled agency of combining logics aimed at enhancing their opportunity and action space. The study suggests that the interplay between co-existing institutional logics, action strategies and the practical skills of top-level public servants provides the basis...

  7. [Public health care system in the Italia regions.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Alessandra; Solipaca, Alessandro; Milazzo, Rosario

    2007-01-01

    The National Health Plan 2006-2008 underlines the need to overcome the differences that exist in the health care services of the Italian regions. Because the health care systems are organised differently on the territory, the Regions provide different answers to the health needs of their residents. Therefore, the purpose of this document is that of analysing the characteristics of the Italian public health care system in 2003. While in the first part, the health system is described region by region, in the second part, a cluster analysis is used to describe the local health authorities. The results show that while both the first and second level assistance have become stronger, the centrality of the hospital system has decreased, even though it still occupies a dominant position.

  8. General classification of regulations on public administration of labor potential development of higher education institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Moroz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of regulations’ classification was grounded in the article, the content of which is related to the practice of public administration of labor potential development of higher educational institutions. The article contains an analysis and synthesis on categorial content of such definitions as «classification» and «legal act». The scientific research organization was based on the existing scientific thought of distribution of regulations for certain classification groups. In the article the author’s approach on the classification of regulations on public administration of development of labor potential of higher education institutions forms the basic classification groups in the following areas of their grouping: the sphere of influence; the content of the educational system; for object orientation; the subjects of management influence; by institutional orientation; the participants of the educational process; the direction of the university; the subjects of law-making and the level of institutionalization of norms of public administration; the nature of the will of the subjects of public administration; Contextual impact on the system and the structure of the labor potential of universities. In addition, the article the author’s views on building classification scheme grouping regulations and defined communication classification groups according to the level of display management hierarchy administrators. The article concludes the evidence of the variability of proposed classification and openness of its content for further improvement within the development of the regulatory mechanism of public administration processes of formation and use of labor potential of higher education institutions. As one of the main results of scientific research, there was submitted justification of public-administrative levels of exposure, and therefore the competence of government relations for the development of labor potential of higher

  9. Receptive Vocabulary and Cognition of Elderly People in Institutional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahimagic, Amela; Zunic, Lejla Junuzovic; Ibrahimagic, Omer C; Smajlovic, Dzevdet; Rasidovic, Mirsada

    2017-06-01

    Basic cognitive functions such as: alertness, working memory, long term memory and perception, as well as higher levels of cognitive functions like: speech and language, decision-making and executive functions are affected by aging processes. Relations between the receptive vocabulary and cognitive functioning, and the manifestation of differences between populations of elderly people based on the primary disease is in the focus of this study. To examine receptive vocabulary and cognition of elderly people with: verified stroke, dementia, verified stroke and dementia, and without the manifested brain disease. The sample consisted of 120 participants older than 65 years, living in an institution. A total of 26 variables was analyzed and classified into three groups: case history/anamnestic, receptive vocabulary assessment, and cognitive assessments. The interview with social workers, nurses and caregivers, as well as medical files were used to determine the anamnestic data. A Montreal Cognitive Assessment Scale (MoCA) was used for the assessment of cognition. In order to estimate the receptive vocabulary, Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test was used. Mean raw score of receptive vocabulary is 161.58 (+-21:58 points). The best results for cognitive assessment subjects achieved on subscales of orientation, naming, serial subtraction, and delayed recall. Discriminative analysis showed the significant difference in the development of receptive vocabulary and cognitive functioning in relation to the primary disease of elderly people. The biggest difference was between subjects without manifested brain disease (centroid = 1.900) and subjects with dementia (centroid = -1754). There is a significant difference between elderly with stroke; dementia; stroke and dementia, and elderly people without manifested disease of the brain in the domain of receptive vocabulary and cognitive functioning. Variables of serial subtraction, standardized test results of receptive vocabulary

  10. Beyond Care Avoidance and Care Paralysis : Theorizing Public Mental Health Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schout, Gert; de Jong, Gideon; Zeelen, Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Care avoidance refers to the condition wherein clients do not seek assistance and do not attend appointments although they are in need of help. Care avoidance is linked to another phenomenon, the inability to help clients with multiple and complex problems by social services and care facilities, in

  11. Beyond Care Avoidance and Care Paralysis : Theorizing Public Mental Health Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schout, Gert; de Jong, Gideon; Zeelen, Jacques

    Care avoidance refers to the condition wherein clients do not seek assistance and do not attend appointments although they are in need of help. Care avoidance is linked to another phenomenon, the inability to help clients with multiple and complex problems by social services and care facilities, in

  12. DEVELOPMENT AND EFFICIENCY OF BUDGET OF PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS BY THE METHOD BASED ON PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina-Ștefana, CIBOTARIU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In Romania, public sector performance is a concept on which it has been written very little and rarely applied in practice. The situation is not the same in developed countries economically to where we focus our attention, regarded as models for our country. Internationally, since the early 70s of the last century there were initiated processes of modernization and reorganization of public institutions in different countries. The society required a higher efficiency of the services provided by it, a better use of public services and also an effective bureaucratic model. It can be said that only in this context, government institutions can gain strength, consistency and can become more reliable. Flexibility, decentralization, creativity, self-management and management contract, all used as measurement tools are the basic features of a managerial reforms that focus on results. Determining the results in the public sector and implementing a system of financial and nonfinancial performance measurement requires a clear definition of the objectives and goals of each organization and component institution.

  13. Picking the best publications to showcase graduate courses: Do institutional mechanisms reinforce gender differences?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leta, J.; Cabanac, G.

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies performed by our research group have brought to light the concept “scientific capital” developed by Bourdieu to characterize the vertical segregation framework in Brazilian science, specifically Brazilian graduate programs, which is the main piece of the country’s S&T system. The present study still focuses on gender differences in Brazilian graduate programs but it turns attention to their institutional assignments. Among all information sent annaually to Capes evaluation process, heads of graduate programs have to send the top five publications of the year. Considering the institutional relevance of this set of publications, the present study aims to identify whether an institutional mechanism, as the choice of the best publications of the graduate program by the heads, promotes gender equality or reinforces discrepancies in Brazilian academia. Preliminary results, performed upon official data of teacher-researchers performance affiliated to Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, suggest that males rather than females more are more represented in this selective set of publications. (Author)

  14. Adversity and Adjustment in Children in Institutions, Family Foster Care, and Adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Morago, Jesús M; León, Esperanza; Román, Maite

    2015-06-22

    This study's objective was to identify the adversity profiles of children in different childcare placements, and to analyze their relationship with subsequent psychological adjustment. We studied a group of 230 children 4 to 10 years old indifferent childcare placements (international adoption, institutional care, non-kin foster care, and kinship care), as well as a control group. Information was collected from parent or caregiver interviews and the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). The results showed that children in the child welfare system had experienced significant adversity before their current placement, especially among institutional care cases and international adoptees. Meanwhile, children in kinship care had experienced less adversity (p .50 to d > .80). After a period of time in their respective placements, children's psychological adjustment was generally positive, but children living in institutional care exhibited the most problems and difficulties, followed by non-kin foster care cases (p .50 to d > .80). Finally, we found that children's early adversity levels (p < .05; r = .16), age of current placement (p < .01; r = .23), and duration of current placement (p < .05: r = -.19) were all tied to current psychological adjustment.

  15. High School Students Residing in Educational Public Institutions: Health-Risk Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Nusa de Almeida; Noll, Matias; Barros, Patrícia de Sá

    2016-01-01

    Although several health-risk behaviors of adolescents have been described in the literature, data of high school students who reside at educational institutions in developing countries are scarce. This study aimed to describe behaviors associated with health risks among high school students who reside at an educational public institution and to associate these variables with the length of stay at the institution. This cross-sectional study was conducted during the year 2015 and included 122 students aged 14–19 years at a federal educational institution in the Midwest of Brazil; students were divided into residents of 20 months. Information concerning the family socioeconomic status and anthropometric, dietary and behavioral profiles was investigated. Despite being physically active, students exhibited risk-associated behaviors such as cigarette and alcohol use and risky sexual behaviors that were exacerbated by fragile socioeconomic conditions and distance from family. A longer time in residence at the institution was associated with an older age (p ≤ 0.001), adequate body mass index (BMI; p = 0.02), nutritional knowledge (p = 0.01), and less doses of alcohol consumption (p ≤ 0.01) compared with those with shorter times in residence. In conclusion, the students exhibited different health-risk behaviors, and a longer institutional residence time, compared with a shorter time, was found to associate with the reduction of health-risk behaviors. PMID:27560808

  16. High School Students Residing in Educational Public Institutions: Health-Risk Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Priscilla Rayanne E Silva; Silveira, Nusa de Almeida; Noll, Matias; Barros, Patrícia de Sá

    2016-01-01

    Although several health-risk behaviors of adolescents have been described in the literature, data of high school students who reside at educational institutions in developing countries are scarce. This study aimed to describe behaviors associated with health risks among high school students who reside at an educational public institution and to associate these variables with the length of stay at the institution. This cross-sectional study was conducted during the year 2015 and included 122 students aged 14-19 years at a federal educational institution in the Midwest of Brazil; students were divided into residents of 20 months. Information concerning the family socioeconomic status and anthropometric, dietary and behavioral profiles was investigated. Despite being physically active, students exhibited risk-associated behaviors such as cigarette and alcohol use and risky sexual behaviors that were exacerbated by fragile socioeconomic conditions and distance from family. A longer time in residence at the institution was associated with an older age (p ≤ 0.001), adequate body mass index (BMI; p = 0.02), nutritional knowledge (p = 0.01), and less doses of alcohol consumption (p ≤ 0.01) compared with those with shorter times in residence. In conclusion, the students exhibited different health-risk behaviors, and a longer institutional residence time, compared with a shorter time, was found to associate with the reduction of health-risk behaviors.

  17. Mental health leadership and patient access to care: a public-private initiative in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, Christopher Paul; Fine, Jennifer; Mayers, Pat; Naidoo, Shan; Zabow, Tuviah

    2017-01-01

    Mental health leadership is a critical component of patient access to care. More specifically, the ability of mental health professionals to articulate the needs of patients, formulate strategies and engage meaningfully at the appropriate level in pursuit of resources. This is not a skill set routinely taught to mental health professionals. A public-private mental health leadership initiative, emanating from a patient access to care programme, was developed with the aim of building leadership capacity within the South African public mental health sector. The express aim was to equip health care professionals with the requisite skills to more effectively advocate for their patients. The initiative involved participants from various sites within South Africa. Inclusion was based on the proposal of an ongoing "project", i.e. a clinician-initiated service development with a multidisciplinary focus. The projects were varied in nature but all involved identification of and a plan for addressing an aspect of the participants' daily professional work which negatively impacted on patient care due to unmet needs. Six such projects were included and involved 15 participants, comprising personnel from psychiatry, psychology, occupational therapy and nursing. Each project group was formally mentored as part of the initiative, with mentors being senior professionals with expertise in psychiatry, public health and nursing. The programme design thus provided a unique practical dimension in which skills and learnings were applied to the projects with numerous and diverse outcomes. Benefits were noted by participants but extended beyond the individuals to the health institutions in which they worked and the patients that they served. Participants acquired both the skills and the confidence which enabled them to sustain the changes that they themselves had initiated in their institutions. The initiative gave impetus to the inclusion of public mental health as part of the curriculum

  18. Public science policy and administration. [cooperation of government industry, foundations, and educational institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, A. H. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    Science, the overwhelming concern of our time, is no longer a matter of private research and development but one of public policy and administration, in which government, industry, foundations, and educational institutions must all work together as never before. Few other single tasks are of such decisive importance to the collective and individual welfare of American citizens as the formulation of public science policy and the administration of scientific programs. Eleven national authorities of varied background in science, education, and government administration contribute their experience and their judgment in an effort to deal with the major aspects of the subject. Their focus is on the meeting of actual problems; they consider the decision making process in both public and public-private organizations. Topics are grouped in three general categories: personnel needs and resources, organizational problems and techniques, and the administrative role in policy leadership.

  19. Publication performance and research output of Neurology and Neurosurgery training institutes in India: A 5-year analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh S Madhugiri

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This evaluation of the publication performance and research output of neurology and neurosurgery training institutes would serve as a baseline data for future evaluations and comparisons. The absence of any publication and research output from several training institutes is a matter of concern.

  20. Continuity of care for patients on a waiting list for institutional long-term care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caris-Verhallen, W.M.C.M.; Kerkstra, A.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine patients' satisfaction with continuity of care while on a waiting list for residential care or nursing home care. Two hundred and seventy-eight patients participated in the study, all living in the community setting of two cities in the Netherlands. These patient

  1. Oral Care during Pregnancy: Attitudes of Brazilian Public Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saul Martins Paiva

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available There is little information about health professionals’ behavior regarding oral health care during pregnancy. We evaluated attitudes of obstetricians/gynecologists, nurses, and dentists working at a public community service towards pregnant women’s oral health. Health professionals responded to a self-applied questionnaire. Cluster analysis identified two clusters of respondents; Chi-square, Student’s t test, and logistic regression were used to compare the two clusters in terms of the independent variables. Respondents were categorized into cluster 1 ‘less favorable’ (n = 159 and cluster 2 ‘more favorable’ (n = 124 attitudes. Professionals that had attended a residency or specialization program (OR = 2.08, 95% CI = 1.15–3.77, p = 0.016 and worked exclusively at the public service (OR = 2.15, 95% CI = 1.10–4.20, p = 0.025 presented more favorable attitudes. Obstetricians/gynecologists (OR = 0.22, 95% CI = 0.09–0.54, p = 0.001 and nurses (OR = 0.50, 95% CI = 0.29–0.86, p = 0.013 showed less favorable attitudes than dentists. Health care providers’ attitudes regarding pregnant women’s oral health were related to their occupation, qualification, and dedication to the public service.

  2. Overcoming Barriers to Public Engagement through a Multi-Institution Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, K. F.; Weiss, M.; Garlick, S.

    2016-12-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that public engagement with science (PES) can enhance the relevance and impact of science on society. At the same time, advances in our understanding of public engagement suggest that greater skills, resources, and time horizons are often required to create effective programs. Consequently, despite a proliferation of training programs, many scientists still face the challenge of balancing the demands of public engagement with the requirements of their disciplinary research. Novel institutions are emerging that bring together interdisciplinary networks of principle investigators with PES practitioners to overcome barriers to effective and sustained public engagement in the environmental sciences. We will use the Science Policy Exchange (SPE), a consortium housed at the Harvard Forest, Harvard University, to illustrate how PIs and PES practitioners can collaborate to design public engagement processes, conduct policy-relevant scientific syntheses, and implement science communication strategies. Results from two SPE case studies demonstrate how multi-institutional consortia can help scientists overcome barriers such as lack of knowledge of evidence-based PES approaches, limits on time and funding to implement PES projects, and the need to integrate PES activities with research. The case studies also show how SPE strives to achieve credibility, saliency, and legitimacy in different public policy contexts: (1) engagement between scientists and local stakeholders to develop scenarios of landscape change; and (2) engagement between scientists and policy makers to understand the relationship between power plant emission standards, and air quality, human health and ecosystem function. The presentation will conclude with examples of how SPE programs have led to institutional change (staffing and budget), cultural change (attitudes and expectations of senior leaders), and research change (development of research questions, funding proposals

  3. Evaluation of leadership competencies of executives in Lithuanian public health institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankūnas, Mindaugas; Sauliūnė, Skirmantė; Smith, Tony; Avery, Mark; Šumskas, Linas; Czabanowska, Katarzyna

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE. Lithuanian and international public health experts emphasize the importance of leadership in public health. The aim of this study was to explore the self-assessed level of leadership competencies of executives in Lithuanian public health institutions. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Data were collected in a cross-sectional survey of executives of Lithuanian public health institutions in 2010. The total number of returned questionnaires was 55 (response rate, 58.5%). Respondents were asked about their competencies in leadership, teamwork, communication, and conflict management. The evaluation was carried out by analyzing the answers provided in the survey, which used a 5-point rating scale. In addition, the Belbin Team-Role Self-Perception Inventory and the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument were used. RESULTS. The results showed that respondents were reserved or limited in their individual capacities through this evaluation of their leadership competencies. The mean score was 3.47 (SD, 0.71). Skills in competency areas of communication, teamwork, and conflict management were scored higher (3.73 [SD, 0.67], 3.73 [SD, 0.62], and 3.53 [SD, 0.63], respectively). Most of executives preferred to choose action-oriented roles (76.2%). The most common role was "implementer" (69.1%). "Avoiding" (52.7%) was the most common conflict solving strategy. The results showed that 89.1% of executives wanted to improve teamwork; 83.6%, leadership competencies; 81.8%, communication; and 80.0%, conflict management. CONCLUSIONS. The study results suggest that the executives of Lithuanian public health institutions evaluate their leadership competencies moderately. These results indicate the value of leadership training for public health executives.

  4. Ambivalent implications of health care information systems: a study in the Brazilian public health care system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Porto de Albuquerque

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This article evaluates social implications of the "SIGA" Health Care Information System (HIS in a public health care organization in the city of São Paulo. The evaluation was performed by means of an in-depth case study with patients and staff of a public health care organization, using qualitative and quantitative data. On the one hand, the system had consequences perceived as positive such as improved convenience and democratization of specialized treatment for patients and improvements in work organization. On the other hand, negative outcomes were reported, like difficulties faced by employees due to little familiarity with IT and an increase in the time needed to schedule appointments. Results show the ambiguity of the implications of HIS in developing countries, emphasizing the need for a more nuanced view of the evaluation of failures and successes and the importance of social contextual factors.

  5. State-owned Enterprises as Institutional Market Actors in the Marketization of Public Service Provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup Christensen, Lene

    This doctoral thesis (PhD) explores from a public governance perspective the role of stateowned enterprises (SOEs) in an era of marketization of public service provision and thus contributes to the renewed academic interest in contemporary SOEs. It builds on an explorative comparative case study...... of DSB SOV and SJ AB in the marketization of passenger rail in Denmark and Sweden respectively from the 1990s to 2015. In the period both cases kept full state ownership and Sweden gradually exposed all services to competition whereas in Denmark with time competition was put on hold. The case study...... as an institutional market actor (IMA)....

  6. Nursing Intervention in adolescence: an institution experience in Public Secondary School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Martínez Esquivel

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Adolescence is a key stage of life to the empowerment that must have health, but it has many needs that healthteams still have not resolved. This article presents an analysis of the health situation of a group of teenagersattending a public institution of higher education and intervention by nursing students, focused on creatingconditions for health promotion and disease prevention. This research was conducted from a quantitative,descriptive and was performed in an institution of secondary education in the period from September toNovember 2012. We worked with students and students of eighth and ninth year with a convenience sample. Themain results indicated needs in sexuality, healthy lifestyles and conflict resolution. To address these issuesevolved different strategies planned, organized, directed and controlled by the individual. We conclude that healtheducation in adolescents is a public health problem and that nurses must meet.

  7. Socio community practices’ analyses at a public superior education institution: Social commitment and transformational potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romina TIRITILLI

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The present research pretends to know about socio community practices’ transformational aspects done by advanced students from a superior education public institution. It’s an exploratory descriptive and qualitative research in which there were used different instruments: tutorials non participant observation during the practices; final students’ colloquies non participant observation; teachers’ critical incidents interviews and students’ final written reports. The sample was intentional composed by students (N=65 and teachers (N=6 from a superior education public institution socio community practices. Basics descriptive statistics were calculated and critical incidents’ and final written reports’ content analyses were done. Results show that socio community practices following the social learning technique promote students transformation in epistemology, social, pedagogic and ethic dimensions. These transformations promote pro social and citizenship behaviors, an ethic position related to professional activity, a critical reflection and community commitment.

  8. Exploring Teachers’ Perception of the Efficacy of ELT in Iranian Public Schools and Private Language Institutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Aliakbari

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper intended to compare teaching English in private language institutes and public schools in Iranian Education system from the viewpoint of the English teachers who practice in both systems. It also aimed at examining teachers’ preference to teach-in either place. 15 English teachers in Ilam city participated in the study and data were collected through a researcher-made questionnaire, including 60 Items through which respondents were asked to express their dis/agreement on 5 subscales. The results showed that better management, better fulfillment of the educational needs, and better teaching environment were among the reasons why the teachers preferred to teach in private language institutes. The study then, provides suggestions for improvement of ELT in the public system.

  9. Institutional Communication and Organizational Culture In Romanian Public Administration. A Case Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luminița Rosca

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to emphasize the extent to which modern management principles are known and applied in the Romanian public institutions. We also aim to identify a system of values that set a pattern of the organizational culture in the system of public institutions. The investigation technique we used is the questionnaire and the method we chose is the sociological survey. According to the standards of research methodology and in order to obtain accurate results, we have pre-tested the research tools in conditions similar to those of the study itself. In this respect, the present study will test the validity of the questionnaire on a group of 41 subjects, master’s students in a specialized program at the University of Bucharest, with the purpose of undertaking the sociological survey. The pilot study conclusions will allow the methodological framework of the sociological survey to refine and adapt the models of international analysis to the actual Romanian context.

  10. Quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff at public healthcare institutions

    OpenAIRE

    María Olga Quintana Zavala; Tatiana Paravic Klinj; Katia Lorena Saenz Carrillo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to determine the quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff at public institutions in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. Method: quantitative, correlational, cross-sectional, and comparative. We used a probabilistic sample of 345 nurses with data collected in 2013 using an instrument created by the authors to gather bio-socio-demographic data and the CVT-GOHISALO instrument with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.95. SPSS 15 was used to analyze the data. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov tes...

  11. Public dental health care program for persons with disability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Hede, Børge; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2005-01-01

    The objectives of the study were (1) to describe the organization and content of the Danish public oral health care program for persons with disability, and (2) to analyse possible variations in relation to the goals and requirements set by the health authorities. Data were collected by means...... of knowledge of oral health and oral health care for persons with disability were barriers to equal access to the program. Preventive dental services were the most frequent services delivered, although relatively few oral hygienists were involved in the program. Special training was most frequent in large...... municipalities. To secure equal access for persons with disability, it is recommended that joint collaboration between smaller municipalities should be made regarding procedures of such programs. Special training of dental personnel and of the staff responsible for selecting persons for the program should...

  12. Public trust in health care in the Netherlands: a performance indicator?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schee, E. van der; Groenewegen, P.P.; Friele, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    If public trust in health care is to be used as a performance indicator for health care systems, its measurement has to be sensitive to changes in the health care system. For this purpose, this study has monitored public trust in health care in The Netherlands over an eight-year period, from 1997 to

  13. Esse Quam Videri, Perhaps: State Policy and Institutional Factors Impacting Low-Income Student Enrollment at North Carolina's Public and Private Four-Year Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly, Leslie Neal

    2012-01-01

    North Carolina is a state with a rich higher education history, which matches the diversity and number of higher education institutions that can be found there. The significant investment of both tax dollars and public support for higher education in North Carolina has created a unique environment in which public policy significantly impacts both…

  14. Should Public Buildings Be Exclusive? A Study of Selected Institutional Buildings in Minna, Niger State.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyetola, S.A

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Some individuals are born with a deformity also known as disability whereas others may become permanently or temporarily disabled over the course of their lives. Buildings should not be made to judge who comes in and goes out of its spaces. A good design must be accessible to all individuals, especially when discussing public buildings. An educational building is a public building and “education for all” is a common dictum that refers to all individuals irrespective of current status. Disabled individuals especially those in wheelchairs have special needs and requirements however, most Institutional buildings do not portray this equality with regards to their design; instead these designs ostracize individuals with disabilities. A survey was carried out on the existing special educational facility and forty four (44 randomly selected institutions of learning located in Minna, the capital of Niger State. They were further categorised based on funding; Federal, state or privately funded institutions. The survey showed that individuals with physical disabilities in Minna were not attending the special educational school and even if they were, facilities were not put in place to accommodate them also, despite the support by the Nigerian government on the equalisation of opportunities for people with disabilities, the public educational system have yet to factor in or retrofit designs to suit disabled individuals in their designs. This paper further highlighted these abnormalities in design and probable causes and concluded by recommending possible solutions.

  15. Public and Institutional Markets for ESCO Services: ComparingPrograms, Practices and Prformance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopper, Nicole; Goldman, Charles; McWilliams, Jennifer; Birr,Dave; Stoughton McMordie, Kate

    2005-03-01

    Throughout the U.S. energy services company (ESCO) industry's history, public and institutional sector customers have provided the greatest opportunities for ESCOs to develop projects. Generally speaking, these facilities are large, possess aging infrastructure, and have limited capital budgets for improvements. The convergence of these factors with strong enabling policy support makes performance contracting an attractive and viable option for these customers. Yet despite these shared characteristics and drivers, there is surprising variety of experience among public/institutional customers and projects. This collaborative study examines the public/institutional markets in detail by comparing the overarching models and project performance in the federal government and the ''MUSH'' markets municipal agencies (state/local government), universities/colleges, K-12 schools,and hospitals that have traditionally played host to much of the ESCO industry's activity. Results are drawn from a database of 1634 completed projects held in partnership by the National Association of Energy Services Companies and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (the NAESCO/LBNL database), including 129 federal Super Energy Savings Performance Contracts (ESPC) provided by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) (Strajnic and Nealon 2003). Project data results are supplemented by interviews with ESCOs.

  16. Status Report on Publicly Traded Child Care Companies--An Interview with John McLaughlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Interview with editor of "Education Industry Report" reveals why child care companies choose to go public on stock exchanges and how publicly traded child care companies are faring. Discusses potential for growth in the industry, advantages of private placement, and recommended steps for going public. Describes nine publicly traded…

  17. Status Report on Publicly Traded Child Care Companies--An Interview with John McLaughlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neugebauer, Roger

    1997-01-01

    Interview with editor of "Education Industry Report" reveals why child care companies choose to go public on stock exchanges and how publicly traded child care companies are faring. Discusses potential for growth in the industry, advantages of private placement, and recommended steps for going public. Describes nine publicly traded companies. (KB)

  18. Challenges of human resource management in the institutions for care of elderly people

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepir, Lj; Šćepović, D.; Radonjić, A. R.

    2017-05-01

    Human resources are the most important resources of any work organization or institution. They are the bearers of the work process and are key in determining the quality of a product or service. The staff employed in an institution contributes with their work to its business success which is why the institution management should pay close attention to human resources management. Functionally, the successful management of social protection institutions implies the attainment of balance in the process of satisfying interests of beneficiaries, interests of the institution management (founder-owner), and interests of the employees (service providers to elderly people). Interests of beneficiaries (elderly people) who are placed in residential care are reflected in the need for high quality and accessible services. Interests of the institution management are recognized as the need to achieve economically sustainable and profitable institution. An interest of direct service providers (employed caregivers, social workers, etc.) is in the safe premises and good working conditions. The term “human resources” in institutions of social protection implies overall knowledge, skills, abilities, creative capabilities, motivation, loyalty and personal characteristics owned by employees in the institution. It is the overall intellectual and emotional energy of employees that the management can count on and that can be engaged to achieving the objectives of the institution. The objectives of human resource management in social protection institutions are related to providing capability with job demands, fulfillment of professional and optimal number of competent workers, improving socio-economic status of employees, ensuring full time engagement of workers, improving the quality of work conditions and work environment, creating and maintaining a flexible and adaptive potential of employees, reducing resistance and increasing the sensitivity of employees to changes in the

  19. [Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement revised guideline, 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleker, O.P.; Meijden, W.I. van der; Wittenberg, J.; Bergen, J.E. van; Boeke, A.J.; Doornum, G.J.J. van; Henquet, C.J.; Galama, J.M.D.; Postma, M.J.; Prins, J.M.; Voorst Vader, P.C. van

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement revised guideline, 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes' summarises the current scientific position on the diagnosis and treatment of a great number of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and neonatal herpes. Symptomatic treatment of susp

  20. Pre-implementation guidelines for infectious disease point-of-care testing in medical institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Eijck (Annemiek); A. Tintu (Andrei); J.P. Hays (John)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractInfectious disease point-of-care test (ID-POCT) devices are becoming widely available, and in this respect, international quality standards and guidelines are available for consultation once ID-POCT has been implemented into medical institutions. However, specific guidelines for consulta

  1. [Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement revised guideline, 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleker, O.P.; Meijden, W.I. van der; Wittenberg, J.; Bergen, J.E. van; Boeke, A.J.; Doornum, G.J.J. van; Henquet, C.J.; Galama, J.M.D.; Postma, M.J.; Prins, J.M.; Voorst Vader, P.C. van

    2003-01-01

    The Dutch Institute for Health Care Improvement revised guideline, 'Sexually transmitted diseases and neonatal herpes' summarises the current scientific position on the diagnosis and treatment of a great number of sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and neonatal herpes. Symptomatic treatment of susp

  2. The health risk due to exposure to bioaerosol occurring in health care institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Ebisz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Health care workers employed in health care institutions are a population particularly exposed to a number of dangerous and burdensome factors, and the main risk factors are biological factors. Infections at the workplace can be transferred by blood but the use of mechanical barriers could potentially reduce the risk. When microorganisms are present in the air and create a bioaerosol, prevention methods are more difficult, and the problem relates to a larger number of employees and other people using health care facilities. Bioaerosol enters the human body through the respiratory system and includes mainly bacteria, fungi, viruses and other organic substances which can cause negative health outcomes.

  3. Essays on the Impacts of Geography and Institutions on Access to Energy and Public Infrastructure Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibong, Belinda

    While previous literature has emphasized the importance of energy and public infrastructure services for economic development, questions surrounding the implications of unequal spatial distribution in access to these resources remain, particularly in the developing country context. This dissertation provides evidence on the nature, origins and implications of this distribution uniting three strands of research from the development and political economy, regional science and energy economics fields. The dissertation unites three papers on the nature of spatial inequality of access to energy and infrastructure with further implications for conflict risk , the historical institutional and biogeographical determinants of current distribution of access to energy and public infrastructure services and the response of households to fuel price changes over time. Chapter 2 uses a novel survey dataset to provide evidence for spatial clustering of public infrastructure non-functionality at schools by geopolitical zone in Nigeria with further implications for armed conflict risk in the region. Chapter 3 investigates the drivers of the results in chapter 2, exploiting variation in the spatial distribution of precolonial institutions and geography in the region, to provide evidence for the long-term impacts of these factors on current heterogeneity of access to public services. Chapter 4 addresses the policy implications of energy access, providing the first multi-year evidence on firewood demand elasticities in India, using the spatial variation in prices for estimation.

  4. Predictors of developmental status in young children living in institutional care in Kazakhstan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupina, Maria G; Toemen, Liza; Aidjanov, Musa M; Georgieff, Michael; Hearst, Mary O; Himes, John H; Johnson, Dana E; Miller, Bradley S; Syzdykova, Aigul M; Sharmanov, Toregeldy S

    2015-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to assess the developmental status of children living in the severely adverse environment of institutional care and the examination of risk factors with regard to developmental status, including degree of stunting and emotional-behavioral and anemia status. The Bayley Scales of Infant Development were used to assess development status in 103 children aged 14.9 months (SD = 6.8) in six Kazakh institutions. The Behavioral Rating Scales were used to assess emotional-behavioral regulation. Physical growth measures were converted to z scores using World Health Organization growth charts. Venous blood was collected for assessment of anemia. Our findings indicated that young children in institutions were developmentally compromised, with duration of institutional care correlated with the severity of delay. Negative predictors of developmental status included: Poor emotional-behavioral regulation, degree of stunting and age at assessment. A particularly large percentage of children were found to be anemic. Additionally, low birth weight was found to be a significant negative predictor of development. Our findings indicate that institutional care has a detrimental impact on the development and emotional regulation of young children. Time in institutional care is a negative predictor for cognitive status for children placed at birth. Moreover stunting was found to be a useful indicator of the degree of impact of early adversity on cognitive development. Particular attention is needed for special-needs children such as those with low birth weight, since their development was found to be more sensitive to early adversity than that of normal birth weight children.

  5. Family-Centered Care in Juvenile Justice Institutions: A Mixed Methods Study Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Eva; Rigter, Henk; Breuk, René; van der Vaart, Wander; Vermeiren, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Background Treatment and rehabilitation interventions in juvenile justice institutions aim to prevent criminal reoffending by adolescents and to enhance their prospects of successful social reintegration. There is evidence that these goals are best achieved when the institution adopts a family-centered approach, involving the parents of the adolescents. The Academic Workplace Forensic Care for Youth has developed two programs for family-centered care for youth detained in groups for short-term and long-term stay, respectively. Objective The overall aim of our study is to evaluate the family-centered care program in the first two years after the first steps of its implementation in short-term stay groups of two juvenile justice institutions in the Netherlands. The current paper discusses our study design. Methods Based on a quantitative pilot study, we opted for a study with an explanatory sequential mixed methods design. This pilot is considered the first stage of our study. The second stage of our study includes concurrent quantitative and qualitative approaches. The quantitative part of our study is a pre-post quasi-experimental comparison of family-centered care with usual care in short-term stay groups. The qualitative part of our study involves in-depth interviews with adolescents, parents, and group workers to elaborate on the preceding quantitative pilot study and to help interpret the outcomes of the quasi-experimental quantitative part of the study. Results We believe that our study will result in the following findings. In the quantitative comparison of usual care with family-centered care, we assume that in the latter group, parents will be more involved with their child and with the institution, and that parents and adolescents will be more motivated to take part in therapy. In addition, we expect family-centered care to improve family interactions, to decrease parenting stress, and to reduce problem behavior among the adolescents. Finally, we assume

  6. The Chinese health care regulatory institutions in an era of transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jing

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to a better understanding of Chinese health care regulation in an era of transition. It describes the major health care regulatory institutions operating currently in China and analyzes the underlying factors. The paper argues that in the transition from a planned to a market economy, the Chinese government has been employing a hybrid approach where both old and new institutions have a role in the management of emerging markets, including the health care market. This approach is consistent with the incremental reform strategy adopted by the Party-state. Although a health care regulatory framework has gradually taken shape, the framework is incomplete, with a particular lack of emphasis on professional self-regulation. In addition, its effectiveness is limited despite the existence of many regulatory institutions. In poor rural areas, the effectiveness of the regulatory framework is further undermined or distorted by the extremely difficult financial position that local governments find themselves in. The interpretations of the principle of 'rule of law' by policy makers and officials at different levels and the widespread informal network of relations between known individuals (Guanxi) play an important role in the operation of the regulatory framework. The findings of this paper reveal the complex nature of regulating health care in transitional China.

  7. Childhood institutional care and personality disorder traits in adulthood: findings from the British national surveys of psychiatric morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Ullrich, Simone; Roberts, Amanda; Coid, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Long-term institutional care in childhood is linked with behavioral and emotional problems and can negatively affect personality development. This study tested the hypotheses that institutional care constitutes a risk factor for adult personality psychopathology and that conduct disorder acts as a mediator to the institutional care effects, based on 544 community individuals and 470 prisoners aged 18-64 years. Childhood institutional care was associated with elevated dependent, histrionic, and narcissistic traits in the community sample and with schizoid traits in prisoners. Initial findings of associations of institutional care with cluster B personality traits in the two populations disappeared after adjusting for conduct disorder symptoms. Identification and treatment of conduct/behavior problems in children before or during care may help to reduce the risk of developing certain personality disorder traits.

  8. Theorizing the Concept of Urban Public Transportation Institutional Framework in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd Rahman Noor Ashikin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The trends in transportation have been changing and will continue to change over the years. Urban dwellers in developing countries require and demand for mobility and accessibility at the same growth rate of these urban areas. Often, this demand is accommodated by the increased number of private vehicles. Development of a country is closely linked with the transportation system facilities thus will have a positive impact on the economic growth and social fabric of a country. The traffic issues are always associated with private vehicles especially in any developing cities such as the Federal Territory of Kuala Lumpur. A practical, efficient and effective transport system includes traffic management, public transport, road network and infrastructure. However, sadly, at present, the traffic problems in Malaysia are resulted from ineffective public transport system which is not methodically integrated from one place to another, therefore, forcing the people to use private vehicles for daily exercise. An integrated and comprehensive approach is required as it enhances the regulatory framework, planning structure and level of services delivered. For that reason, this paper reviews the magnitude of urban public transportation institutional framework in order to improve the people’s mobility, also to respond to the major problem of urban public transportation in the major city of Malaysia. This study therefore applies a case study design and relies very much on qualitative data encompassing policies and guidelines. The findings were drawn from an early investigation of the Malaysian institutional public transport framework through literature review which looks closely into the management structure, as well as the implementation of public transportation system and its enforcement.

  9. A descriptive study on evaluation of bio-medical waste management in a tertiary care public hospital of North India

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Rajiv; Gupta, Anil Kumar; Aggarwal, Arun Kumar; Kumar, Ashok

    2014-01-01

    Background Proper management of Biomedical waste (BMW) generated in a healthcare facility is one of the most important functions of a healthcare worker (HCW) as its improper management not only poses risk to human beings and environment, but may also invite legal action against HCW as well as hospital administration. This study was carried out to evaluate quality of BMW management in 1100-bedded hospital attached to a tertiary care public institute in North India. Methods A checklist, includi...

  10. Crosstalk: public cafés as places for knowledge translation concerning health care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer-Kirkham, Sheryl; Jule, Allyson

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the use of public cafés as a model for knowledge translation and community engagement. We base our discussion on a public café series organized around the theme of access to health care and held in three neighborhoods in the Lower Mainland of British Columbia, Canada. The cafés were part of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Café Scientifique program. Our purposes for this series of cafés were threefold: (a) to provide a site of communication to connect research with members of the public, (b) to build a network among participants based on common connections to the local community, and (c) to explore through discussion how gendered and raced perspectives concerning access to health care may influence the lived experiences of Canadians today. We intended to promote an intergroup conversation, based on the assumption that people of First Nations descent, newcomers to Canada (whether through immigration or resettlement), and settlers (such as Euro-Canadians) would all benefit from hearing each other's perspectives on access to health care, as well as presentations by invited academics about their research on access to health care. A form of "crosstalk" emerged in the cafés, mediated by gender and ethnicity, where social differences and geographical distances between various groups were not easily bridged, and yet where opportunity was created for inclusive dialogic spaces. We conclude that knowledge translation is not easily accomplished with the café format, at least not with the type of critical knowledge we were aiming to translate and the depth of engagement we were hoping for. Our experiences highlighted three strategies that facilitate knowledge translation: relationships and shared goals; involvement of policymakers and decision makers; and tending to social relations of power.

  11. Beneficial effects of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on age-related cognitive decline in long-term-care institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira TCG

    2014-02-01

    , language tests should be routinely adopted in the neuropsychological assessment of elderly subjects, and long-term-care institutions need to include regular sensorimotor, social, and cognitive stimulation as a public health policy for elderly persons. Keywords: aging, multisensory stimulation, cognition, language, impoverished environment, long-term-care institutions

  12. The logical underpinnings and benefits of pooled pharmaceutical procurement: a pragmatic role for our public institutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff-Rousselle, Maggie

    2012-11-01

    Multi-national pharmaceutical companies have long operated across national boundaries, and exercised significant leverage because of the breadth and depth of their market control. The goals of public health can be better served by redressing the imbalance in market leverage between supply and demand. Consolidation of purchasing power across borders, as well as within countries across organizational entities, is one means to addressing this imbalance. In those existing pooled procurement models that consolidate purchasing across national boundaries, benefits have included: 1) reductions in unit purchase prices; 2) improved quality assurance; 3) reduction or elimination of procurement corruption; 4) rationalized choice through better-informed selection and standardization; 5) reduction of operating costs and administrative burden; 6) increased equity between members; 7) augmented practical utility in the role of the host institutions (regional or international) administering the system; and finally, 8) increased access to essential medical products within each participating country. Many barriers to implementation of a multi-country pooled procurement system are eliminated when the mechanism is established within a regional or international institution, especially where participating countries are viewed (and view themselves) as clients/members of the institution, so that they have some sense of ownership over the procurement mechanism. This review article is based on two literature reviews, conducted between 2007 and 2009 (including publications from 1996 through 2009), and interviews with key informants.

  13. Labor Integration with Persons with Disabilities in Public Institutions in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica JUNJAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to investigate the extent to which the legislation aimed to improve and support the labor reinsertion of persons with disabilities is implemented by public institutions. The results suggest that the law provisions concerning labor reinsertion of persons with disabilities are followed to a lower extent than might be expected. Approximately 7% of the organizations that answered this survey and have more than 50 employees do not implement any of the provisions of the law, therefore having no employed persons with disabilities, not paying the contributions to the state budget, and without contracting of services from the protected workplaces. The other institutions employ fewer persons with disabilities than they should do (about 1% comparing to the 4% required by the law. Almost half of the public institutions prefer to use the second option provided by the law, namely to pay the contribution to the state budget instead of hiring persons with disabilities. Additional research is needed to extend this exploratory investigation.

  14. Using Mobile Health to Support the Chronic Care Model: Developing an Institutional Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shantanu Nundy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Self-management support and team-based care are essential elements of the Chronic Care Model but are often limited by staff availability and reimbursement. Mobile phones are a promising platform for improving chronic care but there are few examples of successful health system implementation. Program Development. An iterative process of program design was built upon a pilot study and engaged multiple institutional stakeholders. Patients identified having a “human face” to the pilot program as essential. Stakeholders recognized the need to integrate the program with primary and specialty care but voiced concerns about competing demands on clinician time. Program Description. Nurse administrators at a university-affiliated health plan use automated text messaging to provide personalized self-management support for member patients with diabetes and facilitate care coordination with the primary care team. For example, when a patient texts a request to meet with a dietitian, a nurse-administrator coordinates with the primary care team to provide a referral. Conclusion. Our innovative program enables the existing health system to support a de novo care management program by leveraging mobile technology. The program supports self-management and team-based care in a way that we believe engages patients yet meets the limited availability of providers and needs of health plan administrators.

  15. Where do the poorest go to seek outpatient care in Bangladesh: hospitals run by government or microfinance institutions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-hwei Tseng

    Full Text Available Health programs implemented by microfinance institutions (MFIs aim to benefit the poor, but whether these services reach the poorest remains uncertain. This study intended to investigate the socioeconomic distribution of patients in hospitals operated by microfinance institutions (i.e. MFI hospitals in Bangladesh and compare the differences with public hospitals to determine if the programs were consistent with their pro-poor mandate.In this cross-sectional study, we used the convenience sampling method to conduct an interviewer-assisted questionnaire survey among 347 female outpatients, with 170 in public hospitals and 177 in MFI hospitals. Independent variables were patient characteristics categorized into predisposing factors (age, education, marital status, family size, enabling factors (microcredit membership, household income and need factors (self-rated health, perceived needs for care. We employed Generalized Estimating Equations (GEE to evaluate how these factors contributed to MFI hospital use.Use of MFI hospitals was associated with microcredit membership over 5 years (OR=2.9, p<.01, moderately poor household (OR=4.09, p<.001, non-poor household (OR=7.34, p<.01 and need for preventive care (OR=3.4, p<.01, compared with public hospitals. Combining membership and income, we found microcredit members had a higher tendency towards utilization but membership effect pertained to the non- and moderately-poor. Compared with the group who were non-members and the poorest, microcredit members who were non-poor had the highest likelihood (OR=7.46, p<.001 to visit MFI hospitals, followed by members with moderate income (OR=6.91, p<.001 and then non-members in non-poor households (OR=4.48, p<.01. Those who were members but the poorest had a negative association (OR=0.42, though not significant. Despite a higher utilization of preventive services in MFI hospitals, expenditure there was significantly higher.Inequity was more pronounced in MFI

  16. ISSUES REGARDING THE MANAGEMENT OF INTERNAL CONTROL/ MANAGERIAL AND COMBATING SOME NEGATIVE EFFECTS IN ROMANIAN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS' ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Stegaroiu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to analyze the importance and impact of the management of internal control/ managerial in Romanian public institutions, as well as the consequences arising as a result of not implementing it. It also analyzed the legal framework governing the internal control/managerial and the main conclusions issued by the Romanian Court of Accounts on the status of its implementation in Romanian public institutions. At the same time, it is stressed the role of management carried out by heads of public institutions in terms of combating the negative effects that have a direct impact on their activity.

  17. Marketing aspects of development of medical waste management in health care institutions in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inesa Gurinа

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of marketing approach to medical waste management in health care is suggested.The goal of research was to study the state of marketing activities of health care institutions on medical waste management and development trends of   resolution of outstanding issues.Methods. The methods, which were used in the research, are the methods of mathematical statistics, social studies and scientific knowledge.Results. Environmental marketing institutions of healthcare means perfectly safe for the environment provision of health services. The main directions of environmental marketing concept in health care institutions is the acceptance generally binding legal standards of Use Resources, strict control the formation and licensing of medical waste; economic incentives for workers, aimed at minimizing their interest in the volumes of medical waste; financing of R & D relative to the development of new waste and sound technologies; develop a system of taxes and penalties for polluting the environment and so on.Conclusions. As a result of the implementation of marketing strategies for managing medical waste of healthcare institutions are obtained strategic, social, environmental and economic benefits.

  18. Study on Space Audit Assessment Criteria for Public Higher Education Institution in Malaysia: Space Capacity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Hamdan Wan Samsul Zamani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to measure the capacity rate of learning space based on the as-built drawing provided by the institutions or if the as-built drawing is missing, the researcher have to prepare measured drawing as per actual on site. The learning space Capacity Index is developed by analyzing the space design in as-built drawing or measured drawing and the list of learning spaces available at the institution. The Capacity Index is classified according to the level of Usable Floor Area (UFA and Occupancy Load (OL according to learning space design capacity. The classification of Capacity Index is demonstrated through linguistic value and the color-coded key. From the said index, the institution can easily identify whether the existing learning space is currently best used or vice versa and standard space planning compliance in Malaysia Public Higher Education Institutions. The data will assist the management to clarify whether to maximize the use of existing space or to request for new learning space.

  19. The dynamics of human behavior in the public goods game with institutional incentives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yali; Zhang, Boyu; Tao, Yi

    2016-06-24

    The empirical research on the public goods game (PGG) indicates that both institutional rewards and institutional punishment can curb free-riding and that the punishment effect is stronger than the reward effect. Self-regarding models that are based on Nash equilibrium (NE) strategies or evolutionary game dynamics correctly predict which incentives are best at promoting cooperation, but individuals do not play these rational strategies overall. The goal of our study is to investigate the dynamics of human decision making in the repeated PGG with institutional incentives. We consider that an individual's contribution is affected by four factors, which are self-interest, the behavior of others, the reaction to rewards, and the reaction to punishment. We find that people on average do not react to rewards and punishment, and that self-interest and the behavior of others sufficiently explain the dynamics of human behavior. Further analysis suggests that institutional incentives promote cooperation by affecting the self-regarding preference and that the other-regarding preference seems to be independent of incentive schemes. Because individuals do not change their behavioral patterns even if they were not rewarded or punished, the mere potential to punish defectors and reward cooperators can lead to considerable increases in the level of cooperation.

  20. Paradigms for Assessment of Organizational Climate in a Public Research Institute

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    Jorge Luiz Knupp Rodrigues

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the factors relevant to assessment of organizational climate of a Public Institute for Research in the area of C&T, with headquarters located in Vale do Paraiba Paulista considering their specific characteristics and the perception of its employers for the characteristics of this work environment. This is a quantitative, exploratory descriptive, taking the form of survey. The Institution research participant has 1.075 active employers and the sample used in data collection were 149 respondents in which a questionnaire was administered, whose data were statistically analyzed. It was found the stability of the instrument through Cronbach's Alpha Test, which indicated the reliability of the survey responses and the tests Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin – KMO and Bartlett’s Sphericity indicated that the factor analysis could be used in this mass data. The technique of factor analysis was applied and the results showed that 10 clusters of issues/indicators are suitable for this study. After analyzing the clusters were identified the following factors as relevant for climate study: Identity and Security, Autonomy, Achievement and Satisfaction with Work, Professional Development, Commitment and Teamwork, Leadership, Salary, Interaction, and Satisfaction with Institution Organizational Structure. This work reached its goal and its outcome encourages further studies on the subject, and provides subsidies for the development of a tool to search appropriate to the specific organizational climate of the institution concerned.

  1. The Affordable Care Act's implications for a public health workforce agenda: taxonomy, enumeration, and the Standard Occupational Classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, J Henry; Webb, Susan C

    2015-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act brings a renewed emphasis on the importance of public health services and those whose occupations are defined by performing the essential public health functions. The Affordable Care Act Prevention and Public Health Fund is a signal to the field that its work is important and critical to the health of the nation. Recent reports by the Institute of Medicine describe the changing dimensions of public health work in primary care integration and the need for enhanced financing of public health as investment. Gaining knowledge about the public health workforce, that is, how many workers there are and what they are doing, is of growing interest and concern for the field. Although enumeration of the public health workforce has been attempted several times by the federal government beginning as early as 1982, it was not until the year 2000 that a major effort was undertaken to obtain more complete information. Limitations that hampered Enumeration 2000 have persisted however. With implementation of the Affordable Care Act and other new ventures, key federal agencies are developing strategies to pursue a systemic and systematic enumeration and consistent taxonomy process. Included in these efforts is use of the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Standard Occupational Classification system. A clear and accurate understanding of the public health workforce and its characteristics is a major challenge. A well-constructed, systematic enumeration process can add to our understanding of the nature and functions of that workforce. In addition, discussion of enumeration must include the need for a consensus within the field that leads to a consistent taxonomy for the public health occupations. This article will provide a stage-setting brief of historical actions regarding enumeration, and it will examine selected enumeration activities taking place currently. It will discuss positive and negative implications facing public health and the potential for enhancing the

  2. Analyzing the Challenges of IS implementation in public health institutions of a developing country

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the challenges of introducing computer-based health information systems in the context of the Ethiopian public health care system. Drawing empirical examples from the process of introducing computer-based health information system(HIS) in two regional states (Amhara and Benish......This paper explores the challenges of introducing computer-based health information systems in the context of the Ethiopian public health care system. Drawing empirical examples from the process of introducing computer-based health information system(HIS) in two regional states (Amhara...... base and cultivation the paper examines the socio-technical issues and factors that influenced the process of developing, customizing, and implementing computerised HIS in different settings. The findings of this paper revealed that contextual differences in terms of access to infrastructural reources...... diffferent flexible strategies: the strategy of gateways, top-down vs bottom-up approaches, flexible essential data sets and clustering have beed identified as being useful in implementing computer-based systems in different settings of the Ethiopian public health care system....

  3. Beneficial effects of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on age-related cognitive decline in long-term-care institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Thaís Cristina Galdino; Soares, Fernanda Cabral; De Macedo, Liliane Dias E Dias; Diniz, Domingos Luiz Wanderley Picanço; Bento-Torres, Natáli Valim Oliver; Picanço-Diniz, Cristovam Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present report was to evaluate the effectiveness and impact of multisensory and cognitive stimulation on improving cognition in elderly persons living in long-term-care institutions (institutionalized [I]) or in communities with their families (noninstitutionalized [NI]). We compared neuropsychological performance using language and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) test scores before and after 24 and 48 stimulation sessions. The two groups were matched by age and years of schooling. Small groups of ten or fewer volunteers underwent the stimulation program, twice a week, over 6 months (48 sessions in total). Sessions were based on language and memory exercises, as well as visual, olfactory, auditory, and ludic stimulation, including music, singing, and dance. Both groups were assessed at the beginning (before stimulation), in the middle (after 24 sessions), and at the end (after 48 sessions) of the stimulation program. Although the NI group showed higher performance in all tasks in all time windows compared with I subjects, both groups improved their performance after stimulation. In addition, the improvement was significantly higher in the I group than the NI group. Language tests seem to be more efficient than the MMSE to detect early changes in cognitive status. The results suggest the impoverished environment of long-term-care institutions may contribute to lower cognitive scores before stimulation and the higher improvement rate of this group after stimulation. In conclusion, language tests should be routinely adopted in the neuropsychological assessment of elderly subjects, and long-term-care institutions need to include regular sensorimotor, social, and cognitive stimulation as a public health policy for elderly persons.

  4. Health-related behaviour among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerneja Farkas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Behavioural risk factors have a significant impact on health. We aimed to assess health-related behaviour, health status, and use of healthcare services among managers of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study which included management (directors, scientific directors, directors’ deputies of Slovenian hospitals and institutes of public health (63 respondents; 57% women; overall mean age: 51±7 years; response rate: 74%. Data were obtained using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire. Results: About 35% of respondents were directors. More than half of the respondents were overweight or obese (52%, the majority were not sufficiently physically active (59% and overloaded with stress (87%. Hypercholesterolemia (36%, spinal disease (17%, and arterial hypertension (16% were most common chronic diseases. Whilst only few participants visited their general practitioner due their health complaints, blood pressure (76%, cholesterol (51%, and glucose (54% were measured within last year in most of the respondents. Conclusion: Our findings point to a high prevalence of overweight and obesity as well as workplace-related stress among Slovenian public health managers. Therefore, effective preventive strategies should be focused on stress management along with promotion of healthy behavioural patterns.

  5. Breast cancer mammographic diagnosis performance in a public health institution: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Juliana M R B; Bittelbrunn, Fernando P; Rockenbach, Marcio A B C; May, Guilherme G; Vedolin, Leonardo M; Kruger, Marilia S; Soldatelli, Matheus D; Zwetsch, Guilherme; de Miranda, Gabriel T F; Teixeira, Saone I P; Arruda, Bruna S

    2017-10-04

    To evaluate the quality assurance of mammography results at a reference institution for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer in southern Brazil, based on the BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System) 5th edition recommendations for auditing purposes. Retrospective cohort and cross-sectional study with 4502 patients (9668 mammographies)) who underwent at least one or both breast mammographies throughout 2013 at a regional public hospital, linked to a federal public university. The results were followed until 31 December 2014, including true positives (TPs), true negatives (TNs), false positives (FPs), false negatives (FNs), positive predictive values (PPVs), negative predictive value (NPV), sensitivity and specificity, with a confidence interval of 95%. The study showed high quality assurance, particularly regarding sensitivity (90.22%) and specificity (92.31%). The overall positive predictive value (PPV) was 65.35%, and the negative predictive value (NPV) was 98.32%. The abnormal interpretation rate (recall rate) was 12.26%. The results are appropriate when compared to the values proposed by the BIRADS 5th edition. Additionally, the study provided self-reflection considering our radiological practice, which is essential for improvements and collaboration regarding breast cancer detection. It may stimulate better radiological practice performance and continuing education, despite possible infrastructure and facility limitations. • Accurate quality performance rates are possible despite financial and governmental limitations. • Low-income institutions should develop standardised teamwork to improve radiological practice. • Regular mammography audits may help to increase the quality of public health systems.

  6. Course of neuropsychiatric symptoms in residents with dementia in long-term care institutions : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, Roland; Zuidema, Sytse; Jansen, Iepke; Verhey, Frans; Koopmans, Raymond

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuropsychiatric symptoms (NPS) occur frequently in residents of long-term care institutions. The aim of this study was to review the literature systematically on the course of NPS in residents with dementia in long-term care institutions. METHODS: A systematic literature search was cond

  7. Institutional Care of Children in Low- and Middle-Income Settings: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom of Oliver Twist

    OpenAIRE

    Braitstein, Paula

    2015-01-01

    Whether institutions or extended families are better suited to care for orphans depends on the specific circumstances. Reported rates of traumatic experiences among orphans and vulnerable children are high in both institutions and extended families; improving the quality of care for such children should be the paramount priority in all settings.

  8. Where we publish : an analysis of the publications of German institutes of pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, Florian Rudolf; Dietel, Manfred; Kristiansen, Glen

    2008-04-01

    Pathologists provide the link between the clinical and the natural science aspect of medicine and are often integrated in translational research projects. We wanted to analyse the spread and position of research led by pathologists in the scientific literature. Publications from institutes of pathology of 21 randomly chosen German university cities between 2004 and 2006 were analysed. To validate our findings we subsequently extended our analysis to 45 university cities from Italy, France and the Nordic countries (Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden). We detected publications directed by pathologists in numerous biomedical journals, most of which not categorised as "pathology" journals. In the analyses from Germany and Italy, Virchows Archiv led the ranking in terms of absolute number of publications. Meanwhile, Anticancer Research and the International Journal of Cancer took the lead concerning publications from pathologists from the Nordic countries. Our results mirror the wide diversification in scientific pathology and the overlap with other medical subspecialties, especially oncology, cell biology and biochemistry. This explains the problem of defining "pathology" journals and deducting pathological research activity from these publications. However, the general notion that pathology journals are the most important communication medium of pathology research was affirmed.

  9. Systemic management of projects in a public research and development institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcia Helena de Oliveira

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study describes the research and development (R & D project management process in an aerospace sector public research institution, belonging to the São Paulo State Paraiba River Valley technological and industrial park, the General Command for Aerospace Technology (Comando - Geral de Tecnologia Aeroespacial – CTA. The exploratory research undertaken aimed to identify the application of federal government and FINEP funding, as well as the instruments and tools available to the institution, including its planning, its regulations, guidelines, standards and reports which pervade the R & D project management process. This study examined the planning, follow-up and monitoring activities associated with real case studies. From the qualitative and quantitative information collected, observations and recommendations were made in order to improve the efficient management of these activities.

  10. HEALTH CARE INSTITUTIONS ENERGY CONSERVATION STATUS AND THOUGHTS%我国医疗卫生机构节能工作现状与思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯惠荣; 李兆宇

    2015-01-01

    Health care institutions energy conservation work is an important part of national public service institutions energy conservation work. The article explains the urgency and importance of health care institutions energy conservation work; describes the progress of the energy conservation work; and gives advice to carry out energy-saving work in the future.%医疗卫生机构的节能工作是我国公共服务机构节能领域的一项重要内容。文章概述了我国医疗卫生机构节能工作的紧迫性和重要性,阐述了医疗卫生机构节能工作的进展情况,并提出了未来开展节能工作的建议。

  11. Public Access and Use of Health Research: An Exploratory Study of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy Using Interviews and Surveys of Health Personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willinsky, John; Maggio, Lauren

    2011-01-01

    Background In 2008, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Public Access Policy mandated open access for publications resulting from NIH funding (following a 12-month embargo). The large increase in access to research that will take place in the years to come has potential implications for evidence-based practice (EBP) and lifelong learning for health personnel. Objective This study assesses health personnel’s current use of research to establish whether grounds exist for expecting, preparing for, and further measuring the impact of the NIH Public Access Policy on health care quality and outcomes in light of time constraints and existing information resources. Methods In all, 14 interviews and 90 surveys of health personnel were conducted at a community-based clinic and an independent teaching hospital in 2010. Health personnel were asked about the research sources they consulted and the frequency with which they consulted these sources, as well as motivation and search strategies used to locate articles, perceived level of access to research, and knowledge of the NIH Public Access Policy. Results In terms of current access to health information, 65% (57/88) of the health personnel reported being satisfied, while 32% (28/88) reported feeling underserved. Among the sources health personnel reported that they relied upon and consulted weekly, 83% (73/88) reported turning to colleagues, 77% (67/87) reported using synthesized information resources (eg, UpToDate and Cochrane Systematic Reviews), while 32% (28/88) reported that they consulted primary research literature. The dominant resources health personnel consulted when actively searching for health information were Google and Wikipedia, while 27% (24/89) reported using PubMed weekly. The most prevalent reason given for accessing research on a weekly basis, reported by 35% (31/88) of survey respondents, was to help a specific patient, while 31% (26/84) were motivated by general interest in research. Conclusions

  12. A Case Study of Institutional Visioning, Public Good, and the Renewal of Democracy: The Theory and Practice of Public Good Work at the University of Denver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretz, Eric; Cutforth, Nick; Nicotera, Nicole; Thompson, Sheila Summers

    2009-01-01

    In 2001, the University of Denver included language in its vision statement that committed the institution to becoming "a great private university dedicated to the public good." This essay (1) explains how the development of an institutional visioning statement led to the implementation of a series of campus dialogues and action steps…

  13. Environmental Sustainability: Study an Institution of Higher Education Public of the State of Santa Catarina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Kalynka Rocha

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper has the general objective of analyzing the environmental sustainability of an Institution of Higher Education (IHE Public of the State of Santa Catarina. To meet this objective has to reach the specific objectives: to check the number of IHEs in Brazil and Santa Catarina; to identify the number of public and private institutions and to propose a management model 5W2H to deficit sustainability criteria. The methodology and the objectives considered descriptive, with the technical procedures has the case study and the approach problem qualitative. The methodology is divided into three phases: the first phase it is the theoretical basis, it approaches social and environmental responsibility; environmental management and environmental management system. In the second phase it is the analysis of the results where first there was the amount of IHE and distribution in administrative categories. In the third phase, it has been the purpose of responding to a checklist of 154 questions developed by Pieri et al (2011 and Environmental Management Plan Summary (5W2H. In the end it is concluded that the institution submitted a global sustainability index of 32 %, being regarded as weak, proposing with the 5W2H tool, an action for each criterion, as the inclusion of recyclable products in acquisitions; recycling of waste; accessibility to the handicapped; and creating actions that approximates the IHE to the society. It is hoped that the proposed actions that the institution to put them into practice, increase the environmental sustainability index, benefiting society and the environment.

  14. The role of communication in the transformation process of public institutions in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Vasile

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available As a result of changes that take place in the Romanian economical-political-social environment before and after the integration in the European Union, the public administration must be able to rise up to the challenges that it has to confront. On the other hand, the civil society and the private sector, in order to develop, must find in the administration a partner that can facilitate communication and can offer the levers and instruments for them to express themselves and develop. A rigid administration, constrained by its own resources, norms and regulations cannot offer the most prompt answer to the needs of society, forming a barrier, often hard to surpass. That is why change should be a priority for the public administration in order to adapt to the same rhythm through a strategy that can promote communication, transparency, efficiency and effectiveness.Despite all this, it is required that the reform initiatives of the public administration to involve all factors that can contribute to the reform process: institutional, governmental factors, the European Union regulations, the requirements of the private and civil society. In order to answer to and involve all this factors, a communication strategy made and, precisely, adapted in the frame of the implementation process of the management of change is needed. In this process, the communication is answering the following wishes: the need of transparency of the decisional system; the need of communicating everything, immediately; the internal and external credibility of the institution management; the need of changing the people perception in regard to the institution, and, in this case facilitator and instrument in the change process.

  15. Quality of Care at Hospitals Identified as Outliers in Publicly Reported Mortality Statistics for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldo, Stephen W; McCabe, James M; Kennedy, Kevin F; Zigler, Corwin M; Pinto, Duane S; Yeh, Robert W

    2017-05-16

    Public reporting of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) outcomes may create disincentives for physicians to provide care for critically ill patients, particularly at institutions with worse clinical outcomes. We thus sought to evaluate the procedural management and in-hospital outcomes of patients treated for acute myocardial infarction before and after a hospital had been publicly identified as a negative outlier. Using state reports, we identified hospitals that were recognized as negative PCI outliers in 2 states (Massachusetts and New York) from 2002 to 2012. State hospitalization files were used to identify all patients with an acute myocardial infarction within these states. Procedural management and in-hospital outcomes were compared among patients treated at outlier hospitals before and after public report of outlier status. Patients at nonoutlier institutions were used to control for temporal trends. Among 86 hospitals, 31 were reported as outliers for excess mortality. Outlier facilities were larger, treating more patients with acute myocardial infarction and performing more PCIs than nonoutlier hospitals (Poutlier hospital after public report. The likelihood of PCI at outlier (relative risk [RR], 1.13; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12-1.15) and nonoutlier institutions (RR, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.11-1.14) increased in a similar fashion (interaction P=0.50) after public report of outlier status. The likelihood of in-hospital mortality decreased at outlier institutions (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.81-0.85) after public report, and to a lesser degree at nonoutlier institutions (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.87-0.92; interaction Poutlier institutions after public recognition of outlier status in comparison with prior (RR, 0.72; 9% CI, 0.66-0.79), a decline that exceeded the reduction at nonoutlier institutions (RR, 0.87; 95% CI, 0.80-0.96; interaction Poutliers. The rates of percutaneous revascularization increased similarly at outlier and nonoutlier institutions after report

  16. Profile of hospital care for external causes in public hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlos Victor Fonsêca de Lima

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify the profile of external causes in the emergency room of a public reference hospital in the state. Descriptive research document with a quantitative approach. The data analysis revealed that from January to December 2009 were made 4464 external causes. The higher frequency of injuries occurred in individuals aged 21 to 40 years (37.70%, males (68.6%. Regarding the causes, falls (29% was the biggest variable, followed by motorcycle accidents (17.98%, domestic accidents (16.53%, physical abuse (10.43% and bicycle accident (8, 84%. It was observed that 23.3% of the visits made to the emergency room were the people coming from surrounding municipalities. The study revealed the need to improve the quality of information about the grievances motivated by external causes, which are major causes of hospitalization and health care expenses.

  17. Publications and geothermal sample library facilities of the Earth Science Laboratory, University of Utah Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Phillip M.; Ruth, Kathryn A.; Langton, David R.; Bullett, Michael J.

    1990-03-30

    The Earth Science Laboratory of the University of Utah Research Institute has been involved in research in geothermal exploration and development for the past eleven years. Our work has resulted in the publication of nearly 500 reports, which are listed in this document. Over the years, we have collected drill chip and core samples from more than 180 drill holes in geothermal areas, and most of these samples are available to others for research, exploration and similar purposes. We hope that scientists and engineers involved in industrial geothermal development will find our technology transfer and service efforts helpful.

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF THE INSTITUTIONAL BASIS FOR FINANCING THE PUBLIC SECTOR OF THE REGIONAL ECONOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.N. Sidorova

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the problems of financial support of the regional and municipal economy development. Formation of the institutional basis for the budgeting process and budgets interactions between the territories of different levels are shown on the base of retrospective analysis of foundation and development of budget federalism in Russia. Attraction of entrepreneurial sector resources on the conditions of public-private partnership is discussed as additional finance source and definite particularities of this process are described in line with the possibilities of their appliance.

  19. Quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff at public healthcare institutions 1

    OpenAIRE

    Zavala,María Olga Quintana; Klinj, Tatiana Paravic; Carrillo, Katia Lorena Saenz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to determine the quality of life in the workplace for nursing staff at public institutions in Hermosillo, Sonora, Mexico. Method: quantitative, correlational, cross-sectional, and comparative. We used a probabilistic sample of 345 nurses with data collected in 2013 using an instrument created by the authors to gather bio-socio-demographic data and the CVT-GOHISALO instrument with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.95. SPSS 15 was used to analyze the data. A Kolmogorov-Smirnov test wa...

  20. AICPA standard aids in detecting risk factors for fraud. American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinstein, A; Dery, R J

    1999-10-01

    The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants' Statement on Auditing Standards (SAS) No. 82, Consideration of Fraud in a Financial Statement Audit, requires independent auditors to obtain reasonable assurance that financial statements are free of material mis-statements caused by error or fraud. SAS No. 82 provides guidance for independent auditors to use to help detect and document risk factors related to potential fraud. But while SAS No. 82 suggests how auditors should assess the potential for fraud, it does not expand their detection responsibility. Accordingly, financial managers should discuss thoroughly with auditors the scope and focus of an audit as a means to further their compliance efforts.

  1. Health care institution labor law: case law developments, 1974-78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, I M

    1978-01-01

    This Article examines the key National Labor Relations Board and federal court interpretations of the much-heralded 1974 Health Care Institution Amendments to the National Labor Relations Act. It analyzes NLRB decisions that have resulted in a proliferation of separate employee bargaining units at health care facilities, and that have applied the strike notice provisions of the NLRA to labor disputes involving building trade employees engaged in construction at operating health care facilities. In addition, the Article examines the Board's decision to decline jurisdiction over employee unions representing interns and residents, and summarizes both the special NLRB rules designed to apply to union solicitation of employees at health care facilities and the conflicting circuit court decisions that have modified the Board's specialized solicitation rules.

  2. State-owned Enterprises as Institutional Market Actors in the Marketization of Public Service Provision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolstrup Christensen, Lene

    of DSB SOV and SJ AB in the marketization of passenger rail in Denmark and Sweden respectively from the 1990s to 2015. In the period both cases kept full state ownership and Sweden gradually exposed all services to competition whereas in Denmark with time competition was put on hold. The case study......This doctoral thesis (PhD) explores from a public governance perspective the role of stateowned enterprises (SOEs) in an era of marketization of public service provision and thus contributes to the renewed academic interest in contemporary SOEs. It builds on an explorative comparative case study...... consists of document study and +50 interviews and is based on a historical institutionalist perspective on gradual change that emphasizes interpretation in the implementation between rule makers and rule takers as a driver of institutional change. It leads to the conceptualization of the SOE...

  3. Balanced Scorecard – Strategic Management Tool of Performance in Public Institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Cretu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Balanced Scorecard (BSC is used to achieve an operational strategic vision at all levels of the organization regarding issues related to performance, strategy, communication, resource allocation, decision-making and competitiveness. BSC was created to restrict the limits of traditional financial and management tools and ensure unity of vision and long-term action in an organization. The main advantage of the method consists in guiding managers and departments, human resources, technological and financial resources towards the strategy of the organization. Unfortunately BSC is mainly used in private companies, because high costs and lack of specialists pose a real obstacle in implementing this instrument in public institutions. Our arguments attempts to show that the Balanced Scorecard can be the most appropriate among all the management tools for the public sector.

  4. Acceptance and use of health information technology in Slovenian public health institutions: a national survey based on UTAUT model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matej Vinko; Špela Brecelj; Ivan Eržen; Dejan Dinevski

    2013-01-01

    ... (IT) in Slovenian public healthcare institutions. To our knowledge, this is the first national survey to estimate the willingness of employees to welcome new technology into their work routine. Methods...

  5. Primary Care Research in the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute's Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selby, Joe V; Slutsky, Jean R

    2016-04-01

    In their article in this issue, Mazur and colleagues analyze the characteristics of early recipients of funding from the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). Mazur and colleagues note correctly that PCORI has a unique purpose and mission and suggest that it should therefore have a distinct portfolio of researchers and departments when compared with other funders such as the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Responding on behalf of PCORI, the authors of this Commentary agree with the characterization of PCORI's mission as distinct from that of NIH and others. They agree too that data found on PCORI's Web site demonstrate that PCORI's portfolio of researchers and departments is more diverse and more heavily populated with clinician researchers, as would be expected. The authors take issue with Mazur and colleagues' suggestion that because half of clinical visits occur within primary care settings, half of PCORI's funded research should be based in primary care departments. PCORI's portfolio reflects what patients and others tell PCORI are the critical questions. Many of these do, in fact, occur with more complex conditions in specialty care. The authors question whether the research of primary care departments is too narrowly focused and whether it sufficiently considers study of these complex conditions. Research on more complex conditions including heart failure, coronary artery disease, and multiple comorbid conditions could be highly valuable when approached from the primary care perspective, where many of the comparative effectiveness questions first arise.

  6. Ethics support in institutional elderly care: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Dam, Sandra; Molewijk, Bert; Widdershoven, Guy A M; Abma, Tineke A

    2014-09-01

    Clinical ethics support mechanisms in healthcare are increasing but little is known about the specific developments in elderly care. The aim of this paper is to present a systematic literature review on the characteristics of existing ethics support mechanisms in institutional elderly care. A review was performed in three electronic databases (Pubmed, CINAHL/PsycINFO, Ethxweb). Sixty papers were included in the review. The ethics support mechanisms are classified in four categories: 'institutional bodies' (ethics committee and consultation team); 'frameworks' (analytical tools to assist care professionals); 'educational programmes and moral case deliberation'; and 'written documents and policies'. For each category the goals, methods and ways of organising are described. Ethics support often serves several goals and can be targeted at various levels: case, professional or organisation. Over the past decades a number of changes have taken place in the development of ethics support in elderly care. Considering the goals, ethics support has become more outreaching and proactive, aiming to qualify professionals to integrate ethics in daily care processes. The approaches in clinical ethics support have become more diverse, more focused on everyday ethical issues and better adapted to the concrete learning style of the nursing staff. Ethics support has become less centrally organised and more connected to local contexts and primary process within the organisation.

  7. An evaluation of the National Public Health Leadership Institute--1991-2006: part I. Developing individual leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umble, Karl E; Baker, Edward L; Woltring, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Public health leadership development programs are widely employed to strengthen leaders and leadership networks and ultimately agencies and systems. The year-long National Public Health Leadership Institute's (PHLI) goals are to develop the capacity of individual leaders and networks of leaders so that both can lead improvement in public health systems, infrastructure, and population health. To evaluate the impact of PHLI on individual graduates using data collected from the first 15 cohorts. Between 1992 and 2006, PHLI graduated 806 senior leaders from governmental agencies, academia, health care, associations, nonprofit organizations, foundations, and other organizations. Of 646 graduates located, 393 (61%) responded to a survey, for an overall response rate of 49% (393/806). PHLI has included retreats; readings, conference calls, and webinars; assessments, feedback, and coaching; and action learning projects, in which graduates apply concepts to a work challenge aided by peers and a coach. A survey of all graduates and interviews of 34 graduates and one other key informant. PHLI improved graduates' understanding, skills, and self-awareness, strengthened many graduates' connections to a network of leaders, and significantly increased graduates' voluntary leadership activities at local, state, and national levels (P supportive peers and ideas, and bolstered confidence and interest in taking on leadership work. Nearly all graduates remained in public health. Some partially attributed to PHLI their promotions into more senior positions. Leadership development programs can strengthen and sustain their impact by cultivating sustained "communities of practice" that provide ongoing support for skill development and innovative practice. Sponsors can fruitfully view leadership development as a long-term investment in individuals and networks within organizations or fields of practice.

  8. Public private partnerships for emergency obstetric care: Lessons from Maharashtra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarika Chaturvedi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The National Rural Health Mission of India advocates public private partnerships (PPPs to meet its "service guarantee" of Emergency obstetric care (EmOC provision. The Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY has a provision of Rs. 1500 for contracting in obstetric specialists. Objectives: The study aimed to understand the issues in the design and implementation of the PPPs for EmOC under the JSY in Maharashtra and how they affect the availability of EmOC services to women. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study using the rapid assessment approach was conducted in Ahmednagar district of Maharashtra spanning 1-year duration ending in June 2009. Primary data were obtained through interviews with women, providers, and administrators at various levels. Data were analyzed thematically. Results: The PPP scheme for EmOC is restricted to deliveries by Caesarean section. The administrators prefer subsidization of costs for services in private facilities to contracting in. There are no PPPs executed in the study district. This study identifies barriers to women in accessing the benefit and the difficulties faced by administrators in implementing the scheme. Conclusion: The PPPs for EmOC under the JSY have minimally influenced the out-of-pocket payments for EmOC. Infrastructural inadequacies and passive support of the implementers are major barriers to the implementation of contracting-in model of PPPs. Capacities in the public health system are inadequate to design and manage PPPs.

  9. Public private partnerships for emergency obstetric care: lessons from maharashtra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sarika; Randive, Bharat

    2011-01-01

    The National Rural Health Mission of India advocates public private partnerships (PPPs) to meet its "service guarantee" of Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) provision. The Janani Suraksha Yojana (JSY) has a provision of Rs. 1500 for contracting in obstetric specialists. The study aimed to understand the issues in the design and implementation of the PPPs for EmOC under the JSY in Maharashtra and how they affect the availability of EmOC services to women. A cross-sectional study using the rapid assessment approach was conducted in Ahmednagar district of Maharashtra spanning 1-year duration ending in June 2009. Primary data were obtained through interviews with women, providers, and administrators at various levels. Data were analyzed thematically. The PPP scheme for EmOC is restricted to deliveries by Caesarean section.The administrators prefer subsidization of costs for services in private facilities to contracting in. There are no PPPs executed in the study district. This study identifies barriers to women in accessing the benefit and the difficulties faced by administrators in implementing the scheme. The PPPs for EmOC under the JSY have minimally influenced the out-of-pocket payments for EmOC. Infrastructural inadequacies and passive support of the implementers are major barriers to the implementation of contracting-in model of PPPs. Capacities in the public health system are inadequate to design and manage PPPs.

  10. [Difficulties of the care of public antigen alloimmunization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Amor, I; Rekik, T; Louati, N; Lahiani, W; Rekik, H; Peyrard, T; Menif, H; Gargouri, J

    2016-05-01

    Alloimmunization against high-frequency erythrocyte antigens is a problematic situation in terms of laboratory diagnosis, transfusion and obstetrical management. We report the case of a pregnant woman alloimmunized against public Ag. We detail the difficulties of alloantibody (Ab) identification and transfusion management of the deliveries. A 29-year-old pregnant woman was hospitalized in gynecology and obstetrics departments at 36 weeks of gestation for assessment of hydrops fetalis. Antibody identification test revealed the presence of a pan-reactive antibody. Investigations realized in CNRGS (Paris) concluded in anti-GE2+anti-RH3+autoantibody. The red cell phenotype was GE: -2,3. A therapeutic interruption of the pregnancy was indicated. A program of autologous transfusion was organized with withdrawal of 2 units of blood. The 2nd pregnancy took place normally. Before delivery, an autologous blood reserve consisting of 2 red cell packs and 2 fresh frozen plasma was withdrawn and transfused after delivery. The management of anti-public alloimmunization poses several problems. The first one is of diagnostic nature with, on the one hand, the difficulty of Ab identification by the available red cell panels and, on the other hand, the possible presence of alloantibodies of transfusional or obstetric interest masked by anti-public Ab. The second is represented by transfusional care of these patients. In the absence of a national reserve of frozen rare blood, the autologous transfusion remains the only alternative. However, it can answer only a limited number of indications and only in case of moderate blood loss.

  11. [Children's department and child care institutions of the Central military, hospital of People's commissariat during the Great Patriotic War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonenko, V B; Krainyukov, P E; Abashin, V G

    2016-01-01

    The article presents historical data about paediatric health care delivery and escort of children of the Command of the Red Army during their evacuation from Moscow in 1941. Data on foundation of kindergartens of People's commissariat in 1942-1943, their support and foundation of children's department in the hospital is given. Special subdivision governed by the head of child care institutions of the hospital was formed for managing child care institutions.

  12. The maternity ward as mirror : Maternal death, biobureaucracy, and institutional care in the Tanzanian health sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strong, A.E.

    2017-01-01

    As public health policies continue to encourage women to give birth in biomedical care facilities, this research provides insight into the sequences of events leading to deaths in these settings from the unique perspective of the healthcare providers and administrators themselves, in addition to

  13. Do Physical Proximity and Availability of Adequate Infrastructure at Public Health Facility Increase Institutional Delivery? A Three Level Hierarchical Model Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rachana; Ladusingh, Laishram

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to examine the inter-district and inter-village variation of utilization of health services for institutional births in EAG states in presence of rural health program and availability of infrastructures. District Level Household Survey-III (2007-08) data on delivery care and facility information was used for the purpose. Bivariate results examined the utilization pattern by states in presence of correlates of women related while a three-level hierarchical multilevel model illustrates the effect of accessibility, availability of health facility and community health program variables on the utilization of health services for institutional births. The study found a satisfactory improvement in state Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Orissa, importantly, in Bihar and Uttaranchal. The study showed that increasing distance from health facility discouraged institutional births and there was a rapid decline of more than 50% for institutional delivery as the distance to public health facility exceeded 10 km. Additionally, skilled female health worker (ANM) and observed improved public health facility led to significantly increase the probability of utilization as compared to non-skilled ANM and not-improved health centers. Adequacy of essential equipment/laboratory services required for maternal care significantly encouraged deliveries at public health facility. District/village variables neighborhood poverty was negatively related to institutional delivery while higher education levels in the village and women's residing in more urbanized districts increased the utilization. "Inter-district" variation was 14 percent whereas "between-villages" variation for the utilization was 11 percent variation once controlled for all the three-level variables in the model. This study suggests that the mere availability of health facilities is necessary but not sufficient condition to promote utilization until the quality of service is inadequate and inaccessible considering

  14. A comparison of outpatient healthcare expenditures between public and private medical institutions in urban China: an instrumental variable approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Judy; Liu, Gordon; Deng, Guoying; Li, Lin; Xiong, Xianjun; Basu, Kisalaya

    2015-03-01

    The growth of healthcare expenditure provokes constant comments and discussions, as countries battle the issues on cost containment and cost effectiveness. Prior to 1978, medical institutions in China were either state-owned or were collective public hospitals. Since 1978, China has been trying to rebuild its healthcare system, which was destroyed during the 'cultural revolution', allowing private medical institutions to deliver healthcare services. As a result, private medical institutions have grown from 0% to 28.57% between 1978 and 2010. In this context, we compare outpatient healthcare expenditures between public and private medical institutions. The central problem of this comparison is that the choice of medical institution is endogenous. So we apply an instrumental variable (IV) framework utilizing geographic information (whether the closest medical institution is private) as the instrument while controlling for severity of health and other relevant confounding factors. Using China's Urban Resident Basic Medical Insurance Survey 2008-2010, we found that there is no difference in expenditure between public and private medical institutions when IV framework is used. Our econometric tests suggest that our IV model is specified appropriately. However, the ordinary least square model, which is inconsistent in the presence of endogenous regressor(s), reveals that public medical institutions are more expensive. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Comparing Public and Private Institutions That Have and Have Not Implemented Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems: A Resource Dependence Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendhil, Geetha R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this national study was to utilize quantitative methods to examine institutional characteristics, financial resource variables, personnel variables, and customer variables of public and private institutions that have and have not implemented enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, from a resource dependence perspective.…

  16. State-of-The-Art Technologies Used in Training Delivery and Administration at the Institute of Public Administration: Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewain, Saleh A. S.

    2005-01-01

    The Institute of Public Administration (IPA), in Saudi Arabia, is a well renowned training institution designated for training civil servants in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This paper mainly discusses the uses of technologies in the administrative aspects of the IPA. The author also points out the obstacles faced and lessons learned from the…

  17. Comparing Public and Private Institutions That Have and Have Not Implemented Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Systems: A Resource Dependence Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sendhil, Geetha R.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this national study was to utilize quantitative methods to examine institutional characteristics, financial resource variables, personnel variables, and customer variables of public and private institutions that have and have not implemented enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems, from a resource dependence perspective.…

  18. Implementing health care reform in the United States: intergovernmental politics and the dilemmas of institutional design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Daniel; Rocco, Philip; Waddan, Alex

    2014-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was enacted, and continues to operate, under conditions of political polarization. In this article, we argue that the law's intergovernmental structure has amplified political conflict over its implementation by distributing governing authority to political actors at both levels of the American federal system. We review the ways in which the law's demands for institutional coordination between federal and state governments (and especially the role it preserves for governors and state legislatures) have created difficulties for rolling out health-insurance exchanges and expanding the Medicaid program. By way of contrast, we show how the institutional design of the ACA's regulatory reforms of the insurance market, which diminish the reform's political salience, has allowed for considerably less friction during the implementation process. This article thus highlights the implications of multi-level institutional designs for the post-enactment politics of major reforms.

  19. [Nutritional status and nutritional rehabilitation of elderly people living in long-term care institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelovics, Zsuzsanna

    2009-11-01

    We review our studies on the most important factors related to feeding and nutrition in long-term care institutions, as well as we present the nutritional status of elderly people living in social homes, and, based on our results, we make recommendations concerning nutritional rehabilitation. We aimed to assess the following: nutritional status of people older than sixty years (elderly) living in long-term care institutions; changes in the body mass index of elderly living in long-term care institutions; changes in the nutritional status of elderly living in long-term care institutions during the last half decade; relations and correlations between acute and chronic diseases and nutritional status; the sip feed provision for elderly living in long-term care institutions; relationship between the discovered potential influencing factors and nutritional status screened by Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST). We screened the nutritional status of altogether 4774 (men: 28.9-30.9%, women: 69.1-71.19%; mean age: 77.8+/-8.9 years) elderly long-term care residents who volunteered to participate. In 2004 and 2006 the MUST and our questionnaire, in 2008 the nutritionDay questionnaire was used. Risk of malnutrition is high (26.8-77.0%) in elderly residents of social homes. Assessment of nutritional status is done four times a year or even more rarely in 29.5% of the residents. Nutritional status is multifactorial; it is influenced by immobility, fever, etc. Loss of appetite and swallowing difficulties are 2.5-fold, limited mobility, dementia and missing teeth are almost two-fold (1.6-1.7) more frequent in the group of high risk elderly than in the elderly living in social homes. Neurological diseases are in a significant correlation with nutritional status. Incidence of neurological diseases increased significantly in the last years. Nutritional rehabilitation does not end with screening the nutritional status, moreover, it begins with that. Individual diet has to

  20. Interaction between public enterprises and foreign institutions in the improvement of territories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergienko Vitaly, Yu.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Beautification problems of urban areas are crucial and urgent issues of modern urban planning and image of the region as they provide vision and social objectives of creating a favorable living environment to ensure the most favorable conditions for activities of the population. The level of Buildings - one of the indicators of the living environment quality of the population and purposeful activity on formation of supportive and comfortable living environment of the population is the essence of the state of urban policy. This paper discusses the interaction of public enterprises with foreign institutions in the process of improvement of the region as a factor of improvement and modernization of its infrastructure with the aim of finding effective and constructive balance of interests. The mechanism of interaction of public enterprises with the business community, external institutions, and not commercial organizations in the creation of image region is considered. To optimize the social and economic processes in the field of improvement of urban areas and improve the effectiveness of local governments a systematic approach is required for the territory development as much as possible taking into account the specialization of its unique resource and market potential, as well as the joint efforts of various communities, which are the essential importance of social strata of the population.

  1. E-health readiness assessment: promoting "hope" in the health-care institutions of Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoja, Shariq; Scott, Richard; Gilani, Salman

    2008-01-01

    e-Health readiness refers to the preparedness of health-care institutions to implement programmes that involve use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in provision and management of health services. Level of readiness depends on a number of factors that lead to success or failure of e-health programmes, and thus increase or decrease hope of achieving the desired results. This report presents results from in-depth interviews conducted during a larger study and presents views of managers and health-care providers from various institutions in Pakistan about the usefulness of e-health readiness assessment tools. Participants emphasized the need for implementing e-health programmes in the country, while appreciating the need for readiness assessment tools, and the way these tools could avoid failures related to implementation of e-health programmes. Participants also linked e-health readiness with the process of change management, essential for sustainable implementation of e-health programmes in the health-care institutions of developing countries.

  2. Sites of institutional racism in public health policy making in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Came, Heather

    2014-04-01

    Although New Zealanders have historically prided ourselves on being a country where everyone has a 'fair go', the systemic and longstanding existence of health inequities between Māori and non-Māori suggests something isn't working. This paper informed by critical race theory, asks the reader to consider the counter narrative viewpoints of Māori health leaders; that suggest institutional racism has permeated public health policy making in New Zealand and is a contributor to health inequities alongside colonisation and uneven access to the determinants of health. Using a mixed methods approach and critical anti-racism scholarship this paper identifies five specific sites of institutional racism. These sites are: majoritarian decision making, the misuse of evidence, deficiencies in both cultural competencies and consultation processes and the impact of Crown filters. These findings suggest the failure of quality assurance systems, existing anti-racism initiatives and health sector leadership to detect and eliminate racism. The author calls for institutional racism to be urgently addressed within New Zealand and this paper serves as a reminder to policy makers operating within other colonial contexts to be vigilant for such racism.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A REFERENCE MODEL TO INTEGRATED DESIGN MANAGEMENT ON PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Andery

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper aims discussing the design process carried out in public institutions. Since there are different players in the design process, including designers, coordinators, bureaucratic managers, the design development brings some problems that come from the lack of a contracting and design development model, as well as in the information flow between its stakeholders. Rework, delays in contracts deadlines and low quality of the final product are not unusual. Due to the complexity of the design process, it has been searched in the process modeling a valid option to fulfill that blank. A Referential Term was developed by creating a work flow to the institution’s design process through the systematization of solutions developed by other researchers. The mentioned Term makes possible a clear understanding of the design process, leads to the definition of each player responsibilities, defines design phases, providing a general plan and establishing a detailed and integrated vision of the job made by every agent involved. The research was conducted by the implementation of this Term of reference in two Projects of the institution. It is briefly presented an analysis of main aspects of the implementation, highlighting the improvement of contractual relations between designers and the institution, reduction of design duration, improvement in the information flow, as well as a better collaborative environment.

  4. Examining Time Use of Dutch Nursing Staff in Long-Term Institutional Care : A Time-Motion Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinman, Astrid; de Greef, Mathieu H G; Krijnen, Wim P; Nieweg, Roos M B; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Increasing residents' acuity levels and available resources in long-term institutional care requires insight into the care provided by nursing staff so as to guide task allocation and optimal use of resources, and enhance quality of care. The purpose of this study was to examine the

  5. Evaluation of health care service diversification options in health care institutions and programs by portfolio analysis: a marketing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, L R; Rosko, M D

    1988-03-01

    Originally conceived as a technique to assess how well current activities contribute to the attainment of organizational goals, portfolio analysis also can be used as a marketing research tool for considering the relative merits of various diversification options under consideration by institutional decision makers. The authors describe the features of portfolio analysis and its use as a tool in the evaluation of health care diversification options. A case study of a hospital that has employed the method in its corporate planning and marketing efforts illustrates the use of this analysis technique.

  6. Self-assessment of nursing competency among final year nursing students in Thailand: a comparison between public and private nursing institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaengdee, Krisada; Kantamaturapoj, Kanang; Seneerattanaprayul, Parinda; Putthasri, Weerasak; Suphanchaimat, Rapeepong

    2016-01-01

    Nurses play a major role in Thailand's health care system. In recent years, the production of nurses, in both the public and private sectors, has been growing rapidly to respond to the shortage of health care staff. Alongside concerns over the number of nurses produced, the quality of nursing graduates is of equal importance. This study therefore aimed to 1) compare the self-assessed competency of final year Thai nursing students between public and private nursing schools, and 2) explore factors that were significantly associated with competency level. A cross-sectional clustered survey was conducted on 40 Thai nursing schools. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of questions about respondents' background, their education profile, and a self-measured competency list. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, and multivariate regression analysis were applied. A total of 3,349 students participated in the survey. Approximately half of the respondents had spent their childhood in rural areas. The majority of respondents reported being "confident" or "very confident" in all competencies. Private nursing students reported a higher level of "public health competency" than public nursing students with statistical significance. However, there was no significant difference in "clinical competency" between the two groups. Nursing students from private institutions seemed to report higher levels of competency than those from public institutions, particularly with regard to public health. This phenomenon might have arisen because private nursing students had greater experience of diverse working environments during their training. One of the key limitations of this study was that the results were based on the subjective self-assessment of the respondents, which might risk respondent bias. Further studies that evaluate current nursing curricula in both public and private nursing schools to assess whether they meet the health

  7. Perceived service quality, perceived value, overall satisfaction and happiness of outlook for long-term care institution residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jesun; Hsiao, Chih-Tung; Glen, Robert; Pai, Jar-Yuan; Zeng, Sin-Huei

    2014-06-01

    To investigate the psychometric properties and relationships of perceived service quality, perceived value and overall satisfaction for residents with respect to their long-term care institutions. The five-point Likert scale questionnaire administered through facetoface interviews. Fourteen long-term care institutions located in central and southern Taiwan stratified according to services and accommodation population. One hundred and eighty long-term institutional care residents. Perceived service quality (the SERVPERF model), perceived value and overall satisfaction (models based on the literature on perceived value and satisfaction). Student's t-test on institutional location shows a significant difference between overall satisfaction for central and southern institution long-term care recipients. The correlation test revealed that the higher a resident's level of education, the higher the scores for perceived value. The factor loading results of confirmation factor analysis show acceptable levels of reliability and index-of-model fits for perceived service, perceived value and overall satisfaction. In addition, the results suggest that an additional construct, a positive attitude (happiness of outlook) towards long-term care institutions, is also an important factor in residents' overall satisfaction. The primary goal of long-term institutional care policy in Taiwan, as in other countries, is to provide residents with practical, cost-effective but high-quality care. On the basis of the results of in-depth interviews with long-term institutional care residents, this study suggests long-term care institutions arrange more family visit days to increase the accessibility and interaction of family and residents and thereby increase the happiness of outlook of the residents. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. A Little Help from Their Friends: Institutions Build Armies of Alumni Advocates to Influence Legislators and Shape Public Opinion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Institutions build armies of alumni advocates to influence legislators and shape public opinion. This article describes two types of alumni advocacy: grasstops and grassroots. Grasstops advocacy engages smaller, targeted groups of alumni who have a stronger, more influential connection with legislators and other public officeholders. Grassroots…

  9. Results of a transparent expert consultation on patient and public involvement in palliative care research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveson, Barbara A; de Wolf-Linder, Susanne; Witt, Jana; Newson, Kirstie; Morris, Carolyn; Higginson, Irene J; Evans, Catherine J

    2015-01-01

    Background: Support and evidence for patient, unpaid caregiver and public involvement in research (user involvement) are growing. Consensus on how best to involve users in palliative care research is lacking. Aim: To determine an optimal user-involvement model for palliative care research. Design: We hosted a consultation workshop using expert presentations, discussion and nominal group technique to generate recommendations and consensus on agreement of importance. A total of 35 users and 32 researchers were approached to attend the workshop, which included break-out groups and a ranking exercise. Descriptive statistical analysis to establish consensus and highlight divergence was applied. Qualitative analysis of discussions was completed to aid interpretation of findings. Setting/participants: Participants involved in palliative care research were invited to a global research institute, UK. Results: A total of 12 users and 5 researchers participated. Users wanted their involvement to be more visible, including during dissemination, with a greater emphasis on the difference their involvement makes. Researchers wanted to improve productivity, relevance and quality through involvement. Users and researchers agreed that an optimal model should consist of (a) early involvement to ensure meaningful involvement and impact and (b) diverse virtual and face-to-face involvement methods to ensure flexibility. Conclusion: For involvement in palliative care research to succeed, early and flexible involvement is required. Researchers should advertise opportunities for involvement and promote impact of involvement via dissemination plans. Users should prioritise adding value to research through enhancing productivity, quality and relevance. More research is needed not only to inform implementation and ensure effectiveness but also to investigate the cost-effectiveness of involvement in palliative care research. PMID:25931336

  10. THE IMPACT OF NEW INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS ACCOUNTING

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    Valentin Ioan UŞURELU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The studied field has suffered continuous transformation, both in interaction with other scientific fields and in constituent sub-classes, for discovering and understanding more deeply the contemporary economic realities under the impact of major trends of world development. This paper aims to analyze the location and the effects of information and communication technologies within the public accounting in order to evaluate the effects of this element on accounting research, teaching and professional practice. In a comprehensive approach of public institutions accounting, new information and communication technologies represent a tool that facilitates the accounting function and realizes the connection between the transmitter and the receiver, both within and outside the organization, not just at the micro and macro economic level but also at the micro and macro social one. The advantages of recent progress of information and communication technologies are obvious for the organizations management. It highlights the developments and challenges represented by these new technologies for researchers and professionals in the idea of performing a broad and flexible view of public accounting enabling them to provide useful services for all categories of users of accounting information.

  11. Use of results of public health research in a governmental institution of Colombia

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    Janeth Mosquera

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Research is an essential function of public health. Great amounts of resources are spent in health research that should contribute to improve people’s health. However, impact or social gains of health research have been insufficiently measured. Objectives: To explore perceptions of policy-makers and researchers about research use in public health and to identify barriers and facilitators for using research results at a Departmental Secretariat of Health, in Colombia. Methods: We carried out a case-study about perceptions of use of research results in the Valle del Cauca Secretariat of Health using a semi-structured interview with 17 health policy makers and researchers. Researchers in health research institutions and health officials in the Secretariat of Health were selected by purposing sample. We identified preliminary and emergent categories; relations between them and suggested explanations of the issues under study were established. Main results: Policy makers to guide decisions in public health at the Departmental Secretariat of Health do not use research results. Barriers for using research results are associated with the lack of a research policy, deficiencies in research management structure and exclusive contractual relationships established between researchers and policy-makers. There are few experiences in using research results and they were facilitated by a better knowledge of health officials about research process, a participative role of them in research, and by characteristics of research development. Conclusions: Research results do not contribute to make decisions at the Secretariat of Health.

  12. An integrated and sustainable EU health information system: national public health institutes' needs and possible benefits.

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    Bogaert, Petronille; Van Oyen, Herman

    2017-01-01

    Although sound data and health information are at the basis of evidence-based policy-making and research, still no single, integrated and sustainable EU-wide public health monitoring system or health information system exists. BRIDGE Health is working towards an EU health information and data generation network covering major EU health policy areas. A stakeholder consultation with national public health institutes was organised to identify the needs to strengthen the current EU health information system and to identify its possible benefits. Five key issues for improvement were identified: (1) coherence, coordination and sustainability; (2) data harmonization, collection, processing and reporting; (3) comparison and benchmarking; (4) knowledge sharing and capacity building; and (5) transferability of health information into evidence-based policy making. The vision of an improved EU health information system was formulated and the possible benefits in relation to six target groups. Through this consultation, BRIDGE Health has identified the continuous need to strengthen the EU health information system. A better system is about sustainability, better coordination, governance and collaboration among national health information systems and stakeholders to jointly improve, harmonise, standardise and analyse health information. More and better sharing of this comparable health data allows for more and better comparative health research, international benchmarking, national and EU-wide public health monitoring. This should be developed with the view to provide the tools to fight both common and individual challenges faced by the Members States and their politicians.

  13. Institutional comunication and cultural marketing: Peculiarities in museum communication within the framework of public relations

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    Camelia BURGHELE

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cultural management theoreticians believe that the main target of museum communication is gaining knowledge on specific messages by as large a number of people as possible. Museum public relation practice – intensified and upgraded at the same time with the revolution of the new communication technologies – is both science and art which analyse certain tendences (in attitude, taste and informal of anticipating their consequences for implementing certain museum offer programs to appeal to the public.As an institution with a decisive role in guarding cultural heritage and in outlining cultural identity – as it keeps the necessary instruments for this, the specialists and also the motivation through its own purposes – the museum in its dynamic, modern, enhanced shape must provide an attractive cultural product to the public, based on a anthropological approach to cultural fact.Modern museum-ology is built upon the concept that museum is a story and modern museums stimulate to a high degree participative learning, generated by a productive dialogue.

  14. Tissue establishment as a necessary institution within the country health care system: importance, requirements and structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2016-06-01

    A tissue establishment is a unit or service, inside or outside of a public or private hospital, generally operated by public or non-profit-making bodies or in some countries by private profit-making institutions that procure, process, sterilise, store, and distribute sterilised human tissues to private or public hospitals to be used in certain medical treatments. Each tissue establishment should adopt the best possible structure, hired the necessary well-trained staff, according to the level of its activities, and should establish the necessary internal committees to ensure the highest quality of its operation. In addition, the tissue establishment should adopt a quality management system in order to reduce the risk and maximize the benefits of the transplantation process.

  15. Regional variations in public opinion on the affordable care act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodie, Mollyann; Deane, Claudia; Cho, Sarah

    2011-12-01

    One year after passage, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) remains a divisive topic. Most publicly released polls on the law have focused on the views of Americans as a whole. But with much of the responsibility of implementation lying with the states, this essay explores whether opinion differs geographically. The analysis finds that views on the health reform law do differ by region, and these differences are most likely driven by the political leanings of a given area. While opinion nationally differs by age and race, this pattern does not hold when looking by region. Areas that have a larger share of uninsured and are slated to receive greater federal funding under the ACA also do not differ in their opinions. These data suggest that regional variations in attitudes about the ACA are based less on the demographic structure of a region and more on the political ideologies of residents in a given region. As implementation of the law continues, this analysis shows that national opinion data mask important regional variations in views of the ACA.

  16. Characteristics of diabetes care in an institutional network of health services Medellin. 2005-2008

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    Sandra M. Agudelo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Because of its severity, frequency and increasing social and economic impact, Diabetes Mellitus (DM is considered the third priority health problem in the world. Although to date there is no curative treatment, it does have effective measures to reduce its occurrence and limit its complications. Objective: to describe the control program of diabetes in a statewide network of health services in regard to clinical variables, the epidemiology of population served and the control actions, in order to identify strategies for improvement. Methodology: operational research based on secondary data. We reviewed the general conditions of operation of the program based on records of patient care. We studied a random sample of medical records of patients served by the control program of diabetes care units in the network.The results were validated in a meeting with officials of the institution. Results: we detected flaws and points of improvement in the performance of the control program that resulted in specific recommendations for the institutional network. Other failures are due to rules that hinder health system monitoring and control of the DM at the first level. Conclusion:the review of medical records reveals important problems about registration, monitoring and control of diabetics. Other regulatory and contractual provisions of the colombian health system were identified as restrictions that prevent the program to control hyperglycemia and early detection of renal damage. These restrictions could be affecting the programs of control of diabetes in other institutions of the country that are subject to the same rules

  17. Importance of sale in brand building private health care institutions in the Republic of Serbia

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    Jović Željko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful development of private health institutions largely depends on the proper organization of the sales process and forecast the challenges that these institutions face in the market that has just begun. Defining the shape and segment sales process is a priority task for management of private health care system , because it is from them depends to what extent and how the specific health brand positioning in the market. This paper will try that, according to past experience, the basic guidelines for that prediction and to identify the role of sales in the level of achieving customer satisfaction and loyalty. Lacking the scientific literature dealing with this problem in our country will be partly compensated by the experience of international experts who have dealt with the same or similar issues . Also, by analyzing the results of empirical research that had previously been conducted in several medical institutions and companies in Belgrade will present attitudes , evaluations and expectations of patients on the one hand and the competent management structure of companies that organize health care of its employees as defined benefit, on the other hand.

  18. Living invisible: HTLV-1-infected persons and the lack of care in public health.

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    Karina Franco Zihlmann

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection is intractable and endemic in many countries. Although a few individuals have severe symptoms, most patients remain asymptomatic throughout their lives and their infections may be unknown to many health professionals. HTLV-1 can be considered a neglected public health problem and there are not many studies specifically on patients' needs and emotional experiences. OBJECTIVE: To better understand how women and men living with HTLV-1 experience the disease and what issues exist in their healthcare processes. METHODS: A qualitative study using participant observation and life story interview methods was conducted with 13 symptomatic and asymptomatic patients, at the outpatient clinic of the Emilio Ribas Infectious Diseases Institute, in Sao Paulo, Brazil. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The interviewees stated that HTLV-1 is a largely unknown infection to society and health professionals. Counseling is rare, but when it occurs, focuses on the low probability of developing HTLV-1 related diseases without adequately addressing the risk of infection transmission or reproductive decisions. The diagnosis of HTLV-1 can remain a stigmatized secret as patients deny their situations. As a consequence, the disease remains invisible and there are potentially negative implications for patient self-care and the identification of infected relatives. This perception seems to be shared by some health professionals who do not appear to understand the importance of preventing new infections. CONCLUSIONS: Patients and medical staff referred that the main focus was the illness risk, but not the identification of infected relatives to prevent new infections. This biomedical model of care makes prevention difficult, contributes to the lack of care in public health for HTLV-1, and further perpetuates the infection among populations. Thus, HTLV-1 patients experience an "invisibility" of their complex demands

  19. Journal publications by pharmacy practice faculty evaluated by institution and region of the United States (2001-2003

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    Coleman CI

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the quantity of manuscripts published in journals by departments of pharmacy practice at schools and colleges of pharmacy in the United States for the years 2001-2003.Methods: We utilized the Web of Science bibliographic database to identify publication citations for the years 2001 to 2003 which were then evaluated in a number of different ways. Faculty were identified via American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy rosters for 2000-2001, 2001-2002, and 2002-2003 academic years. Results: Rankings were done based on the number of publications per institution and average number of publications per faculty member at an institution. Upon linear regression analysis, a relationship exists between an institution’s faculty size and the total number of publications but not for tenure/nontenure-track faculty ratio. Rating highest in overall publication number did not guarantee high rankings in the average number of publications per faculty member at an institution assessment. Midwestern schools were responsible for more publications per institution than other regions. Many schools only generated minimal scholarship over this evaluative period.Conclusion: While many schools have pharmacy practice faculty that strongly contributed to the biomedical literature, other schools have not. Pharmacy practice faculty in the Midwest publish more journal manuscripts than faculty in other regions of the country. More pharmacy schools need to engage their faculty in scholarly endeavors by providing support and incentives.

  20. Comparative analysis of morbidity rate in adolescents studied in different types of public educational institutions

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    Nizom Ermatov

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Common morbidity rate of adolescents aged from 15 to 18 years has been simultaneously estimated based on their appeals data to the polyclinics. These adolescents studied in public elementary schools and lyceums at medical high educational institutions of Tashkent city. Incidence was in 1.2-1.8 times higher among lyceum students than schoolchildren, while the structure of diseases was similar. The more important factors of morbidity in elementary schools and lyceums include iodine-deficiency, nonspecific respiratory diseases, iron-deficient anemia, gastritis, skin and subcutaneous tissue illnesses. These disease characteristics of in elementary schools and lyceums should be considered when organizing recreational activities, in particular, during improving physical education and optimization of learning environment.

  1. PATIENTS’ SATISFACTION WITH HEALTH SERVICES AT THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF PUBLIC HEALTH OF KOSOVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadani, Naser; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Berisha, Merita; Hoxha, Rina; Gashi, Sanije; Begolli, Ilir; Salihu, Drita; Muçaj, Sefedin

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Purpose of the research is to assess patient satisfaction with the quality of health services provided in National Institute of Public Health of Kosova. Methods: Study was observational and cross-sectional. Interviews were conducted with 625 clients of IPH. Inclusion criteria for enrollment in the study were patients above 18 years old, with verbally informed consent. Results: In our study, access to IPH, efficacy, patient-provider interpersonal communication, and explanations regarding procedures, readiness to answer to patients need and physical settings and appearance are valued satisfactorily whereas cleanliness was rated with minimal grades. Evaluated 12 quality components, were scored with average mark 3.6. Conclusions: SWOT analysis, and fishbone diagram should be used on regular bases and a new position for a manager for administrative issues, is opened, complaints box and list of rights and responsibilities of patients were dislocated in a more visible place, and internal staff turnover, is introduced. PMID:27482155

  2. Competition of individual and institutional punishments in spatial public goods games

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    Szolnoki, Attila; Czako, Lilla

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the evolution of strategies in spatial public goods games where both individual (peer) and institutional (pool) punishments are present beside unconditional defector and cooperator strategies. The evolution of strategy distribution is governed by imitation based on random sequential comparison of neighbors' payoff for a fixed level of noise. Using numerical simulations we have evaluated the strategy frequencies and phase diagrams when varying the synergy factor, punishment cost, and fine. Our attention is focused on two extreme cases describing all the relevant behaviors in such a complex system. According to our numerical data peer punishers prevail and control the system behavior in a large segments of parameters while pool punishers can only survive in the limit of weak peer punishment when a rich variety of solutions is observed. Paradoxically, the two types of punishment may extinguish each other's impact resulting in the triumph of defectors. The technical difficulties and suggested meth...

  3. Biospecimen quality program in the biobank of the Norwegian Institute of Public Health

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    Liv Paltiel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The biological material collected, processed and stored in biobanks are important research tools and it is important to minimize preanalytical variations to provide researchers with high quality biological material that will give reproducible results. Methods: To minimize the preanalytical variations caused by sample collection, processing and storage, we have established a biospecimen quality program. It consists of quality assurance aspects as well as quality control programs to measure adherence to protocols and sample integrity. The quality control program includes measurements and evaluation of the DNA quality and quantity before storage, i.e. concentration, purity, fragmentation and PCR success, and long term storage programs for plasma, urine and RNA. Conclusions: The Biobank at the Norwegian Institute of Public Health has established a biospecimen quality program that ensures high quality specimens and provides the documentation required to use the biomaterial in a best possible way.

  4. Self-assessment of nursing competency among final year nursing students in Thailand: a comparison between public and private nursing institutions

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    Sawaengdee K

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Krisada Sawaengdee,1,2 Kanang Kantamaturapoj,3 Parinda Seneerattanaprayul,1 Weerasak Putthasri,1 Rapeepong Suphanchaimat,1,4 1International Health Policy Program (IHPP, 2Praboromrajchanok Institute for Health Workforce Development, Ministry of Public Health, Nonthaburi, 3Banphai Hospital, Khon Kaen, 4Department of Social Sciences, Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Mahidol University, Nakhon Pathom, Thailand Introduction and objectives: Nurses play a major role in Thailand’s health care system. In recent years, the production of nurses, in both the public and private sectors, has been growing rapidly to respond to the shortage of health care staff. Alongside concerns over the number of nurses produced, the quality of nursing graduates is of equal importance. This study therefore aimed to 1 compare the self-assessed competency of final year Thai nursing students between public and private nursing schools, and 2 explore factors that were significantly associated with competency level.Methods: A cross-sectional clustered survey was conducted on 40 Thai nursing schools. Data were collected through self-administered questionnaires. The questionnaire consisted of questions about respondents’ background, their education profile, and a self-measured competency list. Descriptive statistics, factor analysis, and multivariate regression analysis were applied. Results: A total of 3,349 students participated in the survey. Approximately half of the respondents had spent their childhood in rural areas. The majority of respondents reported being “confident” or “very confident” in all competencies. Private nursing students reported a higher level of “public health competency” than public nursing students with statistical significance. However, there was no significant difference in “clinical competency” between the two groups.Conclusion: Nursing students from private institutions seemed to report higher levels of competency than

  5. Psychopathology in young children in two types of foster care following institutional rearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibu, Florin; Humphreys, Kathryn L; Fox, Nathan A; Nelson, Charles A; Zeanah, Charles H

    2014-01-01

    Institutional rearing of young children has been demonstrated to increase risk for a broad range of psychiatric disorders and other impairments. This has led many countries to consider or to invest in foster care. However, no study to date has explored potential differences in psychiatric symptoms in children placed in different types of foster care. We assessed internalizing disorders, externalizing disorders, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in 54-month-old children living with foster families. We compared one group of children living in high-quality foster families who had benefited from specialized training and support to another group of children placed with government-sponsored foster care in Bucharest, Romania. After controlling for duration of time spent in foster care, there was a main group effect in predicting ADHD (p = .021) and a marginal group × gender interaction effect. No effects were noted for signs of externalizing disorders. There was, however, a significant group × gender interaction effect of signs of internalizing disorders (p = .007), with the girls in high-quality foster care having less severe symptomatology than did their counterparts in the government-sponsored group. Governments must invest in quality interventions for their most vulnerable citizens to prevent serious and potentially lasting problems. © 2014 Michigan Association for Infant Mental Health.

  6. The Intellectual Capital And The New Career Management In Public Institutions From Defence Field

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    Daniel Gogoescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In public institution the development of the concept of intellectual capital (understand simultaneously as human, structural and relational capital mean the rise of the organisation`s competitiveness and the beget of structural capital (potential subsequently invested to achieve knowledge, respective the power building-up in efficient action – meaning the consolidation and development of success obtained in competition. The term of intellectual capital add up a sum of values, knowledges, abilities and habitudes of the employees, and also those cumulated on organisational level within what we call organisational culture, the final goal of its evolution being to obtain the optimal managerial efficiency. So, the individual is the main component (as human capital of the organisational intellectual capital, being the source of his performance and the performance of the organisation where he is part of. It is easy and logic, from a certain perspective, to understand the purpose of an individual to create added value to his capacity and capabilities (the human capital is not the sum of individuals, but the sum the individuals intelligence`s interactions in the creation process, but we always put the question of what is the adequate measure for an individual of what he whish and need to invest in this intelligence and knowledge. There is no performance where there is no intellectual capital and where is no investment in human capital, the process being, generally speak-ing, an Archimedean convolution: the human capital generates intellectual capital which, also brings added value to knowledge and, implicitly, develops continuously the human capital. The adequate exploitation of intellectual capital, obtained through the adequate exploitation of intellectual potential, of the individual and collective capabilities, capacities and performances ale the human potential mean to rich the maximum efficiency of institution. Repetitively application of an

  7. Knowledge levels of the health care employees working at the primary health institutions about patient rights

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    Handan Zincir

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research was to examine the knowledge levels of the health care personnel working at the first step health institutions about patient rights. It was a descriptive research which was carried out in Melikgazi and Kocasinan Health Group Directorate of Kayseri Province between 1st. of October 2006 and 30th. of May 2007. 406 of 610 health care personnel participated in the study (% 66.5 participation rate. A questionnaire form of 39 questions was utilized. Kruskal-wallis test was used for statistical evaluation. % 56.2 of the health care personnel was 29 years old and younger. % 38.4 of the personnel had undergraduate diploma, % 37.9 was midwife, % 37.2 worked for 10 or 14 years. It was found out that % 42.4 of the personnel was unaware of the patient rights. It was seen in the statistical evaluation that there was a significant statistical difference between the scores of knowledge on patient rights of the personnel and age, educational status, professional group and working period. It was concluded that nearly half of the personnel working at the first step health institutions did not know nothing about patient rights and such variables as age, school from which they graduated, professional status and working period affected knowledge levels of patient rights.

  8. Public Sector Education Institution's Analysis: A Way Forward to Curtail Rural-Regional Education Accessibility Problems

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    Mir Aftab Hussain Talpur

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The availability of accessible educational facilities is essential for the better rural education. However, because of the huge population, lack of resources and absence of proper policy plans; the distance between educational facilities and rural communities is mounting as time progresses. These sorts of problematic circumstances put damaging effects on education standards and become responsible for the declining literacy rate. Hence, the goal of this research is to investigate the lack of educational institutions with respect to indigenous standards. Therefore, in this study, the dearth of education institutions was determined for the one of the most deprived sub-regions of Pakistan, i.e. Badin. The data were collected through observations, questionnaire survey, and from secondary sources, like census report and other pertinent public sector documents. The outcome of this study can be taken as an input to develop policy plans, targeting the education accessibility issues of backward communities. This research could show a guiding-path to local planning agencies, as these can come-up with the policy plans to trounce the education accessibility issues from the bucolic sub-regions of developing countries

  9. Design Failure Affecting Maintenance Management on Public Higher Education Institution in Malaysia

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    Agus Salim Nuzaihan Aras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of government building defect is keeping on reporting in the media and arising since 2007. These issues of building defects, maintenance and management have existing and it is deliberated up to the parliament level. The government keep continue increased the maintenance allowance in National Budgetary in every year. However, the building disasters and failures keep going develop their number of cases in Malaysia. Most of the issues are related with a weak maintenance management and faulty in design. This reflects to a poorly building condition, create discomfort and danger environment to the building users. Besides, it will result to a low quality building condition and reflect to a weak building maintenance management. Building defects arise through inappropriate or poor design, specification, construction and it will give an impact to maintenance management itself [1]. Errors in the design of the building are being debated and becoming a reason of major factor in building defect reproduction [2]. Thus, this issue will discover the major cause in building design failure that develop the building defects and verify the impact of design defects towards building maintenance management. The study involved with the public higher education institution in Malaysia focusing on main campuses and the distribution of questionnaire to the facility and maintenance management department. This research is aimed to produce a better understanding on the impact of building design failure towards the institution facilities’ condition.

  10. An Exploratory Study to Develop an Alternative Model of Public Library Management Using the Institute of Museum and Library Services' Public Library Statistics

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    Kim, Giyeong; Yu, So Young

    2011-01-01

    In this explorative study, we first investigate current use of public library statistics in public library management to identify a governing framework and then carefully suggest an alternative framework with income as a goal for sustainability. The meaning of income in terms of management is also discussed. Within this framework, we conduct a…

  11. [International relations of the Central Scientific Research Roentgenoradiology Institute of the USSR Ministry of Public Health].

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    Komarov, E I; Lialin, E A; Shul's, T S

    1988-11-01

    The main directions of the international cooperation of the Institute since its foundation are presented. Information on the agreements with institutions abroad and WHO collaborating centers is provided.

  12. The Influence of Organizational Systems on Information Exchange in Long-Term Care Facilities: An Institutional Ethnography.

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    Caspar, Sienna; Ratner, Pamela A; Phinney, Alison; MacKinnon, Karen

    2016-06-01

    Person-centered care is heavily dependent on effective information exchange among health care team members. We explored the organizational systems that influence resident care attendants' (RCAs) access to care information in long-term care (LTC) settings. We conducted an institutional ethnography in three LTC facilities. Investigative methods included naturalistic observations, in-depth interviews, and textual analysis. Practical access to texts containing individualized care-related information (e.g., care plans) was dependent on job classification. Regulated health care professionals accessed these texts daily. RCAs lacked practical access to these texts and primarily received and shared information orally. Microsystems of care, based on information exchange formats, emerged. Organizational systems mandated written exchange of information and did not formally support an oral exchange. Thus, oral information exchanges were largely dependent on the quality of workplace relationships. Formal systems are needed to support structured oral information exchange within and between the microsystems of care found in LTC.

  13. What Risk Assessments of Genetically Modified Organisms Can Learn from Institutional Analyses of Public Health Risks

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    S. Ravi Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  14. What risk assessments of genetically modified organisms can learn from institutional analyses of public health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, S Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  15. System evaluation of logistics performance: Proposal for a supply network in a Public Higher Education Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto de Oliveira Cardoso Neto

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent quest for efficiency in public companies in Brazil was one of the motives to elaborate this paper, which had a public Institution of Higher Education (IHE as its subject of study. The IHE profiled possesses a multi-campus structure and the distribution of its consumer items is performed by the institution’s own warehouse. Through field research, it became apparent that the supply of these items had some problems, such as items out of stock, orders with delayed delivery, items past their shelf life etc. Therefore, this paper article aimed to propose an evaluation system of the logistical services at the IHE studied, based on performance indicators developed from mangers’ perceptions about the problems occurring in the distribution of consumer items. In addition, an index, calculated from diverse indicators, was proposed which would be able to express the performance of the logistics service of the IHE studied, and reflect the perceptions of the main users of this service. It is understood that the solution proposed here can be applied to any two-echelon supply network.

  16. [The strategy of health care of population as a background of public social policy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khabriev, R U; Lindendraten, A L; Komarov, Yu M

    2014-01-01

    The overwhelming majority of underlying documents adopted during last years in area of health care first of all relate to development of public health system i.e. that most important branch targeted to rendering medical care and restoring lost health. At the same time, absence of the Federal strategy of health care of population hinders both achievement of goals stated for country and development of regional health strategies. Overall, this situation significantly decreases effectiveness of public policy in this sphere of activity. The main directions of strategy are presented. The major purpose of strategy as a public intersectoral approach to health care and health promotion of population is discussed.

  17. Peer pressure and public reporting within healthcare setting: improving accountability and health care quality in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specchia, Maria Lucia; Veneziano, Maria Assunta; Cadeddu, Chiara; Ferriero, Anna Maria; Capizzi, Silvio; Ricciardi, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, the need of public reporting of health outcomes has acquired a great importance. The public release of performance results could be a tool for improving health care quality and many attempts have been made in order to introduce public reporting programs within the health care context at different levels. It would be necessary to promote the introduction of a standardized set of outcome and performance measures in order to improve quality of health care services and to make health care providers aware of the importance of transparency and accountability.

  18. Financing institutional long-term care for the elderly in China: a policy evaluation of new models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Jingwei He, Alex; Fang, Lijie; Mossialos, Elias

    2016-12-01

    A rapid ageing population coupled with changes in family structure has brought about profound implications to social policy in China. Although the past decade has seen a steady increase in public funding to long-term care (LTC), the narrow financing base and vast population have created significant unmet demand, calling for reforms in financing. This paper focuses on the financing of institutional LTC care by examining new models that have emerged from local policy experiments against two policy goals: equity and efficiency. Three emerging models are explored: Social Health Insurance (SHI) in Shanghai, LTC Nursing Insurance (LTCNI) in Qingdao and a means-tested model in Nanjing. A focused systematic narrative review of academic and grey literature is conducted to identify and assess these models, supplemented with qualitative interviews with government officials from relevant departments, care home staff and service users. This paper argues that, although SHI appears to be a convenient solution to fund LTC, this model has led to systematic bias in affordable access among participants of different insurance schemes, and has created a powerful incentive for the over-provision of unnecessary services. The means-tested method has been remarkably constrained by narrow eligibility and insufficiency of funding resources. The LTCNI model is by far the most desirable policy option among the three studied here, but the narrow definition of eligibility has substantively excluded a large proportion of elders in need from access to care, which needs to be addressed in future reforms. This paper proposes three lines of LTC financing reforms for policy-makers: (1) the establishment of a prepaid financing mechanism pooled specifically for LTC costs; (2) the incorporation of more stringent eligibility rules and needs assessment; and (3) reforming the dominant fee-for-service methods in paying LTC service providers.

  19. Academic health sciences librarians' contributions to institutional animal care and use committees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steelman, Susan C; Thomas, Sheila L

    2014-07-01

    The study gathered data about librarians' membership in institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs) and their professional activities supporting animal researchers. Libraries affiliated with medical schools that were members of the Association of American Medical Colleges were surveyed. A survey was distributed via library directors' email discussion lists and direct email messages. Sixty surveys were completed: 35 (58%) reported that librarians performed database searches for researchers, and 22 (37%) reported that a librarian currently serves on the IACUC. The survey suggests that academic health sciences librarians provide valuable, yet underutilized, services to support animal research investigators.

  20. [Risks of drug-nutrient interaction for the elderly in long-term care institutions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixoto, Jessica Sereno; Salci, Maria Aparecida; Radovanovic, Cremilde Aparecida Trindade; Salci, Tania Pereira; Torres, Maricy Morbin; Carreira, Lígia

    2012-09-01

    This study was aimed at verifying the risks of drug-nutrient interactions in the elderly residents of a long-term care institution. Descriptive study of quantitative approach, performed in 73 elderly people. Data collection occurred in 2008 through analysis of medical records, diet history and evaluation of the BMI. Data evidenced that the drugs more frequently used were the ones for nervous and cardiovascular systems, totaling approximately 66% of the prescriptions; among the 375 drugs prescribed 166 make some type of interaction, 32.0% reduce the effect of drug absorption when there is use with caffeine and 14.3% reduce the B12 vitamin absorption. Taking several drugs of continuous use may cause damage to the absorption of nutrients. The action of the health team becomes vital, through careful evaluation of the administered drugs, diet and interaction between them, to benefit the elderly with a better use of the therapeutics and improvement of the nutritional conditions.

  1. A burn center paradigm to fulfill deferred consent public disclosure and community consultation requirements for emergency care research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Martha G; Falletta, Lynn; Andrews, David A; Reed, Michael D

    2012-09-01

    To fulfill Food and Drug Administration and Department of Health and Human Services emergency care research informed consent requirements, our burn center planned and executed a deferred consent strategy gaining Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval to proceed with the clinical study. These federal regulations dictate public disclosure and community consultation unique to acute care research. Our regional burn center developed and implemented a deferred consent public notification and community consultation paradigm appropriate for a burn study. Published accounts of deferred consent strategies focus on acute care resuscitation practices. We adapted those strategies to design and conduct a comprehensive public notification/community consultation plan to satisfy deferred consent requirements for burn center research. To implement a robust media campaign we engaged the hospital's public relations department, distributed media materials, recruited hospital staff for speaking engagements, enlisted community volunteers, and developed initiatives to inform "hard-to-reach" populations. The hospital's IRB determined we fulfilled our obligation to notify the defined community. Our communication strategy should provide a paradigm other burn centers may appropriate and adapt when planning and executing a deferred consent initiative. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  2. Health care access for refugees and immigrants with precarious status: public health and human right challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Cécile; ter Kuile, Sonia; Munoz, Marie; Nadeau, Lucie; Ouimet, Marie-Jo; Kirmayer, Laurence; Crépeau, François

    2008-01-01

    Migration flux is being transformed by globalization, and the number of people with either undocumented or with a precarious status is growing in Canada. There are no epidemiological data on the health and social consequences of this situation, but clinicians working in primary care with migrants and refugees are increasingly worried about the associated morbidity. This commentary summarizes findings from a pilot study with health professionals in the Montreal area and suggests that the uninsured population predicament is a national problem. Although ethical and legal issues associated with data collection by clinicians, institutions and governments need to be examined, estimating the public health consequences and long-term cost associated with problems in access to health care due to migratory status should be a priority. Current regulations and administrative policies appear to be at odds with the principles of equal rights set out by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Beyond the commitment of individual clinicians, Canadian medical associations should take an advocacy role and scrutinize the ethical and medical implications of the present system.

  3. 38 CFR 17.55 - Payment for authorized public or private hospital care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hospital care authorized under 38 U.S.C. 1703 and 38 CFR 17.52 of this part or under 38 U.S.C. 1728 and 38... shall pay the transferring hospital an amount calculated by the HCFA PRICER for each patient day of care... public or private hospital care. 17.55 Section 17.55 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief...

  4. 75 FR 2562 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-15

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... document announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by...

  5. 75 FR 26276 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-11

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by ARRA,...

  6. 75 FR 13595 - Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage Provided Pursuant to the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Benefits Security Administration Publication of Model Notices for Health Care Continuation Coverage... Administration, Department of Labor. ACTION: Notice of the availability of the Model Health Care Continuation... document announces the availability of the model health care continuation coverage notices required by...

  7. The conflict between the ethics of th individual and the ethics governing public health: practical sustainability of health care in jeopardy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Saxon Donald

    2007-12-01

    The "health rights movement" has reconstructed the clinical relationship between health care workers and patients by simultaneously demanding more from traditional medical care and challenging the perceived power differential between doctors and patients by rejecting the paternalistic medical model in favour of an individual patients' rights model. However, the growth in individual expectations of a right to health care creates a potential conflict with the ethics that prioritise public health and guide the rationing of its limited financial and human capital resources. This, in turn, creates a practical dilemma which requires public health institutions to become service orientated while sacrificing their integral role in training and educating the medical workforce and potentially compromising the practical sustainable delivery of public health in Australia. However, the law can play a role in resolving this conflict through legislation, regulations, codes, administrative law and common law in an effort to ensure the quality and future sustainability of public health in Australia.

  8. Nurses' Perceptions of Their Relationships with Informal Carers in Institutional Respite Care for Older People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirpa Salin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe nurses' experiences of their collaboration and relationships with family members in institutional respite care for the elderly. The family has a particularly important role in respite care, which is an extension of care provided at home. However no published studies were found on this subject. The data were collected through qualitative interviews (N=22. Content analysis of the nurses’ descriptions of their collaboration with family members yielded four main categories as follows: (1 conscious ignoring, (2 attempting to understand the family’s situation, (3 hinting at private family matters, and (4 being a friend. The results lend support to earlier findings which emphasize the complexity of relationships between nurses and family carers. A novel finding here is that these relationships may also develop into friendships. Greater emphasis must be placed on primary nursing so that the nurse and informal carer can build up a genuine relationship of trust. If periods of respite care are to help older people and their families to manage independently, it is imperative that nurses have the opportunity to visit their patients at home.

  9. Animal models in epigenetic research: institutional animal care and use committee considerations across the lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Craig

    2012-01-01

    The rapid expansion and evolution of epigenetics as a core scientific discipline have raised new questions about how endogenous and environmental factors can inform the mechanisms through which biological form and function are regulated. Existing and proposed animal models used for epigenetic research have targeted a myriad of health and disease endpoints that may be acute, chronic, and transgenerational in nature. Initiating events and outcomes may extend across the entire lifespan to elicit unanticipated phenotypes that are of particular concern to institutional animal care and use committees (IACUCs). The dynamics and plasticity of epigenetic mechanisms produce effects and consequences that are manifest differentially within discreet spatial and temporal contexts, including prenatal development, stem cells, assisted reproductive technologies, production of sexual dimorphisms, senescence, and others. Many dietary and nutritional interventions have also been shown to have a significant impact on biological functions and disease susceptibilities through altered epigenetic programming. The environmental, chemical, toxic, therapeutic, and psychosocial stressors used in animal studies to elicit epigenetic changes can become extreme and should raise IACUC concerns for the well-being and proper care of all research animals involved. Epigenetics research is rapidly becoming an integral part of the search for mechanisms in every major area of biomedical and behavioral research and will foster the continued development of new animal models. From the IACUC perspective, care must be taken to acknowledge the particular needs and concerns created by superimposition of epigenetic mechanisms over diverse fields of investigation to ensure the proper care and use of animals without impeding scientific progress.

  10. Where Did They Go? Market Share Trends of Business Student Enrollment at Public, Not-for-Profit, and For-Profit Institutions from 1996 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox Garrity, Bonnie Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The author presents the trends in market share of business student enrollment at public, not-for-profit, and for-profit 4-year-and-above institutions from 1996 to 2008. Although each sector of the institutions has experienced growth in overall enrollments, the relative market share of public and not-for-profit institutions has dropped, whereas the…

  11. Where Did They Go? Market Share Trends of Business Student Enrollment at Public, Not-for-Profit, and For-Profit Institutions from 1996 to 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox Garrity, Bonnie Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    The author presents the trends in market share of business student enrollment at public, not-for-profit, and for-profit 4-year-and-above institutions from 1996 to 2008. Although each sector of the institutions has experienced growth in overall enrollments, the relative market share of public and not-for-profit institutions has dropped, whereas the…

  12. Challenges and opportunities in advancing models of care for older adults: an assessment of the National Institute on Aging research portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liggins, Charlene; Pryor, Lisa; Bernard, Marie A

    2010-12-01

    To identify existing projects supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA) that may relate to the recommendations for models of care (MOCs) presented in the 2008 Institute of Medicine Report, Retooling for an Aging America: Building the Healthcare Workforce. Cross-sectional analysis of NIA's grant portfolio. NIA. NIA grantees. NIA's grant portfolio was queried for the period 1999 to 2008 using a variety of search terms related to MOCs. Inclusion criteria were adherence to guiding principles for MOCs (comprehensive care, efficient care, older person as an active partner) or focus on innovative feature(s) of MOCs (interdisciplinary care, care management, chronic disease self-management, pharmaceutical management, preventive home visits, proactive rehabilitation, transitional care). Exclusion criteria were lack of focus on an intervention and focus on informal caregivers. Expert NIA staff reviewed and validated projects. One hundred thirty-five grants were identified. These grants represent fewer than 1% of the approximate number of grants NIA has funded over this same period of time (∼24,000 grants). Forty-four percent focused on components of comprehensive care and 34% on active involvement of older adults. Approximately half specifically focused on innovative features of MOCs, ranging from chronic disease self-management (32%) and proactive rehabilitation (26%) to preventive home visits (1%) and transitional care (1%). The majority of projects were investigator-initiated grants (46%). NIA has supported the development of many interventions that include components of MOCs related to recommendations from the IOM report. The challenge for the future will be determining which of the many components of comprehensive care systems are most effective for which subsets of the elderly population and assessing opportunities for enhanced collaboration between public and private aging research stakeholders. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2010

  13. A systematic review of the international published literature relating to quality of institutional care for people with longer term mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, T.L.; Killaspy, H.; Wright, C.; Turton, P.; White, S.; Kallert, T.W.; Schuster, M.; Cervilla, J.A.; Brangier, P.; Raboch, J.; Kalisova, L.; Onchev, G.; Dimitrov, H.; Mezzina, R.; Wolf, Kinou; Wiersma, D.; Visser, E.; Kiejna, A.; Piotrowski, P.; Ploumpidis, D.; Gonidakis, F.; Caldas-de-Almeida, J.; Cardoso, G.; King, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A proportion of people with mental health problems require longer term care in a psychiatric or social care institution. However, there are no internationally agreed quality standards for institutional care and no method to assess common care standards across countries. We aimed to

  14. A systematic review of the international published literature relating to quality of institutional care for people with longer term mental health problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taylor, T.L.; Killaspy, H.; Wright, C.; Turton, P.; White, S.; Kallert, T.W.; Schuster, M.; Cervilla, J.A.; Brangier, P.; Raboch, J.; Kalisova, L.; Onchev, G.; Dimitrov, H.; Mezzina, R.; Wolf, Kinou; Wiersma, D.; Visser, E.; Kiejna, A.; Piotrowski, P.; Ploumpidis, D.; Gonidakis, F.; Caldas-de-Almeida, J.; Cardoso, G.; King, M.B.

    2009-01-01

    Background: A proportion of people with mental health problems require longer term care in a psychiatric or social care institution. However, there are no internationally agreed quality standards for institutional care and no method to assess common care standards across countries. We aimed to ident

  15. The Fifth International Heelsum Workshop 'more synergy between primary care and public health': mission statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, van C.; Hiddink, G.J.; Binsbergen, van J.J.; Brotons, C.; Drenthen, A.J.M.; Green, L.E.; Halsted, C.H.; Koelen, M.A.; Kok, F.J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.; Ockhuizen, Th.; Truswell, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The theme of the Heelsum Workshops is nutrition and dietary patterns as determinants of individual and public health. The meetings thus find themselves on the turning point between public health and individual health care¿a crucial turning point from a public health point of view. `Nutrition¿ has

  16. The Fifth International Heelsum Workshop 'more synergy between primary care and public health': mission statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, van C.; Hiddink, G.J.; Binsbergen, van J.J.; Brotons, C.; Drenthen, A.J.M.; Green, L.E.; Halsted, C.H.; Koelen, M.A.; Kok, F.J.; Mathus-Vliegen, E.M.; Ockhuizen, Th.; Truswell, A.S.

    2008-01-01

    The theme of the Heelsum Workshops is nutrition and dietary patterns as determinants of individual and public health. The meetings thus find themselves on the turning point between public health and individual health care¿a crucial turning point from a public health point of view. `Nutrition¿ has al

  17. Sexual Behavior Among Orphaned Adolescents in Western Kenya: A Comparison of Institutional- and Family-Based Care Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Embleton, Lonnie; Nyandat, Joram; Ayuku, David; Sang, Edwin; Kamanda, Allan; Ayaya, Samuel; Nyandiko, Winstone; Gisore, Peter; Vreeman, Rachel; Atwoli, Lukoye; Galarraga, Omar; Ott, Mary A; Braitstein, Paula

    2017-04-01

    This study sought to assess whether risky sexual behaviors and sexual exploitation of orphaned adolescents differed between family-based and institutional care environments in Uasin Gishu County, Kenya. We analyzed baseline data from a cohort of orphaned adolescents aged 10-18 years living in 300 randomly selected households and 19 charitable children's institutions. The primary outcomes were having ever had consensual sex, number of sex partners, transactional sex, and forced sex. Multivariate logistic regression compared these between participants in institutional care and family-based care while adjusting for age, sex, orphan status, importance of religion, caregiver support and supervision, school attendance, and alcohol and drug use. This analysis included 1,365 participants aged ≥10 years: 712 (52%) living in institutional environments and 653 (48%) in family-based care. Participants in institutional care were significantly less likely to report engaging in transactional sex (adjusted odds ratio, .46; 95% confidence interval, .3-.72) or to have experienced forced sex (adjusted odds ratio, .57; 95% confidence interval, .38-.88) when controlling for age, sex, and orphan status. These associations remained when adjusting for additional variables. Orphaned adolescents living in family-based care in Uasin Gishu, Kenya, may be at increased risk of transactional sex and sexual violence compared to those in institutional care. Institutional care may reduce vulnerabilities through the provision of basic material needs and adequate standards of living that influence adolescents' sexual risk-taking behaviors. The use of single items to assess outcomes and nonexplicit definition of sex suggest the findings should be interpreted with caution. Copyright © 2016 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India - A Systematic Review.

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types o...

  19. Physical restraint use in institutional care of old people in Sweden in 2000 and 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellfolk, Tony; Sandman, Per-Olof; Gustafson, Yngve; Karlsson, Stig; Lövheim, Hugo

    2012-07-01

    Physical restraint use is common in institutional care for old people and mainly used to prevent falls, despite the fall-preventive effect of physical restraints being questioned in previous research. The aim of the study was to investigate the use of physical restraints in Sweden in 2000 and 2007. Data were collected from two comparable census surveys conducted in all institutional care units for old people in 2000 (n = 3,669) and 2007 (n = 2,914). Information on residents' characteristics and physical restraint use was collected using the Multi-Dimensional Dementia Assessment Scale (MDDAS). In 2000 16.0% (95% confidence interval (CI) 14.8%-17.2%) of the residents were restrained compared to 18.2% (95% CI 16.8%-19.6%) in 2007 (p = 0.017). Adjusting for residents' characteristics showed that residents in 2007 were more likely to be physically restrained, relative to the residents in 2000 (odds ratio (OR) 1.031, 95% CI 1.005-1.058, p = 0.017). In 2007 the residents had been restrained longer, and a higher proportion were restrained for unknown reasons. Physical restraint use is still common. Moreover, the findings of this study suggest a small increase (OR 1.031) in the prevalence of physical restraint use from 2000 to 2007 adjusted for residents' characteristics.

  20. STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES IN INSTITUTIONAL CARE CONDITION: CHALLENGES FOR MANAGEMENT AND SCHOOL INCLUSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraia Napoleão Freitas

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses about management and school inclusion of students with disabilities who are living under institutional care conditions. The themes are relevant given that there is little research that aims to relate them. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate and understand the reality of educational management on the inclusion of students with disabilities living in institutional care conditions. Some authors were selected to support this study, including: Lück (2006; Libâneo, Oliveira and Toschi (2005; Sousa and Paravidini (2013; Carvalho (2006; Tezani (2010; Yin (2010; and Bardin (2011. This research was classified as qualitative case study. The instruments for data collection were semi-structured interviews and observations in the school the disabled student was enrolled in.  The results point to a still deficient inclusive practice, and the school states that the support from the City Department of Education is still incipient in support to the work of school management in the provision of financial and human resources for the inclusion to happen. It can be observed that for inclusion to be effective, it is necessary a truly articulated work among all people involved in the process.

  1. ELEMENTS OF MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION CABIMAS MUNICIPALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Castillo

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This article is an advance of a wider investigation, in which the objective is to analyze overall maintenance management in public institutions of higher education in the municipality Cabimas, hence in this development describes the elements of the management maintenance present in these institutions. Authors were consulted such as Duffuaa et al. (2010, Clemenza (2010, Zambrano and Leal (2006 , Robbins and Coulter (2005 y Martínez (2007 among others. The research is descriptive, non-experimental   design, transactional  and  field.  We  used  a population   census,  for  a  total  of   twenty-three  (23   research  subjects,  belonging  to  the Universidad   del   Zulia    Núcleo   Costa   Oriental   del   Lago,  Universidad    Nacional Experimental  Rafael  Maria Baralt and  Instituto Universitario Tecnológico  Cabimas. To collect data, a questionnaire was composed of twenty-two (22 items, which was validated by the trial of six (6 experts, with 0.99 reliability by Cronbach alpha coefficient.  We conclude that the elements planning, organizing, scheduling, execution and control, have a high presence in maintenance management, not the human resource and security elements.

  2. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations for the Use of Wildlife in Research and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, Robert S; Bryan, John A

    2016-01-01

    Ethical and effective oversight of the use of wildlife species in research and education requires consideration of issues and methods not relevant to work with traditional laboratory or domesticated animals, just as the effective oversight of biomedical research requires consideration of issues and methods not germane to wildlife research. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committees or other institutional review committees can meet their responsibilities in these disparate types of animal activities only by using resources tailored to the animals and situations encountered. Here we review the issues and the resources that facilitate effective oversight of such activities in the wildlife research arena available to researchers, institutional review committees, regulatory bodies, and accrediting bodies. Issues covered include an understanding of the fundamental differences between wildlife research and biomedical research; the profound differences between wildlife species and traditional laboratory subjects, most of which are domesticated animals; and the unique issues presented when the research subjects are members of wild populations and communities. We review the resources available for effective oversight of wildlife projects and emphasize that competent oversight of wildlife research demands the use of appropriate resources. These resources include guidelines designed for the use of wild species (taxon-specific guidelines) and protocol forms tailored for the species and situations encountered.

  3. THE IMPORTANCE OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS IN THE MANAGEMENT AND PROCESSING OF LARGE DATA VOLUMES IN PUBLIC INSTITUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CARINA-ELENA STEGĂROIU

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Under a computerized society, technological resources become a source of identification for any community, institution or country. Globalization of information becomes a reality, all the resources having entered into a relationship of subordination with the World Wide Web, the information highways and the Internet. "Information technology - with its most important branch, data management computer science - enters a new era, in which the computer leads to the benefit of a navigable and transparent communication space, focusing on information". Therefore, in an information-based economy, information systems have been established which, based on management systems through the methods of algebra, with applications in economic engineering, have come to manage and process large volumes of data, especially in public institutions. Consequently, the Ministry of Public Affairs has implemented the “Increasing the public administration’s responsibility by modernising the information systems for generating the reports of the financial situations of public institutions” project (FOREXEBUG”, cod SMIS 34952, for which it received in 2012 non-refundable financing from the European Social Fund through the Operational Program for Developing the Administrative Capacity 2007-2013, based on which this paper will analyse the usefulness of implementing such a program in public institutions. Such a system aims to achieve a new form of reporting of budget execution and financial statements (including information related to legal commitments submitted monthly by each public institution in electronic, standardized, secure form, with increasing the reliability of data collected by cross-checking data from the treasury and providing reliable information for use by the Ministry of Finance, public institutions, other relevant institutions and the public, both at the level of detail and the consolidation possibilities at various levels, in parallel with their use for

  4. [Childbirth practices and challenges for humanization of care in two public hospitals in Southern Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagahama, Elizabeth Eriko Ishida; Santiago, Silvia Maria

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize hospital care for childbirth in two hospitals affiliated with the Unified National Health System in Maringá, Paraná, Brazil, and identify both obstacles and facilitating factors for the implementation of humanized care, based on women's perception of the care received. This was an exploratory and descriptive study with a cross-sectional design, analyzing hospital patient charts and interviews with 569 women who gave birth at the two hospitals from March 2005 to February 2006. Hospital care was characterized on the basis of WHO quality-of-care guidelines for labor and delivery. The data pointed to a healthcare model marked by the hygienist legacy in physician-centered hospital protocols and professional practices. Institutional factors, identified as difficulties in institutional and infrastructure organization, hospital protocols, and health professionals' individual practices and stances, denote barriers that jointly hinder the implementation of a humanized model for childbirth care.

  5. Obstetric patients requiring intensive care: a one year retrospective study in a tertiary care institute in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Niyaz; Mishra, Sandeep Kumar; Kundra, Pankaj; Veena, P; Soundaraghavan, S; Habeebullah, S

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives. Critically ill obstetric patients are a particularly unique cohort for the intensivist. The objective of this study was to review the indications for admission, demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of obstetric patients admitted to intensive care unit of a medical college hospital in southern India and to identify conditions associated with maternal mortality. Design. Retrospective analysis of pregnant/postpartum (up to 6 weeks) admissions over a 1-year result. We studied 55 patients constituting 11.6% of mixed ICU admissions during the study period. Results. The mean APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation) II score of patients at admission was 11.8. Most of the patients (76%) were admitted in the antepartum period. The commonest indications for ICU admission were obstetric haemorrhage (51%) and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (18%). 85% of patients required mechanical ventilation and 78% required inotropic support. Conclusions. Maternal mortality was 13%, and the majority of the deaths were due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and multiorgan failure, following an obstetric haemorrhage. A dedicated obstetric ICU in tertiary hospitals can ensure that there is no delay in patient management and intensive care can be instituted at the earliest.

  6. Obstetric Patients Requiring Intensive Care: A One Year Retrospective Study in a Tertiary Care Institute in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyaz Ashraf

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Critically ill obstetric patients are a particularly unique cohort for the intensivist. The objective of this study was to review the indications for admission, demographics, clinical characteristics, and outcomes of obstetric patients admitted to intensive care unit of a medical college hospital in southern India and to identify conditions associated with maternal mortality. Design. Retrospective analysis of pregnant/postpartum (up to 6 weeks admissions over a 1-year result. We studied 55 patients constituting 11.6% of mixed ICU admissions during the study period. Results. The mean APACHE (acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score of patients at admission was 11.8. Most of the patients (76% were admitted in the antepartum period. The commonest indications for ICU admission were obstetric haemorrhage (51% and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (18%. 85% of patients required mechanical ventilation and 78% required inotropic support. Conclusions. Maternal mortality was 13%, and the majority of the deaths were due to disseminated intravascular coagulation and multiorgan failure, following an obstetric haemorrhage. A dedicated obstetric ICU in tertiary hospitals can ensure that there is no delay in patient management and intensive care can be instituted at the earliest.

  7. A New Agenda for Teaching Public Administration and Public Policy in Brazil: Institutional Opportunities and Educational Reasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Sandra; Almeida, Lindijane S. B.; Lucio, Magda L.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the reasons and teaching objectives of an array of new undergraduate courses on public administration and public policy management which have emerged recently in Brazil. While in 2001 there were only two undergraduate courses teaching formal public administration in the country, by 2015, they had risen to 40, and also…

  8. A New Agenda for Teaching Public Administration and Public Policy in Brazil: Institutional Opportunities and Educational Reasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Sandra; Almeida, Lindijane S. B.; Lucio, Magda L.

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the reasons and teaching objectives of an array of new undergraduate courses on public administration and public policy management which have emerged recently in Brazil. While in 2001 there were only two undergraduate courses teaching formal public administration in the country, by 2015, they had risen to 40, and also…

  9. New institutional mechanisms to bridge the information gap between climate science and public policy decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, W.; Gulledge, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    Many decision makers lack actionable scientific information needed to prepare for future challenges associated with climate change. Although the scope and quality of available scientific information has increased dramatically in recent years, this information does not always reach - or is not presented in a form that is useful to - decision makers who need it. The producer (i.e. scientists) community tends to be stovepiped, even though consumers (i.e. decision makers) often need interdisciplinary science and analysis. Consumers, who may also be stovepiped in various agencies or subject areas, may lack familiarity with or access to these separate communities, as well as the tools or time to navigate scientific information and disciplines. Closing the communication gap between these communities could be facilitated by institutionalizing processes designed for this purpose. We recommend a variety of mainstreaming policies within the consumer community, as well as mechanisms to generate a strong demand signal that will resonate more strongly with the producer community. We also recommend institutional reforms and methods of incentivizing policy-oriented scientific analysis within the producer community. Our recommendations focus on improving information flow to national security and foreign policy decision makers, but many are relevant to public policy writ large. Recommendations for Producers 1. The scientific community should formally encourage collaborations between natural and social scientists and reward publications in interdisciplinary outlets Incentives could include research funding and honorary awards recognizing service to public policy. 2. Academic merit review should reward research grants and publications targeted at interdisciplinary and/or policy-oriented audiences. Reforms of merit review may require new policies and engaged institutional leadership. Recommendations for Consumers 1. Congress should amend Title VI of the National Defense Education Act

  10. Public Policy Report. Child Care: An Endangered Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jerlean

    1990-01-01

    Presents testimony given at a Congressional briefing on findings of the National Child Care Staffing Study. The study concerned the staffing and budgeting crisis in the child care industry as a whole and the University of Pittsburgh Child Development Center in particular. (Author/BB)

  11. Pharmaceutical services in a Mexican pain relief and palliative care institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Escutia Gutierrez R

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Neither the purchase nor the distribution of pharmaceuticals in hospitals and community pharmacies in Mexico is under the care of pharmacists. Some are under control of physicians.This report presents the results of the implementation of somef pharmaceutical services for the Jalisco Pain Relief, and Palliative Care Institute (Palia Institute, under the direction of the Secretary of Health, Government of Jalisco. The services implemented were drug distribution system, Drug Information Service, Pharmacovigilance Program , and home pharmacotherapy follow-up pilot program for patients with advanced illness, with the ultimate using the appropriate medication. The drug distribution system included dispensing of opioid pain medications, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, NSAIDs, anxiolytic drugs, steroid drugs, laxatives, and anti-emetics. The frequently used drugs were morphine sulfate (62%, amitriptyline (6.4%, and dextropropoxyphene (5.8%. The Drug Information Service answered 114 consultations, mainly asked by a physician (71% concerned with adverse drug reactions and contraindications (21%. The pharmacovigilance program identified 146 suspected adverse drug reactions and classified them reasonably as possible (27%, probable (69%, and certain (4%. These were attributed mainly to pregabalin and tramadol. The home pharmacotherapy follow-up pilot program cared patients with different cancer diagnoses and drug-related problems (DRP, which were identified and classified (according to second Granada Consensus for pharmaceutical intervention as DRP 1 (5%, DRP 2 (10%, DRP 3 (14%, DRP 4 (19%, DRP 5 (24%, or DRP 6 (28%. This report provides information concerning the accurate use of medication and, above all, an opportunity for Mexican pharmacists to become an part of health teams seeking to resolve drug-related problems.

  12. Pharmaceutical services in a Mexican pain relief and palliative care institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escutia Gutiérrez, Raymundo; Cortéz Álvarez, César R; Alvarez Álvarez, Rosa M; Flores Hernández, Jorge Lv; Gutiérrez Godínez, Jéssica; López Y López, José G

    2007-10-01

    Neither the purchase nor the distribution of pharmaceuticals in hospitals and community pharmacies in Mexico is under the care of pharmacists. Some are under control of physicians. This report presents the results of the implementation of somef pharmaceutical services for the Jalisco Pain Relief, and Palliative Care Institute (Palia Institute), under the direction of the Secretary of Health, Government of Jalisco. The services implemented were drug distribution system, Drug Information Service, Pharmacovigilance Program, and home pharmacotherapy follow-up pilot program for patients with advanced illness, with the ultimate using the appropriate medication. The drug distribution system included dispensing of opioid pain medications, antidepressants, anticonvulsants, NSAIDs, anxiolytic drugs, steroid drugs, laxatives, and anti-emetics. The frequently used drugs were morphine sulfate (62%), amitriptyline (6.4%), and dextropropoxyphene (5.8%). The Drug Information Service answered 114 consultations, mainly asked by a physician (71%) concerned with adverse drug reactions and contraindications (21%). The pharmacovigilance program identified 146 suspected adverse drug reactions and classified them reasonably as possible (27%), probable (69%), and certain (4%). These were attributed mainly to pregabalin and tramadol. The home pharmacotherapy follow-up pilot program cared patients with different cancer diagnoses and drug-related problems (DRP), which were identified and classified (according to second Granada Consensus) for pharmaceutical intervention as DRP 1 (5%), DRP 2 (10%), DRP 3 (14%), DRP 4 (19%), DRP 5 (24%), or DRP 6 (28%). This report provides information concerning the accurate use of medication and, above all, an opportunity for Mexican pharmacists to become an part of health teams seeking to resolve drug-related problems.

  13. Maternal employment in child-care institutions and the risk of infant wheeze and atopic dermatitis in the offspring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hersoug, L.G.; Benn, C.S.; Simonsen, J.B.;

    2008-01-01

    this hypothesis, we studied the incidence of wheezing and atopic dermatitis (AD) in infants of mothers employed in child-care institutions - and thus presumably being highly exposed to infections and microbes - compared with infants of mothers not so employed. A total of 31471 mother-child pairs enrolled...... in the Danish National Birth Cohort were followed prospectively. Information on wheezing episodes, AD, maternal employment, and other variables were collected by interview at 12 and 30 wk of gestation, and 6 and 18 months of age, and by linkage to the Danish Medical Birth Register and the Child-care Database......% CI: 1.05-1.77), and 1.03 (95% CI: 0.81-1.31), respectively, for first-born infants of mothers employed in child-care institutions compared with infants of mothers not so employed. There was no effect of maternal employment in child-care institutions among infants with older siblings. In conclusion...

  14. Referrals between Public Sector Health Institutions for Women with Obstetric High Risk, Complications, or Emergencies in India - A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Samiksha; Doyle, Pat; Campbell, Oona M; Mathew, Manu; Murthy, G V S

    2016-01-01

    Emergency obstetric care (EmOC) within primary health care systems requires a linked referral system to be effective in reducing maternal death. This systematic review aimed to summarize evidence on the proportion of referrals between institutions during pregnancy and delivery, and the factors affecting referrals, in India. We searched 6 electronic databases, reviewed four regional databases and repositories, and relevant program reports from India published between 1994 and 2013. All types of study or reports (except editorials, comments and letters) which reported on institution-referrals (out-referral or in-referral) for obstetric care were included. Results were synthesized on the proportion and the reasons for referral, and factors affecting referrals. Of the 11,346 articles identified by the search, we included 232 articles in the full text review and extracted data from 16 studies that met our inclusion criteria Of the 16, one was RCT, seven intervention cohort (without controls), six cross-sectional, and three qualitative studies. Bias and quality of studies were reported. Between 25% and 52% of all pregnancies were referred from Sub-centres for antenatal high-risk, 14% to 36% from nurse run delivery or basic EmOC centres for complications or emergencies, and 2 to 7% were referred from doctor run basic EmOC centres for specialist care at comprehensive EmOC centres. Problems identified with referrals from peripheral health centres included low skills and confidence of staff, reluctance to induce labour, confusion over the clinical criteria for referral, non-uniform standards of care at referral institutions, a tendency to by-pass middle level institutions, a lack of referral communication and supervision, and poor compliance. The high proportion of referrals from peripheral health centers reflects the lack of appropriate clinical guidelines, processes, and skills for obstetric care and referral in India. This, combined with inadequate referral communication

  15. Integrated model of primary and secondary eye care for underserved rural areas: the L V Prasad Eye Institute experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gullapalli N; Khanna, Rohit C; Athota, Sashi Mohan; Rajshekar, Varda; Rani, Padmaja Kumari

    2012-01-01

    Blindness is a major global public health problem and recent estimates from World Health Organization (WHO) showed that in India there were 62 million visually impaired, of whom 8 million are blind. The Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study (APEDS) provided a comprehensive estimate for prevalence and causes of blindness for the state of Andhra Pradesh (AP). It also highlighted that uptake of services was also an issue, predominantly among lower socio-economic groups, women, and rural populations. On the basis of this analysis, L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) developed a pyramidal model of eye care delivery. This article describes the LVPEI eye care delivery model. The article discusses infrastructure development, human resource development, and service delivery (including prevention and promotion) in the context of primary and secondary care service delivery in rural areas. The article also alludes to opportunities for research at these levels of service delivery and the amenability of the evidence generated at these levels of the LVPEI eye health pyramid for advocacy and policy planning. In addition, management issues related to the sustainability of service delivery in rural areas are discussed. The article highlights the key factors required for the success of the LVPEI rural service delivery model and discusses challenges that need to be overcome to replicate the model. The article concludes by noting the potential to convert these challenges into opportunities by integrating certain aspects of the existing healthcare system into the model. Examples include screening of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in order to promote higher community participation. The results of such integration can serve as evidence for advocacy and policy.

  16. Integrated model of primary and secondary eye care for underserved rural areas: The L V Prasad Eye Institute experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gullapalli N Rao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Blindness is a major global public health problem and recent estimates from World Health Organization (WHO showed that in India there were 62 million visually impaired, of whom 8 million are blind. The Andhra Pradesh Eye Disease Study (APEDS provided a comprehensive estimate for prevalence and causes of blindness for the state of Andhra Pradesh (AP. It also highlighted that uptake of services was also an issue, predominantly among lower socio-economic groups, women, and rural populations. On the basis of this analysis, L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI developed a pyramidal model of eye care delivery. This article describes the LVPEI eye care delivery model. The article discusses infrastructure development, human resource development, and service delivery (including prevention and promotion in the context of primary and secondary care service delivery in rural areas. The article also alludes to opportunities for research at these levels of service delivery and the amenability of the evidence generated at these levels of the LVPEI eye health pyramid for advocacy and policy planning. In addition, management issues related to the sustainability of service delivery in rural areas are discussed. The article highlights the key factors required for the success of the LVPEI rural service delivery model and discusses challenges that need to be overcome to replicate the model. The article concludes by noting the potential to convert these challenges into opportunities by integrating certain aspects of the existing healthcare system into the model. Examples include screening of diabetes and diabetic retinopathy in order to promote higher community participation. The results of such integration can serve as evidence for advocacy and policy.

  17. Concept Of The Public Safety In The Russian Federation As A Legal Measure Of The Educational Institutions (Organizations Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Chesnokov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author researches basic positions presented in the Concept of Public Security in the Russian Federation and focused on the educational institutions (organizations. Author analyzes main sources of threat to the public security: the threat of a criminal nature; terrorist threats; extremist activity; increase in the number of crimes; complication of the crime situation; increase in the number of criminals; high levels of corruption; illegal migration; internal migration; social tension in society; deterioration of the technical state of transport infrastructure; likelihood of emergencies; risk of harm to the human life and health, environment; high probability of fire occurrence in Russia; natural variations in the characteristics of the hydrological regime of water bodies; seismic hazard. Author defines goals of public security, outlines priority (main and other tasks, as well as the principles and key activities to ensure public security. In the conclusion author concludes that public safety, in fact, involves complex nature of activity and contributes to the legal security of educational institution (organization, gives definition of the public security of the educational institution (organization and results of operations for its assuring.

  18. Institutional abuse toward the elderly: Perceptions of health care providers and older adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guadalupe Ruelas-González

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To analyze the health care providers (HCP and elderly patients’ perceptions about abuse of the elderly by health personnel of public health services, in selected cities in Mexico. Materials and methods. A qualitative study and a strategy of data triangulation were performed during 2009 and 2012; 13 HCPs and 12 elders were interviewed, in order to obtain their experience regarding elder abuse. Grounded Theory proceedings were used for the analysis. Results. Elder abuse is a naturalized practice, from HCP and elderly people’s point of view; these perceptions are showed in different ways. Conclusion. Institutionalization, historical professionalization and lack of consciousness about needs of the elderly (sociocultural and economic, require changes in planning, organization and monitoring process in the Health System; training and educational interventions on staff and exchange attitudes and behavior are necessary in order to offer a health care that is comprehensive, decent, human and with respect for the human rights.

  19. Total energy management for nursing homes and other long-term care institutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to provide the basic instruction needed to implement the most effective form of energy conservation--Total Energy Management, or TEM--in your long-term care facility. The effort required is worthwhile for many different reasons: TEM is self-paying; TEM promotes energy conservation without negative impact on health care services; and energy costs will continue to escalate. Following the introductory chapter, chapters are titled: Understanding Energy Consumption; Initiating a Total Energy Management Program; Developing Energy Consumption Data; Conducting the Facility Survey; Developing and Implementing the Basic Plan; Communication and Motivation; Monitoring Your Program and Keeping It Effective; and Guidelines for Energy Conservation. Two appendices furnish information on building information for TEM and sources of information for energy management. (MCW)

  20. Insulin pump therapy in the perioperative period: a review of care after implementation of institutional guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Mary E; Seifert, Karen M; Beer, Karen A; Mackey, Patricia; Schlinkert, Richard T; Stearns, Joshua D; Cook, Curtiss B

    2012-09-01

    An institutional policy was previously established for patients with diabetes on insulin pump therapy undergoing elective surgical procedures. Electronic medical records were reviewed to assess documentation of insulin pump status and glucose monitoring during preoperative, intraoperative, and postanesthesia care unit (PACU) phases of care. Twenty patients with insulin pumps underwent 23 procedures from March 1 to December 31, 2011. Mean (standard deviation) age was 58 (13) years, mean diabetes duration was 28 (17) years, and mean duration of insulin pump therapy was 7 (6) years. Nearly all cases (86%) during the preoperative phase had the presence of the device documented--an improvement over the 64% noted in data collected before the policy. Intraoperatively, 13 cases (61%) had the presence of the pump documented, which was higher than the 28% before implementation of the policy. However, documentation of pump status was found in only 38% in the PACU and was actually less than the 60% documented previously. Over 90% of cases had glucose checked in the preoperative area and the PACU, and only 60% had it checked intraoperatively, which was nearly identical to the percentages seen before policy implementation. No adverse events occurred when insulin pump therapy was continued. Although some processes still require improvement, preliminary data suggest that the policy for perioperative management of insulin pumps has provided useful structure for care of these cases. The data thus far indicate that insulin pump therapy can be continued safely during the perioperative period. © 2012 Diabetes Technology Society.

  1. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  2. The participation of public institutions and private sector stakeholders to Devrekani Watershed management planning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevgi Öztürk

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Watershed management is creating the ecological balance between human beings and habitats and natural resources especially water resources. In this study the nature and human beings and all of the components involving on human activities in nature were tried to be tackled and the strengths and weaknesses, threats and opportunities (SWOT analysis of the area were evaluated by prioritizing R’WOT (Ranking + SWOT analysis for ensuring the participation and evaluating the ideas and attitudes of public institutions and private sector which are interest groups of Devrekani Watershed. According to the analysis result, both of the participant groups stated that the planned Hydroelectric Power Plant (HPP in the basin will negatively affect the natural resource value. The economical deficiency- for the local administration- and the lack of qualified labour force –for private sector- issues are determined as the most important issues. Having an environmental plan (EP, supporting the traditional animal husbandry were determined as the highest priority factors by the local administration group and the presence of forests and grasslands and the eco-tourism potential were determined as the highest priority factors for the private sector. Creating awareness to local administration group, who are one of the most important decision making mechanisms in the area and did not prefer threats in a high priority way, is foreseen according to the context of the study.

  3. Work Satisfaction and Leadership Styles in Public and Private Education Institutions in Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M. Chiang Vega

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to analyze the relationship between work satisfaction and leadership style in 145 faculty staff in public and private education institutions in Chile. To measure work satisfaction, the questionnaire by Chiang et al., (2008 was used and for leadership styles, a questionnaire was used based on the situational theory by Hersey and Blanchard (Chiang and Salazar 2011. The reliability of the scales is variable and in all cases adequate, with Cronbach's alpha between 0.7 and 0.9. Values of work satisfaction are around 4 (scale from 1 to 5, placing those surveyed at a level as "satisfied with their work". No results are available to indicate low levels of satisfaction. Values regarding instruction, persuasive, participation, and delegation leadership styles range between 3 and 3.5, both for the female and male samples. The results indicate that the four leadership styles are present with medium levels. Statistically significant correlations exist, in low levels, among instruction, persuasion, and participation leadership styles with all the factors of work satisfaction. Positive correlations are highlighted between satisfaction with the way their work is carried out and the persuasion and participation leadership styles. The delegation leadership style does not correlate with any of the factors associated to work satisfaction

  4. Anticancer patent landscape and technology assessment of Indian public-funded research institutes and organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dara, Ajay; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2014-08-01

    This review discusses the various drug therapeutic targets and latest technologies of anticancer patents from 10 Indian public-funded research organizations covering more than 150 esteemed institutes. We have identified and reported the leading assignee and inventors along with their collaboration network and, thereby, have analyzed the various patent trends, geographical distributions, citation maps, Derwent World Patents Index, international patent classification analysis and the like. This article provides the insights of 1905 patent documents from 191 families and discusses in-depth anticancer technology through categorization studies at the level of drug discovery, drug development and treatment and diagnosis. In addition, various cancer targets were correlated with recent technologies so as to identify the white spaces for upcoming technologies. Over a period of 13 years (1990 - 2013) the main focus of Indian cancer research was in the field of synthetic chemistry and natural extracts followed by the pharmaceutical compositions and combinations, whereas, the white spaces for future cancer remedy were identified from research in the areas of cancer stem cell lines, vaccines, gene therapy, nano formulations with targeted drug delivery systems as core and latest technologies.

  5. Aerobiology of schools and public institutions--part of a study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravesen, S; Larsen, L; Skov, P

    1983-01-01

    The influence of the indoor climate in relation to the health of persons has mainly been connected with the physico-chemical properties of the environment. Complaints from patients concerning eye, nose and throat problems, hoarseness, headache and fatigue are common, especially in schools and other public institutions with heavy traffic and badly cleaned or water damaged wall-to-wall carpets. The significance of specific allergenic components in dust such as mites, mould, animal dander and pollen is well-known. However, the influence of a dirt-factor or a moisture-factor in the carpets or from ventilation systems leading to accumulation, liberation and inhalation of dust and micro-organisms, on allergic and non-allergic persons has, until recently, been neglected. To obtain knowledge on this influence, a systematical registration of the biological factors based on consecutive investigation has started. Results from registration of airborne micro-organisms show a tendency towards a larger amount of micro-organisms measured 1 m above carpets than above bare floors.

  6. Accessibility of a cadeirante in a public institution of higher education: routes and routines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Silveira Cambruzzi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The physical disability is group is heterogeneous, even within a “category”, since that covers a diversity, because each has a mechanism to organize in spaces in which attends but all participate of the same challenges. However, due to the challenges encountered by persons with disabilities in establishing routes and routines within a University is that we have developed this research. We chose search access of physically disabled person in your external displacement of student housing to the classroom and the classroom until the Secretariat Department that frequents. Research whose goal is the identification and analysis of routes as its accessibility, on the campus of a public institution of higher education. The survey was submitted to the Ethics Committee that approves their implementation. Direct observations were performed, as well as records via photos and footage, which were authorized by the University. The information collected were analyzed qualitatively as the standards of the Brazilian Association of technical norms and the guiding document for the Regional Council of engineering and architecture, Rio Grande do Sul, titled: Roadmap survey. In data analysis, we see that there are needs for providing accessibility with safety and convenience, as well as establish mechanisms for the community library and the University restaurant part of living as part of the University community and also, in the exercise of their constitutional rights.

  7. Measuring the effects of reducing subsidies for private insurance on public expenditure for health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Terence Chai

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of reducing subsidies for private health insurance on public sector expenditure for hospital care. An econometric framework using simultaneous equation models is developed to analyse the interrelated decisions on the intensity and type of health care use and private insurance. The framework is applied to the context of the mixed public-private system in Australia. The simulation projections show that reducing premium subsidies is expected to generate net cost savings. This arises because the cost savings achieved from reducing subsidies are larger than the potential increase in public expenditure on hospital care. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Performance of the public health care sector in the Republic of Macedonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lolita Mitevska

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Healthcare authorities constantly search for new approaches of assessing the performance of the health sector. Comparative studies help for improvements in healthcare by learning from each-other. Our aim was to assess the performance of the public healthcare system in the Republic of Macedonia, through the analysis of preparedness of institutions to fulfill the population’s healthcare needs and expectations. Methods: This study had a regional character. The national research team interviewed 175 randomly selected participants from Macedonia. The research was performed in the period March 2012 – March 2013. For the research purposes there were used especially designed questionnaires for cancer, stroke, myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus and injuries. For assessment of the performances, the appropriate techniques were developed. Results: Macedonians consider public healthcare system as being medium-good in all aspects: accessibility, availability, quality of health care services and population’s confidence. The knowledgeable observers (N=125 believe that state-of-the-art treatment exist all over the country (“yes”: 33.6% and “rather yes”: 44.8%. They believe that the services are accessible to everybody, free of major charges (“yes”: 31.2% and “rather yes”: 45.6%. The individual witnesses (N=50 argued toward lack of pharmacies and proper medicines in rural areas, with a gap between the availability and quality of services in rural vs. urban areas. Conclusion: The future goals for Macedonia include better public healthcare financing, cost definition of health packages, improved disease prevention and effective human resources.

  9. Comparing public service motivation within various Europe countries: do institutional environments make a difference ? Paper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenabeele, W.V.; Steijn, B.; Egger-Peitler, I; Hammerschmid, G; Meyer, R.; Camilleri, E; Cerase, F; Leisink, P.L.M.; Ritz, A; Hondeghem, A

    2009-01-01

    The motivation of public servants in general (Behn 1995), and public service motivation (PSM) in particular (Perry and Hondeghem 2008b), have always been important issues in public administration and public management research. In recent years, research on public service motivation has made signific

  10. Costs of medically assisted reproduction treatment at specialized fertility clinics in the Danish public health care system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Terkel; Erb, Karin; Rizvanovic, Amra

    2014-01-01

    To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction.......To examine the costs to the public health care system of couples in medically assisted reproduction....

  11. Analyzing Public Sector Education Facilities: A Step Further towards Accessible Basic Education Institutions in Destitute Subregions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talpur, Mir Aftab Hussain; Napiah, Madzlan; Chandio, Imtiaz Ahmed; Memon, Irfan Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Rural subregions of the developing countries are suffering from many physical and socioeconomic problems, including scarcity of basic education institutions. The shortage of education institutions extended distance between rural localities and education institutions. Hence, to curb this problem, this research is aimed to deal with the basic…

  12. Census of Institutional Repositories in the United States: MIRACLE Project Research Findings. CLIR Publication No. 140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markey, Karen; Rieh, Soo Young; St. Jean, Beth; Kim, Jihyun; Yakel, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    In this report, the authors describe results of a nationwide census of institutional repositories in U.S. academic institutions. The census is one of several activities of the MIRACLE Project, an Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS)-funded research program based at the University of Michigan. The acronym MIRACLE means "Making…

  13. Improvements in children with cerebral palsy following intrathecal baclofen: use of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Care and Comfort Caregiver Questionnaire (RIC CareQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karin W; Tann, Beverley; Mutlu, Akmer; Gaebler-Spira, Deborah

    2014-03-01

    Implantation of an intrathecal baclofen pump is recommended for children with cerebral palsy as a means to improve care and comfort when other options fail to control severe hypertonia. Making an assessment of a child's spasticity-related limitations in both routine care and activity is a necessary component of selection of intrathecal baclofen candidates. The Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Care and Comfort Caregiver Questionnaire (RIC CareQ) is a validated, easy-to-use questionnaire that elicits information about the ease of daily activity and caregiving in patients with severe spasticity. Questionnaires completed by caregivers and patients at a pediatric physiatry spasticity clinic over an 11-year period were reviewed to evaluate whether the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago Care and Comfort Caregiver Questionnaire captured improved caregiving and comfort of children with cerebral palsy and severe spasticity following intrathecal baclofen pump implantation. The Questionnaire scores showed improvement after intrathecal baclofen pump implantation, consistent with subjective reports of patient and caregiver satisfaction.

  14. Factsheets for the (eco)toxicological risk assessment strategy of the National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luttik R; Raaij MTM van; CSR

    2001-01-01

    Eight fact sheets describing risk assessment methods used at the Centre of Substances and Risk assessment (CSR) of the National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) are presented here with the main aim of promoting greater transparency in the risk assessment methods used at the Ins

  15. Participation Patterns in Adult Education: The Role of Institutions and Public Policy Frameworks in Resolving Coordination Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Richard; Rubenson, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on evidence regarding cross-national patterns of participation in adult education and an interpretation of these patterns from an institutional and public policy perspective. The interpretation follows from the perspective that sustaining high and widely distributed levels of investment in the development and maintenance of…

  16. Research Results from the Student Transitions Project: Movement Among B.C. Public Post-Secondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development, 2008

    2008-01-01

    The Student Transitions Project (STP) studied the flow of a group of 2001/02 grade 12 graduates over five years, from 2002/03 to 2006/07 to track their movement into and among B.C. public post-secondary institutions and analyze their retention and credential completion outcomes. The primary research question of interest is: "What is the flow…

  17. Participation Patterns in Adult Education: The Role of Institutions and Public Policy Frameworks in Resolving Coordination Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desjardins, Richard; Rubenson, Kjell

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on evidence regarding cross-national patterns of participation in adult education and an interpretation of these patterns from an institutional and public policy perspective. The interpretation follows from the perspective that sustaining high and widely distributed levels of investment in the development and maintenance of…

  18. Back in the OECD...an oblique comment on the World Bank's "Better results from public sector institutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ch. Pollitt (Christopher)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractMost of my thinking and experience has been focused on the developed world, rather than developing countries. Thus I bring an outsider’s perspective to the World Bank’s 2012 document, Better results from public institutions. I am grateful to Nick Manning and Willy McCourt for their

  19. Gender Equality in Public Higher Education Institutions of Ethiopia: The Case of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egne, Robsan Margo

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring gender equality in higher education system is high on the agenda worldwide particularly in science disciplines. This study explores the problems and prospects of gender equality in public higher education institutions of Ethiopia, especially in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Descriptive survey and analytical research…

  20. A Survey of Movers: Students Who Move between BC Public Post-Secondary Institutions. A Summary of Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several years, there has been a wealth of new data on student mobility in British Columbia's postsecondary system. Quantitative information from the Student Transitions Project (STP) has allowed current and prospective students, the BC Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT), public post-secondary institutions, the Ministry…

  1. The Demand for Higher Education in the U.S., 1927-72: The Public and Private Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hight, Joseph E.

    1975-01-01

    In assessing the impact that the increases in income and tuition charges have had on the share of the market captured by privately controlled institutions, results suggest that the rise in family income favors private enrollment but the rise in the private to public tuition ratio swamped the income effect. (Author/BP)

  2. Effects of an Incentive Based Budgeting System on Institutional Performance Indicators: An Exploratory Longitudinal Case Study of a Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory longitudinal case study was to examine how the implementation of an Incentive Based Budgeting (IBB) system (i.e., Responsibility-Centered Management [RCM]) affected selected institutional performance indicators at the campus level and two comparable schools at a large Mid-Western public University. The value of…

  3. Acceptance and use of health information technology in Slovenian public health institutions: a national survey based on UTAUT model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matej Vinko

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: The results show a positive attitude toward IT among Slovenian healthcare professionals. These findings are especially relevant in view of the fact that all types of healthcare professionals from all kinds of public healthcare institutions across the country were included in the survey.

  4. Gender Equality in Public Higher Education Institutions of Ethiopia: The Case of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egne, Robsan Margo

    2014-01-01

    Ensuring gender equality in higher education system is high on the agenda worldwide particularly in science disciplines. This study explores the problems and prospects of gender equality in public higher education institutions of Ethiopia, especially in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. Descriptive survey and analytical research…

  5. Organizational culture in public institutions and its impact in the process of implementation of total quality management (case of Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr.Sc. Ilir Rexhepi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Total Quality Management (TQM is a management philosophy and approach, whose importance is growing evermore after the 90s. Kosovo's public institutions for a short time now organise activities as part of an independent state and as such they are facing ahead management challenges which are becoming more acute and in the framework of the EU integration processes. Total Quality Management in public institutions, is preceded by establishment and implementation phase ISO 9001 systems. In this paper we tried that through an empirical study in three public institutions of Kosovo, evidence the factors that facilitate or impede timely and successful implementation of quality systems and therefore of TQM. Moreover, we will concentrate on organizational culture. Analysis on the norms, beliefs, principles that characterize the organizational culture of Kosovo institutions and furthermore intertwined with the Law on Public Administration and the political context, will serve to shape the changes that need to be designed to proceed to successful implementation of TQM. In function of the analysis of impeding factors, elements of organizational culture as well as modeling the changes there will be used a number of interviews and questionnaires.

  6. Staff knowledge, attitudes and practices in public sector primary care ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of diabetic nephropathy_ Knowledge of appropriate care of patients with ... other staff; Ui~ attitudes to working with diabetic patients;. (iv) suggestions for ... skin; 80% of staff - heart. Cataracts and retinopathy were correctly identified as the.

  7. patients' satisfaction with dental care provided by public dental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-04-04

    Apr 4, 2006 ... known with regard to equity, efficiency, geographical equality of access, patient ... (vi) Physical environment features of setting in which care is delivered: (e.g. .... This exercise, which will involve equipping the clinics with the ...

  8. HIV infection and AIDS in the public health and health care systems: the role of law and litigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostin, L O; Webber, D W

    1998-04-08

    The AIDS Litigation Project has reviewed nearly 600 reported cases involving individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the federal and state courts in the United States between 1991 and 1997. Cases were identified through a federal and 50-state computer and library search. An important subset of litigation relates to HIV/AIDS in the public health and health care systems, since the law affects health care institutions and professionals, patients, and public health policy in America. This subset of HIV/AIDS litigation includes testing and reporting; privacy, the duty to warn, and the right to know; physician standards of care in prevention and treatment; and discrimination and access to health care. In broad terms, the review demonstrates a reliance on voluntary testing and protection of patient privacy through HIV-specific statutes and the common law. Negligence with potential civil and criminal liability has been alleged in cases of erroneous or missed diagnosis of HIV infection. In the first AIDS case to be considered by the Supreme Court, the Court will decide whether patients with asymptomatic HIV infection are protected under the Americans With Disabilities Act. Considerable progress has been made, both socially and legally, during the first 2 decades of the epidemic, but much still needs to be accomplished to protect privacy, prevent discrimination, and promote tolerance.

  9. Public health nurses' primary health care practice: strategies for fostering citizen participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Megan; Meagher-Stewart, Donna; Edwards, Nancy; Young, Linda M

    2009-01-01

    Citizen participation is heralded as a critical element of community health programs that emphasize empowerment and health promotion strategies. Although there is a growing body of research on public health nurses' primary health care practice, few studies have described how public health nurses foster citizen participation. This article presents findings from an interpretive qualitative study of public health nurses' perceptions of their role in fostering citizen participation in an eastern Canadian province at a time of significant health care restructuring. The findings from this study clearly profile public health nurses as integral to the practice of fostering citizen participation.

  10. [Co-payment for public health care services--public opinion survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkacz, Marek; Chmiel-Perzyńska, Iwona; Buczak-Stec, Elzbieta; Pachuta, Izabela; Kowal, Agnieszka; Grywalska, Ewelina; Pinkowska, Patrycja; Pawlos, Joanna; Bednarczyk, Natalia; Kuszewski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    One of the solutions aimed at improving the functioning of the healthcare system in Poland is to introduce patients' co-payment for public healthcare services. In all countries where the healthcare system is at a high level there already exists a co-payment system and it is regarded by many specialists as a necessary and indispensable condition for the proper functioning of healthcare. The aim of this study was to show respondents' attitudes and opinions regarding the proposal of introduction co-payments as and additional form of financing medical care. The questionnaire survey covered a group of 2,409 persons (50.7% men and 49.3% women). Most respondents, despite the overall rising dissatisfaction with the quality and availability of medical services do not see the need for co-payments. The opinion about the implementation of co-payments. The opinion about the implementation of co-payments depends on many factors, to the most important belong age, education, place of residence and income. More often, the co-payments is in favour of young people in good health condition, who live in big cities, having a university degree and determining their financial situation as good. Before the introduction of co-payment - certain social groups, which would be exempt from additional fees, should be specified. To the highest costs that patients are able to carry belong: paying for a home visit of family doctor or specialist, for surgical procedures, and for complex tests performed during the hospital stay (including computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging).

  11. Cooperation between research institutions and journals on research integrity cases: Guidance from the committee on publication ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Elizabeth; Kleinert, Sabine

    2012-04-01

    Institutions and journals both have important duties relating to research and publication misconduct. Institutions are responsible for the conduct of their researchers and for encouraging a healthy research environment. Journals are responsible for the conduct of their editors, for safeguarding the research record, and for ensuring the reliability of everything they publish. It is, therefore, important for institutions and journals to communicate and collaborate effectively on cases relating to research integrity. To achieve this, we make the following recommendations.The institutions should:have a research integrity officer (or office) and publish their contact details prominentlyinform journals about cases of proven misconduct that affect the reliability or attribution of the research that they have publishedrespond to journals if they request information about issues, such as, disputed authorship, misleading reporting, competing interests, or other factors, including honest errors, that could affect the reliability of the published studyinitiate inquiries into allegations of research misconduct or unacceptable publication practice raised by journalshave policies supporting a responsible research conduct and systems in place for investigating suspected research misconduct.The journals should:publish the contact details of their editor-in-chief who should act as the point of contact for questions relating to research and publication integrityinform institutions if they suspect misconduct by their researchers, and provide evidence to support these concernscooperate with investigations and respond to institutions' questions about misconduct allegationsbe prepared to issue retractions or corrections (according to the COPE guidelines on retractions) when provided with findings of misconduct arising from investigationshave policies for responding to institutions and other organizations that investigate cases of research misconduct.

  12. Cooperation between research institutions and journals on research integrity cases: guidance from the committee on publication ethics (cope).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Elizabeth; Kleinert, Sabine

    2012-09-01

    Institutions and journals both have important duties relating to research and publication misconduct. Institutions are responsible for the conduct of their researchers and for encouraging a healthy research environment. Journals are responsible for the conduct of their editors, for safeguarding the research record, and for ensuring the reliability of everything they publish. It is therefore important for institutions and journals to communicate and collaborate effectively on cases relating to research integrity. To achieve this, we make the following recommendations. Institutions should: have a research integrity officer (or office) and publish their contact details prominently; inform journals about cases of proven misconduct that affect the reliability or attribution of work that they have published; respond to journals if they request information about issues, such as disputed authorship, misleading reporting, competing interests, or other factors, including honest errors, that could affect the reliability of published work; initiate inquiries into allegations of research misconduct or unacceptable publication practice raised by journals; have policies supporting responsible research conduct and systems in place for investigating suspected research misconduct.Journals should: publish the contact details of their editor-in-chief who should act as the point of contact for questions relating to research and publication integrity; inform institutions if they suspect misconduct by their researchers, and provide evidence to support these concerns; cooperate with investigations and respond to institutions' questions about misconduct allegations; be prepared to issue retractions or corrections (according to the COP E guidelines on retractions) when provided with findings of misconduct arising from investigations; have policies for responding to institutions and other organizations that investigate cases of research misconduct.

  13. 建立公立医疗机构公益性评价工具的必要性和理论思考%Necessary and Theoretical Ideas of Developing the Public Benefit Evaluation Instrument for Public Medical Institutions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈英耀; 赵列宾; 钱序; 应晓华; 倪明

    2011-01-01

    Through focusing on public medical institution's social responsibility, reviewing relevant literatures and analyzing the Chinese health care reform progress, significance and necessary of developing the social responsibility evaluation instrument for public medical institutions are clarified.Based on the theory of governance and stewardship,the external context for institutions' social responsibility, multi-dimension and intrinsic incentives of social responsibility, and consumers' subjective feelings are explored initially.%围绕公立医疗机构公益性评价,通过对相关文献的评阅以及对当前改革进展的分析.明确建立公立医疗机构公益性评价工具的理论意义及必要性.在结合治理相关理论的基础上,就公立医疗机构公益性的外部环境、公益性的多维特征、主观能动性和服务对象的主观感受进行了初步探讨.

  14. Clients satisfaction of antenatal care services in public and private ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... to be effective and educating pregnant women about planning for safe birth. ... Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional comparative study design was used to ... in public and private health facilities in Surulere local government, Lagos state.

  15. Poor linkages in maternal health care services-evidence on antenatal care and institutional delivery from a community-based longitudinal study in Tigray region, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, Yohannes Adama; Weldearegawi, Berhe; Tesfay, Fisaha Haile; Abera, Semaw Ferede; Abraham, Loko; Aregay, Alemseged; Ashebir, Yemane; Eshetu, Friehiwot; Haile, Ashenafi; Lakew, Yihunie; Kinsman, John

    2014-12-19

    Progress towards attaining the maternal mortality and maternal health targets set by Millennium Development Goal 5 has been slow in most African countries. Assessing antenatal care and institutional delivery service utilization and their determinants is an important step towards improving maternal health care services. Data were drawn from the longitudinal database of Kilite-Awlaelo Health and Demographic Surveillance System. A total of 2361 mothers who were pregnant and who gave birth between September 2009 and August 2013 were included in the analysis. Potential variables to explain antenatal care and institutional delivery service utilization were extracted, and descriptive statistics and logistic regression were used to determine the magnitude of maternal health care service utilization and associated factors, respectively. More than three-quarters, 76% [95% CI: 74.8%-78.2%] (n = 1806), of mothers had undergone at least one antenatal care visit during their previous pregnancy. However, only 27% [95% CI: 25.3%-28.9%] (n = 639) of mothers gave birth at a health institution. Older mothers, urban residents, mothers with higher education attainment, and farmer mothers were more likely to use antenatal care. Institutional delivery services were more likely to be used among older mothers, urban residents, women with secondary education, mothers who visited antenatal care, and mothers with lower parity. Despite a relatively high proportion of mothers attending antenatal care services at least once, we found low levels of institutional delivery service utilization. Health service providers in Kilite-Awlaelo should be particularly vigilant regarding the additional maternal health needs of rural and less educated women with high parity.

  16. Factors increasing the risk of inactivity among administrative, technical, and manual workers in Warszawa public institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Biernat

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The research aims to assess the level of physical activity among administrative, technical, and manual workers employed in Warszawa public institutions and to analyze the factors that increase the risk of failing to meet World Health Organization (WHO recommendations. Material and Methods: The study comprised 373 employees of randomly selected institutions. A short version of International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ was applied. The correlation between the mean values of duration, days, MET-min/week of efforts, gender, and type of work was analyzed using the Tukey’s honest significant difference (HSD test, while the correlation between the level of physical activity and the socio-demographic characteristics was assessed with the Chi2 test. The strength of the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics and fulfilment of WHO standards was expressed by the odds ratio (OR and 95% confidence interval (95% CI. The significance level was p = 0.05. Results: High levels of physical activity were declared by 41.8% of the manual workers, 14.7% of the administration staff, and 7.3% of the technicians; 19%, 31.5% and 54.5%, respectively, reported low levels of physical activity. Factors determining the fulfilment of the WHO recommendations include: the nature of work (p = 0.003, education (p = 0.004, and income (p = 0.003. The risk of being inactive nearly doubles in the case of administration staff (31.5% and increases more than 4 times in the case of technicians (54.5%. Respondents with secondary school education (31.6% are exposed to a 3-fold higher risk of inactivity, while in respondents with higher education (37.2%, the level of the risk is 4-fold higher. Compared to those in the highest income group (23.4%, people who earn less (34.1% are inactive almost twice as often. Conclusions: Urgent intervention is necessary in all studied groups: increased energy expenditure for recreation and locomotion, educational offers

  17. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations for Animal Models of Peripheral Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabb, Thea; Carbone, Larry; Snyder, Jessica; Phillips, Nona

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathy and neuropathic pain are debilitating, life-altering conditions that affect a significant proportion of the human population. Animal models, used to study basic disease mechanisms and treatment modalities, are diverse and provide many challenges for institutional animal care and use committee (IACUC) review and postapproval monitoring. Items to consider include regulatory and ethical imperatives in animal models that may be designed to study pain, the basic mechanism of neurodegeneration, and different disease processes for which neuropathic pain is a side effect. Neuropathic pain can be difficult to detect or quantify in many models, and pain management is often unsuccessful in both humans and animals, inspiring the need for more research. Design of humane endpoints requires clear communication of potential adverse outcomes and solutions. Communication with the IACUC, researchers, and veterinary staff is also key for successful postapproval monitoring of these challenging models. PMID:24615447

  18. [Job Demands-Resources, exhaustion and work engagement in a long-term care institution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, P M; Neri, L; Campanini, P; Francioli, L; Camerino, D; Punzi, S; Fichera, G P; Costa, G

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we aimed at testing the main hypotheses of the Job Demands-Resources model (JD-R) in a sample of employees (n = 205, mainly healthcare workers) of a long-term care institution located in Northern Italy. Hierarchical linear regression analyses show that almost all job demands considered were significantly associated with higher general psycho-physical exhaustion (beta ranging from 0.14 to 0.29), whereas more unfavourable scores in all job resources were associated with lower work engagement (from -0.27 to -0.51). However, also significant cross-over associations were observed, mainly between job resources and exhaustion, with effect sizes comparable with those found for the relationships between job demands and exhaustion. Hence, our study only partially supports the JD-R model. Implications of results for work-related stress management are finally discussed.

  19. Does corruption undermine trust in health care? Results from public opinion polls in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radin, Dagmar

    2013-12-01

    Health and health care provision are one of the most important topics in public policy, and often a highly debated topic in the political arena. The importance of considering trust in the health care sector is highlighted by studies showing that trust is associated, among others, with poor self-related health, and poorer health outcomes. Similarly, corruption has shown to create economic costs and inefficiencies in the health care sector. This is particularly important for a newly democratized country such as Croatia, where a policy responsive government indicates a high level of quality of democracy (Roberts, 2009) and where a legacy of corruption in the health care sector has been carried over from the previous regime. In this study, I assess the relationship between health care corruption and trust in public health care and hypothesize that experience with health care corruption as well as perception of corruption has a negative effect on trust in public care facilities. Data were collected in two surveys, administered in 2007 and 2009 in Croatia. Experience with corruption and salience with corruption has a negative effect on trust in public health care in the 2007 survey, but not in the 2009 survey. While the results are mixed, they point to the importance of further studying this relationship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Ethics, Politics, and Religion in Public Health Care: A Manifesto for Health Care Chaplains in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasair, Simon

    2016-03-01

    Health care chaplaincy positions in Canada are significantly threatened due to widespread health care cutbacks. Yet the current time also presents a significant opportunity for spiritual care providers. This article argues that religion and spirituality in Canada are undergoing significant changes. The question for Canadian health care chaplains is, then: how well equipped are they to understand these changes in health care settings and to engage them? This article attempts to go part way toward an answer.