WorldWideScience

Sample records for public benefit organizations

  1. Participation of Public Benefit Organizations in Income Tax – Financial and Legal Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Musiałkiewicz

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the article is a legal analysis of the participation of public benefit organizations in personal income tax. The author defines public benefit organizations, indicating the conditions that they need to meet in order to be able to participate in the personal income tax. Broad considerations relate to the analysis of the legal structure of the 1% tax deduction, its scope and the procedures for transfer of funds from the State budget to eligible entities. The article also presents...

  2. Participation of Public Benefit Organizations in Income Tax – Financial and Legal Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Musiałkiewicz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is a legal analysis of the participation of public benefit organizations in personal income tax. The author defines public benefit organizations, indicating the conditions that they need to meet in order to be able to participate in the personal income tax. Broad considerations relate to the analysis of the legal structure of the 1% tax deduction, its scope and the procedures for transfer of funds from the State budget to eligible entities. The article also presents the scale of the issues against the background of the practical functioning of the public finances. The article summarizes the reflection on the rationality and the essence of the transfer of public funds to public benefit organizations.

  3. Public services, personal benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bob Kuhry; Evert Pommer; Jedid-Jah Jonker; John Stevens

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Publieke productie & persoonlijk profijt. This report looks in detail at the costs of public services (such as care, education, public administration and safety) and the benefits that citizens derive from the government expenditure involved in delivering those services. In

  4. Public services, personal benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bob Kuhry; Evert Pommer; Jedid-Jah Jonker; John Stevens

    2006-01-01

    Original title: Publieke productie & persoonlijk profijt. This report looks in detail at the costs of public services (such as care, education, public administration and safety) and the benefits that citizens derive from the government expenditure involved in delivering those services. In 2003,

  5. Benefits of hybridity in organizations: Views from public, private and the third sector

    OpenAIRE

    Hyyryläinen, Esa; Viinamäki, Olli-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    We have recently seen research examining the origin and functioning of hybrid organizations. The growing practical and academic interest in hybrids is a clear manifestation of the changing and blurring roles of governments and private sector organizations. It also reveals new ways of thinking about governments' relations with various commercial and community organizations as well as ways of reorganizing service delivery and production. While there is a growing body of research and practical k...

  6. Private opportunity, public benefit?

    OpenAIRE

    John Hall

    1998-01-01

    The newly elected Labour government has pledged to ‘reinvigorate the Private Finance Initiative’, as part of the new emphasis on ‘public/private partnerships’ in the delivery of core public services. This article assesses the merits of using private finance to deliver public services against three criteria: whether it will lead to additional investment in social infrastructure, whether it represents good value for the taxpayer’s money and whether the use of private finance will reduce the pub...

  7. Private opportunity, public benefit?

    OpenAIRE

    John Hall

    1998-01-01

    The newly elected Labour government has pledged to ‘reinvigorate the Private Finance Initiative’, as part of the new emphasis on ‘public/private partnerships’ in the delivery of core public services. This article assesses the merits of using private finance to deliver public services against three criteria: whether it will lead to additional investment in social infrastructure, whether it represents good value for the taxpayer’s money and whether the use of private finance will reduce the pub...

  8. Supporting the Public Benefits of Public Higher Education. Policy Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Alice

    This policy statement from the American Association of State Colleges and Universities addresses the benefits of public higher education. Along with introductory and concluding sections, the statement addresses access, academic quality, research and public service, accountability, public financial support, and balanced governance. The statement…

  9. Public Private Partnership Benefits in Delivering Public Facilities in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapri M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of infrastructure in developing country such as Malaysia was increasingly founded by the Public–Private Partnership (PPP scheme. Collaboration with private sector has become popular as a means to improve the delivery of public facilities. Yet, empirical evidence on how PPP initiative has benefits the delivery of public facilities within Malaysia context is lagging. The purpose of this paper is to identify and assess the perception of stakeholders on the benefits of adopting PPP in delivering public facilities in Malaysia. Literature review was carried out to identify PPP benefits, which were then incorporated into the questionnaire. The mean score and mean score ranking was conducted to assess the agreement level of stakeholders towards the PPP benefits. The overall findings show that the implementation of PPP has benefitted the delivery of public facilities in both financial and non-financial aspects. From the analysis, improvement in service quality is perceived as the top advantage followed by innovation in design and transfer of risk. The findings provide more informed basis on the rationale of PPP implementation and its potential in improving the delivery of public facilities within Malaysia context.

  10. Effect of Organic Potato Farming on Human and Environmental Health and Benefits from New Plant Breeding Techniques. Is It Only a Matter of Public Acceptance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Pacifico

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic farming practices are commonly thought to reduce the environmental impact of agriculture and to preserve the naturalness of the products. Herein, we report the effect of crop management practices on nutritional and toxicological value of potato tubers. Comparative studies are often controversial and the results are dependent on genotype and methodological approach. Targeted analysis and “omics” strategies are discussed, pointing at the nutritional aspects and the corresponding biological and molecular processes involved. Organic farming supporters still do not accept the use of genetic modification to produce new varieties suited for organic agriculture and crop improvement by genetic engineering still sparks hot debate among various scientific and social factions whose major concern is the possible existence of unintended effects both on human and world health. In this context, the advent of “new plant breeding techniques” has reignited the discussion on genetic engineering and on the compatibility of the new technologies with an eco-friendly agriculture. Could cisgenic and genome-edited potatoes be new good options for organic agriculture? We discuss how these approaches can be used to address food security challenges and to overcome specific problems based on the biological characteristics of potato tubers, producing new varieties that can improve farmers’ profit with a lower impact on public opinion. However, political, ethical, and social fears will probably persist much longer, mainly in Italy, historically a fiercely anti-GM country with a European leadership in organic food production and export.

  11. Public representation in water management -- A network analysis of organization and public perceptions in Phoenix, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethany B. Cutts; Tischa A. Muñoz-Erickson; Shade T. Shutters

    2015-01-01

    To better accomplish their mission of an informed public, environmental education organizations often exchange ideas, share financing, and distribute overhead through collaboration. Yet it remains to be seen whether benefits of these collaborations extend to the public. We examine two possible benefits: the ability of the organizations to act as representatives of the...

  12. Strategy narratives in public organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang

    2016-01-01

    Strategic concerns have spread into public management and fuelled the growth of strategic practices in public organizations. The purpose of this paper is to examine the discursive structures of strategy narratives in public organizations. It studies the linkages between strategy narratives...... in public organizations and discourses of strategy. Based on focus group interviews and a deconstructive approach, the paper identifies four different strategy narratives: a “rationalist” narrative, a “structuralist” narrative, an “idealist” narrative and a “constructivist” narrative. The narratives...... complement each other, but are not necessarily incompatible in practice. Rather, strategy makers can draw on several or all of the narratives in public organizations as well as the body of literature on strategic management, which are related to them. The paper concludes by suggesting directions for further...

  13. Do incentives matter? Providing benefits to families of organ donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, C L; Siminoff, L A; Ubel, P A; Nathan, H; Caplan, A; Arnold, R M

    2005-12-01

    Whether the number of organs available for transplant would be positively or negatively affected by providing benefits to families of organ donors has been debated by policymakers, ethicists and the transplant community at large. We designed a telephone survey to measure public opinion regarding the use of benefits in general and of five types in particular: funeral benefits, charitable contributions, travel/lodging expenses, direct payments and medical expenses. Of the 971 adults who completed the survey (response rate = 69%), all were from Pennsylvania households, 45.6% were registered organ donors, and 51.7% were nonwhite. Although 59% of respondents favored the general idea of incentives, support for specific incentives ranged from 53% (direct payment) to 84% (medical expenses). Among those registered as donors, more nonwhites than whites supported funeral benefits (88% vs. 81%; p = 0.038), direct payment (63% vs. 41%; p benefits would not influence their own behavior concerning donation but would influence the behavior of others. While benefits appear to be favored, their true impact can only be assessed through pilot programs.

  14. Youth Views of Experiences and Benefits of Public Speaking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Silliman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Ninety-eight youth participants, ages 9-17, involved in a public speaking event reported that preparation and presentation of a 5-12 minute demonstration or illustrated talk improved confidence, knowledge of a selected topic and skills in communicating, goal setting, organizing, working with others, and doing research. Positive benefits were reported from first-year as well as multi-year participants. Most youth surveyed indicated that they participated by choice and received adequate assistance in preparation for speaking. Similar results were found for a smaller group (N = 20 involved in a non-competitive performing arts event. A randomly-selected group (N = 37 interviewed about the extended effects of public speaking revealed that the experience helped them in school presentations, community leadership, and more in-depth involvement in specific topic areas. Implications of results for youth programming and engaging wider audiences of youth are discussed.

  15. THE LEADERSHIP WITHIN PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BENTE CRISTIAN

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this article is to demonstrate the important role played by leadership in the managementof public organizations. Organizational culture can help to the clarification of many phenomena that appearin the organizations, can operate as brake or incentive for organizational effectiveness and the leadership playthe main role in the creation and the development of organizational culture.

  16. Staff Performance Evaluation in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drumea C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In public Organizations staff performance is difficult to measure in absence of overall quantitative performance indicators. There are also the qualitative indicators that give an overview on staff’s motivation, strive, ability, commitment to values, teamwork. These aspects are even less easy to illustrate, in private and public sectors equally. In both cases, measuring staff performance at work, as well as its input on the global performance of the organization is a difficult task which has in practice different approaches. Subsequently, this paper is discussing the system indicators and performance triggers used in International Organizations UN affiliated, in order to adjust staff classification and benefits to their staff’s performance.

  17. Benefits of tolerance in public goods games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Chen, Xiaojie

    2015-10-01

    Leaving the joint enterprise when defection is unveiled is always a viable option to avoid being exploited. Although loner strategy helps the population not to be trapped into the tragedy of the commons state, it could offer only a modest income for nonparticipants. In this paper we demonstrate that showing some tolerance toward defectors could not only save cooperation in harsh environments but in fact results in a surprisingly high average payoff for group members in public goods games. Phase diagrams and the underlying spatial patterns reveal the high complexity of evolving states where cyclic dominant strategies or two-strategy alliances can characterize the final state of evolution. We identify microscopic mechanisms which are responsible for the superiority of global solutions containing tolerant players. This phenomenon is robust and can be observed both in well-mixed and in structured populations highlighting the importance of tolerance in our everyday life.

  18. Benefits of tolerance in public goods games

    CERN Document Server

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Leaving the joint enterprise when defection is unveiled is always a viable option to avoid being exploited. Although loner strategy helps the population not to be trapped into the tragedy of the commons state, it could offer only a modest income for non-participants. In this paper we demonstrate that showing some tolerance toward defectors could not only save cooperation in harsh environments, but in fact results in a surprisingly high average payoff for group members in public goods games. Phase diagrams and the underlying spatial patterns reveal the high complexity of evolving states where cyclic dominant strategies or two-strategy alliances can characterize the final state of evolution. We identify microscopic mechanisms which are responsible for the superiority of global solutions containing tolerant players. This phenomenon is robust and can be observed both in well-mixed and in structured populations highlighting the importance of tolerance in our everyday life.

  19. Beyond Fair Benefits: Reconsidering Exploitation Arguments Against Organ Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koplin, Julian J

    2017-02-04

    One common objection to establishing regulated live donor organ markets is that such markets would be exploitative. Perhaps surprisingly, exploitation arguments against organ markets have been widely rejected in the philosophical literature on the subject. It is often argued that concerns about exploitation should be addressed by increasing the price paid to organ sellers, not by banning the trade outright. I argue that this analysis rests on a particular conception of exploitation (which I refer to as 'fair benefits' exploitation), and outline two additional ways that the charge of exploitation can be understood (which I discuss in terms of 'fair process' exploitation and complicity in injustice). I argue that while increasing payments to organ sellers may mitigate or eliminate fair benefits exploitation, such measures will not necessarily address fair process exploitation or complicity in injustice. I further argue that each of these three forms of wrongdoing is relevant to the ethics of paid living organ donation, as well as the design of public policy more generally.

  20. Increasing HPV vaccination through policy for public health benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Heather M; Pierce, Jennifer Young; Crary, Ashley

    2016-06-02

    Vaccines against specific types of human papillomavirus (HPV) linked to cancer and other diseases have been met with mixed acceptance globally and in the United States. Policy-level interventions have been shown to be effective in increasing public health benefit. Government policies and mandates may result in improved HPV vaccination coverage and reduced disease burden, and alternative policies that improve unhindered access to HPV vaccination may allow success as well. The purpose of this commentary is to summarize policy efforts to maximize the public health benefit of HPV vaccination. We examine selected examples of HPV vaccination policy in global contexts and in the United States.

  1. Genetically modified organisms: do the benefits outweigh the risks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hug, Kristina

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this literature review is to analyze the implications of using genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as well as international and European position regarding such organisms. Review of international and European legal requirements and ethical guidelines and relevant publications, found and accessed with the help of PubMed and Lund University Library databases. The article discusses the main application areas of GMOs, the expansion of using GMOs in the world as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the implications of their usage. It further provides an overview of the suggested ways to tackle or avoid the GMO-related risks. The international and European positions regarding the application of GMOs are discussed and European Directives, Regulations, and ethical guidelines are overviewed. The article further presents the public attitudes towards GMOs in Europe as well as overviews surveys conducted at the national level. Suggested steps to tackle the challenge of developing and managing biotechnology for the benefit of public health and the environment are presented.

  2. Private Schools and Public Benefit: Fees, Fee Remissions, and Subsidies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The level of fee remissions offered by private schools bears upon the scope for relying on private schools to provide public benefit. Analyses of education voucher systems have generally ignored the possibility that they will partially crowd out school-financed fee remissions. Moreover, variation in fee remissions between private schools may be…

  3. Valuing Multiple Benefits, and the Public Perception of SUDS Ponds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy Jarvie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how the public perceive and value ponds is fundamental to appreciate the synergy between Sustainable urban Drainage (SUDS ponds and the multiple benefits they provide. This paper investigates this, through the application of a structured postal and online survey, for a case study area of Edinburgh, in the UK. It compares man-made ponds (including SUDS, and ponds with natural origins. The results from Whole Life Cost show that the benefits (based on Contingent Valuation exceed the CAPEX and OPEX costs for three of five artificial ponds studied. Benefits from natural (reference ponds exceed the replacement costs for a pond with the same surface area/catchment. This paper highlights the importance of monetising the multiple benefits from ponds.

  4. ORGANIZATION IN CONTEMPORARY PUBLIC SPHERE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rosemarie HAINES

    2013-01-01

    The critical analysis of Habermas’ Public Sphere Theory and the comparative undertaking to the current day enables us to assert that in contemporary society, public sphere is no longer a political public sphere, this dimension being...

  5. ORGANIZATION IN CONTEMPORARY PUBLIC SPHERE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemarie HAINES

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The critical analysis of Habermas’ Public Sphere Theory and the comparative undertaking to the current day enables us to assert that in contemporary society, public sphere is no longer a political public sphere, this dimension being completed by a societal dimension, the public sphere has extended and now we can talk about partial public spheres in an ever more commercial environment. The new rebuilding and communication technologies create a new type of public character: the visible sphere – non-located, non-dialogical and open. Information and communication are more and more involved in the restructuring of capitalism on an international scale and the reorganization of leadership and management systems. The reevaluation of the public sphere, public opinion, communication allows us to define public sphere according to the profound mutations from today’s democratic societies.

  6. Discretion and Public Benefit in a Regulatory Agency

    OpenAIRE

    Nagarajan, Vijaya

    2013-01-01

    This book explores the manner in which a variety of public benefits such as environmental protection and consumer safety have been accommodated through the authorisation process within competition law and policy in Australia. While the regulator’s use of its discretion can be explained as a triumph of practice over theory, this book explores the potential for competition principles to be imbued by the wider discourses of democratic participation and human rights. In doing so it makes a signif...

  7. STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT IN NONPROFIT AND PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan NICOLAE

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic management in public organizations can use coerciveness as a keyelement of their strategy. Private organizations are more dependent onmarketing or selling to potential customers. As publicness increases,marketing declines in importance and maintaining favorable coercivearrangements increases in importance. Strategic managers should be awareof coercive opportunities in their mandates as they fashion strategy anddevise implementation plans.

  8. Remuneration and Employee Benefits in Organizations in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana Urbancová

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In today’s highly competitive environment, the goal of organizations is to recruit, retain and sufficiently stimulate employees to give high quality performance, which may actually be achieved by a well‑developed system of remuneration and a wide range of suitably selected employee benefits. The article aims to identify and evaluate important factors influencing the area of employee remuneration and benefits offered in organizations in the Czech Republic. The research was carried out through a questionnaire survey that involved selected organizations in the Czech Republic (n = 402. The obtained primary data were processed using descriptive and multidimensional statistics. The factors examined in relation to the employee remuneration and benefits include: industries and sectors of organizations; markets in which they operate; the size of organizations by the headcount; the existence or absence of the Human Resource Department. The results confirm that the organizations that want to maintain a good position in the labour market pay attention to their personnel marketing, which is also helped by the right (suitable system of employee remuneration and fringe benefits thanks to which they retain their employees and can increase employee satisfaction and loyalty. Employee benefits are exactly what may distinguish the organizations from their competitors in the labour market.

  9. Research on Benefit Distribution Mechanism of Farmers’ Specialized Cooperative Economic Organization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of conducting survey in Jiaonan City,the thesis analyzes benefit distribution mechanism of farmers’ specialized cooperative economic organizations:firstly,the benefit correlation is mainly the contract correlation;secondly,the profit distribution is mainly the dividend;thirdly,patronage refund has many connotations;fourthly,the public accumulation has not yet been quantified to individual;fifthly,the government support capital is ill-defined.Based on these,the measures are put forward in order to improve benefit distribution pattern of farmers’ specialized cooperative economic organizations:firstly,reform structure of property rights and realize farmers’ ownership;secondly,change mode of decision-making,and realize farmers’ control;thirdly,increase turnover rebate and realize farmers’ benefiting;fourthly,quantify public accumulation and government support fund.

  10. Punishment based on public benefit fund significantly promotes cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuling Wang

    Full Text Available In prisoner's dilemma game (shortly, PD game, punishment is most frequently used to promote cooperation. However, outcome varies when different punishment approaches are applied. Here the PD game is studied on a square lattice when different punishment patterns are adopted. As is known to all, tax system, a common tool to adjust the temperature of the economy, is widely used in human society. Inspired by this philosophy, players in this study would pay corresponding taxes in accordance with their payoff level. In this way, public benefit fund is established consequently and it would be utilized to punish defectors. There are two main methods for punishing: slight intensity of punishment (shortly, SLP and severe intensity of punishment (shortly, SEP. When the totaling of public benefit fund keeps relatively fixed, SLP extends further, which means more defectors would be punished; by contrast, SEP has a smaller coverage. It is of interest to verify whether these two measures can promote cooperation and which one is more efficient. Simulate results reveal that both of them can promote cooperation remarkably. Specifically speaking, SLP shows constant advantage from the point of view either of fractions of cooperation or average payoff.

  11. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhabra, Ria; Kolli, Santharam; Bauer, Johannes H

    2013-01-01

    The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans). Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health.

  12. Organically grown food provides health benefits to Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ria Chhabra

    Full Text Available The "organic food" market is the fastest growing food sector, yet it is unclear whether organically raised food is nutritionally superior to conventionally grown food and whether consuming organic food bestows health benefits. In order to evaluate potential health benefits of organic foods, we used the well-characterized fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a model system. Fruit flies were raised on a diets consisting of extracts of either conventionally or organically raised produce (bananas, potatoes, raisins, soy beans. Flies were then subjected to a variety of tests designed to assess overall fly health. Flies raised on diets made from organically grown produce had greater fertility and longevity. On certain food sources, greater activity and greater stress resistance was additionally observed, suggesting that organic food bestows positive effects on fly health. Our data show that Drosophila can be used as a convenient model system to experimentally test potential health effects of dietary components. Using this system, we provide evidence that organically raised food may provide animals with tangible benefits to overall health.

  13. Business process reengineering in Ethiopian public organizations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in Ethiopian public organizations: the relationship between theory and practice. ... Hence, it is important to introduce a conceptual framework and a working model ... Management Information System (MIS), Information Technology (IT) , MCB, ...

  14. Including public-health benefits of trees in urban-forestry decision making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan

    2017-01-01

    Research demonstrating the biophysical benefits of urban trees are often used to justify investments in urban forestry. Far less emphasis, however, is placed on the non-bio-physical benefits such as improvements in public health. Indeed, the public-health benefits of trees may be significantly larger than the biophysical benefits, and, therefore, failure to account for...

  15. Discursive strategies of strategy in public organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang; Holmgren, Jens; Friis, Ole Uhrskov

    In the last decades, private sector principles and policies have spread into public management. This has fuelled the growth of strategic practices in public service organizations. Although public service organizations typically do not exist in markets or have directs competitors, they tend...... to articulate their strategies through private sector strategy terminology about competition, ranking, benchmarking, etc.. Thus, it is time to explore how strategy making is given discursive legitimacy in public organizations. An important way to study strategy as practice is by attending of the discourse...... of strategy. Bodies of discursive scholarship, such as critical discourse analysis, narrative analysis, metaphor analysis and conversation analysis, have contributed with significant research into important issues and themes in strategy making processes such as sense-making, subject-positions and power...

  16. Guide for Conducting Benefit-Cost Evaluation of Realized Impacts of Public R&D Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruegg, Rosalie [TIA Consulting, Inc., Emerald Isle, NC (United States); Jordan, Gretchen B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2011-08-01

    This document provides guidance for evaluators who conduct impact assessments to determine the “realized” economic benefits and costs, energy, environmental benefits, and other impacts of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) R&D programs. The focus of this Guide is on realized outcomes or impacts of R&D programs actually experienced by American citizens, industry, and others. Retrospective evaluations may be contrasted to prospective evaluations that reflect expected or potential outcomes only if assumptions hold. The retrospective approach described in this Guide is based on realized results only and the extent they can be attributed to the efforts of an R&D program. While it has been prepared specifically to guide retrospective benefit-cost analysis of EERE R&D Programs, this report may be used for similar analysis of other public R&D organizations.

  17. Common Benefits of Prayer and Yoga on Human Organism

    OpenAIRE

    İMAMOĞLU, Osman; DİLEK, Ahmet Naci

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Prayer and Yoga benefits study aimed to explore the mutual on the human organism.Methods: A literature search was conducted. Results: Muslim prayers and yoga are as through them the same benefits, In terms of shape and utility of the movement.  Even each prayer (namaz) positions-corresponding yoga position and the positions together “activate” all seven “chakras” (energy fields) in the body-as per yoga practices. Prayer is in the standing room section (Takbir and qiyam) qiyam and exp...

  18. Does organic farming benefit farmland birds in winter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, D E; Joys, A; Johnson, P J; Norton, L; Feber, R E; Fuller, R J

    2010-02-23

    The generally higher biodiversity on organic farms may be influenced by management features such as no synthetic pesticide and fertilizer inputs and/or by differences in uncropped habitat at the site and landscape scale. We analysed bird and habitat data collected on 48 paired organic and conventional farms over two winters to determine the extent to which broad-scale habitat differences between systems could explain overall differences in farmland bird abundance. Density was significantly higher on organic farms for six out of 16 species, and none on conventional. Total abundance of all species combined was higher on organic farms in both years. Analyses using an information-theoretic approach suggested that both habitat extent and farm type were important predictors only for starling and greenfinch. Organic farming as currently practised may not provide significant benefits to those bird species that are limited by winter food resources, in particular, several declining granivores.

  19. Translational Research: From Biological Discovery to Public Benefit (or Not

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Emmert-Buck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advances in biology are occurring at a breathtaking pace today, from genetic insights facilitated by the Human Genome Project and next generation DNA sequencing technologies, to global nucleic acid and proteomic expression measurement using new high-throughput methods. Less publicized in recent years, yet still the central driver of progress, are the steadily proceeding biological insights gained through tried and true hypothesis-driven investigation into the complex worlds of metabolism, growth, development, and regulation. Certainly, the basic science ecosystem is productive and this portends well for the myriad new applications that will benefit mankind; drugs, vaccines, devices, and related economic growth—or perhaps not—in stark contrast to the generation of fundamental biological knowledge are inefficiencies in applying this information to real-world problems, especially those of the clinic. While investigation hums along at light speed, translation often does not. The good news is that obstacles to progress are tractable. The bad news, however, is that these problems are difficult. The present paper examines translational research from multiple perspectives, beginning with a historical account and proceeding to the current state of the art. Included are descriptions of successes and challenges, along with conjecture on how the field may need to evolve in the future.

  20. 77 FR 43601 - Risks and Benefits of Hydroxyethyl Starch Solutions; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risks and Benefits of Hydroxyethyl Starch Solutions; Public... Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled: ``Risks and Benefits of Hydroxyethyl Starch... FDA-approved hydroxyethyl starch (HES) solutions. The public workshop has been planned in...

  1. Patient and public involvement: how much do we spend and what are the benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Elena; Doyle, Cathal; Matthews, Rachel; Barlow, James

    2015-12-01

    Patient and public involvement (PPI) is seen as a way of helping to shape health policy and ensure a patient-focused health-care system. While evidence indicates that PPI can improve health-care decision making, it also consumes monetary and non-monetary resources. Given the financial climate, it is important to start thinking about the costs and benefits of PPI and how to evaluate it in economic terms. We conducted a literature review to assess the potential benefits and costs of involvement and the challenges in carrying out an economic evaluation of PPI. The benefits of PPI include effects on the design of new projects or services, on NHS governance, on research design and implementation and on citizenship and equity. Economic evaluation of PPI activities is limited. The lack of an appropriate analytical framework, data recording and understanding of the potential costs and benefits of PPI, especially from participants' perspectives, represent serious constraints on the full evaluation of PPI. By recognizing the value of PPI, health-care providers and commissioners can embed it more effectively within their organizations. Better knowledge of costs may prompt organizations to effectively plan, execute, evaluate and target resources. This should increase the likelihood of more meaningful activity, avoid tokenism and enhance organizational efficiency and reputation. © 2014 The Authors Health Expectations Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Management Control Packages in Public Sector Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Kolk, Berend

    2016-01-01

    This thesis examines configurations of management control (MC) packages in public sector organizations, and how they relate to employee motivation and behavior. Using multiple case studies and a survey study, this thesis contributes to the extant literature in three ways. First, it enhances the unde

  3. [Ethical dilemmas in public health care organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda Vicandi, M

    2014-01-01

    Today you can ask if you can apply ethics to organizations because much of the greater overall impact decisions are not made by private individuals, are decided by organizations. Any organization is legitimate because it satisfies a need of society and this legitimacy depends if the organization does with quality. To offer a good service, quality service, organizations know they need to do well, but seem to forget that should do well not only instrumental level, must also make good on the ethical level. Public health care organizations claim to promote attitudes and actions based on ethics, level of their internal functioning and level of achievement of its goals, but increased awareness and analysis of its inner workings can question it. Such entities, for its structure and procedures, may make it difficult for ethical standards actually govern its operation, also can have negative ethical consequences at the population level. A healthcare organization must not be organized, either structurally or functionally, like any other organization that offers services. In addition, members of the organization can not simply be passive actors. It is necessary that operators and users have more pro-ethical behaviors. Operators from the professionalism and users from liability. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. HRM in private and public organizations in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berber Nemanja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Human resource management (HRM is a management concept which obtains many practices and activities. Although there is a substantial literature on HRM in the private sector, the practice of HRM in the public sector is still scarce. In the private sector, HRM is found as a factor for gaining competitive advantage, especially if HR practices are implemented in the way of high-performing working practice (HPWP. In the public sector, HRM is seen as paternalistic management, with the standardization of employment practices, collective bargaining and working practices that emphasize equal opportunities for employees. The goal of this research is to explore the characteristics and differences between HRM practice in organizations from the private and public sector. The subject of the research is HRM practice (staffing, training and development, compensation and benefits, and industrial relation and communication in the private and public organizations in the Republic of Serbia. The methodology of the paper includes exploration of the available literature on the theme and statistical analysis of the differences between HR practices in organizations from the private and public sector. The research is based on the HR data gathered in the second CRANET research round in Serbia, performed in 2015.

  5. Public-Private Collaborations with Earth-Space Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) was established in October 2010 to promote collaborative problem solving and project development to advance human health and performance innovations benefiting life in space and on Earth. The NHHPC, which now boasts over 150 corporate, government, academic and non-profit members, has convened four successful workshops and engaged in multiple collaborative projects. The virtual center facilitates member engagement through a variety of vehicles, including annual in-person workshops, webcasts, quarterly electronic newsletters, web postings, and the new system for partner engagement. NHHPC workshops serve to bring member organizations together to share best practices, discuss common goals, and facilitate development of the collaborative projects. The most recent NHHPC workshop was conducted in November 2013 on the topic of "Accelerating Innovation: New Organizational Business Models," and focused on various collaborative approaches successfully used by organizations to achieve their goals. Past workshops have addressed smart media and health applications, connecting through collaboration, microbiology innovations, and strategies and best practices in open innovation. A fifth workshop in Houston, Texas, planned for September 18, 2014, will feature "Innovation Through Co-Development: Engaging Partners". One area of great interest to NASA is mobile health applications, including mobile laboratory analytics, health monitoring, and close loop sensing, all of which also offer ground-based health applications for remote and underserved areas. Another project being coordinated by NASA and the Health and Environmental Sciences Institute is the pursuit of one to several novel strategies to increase medication stability that would enable health care in remote terrestrial settings as well as during space flight. NASA has also funded work with corporate NHHPC partner GE, seeking to develop ultrasound methodologies that will

  6. Benefits and Costs of For-Profit Public Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Molnar

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available As a policy initiative, for-profit operation of public schools has not lived up to the claims of its proponents. An examination of issues such as teaching methods, academic achievement, autonomy, local control, and the image and influence of for-profit public schools suggests that "for-profits" are unlikely to succeed in the long term in improving the overall quality of public education. They do, however, seem capable of harming public schools.

  7. [On the clients of public health organizations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Júlia; Villalbí, Joan R; Guix, Joan

    2004-01-01

    Public services must satisfy a variety of agents: users of these services, the citizens who pay the taxes that finance them, politicians, and those that work in them. To obtain public services that give priority to the citizen-user, knowledge of clients, their expectations, preferences, complaints and degree of satisfaction is essential. This article presents the process of internal discussion in our agency about its clients, who differ from those of an industrial or commercial organization. A proposal for the classification of clients, as well as the process that has led to a client portfolio, are presented and steps to improve services from the perspective of the client are suggested.

  8. Fringe Benefits for Superintendents in Public Schools, 1981-82. Part 1 of National Survey of Fringe Benefits in Public Schools. ERS Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    To help school boards and superintendents assess fringe benefit packages in their districts, this fourth biennial survey presents data on nonsalary compensation for public school superintendents in a national stratified sample of 1,036 of the nation's 11,313 public school systems. Arrayed in 38 tables, the data are classified by district…

  9. Public-Private Collaborations with Earth-Space Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey R.; Richard, Elizabeth E.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) was established in October 2010 to promote collaborative problem solving and project development to advance human health and performance innovations benefiting life in space and on Earth. The NHHPC, which now boasts over 135 corporate, government, academic and non-profit members, has convened four successful workshops and engaged in multiple collaborative projects. The center is currently developing a streamlined partner engagement process to capture technical needs and opportunities of NHHPC members, facilitate partnership development, and establish and manage collaborative projects for NASA. The virtual center facilitates member engagement through a variety of vehicles, including annual inperson workshops, webcasts, quarterly electronic newsletters, web postings, and the new system for partner engagement. The most recent NHHPC workshop was conducted in November 2013 on the topic of "Accelerating Innovation: New Organizational Business Models," and focused on various collaborative approaches successfully used by organizations to achieve their goals. The powerful notion of collaboration across sectors to solve intractable problems was recently highlighted in Williams Eggers' book "The Solution Revolution,"i which provides numerous examples of how business, government and social enterprises partner to solve tough problems. Mr. Eggers was a keynote speaker at the workshop, along with Harvard Business School, Jump Associates, and the Conrad Foundation. The robust program also included an expert panel addressing collaboration across sectors, four interactive breakout sessions, and a concluding keynote on innovative ways to increase science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education by NASA Associate Administrator for Education, Leland Melvin. The NHHPC forum also provides a platform for international partners to interact on many topics. Members from around the world include ISS International Partner JAXA

  10. Risk-benefit analysis and public policy: a bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, E.M.; Van Horn, A.J.

    1976-11-01

    Risk-benefit analysis has been implicitly practiced whenever decision-makers are confronted with decisions involving risks to life, health, or to the environment. Various methodologies have been developed to evaluate relevant criteria and to aid in assessing the impacts of alternative projects. Among these have been cost-benefit analysis, which has been widely used for project evaluation. However, in many cases it has been difficult to assign dollar costs to those criteria involving risks and benefits which are not now assigned explicit monetary values in our economic system. Hence, risk-benefit analysis has evolved to become more than merely an extension of cost-benefit analysis, and many methods have been applied to examine the trade-offs between risks and benefits. In addition, new scientific and statistical techniques have been developed for assessing current and future risks. The 950 references included in this bibliography are meant to suggest the breadth of those methodologies which have been applied to decisions involving risk.

  11. Organic farming and soil carbon sequestration: what do we really know about the benefits?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifeld, Jens; Fuhrer, Jürg

    2010-12-01

    Organic farming is believed to improve soil fertility by enhancing soil organic matter (SOM) contents. An important co-benefit would be the sequestration of carbon from atmospheric CO2. Such a positive effect has been suggested based on data from field experiments though many studies were not designed to address the issue of carbon sequestration. The aim of our study was to examine published data in order to identify possible flaws such as missing a proper baseline, carbon mass measurements, or lack of a clear distinction between conventional and organic farming practices, thereby attributing effects of specific practices to organic farming, which are not uniquely organic. A total of 68 data sets were analyzed from 32 peer-reviewed publications aiming to compare conventional with organic farming. The analysis revealed that after conversion, soil C content (SOC) in organic systems increased annually by 2.2% on average, whereas in conventional systems SOC did not change significantly. The majority of publications reported SOC concentrations rather than amounts thus neglecting possible changes in soil bulk density. 34 out of 68 data sets missed a true control with well-defined starting conditions. In 37 out of 50 cases, the amount of organic fertilizer in the organic system exceeded that applied in the compared conventional system, and in half of the cases crop rotations differed between systems. In the few studies where crop rotation and organic fertilization were comparable in both systems no consistent difference in SOC was found. From this data analysis, we conclude that the claim for beneficial effects of organic farming on SOC is premature and that reported advantages of organic farming for SOC are largely determined by higher and often disproportionate application of organic fertilizer compared to conventional farming.

  12. INFORMAL STRATEGIZING IN A PUBLIC ORGANIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Pedro Vieira

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Strategy as Practice analyzes what people do in relation to the development of strategy in organizations, providing insights into current issues in strategy that require a more micro level of understanding (JOHNSON et al., 2007. Considering the perspective of strategy as practice arising from the emerging strategies, we noticed the lack of studies to understand how these activities occur in a daily basis of organization characterizing as informal strategies (WHITTINGTON, 2007. Therefore, this study proposes to address this issue, showing the occurrence of informal strategizing at a public organization under the strategy-as-practice perspective. For this we held a qualitative research through a single case study (EISENHARDT, 1989 in a municipality in southern Brazil. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with officials of different levels of the organization; direct observation, with notebook guide and analysis of documents provided by the organization, encouraging the triangulation of data. Informal strategies were mainly identified on customer service activities when an applicant’s request is not strictly met under the law or the legislation is dubious and opens room for double-meaning surveying, interpretation and information communication.

  13. Public Benefits and Power Sector Reform. Report from an International Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Lars J.; Arvidson, Anders; Eberhard, Anton (eds.)

    2003-10-01

    The Workshop on Public Benefits and Power Sector Reform was motivated by the need to address broader development goals and advance the provision of public benefits in power sector reforms. The primary objectives were: To provide a forum for a discussion among specialists, of how the provision of public benefits can be expanded as power sectors in developing countries are reformed, and review the experience (Day 1). To identify the needs for training and capacity building and institutional arrangements, as well as make recommendations for their design and implementation, for policy makers, regulators, and other professionals in developing countries (Day 2). Public benefits is a socially constructed concept that includes activities that are not adequately conceived by competitive markets. Public benefit policies and programmes include those that expand electricity access to rural areas and the urban poor, improve security of supply, promote energy efficiency and renewable energy, etc. Reforms have indeed been a threat to public benefits as traditionally delivered through electric utilities. However, in many cases public benefit programmes have also been rescued. In fewer cases, public benefit programmes have been conceived in the reform process. From experience so far it is clear that power sector reforms must be made more compatible with broader sustainable development goals. Recognising the need for broader policy integration and putting public benefits higher on the reform agenda points to the importance of reaching beyond energy ministries and power sector experts at an early stage in the reform process. Other actors, such as NGOs and academia, may also be instrumental in monitoring and assessing the impacts of reform. Public benefits can be an integral part of a reform package, or a complement to reform. It does appear that reform creates space and opportunity to achieve public benefits, but someone has to utilise that opportunity. The need to make trade

  14. Vaccine safety--vaccine benefits: science and the public's perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C B; Marcuse, E K

    2001-11-01

    The development of cowpox vaccination by Jenner led to the development of immunology as a scientific discipline. The subsequent eradication of smallpox and the remarkable effects of other vaccines are among the most important contributions of biomedical science to human health. Today, the need for new vaccines has never been greater. However, in developed countries, the public's fear of vaccine-preventable diseases has waned, and awareness of potential adverse effects has increased, which is threatening vaccine acceptance. To further the control of disease by vaccination, we must develop safe and effective new vaccines to combat infectious diseases, and address the public's concerns.

  15. Economics of Sustainable Technologies : Private and Public Costs and Benefits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Yoram; Abraham, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This article is focused on the economics of sustainable technologies from the mainstream and heterodox perspectives. The aim is to present major concepts, methodologies, and debates for public use. The paper is focused on decision making aiming at the development and use of sustainable technologies.

  16. Crisis-induced learning in public sector organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deverell, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    How do public organizations manage crises? How do public organizations learn from crises? These seemingly basic questions still pose virtual puzzles for crisis management researchers. This dissertation sheds light on the problems regarding the lack of knowledge on how public organizations manage and

  17. Crisis-induced learning in public sector organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deverell, E.C.

    2010-01-01

    How do public organizations manage crises? How do public organizations learn from crises? These seemingly basic questions still pose virtual puzzles for crisis management researchers. This dissertation sheds light on the problems regarding the lack of knowledge on how public organizations manage and

  18. [Fiscal policy and tobacco control: a unique opportunity to benefit public health and the public treasury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendares, Pedro Enrique; Reynales Shigematsu, Luz Miriam

    2006-01-01

    Various studies and analyses show that an increase in tobacco prices through taxation is one of the most efficient tools in the application of integral policies in the fight against tobacco. Increases in taxes contribute to cessation, to reductions in consumption and in the number of deaths among addicts and to decrease the number of people who start to smoke. However, many governments hesitate to apply high taxes to tobacco for fear of possible negative economic results including loss of jobs and a decrease in fiscal revenue as a consequence of smuggling. Both literature and empirical experience indicate that these negative consequences do not occur or have been overestimated, often due to arguments promoted by the tobacco industry itself. Increases in tobacco taxes result in greater fiscal income, even in the presence of smuggling, which can be confronted without eroding tobacco control policies. Numerous countries, including Mexico, still have a wide margin for increasing tobacco taxes, and thereby to take advantage of an exceptional opportunity that benefits both the population's health and the public treasury. To do so, governments must stand up to the powerful tobacco industry, which is aware of the efficiency of taxes to combat tobacco use and therefore resorts to intense ad campaigns, political lobbying and negotiation of voluntary agreements for "self-regulation" in order to avoid stricter legislative or fiscal measures.

  19. Fringe Benefits for Administrators in Public Schools, 1979-80. Part 2 of National Survey of Fringe Benefits in Public Schools. ERS Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    Thirty tables present data from the third biennial survey of fringe benefits among non-superintendent administrators and supervisors in public elementary and secondary school systems. Designed to help school boards and administrators assess their non-cash compensation packages, the national survey drew responses from 803 districts in a random…

  20. Fringe Benefits for Administrators in Public Schools, 1981-82. Part 2 of National Survey of Fringe Benefits in Public Schools. ERS Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    To help school boards and administrative personnel assess the noncash compensation packages in their districts, this fourth biennial survey provides information on fringe benefits given administrators and supervisors (other than superintendents) in a national stratified random sample of 1,044 of the nation's 11,313 public school districts.…

  1. Fringe Benefits for Superintendents in Public Schools, 1979-80. Part 1 of National Survey of Fringe Benefits in Public Schools. ERS Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Educational Research Service, Arlington, VA.

    Displayed in 38 tables, the data in this third biennial survey of public school superintendents' fringe benefits are designed to help school boards and administrators assess their non-cash compensation packages. A national sample of 797 school districts--stratified by district enrollment size, expenditure per pupil, and geographic region--supplied…

  2. Discursive strategies of strategy in public organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lystbæk, Christian Tang; Holmgren, Jens; Friis, Ole Uhrskov

    of strategy. Bodies of discursive scholarship, such as critical discourse analysis, narrative analysis, metaphor analysis and conversation analysis, have contributed with significant research into important issues and themes in strategy making processes such as sense-making, subject-positions and power...... relations, however they have not depicted an underlying conceptual structure in how strategy making is given discursive legitimacy in public service organizations. In this study, we depart from previous discursive strategy research by taking a deconstructive approach in order to identify underlying...... concerns whether the main emphasis is on “logical” or rather on “emotional” foundations and another dimension concerns whether the emphasis is rooted in internal forces or external forces. We label the four discourses “rationalistic”, structuralistic”, “idealistic” and “identity “....

  3. Public versus Private Incentives to Invest in Green Roofs: A Cost Benefit Analysis for Flanders.

    OpenAIRE

    Claus, Karla; Rousseau, Sandra

    2010-01-01

    By means of a cost benefit analysis, we compare public and private incentives to invest in extensive green roofs in urban areas. From the comparison of these public and private incentives we find that subsidies for green roofs are socially desirable and that subsidies are actually needed to convince potential private investors to construct green roofs. Specifically, we estimate the costs and benefits associated with an investment project in Groot-Bijgaarden (Belgium) where a real estate inves...

  4. Improving the effectiveness of sickness benefit case management through a public-private partnership?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Malene Rode; Aust, Birgit; Høgelund, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether a multidimensional public-private partnership intervention, focussing on improving the quality and efficiency of sickness benefit case management, reduced the sickness benefit duration and the duration until self-support. Methods We used...

  5. Benefits of Water Safety Plans: microbiology, compliance, and public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunnarsdottir, Maria J; Gardarsson, Sigurdur M; Elliott, Mark; Sigmundsdottir, Gudrun; Bartram, Jamie

    2012-07-17

    The Water Safety Plan (WSP) methodology, which aims to enhance safety of drinking water supplies, has been recommended by the World Health Organization since 2004. WSPs are now used worldwide and are legally required in several countries. However, there is limited systematic evidence available demonstrating the effectiveness of WSPs on water quality and health. Iceland was one of the first countries to legislate the use of WSPs, enabling the analysis of more than a decade of data on impact of WSP. The objective was to determine the impact of WSP implementation on regulatory compliance, microbiological water quality, and incidence of clinical cases of diarrhea. Surveillance data on water quality and diarrhea were collected and analyzed. The results show that HPC (heterotrophic plate counts), representing microbiological growth in the water supply system, decreased statistically significant with fewer incidents of HPC exceeding 10 cfu per mL in samples following WSP implementation and noncompliance was also significantly reduced (p diarrhea was detected where a WSP was implemented, and, furthermore, the results indicate that population where WSP has been implemented is 14% less likely to develop clinical cases of diarrhea.

  6. Balancing radiation benefits and risks: The needs of an informed public

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The American public`s perceptions regarding ionizing radiation do not always conform to or correlate with scientific evidence. The ultimate purpose of this coordinated Federal effort and report is to increase the public`s knowledge of the benefits and risks associated with ionizing radiation. This report is divided into five sections. The first section, Introduction, discusses the public`s knowledge of radiation, their perceptions of benefits versus risks, and the Federal government`s role in public education. The section also outlines the charge to the Subpanel. Radiation Issues and Public Reactions discusses several radiation issues important to Federal agencies for which public education programs need to be established or enhanced. Federal Programs describes Federal agencies with public education programs on radiation and the nature of the programs they support. Education Issues and Federal Strategies explores the elements identified by the Subpanel as critical to the development and implementation of an effective Federal program in the area of public education on radiation issues and nuclear technologies. An important issue repeatedly brought up during the public sector presentations to the Subpanel was the perceived lack of Federal credibility on radiation issues in the eyes of the public. To some degree, this concern was factored into all of the recommendations developed by the subpanel. The issues discussed in this section include the fragmented nature of Federal radiation programs and the need to improve credibility, promote agency responsiveness, and support the enhancement of scientific literacy. Finally, under Recommendations, the Subpanel discusses its overall findings and conclusions.

  7. Costs and benefits of communicating product safety information to the public via the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saoutert, Erwan; Andreasen, Ina

    2006-04-01

    Procter & Gamble (P&G) developed Science-in-the-Box (SIB; www.scienceinthebox.com) after discussions with their stakeholders as to how the consumer products company could better communicate key environmental performance and safety information to the public. A series of workshops enabled P&G to understand that consumers and other key business decision makers wanted meaningful information about the science behind P&G products. In addition, it was clear that making such information available would produce business benefits by encouraging long-term relationships with decision makers ranging from consumers and retailers to policy makers and nongovernmental organizations. These benefits were not necessarily quantifiable in the short term, but they still had to be balanced by the costs in terms of resource commitment and potential intellectual property issues. Since its inception in September 2002, SIB has successfully reached key target audiences and built improved credibility and confidence in P&G products and approaches. The website is now available in English, French, Spanish, German, and Italian and is used by consumers, journalists, teachers, scientists, and policy makers. Several user surveys carried out during the initial developmental period, together with unsolicited e-mail feedback, have demonstrated that SIB has successfully created a platform for continuous dialogue with consumers and other interested parties.

  8. Peer Review in Scientific Publications: Benefits, Critiques, & A Survival Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jacalyn; Sadeghieh, Tara; Adeli, Khosrow

    2014-10-01

    Peer review has been defined as a process of subjecting an author's scholarly work, research or ideas to the scrutiny of others who are experts in the same field. It functions to encourage authors to meet the accepted high standards of their discipline and to control the dissemination of research data to ensure that unwarranted claims, unacceptable interpretations or personal views are not published without prior expert review. Despite its wide-spread use by most journals, the peer review process has also been widely criticised due to the slowness of the process to publish new findings and due to perceived bias by the editors and/or reviewers. Within the scientific community, peer review has become an essential component of the academic writing process. It helps ensure that papers published in scientific journals answer meaningful research questions and draw accurate conclusions based on professionally executed experimentation. Submission of low quality manuscripts has become increasingly prevalent, and peer review acts as a filter to prevent this work from reaching the scientific community. The major advantage of a peer review process is that peer-reviewed articles provide a trusted form of scientific communication. Since scientific knowledge is cumulative and builds on itself, this trust is particularly important. Despite the positive impacts of peer review, critics argue that the peer review process stifles innovation in experimentation, and acts as a poor screen against plagiarism. Despite its downfalls, there has not yet been a foolproof system developed to take the place of peer review, however, researchers have been looking into electronic means of improving the peer review process. Unfortunately, the recent explosion in online only/electronic journals has led to mass publication of a large number of scientific articles with little or no peer review. This poses significant risk to advances in scientific knowledge and its future potential. The current article

  9. Peer Review in Scientific Publications: Benefits, Critiques, & A Survival Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Jacalyn; Sadeghieh, Tara

    2014-01-01

    Peer review has been defined as a process of subjecting an author’s scholarly work, research or ideas to the scrutiny of others who are experts in the same field. It functions to encourage authors to meet the accepted high standards of their discipline and to control the dissemination of research data to ensure that unwarranted claims, unacceptable interpretations or personal views are not published without prior expert review. Despite its wide-spread use by most journals, the peer review process has also been widely criticised due to the slowness of the process to publish new findings and due to perceived bias by the editors and/or reviewers. Within the scientific community, peer review has become an essential component of the academic writing process. It helps ensure that papers published in scientific journals answer meaningful research questions and draw accurate conclusions based on professionally executed experimentation. Submission of low quality manuscripts has become increasingly prevalent, and peer review acts as a filter to prevent this work from reaching the scientific community. The major advantage of a peer review process is that peer-reviewed articles provide a trusted form of scientific communication. Since scientific knowledge is cumulative and builds on itself, this trust is particularly important. Despite the positive impacts of peer review, critics argue that the peer review process stifles innovation in experimentation, and acts as a poor screen against plagiarism. Despite its downfalls, there has not yet been a foolproof system developed to take the place of peer review, however, researchers have been looking into electronic means of improving the peer review process. Unfortunately, the recent explosion in online only/electronic journals has led to mass publication of a large number of scientific articles with little or no peer review. This poses significant risk to advances in scientific knowledge and its future potential. The current

  10. Marginal benefit incidence of public health spending: evidence from Indonesian sub-national data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Sparrow (Robert); M.P. Pradhan (Menno); I. Kruse (Ioana)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractWe examine the marginal effects of decentralized public health spending by incorporating estimates of behavioural responses to changes in public health spending through benefit incidence analysis. The analysis is based on a panel dataset of 207 Indonesian districts over a 4-year period f

  11. Financing U.S. Renewable Energy Projects Through Public Capital Vehicles: Qualitative and Quantitative Benefits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsohn, M.; Feldman, D.

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores the possibility of financing renewable energy projects through raising capital in the public markets. It gives an overview of the size, structure, and benefits of public capital markets, as well as showing how renewable energy projects might take advantage of this source of new funds to lower the cost of electricity.

  12. Vaccine Risk/Benefit Communication: Effect of an Educational Package for Public Health Nurses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Terry C.; Fredrickson, Doren D.; Kennen, Estela M.; Humiston, Sharon G.; Arnold, Connie L.; Quinlin, Mackey S.; Bocchini, Joseph A., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an in-service for public health nurses (PHNs) and accompanying educational materials could improve vaccine risk/benefit communication. The content and timing of vaccine communication were recorded during 246 pre-and 217 post-intervention visits in two public health immunization clinics.…

  13. Public Library Use in Pennsylvania: Identifying Uses, Benefits, and Impacts. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Charles R.; Bertot, John Carlo

    The purpose of this study is to identify users of Pennsylvania public libraries and determine their reasons for using the library. In addition, the study provides information describing the impacts and benefits to those users as a result of their contact with the public library. The objectives were to: (1) describe users in terms of their…

  14. Real Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Needed in American Public Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert D. Stoneberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Public school critics often point to rising expenditures and relatively flat test scores to justify their school reform agendas. The claims are flawed because their analyses fail to account for the difference in data types between dollars (ratio and test scores (interval. A cost-benefit analysis using dollars as a common metric for both costs and benefits can provide a good estimate of their relationship. It also acknowledges that costs and benefits are both subject to inflation. The National Center for Education Research administers a methods training program for researchers who want to know more about cost-benefit analyses on education policies and programs.

  15. Visibility of Public Budget Burdens and Benefits in New European Union Member Countries

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The size and pattern of any public budget depend, among other factors, on the visibility of both the burdens and benefits of public revenue and expenditure. Furthermore, such visibility is a necessary - not a sufficient - condition for an efficient allocation of resources between the private and public sectors of an economy. The aim of this contribution, based on a recent research, is to apply fiscal visibility indicators to territorial government levels of new European Union member countries...

  16. Performance in Public Organizations: Clarifying the Conceptual Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Boesen, Andreas; Holm Pedersen, Lene

    2016-01-01

    Performance in public organizations is a key concept that requires clarification. Based on a conceptual review of research published in 10 public administration journals, this article proposes six distinctions to describe the systematic differences in performance criteria: From which stakeholder'...

  17. Balancing the benefits and risks of public-private partnerships to address the global double burden of malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraak, Vivica I; Harrigan, Paige B; Lawrence, Mark; Harrison, Paul J; Jackson, Michaela A; Swinburn, Boyd

    2012-03-01

    Transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies, and their corporate foundations, may be potential collaborators to help address complex public health nutrition challenges. While UN system guidelines are available for private-sector engagement, non-governmental organizations (NGO) have limited guidelines to navigate diverse opportunities and challenges presented by partnering with these companies through public-private partnerships (PPP) to address the global double burden of malnutrition. We conducted a search of electronic databases, UN system websites and grey literature to identify resources about partnerships used to address the global double burden of malnutrition. A narrative summary provides a synthesis of the interdisciplinary literature identified. We describe partnership opportunities, benefits and challenges; and tools and approaches to help NGO engage with the private sector to address global public health nutrition challenges. PPP benefits include: raising the visibility of nutrition and health on policy agendas; mobilizing funds and advocating for research; strengthening food-system processes and delivery systems; facilitating technology transfer; and expanding access to medications, vaccines, healthy food and beverage products, and nutrition assistance during humanitarian crises. PPP challenges include: balancing private commercial interests with public health interests; managing conflicts of interest; ensuring that co-branded activities support healthy products and healthy eating environments; complying with ethical codes of conduct; assessing partnership compatibility; and evaluating partnership outcomes. NGO should adopt a systematic and transparent approach using available tools and processes to maximize benefits and minimize risks of partnering with transnational food, beverage and restaurant companies to effectively target the global double burden of malnutrition.

  18. Crisis-induced learning in public sector organizations

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    How do public organizations manage crises? How do public organizations learn from crises? These seemingly basic questions still pose virtual puzzles for crisis management researchers. This dissertation sheds light on the problems regarding the lack of knowledge on how public organizations manage and learn from crises, with a number of critical knowledge gaps in contemporary crisis management as the starting point. It argues that there is a need of increased knowledge not only about crises and...

  19. Rural Public Investment and Benefit in Sichuan’s Hilly and Mountainous Areas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Using representative sampling survey data,we take the case of roads,domestic water,irrigation facilities,clinics and schools,to give an overview of the status quo of rural public investment in Sichuan’s hilly and mountainous areas in the period 2005 -2008; conduct comprehensive analysis of public investment benefit,from the status quo of supply and demand,social benefit and villagers’ satisfaction. The results show that the social benefit arising from the construction of road projects is good,while the social benefit arising from the construction of irrigation facilities is poor; the matching effect of supply and demand of public investment is poor,especially for the investment in irrigation facilities; on the whole,villagers’ satisfaction with public investment has been promoted,but most of the villagers are still unsatisfied with the current irrigation facilities. The major capital source of rural public investment is from the government,but from the perspective of the villagers’ demand,we should further increase the public financial input.

  20. A generalized public goods game with coupling of individual ability and project benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Li-Xin; Xu, Wen-Juan; He, Yun-Xin; Zhong, Chen-Yang; Chen, Rong-Da; Qiu, Tian; Shi, Yong-Dong; Ren, Fei

    2017-08-01

    Facing a heavy task, any single person can only make a limited contribution and team cooperation is needed. As one enjoys the benefit of the public goods, the potential benefits of the project are not always maximized and may be partly wasted. By incorporating individual ability and project benefit into the original public goods game, we study the coupling effect of the four parameters, the upper limit of individual contribution, the upper limit of individual benefit, the needed project cost and the upper limit of project benefit on the evolution of cooperation. Coevolving with the individual-level group size preferences, an increase in the upper limit of individual benefit promotes cooperation while an increase in the upper limit of individual contribution inhibits cooperation. The coupling of the upper limit of individual contribution and the needed project cost determines the critical point of the upper limit of project benefit, where the equilibrium frequency of cooperators reaches its highest level. Above the critical point, an increase in the upper limit of project benefit inhibits cooperation. The evolution of cooperation is closely related to the preferred group-size distribution. A functional relation between the frequency of cooperators and the dominant group size is found.

  1. Public Health benefits of partner notification for sexually transmitted infections and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Berit; Low, N; Martin Hilber, Adriane

    2013-01-01

    Background European countries have used partner notification as one of a range of measures to control sexually transmitted infections (STI) since the early 1900s. Besides clinical benefits, public health benefits are also recognised such as controlling the spread of STI, reducing STI...... as patient referral, provider referral, and contract or conditional referral. Lack of consensus about the most effective methods of partner notification is another reason for the diversity of practice across countries and also represents a challenge to improving partner efforts....

  2. The Performance of Public Organization: Still Unclear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacanu B.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the present discussions about the organisation’s performance have revealed the fact that the concept is unclear. The use of the concept is more difficult in public organisations. The paper presents the case of Romanian SOE Hidroelectrica and the case of public universities, to pinpoint the fact that ambiguous objectives are the cause of a dilemmatic management. The general opinion is that the results of the public organisations management reflect a poor performance of the latter.

  3. Medicare health maintenance organization benefits packages and plan performance measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Don; Lanyi, Bettina; Strabic, Allison

    2002-01-01

    This article reports the results of an analysis of the relationship between supplemental benefits offered by Medicare+Choice (M+C) plans and their plan performance ratings. We examined two measures of plan performance: (1) plan ratings as reported in the Medicare Managed Care (MMC) Consumer Assessment of Health Care Study (CAHPS), and (2) disenrollment rates. The results of our analysis indicated that variations in plan supplemental offerings have little impact on enrollees' plan performance ratings--both overall ratings and access to care measures. Furthermore, disenrollment rates were found to be more sensitive to the availability of alternative M+C plans, either in general, or for specific benefits than to variations in benefit offerings.

  4. Matgrass sward plant species benefit from soil organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, E.P.; Raaijmakers, C.E.; Bakx-Schotman, J.M.T.; Hannula, S.E.; Kemmers, R.H.; Boer, de W.; Putten, van der W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Soil organisms are important in the structuring of plant communities. However, little is known about how to apply this knowledge to vegetation management. Here, we examined if soil organisms may promote plant species of characteristic habitats, and suppress plant species of disturbed habitats. We cl

  5. Approaches to organizing public relations functions in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Bonnie; Williams, David R; Aldridge, Alicia; Roggenkamp, Susan D

    2007-01-01

    This article provides health care audiences with a framework for understanding different perspectives of the role and functions of public relations in healthcare organizations and the resultant alternatives for organizing and enacting public relations functions. Using an example of a current issue receiving much attention in US healthcare (improving rates of organ donation), the article provides examples of how these different perspectives influence public relations goals and objectives, definitions of 'public', activities undertaken, who undertakes them and where they fit into the organizational hierarchy.

  6. Impact of Performance Management in Public and Private Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidman, Ulrik; Andersen, Simon Calmar

    2014-01-01

    Recent theoretical developments suggest that management actions have different impacts on outcomes in public and private organizations. This proposition is important to public organizations’ widespread import of private sector management tools such as performance management. This article examines...... how performance management influences performance outcomes in otherwise similar public and private organizations. Showing that the factors expected to diminish the impact of performance management parallel the organizational characteristics of public organizations, we hypothesize that this type...... of management is less effective in public organizations. A difference-in-differences model based on survey data on management in Danish public and private schools, combined with administrative data of students’ test scores, confirms the hypothesis. The results have important implications for the transfer...

  7. The interrelations amongst control system elements in public sector organizations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeeten, F.H.M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explain the decisions that public sector organizations make with regard to the design and use of their management control system. New Public Management, based on economics theory, suggests that employees in the public sector should be freed from traditional bureaucratic

  8. After the reform : Change in Dutch public and private organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieto Morales, F.; Wittek, R.P.M.; Heyse, L.

    Proponents of new public management (NPM) expect public organizations to become more flexible and adaptive after administrative reforms, effectively showing convergence with patterns of organizational change in the private sector. This "convergence argument" is tested with a sample of 61 public and

  9. After the reform : Change in Dutch public and private organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieto Morales, F.; Wittek, R.P.M.; Heyse, L.

    2013-01-01

    Proponents of new public management (NPM) expect public organizations to become more flexible and adaptive after administrative reforms, effectively showing convergence with patterns of organizational change in the private sector. This "convergence argument" is tested with a sample of 61 public and

  10. Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Local Food Procurement in Publicly Funded Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew J.; Chopra, Hema

    2013-01-01

    Community-Based Social Marketing is presented as a technique to add to Extension's community economic development toolbox by examining perceived benefits and barriers to local food procurement at publicly funded institutions. Data were gathered through 86 in-person interviews with representatives across the supply chain. The findings revealed that…

  11. Real Cost-Benefit Analysis Is Needed in American Public Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneberg, Bert D.

    2015-01-01

    Public school critics often point to rising expenditures and relatively flat test scores to justify their school reform agendas. The claims are flawed because their analyses fail to account for the difference in data types between dollars (ratio) and test scores (interval). A cost-benefit analysis using dollars as a common metric for both costs…

  12. Strategy for communicating benefit-risk decisions: a comparison of regulatory agencies' publicly available documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong Wai Yeen, James; Salek, Sam; Walker, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    The assessment report formats of four major regulatory reference agencies, US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, Health Canada, and Australia's Therapeutic Goods Administration were compared to a benefit-risk (BR) documentation template developed by the Centre for Innovation in Regulatory Science and a four-member Consortium on Benefit-Risk Assessment. A case study was also conducted using a US FDA Medical Review, the European Public Assessment Report and Australia's Public Assessment Report for the same product. Compared with the BR Template, existing regulatory report formats are inadequate regarding the listing of benefits and risks, the assigning of relative importance and values, visualization and the utilization of a detailed, systematic, standardized structure. The BR Template is based on the principles of BR assessment common to major regulatory agencies. Given that there are minimal differences among the existing regulatory report formats, it is timely to consider the feasibility of a universal template.

  13. Strategy for communicating benefit-risk decisions: A comparison of regulatory agencies’ publicly available documents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James eLeong Wai Yeen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The assessment report formats of four major regulatory reference agencies, US Food and Drug Administration, European Medicines Agency, Health Canada, and Australia’s Therapeutic Goods Administration were compared to a benefit-risk (BR documentation template developed by the Centre for Innovation in Regulatory Science and a four-member Consortium on Benefit-Risk Assessment. A case study was also conducted using a US FDA Medical Review, the European Public Assessment Report and Australia’s Public Assessment Report for the same product. Compared with the BR Template, existing regulatory report formats are inadequate regarding the listing of benefits and risks, the assigning of relative importance and values, visualization and the utilization of a detailed, systematic, standardized structure. The BR Template is based on the principles of BR assessment common to major regulatory agencies. Given that there are minimal differences among the existing regulatory report formats, it is timely to consider the feasibility of a universal template.

  14. The benefits of sexual orientation diversity in sport organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, George B; Melton, E Nicole

    2011-01-01

    While sexual orientation diversity can potentially serve as a source of competitive advantage, researchers have largely failed to fully articulate the theoretical linkage between this diversity form and organizational effectiveness. As such, we propose a theoretical framework to understand these dynamics. Sexual orientation diversity is posited to positively contribute to organizational effectiveness through three mechanisms: enhanced decision making capabilities, improved marketplace understanding, and goodwill associated with engaging in socially responsible practices. We also propose two approaches to leveraging the benefits of sexual orientation diversity: targeting the categorization process and creating a proactive and inclusive diversity culture. Contributions and implications are discussed.

  15. CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF MARKETING STRATEGIC PLANNING SPECIFIC TO PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu Florin Tudor; Barbu Andreea Mihaela

    2012-01-01

    In public services, the political component of the marketing environment has a major importance, as all decisions adopted within central administration influence both the objectives and measures implemented by units of local government and other public service providers. Any discontinuity in the activity of such entities might result in neglecting the real needs of citizens and slowing the reform process in the public sector. Therefore, all initiatives of public organizations must have a unit...

  16. Benefits Awareness: Educating Industry, Finance, and the Public About Space Commercialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Blake; Nall, Mark; Casas, Joseph C.; Henderson, Robin N. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For space to be truly commercialized, businesses of all sizes and types must be involved, from foundries to agricultural research initiatives. Achieving this goal, however, requires three separate but integrated educational efforts to support it. The first is to educate industry leaders about the possibilities available through such research, while dispelling some of the myths and misinformation educate the financial community about the economic benefits that result both from the research and the leveraging of private research dollars through the use of space and microgravity research. The third is to educate the public about the tangible benefits that come directly to them from such efforts, the economic benefits to national economies from same, and the other less tangible benefits that will cascade from commercial operations. Together, these steps will educate and provide the framework necessary to help advance space commercialization.

  17. Contribution of organic farming to public goods in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lizzie Melby; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Fog, Erik

    2017-01-01

    The potential contribution of organic farming to the public goods, ‘Nature and Biodiversity’, ‘Environment’, ‘Energy and Climate’, ‘Human Health and Welfare’ and ‘Animal Health and Welfare’ in Denmark is guided and partly secured by the principles and specific requirements of the EU Organic...... such uses in organic farming, as examples, the positive and negative contributions of organic farming in relation to selected public goods were analysed. The contributions of organic farming to Nature and Biodiversity and Human and Animal Health and Welfare are mainly positive compared to conventional...... to the public goods Energy and Climate, which at present are not addressed in the EU Organic Regulation. Moreover, some organic farming requirements and practices cause dilemmas; e.g. more space per animal and outdoor access improves Animal Health and Welfare but at the same time has negative effects...

  18. Contribution of organic farming to public goods in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Lizzie Melby; Baggesen, Dorte Lau; Fog, Erik

    2017-01-01

    to the public goods Energy and Climate, which at present are not addressed in the EU Organic Regulation. Moreover, some organic farming requirements and practices cause dilemmas; e.g. more space per animal and outdoor access improves Animal Health and Welfare but at the same time has negative effects......The potential contribution of organic farming to the public goods, ‘Nature and Biodiversity’, ‘Environment’, ‘Energy and Climate’, ‘Human Health and Welfare’ and ‘Animal Health and Welfare’ in Denmark is guided and partly secured by the principles and specific requirements of the EU Organic...... such uses in organic farming, as examples, the positive and negative contributions of organic farming in relation to selected public goods were analysed. The contributions of organic farming to Nature and Biodiversity and Human and Animal Health and Welfare are mainly positive compared to conventional...

  19. The Quasi Nongovernmental Organization in Public Broadcasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Michael B.

    1969-01-01

    "Educational broadcasting faces a problem of remaining autonomous under increased governmental support through the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. Dr. Grossman draws parallels between what is happening in ETV and the history of autonomy and constituency in the schools and universities. (Editor)

  20. Environmental Aspects of Social Responsibility of Public Sector Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Hawrysz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In addition to determining social responsibility policies that affect the market and social actors, certain governments also set objectives related to their internal activity. For example, one of the activities of the German government is to implement the concept of social responsibility into public institutions. In the Netherlands, one of the government tasks is to set an example for responsible practices (government as a role model. The aim of this paper is to examine firstly whether public sector entities set an example for responsible practices, especially with regard to respect for the environment, and secondly, whether public sector organizations in Poland significantly differ from organizations abroad in terms of their practices in the field of environmental protection. A questionnaire was a basis for data collection. The questionnaires were distributed to representatives of deliberately selected public sector organizations located primarily in Europe. The study was conducted in 2012–2013 on a group of 220 public sector organizations (102 Polish and 118 other European. The paper presents only the selected part of research. Public sector organizations in Poland do not have internal mechanisms of environmental responsibility. There is a significant discrepancy between the state of the environmental responsibility of organizations located in Poland and abroad. Obtained results show that public sector organizations, those in Poland in particular, are making their first steps in developing internal environmental responsibility.

  1. Assessment of the Perception of Benefits of Organic Gardening in Maiduguri Metropolis, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustapha, S. B.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the perception of benefits of organic gardening in Maiduguri Metropolis, Nigeria. Structured questionnaires were administered to obtain information from 166 respondents through multi-stage random and purposive sampling techniques. Data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics (frequency distribution, percentage and mean scores. The study indicates that the respondents had perceived a relatively neutral (mean score = 2.87 socio-economic benefits of organic gardening. Nevertheless, they agreed (mean score = 3.84 with the ecological benefits or organic farming. The result, equally reports that the intension of conversion to organic farming was relatively neutral (mean score = 3.49. The most important constraint to organic gardening conversion was lack of knowledge and skills regarding organic gardening. Policy recommendations were made to include: the creation of awareness on the consequences of synthetic fertilizers, pesticides among others, and adequate government support for organic gardening in the study area.

  2. Public opinion and organ donation suggestions for overcoming barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantarovich, Félix

    2005-01-01

    Getting organs for transplantation depends on people's decision; thus, public opinion is essential to finding a solution to this problem. Efforts to improve organ shortage focus on: 1) Living, unrelated donation, 2) increasing marginal donors and 3) proposing economic support for donors. Paradoxically, no initiative has been suggested to modify public opinion towards cadaver donors. Several reasons explain the resistance to donating cadaver organs: Lack of awareness, religious uncertainties, distrust of medicine, hostility to new ideas, and misinformation. Education should be used to reshape public opinion about the use of organs for transplantation. Society should accept that "using" body parts is moral and offers a source of health for everybody. The concept that using cadaver organs implies sharing a source of health might be a social agreement between all members of Society. Suggestions for improving organ shortage include: 1) Society should understand that during one's life one may be just as easily a potential organ receiver as one is an organ donor. 2) Cadaver organs are an irreplaceable source of health. 3) As self-interest is one obstacle to donating cadaver organs, the "concept that allowing the use of our organs after death represents a chance of sharing health for everybody" may be useful for a change of attitude. Even though a poll among transplant professionals supported this suggestion, an international public survey should be carried out to evaluate people's reaction to this message.

  3. An Assessment of Future Demands for and Benefits of Public Transit Services in Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, F.

    2003-06-10

    This report documents results from a study carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville for the Office of Public Transportation, Tennessee Department of Transportation. The study team was tasked with developing a process and a supporting methodology for estimating the benefits accruing to the State from the operation of state supported public transit services. The team was also tasked with developing forecasts of the future demands for these State supported transit services at five year intervals through the year 2020, broken down where possible to the local transit system level. Separate ridership benefits and forecasts were also requested for the State's urban and rural transit operations. Tennessee's public transit systems are subsidized to a degree by taxpayers. It is therefore in the public interest that assessments of the benefits of such systems be carried out at intervals, to determine how they are contributing to the well-being of the state's population. For some population groups within the State of Tennessee these transit services have become essential as a means of gaining access to workplaces and job training centers, to educational and health care facilities, as well as to shops, social functions and recreational sites.

  4. An Assessment of Future Demands for and Benefits of Public Transit Srevices in Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, F.

    2004-04-29

    This report documents results from a study carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Tennessee at Knoxville for the Office of Public Transportation, Tennessee Department of Transportation. The study team was tasked with developing a process and a supporting methodology for estimating the benefits accruing to the State from the operation of state supported public transit services. The team was also tasked with developing forecasts of the future demands for these State supported transit services at five year intervals through the year 2020, broken down where possible to the local transit system level. Separate ridership benefits and forecasts were also requested for the State's urban and rural transit operations. Tennessee's public transit systems are subsidized to a degree by taxpayers. It is therefore in the public interest that assessments of the benefits of such systems be carried out at intervals, to determine how they are contributing to the well-being of the state's population. For some population groups within the State of Tennessee these transit services have become essential as a means of gaining access to workplaces and job training centers, to educational and health care facilities, as well as to shops, social functions and recreational sites.

  5. Public Health benefits of partner notification for sexually transmitted infections and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Berit; Low, N; Martin Hilber, Adriane

    2013-01-01

    Background European countries have used partner notification as one of a range of measures to control sexually transmitted infections (STI) since the early 1900s. Besides clinical benefits, public health benefits are also recognised such as controlling the spread of STI, reducing STI......-related morbidity and mortality, reaching people with asymptomatic STI and people who do not present for diagnosis, counselling and treatment. Considerable variation in the ways of implementation exists across countries. Differences in laws, policies, regulations and clinical guidelines contribute to this. Health...

  6. The benefit of smart phone usage in liver organ procurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croome, Kris P; Shum, Jeff; Al-Basheer, Mamoun A; Kamei, Hideya; Bloch, Michael; Quan, Douglas; Hernandez-Alejandro, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    A 56-year-old man was on the transplant list with end-stage liver disease secondary to hepatitis C when a donor liver became available at a location 545 km away. The procurement team, consisting of a senior and junior fellow, went on the retrieval, while the staff surgeon remained in the hospital with the recipient. At the time of organ procurement, a suspicious lesion was identified in the left lateral lobe. The transplant fellows took intraoperative pictures of the lesion with a smart phone and sent them to the staff surgeon for advice. A teleconsultation, facilitated by images sent from the smart phone, took place over the next 22 min. The decision was made to proceed with the transplant, as it was felt that the lesion could be resected from the liver allograft. Had the fellows not been able to interact with the staff surgeon in real-time during the surgery, there is a high likelihood that the organ would have been rejected by the staff surgeon due to the unexpected finding. The patient's postoperative course was relatively uneventful with no evidence of infection. The patient was discharged from hospital and continues to do well. We expect that the role of smart phones in remote consultation will continue to expand in future.

  7. Public attitudes to financial incentive models for organs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoeyer, Klaus; Schicktanz, Silke; Deleuran, Ida

    2013-01-01

    Waiting lists for organs have stimulated interest in the use of financial incentives for organ donation (FIs), but the literature does not contain an adequate overview of studies of public attitudes toward this mode of procurement. We conducted a literature review of international peer......-reviewed research published between 2002 and 2012 on how members of the public position themselves toward FIs. We identified and analyzed 23 studies using MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Sociological Abstracts and cross-reference search. The search included whole organs, donation, quantitative and empirical qualitative social...... scientific studies on, public attitudes (excluding professionals and medical students). The review reveals a broad divergence of public opinions on financial incentives. However, quantitative studies showed a low overall level of acceptance of payment for organs in living donation (LD); only a slightly...

  8. Marketing communication practices of public organizations to prevent human trafficking

    OpenAIRE

    T.M. Borysova

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to analyze marketing communicative measures against human trafficking which were implemented by public organizations in 15 regions of Ukraine in 2011-2012. There are following research objectives: to investigate what kind of campaign or program of preventing the potential victims of human trafficking has been used by Ukrainian public organizations during 2011-2012; to determine whether marketing communicative measures have been implement...

  9. Communication and Conflict Management in Local Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela HENER

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Intra-organizational conflict within public institutions represents a topic that, until recently, has been rather ignored in Romania. This article is trying to present the multiple role of communication in solving, controlling and preventing conflicts in local public organizations. The paper presents a set of theoretical models (of conflict and communication in organizations and, based on the data offered by an organizational diagnosis-type research, analyzes the role of communication processes in conflict management and prevention.

  10. Preliminary benefits study for a public service communications satellite system: Task order 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    The economic and social benefits to accrue from an operational public service communications satellite system are estimated for the following applications: teleradiology, emergency medical services, teleconferencing for both civilian and defense agencies, data transfer, remote cardiac monitoring, teleconsultation, continuing education for professionals, and severe storm warning. The potential impact of improved communication on the cost and quality of services are assessed for various agencies, professions, and industries.

  11. The Public Benefit of Energy Efficiency to the State of Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Washington State Office of Trade and Economic Development NCLC National Consumer Law Center NERC North American Electric Reliability Council NOX Nitrogen...Analysis of low-income benefits in determining cost-effectiveness of energy efficiency programs. Washington, D.C. National Consumer Law Center. Jorgenson...A.H. 1990. How Does Public Infrastructure Affect Regional Economic Performance? New England Economic Review 0(0): 11-32. National Consumer Law Center

  12. Information Technology and the Organization Chart of Public Administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zouridis, S.; Snellen, I.Th.M.; van de Donk, W.B.H.J.

    1998-01-01

    To a certain extent the organization chart of public administration is inspired by the doctrines which are offered by public administration science. Some of these doctrines relate to policy implementation and the design of implementing agencies. In this chapter three of these main doctrines are disc

  13. Information Technology and the Organization Chart of Public Administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zouridis, S.; Snellen, I.Th.M.; van de Donk, W.B.H.J.

    1998-01-01

    To a certain extent the organization chart of public administration is inspired by the doctrines which are offered by public administration science. Some of these doctrines relate to policy implementation and the design of implementing agencies. In this chapter three of these main doctrines are

  14. Applying strategic management theories in public sector organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Rosenberg; Ewan, Ferlie

    2016-01-01

    conditions: the degree of administrative autonomy, performance-based budgeting and market-like competition. We give empirical examples drawn from public servives in the UK and Denmark. We call for more exploration of these (and other) strategic management approaches within contemporary public services...... that possibiliteis for applying these theories vary depending on the type of public organizations involved, and are les appropriate in traditional settings but more relevant in autonomized and market-like service-delivery organizations. We further propose that their increased applicability depends on three specific...

  15. Introducing a Technological Change in a Public School Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, A. E.

    A segment of a longitudinal study of the changing management philosophy of a public school organization involves the introduction of a new technology--the use of an integrated information system--in an environment that was to have been prepared for change. The administrators and staff of the organization had participated in a feasibility study…

  16. Benefits of training and development for individuals and teams, organizations, and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinis, Herman; Kraiger, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a review of the training and development literature since the year 2000. We review the literature focusing on the benefits of training and development for individuals and teams, organizations, and society. We adopt a multidisciplinary, multilevel, and global perspective to demonstrate that training and development activities in work organizations can produce important benefits for each of these stakeholders. We also review the literature on needs assessment and pretraining states, training design and delivery, training evaluation, and transfer of training to identify the conditions under which the benefits of training and development are maximized. Finally, we identify research gaps and offer directions for future research.

  17. Citizen expectations of 'academic entrepreneurship' in health research: public science, practical benefit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Fiona A; Painter-Main, Michael; Axler, Renata; Lehoux, Pascale; Giacomini, Mita; Slater, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Responsiveness to citizens as users of technological innovation helps motivate translational research and commercial engagement among academics. Yet, retaining citizen trust and support for research encourages caution in pursuit of commercial science. We explore citizen expectations of the specifically academic nature of commercial science [i.e. academic entrepreneurship (AE)] and the influence of conflict of interest concerns, hopes about practical benefits and general beliefs. We conducted a cross-sectional national opinion survey of 1002 Canadians online in 2010. Approval of AE was moderate (mean 3.2/5, SD 0.84), but varied by entrepreneurial activity. Concern about conflict of interests (COI) was moderate (mean 2.9/5, SD 0.86) and varied by type of concern. An ordinary least-squares regression showed that expectations of practical benefits informed support for AE, specifically that academic-industry collaboration can better address real-world problems; conflict of interest concerns were insignificant. These findings suggest that citizens support AE for its potential to produce practical benefits, but enthusiasm varies and is reduced for activities that may prioritize private over public interests. Further, support exists despite concern about COI, perhaps due to trust in the academic research context. For user engagement in research priority setting, these findings suggest the need to attend to the commercial nature of translational science. For research policy, they suggest the need for governance arrangements for responsible innovation, which can sustain public trust in academic research, and realize the practical benefits that inform public support for AE. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Public perceptions of the risks, benefits and use of natural remedies, pharmaceutical medicines and personalised medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David W; Horne, Rob; Shephard, Elizabeth A

    2013-10-01

    To investigate public perceptions of the benefits, risks and use of a natural remedy, a pharmaceutical medicine and a personalised medicine, tailored to a person's genetic-makeup, to treat illness. In a case-based scenario, groups of participants individually rated the three different treatments of an illness in terms of their perceived benefits, risks and willingness to use, and completed a questionnaire on beliefs about medicines in general. Our study (n=158 adults) revealed a similar perception of a pharmaceutical medicine and a personalised medicine relative to a natural remedy. Contrary to expectation, personalised medicine was rated as no more beneficial and no less risky than a pharmaceutical medicine and was less likely to be used. However, willingness to use each medicine was differentially predicted by general beliefs about medicine. Avoidance of harm predicted willingness to use a natural remedy whereas the beneficial effects of medicines predicted use of a personalised medicine. By contrast, willingness to use a pharmaceutical medicine was predicted by a trade-off between perceived harm, risk of overuse and benefit. Personalised medicine, in the form of a pharmacogenetic approach, has the potential to improve drug efficacy and reduce adverse drug reactions but remains closely allied to public perceptions of pharmaceutical medicine. Nonetheless our data indicate some differentiation with respect to background beliefs on the beneficial effects of personalised medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Public meetings on nuclear waste management: their function and organization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duvernoy, E.G.; Marcus, A.A.; Overcast, T.; Schilling, A.H.

    1981-05-01

    This report focuses on public meetings as a vehicle for public participation in nuclear waste management. The nature of public meetings is reviewed and the functions served by meetings highlighted. The range of participants and their concerns are addressed, including a review of the participants from past nuclear waste management meetings. A sound understanding of the expected participants allows DOE to tailor elements of the meeting, such as notification, format, and agenda to accommodate the attendees. Finally, the report discusses the organization of public meetings on nuclear waste management in order to enhance the DOE's functions for such meetings. Possible structures are suggested for a variety of elements that are relevant prior to, during and after the public meeting. These suggestions are intended to supplement the DOE Public Participation Manual.

  20. Doing and Feeling Research in Public: Queer Organizing for Public Education and Justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meiners, Erica R.; Quinn, Therese M.

    2010-01-01

    Grounded in activism--fighting the implementation of Department of Defense-run schools in a public schools system; organizing to fight the largest national teacher education accreditation agency's removal of sexual orientation and social justice from its accreditation standards; and protesting a state's decision to hold a public meeting for…

  1. An integrated and sustainable EU health information system: national public health institutes' needs and possible benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaert, Petronille; Van Oyen, Herman

    2017-01-01

    Although sound data and health information are at the basis of evidence-based policy-making and research, still no single, integrated and sustainable EU-wide public health monitoring system or health information system exists. BRIDGE Health is working towards an EU health information and data generation network covering major EU health policy areas. A stakeholder consultation with national public health institutes was organised to identify the needs to strengthen the current EU health information system and to identify its possible benefits. Five key issues for improvement were identified: (1) coherence, coordination and sustainability; (2) data harmonization, collection, processing and reporting; (3) comparison and benchmarking; (4) knowledge sharing and capacity building; and (5) transferability of health information into evidence-based policy making. The vision of an improved EU health information system was formulated and the possible benefits in relation to six target groups. Through this consultation, BRIDGE Health has identified the continuous need to strengthen the EU health information system. A better system is about sustainability, better coordination, governance and collaboration among national health information systems and stakeholders to jointly improve, harmonise, standardise and analyse health information. More and better sharing of this comparable health data allows for more and better comparative health research, international benchmarking, national and EU-wide public health monitoring. This should be developed with the view to provide the tools to fight both common and individual challenges faced by the Members States and their politicians.

  2. Motivating Citizens to Participate in Public Policymaking: Identification, Trust and Cost-Benefit Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Antonini

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Under what conditions do citizens of nations and states comply with governmental requests to participate in public policymaking? Drawing on the dual pathway model of collective action (Stürmer & Simon, 2004 but with a focus on compliance with the status quo, rather than participation in collective protest, two studies examined citizens’ motivation to participate in public policymaking. Study 1 (N = 169 was an MTurk hosted survey that recruited participants from California, while Study 2 (N = 198 was a field experiment that recruited participants in Sardinia, Italy. Study 1 measured cost-benefit analyses, societal identification, and willingness to participate in public policymaking. Study 2 repeated the same procedures, with the exception that we manipulated costs of participation, and also measured participants’ trust in government. Study 1 confirmed our initial hypotheses – fewer costs predicted more willingness to participate, as did stronger state identification. However, Study 2 found an interactive effect of costs, identification, and trust on willingness to participate in public policymaking. Results confirm our hypotheses by showing that both costs and identification independently influence willingness to participate in public policymaking. Results also add to the literature by showing that these additive pathways can be influenced by trust in the source of governance.

  3. Cost-Benefit Analysis for Energy Management in Public Buildings: Four Italian Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Astiaso Garcia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Improving energy efficiency in public buildings is one of the main challenges for a sustainable requalification of energy issues and a consequent reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. This paper aims to provide preliminary information about economic costs and energy consumption reductions (benefits of some considered interventions in existing public buildings. Methods include an analysis of some feasible interventions in four selected public buildings. Energy efficiency improvements have been assessed for each feasible intervention. The difference of the building global energy performance index (EPgl has been assessed before and after each intervention. Economic costs of each intervention have been estimated by averaging the amount demanded by different companies for the same intervention. Results obtained show economic costs and the EPgl percentage improvement for each intervention, highlighting and allowing for the comparison of energy consumption reduction and relative economic costs. The research results come from data gathered from four public buildings, and as such they could not be used to generically identify cost-beneficial energy efficiency interventions for every context or building type. However, the data reveals useful cost based considerations for selecting energy efficiency interventions in other public buildings.

  4. Estimating the benefits of public health policies that reduce harmful consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Elizabeth M; Nardinelli, Clark; Lavaty, Rosemarie A

    2015-05-01

    For products such as tobacco and junk food, where policy interventions are often designed to decrease consumption, affected consumers gain utility from improvements in lifetime health and longevity but also lose utility associated with the activity of consuming the product. In the case of anti-smoking policies, even though published estimates of gross health and longevity benefits are up to 900 times higher than the net consumer benefits suggested by a more direct willingness-to-pay estimation approach, there is little recognition in the cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness literature that gross estimates will overstate intrapersonal welfare improvements when utility losses are not netted out. This paper presents a general framework for analyzing policies that are designed to reduce inefficiently high consumption and provides a rule of thumb for the relationship between net and gross consumer welfare effects: where there exists a plausible estimate of the tax that would allow consumers to fully internalize health costs, the ratio of the tax to the per-unit long-term cost can provide an upper bound on the ratio of net to gross benefits. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Public health benefits of strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions: urban land transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodcock, James; Edwards, Phil; Tonne, Cathryn; Armstrong, Ben G; Ashiru, Olu; Banister, David; Beevers, Sean; Chalabi, Zaid; Chowdhury, Zohir; Cohen, Aaron; Franco, Oscar H; Haines, Andy; Hickman, Robin; Lindsay, Graeme; Mittal, Ishaan; Mohan, Dinesh; Tiwari, Geetam; Woodward, Alistair; Roberts, Ian

    2009-12-05

    We used Comparative Risk Assessment methods to estimate the health effects of alternative urban land transport scenarios for two settings-London, UK, and Delhi, India. For each setting, we compared a business-as-usual 2030 projection (without policies for reduction of greenhouse gases) with alternative scenarios-lower-carbon-emission motor vehicles, increased active travel, and a combination of the two. We developed separate models that linked transport scenarios with physical activity, air pollution, and risk of road traffic injury. In both cities, we noted that reduction in carbon dioxide emissions through an increase in active travel and less use of motor vehicles had larger health benefits per million population (7332 disability-adjusted life-years [DALYs] in London, and 12 516 in Delhi in 1 year) than from the increased use of lower-emission motor vehicles (160 DALYs in London, and 1696 in Delhi). However, combination of active travel and lower-emission motor vehicles would give the largest benefits (7439 DALYs in London, 12 995 in Delhi), notably from a reduction in the number of years of life lost from ischaemic heart disease (10-19% in London, 11-25% in Delhi). Although uncertainties remain, climate change mitigation in transport should benefit public health substantially. Policies to increase the acceptability, appeal, and safety of active urban travel, and discourage travel in private motor vehicles would provide larger health benefits than would policies that focus solely on lower-emission motor vehicles.

  6. 45 CFR Exhibit A to Part 12 - Public Benefit Allowance for Transfer of Real Property for Health Purposes 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION DISPOSAL AND UTILIZATION OF SURPLUS REAL PROPERTY FOR PUBLIC HEALTH... Integrated research program Outpatient services Public services Training program Maximum public benefit allowance Hospitals 50 20 20 10 10 20 30 10 10 10 10 100 Clinics 50 20 20 10 10 20 30 100 Nursing Homes...

  7. Dietary sources of omega 3 fatty acids: public health risks and benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, J A; Bibiloni, M M; Sureda, A; Pons, A

    2012-06-01

    Omega 3 fatty acids can be obtained from several sources, and should be added to the daily diet to enjoy a good health and to prevent many diseases. Worldwide, general population use omega-3 fatty acid supplements and enriched foods to get and maintain adequate amounts of these fatty acids. The aim of this paper was to review main scientific evidence regarding the public health risks and benefits of the dietary sources of omega-3 fatty acids. A systematic literature search was performed, and one hundred and forty-five articles were included in the results for their methodological quality. The literature described benefits and risks of algal, fish oil, plant, enriched dairy products, animal-derived food, krill oil, and seal oil omega-3 fatty acids.

  8. Governance of Public Benefit Funds to Promote Innovation in Energy by Addressing Early Adopter Risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paterson, Andrew; Oppenheim, Jerrold; Dubravka Pineda, Maria

    2010-09-15

    Building a better energy future will be expensive, in part, because it will require modernizing energy infrastructure and bringing more innovative technologies to deliver energy more efficiently to consumers with less environmental impact. With the extended recession and turmoil in credit markets in 2008, some states have turned to public benefit funds to address critical risks in adopting innovative energy technologies and systems. This paper updates valuable observations for governing PBFs to promote wider adoption of innovative energy technologies enabling a better balance of risk and return in concert with other policy tools by negotiating mitigation of early adopter risks.

  9. Predictors of public attitude toward living organ donation in Kano, northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliyasu, Zubairu; Abubakar, Isa S; Lawan, Umar M; Abubakar, Mustapha; Adamu, Bappa

    2014-01-01

    Organ shortage is a major public health challenge for transplant programs globally. The sustenance of such programs as an effective therapy for end-stage organ failure (ESOF) requires an exploration of public awareness and willingness to donate organs. This is imperative, especially in developing countries where ESOF is highly prevalent. We studied the awareness and predictors of public attitude toward organ donation in Kano city in northern Nigeria. Using interviewer-administered questionnaires, we assessed the awareness and willingness to donate solid organs among 400 adults in the Kano metropolis. Three hundred and five of the 383 respondents (79.6%) reported that they had heard about organ donation. There was a significant variation of awareness by education and ethnicity (P donate an organ. Gender [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.13; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.40-4.95], educational attainment (AOR = 2.55; 95% CI: 1.35-5.88), marital status (AOR = 4.5; 95% CI: 2.97-9.1), religion (AOR = 3.40; 95% CI: 1.43-8.10) and ethnicity (AOR = 2.36; 95% CI 1.04-5.35) were significant predictors of willingness to donate an organ. Preferred organ recipients were parents (48.9%), children (21.3%), spouses (14.6%) and other relatives (13.4%). Reasons for willingness to donate organs included religion (51.2%), moral obligation (21.4%) and compassion (11.9%), among others. However, there was widespread ignorance of religious precepts concerning organ donation. The high level of awareness and willingness to donate organs in this society could be further enhanced by intensive information, education and communication strategies providing clear messages on societal benefits, religious aspects and bioethical guidance regarding organ donation.

  10. Predictors of public attitude toward living organ donation in Kano, northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubairu Iliyasu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organ shortage is a major public health challenge for transplant programs globally. The sustenance of such programs as an effective therapy for end-stage organ failure (ESOF requires an exploration of public awareness and willingness to donate organs. This is imperative, especially in developing countries where ESOF is highly prevalent. We studied the awareness and predictors of public attitude toward organ donation in Kano city in northern Nigeria. Using interviewer-administered questionnaires, we assessed the awareness and willingness to donate solid organs among 400 adults in the Kano metropolis. Three hundred and five of the 383 respondents (79.6% reported that they had heard about organ donation. There was a significant variation of awareness by education and ethnicity (P <0.05. Most respondents, 303 (79.1%, were willing to donate an organ. Gender [adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 2.13; 95% confidence interval (CI: 1.40-4.95], educational attainment (AOR = 2.55; 95% CI: 1.35-5.88, marital status (AOR = 4.5; 95% CI: 2.97-9.1, religion (AOR = 3.40; 95% CI: 1.43-8.10 and ethnicity (AOR = 2.36; 95% CI 1.04-5.35 were significant predictors of willingness to donate an organ. Preferred organ recipients were parents (48.9%, children (21.3%, spouses (14.6% and other relatives (13.4%. Reasons for willingness to donate organs included religion (51.2%, moral obligation (21.4% and compassion (11.9%, among others. However, there was widespread ignorance of religious precepts concerning organ donation. The high level of awareness and willingness to donate organs in this society could be further enhanced by intensive information, education and communication strategies providing clear messages on societal benefits, religious aspects and bioethical guidance regarding organ donation.

  11. Public Perception of Cadaver Organ Donation in Hunan Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, A J; Xie, W Z; Luo, J J; Ouyang, W

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to (1) survey public' perception and attitudes toward organ donation and (2) analyze the relationship between knowledge, attitudes, and willingness to donate. We developed a questionnaire, and conducted the survey with stratified random sampling. Overall, 600 residents, aged ≥18 who resided in Hunan, and 600 undergraduates from 3 universities in Hunan were surveyed randomly. For this study, 1085 valid questionnaires were completed, with a response rate of 90.4%. Of the 1085 participants, 581 (53.5%) were students, 504 (46.5%) were residents, and 519 (47.8%) were male and 566 (52.2%) female. The mean accuracy rate was 71.96%, and the students' mean accuracy rate was slightly higher than that of the resident population (73.06% vs 70.68%, respectively). The results showed that 82.2% of public support organ donation, and 53.5% were willing to donate their organs after death. Students scored higher than the residents (88% vs 75.6% and 55.6% vs 51.2%). Nearly 1.8% felt that organ donation was against their religion, 14.9% thought it was important to ensure the integrity of the body, 71.7% agreed that organ donation allowed a positive outcome after a person's death, and 61.5% agreed that organ donation represented a continuation of life, to help families cope with grief. Age and gender were related to attitudes. Public knowledge of organ donation and their attitudes were correlated positively (r = 0.666). Public knowledge of organ donation is poor, biased, and incomplete, and based on television, movies, and communication networks. Positive attitudes toward donation displayed in the surveys were not matched by actual organ donation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Renewable Electricity Benefits Quantification Methodology: A Request for Technical Assistance from the California Public Utilities Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, G.; Vimmerstedt, L.

    2009-07-01

    The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) requested assistance in identifying methodological alternatives for quantifying the benefits of renewable electricity. The context is the CPUC's analysis of a 33% renewable portfolio standard (RPS) in California--one element of California's Climate Change Scoping Plan. The information would be used to support development of an analytic plan to augment the cost analysis of this RPS (which recently was completed). NREL has responded to this request by developing a high-level survey of renewable electricity effects, quantification alternatives, and considerations for selection of analytic methods. This report addresses economic effects and health and environmental effects, and provides an overview of related analytic tools. Economic effects include jobs, earnings, gross state product, and electricity rate and fuel price hedging. Health and environmental effects include air quality and related public-health effects, solid and hazardous wastes, and effects on water resources.

  13. Challenges of adopting agile methods in a public organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouko Nuottila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Agile development methods are widely used among business enterprises. Since the introduction of the Agile Manifesto in 2001, several agile methods have been implemented, first in single-team set-ups and later in larger multi-team set-ups for complex Information Technology (IT system development. However, the adoption of agile methods has been slow in the public sector. This is also reflected in the academic literature, as there are only a few studies discussing agile adoption in public organizations. This paper contributes to research on the use of agile practices specifically in the context of public organizations, and sheds light on the challenges a public organization may face while adopting these practices. The aim of this paper is to identify and categorize the challenges that may hinder efficient adoption and use of agile methods in public IT projects that include private software vendors. This research is based on a case study of a large governmental office. As a result, this paper presents several categories of identified challenges, the root causes of these challenges, and a discussion of the characteristics of these challenges for the public sector.

  14. Green roof adoption in atlanta, georgia: the effects of building characteristics and subsidies on net private, public, and social benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Jeffrey D; Lamsal, Madhur; Colson, Greg

    2013-10-01

    This research draws on and expands previous studies that have quantified the costs and benefits associated with conventional roofs versus green roofs. Using parameters from those studies to define alternative scenarios, we estimate from a private, public, and social perspective the costs and benefits of installing and maintaining an extensive green roof in Atlanta, GA. Results indicate net private benefits are a decreasing function of roof size and vary considerably across scenarios. In contrast, net public benefits are highly stable across scenarios, ranging from $32.49 to $32.90 m(-2). In addition, we evaluate two alternative subsidy regimes: (i) a general subsidy provided to every building that adopts a green roof and (ii) a targeted subsidy provided only to buildings for which net private benefits are negative but net public benefits are positive. In 6 of the 12 general subsidy scenarios the optimal public policy is not to offer a subsidy; in 5 scenarios the optimal subsidy rate is between $20 and $27 m(-2); and in 1 scenario the optimal rate is $5 m(-2). The optimal rate with a targeted subsidy is between $20 and $27 m(-2) in 11 scenarios and no subsidy is optimal in the twelfth. In most scenarios, a significant portion of net public benefits are generated by buildings for which net private benefits are positive. This suggests a policy focused on information dissemination and technical assistance may be more cost-effective than direct subsidy payments.

  15. Investment in safe routes to school projects: public health benefits for the larger community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Margaret; Dannenberg, Andrew L

    2008-07-01

    The Safe Routes to School (SRTS) program is designed to encourage active and safe transportation for children to school. This report examines the potential broader impact of these programs on communities within 0.5 mile (0.8 km) of schools. We used a geographic information system to generate estimates of the land area within 0.5 mile of public schools in 4 U.S. Census-defined categories: 37 large urban areas, 428 small urban areas, 1088 metropolitan counties (counties in metropolitan statistical areas excluding the urban areas), and 2048 nonmetropolitan counties. We estimated population at the county level or at the U.S. Census-defined urban-area level using data from the 2000 U.S. Census. In large urban areas, 39.0% of the land area was within 0.5 mile of a public school, and in small urban areas, 26.5% of the land area was within 0.5 mile of a public school. An estimated 65.5 million people in urban areas could benefit from SRTS projects. In nonurban areas, 1% or less of land is within 0.5 mile of a public school. Results suggest that SRTS projects in urban areas can improve the walking and bicycling environment for adults as well as for children, the target users. Investment in SRTS can contribute to increased physical activity among children and adults.

  16. Collaboration across private and public sector primary health care services: benefits, costs and policy implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Julie; Powell Davies, Gawaine; Jayasuriya, Rohan; Fort Harris, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Ongoing care for chronic conditions is best provided by interprofessional teams. There are challenges in achieving this where teams cross organisational boundaries. This article explores the influence of organisational factors on collaboration between private and public sector primary and community health services involved in diabetes care. It involved a case study using qualitative methods. Forty-five participants from 20 organisations were purposively recruited. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and from content analysis of documents. Thematic analysis was used employing a two-level coding system and cross case comparisons. The patterns of collaborative patient care were influenced by a combination of factors relating to the benefits and costs of collaboration and the influence of support mechanisms. Benefits lay in achieving common or complementary health or organisational goals. Costs were incurred in bridging differences in organisational size, structure, complexity and culture. Collaboration was easier between private sector organisations than between private and public sectors. Financial incentives were not sufficient to overcome organisational barriers. To achieve more coordinated primary and community health care structural changes are also needed to better align funding mechanisms, priorities and accountabilities of the different organisations.

  17. Resource and competitive dynamics shape the benefits of public goods cooperation in a plant pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Thomas G; Fuqua, Clay; Bever, James D

    2012-06-01

    Cooperative benefits depend on a variety of ecological factors. Many cooperative bacteria increase the population size of their groups by making a public good available. Increased local population size can alleviate the constraints of kin competition on the evolution of cooperation by enhancing the between-group fitness of cooperators. The cooperative pathogenesis of Agrobacterium tumefaciens causes infected plants to exude opines--resources that provide a nearly exclusive source of nutrient for the pathogen. We experimentally demonstrate that opines provide cooperative A. tumefaciens cells a within-group fitness advantage over saprophytic agrobacteria. Our results are congruent with a resource-consumer competition model, which predicts that cooperative, virulent agrobacteria are at a competitive disadvantage when opines are unavailable, but have an advantage when opines are available at sufficient levels. This model also predicts that freeloading agrobacteria that catabolize opines but cannot infect plants competitively displace the cooperative pathogen from all environments. However, we show that these cooperative public goods also promote increased local population size. A model built from the Price Equation shows that this effect on group size can contribute to the persistence of cooperative pathogenesis despite inherent kin competition for the benefits of pathogenesis.

  18. Benefits on public health from transport-related greenhouse gas mitigation policies in Southeastern European cities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarigiannis, D A; Kontoroupis, P; Nikolaki, S; Gotti, A; Chapizanis, D; Karakitsios, S

    2017-02-01

    Climate change is a major environmental threat of our time. Cities have a significant impact on greenhouse gas emissions as most of the traffic, industry, commerce and more than 50% of world population is situated in urban areas. Southern Europe is a region that faces financial turmoil, enhanced migratory fluxes and climate change pressure. The case study of Thessaloniki is presented, one of the only two cities in Greece with established climate change action plans. The effects of feasible traffic policies in year 2020 are assessed and their potential health impact is compared to a business as usual scenario. Two types of measures are investigated: operation of underground rail in the city centre and changes in fleet composition. Potential co-benefits from reduced greenhouse gas emissions on public health by the year 2020 are computed utilizing state-of-the-art concentration response functions for PMx, NO2 and C6H6. Results show significant environmental health and monetary co-benefits when the city metro is coupled with appropriate changes in the traffic composition. Monetary savings due to avoided mortality or leukaemia incidence corresponding to the reduction in PM10, PM2.5, NO2 and C6H6 exposure will be 56.6, 45, 37.7 and 1.0 million Euros respectively. Promotion of 'green' transportation in the city (i.e. the wide use of electric vehicles), will provide monetary savings from the reduction in PM10, PM2.5, NO2 and C6H6 exposure up to 60.4, 49.1, 41.2 and 1.08 million Euros. Overall, it was shown that the respective GHG emission reduction policies resulted in clear co-benefits in terms of air quality improvement, public health protection and monetary loss mitigation.

  19. Ecological validity and the study of publics: The case for organic public engagement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, Pat J

    2014-01-01

    This essay argues for a method of public engagement grounded in the criteria of ecological validity. Motivated by what Hammersly called the responsibility that comes with intellectual authority: "to seek, as far as possible, to ensure the validity of their conclusions and to participate in rational debate about those conclusions" (1993: 29), organic public engagement follows the empirical turn in citizenship theory and in rhetorical studies of actually existing publics. Rather than shaping citizens into either the compliant subjects of the cynical view or the deliberatively disciplined subjects of the idealist view, organic public engagement instead takes Asen's advice that "we should ask: how do people enact citizenship?" (2004: 191). In short, organic engagement methods engage publics in the places where they already exist and through those discourses and social practices by which they enact their status as publics. Such engagements can generate practical middle-range theories that facilitate future actions and decisions that are attentive to the local ecologies of diverse publics.

  20. The 'Publicness-puzzle' in public leadership. A theoretical exploration of leadership in public organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Dorsman (Stephan); M. Thaens (Marcel); S.M. Groeneveld (Sandra)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Following a contingency approach we argue that the content and style of administrative leadership depends on characteristics of the public context. The purpose of the paper is to develop hypotheses on the relationships between several dimensions of publicness and the content a

  1. The 'Publicness-puzzle' in public leadership. A theoretical exploration of leadership in public organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.J. Dorsman (Stephan); M. Thaens (Marcel); S.M. Groeneveld (Sandra)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAbstract Following a contingency approach we argue that the content and style of administrative leadership depends on characteristics of the public context. The purpose of the paper is to develop hypotheses on the relationships between several dimensions of publicness and

  2. When thoracic organ recipients become abdominal organ donors: sharing the risks and benefits of transplantation: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, S; Swaminathan, R; Irish, A

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand for organ donation has resulted in the use of expanded-criteria donors. Solid organ transplant recipients and potential recipients represent a unique pool of selected organ donors that may help to meet this demand. We present 2 cases, a lung transplant recipient and a patient on the lung transplant waiting list, who became kidney donors to 4 recipients. These donations illustrate the interrelated risks and benefits for transplant recipients who themselves can become unintended, but effective donors. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Application and importance of cost-benefit analysis in energy efficiency projects implemented in public buildings: The case of Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurovic Dejan M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this paper is to present the advantages of using Cost-Benefit analysis in energy efficiency projects implemented in public buildings, and to prove the hypothesis that Cost-Benefit analysis boosts the effectiveness and efficiency of the said type of projects. The paper offers theoretical and practical explanation of the implementation of Cost-Benefit analysis in the relevant area. Since energy efficiency projects in public buildings usually represent a part of a broader portfolio of similar projects and their implementation demands allocation of substantial financial resources, communities are often be interested in achieving maximal economic and non-economic benefits. This paper aims to demonstrate that Cost-Benefit analysis can represent an excellent contribution when attempting to select the projects for implementation within a broader portfolio of energy efficiency projects in public buildings. This hypothesis was demonstrated by putting a greater emphasis on non-economic benefits and the costs arising from implementation of the aforementioned types of projects. In addition, a practical test of this hypothesis was performed through the implementation of an energy efficiency portfolio in public buildings, worth several tens of millions of dollars - the Serbian Energy Efficiency Project. The paper concludes that the use of Cost-Benefit analysis can help us to effectively evaluate and manage projects of this type aimed at achieving maximum benefits for the community in question.

  4. Measuring the Benefits of Public Chargers and Improving Infrastructure Deployments Using Advanced Simulation Tools: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Eric; Neubauer. Jeremy; Burton, Evan

    2015-02-01

    With support from the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed BLAST-V -- the Battery Lifetime Analysis and Simulation Tool for Vehicles. The addition of high-resolution spatial-temporal travel histories enables BLAST-V to investigate user-defined infrastructure rollouts of publically accessible charging infrastructure, as well as quantify impacts on vehicle and station owners in terms of improved vehicle utility and station throughput. This paper presents simulation outputs from BLAST-V that quantify the utility improvements of multiple distinct rollouts of publically available Level 2 electric vehicle supply equipment (EVSE) in the Seattle, Washington, metropolitan area. Publically available data on existing Level 2 EVSE are also used as an input to BLAST-V. The resulting vehicle utility is compared to a number of mock rollout scenarios. Discussion focuses on the estimated number of Level 2 stations necessary to substantially increase vehicle utility and how stations can be strategically sited to maximize their potential benefit to prospective electric vehicle owners.

  5. IT PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT: MODULARITY PROBLEMS IN A PUBLIC ORGANIZATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kristian; Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw

    2012-01-01

    As today’s public and private sector organizations heavily rely on Information Technology (IT) to provide faster cycle times and better services, IT Project Portfolio Management (IT PPM) has become a high priority issue. This research adopts engaged scholarship to investigate IT PPM practices...... suggest a model addressing the identified problems by organizing IT PPM in three modules connected by three gateways. These results may be used to inform further research into IT PPM and to help managers improve IT PPM practices in public organizations. Keywords: IT Project Portfolio Management (IT PPM......, and (2) what modularity mechanisms can be recommended to improve IT PPM? By drawing on the theory’s distinction between visible information and Hidden design parameters five modularity problems are identified: (1) Lack of operational levels strategies, (2) No systematic approach to manage IT project...

  6. How to anticipate the assessment of the public health benefit of new medicines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massol, Jacques; Puech, Alain; Boissel, Jean-Pierre

    2007-01-01

    The Public Health Benefit (PHB) of new medicines is a recent and French-specific criterion (October 1999 decree) which is often only partially documented in the transparency files due to a lack of timely information. At the time of the first reimbursement application for a new medicine to the "Transparency Committee", the file is exclusively based on data from randomised clinical trials. These data are generated from a global clinical development plan which was designed a long time before the new medicine's submission for reimbursement. And this plan does not systematically provide the data needed to assess the PHB. Thus, one easily understands the difficulty to anticipate and document this recent French criterion. In France, the PHB is both one of the necessary criteria for the reimbursement submission and an indicator for the national health policy management. Its assessment also helps to identify the needs and objectives of the post-registration studies (nowadays in the scope of responsibilities of the "Drug Economics Committee"). The assessment of the PHB criterion is carried through after the marketing authorization process and is an addition to it. To understand how to anticipate the assessment of the new medicines' PHB, one needs to consider how it differs from the preliminary step of the marketing authorization process. Whereas the evaluation for marketing authorization seeks to determine if the new medicine could be useful in a specific indication, the PHB assessment aims at quantifying the therapeutic benefit in a population, taking into account the reference treatments in this population. A new medicine receives a marketing authorization based on the data of the registration file which provides information on the clinical benefit of the new medicine in the populations of the trials and in the context of the trials. On the other side, the PHB looks at the effects of the new medicine at the scale of the general population, in real practice. The PHB

  7. Considerations for Public Health Organizations Attempting to Implement a Social Media Presence: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Mark; Stetten, Nichole; Castaneda, Gail

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, social media has become an integral part of our everyday lives, but research on how this tool is used by public health workers and organizations is still developing. Budget cuts and staff reduction in county departments have required employees to take on more responsibilities. These reductions have caused a reduction in the time for training or collaborating with others in the field. To make up for the loss, many employees are seeking collaboration through social media sites but are unable to do so because state departments block these Internet sites. This study sought to highlight the key considerations and decision-making process for a public health organization deciding whether to implement a social media presence for their organization. Using 3 structured interviews, 15 stakeholders were questioned on their personal experience with social media, experience within the context of public health, and their thoughts on implementation for their center. Interviews were coded using constant comparative qualitative methods. The following themes emerged from the interviews: (1) personal experience with technology and social networking sites, (2) use of social networking sites in public health, (3) use of social networking sites in work environments, (4) social networking sites access, (5) ways the Rural South Public Health Training Center could use social networking sites, and (6) perceived outcomes of social networking site usage for the Rural South Public Health Training Center (positive and negative). The collective voice of the center showed a positive perceived perception of social media implementation, with the benefits outweighing the risks. Despite the benefits, there is a cautious skepticism of the importance of social networking site use.

  8. Functional and structural microbial diversity in organic and conventional viticulture: organic farming benefits natural biocontrol agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Moser, Gerit; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele

    2011-03-01

    Statistically significant differences in the structure and function of above-ground grapevine-associated microorganisms from organically and conventionally managed vineyards were found. Aureobasidium pullulans, a copper-detoxifying fungus and biocontrol agent, plays a key role in explaining these differences. The black fungus was strongly enriched in the communities of organically managed plants and yielded a higher indigenous antiphytopathogenic potential.

  9. Association between organizational capacity and involvement in chronic disease prevention programming among Canadian public health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusaik, Nancy; Sabiston, Catherine M; Kishchuk, Natalie; Maximova, Katerina; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    In the context of the emerging field of public health services and systems research, this study (i) tested a model of the relationships between public health organizational capacity (OC) for chronic disease prevention, its determinants (organizational supports for evaluation, partnership effectiveness) and one possible outcome of OC (involvement in core chronic disease prevention practices) and (ii) examined differences in the nature of these relationships among organizations operating in more and less facilitating external environments. OC was conceptualized as skills and resources/supports for chronic disease prevention programming. Data were from a census of 210 Canadian public health organizations with mandates for chronic disease prevention. The hypothesized relationships were tested using structural equation modeling. Overall, the results supported the model. Organizational supports for evaluation accounted for 33% of the variance in skills. Skills and resources/supports were directly and strongly related to involvement. Organizations operating within facilitating external contexts for chronic disease prevention had more effective partnerships, more resources/supports, stronger skills and greater involvement in core chronic disease prevention practices. Results also suggested that organizations functioning in less facilitating environments may not benefit as expected from partnerships. Empirical testing of this conceptual model helps develop a better understanding of public health OC. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A framework for organizing and selecting quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puhan, Milo A; Singh, Sonal; Weiss, Carlos O; Varadhan, Ravi; Boyd, Cynthia M

    2012-11-19

    Several quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment of health care interventions exist but it is unclear how the approaches differ. Our aim was to review existing quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment and to develop an organizing framework that clarifies differences and aids selection of quantitative approaches for a particular benefit-harm assessment. We performed a review of the literature to identify quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment. Our team, consisting of clinicians, epidemiologists, and statisticians, discussed the approaches and identified their key characteristics. We developed a framework that helps investigators select quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment that are appropriate for a particular decisionmaking context. Our framework for selecting quantitative approaches requires a concise definition of the treatment comparison and population of interest, identification of key benefit and harm outcomes, and determination of the need for a measure that puts all outcomes on a single scale (which we call a benefit and harm comparison metric). We identified 16 quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment. These approaches can be categorized into those that consider single or multiple key benefit and harm outcomes, and those that use a benefit-harm comparison metric or not. Most approaches use aggregate data and can be used in the context of single studies or systematic reviews. Although the majority of approaches provides a benefit and harm comparison metric, only four approaches provide measures of uncertainty around the benefit and harm comparison metric (such as a 95 percent confidence interval). None of the approaches considers the actual joint distribution of benefit and harm outcomes, but one approach considers competing risks when calculating profile-specific event rates. Nine approaches explicitly allow incorporating patient preferences. The choice of quantitative approaches depends on the

  11. A framework for organizing and selecting quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puhan Milo A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment of health care interventions exist but it is unclear how the approaches differ. Our aim was to review existing quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment and to develop an organizing framework that clarifies differences and aids selection of quantitative approaches for a particular benefit-harm assessment. Methods We performed a review of the literature to identify quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment. Our team, consisting of clinicians, epidemiologists, and statisticians, discussed the approaches and identified their key characteristics. We developed a framework that helps investigators select quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment that are appropriate for a particular decisionmaking context. Results Our framework for selecting quantitative approaches requires a concise definition of the treatment comparison and population of interest, identification of key benefit and harm outcomes, and determination of the need for a measure that puts all outcomes on a single scale (which we call a benefit and harm comparison metric. We identified 16 quantitative approaches for benefit-harm assessment. These approaches can be categorized into those that consider single or multiple key benefit and harm outcomes, and those that use a benefit-harm comparison metric or not. Most approaches use aggregate data and can be used in the context of single studies or systematic reviews. Although the majority of approaches provides a benefit and harm comparison metric, only four approaches provide measures of uncertainty around the benefit and harm comparison metric (such as a 95 percent confidence interval. None of the approaches considers the actual joint distribution of benefit and harm outcomes, but one approach considers competing risks when calculating profile-specific event rates. Nine approaches explicitly allow incorporating patient preferences

  12. The public health benefits of insulation retrofits in existing housing in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishioka Yurika

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methodological limitations make it difficult to quantify the public health benefits of energy efficiency programs. To address this issue, we developed a risk-based model to estimate the health benefits associated with marginal energy usage reductions and applied the model to a hypothetical case study of insulation retrofits in single-family homes in the United States. Methods We modeled energy savings with a regression model that extrapolated findings from an energy simulation program. Reductions of fine particulate matter (PM2.5 emissions and particle precursors (SO2 and NOx were quantified using fuel-specific emission factors and marginal electricity analyses. Estimates of population exposure per unit emissions, varying by location and source type, were extrapolated from past dispersion model runs. Concentration-response functions for morbidity and mortality from PM2.5 were derived from the epidemiological literature, and economic values were assigned to health outcomes based on willingness to pay studies. Results In total, the insulation retrofits would save 800 TBTU (8 × 1014 British Thermal Units per year across 46 million homes, resulting in 3,100 fewer tons of PM2.5, 100,000 fewer tons of NOx, and 190,000 fewer tons of SO2 per year. These emission reductions are associated with outcomes including 240 fewer deaths, 6,500 fewer asthma attacks, and 110,000 fewer restricted activity days per year. At a state level, the health benefits per unit energy savings vary by an order of magnitude, illustrating that multiple factors (including population patterns and energy sources influence health benefit estimates. The health benefits correspond to $1.3 billion per year in externalities averted, compared with $5.9 billion per year in economic savings. Conclusion In spite of significant uncertainties related to the interpretation of PM2.5 health effects and other dimensions of the model, our analysis demonstrates that a risk

  13. Innovative work behaviour in knowledge-intensive public sector organizations: the case of supervisors in the Netherlands fire services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-Nehles, Anna; Bondarouk, Tanya; Nijenhuis, Koen

    2016-01-01

    Studying innovative employee behaviours within knowledge-intensive public sector organizations (KIPSOs) might seem an odd thing to do given the lack of competitive pressures, the limited identification of the costs and benefits of innovative ideas and the lack of opportunities to incentivize employe

  14. Innovative work behaviour in knowledge-intensive public sector organizations: the case of supervisors in the Netherlands fire services

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos-Nehles, Anna; Bondarouk, Tanya; Nijenhuis, Koen

    2017-01-01

    Studying innovative employee behaviours within knowledge-intensive public sector organizations (KIPSOs) might seem an odd thing to do given the lack of competitive pressures, the limited identification of the costs and benefits of innovative ideas and the lack of opportunities to incentivize employe

  15. Public voices in pharmaceutical deliberations: negotiating "clinical benefit" in the FDA's Avastin Hearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teston, Christa B; Graham, S Scott; Baldwinson, Raquel; Li, Andria; Swift, Jessamyn

    2014-06-01

    This article offers a hybrid rhetorical-qualitative discourse analysis of the FDA's 2011 Avastin Hearing, which considered the revocation of the breast cancer indication for the popular cancer drug Avastin. We explore the multiplicity of stakeholders, the questions that motivated deliberations, and the kinds of evidence presented during the hearing. Pairing our findings with contemporary scholarship in rhetorical stasis theory, Mol's (2002) construct of multiple ontologies, and Callon, Lascoumes, and Barthe's (2011) "hybrid forums," we demonstrate that the FDA's deliberative procedures elides various sources of evidence and the potential multiplicity of definitions for "clinical benefit." Our findings suggest that while the FDA invited multiple stakeholders to offer testimony, there are ways that the FDA might have more meaningfully incorporated public voices in the deliberative process. We conclude with suggestions for how a true hybrid forum might be deployed.

  16. Can midlevel dental providers be a benefit to the American public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Tobias E; Galka, Audrey L; Lacy, Ernestine S; Pellegrini, August D; Sweier, Domenica G; Romito, Laura M

    2013-05-01

    The use of midlevel dental providers (MLDPs) is being debated as a means of reducing oral health disparities and increasing access to care among underserved populations. Midlevel dental providers include the advanced dental hygiene practitioner, community dental health coordinator, dental health aide therapist, and dental therapist. While midlevel providers are new to the U.S. dental profession, medicine has utilized these positions for years. Medical literature has shown mixed results as to whether midlevel providers improve access to care and increased practice efficiency, however, it has demonstrated clearly that the quality of care outcomes of these providers have been comparable to those of physicians. Studies of MLDPs suggest potential practice and public health benefits. With appropriate training, licensure, supervision, and deployment to geographical areas of significant need, we believe MLDPs could increase access to care to underserved populations and help in the prevention of deaths attributable to untreated dental disease.

  17. CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF MARKETING STRATEGIC PLANNING SPECIFIC TO PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Florin Tudor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In public services, the political component of the marketing environment has a major importance, as all decisions adopted within central administration influence both the objectives and measures implemented by units of local government and other public service providers. Any discontinuity in the activity of such entities might result in neglecting the real needs of citizens and slowing the reform process in the public sector. Therefore, all initiatives of public organizations must have a unitary goal and integrate harmoniously within a single process. A tool from the management-marketing literature that both contributes to this purpose and leads to an increased customer satisfaction and organizational performance is strategic marketing planning. This paper presents, firstly, requirements and particularities of this process in the public sector, focusing on the need for bottom-up planning, meaning from the functional levels of public service organizations, to the corporate level, where strategic decisions are taken. To achieve this goal, there should be included in the planning process the clients and other audiences, which can provide useful information about the services they want, the quality or the accessibility thereof, and news about the services they need in the future. There are also mentioned the factors that can influence the quality of strategic marketing planning in public services domain: the importance of marketing within the organization, marketing knowledge of employees in marketing departments and/or of management personnel, the efficiency of activities within the organization, and the manager’s marketing vision. In the final part of the paper there are presented the stages of the conceptual model of strategic marketing planning in public services field: (1 accepting the idea of bottom-up planning, (2 avoid or eliminate discrepancies between measures taken at high levels and executions carried out at operational

  18. Managing Effective Organization: Public Administration and the Competing Values Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John ROHRBAUGH

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As we begin to develop the curriculum of public administration for the next century, one fundamental question remains unanswered. By what standards do we judge the effectiveness of government agencies? Our students will be leading some of the most important organizations in their countries, if not in the world. Our charge is to prepare them for distinguished management careers in which through thoughtful redesign they will be responsible for the creation of far better organizational structures and processes than existed in this decade or the last. To design curriculum appropriate to this challenge, we must be guided by a better understanding of effective and ineffective performance in the public sector.

  19. The effectiveness of the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020 to increase the level of organic public procurement in Danish public kitchens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Nørgaard; Tetens, Inge; Løje, Hanne;

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To measure the effect of organic food conversion projects on the percentage of organic food used in Danish public kitchens participating in the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020. Design: The current longitudinal study was based on measurements of organic food percentages in Danish public...... kitchens before and after kitchen employees participated in conversion projects. Setting: Public kitchens participating in the nine organic food conversion projects under the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020, initiated during autumn 2012 and spring 2013 and completed in summer 2015. Subjects: A total of 622...... public kitchens. Results: The average (median) increase in organic food percentage from baseline to follow-up was 24 percentage points (P...

  20. Defining the Impact of Public Administration Programmes for Public Sector Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broucker, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    In times of financial and economic crises, public organizations seem to cut their budgets for training and education, especially when the impact of a programme is questioned. Therefore, PA programmes need to clarify what impact can be expected and what individual and organizational processes are influencing the impact of a PA programme on the…

  1. The logical underpinnings and benefits of pooled pharmaceutical procurement: a pragmatic role for our public institutions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff-Rousselle, Maggie

    2012-11-01

    Multi-national pharmaceutical companies have long operated across national boundaries, and exercised significant leverage because of the breadth and depth of their market control. The goals of public health can be better served by redressing the imbalance in market leverage between supply and demand. Consolidation of purchasing power across borders, as well as within countries across organizational entities, is one means to addressing this imbalance. In those existing pooled procurement models that consolidate purchasing across national boundaries, benefits have included: 1) reductions in unit purchase prices; 2) improved quality assurance; 3) reduction or elimination of procurement corruption; 4) rationalized choice through better-informed selection and standardization; 5) reduction of operating costs and administrative burden; 6) increased equity between members; 7) augmented practical utility in the role of the host institutions (regional or international) administering the system; and finally, 8) increased access to essential medical products within each participating country. Many barriers to implementation of a multi-country pooled procurement system are eliminated when the mechanism is established within a regional or international institution, especially where participating countries are viewed (and view themselves) as clients/members of the institution, so that they have some sense of ownership over the procurement mechanism. This review article is based on two literature reviews, conducted between 2007 and 2009 (including publications from 1996 through 2009), and interviews with key informants.

  2. Public service allocation, social utility and spillover effects: a revised benefit incidence approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mainardi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In many developing countries, public service provision continues to fall short of demand. In the presence of severe infrastructure backlogs and different returns on public investment expenditure, marginal benefit incidence theory envisages that measures aimed at maximizing average access rates have contradictory impacts in the medium term. While relatively uniform expansion of access coverage across target areas can be achieved in some sectors, geographical disparities may persist or worsen in others. This study revises and extends a previous modeling approach by testing for endogenous eligibility, geographically-varying functional relationships, and number of uncompensated losers (numbers effect as an additional social welfare objective. Relative to medium-term changes in access rates in primary schools and healthcare, spatial and geographically weighted regression models are applied to districts in Niger. Results point to an eligibility threshold which exceeds the average coverage rate for primary education, some evidence of numbers effect as a target for healthcare, and substantial spatial heterogeneity particularly for primary schools.

  3. Dentists' experience with low-income patients benefiting from a public insurance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pegon-Machat, E; Tubert-Jeannin, S; Loignon, C; Landry, A; Bedos, C

    2009-08-01

    France has a system of public coverage that guarantees low-income earners full payment of basic dental health costs. In spite of this coverage and major needs for care, deprived populations have lower access to dental care. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore dentists' experience with low-income patients benefiting from the French universal healthcare coverage system. This study is based on 17 one-on-one semistructured interviews carried out with French private dentists. Dentists distinguished two categories of low-income patients: 'good patients', described as being regular attenders; and 'bad patients', whose main characteristic is irregular attendance. Dentists explained that they have difficulties in dealing with patients who do not keep their appointments. First, dentists feel that they fail in conducting their mission of being a care provider (therapeutic failure). The absence of the patient is also seen as a lack of recognition (relationship failure). Furthermore, dentists do not earn money when patients miss their appointments (financial failure). In this context, many dentists feel discouraged and powerless (personal failure). Moreover, dentists do not understand why patients renounce the dental-care opportunities offered under the system of public coverage (failure of the system). Dentists who repeatedly experience failures related to irregular attendance tend to adopt exclusion strategies.

  4. Marketing communication practices of public organizations to prevent human trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.M. Borysova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to analyze marketing communicative measures against human trafficking which were implemented by public organizations in 15 regions of Ukraine in 2011-2012. There are following research objectives: to investigate what kind of campaign or program of preventing the potential victims of human trafficking has been used by Ukrainian public organizations during 2011-2012; to determine whether marketing communicative measures have been implemented on the basis of previously carried out researches for determining effective preventive methods and to find out if they were addressed to a target group of potential victims; to analyze the material used for the campaigns or programs and its dissemination. The results of the analysis. The analysis of data obtained from 15 investigated regions makes it possible to draw the following results: active informing of society about human trafficking by public organizations and authorities took place in 2011-2012, but their measures were not coordinated, communications were not integrated, without clearly defined executors, time frames, criteria of evaluation and were not based on previous researches. Monitoring of implementation of measures was not carried out by authorities. All target audiences were not reached; the choice of the target market and methodology of preventive work was based on previous researches; their actions were directed on target audiences of communications, which both are the population in general and potential victims, establishments aiding victims of trafficking in human beings, central executive authorities, local executive authorities; public organizations have used the following channels of communication: personal communications in forms of training, seminars, press-conferences, different outdoor actions, consultations on human trafficking combating by «hot line»; there is a problem of common, standardized, objective state statistics in the

  5. Public Opinion on Organ Donation After Death and Its Influence on Attitudes Toward Organ Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijing, Luo; Wenzhao, Xie; Wei, Wei; Qiquan, Wan; Xuantong, Deng

    2016-08-18

    BACKGROUND China officially launched a pilot program of organ donation after cardiac death to overcome the shortage of available organs since 2011. Voluntary organ donation by deceased citizens became the only source of transplant organs beginning January 1, 2015. To investigate public opinions on organ donation by deceased donors, and discuss the effect of these opinions on the willingness and attitude of the public regarding voluntary organ donation. MATERIAL AND METHODS We designed a questionnaire. The survey was conducted from December 2014 to January 2015 in Changsha City, and 417 valid questionnaires were recovered. RESULTS A total of 162 respondents explicitly expressed a willingness to donate organs, and 269 believed that the organ donors' relatives should be compensated. A total of 255 respondents thought it acceptable to complete the donation-consent form when receiving a driver's license. Among the respondents, 65.3% did not agree with the statement "My body is bestowed by my parents, and to donate my body parts would not display filial respect"; 88.9% agreed that "It is necessary to consider the willingness of my family"; 74.4% agreed that "Donated organs have not been fairly and appropriately used; the wealthy and celebrities have been favored"; and 61.4% agreed that "Organ donation laws and regulations are not well developed, and organ donations will result in unnecessary difficulties." More than 80% believed that organ donation and transplantation extend life. CONCLUSIONS Public opinions on organ donation after death are associated with various factors, including traditional values, religious beliefs, compensation mechanisms, donor registration, institutional credibility, and ideals.

  6. Understanding implementation in complex public organizations – implication for practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gry Cecilie Høiland

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The effective implementation of politically initiated public service innovations to the front-lines of the public service organization, where the innovation is to be applied, is a challenge that both practitioners and researchers struggle to solve. We highlight the importance of analysing contextual factors at several levels of the implementation system, as well as the importance of considering how the practical everyday work situations of the front-line workers influence their application of the innovation in question. We illustrate this by exploring the implementation process of a specific work inclusion measure, looking at its wider context and some of its implementation outcomes at a specific public agency. The intention is to illustrate the significance of considering the contextual complexity influencing implementation work as a reminder for practitioners to take this into account in their planning and practices.

  7. Mystery shopping as a quality adjunct in public health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, R

    1995-12-01

    Public health in Australia is undergoing unprecedented emphasis on meeting customers' needs, wants and expectations. Mystery shopping, common in the commercial world, has much to offer health organizations in their push towards quality. This paper describes this inexpensive technique and reports on its use in North West Health Service, a large rural health provider. The potential exists for its widescale adoption in health to better meet customer focus objectives.

  8. Organizing public good provision: Lessons from managerial accounting

    OpenAIRE

    Arruñada, Benito; Hansen, Stephen Eliot

    2014-01-01

    This paper applies ideas and findings from Managerial Accounting to the problem of public good provision. It first links the problems of traditional bureaucracies with those of "discretionary expense centers", which are characterized by poor user and supplier incentives as well as overproduction. It then describes alternative hybrid organizations that delegate authority and provide incentives on some dimensions, while maintaining control on others. Finally, it illustrates the ideas with sever...

  9. Selecting Large Portfolios of Social Projects in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Litvinchev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We address the portfolio selection of social projects in public organizations considering interdependencies (synergies affecting project funds requirements and tasks. A mixed integer linear programming model is proposed incorporating the most relevant aspects of the problem found in the literature. The model supports both complete (all or nothing and partial (a certain amount from a given interval of funding resource allocation policies. Numerical results for large-scale problem instances are presented.

  10. World Health Organization and disease surveillance: Jeopardizing global public health?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin Genest, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Health issues now evolve in a global context. Real-time global surveillance, global disease mapping and global risk management characterize what have been termed 'global public health'. It has generated many programmes and policies, notably through the work of the World Health Organization. This globalized form of public health raises, however, some important issues left unchallenged, including its effectiveness, objectivity and legitimacy. The general objective of this article is to underline the impacts of WHO disease surveillance on the practice and theorization of global public health. By using the surveillance structure established by the World Health Organization and reinforced by the 2005 International Health Regulations as a case study, we argue that the policing of 'circulating risks' emerged as a dramatic paradox for global public health policy. This situation severely affects the rationale of health interventions as well as the lives of millions around the world, while travestying the meaning of health, disease and risks. To do so, we use health surveillance data collected by the WHO Disease Outbreak News System in order to map the impacts of global health surveillance on health policy rationale and theory.

  11. Principles for building public-private partnerships to benefit food safety, nutrition, and health research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Sylvia; Alexander, Nick; Kretser, Alison; Steele, Robert; Kretsch, Molly; Applebaum, Rhona; Clydesdale, Fergus; Cummins, Deborah; Hentges, Eric; Navia, Juan; Jarvis, Ashley; Falci, Ken

    2013-10-01

    The present article articulates principles for effective public-private partnerships (PPPs) in scientific research. Recognizing that PPPs represent one approach for creating research collaborations and that there are other methods outside the scope of this article, PPPs can be useful in leveraging diverse expertise among government, academic, and industry researchers to address public health needs and questions concerned with nutrition, health, food science, and food and ingredient safety. A three-step process was used to identify the principles proposed herein: step 1) review of existing PPP guidelines, both in the peer-reviewed literature and at 16 disparate non-industry organizations; step 2) analysis of relevant successful or promising PPPs; and step 3) formal background interviews of 27 experienced, senior-level individuals from academia, government, industry, foundations, and non-governmental organizations. This process resulted in the articulation of 12 potential principles for establishing and managing successful research PPPs. The review of existing guidelines showed that guidelines for research partnerships currently reside largely within institutions rather than in the peer-reviewed literature. This article aims to introduce these principles into the literature to serve as a framework for dialogue and for future PPPs.

  12. Public health benefits of strategies to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions: food and agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friel, Sharon; Dangour, Alan D; Garnett, Tara; Lock, Karen; Chalabi, Zaid; Roberts, Ian; Butler, Ainslie; Butler, Colin D; Waage, Jeff; McMichael, Anthony J; Haines, Andy

    2009-12-12

    Agricultural food production and agriculturally-related change in land use substantially contribute to greenhouse-gas emissions worldwide. Four-fifths of agricultural emissions arise from the livestock sector. Although livestock products are a source of some essential nutrients, they provide large amounts of saturated fat, which is a known risk factor for cardiovascular disease. We considered potential strategies for the agricultural sector to meet the target recommended by the UK Committee on Climate Change to reduce UK emissions from the concentrations recorded in 1990 by 80% by 2050, which would require a 50% reduction by 2030. With use of the UK as a case study, we identified that a combination of agricultural technological improvements and a 30% reduction in livestock production would be needed to meet this target; in the absence of good emissions data from Brazil, we assumed for illustrative purposes that the required reductions would be the same for our second case study in São Paulo city. We then used these data to model the potential benefits of reduced consumption of livestock products on the burden of ischaemic heart disease: disease burden would decrease by about 15% in the UK (equivalent to 2850 disability-adjusted life-years [DALYs] per million population in 1 year) and 16% in São Paulo city (equivalent to 2180 DALYs per million population in 1 year). Although likely to yield benefits to health, such a strategy will probably encounter cultural, political, and commercial resistance, and face technical challenges. Coordinated intersectoral action is needed across agricultural, nutritional, public health, and climate change communities worldwide to provide affordable, healthy, low-emission diets for all societies.

  13. Garden roof in the southwest for environmental benefits : the School of Public Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaack, K.A. [Roof Consultants Inst., Raleigh, NC (United States). Green Roof Research Committee]|[Roofing Contractors Assoc. of Texas, Pflugerville, TX (United States)]|[Gulf Coast Roof Management Inst., Houston, TX (United States)

    2004-07-01

    . Random watering was performed to help establish the various plants. The progress of the plants was monitored to determine the best suited plants for this application according to weather characteristics of Houston in terms of high humidity, high heat, pollution, and torrential downpours. The primary benefits include heat load reduction, roof membrane protection, and water run-off control. Other benefits provided by this garden roof were better air quality, creating green space, and offering an instrument for education to increase public awareness of green roof technology. 4 tabs., 21 figs.

  14. High rates of adherence and treatment success in a public and public-private HIV clinic in India: potential benefits of standardized national care delivery systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heylen Elsa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The massive scale-up of antiretroviral treatment (ART access worldwide has brought tremendous benefit to populations affected by HIV/AIDS. Optimising HIV care in countries with diverse medical systems is critical; however data on best practices for HIV healthcare delivery in resource-constrained settings are limited. This study aimed to understand patient characteristics and treatment outcomes from different HIV healthcare settings in Bangalore, India. Methods Participants from public, private and public-private HIV healthcare settings were recruited between 2007 and 2009 and were administered structured interviews by trained staff. Self-reported adherence was measured using the visual analogue scale to capture adherence over the past month, and a history of treatment interruptions (defined as having missed medications for more than 48 hours in the past three months. In addition, CD4 count and viral load (VL were measured; genotyping for drug resistance-associated mutations was performed on those who were in virological failure (VL > 1000 copies/ml. Results A total of 471 individuals were included in the analysis (263 from the public facility, 149 from the public-private facility and 59 from the private center. Private facility patients were more likely to be male, with higher education levels and incomes. More participants reported ≥ 95% adherence among public and public-private groups compared to private participants (public 97%; private 88%; public-private 93%, p Conclusions Adherence and treatment success was significantly higher among patients from public and public-private settings compared with patients from private facilities. These results suggest a possible benefit of the standardized care delivery system established in public and public-private health facilities where counselling by a multi-disciplinary team of workers is integral to provision of ART. Strengthening and increasing public-private partnerships can

  15. Transformational Leadership Type in Public and Private Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Rus

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The issue concerning leadership is a very complex one, that is why taking into the account theplurity of styles already existent many times it was asked the questions: „What type of leadership isnecessary?”. By asking this question, we are thinking of a person responsible with organizing or coordinatingwork or the ones hired to do this, to think of what people want, to solve the management problems in group.This study is intended as a comparison of the two types of leadership (transformational vs. transactional interms of employee performance in public and private organizations. To measure performance and chose twoindicators: satisfaction and productivity. This study falls into the category of research studies the type ofdriving through subordinates with both theoretical and practical implications. The efficiency of this type ofleadership has been demonstrated by studies especially in the political and military and very few studies havebeen made in industrial .Type of transformational leadership is better than transactional perceived astransformational leaders are closer to the needs of employees and continuously investigate these necessities.This paper presents a practical validity as advising managers to develop a transformational type of leadership,both public and private organizations, leads to better performance. Also open new avenues of research,among which we can mention: study the impact of organizational culture on the adoption of transformationaltype vs transactional type; decision-making mechanisms in the type of transformational leadership; initiatetraining programs to develop a transformational type of leadership.

  16. Innovative Methods for the Benefit of Public Health Using Space Technologies for Disaster Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinas, Petros C; Mueller, Christian; Clark, Nathan; Elgin, Tim; Nasseri, S Ali; Yaffe, Etai; Madry, Scott; Clark, Jonathan B; Asrar, Farhan

    2015-06-01

    Space applications have evolved to play a significant role in disaster relief by providing services including remote sensing imagery for mitigation and disaster damage assessments; satellite communication to provide access to medical services; positioning, navigation, and timing services; and data sharing. Common issues identified in past disaster response and relief efforts include lack of communication, delayed ordering of actions (eg, evacuations), and low levels of preparedness by authorities during and after disasters. We briefly summarize the Space for Health (S4H) Team Project, which was prepared during the Space Studies Program 2014 within the International Space University. The S4H Project aimed to improve the way space assets and experiences are used in support of public health during disaster relief efforts. We recommend an integrated solution based on nano-satellites or a balloon communication system, mobile self-contained relief units, portable medical scanning devices, and micro-unmanned vehicles that could revolutionize disaster relief and disrupt different markets. The recommended new system of coordination and communication using space assets to support public health during disaster relief efforts is feasible. Nevertheless, further actions should be taken by governments and organizations in collaboration with the private sector to design, test, and implement this system.

  17. Computing what the public wants: some issues in road safety cost-benefit analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauer, Ezra

    2011-01-01

    In road safety, as in other fields, cost-benefit analysis (CBA) is used to justify the investment of public money and to establish priority between projects. It amounts to a computation by which 'few' - the CB analysts - aim to determine what the 'many' - those on behalf of which the choice is to be made - would choose. The question is whether there are grounds to believe that the tool fits the aim. I argue that the CBA tool is deficient. First, because estimates of the value of statistical life and injury on which the CBA computation rests are all over the place, inconsistent with the value of time estimates, and government guidance on the matter appears to be arbitrary. Second, because the premises of New Welfare Economics on which the CBA is founded apply only in circumstances which, in road safety, are rare. Third, because the CBA requires the computation of present values which must be questioned when the discounting is of future lives and of time. Because time savings are valued too highly when compared to life and because discounting tends to unjustifiably diminish the value of lives saved in the future, the CBA tends to bias decisions against investment in road safety.

  18. What is the benefit of organically-reared dairy cattle? Societal perception towards conventional and organic dairy farming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inken Christoph-Schulz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, current systems in agriculture and food production have been topic in public discussions. Especially modern animal husbandry seems not to match consumers’ or societal needs any longer. This paper concentrates on the society’s perspective regarding dairy farming in general and diverting perceptions and expectations with respect to dairy cattle either reared organically or reared conventionally. It aims to give orientation to farmers as well as policymakers about the societal point of view of dairy farming.Six focus groups were carried out in three German cities to capture the scope of opinions and expectations among the population. Three of those groups consisted of participants buying mainly organic food while the other three comprised citizens buying mainly conventional food.With respect to society’s perception of today’s dairy farming results showed that participants put emphasis on the following topics: the space for each cow was considered as insufficient and not species-appropriate, assumed application of medications as too high, and in particular the prophylactic use of antibiotics as problematic.Asked about perceived differences between organic versus conventional farming it became obvious that organic in contrast to the conventional farming was perceived as more species-appropriate. More or less, all previously criticized aspects seem to be regarded as irrelevant in organic farming. Some participants showed a very romantic view of organic dairy farming. The most critical point was an assumed high rate of rogue traders among organic farmers.

  19. IT PROJECT PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT: MODULARITY PROBLEMS IN A PUBLIC ORGANIZATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kristian; Mengiste, Shegaw Anagaw

    2012-01-01

    information across units and sub units, (3) No standard processes for submitting IT projects proposals, (4) No centralized IT project selection process, and (5) Lack of centralized follow up process on IT Projects across units and subunits. Based on data and by using recommendations from Modularity theory, we...... within a large local government. The investigation applies Modularity theory to analyze rich data from the local government covering several units with quite diverse functions to address the following two questions (1) which modularity problems does a public organization have in its IT PPM practices...

  20. Factors influencing public risk-benefit considerations of nanotechnology: Assessing the effects of mass media, interpersonal communication, and elaborative processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Shirley S; Scheufele, Dietram A; Corley, Elizabeth A

    2013-07-01

    This study examines the influence of mass media, interpersonal communication, and elaborative processing on public perception of benefits and risks of nanotechnology, based on a large-scale nationally representative telephone survey of U.S. adult citizens. Results indicate that cognitive processes in the form of news elaboration had a significant positive main effect on benefits outweigh risks perception. The influences of attention to science in newspapers, attention to science news on television, and interpersonal communication about science on public perception of benefits outweigh risks were moderated by elaborative processing, after controlling for socio-demographic variables, religious beliefs, trust in scientists, and scientific knowledge. The findings highlight the importance of elaborative processing when it comes to understanding how the mass media differentially influence public benefits outweigh risks perception of emerging technologies. Specifically, high elaborative processing emphasizes higher levels of perceived benefits outweigh risks than low elaborative processing. This study explores explanations for this phenomenon and offers implications for future research and policy.

  1. Decision Theory and Risk Management in Public Organizations: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Cienfuegos Spikin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Public risk management is becoming accepted and promoted by practitioners, scholars and governments in the public sector. Decision Theory is implicitly contained by the risk management process, since risk management depends on rules derived from general knowledge and precepts of Decision Theory (Vaughan 1997. Once a risk has been past the assessment phase, a decision must be made regarding what –if anything– should be done, thus different approaches to risk management decisions are possible. This article discuss the most classic normative methods for decision making in the context of public entities, elements that could be used to support these types of organizations in the assessment of risk strategies. After studying the difficulties of the rational methodology of decision making and in particular the methods of Cost Benefit Analysis and Multi CriteriaAnalysis, we review the descriptive approaches used to explain decisions in the field of public policy, such as Bounded Rationality, Rules of Thumb, Incrementalism and Mixed Scanning, frameworks which might provide us with further explanations in terms of how local public decision makers formulate choices about risk options.

  2. [Multilevel Analysis in Health Services Research in Healthcare Organizations: Benefits, Requirements and Implementation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansmann, L; Kuhr, K; Kowalski, C

    2017-03-01

    Multilevel Analysis (MLA) are still rarely used in Health Services Research in Germany, though hierarchical data, e. g. from patients clustered in hospitals, is often present. MLA provide the valuable opportunity to study the health care context in health care organizations and the associations between context and health care outcomes. This article's aims are to introduce this particular method of data analysis, to discuss its' benefits and its' applicability particularly for Health Services Research focusing on organizational characteristics and to provide a concise guideline for performing the analysis. First, the benefits and the necessity for MLA compared to ordinary correlation analyses in the case of hierarchical data are discussed. Furthermore, the statistical requirements and key decisions for the performance of MLA are illustrated. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Teaching the Importance and Use of Web-Based Services to Assist Clients in Obtaining Public Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eamon, Mary Keegan; Wu, Chi-Fang; Moroney, Gabriela; Cundari, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that social work students and practitioners are not particularly sensitive to assessing clients' economic hardship, nor when needed to assist clients in accessing relevant resources such as public benefits. To enhance students' understanding of the importance of engaging in these activities, this article provides…

  4. Who Benefits from Public Education Spending in Malawi? Results from the Recent Education Reform. World Bank Discussion Paper No. 350.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Leal, Florencia

    This study uses the Benefit Incidence Analysis to examine the distribution of public spending across different socioeconomic groups before and after the government of Malawi made great changes in educational policy in 1994. Primary education was made the top priority with increased spending on education and primary school fees abolished. The…

  5. Benefit Incidence Analysis of Government Spending on Public-Private Partnership Schooling under Universal Secondary Education Policy in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wokadala, J.; Barungi, M.

    2015-01-01

    The study establishes whether government spending on private universal secondary education (USE) schools is equitable across quintiles disaggregated by gender and by region in Uganda. The study employs benefit incidence analysis tool on the Uganda National Panel Survey (UNPS 2009/10) data to establish the welfare impact of public subsidy on…

  6. Public health department response to mercury poisoning: the importance of biomarkers and risks and benefits analysis for chelation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Charles A

    2013-12-01

    Chelation therapy is often used to treat mercury poisoning. Public health personnel are often asked about mercury toxicity and its treatment. This paper provides a public health department response to use of a mercury-containing cosmetic in Minnesota, a perspective on two unpublished cases of chelation treatment for postulated mercury toxicity, and comments on the use of a nonsystemic treatment for removal of mercury following the Iraqi seed coat poisoning incident. Physicians should evaluate sources of exposure, biomarkers, and risks and benefits before recommending chelation therapy for their patients. Potential risks to chelation therapy and its little understood subtle or latent effects are areas of public health concern.

  7. Scenario analysis of the benefit of municipal organic-waste composting over landfill, Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seng, Bunrith; Hirayama, Kimiaki; Katayama-Hirayama, Keiko; Ochiai, Satoru; Kaneko, Hidehiro

    2013-01-15

    This paper presents insight into the benefits of organic waste recycling through composting over landfill, in terms of landfill life extension, compost product, and mitigation of greenhouse gases (GHGs). Future waste generation from 2003 to 2020 was forecast, and five scenarios of organic waste recycling in the municipality of Phnom Penh (MPP), Cambodia, were carried out. Organic waste-specifically food and garden waste-was used for composting, and the remaining waste was landfilled. The recycling scenarios were set based on organic waste generated from difference sources: households, restaurants, shops, markets, schools, hotels, offices, and street sweeping. Through the five scenarios, the minimum volume reductions of waste disposal were about 56, 123, and 219 m(3) d(-1) in 2003, 2012, and 2020, respectively, whereas the maximum volume reductions in these years were about 325, 643, and 1025 m(3) d(-1). These volume reductions reflect a landfill life extension of a minimum of half a year and a maximum of about four years. Compost product could be produced at a minimum of 14, 30, and 54 tons d(-1) in 2003, 2012, and 2020, respectively, and at a maximum in those years of about 80, 158, and 252 tons d(-1). At the same time benefit is gained in compost product, GHG emissions could be reduced by a minimum of 12.8% and a maximum of 65.0% from 2003 to 2020. This means about 3.23 (minimum) and 5.79 million tons CO(2)eq (maximum) contributed to GHG mitigation. In this regard, it is strongly recommended that MPP should try to initiate an organic-waste recycling strategy in a best fit scenario.

  8. Measuring risk/benefit perceptions of emerging technologies and their potential impact on communication of public opinion toward science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Andrew R; Cacciatore, Michael A; Scheufele, Dietram A; Shaw, Bret R; Corley, Elizabeth A

    2012-10-01

    This study presents a systematic comparison of two alternative measures of citizens' perceptions of risks and benefits of emerging technologies. By focusing on two specific issues (nanotechnology and biofuels), we derive several insights for the measurement of public views of science. Most importantly, our analyses reveal that relying on global, single-item measures may lead to invalid inferences regarding external influences on public perceptions, particularly those related to cognitive schema and media use. Beyond these methodological implications, this analysis suggests several reasons why researchers in the area of public attitudes toward science must revisit notions of measurement in order to accurately inform the general public, policymakers, scientists, and journalists about trends in public opinion toward emerging technologies.

  9. The effectiveness of the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020 to increase the level of organic public procurement in Danish public kitchens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Nina N; Tetens, Inge; Løje, Hanne; Lassen, Anne D

    2016-12-01

    To measure the effect of organic food conversion projects on the percentage of organic food used in Danish public kitchens participating in the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020. The current longitudinal study was based on measurements of organic food percentages in Danish public kitchens before and after kitchen employees participated in conversion projects. Public kitchens participating in the nine organic food conversion projects under the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020, initiated during autumn 2012 and spring 2013 and completed in summer 2015. A total of 622 public kitchens. The average (median) increase in organic food percentage from baseline to follow-up was 24 percentage points (POrganic Cuisine Label in either silver (60-90 % organic food procurement) or gold (90-100 % organic food procurement) level doubled from 31 % to 62 %, respectively, during the conversion period. Conversion project curriculum mostly included elements of 'theory', 'menu planning', 'network' and 'Organic Cuisine Label method' to ensure successful implementation. The study reports significant increases in the level of organic food procurement among public kitchens participating in the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020. Recommendations for future organic conversion projects include adding key curriculum components to the project's educational content and measuring changes in organic food percentage to increase the chances of successful implementation.

  10. Valuing the Benefits of Creek Rehabilitation: Building a Business Case for Public Investments in Urban Green Infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekala, Gayathri Devi; Jones, Roger N.; MacDonald, Darla Hatton

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to increase the livability of its cities, public agencies in Australia are investing in green infrastructure to improve public health, reduce heat island effects and transition toward water sensitive urban design. In this paper, we present a simple and replicable approach to building a business case for green infrastructure. This approach requires much less time and resources compared to other methods for estimating the social and economic returns to society from such investments. It is a pragmatic, reasonably comprehensive approach that includes socio-demographic profile of potential users and catchment analysis to assess the economic value of community benefits of the investment. The approach has been applied to a case study area in the City of Brimbank, a western suburb of Greater Melbourne. We find that subject to a set of assumptions, a reasonable business case can be made. We estimate potential public benefits of avoided health costs of about AU75,049 per annum and potential private benefits of AU3.9 million. The project area is one of the most poorly serviced areas in the municipality in terms of quality open spaces and the potential beneficiaries are from relatively low income households with less than average health status and education levels. The values of cultural (recreational benefits, avoided health costs, and increased property values) and regulating (reduction in heat island effect and carbon sequestration) ecosystem services were quantified that can potentially offset annual maintenance costs.

  11. Valuing the benefits of creek rehabilitation: building a business case for public investments in urban green infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekala, Gayathri Devi; Jones, Roger N; MacDonald, Darla Hatton

    2015-06-01

    In an effort to increase the livability of its cities, public agencies in Australia are investing in green infrastructure to improve public health, reduce heat island effects and transition toward water sensitive urban design. In this paper, we present a simple and replicable approach to building a business case for green infrastructure. This approach requires much less time and resources compared to other methods for estimating the social and economic returns to society from such investments. It is a pragmatic, reasonably comprehensive approach that includes socio-demographic profile of potential users and catchment analysis to assess the economic value of community benefits of the investment. The approach has been applied to a case study area in the City of Brimbank, a western suburb of Greater Melbourne. We find that subject to a set of assumptions, a reasonable business case can be made. We estimate potential public benefits of avoided health costs of about AU$75,049 per annum and potential private benefits of AU$3.9 million. The project area is one of the most poorly serviced areas in the municipality in terms of quality open spaces and the potential beneficiaries are from relatively low income households with less than average health status and education levels. The values of cultural (recreational benefits, avoided health costs, and increased property values) and regulating (reduction in heat island effect and carbon sequestration) ecosystem services were quantified that can potentially offset annual maintenance costs.

  12. [Processes maps in public health organizations: the experience of the Galician Department of Public Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboal-Viñas, José Luis; Lado-Lema, María Eugenia; Amigo-Quintana, Manuel; Hervada-Vidal, Xurxo; Gómez-Amorín, Angel; Fernández-Abreu, Carlos

    2008-01-01

    To design the processes map of the Galician Department of Public Health, we performed document reviews, held meetings and interviewed persons in charge of programs and departments to identify the processes carried out. The processes were classified into strategic, key and support processes. We defined 4 levels of disaggregation and management and staff were kept informed throughout the process. At level 0, we included 4 key processes that defined the organization's mission. At level 1, 5 strategic, 5 support and 10 key processes were defined. The key processes at level 2 identified the health programs' services. A processes map was obtained by consensus and was then approved by management and staff as a first step in implanting a process management system to improve the organization's performance.

  13. The environmental and public health benefits of achieving high penetrations of solar energy in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan; Millstein, Dev; Mai, Trieu; Macknick, Jordan; Carpenter, Alberta; Cohen, Stuart; Cole, Wesley; Frew, Bethany; Heath, Garvin

    2016-10-01

    We estimate the environmental and public health benefits that may be realized if solar energy cost reductions continue until solar power is competitive across the U.S. without subsidies. Specifically, we model, from 2015 to 2050, solar power-induced reductions to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, air pollutant emissions, and water usage. To find the incremental benefits of new solar deployment, we compare the difference between two scenarios, one where solar costs have fallen such that solar supplies 14% of the nation's electricity by 2030 and 27% by 2050, and a baseline scenario in which no solar is added after 2014. We monetize benefits, where credible methods exist to do so. We find that under these scenarios, solar power reduces GHG and air pollutants by ~10%, from 2015 to 2050, providing a discounted present value of $56-$789 billion (central value of ~$250 billion, equivalent to ~2 cents/kWh-solar) in climate benefits and $77-$298 billion (central value of $167 billion, or ~1.4 cents/kWh-solar) in air quality and public health benefits. The ranges reflect uncertainty within the literature about the marginal impact of emissions of GHG and air pollutants. Solar power is also found to reduce water withdrawals and consumption by 4% and 9%, respectively, including in many drought-prone states.

  14. Strategies for changing negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumin, Xie; Woo, Stephanie Mu-Lian; Lei, Zhang

    2013-12-16

    In recent decades, the demand for organ transplantation has risen rapidly worldwide, due to an increased incidence of vital organ failure. However, the scarcity of organs appropriate for transplantation has led to an organ shortage crisis. This article retrospectively reviews strategies to change negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People's Republic of China. We strongly believe that efforts to publicize knowledge of organ donation, promote family discussions, train medical staff and students, establish incentive systems, and implement regulatory oversight may combat unfavorable Chinese public opinion toward organ donation and transplantation, thus potentially increasing the organ donation rate in the People's Republic of China.

  15. Social benefits in the Working for Water programme as a public works initiative

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Magadlela, D

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Working for Water programme is a pioneering environmental conservation initiative in that its implementation successfully combines ecological concerns and social development benefits. By addressing unemployment, skills training and empowerment...

  16. Validation of the Benefit Forecasting Method: Organization Development Program to Increase Health Organization Membership. Training and Development Research Center, Project Number Eleven.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleezer, Catherine M.; And Others

    This project is the sixth in a series of studies designed to validate the Training and Development Benefit Forecasting Method (BFM) sponsored by the Training and Development Research Center (TDRC) at the University of Minnesota. The purpose of this study was to validate the BFM's ability to forecast the benefits of an organization development…

  17. Adequacy of benefits, distributive justice and individual attitudes and behaviors: A case of public community colleges staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azman Bin Ismail

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to examine the indirect effect of distributive justice in the relationship between adequacy of benefits and individual attitudes and behaviors (i.e., job satisfaction and organizational commitment using 190 usable questionnaires gathered from employees in Malaysian public community colleges (MPCOLLEGE sector. The outcome of stepwise regression analysis showed that the inclusion of distributive justice in the analysis had increased the effect of adequacy of benefits on job satisfaction and organizational commitment. Furthermore, this finding confirms that distributive justice does act as a full mediating variable in the benefits program model of the organizational sector sample. In addition, implications and limitations of this study, as well as directions for future research are discussed.

  18. Opportunity to Improve Public Perceptions of Arthropods and Arthropod-Related Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bethany A.; Braman, S. Kristine

    2016-01-01

    The general public may not recognize the value of conserving insects and spiders in home landscapes. We surveyed individuals to assess public perceptions of 10 arthropods--nine common insects and one common spider species--and to determine whether arthropod-related attitudes could be altered. Additionally, we collected data on survey respondent…

  19. The Geographic Distribution of Schooling Benefits: Implications for Public School Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweeten, Luther G.

    1973-01-01

    Local, State, and federal revenues for public schools have become weighted toward nonlocal revenue sources. In an effort to discover how much of the cost of public schooling should be financed at each level and what the appropriate decision criteria should be, a school funding model was developed in which revenue sources were aligned with expected…

  20. Organizational Transformation in Public Sector Organizations of Pakistan in the Quest of Change Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faisal Shafique Butt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to see the organizational transformations in public sector organizations and to observe which factors have great influence in transforming public sector organizations of Pakistan. In a world of growing customer opportunities and declining income, many organizations are finding ways to do more with less by consolidating and putting together departments, functions, business processes, IT infrastructure and entire organizations. Can public sector organizations revolutionize? Organizational Transformation comes about when a company reorganizes itself or practices a sudden change in culture. The objective of this study is to portray the key characteristics which are normally considered for organizational transformation in public sector organizations of Pakistan. Research questionnaire was developed and distributed to public sector organizations in Pakistan. Data analysis was done through SPSS. The results were astonishing and all variables have positive impact on organizational transformation in public sector of Pakistan.

  1. The effectiveness of the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020 to increase the level of organic public procurement in Danish public kitchens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Nørgaard; Tetens, Inge; Løje, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    , the proportion of public kitchens eligible for the Organic Cuisine Label in either silver (60–90 % organic food procurement) or gold (90–100 % organic food procurement) level doubled from 31 % to 62 %, respectively, during the conversion period. Conversion project curriculum mostly included elements of ‘theory...

  2. Intra-hospital organ and tissue donation coordination project: cost-effectiveness and social benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Vanessa Silva e; Moura, Luciana Carvalho; Leite, Renata Fabiana; Oliveira, Priscilla Caroliny de; Schirmer, Janine; Roza, Bartira De' Aguiar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the viability of a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees of organ and tissue donation for transplantation.METHODS Epidemiological, retrospective and cross-sectional study (2003-2011 and 2008-2012), which was performed using organ donation for transplants data in the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. Nine hospitals were evaluated (hospitals 1 to 9). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the differences in the number of brain death referrals and actual donors (dependent variables) after the professional specialist started work (independent variable) at the intra-hospital committee of organ and tissue donation for transplantation. To evaluate the hospital invoicing, the hourly wage of the doctor and registered nurse, according to the legislation of the Consolidation of Labor Laws, were calculated, as were the investment return and the time elapsed to do so.RESULTS Following the nursing specialist commencement on the committee, brain death referrals and the number of actual donors increased at hospital 2 (4.17 and 1.52, respectively). At hospital 7, the number of actual donors also increased from 0.005 to 1.54. In addition, after the nurse started working, hospital revenues increased by 190.0% (ranging 40.0% to 1.955%). The monthly cost for the nurse working 20 hours was US$397.97 while the doctor would cost US$3,526.67. The return on investment was 275% over the short term (0.36 years).CONCLUSIONS This paper showed that including a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees for organ and tissue donation for transplantation proved to be cost-effective. Further economic research in the area could contribute to the efficient public policy implementation of this organ and tissue harvesting model.

  3. Intra-hospital organ and tissue donation coordination project: cost-effectiveness and social benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Silva e Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To evaluate the viability of a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees of organ and tissue donation for transplantation.METHODS Epidemiological, retrospective and cross-sectional study (2003-2011 and 2008-2012, which was performed using organ donation for transplants data in the state of Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil. Nine hospitals were evaluated (hospitals 1 to 9. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the differences in the number of brain death referrals and actual donors (dependent variables after the professional specialist started work (independent variable at the intra-hospital committee of organ and tissue donation for transplantation. To evaluate the hospital invoicing, the hourly wage of the doctor and registered nurse, according to the legislation of the Consolidation of Labor Laws, were calculated, as were the investment return and the time elapsed to do so.RESULTS Following the nursing specialist commencement on the committee, brain death referrals and the number of actual donors increased at hospital 2 (4.17 and 1.52, respectively. At hospital 7, the number of actual donors also increased from 0.005 to 1.54. In addition, after the nurse started working, hospital revenues increased by 190.0% (ranging 40.0% to 1.955%. The monthly cost for the nurse working 20 hours was US$397.97 while the doctor would cost US$3,526.67. The return on investment was 275% over the short term (0.36 years.CONCLUSIONS This paper showed that including a professional specialist in intra-hospital committees for organ and tissue donation for transplantation proved to be cost-effective. Further economic research in the area could contribute to the efficient public policy implementation of this organ and tissue harvesting model.

  4. Agile and Pro-Active Public Administration as a Collaborative Networked Organization

    CERN Document Server

    Cellary, Wojciech

    2011-01-01

    In highly competitive, globalized economies and societies of always-on-line people intensively using the Internet and mobile phones, public administrations have to adapt to new challenges. Enterprises and citizens expect public administrations to be agile and pro-active to foster development. A way to achieve agility and pro-activity is application of a model of Collaborative Network Organizations in its two forms: Virtual Organizations (VO) and Virtual Organization Breeding Environments (VOBE). In the paper, advantages are shown of public administration playing a role of a Virtual Organization customer on the one hand, and a Virtual Organization member on the other hand. It is also shown how public administration playing a role of a Virtual Organization Breeding Environment may improve its agility and promote advanced technologies and management methods among local organizations. It is argued in the paper that public administration should provide a Virtual Organization Breeding Environment as a part of publi...

  5. 7 CFR 3560.659 - Sale or transfer to nonprofit organizations and public bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sale or transfer to nonprofit organizations and... Housing Preservation § 3560.659 Sale or transfer to nonprofit organizations and public bodies. (a) Sales... housing project to a nonprofit organization or public body, two independent appraisals will be...

  6. 19 CFR 148.89 - Property of public international organizations and foreign governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Property of public international organizations and... Personnel of Foreign Governments and International Organizations and Special Treatment for Returning Individuals § 148.89 Property of public international organizations and foreign governments. (a)...

  7. Performance of non-profit organizations: Empirical contrasts between privately and publicly funded Croatian humanitarian organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfirević Nikša

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we contrast different aspects of non-profit organizations’ performance from the perspective of their funding sources. Based on previous empirical results indicating that sources of funding influence fundraising performance, we extend the existing research to the analysis of overall non-profit organizational performance. We use the social constructivist approach to non-profit performance to discuss contrasts between privately and publicly funded humanitarian organizations in Croatia. Some differences in growth- and development-oriented measures of nonprofit performance for these groups are identified and discussed in the context of future regional research.

  8. Benefit Cost Analysis of Three Skin Cancer Public Education Mass-Media Campaigns Implemented in New South Wales, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Christopher M; Ling, Rod; Byrnes, Joshua; Crane, Melanie; Shakeshaft, Anthony P; Searles, Andrew; Perez, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Public education mass media campaigns are an important intervention for influencing behaviour modifications. However, evidence on the effectiveness of such campaigns to encourage the population to reduce sun exposure is limited. This study investigates the benefits and costs of three skin cancer campaigns implemented in New South Wales from 2006-2013. This analysis uses Australian dollars (AUD) and 2010-11 as the currency and base year, respectively. Historical data on skin cancer were used to project skin cancer rates for the period 2006-2020. The expected number of skin cancer cases is derived by combining skin cancer rates, sunburn rates and relative risk of skin cancers due to sun exposure. Counterfactual estimates are based on sunburn exposure in the absence of the campaigns. Monetary values are attached to direct (treatment) and indirect (productivity) costs saved due to fewer skin cancer cases. Monetary benefits are compared with the cost of implementing the campaigns and are presented in the form of a benefit-cost ratio. Relative to the counterfactual (i.e., no campaigns) there are an estimated 13,174 fewer skin cancers and 112 averted deaths over the period 2006-2013. The net present value of these benefits is $60.17 million and the campaign cost is $15.63 million. The benefit cost ratio is 3.85, suggesting that for every $1 invested a return of $3.85 is achieved. Skin cancer public education mass media campaigns are a good investment given the likely extent to which they reduce the morbidity, mortality and economic burden of skin cancer.

  9. 公共管理效益评价方法初探%The Preliminary Exploration of the Method to Evaluate Public Management Benefit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨缅昆; 熊萧

    2005-01-01

    This topic puts forward the notion of public management's benefit on the definitions of its production with national welfare and cost on public expense. The index of its benefit is designed to appraise the achievement of public management. After the discussion of these indexes, the frame of evaluation is built on the model of national welfare described as "strong nation, rich people, comfortable lodging and content work".

  10. Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA); interpretation of "federal public benefit"--HHS. Notice with comment period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-08-04

    This notice with comment period interprets the term "Federal public benefit" as used in Title IV of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 (PRWORA), Pub. L. 104-193, and identifies the HHS programs that provide such benefits under this interpretation. According to section 401 if PRWORA, aliens who are not "qualified aliens" are not eligible for any "Federal public benefit," unless the "Federal public benefit" falls within a specified exception. A "Federal public benefit" includes "any grant, contract, loan, professional license, or commercial license" provided to an individual, and also "any retirement, welfare, health, disability, public or assisted housing, postsecondary education, food assistance, unemployment benefit, or any other similar benefit for which payments or assistance are provided to an individual, household, or family eligibility unit." Under section 432, providers of a non-exempt "Federal public benefit" must verify that a person applying for the benefit is a qualified alien and is eligible to receive the benefit. The HHS programs that provide "Federal public benefits" and are not otherwise excluded from the definition by the exceptions provided in section 401(b) are: Adoption Assistance Administration on Developmental Disabilities (ADD)-State Developmental Disabilities Councils (direct services only) ADD-Special Projects (direct services only) ADD-University Affiliated Programs (clinical disability assessment services only) Adult Programs/Payments to Territories Agency for Health Care Policy and Research Dissertation Grants Child Care and Development Fund Clinical Training Grant for Faculty Development in Alcohol & Drug Abuse Foster Care Health Profession Education and Training Assistance Independent Living Program Job Opportunities for Low Income Individuals (JOLI) Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP) Medicare Medicaid (except assistance for an emergency medical condition) Mental Health Clinical

  11. Bundling the procurement of sports infrastructure projects : How neither public nor private actors really benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Public-private partnerships for infrastructure development are often conceived as puzzling governance tools. A peculiar case in Belgium has been the procurement of multiple similar projects to single private sector partners who design, build, finance and maintain infrastructure for a fixed

  12. Translating Science to Benefit Diverse Publics : Engagement Pathways for Linking Climate Risk, Uncertainty, and Agricultural Identities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leith, Peat; Vanclay, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We argue that for scientists and science communicators to build usable knowledge for various publics, they require social and political capital, skills in boundary work, and ethical acuity. Drawing on the context of communicating seasonal climate predictions to farmers in Australia, we detail four k

  13. Translating Science to Benefit Diverse Publics : Engagement Pathways for Linking Climate Risk, Uncertainty, and Agricultural Identities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leith, Peat; Vanclay, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We argue that for scientists and science communicators to build usable knowledge for various publics, they require social and political capital, skills in boundary work, and ethical acuity. Drawing on the context of communicating seasonal climate predictions to farmers in Australia, we detail four k

  14. Bundling the procurement of sports infrastructure projects : How neither public nor private actors really benefit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Hurk, M.

    2016-01-01

    Public-private partnerships for infrastructure development are often conceived as puzzling governance tools. A peculiar case in Belgium has been the procurement of multiple similar projects to single private sector partners who design, build, finance and maintain infrastructure for a fixed period—bu

  15. Benefits of lethal pandemics: direct impact of contagious diseases on public administration in Hungary (1867-1914).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palvolgyi, Balazs

    2013-01-01

    The reconciliation of 1867 between Austria and Hungary brought great changes to Hungarian public administration: the way towards the building up of a modern public administration had been opened. Although there was a functioning public health system and a related legislation from the late 18th century, major issues - such as balanced geographical distribution of medical personnel, fair access to medical services even in the poorer regions of the country, and the effective protection against some contagious diseases - were not resolved for decades. During the reform work of public administration since the 1870s, the lawmakers touched repeatedly the framework and functioning of the public health as well. Although the general conditions of the domain depended traditionally on the municipalities and counties due to the national importance of the matter, the government made efforts to make the functioning of the public health more efficient through centralisation. The contagious diseases continuously endangered the population, revealing the weak points in the existing public health system, thereby giving a momentum to the reforms and helping the government in its organization of prevention and clearly contributing to the legislation work.

  16. 78 FR 44959 - Public Workshop Related to the International Maritime Organization's Development of a Mandatory...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard Public Workshop Related to the International Maritime Organization's Development of a... International Maritime Organization (IMO Polar Code). Various safety topics will be discussed including...

  17. Interactive communication with the public: qualitative exploration of the use of social media by food and health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Liran Christine; Panagiotopoulos, Panagiotis; Regan, Áine; De Brún, Aoife; Barnett, Julie; Wall, Patrick; McConnon, Áine

    2015-01-01

    To examine the use and impact of social media on 2-way communication between consumers and public organizations in the food safety and nutrition area. In-depth qualitative study conducted between October, 2012 and January, 2013, using semi-structured interviews in the United Kingdom and Ireland. Sixteen professionals worked on the public interface within 5 national organizations with a role in communicating on food safety and nutrition issues in this thematic analysis. Five main themes were identified: gradual shift toward social media-based queries and complaints; challenges and limitations of social media to deal with queries and complaints; benefits of using social media in query and complaint services; content redesign driven by social media use; and using social media to learn more about consumers. Social media penetrated and brought new opportunities to food organizations' interactions with the public. Given the increasing use of social media by the public, food organizations need to explore such new opportunities for communication and research. Copyright © 2015 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. COST-BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF BIOCONVERSION NEUFCHATEL WHEY INTO RECTIFIED ETHANOL AND ORGANIC LIQUID FERTILIZER IN SEMI PILOT SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemilang Lara UTAMA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aims of the study was to determine the cost-benefit analysis in neufchatel whey bioconversion into rectified ethanol and organic liquid fertilizer. Bioconversion whey into rectified ethanol and organic liquid fertilizer has shown great potential as a way to reduce the pollution resulting from cheese-making process. Semi pilot scale experiment was done to ferment 5 L neufchatel whey using 5% K. lactis at 33°C for 24 h in semi anaerobic plastic container without agitation and then distilled into 96.2% purity. Data collected and analyzed descriptively related to benefit cost ratio/BCR, net present value/NPV and internal rate returns/IRR. The result showed that semi pilot scale bioconversion of neufchatel whey resulting in 106.42 ml rectified ethanol and 4404.22 ml distillery residue. Economic benefit could achieved by the support of distillery residue sales as organic liquid fertilizer.

  19. Benefits and tensions in delivering public health in community pharmacies - a qualitative study of healthy living pharmacy staff champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Richard J; Tsoneva, Jo

    2017-10-01

    Healthy Living Pharmacies (HLP) were introduced in the United Kingdom (UK) in a further attempt to deliver public health benefits in community pharmacy settings. Central to the initiative are staff trained as Healthy Living Champions (HLC) and this study sought to explore HLC perceptions of positive and negative aspect of their work and the wider scheme. A qualitative study was undertaken with a purposive sample of HLCs working in pathfinder HCPs in the Sheffield area in 2014. Participants were recruited by email to either a focus group (n = 7) held at a training event or later semi-structured one-to-one interviews in pharmacies (n = 6). Four stages of interpretative phenomenological analysis were used to code and identify themes. Four main themes emerged relating to the positive workforce development impact HLPs had upon HLCs themselves and on perceived customer and patient engagement and benefits. Tensions were identified with existing commercial business demands and negative views overall of the pharmacy setting with a perceived lack of not only integration with other services but also awareness among the public and health care staff. HLCs felt empowered and more confident in initiating conversation about health issues with patients, but identified barriers relating to workload, a lack of time to perform their role, isolation, tensions with non-HLC staff and logistical barriers such as poor Internet access. Delivering public health activities through the HLC role in UK pharmacies is associated with several perceived benefits for different stakeholders, but may be threatened by well recognised barriers in UK pharmacies related to the commercial setting. © 2016 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  20. The break of medical confidentiality for the benefit of public health: a controversial topic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papageorgiou Ε.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This paper refers to the decision made by the Greek Government to publish photographs and personal data of HIV positive sex workers on the grounds of protecting public health. Method: Initially, the law and theoretical background of medical confidentiality and its break were reviewed and then the conditions and data that led to the specific decision made by the Greek Authorities were investigated. Also the contribution of NGOs in the prevention of Public Health was studied. Conclusion: The survey showed that in this particular case the break of confidentiality was excessive and biased due to the origin and illegal activity of the women. A proper solution to the HIV/AIDS outbreak would be the intensification of prevention. In this sector, NGOs can and should play an active role considering that the primary care in Greece, especially during the economic crisis, shows organizational and operational weaknesses.

  1. Industry's focus on benefits 'Creates public distrust'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitev, Lubomir [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-03-15

    The Eagle Project, aimed at identifying and disseminating good practices in information and communication related to ionising radiation, has been carrying out public opinion polls in Europe. NucNet spoke to Genevieve Baumont, senior expert member of the French Expert Commission, and Marie-Helene Eljammal, co-writer of a French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) report on one of the polls, about the results.

  2. 24 CFR 1006.335 - Use of nonprofit organizations and public-private partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Use of nonprofit organizations and... Requirements § 1006.335 Use of nonprofit organizations and public-private partnerships. (a) Nonprofit organizations. The DHHL must, to the extent practicable, provide for private nonprofit organizations...

  3. Potential Benefits of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization to Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Amponsah

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The National Data Centers established around the globe with the support of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization are used to monitor and manage its data, to control and ultimately eliminate nuclear weapon test explosions. The National Data Center in Ghana was established in February, 2010 at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. The Center is mandated to collate seismic, radionuclide, infrasound and hydroacoustic data for monitoring nuclear test explosions for global peace. The data are obtained from our neighboring country Cote d’Ivoire and the International Data Center in Austria. The objectives of the Data Center include the following: receive and use data from the International Monitoring System (IMS stations and products derived from the IMS from the International Data Center for verification and compliance of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and for earthquake hazard studies. From 2010 to date local seismic events from the Center are catalogued for earthquake hazard studies in the country. The data are also made available to our stakeholders for earthquake disaster risk reduction. The benefits of the National Data Center to Ghana are numerous. Apart from the data for seismic hazard studies, it can also provide data for research in fisheries, for the study of the crustal structure among others. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.67.1.5402

  4. Potential Benefits of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization to Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulina Amponsah

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The National Data Centers established around the globe with the support of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Organization are used to monitor and manage its data, to control and ultimately eliminate nuclear weapon test explosions. The National Data Center in Ghana was established in February, 2010 at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. The Center is mandated to collate seismic, radionuclide, infrasound and hydroacoustic data for monitoring nuclear test explosions for global peace. The data are obtained from our neighboring country Cote d’Ivoire and the International Data Center in Austria. The objectives of the Data Center include the following: receive and use data from the International Monitoring System (IMS stations and products derived from the IMS from the International Data Center for verification and compliance of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty and for earthquake hazard studies. From 2010 to date local seismic events from the Center are catalogued for earthquake hazard studies in the country. The data are also made available to our stakeholders for earthquake disaster risk reduction. The benefits of the National Data Center to Ghana are numerous. Apart from the data for seismic hazard studies, it can also provide data for research in fisheries, for the study of the crustal structure among others.

  5. Elements of a Knowledge Management Guide for Public Sector Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark Cameron

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the factors that are critical to the success of public (government) sector knowledge management initiatives and the lessons from private sector knowledge management and organizational learning that apply in the public sector. The goal was to create a concise guide, based on research-validated success factors, to aid government…

  6. Elements of a Knowledge Management Guide for Public Sector Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Mark Cameron

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the factors that are critical to the success of public (government) sector knowledge management initiatives and the lessons from private sector knowledge management and organizational learning that apply in the public sector. The goal was to create a concise guide, based on research-validated success factors, to aid government…

  7. Charter School Competition, Organization, and Achievement in Traditional Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tomeka M.

    2013-01-01

    Market models of education reform predict that the growth of charter schools will infuse competition into the public school sector, forcing traditional public schools to improve the practices they engage in to educate students. Some scholars have criticized these models, arguing that competition from charter schools is unlikely to produce…

  8. On harm thresholds and living organ donation: must the living donor benefit, on balance, from his donation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Nicola Jane

    2017-05-19

    For the majority of scholars concerned with the ethics of living organ donation, inflicting moderate harms on competent volunteers in order to save the lives or increase the life chances of others is held to be justifiable provided certain conditions are met. These conditions tend to include one, or more commonly, some combination of the following: (1) The living donor provides valid consent to donation. (2) Living donation produces an overall positive balance of harm-benefit for donors and recipients which cannot be obtained in a less harmful manner. (3) Donation is not liable to cause significant and long-term morbidity to, or the death of, the donor. This paper critically examines the suggestion that these criteria are not sufficient to offer a general account of justified living organ donation in the context of competent volunteers and that key to justified living organ donation is that donors receive sufficient benefits from their donation that these outweigh the harms they suffer. However, although this view-termed here 'The Donor Benefit Standard'-directs welcome attention to the many and complex motives which may underlie living organ donation, this paper ultimately concludes that given the threats this position poses to individual autonomy and the lives of those in need of organ transplants 'The Donor Benefit Standard' should ultimately be rejected.

  9. Accounting System in Croatian Public Healthcare Organizations: an Empirical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davor VAŠIČEK

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In considering the adequacy of adopting accruals and IPSASs, this paper tests the appropriateness of existing modified accrual accounting and financial reporting system in Croatian public healthcare sector. The paper indicates that accounting information system contains discrepancies and constraints in assuring true and fair view of organization’s financial position and performance. Our statistics confirms low level of cost and managerial accounting methods development, and external and internal financial reporting convergence.Having in mind its specificities, we argue that Croatian public healthcare sector represents a segmental accounting subsystem within the integral public sector accounting framework, where accruals implementation might prove justifiable.

  10. Organic and conventional public food procurement for youth in Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Mikkola, Minna

    2008-01-01

    Public catering in Finland has strong historical roots from the 19th century, connected with the rise of the national state, industrialisation, democracy and modern times in general. The school meal system developed hand in hand with work place meal services, and inherently the aim was to offer lateral support for workers' and pupils' activities by healthy and wholesome nutrition. The public catering had initially a strong label of welfare services and implied economical use of ingredients. ...

  11. Management of Labor Conflicts in Public Health Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Elena Belu; Elena Alexandra Ilinca

    2012-01-01

    The work “Management of labor conflicts in public health organizations” treats a very importantissue, of the present, with extensive and multiple implications for public health. The work can be consideredas an interdisciplinary study justified by two arguments: first, it is essential to applied research step, theknowledge and use of enshrined informational content in management literature, especially of models andmechanisms of managerial activity on the administration of human resources, mana...

  12. Connecting the Learning Organization, Strategic Planning, and Public Relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Bill; Perreault, George

    2002-01-01

    Examines common perceptions about barriers to effective strategic planning in school districts. Argues that primary barrier to effective use of strategic planning in schools is the failure of educators to fully understand the strategic planning process itself. Discusses the components of a learning organization. Links learning organizations with…

  13. The State Trustee Organization. ALTA Publication Number Two.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Barbara B.

    The topic of this document is statewide organizations of and for library trustees. The reasons for such organizations are: (1) to educate individual library trustees, (2) to inform and stimulate library trustees, individually and as library boards, (3) to work with libraries to plan for interlibrary cooperation and library systems, and (4) to work…

  14. Medicaid Benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Benefits Close About Us Messages from CMCS Program History Leadership Organization Visit CMS Contact Us Close Home > Medicaid > ... for Coverage LTSS Prescription Drugs About Us Program History Leadership Organization Visit CMS Contact Us State Medicaid & CHIP ...

  15. Activity of public employment services in the Poznan agglomeration for the benefit of the disabled persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Talaga

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2002-2007 public employment services enlarged the range of service offers within the frames of active policy of labour market for handicapped persons living in the city of Poznań and the poviat (commune. The attempt was successful despite permanent and not very high expenditure on solving the handicapped persons’ problems. Simultaneously there was an observable increase of expenditure on the whole active policy of Poznań agglomeration labour market. Owing to the law changes a lot of positive progress was achieved which introduced professional activation of handicapped people in the forms inaccessible to this group of citizens so far. It should be mentioned here that it came about also thanks to undertakings cofinanced with European funds, alongside with the assistance of private and non-governmental institutions. A constant ratio of the handicapped persons’ employment as well as slightly changeable number of handicapped persons registered at Poznań District Work Office, prove that the present situation does not develop in handicapped youth the necessary skills to actively search work, and it strengthens attitudes of professional passivity.

  16. Mapping private-public-partnership in health organizations: India experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nayan Chakravarty

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The dream of universal health care demands a much larger and wider approach, engaging not just the public but also the private sector. This paper has attempted mapping the present public-private partnership scenario in India using the WHO health system functions framework, giving an insight into the nature and extent of challenge of the present dominant model. A systematic review methodology was adopted to identify published literature on private-public partnership in India. From an initial pool of 785 articles were identified. Finally a total of 29 published articles meeting the inclusion criteria were included. The descriptive framework of Health system functions by WHO (2000, were used to analyze the data. All papers which were considered for the study were segregated based on the 4 prime health system functions: Financing; Management of non-financial inputs; Health service delivery and Oversight. The literature review reveals that more than half of the papers (51.72% selected for the study were focused on health service delivery functions and quite thin literature were available for other 3 functions, which includes financing, management of non-financial inputs and oversight functions as per WHO. This finding raise an important question if the genesis of most of the public-private partnerships is out of the inability of the public sector in reaching out to a particular target group by virtue of its geographical position or difficulty in working with high risk groups. Considering the limitations of the present model of engagement of private and public sectors, it demands for an alternative model of engagement where the mutual strength that exists with each one of the partners, could be harnessed and complemented. An alternate model is to engage in tri-partite partnership (TPP between the government, non-government and the corporates.

  17. Public health benefits of hair-mercury analysis and dietary advice in lowering methylmercury exposure in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Line E; Jørgensen, Jan S; Nielsen, Flemming; Grandjean, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate whether a public health intervention using focused dietary advice combined with a hair-mercury analysis can lower neurotoxic methylmercury exposure among pregnant women without decreasing their overall intake of seafood. A total of 146 pregnant women were consecutively recruited from the antenatal clinic at a Danish university hospital at their initial ultrasound scan. Dietary advice was provided on avoiding methylmercury exposure from large predatory fish and a hair sample from each participant was analysed for mercury, with the results being communicated shortly thereafter to the women. A dietary questionnaire was filled in. Follow-up three months later included a dietary questionnaire and a repeat hair-mercury analysis. In the follow-up group, 22% of the women had hair-mercury concentrations above a safe limit of 0.58 µg/g at enrolment, decreasing to 8% three months later. Average hair-mercury concentrations decreased by 21%. However, the total seafood intake remained at the same level after three months. Increased exposure to methylmercury among pregnant women is an important public health concern in Denmark. The observed lowering of hair-mercury concentrations associated with dietary advice corresponds to a substantial public health benefit that probably makes such an intervention highly profitable.

  18. From Traditional Recruiting To E-Recruiting in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ARTENE Adela Suzana

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Recruiting is the activity that determines, in quantitative and qualitative terms, the structure of the sample of people from which the selection will be made for a specific position and / or public office, for a position that is already created in the organizational structure. The recruitment process is triggered when in the organizational structure of public institutions appear new functions or positions, or when the existing ones become vacant through retirement, death, transfer or dismissal. E-Recruiting represents the process through which the personnel is recruited using electronic resources.

  19. AMBIGUITY IN THE IDENTITY TRANSFORMATION OF PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Acuña

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the transformations implemented by health authorities in a hospital over the last forty years with the purpose of institutionalizing geriatrics in the Chilean public health system. The transformations have been implemented through a process of identity conversion that had implied high levels of ambiguity due to the contradictory coexistence of the old hospital’s identity with the new geriatric practices. These ambiguities are associated with the erratic, precarious support provided by state authorities to the development of the public geriatric framework. Through the handling of images, authorities have paradoxically amplified the achievements of these transformations, thus promoting apparent complacency in internal and external audiences.

  20. A Survey of Textbooks for Industrial Organization and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Daniel O.

    1986-01-01

    Surveys eleven currently available undergraduate textbooks on industrial organization. Concludes that some texts have an economics emphasis and others a policy emphasis. Rates the content of each text according to established criteria. (JDH)

  1. Boards of public sector organizations: a typology with Dutch illustrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thiel, S. van

    2015-01-01

    - Purpose – The purpose of this study is to present two heuristics for researchers to identify different types of boards in public sector organziations, and thus enable exchange of research findings and comparative research. - Design/methodology/approach - Based on existing knowledge, two typologies

  2. Gifts of giving: the role of empathy and perceived benefits to others and self in young adults' decisions to become organ donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Elizabeth L; Hoffner, Cynthia

    2013-01-01

    Trait empathy and self-interest exert a strong influence on different prosocial behaviors, but their role in the promotion of organ donation registration is unclear. A survey examined how perceived benefits of organ donation for others and the self affect people's willingness to register as donors. Perceived other-benefits did not predict registration. Those with lower risk and greater self-benefit perceptions were more willing to donate. Empathic concern predicted donation willingness and moderated the effect of other-benefit perceptions, such that other-benefit perceptions predicted donation willingness among those with greater empathic concern. Applications of these findings to organ donation promotion are discussed.

  3. Organizational capacity for chronic disease prevention: a survey of Canadian public health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusaik, Nancy; O'Loughlin, Jennifer L; Kishchuk, Natalie; Paradis, Gilles; Cameron, Roy

    2010-04-01

    There are no national data on levels of organizational capacity within the Canadian public health system to reduce the burden of chronic disease. Cross-sectional data were collected in a national survey (October 2004 to April 2005) of all 216 national, provincial and regional-level organizations engaged in chronic disease prevention through primary prevention or healthy lifestyle promotion. Levels of organizational capacity (defined as skills and resources to implement chronic disease prevention programmes), potential determinants of organizational capacity and involvement in chronic disease prevention programming were compared in western, central and eastern Canada and across three types of organizations (formal public health organizations, non-governmental organizations and grouped organizations). Forty percent of organizations were located in Central Canada. Approximately 50% were formal public health organizations. Levels of skill and involvement were highest for activities that addressed tobacco control and healthy eating; lowest for stress management, social determinants of health and programme evaluation. The few notable differences in skill levels by provincial grouping favoured Central Canada. Resource adequacy was rated low across the country; but was lowest in eastern Canada and among formal public health organizations. Determinants of organizational capacity (organizational supports and partnerships) were highest in central Canada and among grouped organizations. These data provide an evidence base to identify strengths and gaps in organizational capacity and involvement in chronic disease prevention programming in the organizations that comprise the Canadian public health system.

  4. Health and economic benefits of public financing of epilepsy treatment in India: An agent-based simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megiddo, Itamar; Colson, Abigail; Chisholm, Dan; Dua, Tarun; Nandi, Arindam; Laxminarayan, Ramanan

    2016-03-01

    An estimated 6-10 million people in India live with active epilepsy, and less than half are treated. We analyze the health and economic benefits of three scenarios of publicly financed national epilepsy programs that provide: (1) first-line antiepilepsy drugs (AEDs), (2) first- and second-line AEDs, and (3) first- and second-line AEDs and surgery. We model the prevalence and distribution of epilepsy in India using IndiaSim, an agent-based, simulation model of the Indian population. Agents in the model are disease-free or in one of three disease states: untreated with seizures, treated with seizures, and treated without seizures. Outcome measures include the proportion of the population that has epilepsy and is untreated, disability-adjusted life years (DALYs) averted, and cost per DALY averted. Economic benefit measures estimated include out-of-pocket (OOP) expenditure averted and money-metric value of insurance. All three scenarios represent a cost-effective use of resources and would avert 800,000-1 million DALYs per year in India relative to the current scenario. However, especially in poor regions and populations, scenario 1 (which publicly finances only first-line therapy) does not decrease the OOP expenditure or provide financial risk protection if we include care-seeking costs. The OOP expenditure averted increases from scenarios 1 through 3, and the money-metric value of insurance follows a similar trend between scenarios and typically decreases with wealth. In the first 10 years of scenarios 2 and 3, households avert on average over US$80 million per year in medical expenditure. Expanding and publicly financing epilepsy treatment in India averts substantial disease burden. A universal public finance policy that covers only first-line AEDs may not provide significant financial risk protection. Covering costs for both first- and second-line therapy and other medical costs alleviates the financial burden from epilepsy and is cost-effective across wealth

  5. Evaluating the Effects of Co-Production Initiatives in Public Service Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brix, Jacob; Krogstrup, Hanne Kathrine; Mortensen, Nanna Møller

    2017-01-01

    A change from New Public Management to New Public Governance (NPG) does not occur overnight. This forces public service organizations to develop new hybrid organizational forms as strategic response to the current situation. In NPG the basic assumption is that coproduction will result in increased...... efficiency and effectiveness for public service organizations as a new organizational recipe. However, a recent review determines that only few empirical studies document these claimed effects. To enable the creation of more empirical evidence that establish the effects of co-production, the purpose of our...

  6. Management of Labor Conflicts in Public Health Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Elena Belu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The work “Management of labor conflicts in public health organizations” treats a very importantissue, of the present, with extensive and multiple implications for public health. The work can be consideredas an interdisciplinary study justified by two arguments: first, it is essential to applied research step, theknowledge and use of enshrined informational content in management literature, especially of models andmechanisms of managerial activity on the administration of human resources, managerial style, mobilizationcapacities, communication, coordination or decision ones and, not least the mechanisms characteristic tocollective relations established between managers and employees; second, it is required for theimplementation phase of research findings, capitalization of an informational sphere of law field, specifically,labor law, because labor conflicts are based both on specific regulations of labor law and on a juridicalliterature, of great interest and of strict use for a concrete optimization of labor social relations.

  7. A CONSOLIDATED MODEL OF ANALYSIS OF THE RELATIONS BETWEEN POLITICS AND MANAGEMENT WITHIN PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Maria GEORGESCU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An interdisciplinary approach which combines the theoretical, empirical andconceptual dimensions, the present study tries to offer a new workperspective on the assessment and modeling of the relation between themanagement of public organizations and the political environment. Thetheoretical research was centered on reviewing the literature on the relationbetween the management of public organizations and the politicalenvironment. The empirical research was materialized by modeling with theregression technique of several aspects integrated to the relations betweenthe management of human resources within public organizations in theeducation field and the external political environment.

  8. The Adaptive Capabilities of Organizations. Case of Polish Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Ciszewska-Mlinaric

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Information gathering and analysis, reaction design and implementation, and activities correction and learning are three types of adaptive capabilities connected to three phases of organizational adaptation to the environment. The primary objective of this article is to present how adaptive capabilities of high and low performers differ. In the second part of the article the key factors influencing the adaptive capabilities of Polish public hospitals will be identified and examined.

  9. Medical-device risk management and public safety: using cost-benefit as a measurement of effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Allen A.

    1994-12-01

    Public safety can be enhanced through the development of a comprehensive medical device risk management. This can be accomplished through case studies using a framework that incorporates cost-benefit analysis in the evaluation of risk management attributes. This paper presents a framework for evaluating the risk management system for regulatory Class III medical devices. The framework consists of the following sixteen attributes of a comprehensive medical device risk management system: fault/failure analysis, premarket testing/clinical trials, post-approval studies, manufacturer sponsored hospital studies, product labeling, establishment inspections, problem reporting program, mandatory hospital reporting, medical literature surveillance, device/patient registries, device performance monitoring, returned product analysis, autopsy program, emergency treatment funds/interim compensation, product liability, and alternative compensation mechanisms. Review of performance histories for several medical devices can reveal the value of information for many attributes, and also the inter-dependencies of the attributes in generating risk information flow. Such an information flow network is presented as a starting point for enhancing medical device risk management by focusing on attributes with high net benefit values and potential to spur information dissemination.

  10. Public attitudes to organ donation in South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    be made by the person before death. Most black ... particular to the concepts of brain-stem death and organ donation, is not .... Reasons why some people were unwilling to donate the .... We thank Research Surveys (Pry) Ltd who assisted in.

  11. Firms’ reshaping of commercialization practices to overcome the ‘not invented here’ phenomenon in public healthcare organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Helle Aarøe; Evald, Majbritt Rostgaard; Clarke, Ann Højbjerg

    2015-01-01

    processes. Consequently, PPI is rarely examined from a private sector perspective, including how private firms seek to commercialize new innovations after co-creating these innovations in collaboration with public organizations. However, commercialization is a critical aspect of innovation because...... by elucidating how private firms commercialize co-created welfare solutions. The empirical setting is a multiple case study consisting of four PPI projects conducted in public Danish healthcare. The findings reveal that PPI firms experience the ‘not invented here’ (NIH) phenomenon across Danish hospitals....... This phenomenon appears in the short run to hamper the firms’ commercialization of new welfare innovations. However, in the longer run, firms respond to NIH by reshaping their commercialization practices as they redirect their focus towards the potential benefits of exporting their new welfare solutions...

  12. ``Mirando al Cielo'', Organization of Public Events for Sky Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrao, L.

    2011-10-01

    The events called ``Mirando al cielo'' encompass academic, cultural and economic activities with the purpose of promoting the knowledge and furthering the economy of the place where they are held. The academic activities are carried out by students and teachers of the region, and have been organized by UNAM. The cultural and commercial activities are selected among those typical of each place and carried out under the direction of local authorities, with the participation of their inhabitants.

  13. CHANGE MANAGEMENT: CHALLENGE TO TRANSFORM IT IN PUBLIC SECTOR ORGANIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Prof. Dr. K. Ravichandran; R. Raja Piramuthu

    2012-01-01

    ERP implementation, commonly involve a complete change in business process and operation. Hence, responsiveness to internal customers is critical for an organization to avoid the difficulties associated with this change. To overcome complex organizational problem of workers resistance to ERP implementation, change management methods suggested an integrated, process-oriented knowledge formulation, strategy implementation, to manage the change introduced by IT is to identify and evaluate the at...

  14. Strategic-Decision Quality in Public Organizations: An Information Processing Perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.R.J. George (Bert); S. Desmidt (Sebastian)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis study draws on information processing theory to investigate predictors of strategic-decision quality in public organizations. Information processing theory argues that (a) rational planning practices contribute to strategic-decision quality by injecting information into decision

  15. Publication productivity of the Bio-organic division at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre : a scientometric study

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Attempts to analyse quantitatively 475 papers published by the Bio-Organic Division of Bhabha Atomic Research Centre during 1972–2002 in various domains like Synthesis (202), Bioorganic Chemistry (100), Biotechnology (70), Natural Products (53), Waste Management (30), Supra-molecular Chemistry (18) and Organic Spectroscopy (2). The highest number of publications in a year were 38 in 2001. The average number of publications per year was 15.3 and the highest collaboration coefficient 1.0 was fo...

  16. Environment Health & Safety Research Program. Organization and 1979-1980 Publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1981-01-01

    This document was prepared to assist readers in understanding the organization of Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and the organization and functions of the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program Office. Telephone numbers of the principal management staff are provided. Also included is a list of 1979 and 1980 publications reporting on work performed in the Environment, Health and Safety Research Program, as well as a list of papers submitted for publication.

  17. Improving the quality and safety of organic and low input foods and maximizing the benefits to consumers and producers

    OpenAIRE

    Niggli, Urs; Leifert, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    ‘Improving quality and safety and reduction of cost in the European organic and 'low input' supply chains' (QLIF) is an Integrated Project under the 6th Framework Programme of the European Commission which started in March 2004 and will end in February 2009. After three years of research by 31 QLIF partners, the scientific data on on the benefits of the system approach used in organic and ‘low input’ agriculture has expanded considerably. At the same time the project has developed an array of...

  18. When Operating on Dead People Saves Lives: Benefits of Surgical Organ Donor Intensivists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Kristin; Talley, Cynthia; Yarrison, Rebecca B; Bernard, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for many patients suffering from end-stage organ failure. Organs have been successfully recovered after a variety of aggressive interventions. We propose that decompressive laparotomy, when clinically indicated, should be considered in the aggressive resuscitation of potential organ donors. A thorough literature review examining aggressive interventions on potential organ donors was conducted after experience with a unique case at this institution. Articles were reviewed for the types of interventions performed as well as the time frame in relation to organ donation. In our case, several ethical issues were raised when considering decompressive laparotomy in a patient pronounced dead by neurologic criteria. We propose that having a surgical intensivist involved in the management of potential donors will further increase the salvage rate, as more invasive resuscitation options are possible.

  19. When Operating on Dead People Saves Lives: Benefits of Surgical Organ Donor Intensivists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin Long

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid organ transplantation has emerged as a life-saving treatment for many patients suffering from end-stage organ failure. Organs have been successfully recovered after a variety of aggressive interventions. We propose that decompressive laparotomy, when clinically indicated, should be considered in the aggressive resuscitation of potential organ donors. A thorough literature review examining aggressive interventions on potential organ donors was conducted after experience with a unique case at this institution. Articles were reviewed for the types of interventions performed as well as the time frame in relation to organ donation. In our case, several ethical issues were raised when considering decompressive laparotomy in a patient pronounced dead by neurologic criteria. We propose that having a surgical intensivist involved in the management of potential donors will further increase the salvage rate, as more invasive resuscitation options are possible.

  20. Citizens’ Perceptions on Social Responsibility in Public Administration Organizations: A Case Study on Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis VÁZQUEZ

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes citizens’ expectations on social responsibility of public administration organizations in comparison to other public and private organizations, and argues that the mission attributed to different institutions in society might guide citizens’ perceptions and thresholds of satisfaction with sustainability standards. Three different survey studies were carried out to analyze citizens’ expectations of social responsibility of public administration organizations, private companies and a public university in the same Spanish region. A list of indicators defining internal and external social responsibility practices was developed to compare expectations in the three institutional contexts, and MANOVA was used to test differences between participants in the three surveys. Results support the notion that citizens’ expectations of social responsibility are related to perceived organizational goals in private and public contexts and the specific dimension of responsibility considered. Particularly, participants displayed higher expectations of external social responsibility in public administration organizations than in private companies and the public university analyzed, whereas citizens’ expectations of internal social responsibility were more homogeneous in public and private contexts. Implications of the study and suggestions for further research are discussed.

  1. Phases of Recognition and Management of Financial Crisis in Public Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, L. R.

    Based in part on interviews conducted in 32 municipalities, this paper is intended to provide information to public managers, policy analysts, and others on methods for improving the management of retrenchment. A model summarizes how public organizations recognize and attempt to manage financial crises and prolonged financial stress. Some cutback…

  2. Organic farming and the prospects for stimulating public goods under the CAP 2014-2020

    OpenAIRE

    Stolze, Matthias; Sanders, Jürn; Kasperczyk, Nadja; Madsen, Gudula

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 reform of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP) for the 2014–2020 period aimed to be a flagship initiative for the delivery of more environmental and climate friendly agriculture, encapsulated in the slogan "public money for public goods”. To achieve its environmental and climate change goals, the EU uses key instruments of Pillars 1 and 2 to provide more public goods from EU agriculture. Organic farming is recognised under both instruments for the first time in terms of its contribut...

  3. iPOPY – innovative Public Organic food Procurement for Youth. School meals – and more!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løes, A; Nolting, B; Kristensen, N;

    2008-01-01

    One of eight pilot projects in the European CORE Organic programme, innovative Public Organic food Procurement for Youth, (iPOPY) will study efficient ways of implementing organic food in public serving outlets for young people (2007-10). By analysing practical cases of school meal systems...... and other food serving outlets for youth, we will identify hindrances and promoting factors in the participating countries (Denmark, Finland, Italy and Norway). Policies, supply chains, certification systems, the young consumers’ perception and participation, and health effects of implementation of organic...... policies and menus are focussed in iPOPY. The main aim is to suggest efficient policies and comprehensive strategies to increase the consumption of organic food among young consumers in a public setting, and fostering sustainable nutrition. Interdisciplinary project tools under development...

  4. 7 CFR 1955.119 - Sale of SFH inventory property to a public body or nonprofit organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... nonprofit organization. 1955.119 Section 1955.119 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture... to a public body or nonprofit organization. Notwithstanding the provisions of § 1955.111 through... public body or nonprofit organization to use for transitional housing for the homeless. A public body...

  5. The benefits of accreditation for fundraising nonprofit organizations in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.H.F.P.; Gugerty, M.K.; Prakash, A.

    2010-01-01

    How can fundraising organizations signal trustworthiness to prospective donors? One way to do this is by conforming to standards of excellence and allowing a trusted, independent agency to monitor the organization with regard to these standards. The Central Bureau of Fundraising (CBF) in the Netherl

  6. Elective ventilation for organ donation: law, policy and public ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, John

    2013-03-01

    This paper examines questions concerning elective ventilation, contextualised within English law and policy. It presents the general debate with reference both to the Exeter Protocol on elective ventilation, and the considerable developments in legal principle since the time that that protocol was declared to be unlawful. I distinguish different aspects of what might be labelled elective ventilation policies under the following four headings: 'basic elective ventilation'; 'epistemically complex elective ventilation'; 'practically complex elective ventilation'; and 'epistemically and practically complex elective ventilation'. I give a legal analysis of each. In concluding remarks on their potential practical viability, I emphasise the importance not just of ascertaining the legal and ethical acceptability of these and other forms of elective ventilation, but also of assessing their professional and political acceptability. This importance relates both to the successful implementation of the individual practices, and to guarding against possible harmful effects in the wider efforts to increase the rates of posthumous organ donation.

  7. Strategies for changing negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People's Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumin X

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xie Shumin,1 Stephanie Mu-Lian Woo,2 Zhang Lei3 1Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, The Second Xiangya Hospital of Central South University, Changsha, People's Republic of China; 2Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA; 3Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China Abstract: In recent decades, the demand for organ transplantation has risen rapidly worldwide, due to an increased incidence of vital organ failure. However, the scarcity of organs appropriate for transplantation has led to an organ shortage crisis. This article retrospectively reviews strategies to change negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People's Republic of China. We strongly believe that efforts to publicize knowledge of organ donation, promote family discussions, train medical staff and students, establish incentive systems, and implement regulatory oversight may combat unfavorable Chinese public opinion toward organ donation and transplantation, thus potentially increasing the organ donation rate in the People's Republic of China. Keywords: influencing factors, attitudes, organ transplantation, organ failure

  8. Self-reported use of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program benefits to purchase soda in a public health center population: Los Angeles County, California, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragan, Noel; Gase, Lauren; Butler, Rebecca; Smith, Lisa; Simon, Paul; Kuo, Tony

    2015-01-01

    To better inform local program planning for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health used self-reported data from a public health center population to examine the prevalence of benefits used to purchase soda. We performed statistical analyses, including multivariable regression modeling, using data from a local health and nutrition examination survey. The survey response rate was 69% (n=1,503). More than one-third of survey participants reported receiving, or living in a household where someone receives, nutrition assistance benefits. When asked, 33% (n=170) reported using these benefits to purchase soda "sometimes" and 18% (n=91) reported "often" or "always," suggesting that the use of program benefits to purchase soda was not uncommon in this subpopulation. These findings have meaningful policy and planning implications, as they contribute to ongoing dialogue about strategies for optimizing nutrition among SNAP recipients.

  9. Effects of Message Interactivity upon Relational Maintenance Strategy in Digital Communications between Organizations and the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan-Qing

    2012-01-01

    Digital communication between organizations and the public is strategically important in shaping mutual understanding and long term relationship. The primary focus of this project was to investigate the relationship between message interactivity and relational maintenance strategy in the email communication process on organization websites. At…

  10. Advertising or public relations – which is the organizations choice in the current period?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Duhalm

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current period, when the issue of efficient use of financial resources is a central, organizations seeking the best ways to both promote their self-image, and products or services they produce and sell. Between the promotional techniques by the mass communication in which organizations can appeal, the makers have to choose between advertising and public relations activities.

  11. Founding Mothers: The Contribution of Women's Organizations to Public Library Development in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Paula D.

    1994-01-01

    Examines the work of women's voluntary associations in support of public libraries in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Activities studied include support of traveling libraries, library legislation, and the founding of local libraries. Cooperation of organized women's groups with the American Library Association and other organizations is…

  12. 78 FR 46950 - Ecobaby Organics, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... claims. \\2\\ See Guides for the Use of Environmental Marketing Claims, 77 FR 62, 122, 62,123 (Oct. 11... Ecobaby Organics, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment AGENCY: Federal Trade.... Write ``Ecobaby Organics, File No. 122 3129'' on your comment and file your comment online at...

  13. 26 CFR 1.509(a)-3T - Broadly, publicly supported organizations (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... public charity described in 509(a)(2). N's five-member governing body consists of A, A's sons, B and C... having special knowledge in the particular field or discipline in which the organization is operating, of... section 509(a)(2) are to be computed on the basis of the nature of the organization's normal sources...

  14. Using non-human primates to benefit humans: research and organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, David; Dondorp, Wybo; de Wert, Guido

    2014-11-01

    Emerging biotechnology may soon allow the creation of genetically human organs inside animals, with non-human primates (henceforth simply "primates") and pigs being the best candidate species. This prospect raises the question of whether creating organs in primates in order to then transplant them into humans would be more (or less) acceptable than using them for research. In this paper, we examine the validity of the purported moral distinction between primates and other animals, and analyze the ethical acceptability of using primates to create organs for human use.

  15. Lobbying and advocacy for the public's health: what are the limits for nonprofit organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernick, J S

    1999-09-01

    Nonprofit organizations play an important role in advocating for the public's health in the United States. This article describes the rules under US law for lobbying by nonprofit organizations. The 2 most common kinds of non-profits working to improve the public's health are "public charities" and "social welfare organizations." Although social welfare organizations may engage in relatively unlimited lobbying, public charities may not engage in "substantial" lobbying. Lobbying is divided into 2 main categories. Direct lobbying refers to communications with law-makers that take a position on specific legislation, and grassroots lobbying includes attempts to persuade members of the general public to take action regarding legislation. Even public charities may engage in some direct lobbying and a smaller amount of grassroots lobbying. Much public health advocacy, however, is not lobbying, since there are several important exceptions to the lobbying rules. These exceptions include "non-partisan analysis, study, or research" and discussions of broad social problems. Lobbying with federal or earmarked foundation funds is generally prohibited.

  16. Understanding the organization of public health delivery systems: an empirical typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Glen P; Scutchfield, F Douglas; Bhandari, Michelyn W; Smith, Sharla A

    2010-03-01

    Policy discussions about improving the U.S. health care system increasingly recognize the need to strengthen its capacities for delivering public health services. A better understanding of how public health delivery systems are organized across the United States is critical to improvement. To facilitate the development of such evidence, this article presents an empirical method of classifying and comparing public health delivery systems based on key elements of their organizational structure. This analysis uses data collected through a national longitudinal survey of local public health agencies serving communities with at least 100,000 residents. The survey measured the availability of twenty core public health activities in local communities and the types of organizations contributing to each activity. Cluster analysis differentiated local delivery systems based on the scope of activities delivered, the range of organizations contributing, and the distribution of effort within the system. Public health delivery systems varied widely in organizational structure, but the observed patterns of variation suggested that systems adhere to one of seven distinct configurations. Systems frequently migrated from one configuration to another over time, with an overall trend toward offering a broader scope of services and engaging a wider range of organizations. Public health delivery systems exhibit important structural differences that may influence their operations and outcomes. The typology developed through this analysis can facilitate comparative studies to identify which delivery system configurations perform best in which contexts.

  17. PUBLIC KNOWLEDGE, LEARNING ORGANIZATIONS AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AS STRATEGIC LEVERS FOR A NEW PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IN ITALY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierfranco Malizia

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In one of the most interesting volumes of an equally interesting series entitled “Proposals for a change in the public administrations” concerning the Italian P.A. (VV. AA., 2002, edited by the Civil Service Department of the Italian government and realised with the collaboration of public and private partners to stimulate processes of change in the P.A., a precise and carefully explained reference is made to the absolute importance for the public administrations of the promotion of know-how development by means of the creation, valorisation and sharing of the knowledge-competence patrimony necessary to back the innovation processes like the logic of learning organizations and knowledge management.

  18. The Strategy against Organized Crime in Mexico: a Public Policy Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Montero

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the assumption that the organized crime is a menace for democracy. The article develops an analysis on the fight against organized crime's policy design in the Felipe Calderon's government, questioning if the policy is managed as a police's issue or a national security's issue. The main finding is the identification of the Mexican's government objective in the "war against organized crime" switching the focus from organized crime to the violence created by criminal organizations. To fight violence the government implements a policy based on the use of public force that doesn't consider the cooperation between different governmental agencies.

  19. Cash, rewards, and benefits in organ transplantation: an open letter to Senator Arlen Specter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovitch, Gabriel

    2009-04-01

    To consider proposals to use financial incentives for organ donors that have become a subject of intense controversy in both lay and medical press (in contradistinction to the removal of financial disincentives, which is essentially noncontroversial although typically not practiced). In a concerned response to the shortage of organs the office of Senator Specter of Pennsylvania has been the source of a proposal to amend the 1984 United States National Organ Transplant Act, which has been interpreted to prohibit such incentives. The proposal would permit various forms of financial incentives for donation to no longer be prohibited. The amendment would have unintentional negative consequences that could undermine, rather than strengthen, the national and international organ transplant endeavor. These concerns are considered in my personal correspondence to Senator Specter's office on which the text is based.

  20. An Overview of Benefits of Organic Agriculture as a Climate Change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... due account is given to relevant factors of influence for sustainable development and vulnerability, be this on physical, economic or socio-cultural levels. ... Organic agriculture is an adaptation strategy that can be targeted at improving the ...

  1. 8 CFR 319.5 - Public international organizations in which the U.S. participates by treaty or statute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Public international organizations in which... UNITED STATES CITIZENS § 319.5 Public international organizations in which the U.S. participates by treaty or statute. Organizations designated by the President as international organizations pursuant...

  2. Interconnection Assessment Methodology and Cost Benefit Analysis for High-Penetration PV Deployment in the Arizona Public Service System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggu, Murali; Giraldez, Julieta; Harris, Tom; Brunhart-Lupo, Nicholas; Lisell, Lars; Narang, David

    2015-06-14

    In an effort to better understand the impacts of high penetrations of photovoltaic (PV) generators on distribution systems, Arizona Public Service and its partners completed a multi-year project to develop the tools and knowledge base needed to safely and reliably integrate high penetrations of utility- and residential-scale PV. Building upon the APS Community Power Project-Flagstaff Pilot, this project investigates the impact of PV on a representative feeder in northeast Flagstaff. To quantify and catalog the effects of the estimated 1.3 MW of PV that will be installed on the feeder (both smaller units at homes and large, centrally located systems), high-speed weather and electrical data acquisition systems and digital 'smart' meters were designed and installed to facilitate monitoring and to build and validate comprehensive, high-resolution models of the distribution system. These models are being developed to analyze the impacts of PV on distribution circuit protection systems (including coordination and anti-islanding), predict voltage regulation and phase balance issues, and develop volt/VAr control schemes. This paper continues from a paper presented at the 2014 IEEE PVSC conference that described feeder model evaluation and high penetration advanced scenario analysis, specifically feeder reconfiguration. This paper presents results from Phase 5 of the project. Specifically, the paper discusses tool automation; interconnection assessment methodology and cost benefit analysis.

  3. From motivation to acceptability: a survey of public attitudes towards organ donation in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordfalk, Francisca; Olejaz, Maria; Jensen, Anja M B; Skovgaard, Lea Larsen; Hoeyer, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Over the past three decades, public attitudes to organ donation have been a subject of numerous studies focusing on donor motivation. Here, we present a fresh approach. We suggest focusing on public acceptability instead of motivation. The point is to understand public attitudes well enough to avoid risking public support for organ transplantation. We conducted the study in Denmark because there have been significant developments in public attitudes to organ donation in this country. In the 1990s, Denmark was a country with very low public support for organ donation and Denmark was the last country in Europe to introduce brain death as a legal criterion of death, whereas today Eurobarometer surveys rate Denmark as one of the European countries with the highest support for deceased organ donation from brain dead donors. We conducted a telephone survey in Denmark (N = 1195). A questionnaire was developed on the basis of preceding qualitative studies and pilot testing and included reuse of one item from earlier surveys to facilitate historical comparison. The analysis of the data was carried out using IBM SPSS Statistics 22 and focused on descriptive statistics. A clear majority of 91.9 % are positive or very positive towards organ donation; 85.8 % like the idea of their body being used after their death, 85.0 % is willing to donate their own organs, 82.1 % to donate their tissue and only 2.3 % find that too much has been done to promote organ donation. There is limited support for monetary incentives for organ donation (5.8 %) and presumed consent (30.4 %), while a majority (63.9 %) supports making it mandatory to register a personal decision. Religious self-identification has limited impact on attitudes. We can identify a shift over the past three decades from marked opposition to organ transplantation to strong support as well as a pattern in the contemporary public attitudes, which can help explain what is central to public acceptability: self

  4. Strategies for changing negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People’s Republic of China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumin, Xie; Woo, Stephanie Mu-Lian; Lei, Zhang

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the demand for organ transplantation has risen rapidly worldwide, due to an increased incidence of vital organ failure. However, the scarcity of organs appropriate for transplantation has led to an organ shortage crisis. This article retrospectively reviews strategies to change negative public attitudes toward organ donation in the People’s Republic of China. We strongly believe that efforts to publicize knowledge of organ donation, promote family discussions, train medical staff and students, establish incentive systems, and implement regulatory oversight may combat unfavorable Chinese public opinion toward organ donation and transplantation, thus potentially increasing the organ donation rate in the People’s Republic of China. PMID:24368880

  5. Veterinary syndromic surveillance in practice: costs and benefits for governmental organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda C. Dórea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: We describe a veterinary syndromic surveillance system developed in Sweden based on laboratory test requests. Materials and methods: The system is a desktop application built using free software. Results: Development took 1 year. During the first year of operation, utility was demonstrated by the detection of statistically significant increases in the number of laboratory submissions. The number of false alarms was considered satisfactory in order to achieve the desired sensitivity. Discussion: Besides the demonstrated benefit for disease surveillance, the system contributed to improving data quality and communication between the diagnostic departments and the epidemiology department.

  6. COST/BENEFIT ANALYSIS – A TOOL TO IMPROVE RECRUITMENT, SELECTION AND EMPLOYMENT IN ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Valentina FLOREA

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Human resource is a major source for organization to obtain competitive advantage and can be very important in obtaining long-term performance. The limits of recruitment process are the cost, the choice made, time and legislation. Any organization looks for minimizing the human resources recruitment, selection and employment costs. This article presents the importance of cost in choosing the best practices of recruitment, selection, employment and integration of new employees in the organization, though, the cost is an important variable for analysis. In this article is presented the research made in large organizations from Dambovita County, Romania, and are also presented the costs and their consequences on medium and long-term over the organization activities These activities are discrimination, sexual harassment, ethics, low performance and results, by choosing the “wrong” people, and implicitly diminishing the level of qualifications, knowledge and abilities, by growing the absenteeism, the direct and indirect costs of these processes and the direct consequences over the time management.

  7. Investigation and Strategic Analysis of Public Willingness and Attitudes Toward Organ Donation in East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Zheng, J; Liu, W; Ding, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, H; Zou, Y; Fu, Y

    2015-10-01

    China officially initiated deceased organ donation in 2010. Much progress has been made since then. However, compared with the developed countries in Europe and America, there is still a large gap. In this study, we investigate the willingness and attitude of the general public in East China and the factors that affect organ donation, and propose specific recommendations for promoting it. A simple and random sample was questioned. The data were analyzed statistically using SPSS 19.0 software, χ(2) test, and logistic regression. A total of 1200 questionnaires were issued; of these, 1105 were recovered, with 1074 effective questionnaires, for an effective rate of 89.5%. Among these, 426 respondents (39.7%) were willing to donate, 529 (49.3%) were in favor of donation but would not donate themselves; and 119 (11.1%) were against donation. Women (P organ donation (P organ donation. Reasons to hinder organ donation included imperfect laws and regulations, distrust on organ allocation, and insufficient promotion by relevant organizations. Much needs to be done to promote organ donation in China; targeted publicity will help to improve the work efficiency of organ donation; improvement of relevant policies and regulations, and establishment of a fair and transparent organ allocation system are key to the development of organ donation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Organic farming benefits local plant diversity in vineyard farms located in intensive agricultural landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimbene, Juri; Marini, Lorenzo; Paoletti, Maurizio G

    2012-05-01

    The majority of research on organic farming has considered arable and grassland farming systems in Central and Northern Europe, whilst only a few studies have been carried out in Mediterranean agro-systems, such as vineyards, despite their economic importance. The main aim of the study was to test whether organic farming enhances local plant species richness in both crop and non-crop areas of vineyard farms located in intensive conventional landscapes. Nine conventional and nine organic farms were selected in an intensively cultivated region (i.e. no gradient in landscape composition) in northern Italy. In each farm, vascular plants were sampled in one vineyard and in two non-crop linear habitats, grass strips and hedgerows, adjacent to vineyards and therefore potentially influenced by farming. We used linear mixed models to test the effect of farming, and species longevity (annual vs. perennial) separately for the three habitat types. In our intensive agricultural landscapes organic farming promoted local plant species richness in vineyard fields, and grassland strips while we found no effect for linear hedgerows. Differences in species richness were not associated to differences in species composition, indicating that similar plant communities were hosted in vineyard farms independently of the management type. This negative effect of conventional farming was probably due to the use of herbicides, while mechanical operations and mowing regime did not differ between organic and conventional farms. In grassland strips, and only marginally in vineyards, we found that the positive effect of organic farming was more pronounced for perennial than annual species.

  9. Public health nursing-indispensible and economical for everyone if organized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Haven

    2011-01-01

    In August 1930, the editors of the original Public Health Nursing published an article derived from a speech made by Dr. Haven Emerson, then professor of public health administration at Columbia University, on the topic of the distribution and use of public health nurses. The speech was made before an audience of lay board members from hospitals and public health nursing organizations in Chicago, February 17, 1930. Emerson reported the results of a data analysis in which the numbers and credentials of public health nurses in 24 cities across the United States were reported. Excerpts from this report and Dr. Emerson's conclusions are powerful reminders that while there were issues of labor supply and distribution, the power of nurses to effect social transformation was central to the role as conceived by those administering public health services.

  10. An antidote to the emerging two tier organ donation policy in Canada: the Public Cadaveric Organ Donation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, S

    2005-04-01

    In Canada, as in many other countries, there exists an organ procurement/donation crisis. This paper reviews some of the most common kidney procurement and allocation programmes, analyses them in terms of public and private administration, and argues that privately administered living donor models are an inequitable stopgap measure, the good intentions of which are misplaced and opportunistic. Focusing on how to improve the publicly administered equitable cadaveric donation programme, and at the same time offering one possible explanation for its current failure, it is suggested that the simple moral principle of "give and you shall receive", already considered by some, be extended further. This would allow for those who are willing to sign up to be a public cadaveric donor be given a priority for receiving an organ donation should they ever require it. It is argued that this priority may provide the motivation to give that is so far lacking in Canada. This model is called the Public Cadaveric Organ Donation Program.

  11. The Benefits of Non-Library Professional Organization Membership for Liaison Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Miranda Henry

    2011-01-01

    Although liaison librarians have two important professional identities--librarian and subject specialist--the library literature has paid scant attention to their membership and participation in non-library professional organizations. This article analyzes a study of ten librarians who joined non-library associations and concludes that membership…

  12. The benefits of using quantile regression for analysing the effect of weeds on organic winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, M.; Makowski, D.; Jeuffroy, M.H.; Valantin-Morison, M.; David, C.

    2010-01-01

    P>In organic farming, weeds are one of the threats that limit crop yield. An early prediction of weed effect on yield loss and the size of late weed populations could help farmers and advisors to improve weed management. Numerous studies predicting the effect of weeds on yield have already been

  13. Screening of living organ donors for endemic infections: Understanding the challenges and benefits of enhanced screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Amanda; Ison, Michael G

    2016-11-14

    Living organ donor candidates are screened for medical and psychosocial contraindications to donation. One important goal of this process is to prevent donor-derived infectious diseases transmissions. These transmissions are exceptionally rare, but have the potential to cause significant morbidity and mortality. The Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network now requires each recovery hospital to develop a protocol for evaluating living donors for tuberculosis and other geographically-defined endemic pathogens, including Trypanosoma cruzi (the causative pathogen of Chagas' disease), Strongyloides stercoralis, and West Nile Virus (WNV), in addition to universal screening for blood-borne pathogens. Enhanced screening requirements were developed in response to the changing epidemiology and endemicity of these diseases, as well as recent case reports of donor-derived disease transmission. Living organ donor disease screening presents a number of unique challenges to clinicians and policy-makers, including deciding which donors to test, which testing modality to use, when to test, and appropriate interpretation of results. This review will analyze the epidemiology of T. cruzi, S. stercoralis, and WNV, the assays available for screening for these diseases, and the subsequent impact on the living organ donor process . This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  14. Fullerene alloy formation and the benefits for efficient printing of ternary blend organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Bjerring, Morten; Nielsen, Niels Chr.

    2015-01-01

    behaving as pseudo-binary mixtures due to alloying of the fullerene components. This finding has vast implications for the understanding of polymer–fullerene mixtures and quite certainly also their application in organic solar cells where performance hinges critically on the blend behaviour which is also...

  15. Benefits to Host Organizations from Participating in Internship Programs in Botswana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mgaya, Klodwig; Mbekomize, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe internship programs have gained the attention of many tertiary institutions. Many researchers have found the internship programs to be beneficial to the students, tertiary institutions and host organizations. The Faculty of Business at the University of Botswana runs an internship program which attaches students to various…

  16. Comparable Educational Benefits in Half the Time: An Alternating Organic Chemistry Laboratory Sequence Targeting Prehealth Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sherri C.; Colabroy, Keri L.; Baar, Marsha R.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory is a mainstay in STEM education, promoting the development of critical thinking skills, dexterity, and scientific curiosity. The goals in the laboratory for nonchemistry, prehealth majors, though, could be distinguished from those for chemistry majors. In service courses such as organic chemistry, much laboratory time is often spent…

  17. The benefits of using quantile regression for analysing the effect of weeds on organic winter wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Casagrande, M.; Makowski, D.; Jeuffroy, M.H.; Valantin-Morison, M.; David, C.

    2010-01-01

    P>In organic farming, weeds are one of the threats that limit crop yield. An early prediction of weed effect on yield loss and the size of late weed populations could help farmers and advisors to improve weed management. Numerous studies predicting the effect of weeds on yield have already been c

  18. Comparable Educational Benefits in Half the Time: An Alternating Organic Chemistry Laboratory Sequence Targeting Prehealth Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sherri C.; Colabroy, Keri L.; Baar, Marsha R.

    2016-01-01

    The laboratory is a mainstay in STEM education, promoting the development of critical thinking skills, dexterity, and scientific curiosity. The goals in the laboratory for nonchemistry, prehealth majors, though, could be distinguished from those for chemistry majors. In service courses such as organic chemistry, much laboratory time is often spent…

  19. Minimizing Onsite Organic Household Left-Over Waste: The Emission Benefits of Keeping Pet Rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos P. Tsagarakis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available As waste management is becoming all the more crucial, this study investigates the way in which house left-over organic waste can be better managed on site, in order to minimize the off-site treatment cost and maximize environmental performance. For the implementation of this research, a full year measurement was recorded, showing the organic leftover waste food intake of two rabbits in a household of four. The organic food, collected in two separate baskets suitable for composting—though one for rabbit intake—was 168.5 kg in total, plus 68.8 kg, which was delivered directly to the composting bin, along with food remains and rabbit feces. The results show that, over the examined year, a total of up to 0.417 metric tons of CO2 equivalent per year emissions was avoided, suggesting that if 30 houses were to apply this methodology, one garbage truck journey per year would be saved. Overall, this study suggests that better information and environmental awareness can result in on-site, low cost, individual management of recyclable organic material, which would assist with the decrease in the cost of management, along with increased environmental performance.

  20. Organic amendments derived from a pharmaceutical by-product: benefits and risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigliotti, Giovanni; Cucina, Mirko; Zadra, Claudia; Pezzolla, Daniela; Sordi, Simone; Carla Marcotullio, Maria; Curini, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    The application of organic amendments to soils, such as sewage sludge, anaerobic digestate and compost is considered a tool for improving soil fertility and enhancing C stocks. The addition of these different organic materials allows a good supply of nutrients for plants but also contributes to C sequestration, affects the microbial activity and the transformation of soil organic matter (SOM). Moreover, the addition of organic amendment has gained importance as a source of CO2 emissions and then as a cause of the "Global Warming". Therefore, it is important to investigate the factors controlling the SOM mineralization in order to improve the soil C sequestration and decreasing at the same time CO2 emissions. Moreover, the quality of organic matter added to the soil will play an important role in these dynamics. Based on these considerations, the aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of the application to an arable soil of different organic materials derived from a pharmaceutical by-product which results from the fermentative biomass after the separation of the lipopolypeptidic antibiotic produced. A microcosm soil experiment was carried out using three different materials: a sewage sludge derived from the stabilization process of the by-product, a digestate obtained from the anaerobic treatment of the by-product and a compost produced by the aerobic treatment of the same digestate. To achieve this aim, the short-term variations of CO2 emissions, enzymatic soil activities (Dehydrogenase total activity and Fluoresceine diacetate hydrolysis), SOM quantity and quality were studied. In addition, process-related residues of antibiotic and decanoic acid (a precursor added during the fermentation) were analyzed on the organic materials to assess their possible presence. Through these analyses it was possible to state that the application to the soil of sewage sludge and anaerobic digestate may have a strong influence on the short-term variations of the

  1. Strategic planning models in public and non-profit sport organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELENA THEAKOU

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategic planning is widely used by organisations, as itis an integral part of strategy. The present study tackles thetopic of strategic planning as it is developed by public andnon-profit organizations and provides an extensive review ofliterature in the area of the development and role of strategic planning within strategic management and the way it is adopted by public and non-profit organizations. For the purposes of this paper, five models of strategic planning have been discussed with the belief that they describe better the models that can be approached and developed by public and non-profit organizations in the area of sport. This article aims at partly contributing to the theoretical discussion concerning the ability of organizations to integrate and deploy strategic planning. For this study we examined a non-profitsport organization in British Columbia, Canada. The authorspropose that public and non-profit sport organizations shoulddevelop their own model of strategic planning, which mayhelp them to think and act strategically.

  2. Through the Looking Glass: Realizing the Benefits of an International and Comparative Perspective on Teaching Public Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingner, Donald E.; Washington, Charles W.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses reasons why public administrators in the United States; tend to have a parochial U.S.-centered view of the public affairs discipline and the associated negative effects such views have on U.S. public affairs. Proposes an agenda for strengthening the development of an international and comparative perspective in teaching public affairs…

  3. FORECAST, ORGANIZATION-COORDINATION AND MOTIVATION IN LOCAL PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petronela\tSCUTARIU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The proper functioning of local administrative system is not possible without the exercise of the functions of local public administration management. From such a direction, in this article we intend to analyze the contents of the functions of forecast, of organization-coordination and of motivation, in order to show how each of these contributes to good management of local public affairs. Defining the mission, the objectives of local government and the actions to be taken to achieve them, the design and harmonization of optimal local organizational structure components to achieve preset objectives, but also the human resources training from local public administration to use their skills and capacities towards achieving the objectives of the local public organization contribute to improving the local administrative process with effect on satisfying the interests of the local community

  4. Determinants of knowledge-sharing intention and knowledge-sharing behavior in a public organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delio Ignacio Castaneda

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to examine the factors that affect the knowledge-sharing intention and knowledge-sharing behavior in a public sector organization. A survey was conducted with 188 knowledge workers of a public-sector organization at the national level in Colombia. In this public organization significant relationships between self-efficacy and knowledge-sharing intention, subjective norms, and knowledge-sharing behavior, and between knowledge-sharing intention and knowledge-sharing behavior were found. There was a direct effect of perceived organizational support on knowledge-sharing behavior and a moderator role of perceived organizational support between the studied variables. The findings clarify how some personal variables and perceived organizational support interact in the explanation of knowledge sharing.

  5. Disaggregating the Truth: A Re-Analysis of the Costs and Benefits of Michigan's Public Universities. Professional File. Number 125, Summer 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daun-Barnett, Nathan J.

    2012-01-01

    For more than 50 years, human capital theory has been the cornerstone for understanding the value of investing in individuals' productive capacities in terms of both personal social and economic gain and the collective benefits that accrue to society. Vedder and Denhart (2007) challenge the hypothesis that public investment in higher education…

  6. Does Eco-Certification Have Environmental Benefits? Organic Coffee in Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Blackman, Allen; Naranjo, Maria A.

    2010-01-01

    Eco-certification of coffee, timber and other high-value agricultural commodities is increasingly widespread. In principle, it can improve commodity producers’ environmental performance, even in countries where state regulation is weak. However, evidence needed to evaluate this hypothesis is virtually nonexistent. To help fill this gap, we use detailed farm-level data to analyze the environmental impacts of organic coffee certification in central Costa Rica. We use propensity score matching t...

  7. Quality management techniques in public sector organizations: the role of managerial autonomy and organizational culture

    OpenAIRE

    Demuzere, Sara; Verhoest, Koen; Bouckaert, Geert

    2008-01-01

    According to NPM, more effective and efficient public services can be delivered if public sector organizations are granted more managerial autonomy and if they use various (private sector) management techniques. To date, only very limited attention has been paid to the link between managerial autonomy and the use of management techniques. With this study, we seek to fill this gap in the extensive NPM literature by examining the extent to which managerial autonomy has an effect on the use of m...

  8. Association between organizational capacity and involvement in chronic disease prevention programming among Canadian public health organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Hanusaik, Nancy; Sabiston, Catherine M.; Kishchuk, Natalie; Maximova, Katerina; O’Loughlin, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    In the context of the emerging field of public health services and systems research, this study (i) tested a model of the relationships between public health organizational capacity (OC) for chronic disease prevention, its determinants (organizational supports for evaluation, partnership effectiveness) and one possible outcome of OC (involvement in core chronic disease prevention practices) and (ii) examined differences in the nature of these relationships among organizations operating in mor...

  9. HAWAII PUBLIC OPINION ON AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTS DERIVED FROM GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISM (GMO) TECHNOLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Carol; Chan-Halbrendt, Catherine; Wen, Na

    2002-01-01

    This article studied Hawaii public opinion on agricultural products and processes using GMO technology. We used telephone to interview the people in each island of Hawaii. We found out that the favorability rating toward the attributes of GMO technological application differ based on the nature of GMO benefits. And sociodemographic variables played a significant difference in the preference of using GMO technology on producing agricultural products and process. Most significant associations w...

  10. A Review of Research on the Public Benefit of Circulation Industry%流通公益性研究综述

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马龙龙; 陶婷婷

    2016-01-01

    继基础性、先导性、战略性之后,流通产业的公益性成为流通研究中一个重要命题。从流通公益性的内涵、内容分类、评价及供给方式四个主要方面,对已有文献进行全面梳理发现,流通公益性还没有形成完整的理论架构,可拓展的空间还比较大。公平与效率是从产业层面研究流通公益性的一个难点,科学的定量方法将随着公益性认识的加深而被大量运用,公益性多元化供给的具体形式尚待深入挖掘,基于利益相关者理论的企业治理是研究流通公益性一个新的微观视角。%Besides the fundamental,leading and strategic nature of circulation industry,the public benefit of this industry has become one of the important hot issues of related research. The authors review the related literatures from four aspects of the public benefit of circulation,such as the connotation,content classification,evaluation and supply pattern. It is found that there is no integrated theoretical framework concerning the public benefit of circulation,which leaves us with more space to expand. Fairness and efficiency is one of the difficulties in carrying out research on the public benefit of circulation from the industrial level;the scientific quantitative methods will be broadly applied with the increasingly deepened understanding of public benefit;the specific pattern of the diversified supply of public benefit will be deeply explored;and corporate governance based on the theory of stakeholders will become a new micro angle for us to carry out research on the public benefit of circulation.

  11. The project organization as a policy tool in implementing welfare reforms in the public sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Christian; Johansson, Staffan; Löfström, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Organizational design is considered in policy literature as a forceful policy tool to put policy to action. However, previous research has not analyzed the project organization as a specific form of organizational design and, hence, has not given much attention to such organizations as a strategic choice when selecting policy tools. The purpose of the article is to investigate the project as a policy tool; how do such temporary organizations function as a specific form of organization when public policy is implemented? The article is based on a framework of policy implementation and is illustrated with two welfare reforms in the Swedish public sector, which were organized and implemented as project organizations. The case studies and the analysis show that it is crucial that a project organization fits into the overall governance structure when used as a policy tool. If not, the project will remain encapsulated and will not have sufficient impact on the permanent organizational structure. The concept of encapsulation indicates a need to protect the project from a potential hostile environment. The implication of this is that organizational design as a policy tool is a matter that deserves more attention in the strategic discussion on implementing public policies and on the suitability of using certain policy tools.

  12. THE ORGANIZATIONAL SELF-ASSESSMENT OF QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN PUBLIC ORGANIZATION WITH THE EUROPEAN UNION COMMON ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AHMET AZMİ YETİM

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research which is aimed to increase the service quality in public organization by extending the quality management applications is to; put forward the effect of European Union Common Assessment Framework which is one of the implementation and organizational self-assessment model in public administration of total quality management (which is one of the theory of modern management on public organization according to the employee perception by carrying out organizational self-assessment. The research group consists of; 379 employeeS surveyed at the central organization of Ministryr of Labor and Social Security in which the Common Assessment Framework is applied and 247 employees surveyed at the Sports General Directorate Central Organization of the Ministry of Youth and Sport in which the Common Assessment Framework is not applied. This research consists of a descriptive (descriptive- quantification study in which the scanning model was used. In this research; as a data collection tool a Likert type Common Assessment Framework Organizational Quality Scale (CAF-OQS which is developed by us was used. In order for the content validity of the scale, we benefitted From expert opinion composed of 11 people and pilot scheme and also for the construct validation Exploratory Factor Analysis iwas carried out. In order to determine the scale reliability the Cronbach alpha coefficient was calculated. Item-total correlation is approximately between .70 and .90 and cronbach alpha value is .98. The eigenvalue graph of the scale showed that the scale has an integrated structure with a single factor. The explained variance was calculated as 69.53% and this showed that the scale has presented the single factor variable which is called “Organizational Quality” as approximately 70%. As the value of the factor loading which shows whether the item belongs to a factor or not is approximately between .80 and .90, and it presented that the items

  13. Creating Your Strategic Plan A Workbook for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bryson, John M

    2011-01-01

    Creating Your Strategic Plan is the best-selling companion workbook to Bryson's landmark book, Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations. Whether used with the main text or by itself, this thoroughly revised third edition provides a step-by-step guide to putting strategic planning to work in public and nonprofit organizations. The workbook contains new and revised worksheets and additional material on readiness assessment, teamwork, stakeholder analysis, visioning, strategic issue identification, and implementation. Creating Your Strategic Plan covers each of the ten key steps

  14. Sewage sludge, compost and other representative organic wastes as agricultural soil amendments: Benefits versus limiting factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Paula; Mourinha, Clarisse; Farto, Márcia; Santos, Teresa; Palma, Patrícia; Sengo, Joana; Morais, Marie-Christine; Cunha-Queda, Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Nine different samples of sewage sludges, composts and other representative organic wastes, with potential interest to be used as agricultural soil amendments, were characterized: municipal sewage sludge (SS1 and SS2), agro industrial sludge (AIS), municipal slaughterhouse sludge (MSS), mixed municipal solid waste compost (MMSWC), agricultural wastes compost (AWC), compost produced from agricultural wastes and sewage sludge (AWSSC), pig slurry digestate (PSD) and paper mill wastes (PMW). The characterization was made considering their: (i) physicochemical parameters, (ii) total and bioavailable heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn and Hg), (iii) organic contaminants, (iv) pathogenic microorganisms and (v) stability and phytotoxicity indicators. All the sludges, municipal or other, comply with the requirements of the legislation regarding the possibility of their application to agricultural soil (with the exception of SS2, due to its pathogenic microorganisms content), with a content of organic matter and nutrients that make them interesting to be applied to soil. The composts presented, in general, some constraints regarding their application to soil, and their impairment was due to the existence of heavy metal concentrations exceeding the proposed limit of the draft European legislation. As a consequence, with the exception of AWSSC, most compost samples were not able to meet these quality criteria, which are more conservative for compost than for sewage sludge. From the results, the composting of sewage sludge is recommended as a way to turn a less stabilized waste into a material that is no longer classified as a waste and, judging by the results of this work, with lower heavy metal content than the other composted materials, and without sanitation problems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Communicating the risks and benefits of genetically engineered food products to the public: The view of experts from four European countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scholderer, Joachim; Balderjahn, Ingo; Will, Simone

    Executive summary 1. Previous research on the risks and benefits of genetically engineered food products has not accounted for risk communication issues. The introductory part of this paper develops a more comprehensive model. Risks and benefits enter the model as the input of a risk communication......, and the United Kingdom. Leading representatives of the following parties took part: scientific research, authorities responsible for the approval of genetically modified organisms, suppliers of genetically modified organisms, the food processing industry, associations of the food industry, agricultural...... to communication about genetically modified food products....

  16. 我国公安机关网络舆论引导浅析%Analysis of network of public opinion of the public security organs to guide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林琦; 王越琳; 王晓宇

    2012-01-01

    This paper expounds the formation and characteristics of the network of public opinion, the lack of the guide of network of public opinion of Chtna's public security organs, and proposed some methods of improve the guide of public opinion of public security organ network.%本文通过分析网络舆论的形成和特点,我国公安机关网络舆论引导工作存在的不足,提出了加强公安机关网络舆论引导的途径。

  17. Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Electronics Environmental Benefits Calculator (EEBC) was developed to assist organizations in estimating the environmental benefits of greening their purchase,...

  18. Comparative analysis of conflict dynamics within private and public sector organizations / Werner Havenga

    OpenAIRE

    Havenga, Werner

    2004-01-01

    In South Africa, private and public sector organizations have been experiencing conflict at an increasing rate during the past few decades and especially the last ten years. The prominence and high level with which conflict is regarded in this new democracy has made the study of this phenomenon more relevant. Especially within business organizations, between individuals, groups, and at management level, the influence of transformation and affirmative action has steadily affe...

  19. Best practices on institutional performance indicators system in R and D and I public organizations - the case of military organizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Maria Cecilia [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), SP (Brazil). Superintendencia da Qualidade]. E-mail: mcecilia37@hotmail.com; ctmsp-70b1@ctmsp.mar.mil.br; Zouain, Desiree Moraes [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: dmzouain@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    This paper reflects the partial results of a Master degree research, performed in IPEN and CTMSP in Brazil. The focus of this research is to establish the best practices for an Institutional Performance Indicators System in Public Research, Development and Innovation (R and D and I) Organizations, particularly, the military ones. In public sector, especially military Institutes that are strongly committed to R and D and I, there have been changes in order to modernize the organization management. The focus, in our days, is on the Performance Indicator System, financial or not, strategic, tactic and operational, as a tool for the organizational control over the accomplishment of settled plans, the completion of the mission, everything according to a continuous improvement process. Among the many approaches underlying the development of a Performance Indicator System, since the 90s, the Balanced Scorecard - BSC stands out. It is based on the studies developed by Kaplan and Norton in 1986. By using the BSC approach, it is possible to construct a Performance Indicator System that makes available the information, financial or non-financial data, in logical format. This paper presents the results of the international and national experiences review of Institutional Performance Indicator Systems, applicable to the public organizations of R and D and I, preferably military organizations, and identify the best practices of these Systems. At the end of this paper, it is conducted a comparison among the experiences analyzed, in operation or planned, and are established some suggestions for an Institutional Performance Indicator System for a Military R and D and I Organization. (author)

  20. 24 CFR 5.615 - Public housing program and Section 8 tenant-based assistance program: How welfare benefit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 8 tenant-based assistance program: How welfare benefit reduction affects family income. 5.615... assistance program: How welfare benefit reduction affects family income. (a) Applicability. This section... purposes of this section: Covered families. Families who receive welfare assistance or other...

  1. 26 CFR 1.509(a)-3 - Broadly, publicly supported organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... in section 501(c)(3). O was created by A in 1971 for the purpose of carrying on economic studies primarily through persons receiving grants from O and engaging in the sale of economic publications. O's... societies, or civic affairs in the case of parent-teacher associations. (vii) In the case of an organization...

  2. Effect of Learning Organization Perception to the Organizational Commitment: A Comparison between Private and Public University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balay, Refik

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to examine the impact of faculty members' learning organization perceptions to the organizational commitment through quantitative method. The study group consists of 172 faculty members working in two universities, which are private (Zirve University) and public (Harran University) ones. The research results show that faculty…

  3. The role and importance of public relations at non-governmental organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Duhalm

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenomenon of globalization during the twentieth century, has increased the importance of nongovernmental organizations. Their development has gained to the whole world providing an important part of social, educational, cultural and welfare services that the community felt. Voluntary and non-profit activity which it carries led, implicitly, to increasing importance in public relations sector, compared with profit business.

  4. Strategic-Decision Quality in Public Organizations: An Information Processing Perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.R.J. George (Bert); S. Desmidt (Sebastian)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis study draws on information processing theory to investigate predictors of strategic-decision quality in public organizations. Information processing theory argues that (a) rational planning practices contribute to strategic-decision quality by injecting information into decision mak

  5. Building Resilience in Public Organizations: The Role of Waste and Bricolage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper shows how organizational waste and processes of bricolage have an important role in the functioning of public organizations, and how this is essential to innovation, organisational resilience and survival. This paper largely builds on the work of organisation

  6. Matching People and Organizations: Selection and Socialization in Public Accounting Firms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatman, Jennifer A.

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the establishment and maintenance of employee-organization fit, a recent study tracked the early careers of 171 entry-level auditors in 8 large U.S. public accounting firms and assessed the congruence of their values with organizational values. Recruits whose values match the firm's adjust more quickly and experience greater job…

  7. Coordination Incentives, Performance Measurement and Resource Allocation in Public Sector Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrichson, Jens

    Why are coordination problems common when public sector organizations share responsibilities, and what can be done to mitigate such problems? This paper uses a multi-task principal-agent model to examine two related reasons: the incentives to coordinate resource allocation and the difficulties...

  8. Strategic-Decision Quality in Public Organizations: An Information Processing Perspective.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.R.J. George (Bert); S. Desmidt (Sebastian)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis study draws on information processing theory to investigate predictors of strategic-decision quality in public organizations. Information processing theory argues that (a) rational planning practices contribute to strategic-decision quality by injecting information into decision mak

  9. A report on reporting: Why peers report integrity and law violations in public organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaf, de G.

    2010-01-01

    The archives of three bureaus of integrity are analyzed in order to study the reasons for reporting integrity and law violations within public organizations. Peer reporting accounts for only a small percentage of cases; most investigations originate from routine and continuous institutional controls

  10. Cognitive styles, user acceptance and commitment to strategic plans in public organizations: an empirical analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.R.J. George (Bert); S. Desmidt (Sebastian); E. Cools (Eva); A. Prinzie (Anita)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractGiven the lack of insights into the micro-determinants of strategic planning (SP) in public organizations, this study uses information-processing theory and self-efficacy theory to investigate individual-level predictors of commitment to strategic plans among planning team members

  11. Building Resilience in Public Organizations: The Role of Waste and Bricolage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.J. Van de Walle (Steven)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper shows how organizational waste and processes of bricolage have an important role in the functioning of public organizations, and how this is essential to innovation, organisational resilience and survival. This paper largely builds on the work of

  12. [Imaginary dimension and intersubjectivity in public health organizations: implications to managerial work and organizational change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azevedo, Creuza da Silva

    2010-06-01

    This paper deals with organization management in a new perspective, stressing the micro-social aspects and the role of individuals in the process of implementing change in public health organizations such as hospitals. Following the paths of French psychosociology, the article approaches the imaginary, intersubjective and collective dimensions of these organizations, highlighting the ways hospitals' directors and employees engage themselves in a struggle for power, affiliation and recognition. An essentially interactive and intersubjective activity, management is examined in the light of psychoanalysis's leadership function. It seems crucial to take into account the directors' potential structuring role in order to understand the organizational changing processes. Nevertheless, the mounting crisis in Rio de Janeiro public health services does not favor change and the building of personal bonds, but disruption, dismantle of institutional affiliations. In this scenario, the management structuring function and the director's social and psychological mediating role lose ground.

  13. Toward a model of employee engagement in a public service organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mette Strange

    Employee engagement has long been capturing the attention of researchers and practitioners, (e.g. Bakker, Albrecht, & Leiter, 2011; Buckingham & Coffman, 1999) due to its positive impact on various measures of organizational performance (Gruman & Saks, 2011; Harter, Schmidt, & Hayes, 2002; Mone...... & London, 2010). To date, however, employee engagement has primarily been studied in private manufacturing firms leaving out a gap of research in a public service organization, such as eldercare organizations, although engagement according to Boselie (2010) is highly relevant in the specific context....... The purpose of the PhD project is to build a model explaining employee engagement in a public service organization. Research on work design theory (e.g. Hackman & Oldham, 1976) will be used, since it has often been applied to identify antecedents associated with engagement (Bakker & Demerouti, 2007; Kahn...

  14. Effective pseudonymisation and explicit statements of public interest to ensure the benefits of sharing health data for research, quality improvement and health service management outweigh the risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lusignan, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This journal strongly supports the sharing of data to support research and quality improvement. However, this needs to be done in a way that ensures the benefits vastly outweigh the risks, and vitally using methods which are inspire both public and professional confidences--robust pseudonymisation is needed to achieve this. The case for using routine data for research has already been well made and probably also for quality improvement; however, clearer mechanisms are needed of how we test that the public interest is served. Ensuring that the public interest is served is essential if we are to maintain patients' and public's trust, especially in the English National Health Service where the realpolitik is that patients can opt out of data sharing.

  15. “成本—收益”视角下公共参与的影响因素分析%The influence factors of public participation in the"Cost-Benefit" perspective

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨涛

    2012-01-01

    Public participation is of great significance for improving the performance of social governance. Whether the actors choose to participate in public affairs and how they are motivated depend on how actors understand, judge and calculate the cost and benefits of public participation. The costs of public participation consist of those of material, opportunity, transaction, negative psychological experience, transferred cost due to others ~ not choosing participation, risks in participation as well as not choosing participation and quitting participation. The benefits involve those of material, reproduction of public products and the positive experience of participation as well. And the influence factors include remedy, acknowledgement, efficiency, free-riding, selective motivation, community social capital, and the institutionalization and organization of public participation. If we want to analyze public participation, the framework of "cost-benefit" ought to be combined with the factors affecting public participation.%公共参与对于社会治理绩效的提升具有重要的意义。行动者是否选择参与及其参与动力的高低,取决于行动者对参与成本与参与收益的解读、计算和比较。参与成本包括物质成本、机会成本、交易成本、负面的心理体验、他人不参与而被转移的成本、参与中所承受的参与风险以及"不参与成本"和退出参与的成本。参与收益包括物质上的收益、公共产品的再生产以及对参与过程本身的积极体验。公共参与的影响因素有参与补偿、参与认知与参与效能感、搭便车、选择性激励、共同体社会资本以及参与的制度化和组织化。对公共参与的分析,需要将"成本—收益"的分析框架和公共参与的影响因素结合起来。

  16. The public health benefits of reducing fine particulate matter through conversion to cleaner heating fuels in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheirbek, Iyad; Haney, Jay; Douglas, Sharon; Ito, Kazuhiko; Caputo, Steven; Matte, Thomas

    2014-12-02

    In recent years, both New York State and City issued regulations to reduce emissions from burning heating oil. To assess the benefits of these programs in New York City, where the density of emissions and vulnerable populations vary greatly, we simulated the air quality benefits of scenarios reflecting no action, partial, and complete phase-out of high-sulfur heating fuels using the Community MultiScale Air Quality (CMAQ) model conducted at a high spatial resolution (1 km). We evaluated the premature mortality and morbidity benefits of the scenarios within 42 city neighborhoods and computed benefits by neighborhood poverty status. The complete phase-out scenario reduces annual average fine particulate matter (PM2.5) by an estimated 0.71 μg/m(3) city-wide (average of 1 km estimates, 10-90th percentile: 0.1-1.6 μg/m(3)), avoiding an estimated 290 premature deaths, 180 hospital admissions for respiratory and cardiovascular disease, and 550 emergency department visits for asthma each year. The largest improvements were seen in areas of highest building and population density and the majority of benefits have occurred through the partial phase out of high-sulfur heating fuel already achieved. While emissions reductions were greatest in low-poverty neighborhoods, health benefits are estimated to be greatest in high-poverty neighborhoods due to higher baseline morbidity and mortality rates.

  17. Why do bacteria regulate public goods by quorum sensing?-How the shapes of cost and benefit functions determine the form of optimal regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilmann, Silja; Krishna, Sandeep; Kerr, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Many bacteria secrete compounds which act as public goods. Such compounds are often under quorum sensing (QS) regulation, yet it is not understood exactly when bacteria may gain from having a public good under QS regulation. Here, we show that the optimal public good production rate per cell as a function of population size (the optimal production curve, OPC) depends crucially on the cost and benefit functions of the public good and that the OPC will fall into one of two categories: Either it is continuous or it jumps from zero discontinuously at a critical population size. If, e.g., the public good has accelerating returns and linear cost, then the OPC is discontinuous and the best strategy thus to ramp up production sharply at a precise population size. By using the example of public goods with accelerating and diminishing returns (and linear cost) we are able to determine how the two different categories of OPSs can best be matched by production regulated through a QS signal feeding back on its own production. We find that the optimal QS parameters are different for the two categories and specifically that public goods which provide accelerating returns, call for stronger positive signal feedback.

  18. From population to public institutions: what needs to be changed to benefit from the full value of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szucs, Thomas; Quilici, Sibilia; Panfilo, Marina

    2015-01-01

    The poor perception of the benefits of vaccines, and their subsequent underuse, can result in substantial economic, societal, and political burden. Adequate support and communication from health authorities and governments is essential to promote the benefits of vaccination and reduce the risk of infectious diseases outbreaks. Cost-containment policies in the vaccine procurement processes could also be a threat to the long-term sustainability of the vaccine industry and manufacturing sites in Europe. Biologicals, such as vaccines, are highly technical and complex products to manufacture and only a few industries are engaged in this activity. Developing incentives to encourage vaccine manufacturers and identifying means of taking into consideration the specificities of vaccines in economic evaluations could allow the full value of vaccination to be appreciated. In conclusion, governments, international agencies, and other stakeholders have an important role to play to help society regain confidence in vaccination and ensure that the benefits of vaccination programmes are fully recognised and valued.

  19. Do senior management cultures affect performance? Evidence from Italian public healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenestini, Anna; Lega, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare organizations are often characterized by diffuse power, ambiguous goals, and a plurality of actors. In this complex and pluralistic context, senior healthcare managers are expected to provide strategic direction and lead their organizations toward their goals and performance targets. The present work explores the relationship between senior management team culture and performance by investigating Italian public healthcare organizations in the Tuscany region. Our assessment of senior management culture was accomplished through the use of an established framework and a corresponding tool, the competing values framework, which supports the idea that specific aspects of performance are related to a dominant management culture. Organizational performance was assessed using a wide range of measures collected by a multidimensional performance evaluation system, which was developed in Tuscany to measure the performance of its 12 local health authorities (LHAs) and four teaching hospitals (THs). Usable responses were received from 80 senior managers of 11 different healthcare organizations (two THs and nine LHAs). Our findings show that Tuscan healthcare organizations are characterized by various dominant cultures: developmental, clan, rational, and hierarchical. These variations in dominant culture were associated with performance measures. The implications for management theory, professional practice, and public policy are discussed.

  20. [Managment system in safety and health at work organization. An Italian example in public sector: Inps].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Loreto, G; Felicioli, G

    2010-01-01

    The Istituto Nazionale della Previdenza Sociale (Inps) is one of the biggest Public Sector organizations in Italy; about 30.000 people work in his structures. Fifteen years ago, Inps launched a long term project with the objective to create a complex and efficient safety and health at work organization. Italian law contemplates a specific kind of physician working on safety and health at work, called "Medico competente", and 85 Inps's physicians work also as "Medico competente". This work describes how IT improved coordination and efficiency in this occupational health's management system.

  1. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 77 - DD Form 2581-1, Public and Community Service Organization Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false DD Form 2581-1, Public and Community Service Organization Validation C Appendix C to Part 77 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY..., App. C Appendix C to Part 77—DD Form 2581-1, Public and Community Service Organization...

  2. Organizing an Effective Public Relations Program for the Stroudsberg Area School District. Maxi I and Maxi II, Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Thomas J.

    The purpose of this project was to organize an effective, comprehensive, public relations program in a medium size school district and, hopefully, increase the image of the district. The data contained in this report will demonstrate a clear need for the organization of a public relations program, the extent to which an effective, comprehensive…

  3. 78 FR 40664 - Statement for the Guidance of the Public-Organization, Procedure and Availability of Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-08

    ... Guidance of the Public--Organization, Procedure and Availability of Information AGENCY: National Endowment... GUIDANCE OF THE PUBLIC--ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURE AND AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION 0 1. The authority citation... Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) regulations, to remove any reference to the NEH, the Federal Council on...

  4. Rhetorical uses of public space: the discursive organization of a space in conflict

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Masso Tarditi, Andrés

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I explore the discursive use of public space, understood as a rhetorical resource for localized social action. Analysing several extracts of written documents and in-depth interviews, I focus on the rhetorical use of space-formulations and constructions of people-in-place relations by social and institutional agents confronted by the physical definition of a space in conflict. The discursive work includes the rhetorical management of culturally and ideologically organized constructions of urban territoriality, argumentative uses of localized social categories and behaviour-scripts for the performance of normative patterns of coexistence in the public space, and rhetorical work on spatially rooted symbolic processes. The purpose is to contribute to a critical examination of conflictive sociospatial phenomena from a discursive approach, seeking to make visible the social tensions involved in the deliberate attempt to control and organize urban space.

  5. A review of water quality policies in relation to public good benefits and community engagement in rural Ireland

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karen Daly; Marion Breuil; Cathal Buckley; Cathal O’ Donoghue; Mary Ryan; Catherine Seale

    2017-01-01

    ... environment under agri-environmental schemes. Specifically, we review policy instruments that protect water for recreational use, their impacts and the challenges they pose for rural development against current requirements to increase public...

  6. PARTICULARITIES OF THE ORGANIZATION OF LOCAL PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION IN ROMANIAN AND GREEK SPACES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SCUTARIU PETRONELA

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The way the public administration is organized affects the progress of the national community, in general, and of the local communities, in particular. A good management of public affairs from territorial units is not possible without the organizational design of the local administrative mechanism. From such a way, the pages of this paper are devoted to the study in mirror of the organization way of the Romanian and Greek local administrative systems, both territorially and functionally. By examining the territorial and functional administrative organisation we highlighted the peculiarities encountered and we extracted the similarities and the differences in the two local public administrations taken into consideration. As a result of the investigations conducted we found that at the basis of both local administrations are found clear regulations that expressly provide the territorial and functional organisational bases; with reference to the territorial organisation, for both administrative systems we have identified a structure with three levels of government, the difference being given by the existence of other specific territorial divisions; regarding the organs through which is realised the management of public affairs, in both administrations we find own authorities for each of the levels of government; the duration of the mandate of the Romanian local administration authorities differs from the one of the Greek administration authorities; most of administrative authorities of the two systems are elected by direct vote and only for some of them the setting occurs through indirect voting or appointment. Overall, we found that, at least regarding the criteria analyzed, between the two local public administrations there are no consistent differences, the territorial and functional organisational specificities being similar in equal measure.

  7. Assessing communications effectiveness in meeting corporate goals of public health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Gordon D; Bopp, Kenneth D; Boren, Suzanne Austin

    2005-01-01

    Much evaluation of health communications in public health is considered from a program perspective of smoking cessation, weight reduction, education on sexually transmitted diseases, etc. These studies have advanced the knowledge base of communications theory and evaluation and have contributed to program effectiveness. In program-based evaluation the communications process is structured as part of the program itself. This article extends program-based communications evaluation to view communications from the perspective of the consumer and how effectively public health departments respond to consumer expectations. It develops a conceptual model for evaluating elements of communications such as its importance in defining mission and goals within the community, managing strategic constituencies, and enlisting individuals and groups as customers and co-producers of health. It gives a broader perspective on how communications in public heath organizations are managed and a basis for assessing whether they are being managed effectively.

  8. Strategic-Decision Quality in Public Organizations: An Information Processing Perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    George, Bert; Desmidt, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis study draws on information processing theory to investigate predictors of strategic-decision quality in public organizations. Information processing theory argues that (a) rational planning practices contribute to strategic-decision quality by injecting information into decision making and (b) decision makers contribute to strategic-decision quality by exchanging information during decision making. These assumptions are tested upon 55 Flemish pupil guidance centers. Rational ...

  9. Strategic-Decision Quality in Public Organizations: An Information Processing Perspective.

    OpenAIRE

    George, Bert; Desmidt, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    textabstractThis study draws on information processing theory to investigate predictors of strategic-decision quality in public organizations. Information processing theory argues that (a) rational planning practices contribute to strategic-decision quality by injecting information into decision making and (b) decision makers contribute to strategic-decision quality by exchanging information during decision making. These assumptions are tested upon 55 Flemish pupil guidance centers. Rational ...

  10. Fringe Benefits Available to Public School Teachers in the Southeast. Research Report. Occasional Papers in Educational Policy Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabry, Rodney H.; And Others

    This project measured and evaluated the fringe benefit element of the teacher compensation package available in the 12 Southeastern Regional Council member states: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virgina. Data were collected by contacting members…

  11. Effective pseudonymisation and explicit statements of public interest to ensure the benefits of sharing health data for research, quality improvement and health service management outweigh the risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon de Lusignan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This journal strongly supports the sharing of data to support research and quality improvement. However, this needs to be done in a way that ensures the benefits vastly outweigh the risks, and vitally using methods which are inspire both public and professional confidences – robust pseudonymisation is needed to achieve this. The case for using routine data for research has already been well made and probably also for quality improvement; however, clearer mechanisms are needed of how we test that the public interest is served. Ensuring that the public interest is served is essential if we are to maintain patients’ and public’s trust, especially in the English National Health Service where the realpolitik is that patients can opt out of data sharing.  

  12. Benefit Goal Oriented Information Public System of Public Financial Support for Scientific Research Project%效益目标导向的公共财政支持科研项目信息公开机制探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    商兰芳

    2013-01-01

      公共财政的公益性特征与资源配置职能决定了其支出不仅要满足社会公共需要与公众公共利益,而且应当符合社会净效益最大化的原则。因此建立在公共财政支持基础上的科研项目理应将效益作为其逻辑起点与目标追求。文章针对当前公共财政支持科研项目的现实起点,指出信息公开是联结两个起点的有效实践通道,并根据当前科研项目的现状,提出构建效益指向的科研项目信息公开机制的对策建议。%Characteristics of public welfare and public finance resource allocation function determines its spending not only to meet the social public needs and the public interest, and shall conform to the principles of net social benefit maximization. Therefore based on public financial support of scientific research project would benefit as the logical starting point and objective pursuit. This article in view of the current public financial support research projects the reality of the starting point, points out that the information is connecting two starting point the effective practice of the channel, and according to the current situation of scientific research project, and puts forward constructing benefit pointing in the direction of the scientific research project of information disclosure mechanism countermeasures.

  13. Data and Summaries for Catalytic Destruction of a Surrogate Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant as a Potential Co-benefit for Coal-Fired Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Table 1 summarizes and explanis the Operating Conditions of the SCR Reactor used in the Benzene-Destruction.Table 2 summarizes and explains the Experimental Design and Test Results.Table 3 summarizes and explains the Estimates for Individual Effects and Cross Effects Obtained from the Linear Regression Models for Destruction of C6H6 and Reduction of NO.Fig. 1 shows the Down-flow SCR reactor system in detail.Fig. 2 shows the graphical summary of the Effect of the inlet C6H6 concentration to the SCR reactor on the destruction of C6H6.Fig.3 shows the summary of Carbon mass balance for C6H6 destruction promoted by the V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst.This dataset is associated with the following publication:Lee , C., Y. Zhao, S. Lu, and W.R. Stevens. Catalytic Destruction of a Surrogate Organic Hazardous Air Polutant as a Potential Co-benefit for Coal-fired Selective Catalyst Reduction Systems. AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCIETY. American Chemical Society, Washington, DC, USA, 30(3): 2240-2247, (2016).

  14. The value and benefits of the International Conference on Harmonisation to drug regulatory authorities: advancing harmonization for better public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molzon, J A; Giaquinto, A; Lindstrom, L; Tominaga, T; Ward, M; Doerr, P; Hunt, L; Rago, L

    2011-04-01

    The International Conference on Harmonisation (ICH) is an unparalleled undertaking, which has brought together drug regulatory authorities and pharmaceutical trade associations from Europe, Japan, and the United States, to discuss the scientific and technical aspects of medical product registration. Launched in 1990, the value and benefits of ICH to regulators are being realized. ICH has harmonized submission requirements and created a harmonized submission format that is relieving both companies and regulatory authorities of the burdens of assembling and reviewing separate submissions for each region. As more countries embrace ICH guidelines, we anticipate additional benefits, including the promotion of good review practices and, ultimately, a common regulatory language that will facilitate further interactions among global drug regulatory authorities.

  15. Significance of Pirogov`s scientific ideas for modern organization of Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semenova L.S.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article is about Nikolay Ivanovich Pirogov, a surgeon and anatomist, prominent scientist and educator, founder of field surgery. He was the first to learn field surgery and military administration in practice. He was the first to use famous triage (the wounded were sorted according to the severity of injuries. N.I.Pirogov considered that well organized triage at dressing stations and temporary military hospitals is the main tool to provide proper care and to prevent harmful consequences. He organized training of medical nurses to help the wounded. He also published the work on the problems of pedagogy in which he proposed reforms of education system. The authors of the article have analyzed N.I.Pirogov`s works and showed their significance for modern social medicine and organization of Public Health.

  16. Summary of Benefits under the Educational Assistance Test Program Section 901 of Public Law 96-342. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Veterans Affairs, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Section 901 is an Educational Assistance Test Program created by the Department of Defense Authorization Act of 1981 (Public Law 96-342) to individuals who entered on active duty after September 30, 1980, and before October 1, 1981 (or before October 1, 1982, if entry was under a delayed enlistment contract signed between September 30, 1980, and…

  17. Combining the benefits of decision science and financial analysis in public health management: a county-specific budgeting and planning model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fos, Peter J; Miller, Danny L; Amy, Brian W; Zuniga, Miguel A

    2004-01-01

    State public health agencies are charged with providing and overseeing the management of basic public health services on a population-wide basis. These activities have a re-emphasized focus as a result of the events of September 11, 2001, the subsequent anthrax events, and the continuing importance placed on bioterrorism preparedness, West Nile virus, and emerging infectious diseases (eg, monkeypox, SARS). This has added to the tension that exists in budgeting and planning, given the diverse constituencies that are served in each state. State health agencies must be prepared to allocate finite resources in a more formal manner to be able to provide basic public health services on a routine basis, as well as during outbreaks. This article describes the use of an analytical approach to assist financial analysis that is used for budgeting and planning in a state health agency. The combined benefits of decision science and financial analysis are needed to adequately and appropriately plan and budget to meet the diverse needs of the populations within a state. Health and financial indicators are incorporated into a decision model, based on multicriteria decision theory, that has been employed to acquire information about counties and public health programs areas within a county, that reflect the impact of planning and budgeting efforts. This information can be used to allocate resources, to distribute funds for health care services, and to guide public health finance policy formulation and implementation.

  18. Successful and cost neutral strategies to increase organic food used in public kitchens: results from the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Anne Vibeke; Brorson, B.; Lassen, Anne Dahl

    of practical strategies being effective in increasing the organic food used in the public kitchens.MethodsStudy design included baseline data collection, training sessions for all kitchens employees, goal setting, strategy development and implementation for each kitchen, and end point data collection...... baseline to end point were 29 percentage points (Ptrained in the principles of organic food production. The organic price premium was covered within...... existing budget by optimizing the budget and menu planning, minimizing food waste, increase production of homemade food, focusing on seasonal food, and optimizing meat and fish consumption.ConclusionsThis study demonstrates a large potential for public kitchens to increase the level of organic food...

  19. Cost-benefit analysis of the energy conservation scheme of a regional public utility; Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse des Energiespar-Programms eines regionalen Energieversorgers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engel, H. [Energie-Versorgung Schwaben AG, Stuttgart (Germany). Abt. Sondervertragskunden; Karel, A. [Heag Versorgungs-AG, Darmstadt (Germany). Abt. Anwendungsberatung; Setzer, M. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Inst. fuer Volkswirtschaftslehre

    1996-04-22

    Public utilities increasingly advocate energy conservation, not additional power consumption. With this regard, Heag AG, in its ``energy conservation scheme 2000``, offers a broad range of possibilities. It includes incentives for energy conservation and renewable energy use. As an instrument of analysis for this scheme, cost-benefit analysis was chosen. The authors describe the scheme and test the applicability of cost-benefit analysis. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die EVU setzen sich zunehmend fuer das Energieeinsparen ein, statt fuer zusaetzlichen Stromabsatz. Die Heag Versorgungs-AG bietet dazu ein breit angelegtes Foerderprogramm: `Energiespar-Aktion 2000`. Im Rahmen dieser Aktion werden Massnahmen zur Energieeinsparung und Nutzung regenerativer Energie finanziell gefoerdert. Als Analyseinstrument fuer die Energiespar-Aktion wurde die Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse gewaehlt. Die Verfasser erlaeutern die Energiespar-Aktion und pruefen auch die Anwendbarkeit der Kosten-Nutzen-Analyse. (orig.)

  20. Rheumatology in India: a Bird's Eye View on Organization, Epidemiology, Training Programs and Publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas; Negi, Vir Singh

    2016-07-01

    India is home to the world's second largest population. Rheumatology is an emerging specialty in India. We reviewed organization, epidemiology and training facilities for Rheumatology in India. Also, we also looked at publications in the field of rheumatology from India from over the past six years using Scopus and Medline databases. Despite rheumatologic disorders affecting 6%-24% of the population, rheumatology in India is still in its infancy. Till recently, there were as few as two centers in the country training less than five fellows per year. However, acute shortage of specialists and increasing patient numbers led to heightened awareness regarding the need to train rheumatologists. Subsequently, six new centers have now started 3-year training programs in rheumatology. The epidemiology of rheumatic diseases in India is being actively studies under the Community Oriented Programme for Control of Rheumatic Diseases (COPCORD) initiative. The most number of publications on rheumatic diseases from India are on rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and osteoporosis, many of which have been widely cited. Major collaborators worldwide are USA, UK and France, whereas those from Asia are Japan, Saudi Arabia and Singapore. The Indian Rheumatology Association (IRA) is the national organization of rheumatologists. The flagship publication of the IRA, the Indian Journal of Rheumatology, is indexed in Scopus and Embase. To conclude, rheumatology in India is an actively expanding and productive field with significant contributions to world literature. There is a need to train more personnel in the subject in India.

  1. Structure of the physical therapy benefit in a typical Blue Cross Blue Shield preferred provider organization plan available in the individual insurance market in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandstrom, Robert W; Lehman, Jedd; Hahn, Lee; Ballard, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 establishes American Health Benefit Exchanges. The benefit design of insurance plans in state health insurance exchanges will be based on the structure of existing small-employer-sponsored plans. The purpose of this study was to describe the structure of the physical therapy benefit in a typical Blue Cross Blue Shield (BCBS) preferred provider organization (PPO) health insurance plan available in the individual insurance market in 2011. A cross-sectional survey design was used. The physical therapy benefit within 39 BCBS PPO plans in 2011 was studied for a standard consumer with a standard budget. First, whether physical therapy was a benefit in the plan was determined. If so, then the structure of the benefit was described in terms of whether the physical therapy benefit was a stand-alone benefit or part of a combined-discipline benefit and whether a visit or financial limit was placed on the physical therapy benefit. Physical therapy was included in all BCBS plans that were studied. Ninety-three percent of plans combined physical therapy with other disciplines. Two thirds of plans placed a limit on the number of visits covered. The results of the study are limited to 1 standard consumer, 1 association of insurance companies, 1 form of insurance (a PPO), and 1 PPO plan in each of the 39 states that were studied. Physical therapy is a covered benefit in a typical BCBS PPO health insurance plan. Physical therapy most often is combined with other therapy disciplines, and the number of covered visits is limited in two thirds of plans.

  2. A review of water quality policies in relation to public good benefits and community engagement in rural Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daly Karen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines current recreational water use in the rural landscape in Ireland and reviews current EU policies and national regulations aimed at protecting water quality and the wider environment under agri-environmental schemes. Specifically, we review policy instruments that protect water for recreational use, their impacts and the challenges they pose for rural development against current requirements to increase public awareness and participation. In Ireland, there is limited experience in public participation in water quality protection and restoration and we highlight how this can be addressed by focussing on the specific contribution of water quality in rural areas in relation to the provision of recreational ecosystem services. These services provide the infrastructure for much of Ireland’s rural tourism sector. In this context, emerging participatory approaches to policy implementation are also assessed as national and local government prioritise community engagement for the second cycle under the EU Water Framework Directive.

  3. Why people attend science festivals: Interests, motivations and self-reported benefits of public engagement with research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Eric; Buckley, Nicol

    2014-07-01

    As a form of public engagement, science festivals have rapidly expanded in size and number over recent years. However, as with other domains of informal public engagement that are not linked to policy outcomes, existing research .does not fully address science festivals' impacts and popularity. This study adduces evidence from surveys and focus groups to elucidate the perspectives of visitors at a large UK science festival. Results show that visitors value the opportunities afforded by the science festival to interact with scientific researchers and to encounter different types of science engagement aimed at adults, children and families. The most significant self-reported impact of attending a science festival is the development of increased interest in and curiosity about new areas of scientific knowledge within a socially stimulating and enjoyable setting.

  4. Development of user guidelines for ECAS display design. Volume 2: Tasks 9 and 10. [educating the public to the benefits of spacelab and the space transportation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathurst, D. B.

    1979-01-01

    Lay-oriented speakers aids, articles, a booklet, and a press kit were developed to inform the press and the general public with background information on the space transportation system, Spacelab, and Spacelab 1 experiments. Educational materials relating to solar-terrestrial physics and its potential benefits to mankind were also written. A basic network for distributing audiovisual and printed materials to regional secondary schools and universities was developed. Suggested scripts to be used with visual aids describing materials science and technology and astronomy and solar physics are presented.

  5. PRINCIPLES OF THE EUROPEAN ADMINISTRATIVE SPACE AND THEIR IMPACT ON PERFORMANCE IN PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Ema Cioclea

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The European Union is interested in ensuring that each national administration offers comparable administrative capacity through quality of public services and professionalism from the civil servants. At the same time, the European states are characterised by long and varied institutional histories, with different trajectories in their evolution. That is why, public administration structures and regulations vary among the Member States and a set of common principles can guide them towards administrative convergence and performance. This paper aims to analyze the shared principles of a common European Administrative Space and also to address the link between these principles and the performance of public institutions from a managerial point of view. The study is based on review and analysis of academic research, government documents and personal perspectives, extracting and linking key findings from existing research and practice. The paper argues that managerial theories on performance are compatible with public administration organizations and some of the criteria are common to those promoted by the principles of the European Administrative Space.

  6. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: Creating a global corporate network to undermine public health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malone Ruth E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The global tobacco epidemic claims 5 million lives each year, facilitated by the ability of transnational tobacco companies to delay or thwart meaningful tobacco control worldwide. A series of cross-company tobacco industry "issues management organizations" has played an important role in coordinating and implementing common strategies to defeat tobacco control efforts at international, national, and regional levels. This study examines the development and enumerates the activities of these organizations and explores the implications of continuing industry cooperation for global public health. Methods Using a snowball sampling strategy, we collected documentary data from tobacco industry documents archives and assembled them into a chronologically organized case study. Results The International Committee on Smoking Issues (ICOSI was formed in 1977 by seven tobacco company chief executives to create common anti-tobacco control strategies and build a global network of regional and national manufacturing associations. The organization's name subsequently changed to INFOTAB. The multinational companies built the organization rapidly: by 1984, it had 69 members operating in 57 countries. INFOTAB material, including position papers and "action kits" helped members challenge local tobacco control measures and maintain tobacco-friendly environments. In 1992 INFOTAB was replaced by two smaller organizations. The Tobacco Documentation Centre, which continues to operate, distributes smoking-related information and industry argumentation to members, some produced by cross-company committees. Agro-Tobacco Services, and now Hallmark Marketing Services, assists the INFOTAB-backed and industry supported International Tobacco Growers Association in advancing claims regarding the economic importance of tobacco in developing nations. Conclusion The massive scale and scope of this industry effort illustrate how corporate interests, when

  7. Tobacco industry issues management organizations: creating a global corporate network to undermine public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Intinarelli, Gina; Malone, Ruth E

    2008-01-17

    The global tobacco epidemic claims 5 million lives each year, facilitated by the ability of transnational tobacco companies to delay or thwart meaningful tobacco control worldwide. A series of cross-company tobacco industry "issues management organizations" has played an important role in coordinating and implementing common strategies to defeat tobacco control efforts at international, national, and regional levels. This study examines the development and enumerates the activities of these organizations and explores the implications of continuing industry cooperation for global public health. Using a snowball sampling strategy, we collected documentary data from tobacco industry documents archives and assembled them into a chronologically organized case study. The International Committee on Smoking Issues (ICOSI) was formed in 1977 by seven tobacco company chief executives to create common anti-tobacco control strategies and build a global network of regional and national manufacturing associations. The organization's name subsequently changed to INFOTAB. The multinational companies built the organization rapidly: by 1984, it had 69 members operating in 57 countries. INFOTAB material, including position papers and "action kits" helped members challenge local tobacco control measures and maintain tobacco-friendly environments. In 1992 INFOTAB was replaced by two smaller organizations. The Tobacco Documentation Centre, which continues to operate, distributes smoking-related information and industry argumentation to members, some produced by cross-company committees. Agro-Tobacco Services, and now Hallmark Marketing Services, assists the INFOTAB-backed and industry supported International Tobacco Growers Association in advancing claims regarding the economic importance of tobacco in developing nations. The massive scale and scope of this industry effort illustrate how corporate interests, when threatened by the globalization of public health, sidestep competitive

  8. ORGANIZATION AND RESULTS OF AGRICULTURAL HOLDINGS REALIZING INVESTMENTS SUBSIDIZED WITH PUBLIC FUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zofia Kołoszko-Chomentowska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present article, an attempt was made to assess the organization of production and economic results of agricultural holdings that realized investments subsidized with public funds, from the perspective of good agricultural practice. Agricultural holdings in the Podlaskie voivodeship registered in the FADN system in 2011–2012 were investigated. Assessment accounted for crop structure, stock density, production intensity, the value and structure of capital, and profi tableness of land, capital, and labour. Analysis showed that holdings benefi ting from subsidization of investments with public funds were characterized by greater production intensity and also achieved better economic results. However, they exerted greater pressure on the environment and posed hazards that mainly resulted from high stock density.  

  9. Autonomous public organization policy: a case study for the health sector in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajataramya, B; Fried, B; van der Pütten, M; Pongpanich, S

    2009-09-01

    This paper describes factors affecting autonomous public organization (APO) policy agenda setting and policy formation through comparison of policy processes applied to one educational institute under the Ministry of Education and the other educational institute under the Ministry of Public Health in Thailand. This study employs mixed method including a qualitative approach through documentary research, in-depth interviews, and participant observation. Factors that facilitated the formulation of the APO policy were: (1) awareness of need; (2) clarity of strategies; (3) leadership, advocacy, and strategic partnerships, (4) clear organizational identity; (5) participatory approach to policy formulation, and (6) identification of a policy window. Factors that impeded the formulation of the APO policy were: (1) diverting political priorities; (2) ill-defined organizational identity; (3) fluctuating leadership direction, (4) inadequate participation of stakeholders; and (5) political instability. Although findings cannot be generalized, this case study does offer benchmarking for those in search of ways to enhance processes of policy formulation.

  10. Understanding and Supporting a Culture of Public Outreach in Amateur Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berendsen, M.; Ames, Z.; Figueiredo, C.; Storksdieck, M.; Stein, J.

    2010-08-01

    What types of resources can best support amateur science-based organizations who share their enthusiasm with the public? For several years the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) and Institute for Learning Innovation (ILI), have partnered to conduct research aimed at understanding the culture of public outreach conducted by astronomy clubs and their members. Through this research ILI has conducted studies that yielded three main conclusions: amateurs want educational tools, pedagogical skills, and club organizational support. With these ideas in mind the ASP began working on solutions to the amateurs needs in 2004. Since then the ASP has developed a number of solution approaches with extensive help from amateur astronomers around the country.

  11. Public perception on the benefits and risks of nuclear power plants. A simplified study; Um estudo simplificado da percepcao publica dos beneficios e riscos de centrais termonucleares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro Junior, Joaquim Apparecido

    2007-07-01

    Public acceptance of the nuclear based electricity generation depends on many variables that can be affected by circumstances and interests, which although seemingly not close to the issue, can strongly influence the final outcome. Explicit or consented positions assumed by opinion makers and some segments of society are subject to episodic waves of interaction through the media and they permeate to the public in a process that is very complex to be fully understood. The modeling of such process is a very complicated undertaking, and gives no assurance of practical results concerning to what, how and who, should be given prominence in the interactions with the media and the general public. In this context, the risk communication has assumed a leading role and, as a consequence, most of the interaction with the public has been done with both defensive language and content. This study has tried a simple and practical approach to the problem, in such a way as to gather some interesting subsidies to treat this issue in a different way. The basic assumption is that in a similar way as individuals base their decision to acquire a new good or service on a 'intuitive' cost-benefit judgment, society (as a collection of individuals) also manifest their acceptance (or not) with respect to industrial installations and undertakings by comparing risks and benefits according to their perception. An exploratory survey was carried out in a few high schools, colleges and MBA courses in the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. A first part was aimed to catch and understand the public perception of: the intrinsic value of the electric energy, the need to universalize the access to electricity, nuclear plants, the acceptance deficit of nuclear power as compared to other sources of energy, the benefits a nuclear plant can bring and who does and who does not deserves credibility to speak about nuclear plants. The second part was addressed to grasp a picture of more relevant distortions

  12. The indignant page: techniques of neutralization in the publications of pedophile organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Young, M

    1988-01-01

    There is considerable consensus in this and other societies that adult sexual behavior with children is exploitative and victimizing in nature. The publications of three United States pedophile organizations that advocate adult sexual behavior with children and that are politically and socially active in attempts to decriminalize that behavior--the Rene Guyon Society, the Childhood Sensuality Circle, and the North American Man/Boy Love Association--are analyzed as to how they justify, normalize, or rationalize their practices and philosophy in light of that consensus. The framework for that analysis is the sociological concept of techniques of neutralization.

  13. Aid/Watch and the Public Benefit of Advocacy for the Extra-territorial Relief of Poverty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Barnden

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The disqualification of Aid/Watch as a charity and the High Court of Australia's subsequent decision shines a spotlight on the common law definition of charitable activity. The Aid/Watch decision enables charitable organisations to legitimately advocate for more efficient implementation of government policies on the relief of poverty and for the advancement of education and religion, without fear of reprisal. Initially we comment on the inherent tension the Australian Taxation Office experiences as a result of its status as a government department, its responsibilities to administer revenue collection and its role interpreting charity law. We then discuss the common law definition of charity and the Constitutional basis for the High Court’s decision in Aid/Watch. To conclude we outline areas of uncertainties but also potential benefits to charitable organisations which are relevant for any proposal to define ‘charitable organisation’.

  14. Estimating the Costs and Benefits of Providing Free Public Transit Passes to Students in Los Angeles County: Lessons Learned in Applying a Health Lens to Decision-Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren N. Gase

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In spite of increased focus by public health to engage and work with non-health sector partners to improve the health of the general as well as special populations, only a paucity of studies have described and disseminated emerging lessons and promising practices that can be used to undertake this work. This article describes the process used to conduct a Health Impact Assessment of a proposal to provide free public transportation passes to students in Los Angeles County. This illustrative case example describes opportunities and challenges encountered in working with an array of cross-sector partners and highlights four important lessons learned: (1 the benefits and challenges associated with broad conceptualization of public issues; (2 the need for more comprehensive, longitudinal data systems and dynamic simulation models to inform decision-making; (3 the importance of having a comprehensive policy assessment strategy that considers health impacts as well as costs and feasibility; and (4 the need for additional efforts to delineate the interconnectivity between health and other agency priorities. As public health advances cross-sector work in the community, further development of these priorities will help advance meaningful collaboration among all partners.

  15. A study on the development of public campaign messages for organ donation promotion in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hye-Jin

    2015-12-01

    This study aims to find an effective method of expressing a message in public service ads by investigating whether or not a message framing type affects the outcome. Specifically, the study looks into the effects of messaging on organ donation by identifying how the type of message framing (positive vs. negative) and appeal type (rational vs. emotional) affect the attitude and behavioural intention of the consumer. The individual characteristics of each subject such as altruistic mind, level of self-monitoring and issue involvement were selected as intermediate variables that may affect the impact of a message. The study therefore tries to establish a proposition that can be used to generate an effective promotional message on organ donation in a systematic way.

  16. Catalytic Destruction of a Surrogate Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant as a Potential Co-benefit for Coal-fired Selective Catalyst Reduction Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic destruction of benzene (C6H6), a surrogate for organic hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) produced from coal combustion, was investigated using a commercial selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst for evaluating the potential co-benefit of the SCR technology for reduc...

  17. Soil organic carbon stocks under native vegetation - revised estimates for use with the simple assessment option of the Carbon Benefits Project system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batjes, N.H.

    2011-01-01

    The Carbon Benefits Project (CBP) is developing a standardized system for sustainable land management projects to measure, model and report changes in carbon stocks and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for use at varying scales. A global framework of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks under native veget

  18. Promoting the Swedish method of physical education throughout France for the benefit of public health (1868-1954).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazoge, N; Saint-Martin, J; Attali, M

    2013-03-01

    This article examines the cultural and public health challenges associated with the dissemination of the Swedish approach and methods of physical education throughout France and illustrates the two main methods of influence, both direct through research and study visits and indirect through the creation of an international network entitled the International Federation of Physical Education. More particularly, it studies the roles of Philippe Tissié in 1898 and Pierre Seurin in 1946, and shows how these two major players of French physical education contributed actively to strengthening Swedish influence throughout France. It also highlights their equally essential role in the successful implementation of a pro-Swedish network in France, intended to serve their public health aims. This analysis forms part of the geopolitical and socio-cultural history of foreign physical education models, whose exemplarity was mainly dependent on Franco-Swedish relations and the models' social representations. Using archives from the French Physical Education League, travel logs and the Revue des jeux scolaires et d'hygiène sociale (Journal for School Games and Social Hygiene), it has been shown why the myth of the Swedish Eldorado contributed to creating, in France, "a work of art and of science that was, at the same time, both national and practical."

  19. Genetically modified organisms in the United States: implementation, concerns, and public perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeschger, Max P; Silva, Catherine E

    2007-01-01

    We examine the state of biotechnology with respect to genetically modified (GM) organisms in agriculture. Our focus is on the USA, where there has been significant progress and implementation but where, to date, the matter has drawn little attention. GM organisms are the result of lateral gene transfers, the transfer of genes from one species to another, or sometimes, from one kingdom to another. The introduction of foreign genes makes some people very uncomfortable, and a small group of activists have grave concerns about the technology. Attempts by activists to build concern in the general public have garnered little attention; however, the producers of GM organisms have responded to their concerns and established extensive testing programs to be applied to each candidate organism that is produced. In the meantime, GM varieties of corn, cotton, soybean and rapeseed have been put into agricultural production and are now extensively planted. These crops, and the other, newer GM crops, have produced no problems and have pioneered a silent agricultural revolution in the USA.

  20. Public management and network specificity: Effects of colleges’ ties with professional organizations on graduates’ labour market success and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Agnes; Torenvlied, René

    2013-01-01

    Research on managerial networking in the public sector reports positive effects of network activity on performance. However, little is known about which network relations influence different aspects of performance. We argue that for specific organizational goals, organizations should direct their

  1. Research Stakeholders' Views on Benefits and Challenges for Public Health Research Data Sharing in Kenya: The Importance of Trust and Social Relations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Jao

    Full Text Available There is increasing recognition of the importance of sharing research data within the international scientific community, but also of the ethical and social challenges this presents, particularly in the context of structural inequities and varied capacity in international research. Public involvement is essential to building locally responsive research policies, including on data sharing, but little research has involved stakeholders from low-to-middle income countries.Between January and June 2014, a qualitative study was conducted in Kenya involving sixty stakeholders with varying experiences of research in a deliberative process to explore views on benefits and challenges in research data sharing. In-depth interviews and extended small group discussions based on information sharing and facilitated debate were used to collect data. Data were analysed using Framework Analysis, and charting flow and dynamics in debates.The findings highlight both the opportunities and challenges of communicating about this complex and relatively novel topic for many stakeholders. For more and less research-experienced stakeholders, ethical research data sharing is likely to rest on the development and implementation of appropriate trust-building processes, linked to local perceptions of benefits and challenges. The central nature of trust is underpinned by uncertainties around who might request what data, for what purpose and when. Key benefits perceived in this consultation were concerned with the promotion of public health through science, with legitimate beneficiaries defined differently by different groups. Important challenges were risks to the interests of study participants, communities and originating researchers through stigmatisation, loss of privacy, impacting autonomy and unfair competition, including through forms of intentional and unintentional 'misuse' of data. Risks were also seen for science.Given background structural inequities in much

  2. Impact of absorptive capacity and dominant logic on innovation performance of public sector organizations in Hefei (Anhui Province, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhan Khan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Public organization’s performance depends on multiple aspects in which there are different polit-ical and public actors involved. In this study, we discuss the innovation performance of public organizations’ in Hefei (Anhui province, China. Our targeted group for this study were public sector employees at different levels within the organizations being considered. We checked the effect of absorptive capacity (ACAP, and dominant logic on public organization’s innovation performance. We found that absorptive capacity and dominant logic had a positive relation-ship with firms’ performance. Furthermore, these predictors were not only improving firm’s per-formance, but also bring innovation into the public organizations.

  3. Can Public Managers Make Their Welfare Organizations Adapt to the New Performance Landscape Shaped by the Current Austerity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, John Storm; Aagaard, Peter

    2014-01-01

    How managers try to adapt their organizations to the new performance landscape shaped by the current austerity by new forms of change management in Denmark, in the public sector of citizens with disabilities and socially disadvantaged people.......How managers try to adapt their organizations to the new performance landscape shaped by the current austerity by new forms of change management in Denmark, in the public sector of citizens with disabilities and socially disadvantaged people....

  4. Analysis of the User Acceptance for Implementing ISO/IEC 27001:2005 in Turkish Public Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Mataracioglu, Tolga

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to develop a model for the user acceptance for implementing the information security standard (i.e. ISO 27001) in Turkish public organizations. The results of the surveys performed in Turkey reveal that the legislation on information security public which organizations have to obey is significantly related with the user acceptance during ISO 27001 implementation process. The fundamental components of our user acceptance model are perceived usefulness, attitude towards use, social norms, and performance expectancy.

  5. Analysis of the User Acceptance for Implementing ISO/IEC 27001:2005 in Turkish Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga MATARACIOGLU

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop a model for the user acceptance for implementing the information security standard (i.e. ISO 27001 in Turkish public organizations. The results of the surveys performed in Turkey reveal that the legislation on information security public which organizations have to obey is significantly related with the user acceptance during ISO 27001 implementation process. The fundamental components of our user acceptance model are perceived usefulness, attitude towards use, social norms, and performance expectancy.

  6. The Organization Culture In The Public Service At The Regional Secretariat Of Samarinda City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The purpose of this research to analyzing the process of the management of internal integration in an effort to improve public services in the secretariat of the city .In the research results seen that there are culture of bubuhan familial in the management of internal integration in the secretariat of the city of samarinda through a the creation of a language together and conceptual categories in b the distribution of power and status c establishment norms closeness of a working relationship peers and d the application of the award and punishment. In addition to want to answer a desire as well as the need for public service excellence service unit to improve integrated permit handling UPT integrated permit handling services agency one gate BPPTSP capital city of samarinda . In the management of internal integration process in cultural organization that takes the conceptculture of bubuhan must be planned carefully and without prejudice to the rules of law applicable because if not handled wisely can be counter-productive with the vision and mission of Samarinda Government because it can cause a client patron relations which can actually inhibit the organization in achieving its vision and mission.

  7. PERFORMANCE PREMISES FOR HUMAN RESOURCES FROM PUBLIC HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia-Luisa PUPĂZĂ

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Improving the performance of health sector human resources is a goal pursued by all developed or developing countries. However, the lack of human resources planning and lack of clear and transparent human resources policies may lead to a crisis in this area. Human resource planning should be a priority in terms of health policies. In Romania, the lack of a planning concept and the lack of a policy on human resources has led to the actual context, with a human resources crisis of public health organizations. The role that human resources play in the health care system is indisputable. Essential to achieve quality performance in health care is human resources management. To overcome the human resources crisis that public health organizations in Romania is facing , specialists in the field have made several key recommendations: development of a coherent policy formation, development and allocation of human resources in health, increasing the number of medical staff and opportunities of professional career development in the medical field. Health system reform involves changing some aspects of employment, working conditions, degree of decentralization of management, skills, salary system and staff motivation.

  8. What Risk Assessments of Genetically Modified Organisms Can Learn from Institutional Analyses of Public Health Risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ravi Rajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  9. What risk assessments of genetically modified organisms can learn from institutional analyses of public health risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, S Ravi; Letourneau, Deborah K

    2012-01-01

    The risks of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are evaluated traditionally by combining hazard identification and exposure estimates to provide decision support for regulatory agencies. We question the utility of the classical risk paradigm and discuss its evolution in GMO risk assessment. First, we consider the problem of uncertainty, by comparing risk assessment for environmental toxins in the public health domain with genetically modified organisms in the environment; we use the specific comparison of an insecticide to a transgenic, insecticidal food crop. Next, we examine normal accident theory (NAT) as a heuristic to consider runaway effects of GMOs, such as negative community level consequences of gene flow from transgenic, insecticidal crops. These examples illustrate how risk assessments are made more complex and contentious by both their inherent uncertainty and the inevitability of failure beyond expectation in complex systems. We emphasize the value of conducting decision-support research, embracing uncertainty, increasing transparency, and building interdisciplinary institutions that can address the complex interactions between ecosystems and society. In particular, we argue against black boxing risk analysis, and for a program to educate policy makers about uncertainty and complexity, so that eventually, decision making is not the burden that falls upon scientists but is assumed by the public at large.

  10. 公共组织冲突管理效应研究%Research on conflict management effects for public organizations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于柏青

    2012-01-01

    With the continuous deepening of the social and economic reform in China, public organizations are facing all kinds of conflicts. For maximizing the efficiency of conflict management and reducing the blindness of conflict management, exploring the inherent law in the conflict management process of public organizations becomes the focus of the research. On the basis of defining the conflict effect and management effect of public organizations, the econometric model and the cost-effective model of conflict management effect for public organizations have been put forward. Through the questionnaire, an empirical analysis has been carried on the classification, the cost, the principles of red costs and efficiency control, the relationship between costs and benefits.%伴随我国社会经济体制改革的不断深化,公共组织面临各种类型的冲突,探索公共组织冲突管理过程中的内在规律,从而最大限度地提高冲突管理的效率,减少冲突管理的盲目性成为研究的重点.本文在界定公共组织冲突效应和管理效应的基础上,提出了公共组织冲突管理效应计量模型和冲突管理成本效益模型,并通过调查问卷对公共组织公共管理效应分类、成本、冲突成本和效益控制原则、成本与效益的关系进行了实证分析.

  11. Can public managers make their welfare organizations adapt to the new performance landscape shaped by the current austerity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard, Peter; Pedersen, John Storm

    2014-01-01

    How has the current austerity changed the public welfare organizations’ performance landscape in modern welfare states? Can public managers make their organizations adapt to the new performance landscape shaped by the austerity? These questions are answered on the basis of the Danish case...

  12. Public health issues related with the consumption of food obtained from genetically modified organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paparini, Andrea; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo

    2004-01-01

    Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are a fact of modern agriculture and a major field of discussion in biotechnology. As science incessantly achieves innovative and unexpected breakthroughs, new medical, political, ethical and religious debates arise over the production and consumption of transgenic organisms. Despite no described medical condition being directly associated with a diet including approved GM crops in large exposed populations such as 300,000,000 Americans and a billion Chinese, public opinion seems to look at this new technology with either growing concern or even disapproval. It is generally recognized that a high level of vigilance is necessary and highly desirable, but it should also be considered that GMOs are a promising new challenge for the III Millennium societies, with remarkable impact on many disciplines and fields related to biotechnology. To acquire a basic knowledge on GMO production, GM-food consumption, GMO interaction with humans and environment is of primary importance for risk assessment. It requires availability of clear data and results from rigorous experiments. This review will focus on public health risks related with a GMO-containing diet. The objective is to summarize state of the art research, provide fundamental technical information, point out problems and perspectives, and make available essential tools for further research. Are GMO based industries and GMO-derived foods safe to human health? Can we consider both social, ethical and public health issues by means of a constant and effective monitoring of the food chain and by a clear, informative labeling of the products? Which are the so far characterized or alleged hazards of GMOs? And, most importantly, are these hazards actual, potential or merely contrived? Several questions remain open; answers and solutions belong to science, to politics and to the personal opinion of each social subject.

  13. OBJECTIVES, PERFORMANCES, RESULTS – VIEWS ON THEIR USE IN THE PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS FROM ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bacanu Bogdan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on the management associated with relatively common concepts: objective, result and performance (ORP. The study is important because in the Romania of the year 2011, a state reform is being planned, which will substantiate into the reorganization of public institutions, as the improvement of their activity is set forth by utilizing the set of tools associated with the aforementioned concepts. The study represents an analysis related to the use of the set of management tools associated with the aforementioned concepts within the Romanian public organizations. The study is concerned with a qualitative estimation involving the translation of the existing theory into the practice of the present moment. The review of the specialized literature is aimed at selecting the most common theoretical milestones, in order to increase the probability to retrieve them from the practice of the organizations. The works of Drucker represent the first theoretical system of reference. The way the ORP concepts have been utilized within the American organizations generate the guiding elements of the present study. The research presents a longitudinal segmentation, the frontier between the two parts being the present moment. The current state of facts is studied by means of an inductive approach. The hypothesis related to the ORP management in the near future is actually built on the grounds provided by the estimation of this state of facts. Its deductive approach starts from evaluating the pragmatic premises, involving the support of the process that will utilize the ORP in the near future, according to the theoretical percepts. The analysis is qualitative in nature. The identification of the cases that represented the exception was taken into account. The analysis focused on public institutions considered a priori as more transparent: the university, the hospital and the town hall. Even if in the case of the university there are regulations

  14. Connecting Capital and Catastrophe in a Modeled World - How re/insurance and public science interact to manage risk for societal benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, R.

    2010-12-01

    a common philosophy on the need for openness and transparency on modeling methodologies and results. The opportunities for future research and collaboration are significant. The re/insurance sector provides a fertile environment for developing refined research avenues on natural hazards and their social and economic impact. Meanwhile the financial aspects of insurance modelling enable possibilities for improving the scientific analysis from hazard, to risk and ultimately financial loss. This often assists in highlighting the importance and impact of research to funding agencies. Meanwhile re/insurer benefit from the knowledge, resources and rigour of public science. This invited talk with unpack these themes and provide case studies and perspectives of how the re/insurance sector and geophysical science communities can build upon this growing relationship for mutual benefit.

  15. Assessing the Benefits of Social Networks for Organizations: Report on the Second Phase of the SEA-SoNS Project

    OpenAIRE

    BATIKAS MICHAIL; VAN BAVEL Rene

    2013-01-01

    Deliverable 2 of the SEA-SoNS ("Assessing the Benefits of Social Networks on Organizations”) project brings together results from different research activities, both qualitative and quantitative. Together, these results paint a picture of the benefits to organisations of social media, the barriers they face, and the scope for policy action. Phase 2 of SEA-SoNS, which built on the results of Phase 1, included a survey of 600 SMEs in six EU Member States (UK, Netherlands, Spain, Italy, Bulgaria...

  16. Corruption in the Public Organizations. Towards a Model of Costbenefit Analysis for the Anticorruption Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucica MATEI

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to evaluate how theanticorruption strategies contribute towardsminimizing the corruption phenomenon in thepublic organizations, with special referenceto the strategies used in the Romanian publicadministration and health system. Based on someessential features stated by Banfield (1975 withregard to the capacity of public organizations tominimize corruption inside the organizations, theauthors conducted two parallel researches in thepublic administration system and in the healthsystem in Romania. Thus, the researches revealeda paradox in the finality of the analyzed publicorganizations, which focus either exclusively onethical behavior or on other objectives such as:effectiveness, flexibility, dynamics etc. In thecontext of some very interesting studies, such asthose conducted by Rose-Ackerman (1975, 1999,the premises of our research are based on the ideathat “the anticorruption strategies should orientfirstly towards the improvement of the economic,technical and operational efficiency” of the publicorganization. Therefore, the authors speak about“optimal” level of corruption rather than “zero” levelof corruption. The authors justify this fact throughthe costs of supporting the anticorruption strategies,their direct impact on organizational effectivenessand performance.

  17. Strategic Planning for Public and Nonprofit Organizations. A Guide to Strengthening and Sustaining Organizational Achievement. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryson, John M.

    This book shows how leaders and managers of public and nonprofit organizations can use strategic planning to strengthen their organizations. This expanded edition includes many new examples of successful and unsuccessful strategic planning practices, along with new chapters that address how to implement strategies, how to reassess strategies and…

  18. On the Path to SunShot - The Environmental and Public Health Benefits of Achieving High Penetrations of Solar Energy in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ryan [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mai, Trieu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Millstein, Dev [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Macknick, Jordan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Carpenter, Alberta [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cohen, Stuart [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cole, Wesley [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Frew, Bethany [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Heath, Garvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Monetizing the environmental health benefits of solar could add ~3.5¢/kWh to the value of solar energy (see Wiser et al. 2016). The monetary impacts due to environmental degradation and public health impacts seem far removed from the apparent “sticker price” of electricity. Yet quantifying these impacts is essential to understanding the true costs and benefits of solar and conventional generating technologies. Compared with fossil fuel generators, PV and CSP produce far lower lifecycle levels of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and harmful pollutants including fine particular matter (PM2.5), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen oxides (NOx). Achieving the SunShot-level solar deployment targets—14% of U.S. electricity demand met by solar in 2030 and 27% in 2050—could reduce cumulative power-sector GHG emissions by 10% between 2015 and 2050, resulting in savings of $238–$252 billion. This is equivalent to 2.0–2.2 cents per kilowatt-hour of solar installed (¢/kWh-solar). Similarly, realizing these levels of solar deployment could reduce cumulative power-sector emissions of PM2.5 by 8%, SO2 by 9%, and NOx by 11% between 2015 and 2050. This could produce $167 billion in savings from lower future health and environmental damages, or 1.4¢/kWh-solar—while also preventing 25,000–59,000 premature deaths. To put this in perspective, the estimated 3.5¢/kWh-solar in benefits due to SunShot-level solar deployment is approximately equal to the additional LCOE reduction needed to make unsubsidized utility-scale solar competitive with conventional generators today. In addition, water savings from achieving the SunShot goals, could result in the 2015–2050 cumulative savings of 4% of total power-sector withdrawals and 9% of total power-sector consumption—a particularly important consideration for arid states where substantial solar will be deployed. Improving public health and the environment is but one aspect of solar’s many costs and benefits. Clearly, however

  19. Randomised, Double Blind, Controlled Trial of the Provision of Information about the Benefits of Organ Donation during a Family Donation Conversation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve John Philpot

    Full Text Available It is unclear how much information should be provided to families of potential organ donors about the benefits of organ donation. Whilst this information is material to the donation decision, it may also be perceived as coercive.Randomised, double blind, controlled trial in which community members watched one of two videos of a simulated organ donation conversation that differed only in the amount of information provided about the benefits of donation. Participants then completed a questionnaire about the adequacy of the information provided and the degree to which they felt the doctor was trying to convince the family member to say yes to donation.There was a wide variability in what participants considered was the "right" amount of information about organ donation. Those who watched the conversation that included information about the benefits of donation were more likely to feel that the information provided to the family was sufficient. They were more likely to report that the doctor was trying to convince the family member to say yes to donation, yet were no more likely to feel uncomfortable or to feel that the doctor was uncaring or cared more about transplant recipients than he did for the patient and their family.This study suggests that community members are comfortable with health care staff providing information to family members that may be influential in supporting them to give consent for donation.

  20. Randomised, Double Blind, Controlled Trial of the Provision of Information about the Benefits of Organ Donation during a Family Donation Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philpot, Steve John; Aranha, Sarah; Pilcher, David V; Bailey, Michael

    2016-01-01

    It is unclear how much information should be provided to families of potential organ donors about the benefits of organ donation. Whilst this information is material to the donation decision, it may also be perceived as coercive. Randomised, double blind, controlled trial in which community members watched one of two videos of a simulated organ donation conversation that differed only in the amount of information provided about the benefits of donation. Participants then completed a questionnaire about the adequacy of the information provided and the degree to which they felt the doctor was trying to convince the family member to say yes to donation. There was a wide variability in what participants considered was the "right" amount of information about organ donation. Those who watched the conversation that included information about the benefits of donation were more likely to feel that the information provided to the family was sufficient. They were more likely to report that the doctor was trying to convince the family member to say yes to donation, yet were no more likely to feel uncomfortable or to feel that the doctor was uncaring or cared more about transplant recipients than he did for the patient and their family. This study suggests that community members are comfortable with health care staff providing information to family members that may be influential in supporting them to give consent for donation.

  1. Why public moralities matter--the relevance of socioempirical premises for the ethical debate on organ markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweda, Mark; Schicktanz, Silke

    2014-06-01

    The ongoing bioethical debate about organ markets rests not only on theoretical premises, but also on assumptions regarding public views of and attitudes toward organ donation that need closer socioempirical examination. Summarizing results from our previous qualitative social research in this field, this paper illustrates the ethical significance of such public moralities in two respects: On one hand, it analyzes the implicit bias of the common rhetoric of "organ scarcity" which motivates much of the commercialization debate. On the other hand, it explores the blind spots of the paradigm of "altruistic donation" which informs many arguments against commercialization. We conclude that the ethical discourse has to appreciate the social nature of organ donation as a reciprocal interaction between different parties with irreducibly different but equally relevant viewpoints. We criticize the neglect of such well-founded public considerations in certain philosophical-ethical approaches and stress the need for further systematic and comparative socioempirical studies about peoples' actual perspectives in bioethics.

  2. Prospective cost-benefit analysis of a two-dimensional barcode for vaccine production, clinical documentation, and public health reporting and tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Alan C; Kennedy, Erin D; Loomis, Ross J; Haque, Saira N; Layton, Christine M; Williams, Warren W; Amoozegar, Jacqueline B; Braun, Fern M; Honeycutt, Amanda A; Weinbaum, Cindy

    2013-06-28

    In the United States recording accurate vaccine lot numbers in immunization records is required by the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act and is necessary for public health surveillance and implementation of vaccine product recalls. However, this information is often missing or inaccurate in records. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires a linear barcode of the National Drug Code (NDC) on vaccine product labels as a medication verification measure, but lot number and expiration date must still be recorded by hand. Beginning in 2011, FDA permitted manufacturers to replace linear barcodes with two-dimensional (2D) barcodes on unit-of-use product labels. A 2D barcode can contain the NDC, expiration date, and lot number in a symbol small enough to fit on a unit-of-use label. All three data elements could be scanned into a patient record. To assess 2D barcodes' potential impacts, a mixed-methods approach of time-motion data analysis, interview and survey data collection, and cost-benefit analysis was employed. Analysis of a time-motion study conducted at 33 practices suggests scanning 2D-barcoded vaccines could reduce immunization documentation time by 36-39 s per dose. Data from an internet survey of primary care providers and local health officials indicate that 60% of pediatric practices, 54% of family medicine practices, and 39% of health departments would use the 2D barcode, with more indicating they would do so if they used electronic health records. Inclusive of manufacturer and immunization provider costs and benefits, we forecast lower-bound net benefits to be $310-334 million between 2011 and 2023 with a benefit-to-cost ratio of 3.1:1-3.2:1. Although we were unable to monetize benefits for expected improved immunization coverage, surveillance, or reduced medication errors, based on our findings, we expect that using 2D barcodes will lower vaccine documentation costs, facilitate data capture, and enhance immunization data quality. Copyright © 2013

  3. Organizational change for services integration in public human service organizations: experiences in seven counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Thomas; Patti, Rino; Daly, Donna; Tucker-Tatlow, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This is a study of organizational change strategies employed in seven county human service agencies to improve the coordination of services through the structural integration of previously free standing organizations or the development of voluntary interagency collaborative service delivery systems. The central question involves the identification of organizational change tactics which contributed to the success of the organizational change initiatives. The literature on organizational change is reviewed, with particular attention to a framework developed by Fernandez and Rainey based on their extensive review and synthesis of the research on successful change strategies in the public and business sectors. Qualitative and quantitative data were gathered from over 250 individuals and from agency documents. Findings are compared with the success factors identified by Fernandez and Rainey, and refinements to their propositions are suggested. More precise methods for measuring successful and unsuccessful change initiatives are suggested. Implications for practice and research are presented.

  4. Chimera states in a network-organized public goods game with destructive agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvaris, Nikos E.; Requejo, Rubén J.; Hizanidis, Johanne; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2016-12-01

    We found that a network-organized metapopulation of cooperators, defectors, and destructive agents playing the public goods game with mutations can collectively reach global synchronization or chimera states. Global synchronization is accompanied by a collective periodic burst of cooperation, whereas chimera states reflect the tendency of the networked metapopulation to be fragmented in clusters of synchronous and incoherent bursts of cooperation. Numerical simulations have shown that the system's dynamics switches between these two steady states through a first order transition. Depending on the parameters determining the dynamical and topological properties, chimera states with different numbers of coherent and incoherent clusters are observed. Our results present the first systematic study of chimera states and their characterization in the context of evolutionary game theory. This provides a valuable insight into the details of their occurrence, extending the relevance of such states to natural and social systems.

  5. Healthcare public key infrastructure (HPKI) and non-profit organization (NPO): essentials for healthcare data exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Hiroshi; Matsumura, Yasushi; Nakagawa, Katsuhiko; Teratani, Tadamasa; Qiyan, Zhang; Kusuoka, Hideo; Matsuoka, Masami

    2004-01-01

    To share healthcare information and to promote cooperation among healthcare providers and customers (patients) under computerized network environment, a non-profit organization (NPO), named as OCHIS, was established at Osaka, Japan in 2003. Since security and confidentiality issues on the Internet have been major concerns in the OCHIS, the system has been based on healthcare public key infrastructure (HPKI), and found that there remained problems to be solved technically and operationally. An experimental study was conducted to elucidate the central and the local function in terms of a registration authority and a time stamp authority by contracting with the Ministry of Economics and Trading Industries in 2003. This paper describes the experimental design with NPO and the results of the study concerning message security and HPKI. The developed system has been operated practically in Osaka urban area.

  6. The Conditions of Organization Adaptive Capabilities. Case of Polish Public Hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariola Ciszewska-Mlinaric

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In each phase of adaptation organizations need different capabilities that allow them to adapt to their environment. In the previous article the model of adaptive capabilities was presented and differences in adaptive capabilities between high and low performers were discussed. The primary objective of the study is to identify and examine the key factors influencing the adaptive capabilities of Polish public hospitals that had to respond to a revolutionary environmental change (a redesign of healthcare system. Research indicates that following factors are significant: owners policy, environment uncertainty, access to resources, leadership capabilities, interorganizational links, change process (pace and sequence, intraorganizational relations, ideology, strategy, decentralization, employees trust in management and their attitude toward change.

  7. [The transition from 'international' to 'global' public health and the World Health Organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Theodore M; Cueto, Marcos; Fee, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    Within the context of international public health, 'global health' seems to be emerging as a recognized term of preference. This article presents a critical analysis of the meaning and importance of 'global health' and situates its growing popularity within a historical context. A specific focus of this work is the role of the World Health Organization - WHO in both 'international' and 'global' health, and as na agent of transition from one to the other. Between 1948 and 1998, the WHO went through a period of hardship as it came up against an organizational crisis, budget cuts and a diminished status, especially when confronted with the growing influence of new, power players like the World Bank. We suggest that the WHO has responded to this changing international context by inititating its own process of restructuring and repositioning as an agent for coordinating, strategically planning and leading 'global health' initiatives.

  8. Civil society under the Treaty of Lisbon: relationship between national public benefit organizations and European Union policy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, L.C.R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The active involvement of European citizens became a new form of democracy in the Treaty of Lisbon of 2009 by the introduction of a whole new chapter dedicated to this purpose. There is an article that obligates the Commission to give serious consideration to the demands of one million citizens from

  9. Civil society under the Treaty of Lisbon: relationship between national public benefit organizations and European Union policy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteegh, L.C.R.M.

    2011-01-01

    The active involvement of European citizens became a new form of democracy in the Treaty of Lisbon of 2009 by the introduction of a whole new chapter dedicated to this purpose. There is an article that obligates the Commission to give serious consideration to the demands of one million citizens from

  10. THE INFLUENCE OF THE INTEGRATED MODEL OF SOCIAL STRATIFICATION STRUCTURE ON THE PUBLIC PARTICIPATING NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tien Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main body of social stratification structure in Taiwan is transformed with social mobility. By transforming the social stratification structure, the function of non-profit organizations is operating steadily. How does people’s awareness of social strata directly or indirectly influence the operation of non-profit organizations? How do non-profit organizations and governments respond to the transformation of social stratum compositions? And how promotion and policy marketing could guide the general public to be attentive and participate in the operations of non-profit organizations? These questions require in-depth investigation. This study bases on the experiments and concepts of fairness measurement in information integration theory to comprehend the integrated model of social stratification in the public. By means of analyzing the awareness and orientation of the public to the constitution of social stratification which lead the public to identify themselves with the visions of non-profit organizations and the motion of participating non-profit matters to provide the interrelated recommendations of proceeding non-profit matters to non-profit organizations and the government. Comparing the cognitive algebraic functions of input information and outcome information of various groups in the social strata, the only difference is that if the input information is education background and the outcome information profession prestige. Empirically, non-profit organizations promoting and encouraging people to engage in occupational aid related activities could find different methods available.

  11. 42 CFR 422.104 - Special rules on supplemental benefits for MA MSA plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special rules on supplemental benefits for MA MSA... Beneficiary Protections § 422.104 Special rules on supplemental benefits for MA MSA plans. (a) An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan may not provide supplemental benefits that cover expenses that...

  12. JURIDICAL ANALYSIS OF LEGISLATION RELATED TO THE CRIME OF TRADE IN HUMAN ORGANS FOR THE BENEFIT OF THE KIDNEY ORGAN TRANSPLANT (Comparative Studies Between Indonesia with Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benny Situmorang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In accordance with organ transplant’s evolve especially the kidneys it is necessary to rule out specific health legislation  in dealing with transplantation  of human body’s  organs  to prevent  human  trafficking  of human  organs.  The approaches used is the approach of legislation and comparisons to provide an overview of the regulation of transplantation of human body’s organs in Indonesia, and to know the comparison with other countries that have specific rules on transplants. The result is that the regulations in Indonesia does not have rules on organ transplants from living non-related organ donation and found no legal protection againts the donor. Keywords: Organ   transplant,   kidney   transplant,   human   trafficking,   health legislation.

  13. Employees’ Commitment to the Organization of a Public District Hospital: a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyaggelia Tsolaki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The employees' satisfaction from their job and their commitment to the organization appears to be one of the most determinants factors of organizational effectiveness.Aim: The aim of this study was the research of commitment to the organization of employees' working at Sparta General Hospital, as well as the correlation between job satisfaction and social, economic, demographic or other factors.Methodology: The research’s sample included 121 employees from all departments of a public district hospital. For research purposes, the Organizational Commitment Questionnaire was used. Data specially designed for the research’s purposes.Results: The largest sample’s proportion, declared moderate to very satisfy by their job at that Hospital. The particular job demands, exhausting timetables, stress and organizational weaknesses of the Greek Health System seem to have been key components of the problem. Also, for a large sample proportion, the job demands affect negatively the time and energy that Sparta General Hospital employees’ dedicate to themselves and to their families. Almost half of the participants replied that they are not at all satisfied with their payroll. Regarding the rates of emotional, standing and exemplary commitment, showed that gender, education level, marital status, age and total years of professional seniority correlated with the level of emotional commitment. To higher affective commitment is positively correlated with age of employees and years of service.Conclusions: The research of commitment to the organization can contribute substantially in improving the hospital’s and health system’s effectiveness, the increment of job’s satisfaction, the employees’ efficiency.

  14. 42 CFR 422.103 - Benefits under an MA MSA plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Benefits under an MA MSA plan. 422.103 Section 422... Benefits under an MA MSA plan. (a) General rule. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan must make...) Countable expenses. An MA organization offering an MA MSA plan must count toward the annual deductible...

  15. Concept Of The Public Safety In The Russian Federation As A Legal Measure Of The Educational Institutions (Organizations Security

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay A. Chesnokov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present article author researches basic positions presented in the Concept of Public Security in the Russian Federation and focused on the educational institutions (organizations. Author analyzes main sources of threat to the public security: the threat of a criminal nature; terrorist threats; extremist activity; increase in the number of crimes; complication of the crime situation; increase in the number of criminals; high levels of corruption; illegal migration; internal migration; social tension in society; deterioration of the technical state of transport infrastructure; likelihood of emergencies; risk of harm to the human life and health, environment; high probability of fire occurrence in Russia; natural variations in the characteristics of the hydrological regime of water bodies; seismic hazard. Author defines goals of public security, outlines priority (main and other tasks, as well as the principles and key activities to ensure public security. In the conclusion author concludes that public safety, in fact, involves complex nature of activity and contributes to the legal security of educational institution (organization, gives definition of the public security of the educational institution (organization and results of operations for its assuring.

  16. The evolution of public relations and the use of the internet: the implications for health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Eric N

    2007-01-01

    Over the past several years the discipline and practice of public relations has evolved. Historically, this field within health care organizations was a one-way management of communications and often was reactive in nature dealing with a crisis situation with an organization. Recent theoretical development within the discipline suggests that public relations involves more relationship building with key constituencies and on-going-dialogue. Concomitant with this evolution is the technological development of the internet. Most particularly is the use of podcasting and blogging as key tools which have been underutilized by health car providers but have significant potential in both communication and relationship opportunities as discussed in this article.

  17. How does the general public view posthumous organ donation? A meta-synthesis of the qualitative literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Joshua D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many individuals are unwilling to become posthumous organ donors, resulting in a disparity between the supply and demand for organ transplants. A meta-synthesis of the qualitative literature was therefore conducted to determine how the general public views posthumous organ donation. Methods Three online databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus were searched for articles published between January 1990 and May 2008 using the following search terms: organ donation, qualitative, interview. Eligibility criteria were: examination of beliefs about posthumous organ donation; utilization of a qualitative research design; and publication in an English peer-reviewed journal. Exclusion criteria were examining how health professionals or family members of organ donors viewed posthumous organ donation. Grounded theory was used to identify the beliefs emerging from this literature. Thematically-related beliefs were then grouped to form themes. Results 27 articles from 24 studies met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. The major themes identified were: religion, death, altruism, personal relevance, the body, the family, medical professionals, and transplant recipients. An altruistic motivation to help others emerged as the most commonly identified motivator for becoming an organ donor, although feeling a sense of solidarity with the broader community and believing that donated organs are put to good use may be important preconditions for the emergence of this motivation. The two most commonly identified barriers were the need to maintain bodily integrity to safeguard progression into the afterlife and the unethical recovery of organs by medical professionals. The influence of stakeholder groups on willingness to become an organ donor was also found to vary by the level of control that each stakeholder group exerted over the donation recovery process and their perceived conflict of interest in wanting organ donation to proceed. Conclusions

  18. The structure and organization of local and state public health agencies in the U.S.: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Justeen K; Shortell, Stephen M

    2012-05-01

    This systematic review provides a synthesis of the growing field of public health systems research related to the structure and organization of state and local governmental public health agencies. It includes an overview of research examining the influence of organizational characteristics on public health performance and health status and a summary of the strengths and gaps of the literature to date. Data were retrieved through an iterative process, beginning with key word searches in three publication databases (PubMed, JSTOR, Web of Science). Gray literature was searched through the use of Google Scholar™. Targeted searches on websites and key authors were also performed. Documents underwent an initial and secondary screening; they were retained if they contained information about local or state public health structure, organization, governance, and financing. 77 articles met the study criteria. Public health services are delivered by a mix of local, state, and tribal governmental and nongovernmental agencies and delivered through centralized (28%); decentralized (37%); or combined authority (35%). The majority of studies focused on organizational characteristics that are associated with public health performance based on the 10 Essential Public Health Services framework. Population size of jurisdiction served (>50,000); structure of authority (decentralized and mixed); per capita spending at the local level; some partnerships (academic, health services); and leadership of agency directors have been found to be related to public health performance. Fewer studies examined the relationship between organizational characteristics and health outcomes. Improvements in health outcomes are associated with an increase in local health department expenditures, FTEs per capita, and location of health department within local networks. Public health systems in the U.S. face a number of critical challenges, including limited organizational capacity and financial resources

  19. Wellbeing at work among kitchen workers during organic food conversion in Danish public kitchens: a longitudinal survey

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Nina Nørgaard; Løje, Hanne; Tetens, Inge

    2016-01-01

    Background: In 2011, the Danish Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries launched the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020 intending to double the organic agricultural area in Denmark. This study aims to measure experienced physical and psychological wellbeing at work along with beliefs and attitudes...... among kitchen workers before and after participating in educational training programmes in organic food conversion. Method: This longitudinal study applied an online self-administered questionnaire among kitchen workers before and after the implementation of an organic food conversion programme with 1......-year follow-up. The study targeted all staff members in the participating public kitchens taking part in the organic food conversion process funded by the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020. Results: Of the 448 eligible kitchen workers, 235 completed the questionnaire at baseline (52%) and 149 at follow...

  20. What factors determine the choice of public engagement undertaken by health technology assessment decision-making organizations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortley, Sally; Street, Jackie; Lipworth, Wendy; Howard, Kirsten

    2016-09-19

    Purpose Public engagement in health technology assessment (HTA) is increasingly considered crucial for good decision making. Determining the "right" type of engagement activity is key in achieving the appropriate consideration of public values. Little is known about the factors that determine how HTA organizations (HTAOs) decide on their method of public engagement, and there are a number of possible factors that might shape these decisions. The purpose of this paper is to understand the potential drivers of public engagement from an organizational perspective. Design/methodology/approach The published HTA literature is reviewed alongside existing frameworks of public engagement in order to elucidate key factors influencing the choice of public engagement process undertaken by HTAOs. A conceptual framework is then developed to illustrate the factors identified from the literature that appear to influence public engagement choice. Findings Determining the type of public engagement undertaken in HTA is based on multiple factors, some of which are not always explicitly acknowledged. These factors included the: perceived complexity of the policy-making issue, perceived impact of the decision, transparency and opportunities for public involvement in governance, as well as time and resource constraints. The influences of these factors vary depending on the context, indicating that a one size fits all approach to public engagement may not be effective. Originality/value Awareness of the various factors that might influence the type of public engagement undertaken would enable decision makers to reflect on their choices and be more accountable and transparent about their choice of engagement process in eliciting public values and preferences in a HTAO.

  1. Information Assurance for Enterprise Resource Planning Systems: Risk Considerations in Public Sector Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHAHZAD NAEEM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning systems reveal and pose non-typical risks due to its dependencies of interlinked business operations and process reengineering. Understanding of such type of risks is significant conducting and planning assurance involvement of the reliability of these complicated computer systems. Specially, in case of distributed environment where data reside at multiple sites and risks are of unique nature. Until now, there are brief pragmatic grounds on this public sector ERP issue. To analyze this subject, a partially organized consultation study was carried out with 15 skilled information systems auditors who are specialists in evaluating ERP systems risks. This methodology permitted to get more elaborated information about stakeholder?s opinions and customer experiences. In addition, interviewees mentioned a numerous basic execution troubles (e.g. inadequately skilled human resource and insufficient process reengineering attempts that lead into enhanced hazards. It was also reported by the interviewees that currently risks vary across vendors and across applications. Eventually, in offering assurance with ERP systems participants irresistibly stresses examining the process instead of system end product.

  2. Anticancer patent landscape and technology assessment of Indian public-funded research institutes and organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dara, Ajay; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2014-08-01

    This review discusses the various drug therapeutic targets and latest technologies of anticancer patents from 10 Indian public-funded research organizations covering more than 150 esteemed institutes. We have identified and reported the leading assignee and inventors along with their collaboration network and, thereby, have analyzed the various patent trends, geographical distributions, citation maps, Derwent World Patents Index, international patent classification analysis and the like. This article provides the insights of 1905 patent documents from 191 families and discusses in-depth anticancer technology through categorization studies at the level of drug discovery, drug development and treatment and diagnosis. In addition, various cancer targets were correlated with recent technologies so as to identify the white spaces for upcoming technologies. Over a period of 13 years (1990 - 2013) the main focus of Indian cancer research was in the field of synthetic chemistry and natural extracts followed by the pharmaceutical compositions and combinations, whereas, the white spaces for future cancer remedy were identified from research in the areas of cancer stem cell lines, vaccines, gene therapy, nano formulations with targeted drug delivery systems as core and latest technologies.

  3. Quality management and the work environment: an empirical investigation in a public sector organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira, Alvaro D; James, Craig A; Karsh, Ben -Tzion; Sainfort, François

    2003-07-01

    The integration of quality management initiatives, particularly total quality management (TQM), and ergonomics has received increasing attention from scholars and practitioners. Above all, the question of how TQM programs relate to ergonomic aspects of organizational design and culture is at the center of this discussion. This study examines how elements of a "typical", Deming-inspired, TQM program in the public sector interact with the work environment. Elements of the TQM program were defined and measured using the Malcom Baldridge Award criteria. The specific elements examined were "Management Support of Quality", "Information and Analysis", "Human Resources", "Processes and Quality Results", and "Customer Focus and Satisfaction". The relationship between these TQM elements and the work environment were defined through five separate hypotheses. The work environment was described by the constructs "Supervisor Support", "Task Clarity", "Task Orientation", and "Innovation". Data were obtained through survey questionnaires administered to employees of four departments in a municipal government organization. Results supported three of the hypotheses, but produced some unanticipated outcomes with regard to the other two. Namely, "Management Support of Quality" was significantly related to "Supervisor Support", "Task Orientation", "Task Clarity" and "Innovation"; "Human Resources" was significantly related to "Supervisor Support"; "Processes and Quality Results" was significantly related to "Task Orientation" and "Innovation". Contrary to predicted "Information and Analysis" was negatively related to "Innovation", and "Customer Focus" was unrelated to any of the outcome variables. The relationships between these TQM elements and work environment dimensions are discussed. Implications for TQM and ergonomic practice are analyzed, and directions for future research proposed.

  4. Who benefits?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Frederik Georg

    2016-01-01

    Cross-border welfare rights for citizens of European Union member states are intensely contested, yet there is limited research into voter opposition to such rights, sometimes denoted ‘welfare chauvinism’. We highlight an overlooked aspect in scholarly work: the role of stereotypes about...... beneficiaries of cross-border welfare. We present results from an original large-scale survey experiment (N=2525) among Swedish voters, randomizing exposure to cues about recipients' country of origin and family size. Consistent with a model emphasizing the role of stereotypes, respondents react to cues about...... recipient identity. These effects are strongest among respondents high in ethnic prejudice and economic conservatism. The findings imply that stereotypes about who benefits from cross-border welfare rights condition public support for those rights....

  5. The use of ethanol in the bus in public transport system of Salvador (Bahia): environmental benefits; O uso de onibus a etanol no sistema de transporte publico de Salvador (Bahia): beneficios ambientais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Alberto Rodamilans Freire de; Lopo, Luciene Matos; Pereira, Osvaldo Livio Soliano [Universidade Salvador (UNIFACS), BA (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    This article makes an initial approach on the environmental benefits, the replacement of diesel vehicles to the public transportation system in Salvador by cars to ethanol and natural gas. It also makes an approach on reducing the emission of pollutants like carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate material, and estimates the environmental benefit caused by the reduction of the emission of pollutants. (author)

  6. 天津市公共基础设施社会效益评价与提升研究%Research on Social Benefit Evaluation and Promotion of Public Infrastructure in Tianjin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李向春; 孙钰; 陶志梅

    2016-01-01

    In view of Tianjin public infrastructure system from 2004~2013,the paper establishes the social benefit evaluation system of public infrastructure,uses the principal component to analyze the social benefits of public infrastructure system,clears the improving path of the social benefits of the public infrastructure. Then, puts forward the promotion countermeasure,such as increasing the investment intensity of public infrastructure, strengthening the public infrastructure operation and management,and optimizing the investment structure of public infrastructure.%针对天津市2004~2013年公共基础设施系统,建立公共基础设施社会效益评价体系,并采用主成分法分析其社会效益,明确天津市基础设施社会效益的提升路径,进而从加大公共基础设施投入力度、加强公共基础设施运营与管理、优化公共基础设施投资结构角度提出提升对策.

  7. 78 FR 59413 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-26

    ... Federal Aviation Administration International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel... meeting. SUMMARY: In preparation for the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous... Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel's (ICAO DGP's) 24th Panel Meeting. The agenda for the Working Group is...

  8. 77 FR 53250 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... Federal Aviation Administration International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel... meeting. SUMMARY: In preparation for the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous... International Civil Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel's (ICAO DGP's) Working Group of the Whole...

  9. 78 FR 16756 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-18

    ... Federal Aviation Administration International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel... meeting. SUMMARY: In preparation for the International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous... prepares for the International Civil Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel's (ICAO DGP's)...

  10. An Analysis of Changeability Grounds in Iranian Public Organizations: A Case Study in the Cities of Lamerd and Mohr

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Naghi Amiri

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to develop a model and assess changeability grounds in public organizations. The statistical population includes public organizations in the cities of Lamerd and Mohr. The research includes three fundamental stages, each of which tries to answer a key question. To devise a proper model, we initially study the theoretical literature of change management and the resistance against change to determine the dimensions of changeability grounds (the first stage. Then, changeability grounds are analyzed using findings obtained from depth interviews (from a localized attitude with thirty four middle-ranking managers, and the proposed model is presented (the second stage. In analyzing public organizations based on this model (the third stage we used questionnaires to gather information from the statistical sample of two hundred ten subjects. The results indicated that changeability among public organizations is in a moderate level that is due to lack of communications and participation in decision-making, disproportion between changes and the related knowledge, and absence of in-service training.

  11. Public management and network specificity: Effects of colleges’ ties with professional organizations on graduates’ labour market success and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, Agnes; Torenvlied, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Research on managerial networking in the public sector reports positive effects of network activity on performance. However, little is known about which network relations influence different aspects of performance. We argue that for specific organizational goals, organizations should direct their ne

  12. Public Management and Network Specificity. Effects of colleges’ ties with professional organizations on graduates’ labour market success and satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerman, A.; Torenvlied, R.

    2013-01-01

    Research on managerial networking in the public sector reports positive effects of network activity on performance. However, little is known about which network relations influence different aspects of performance. We argue that for specific organizational goals, organizations should direct their ne

  13. Accounting, Accountability, and Ethics in Public Sector Organizations : Toward a Duality Between Instrumental Accountability and Relational Response-Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vosselman, E.G.J.

    2016-01-01

    This article challenges the performativity of organizational economics in the construction of “nexus-of-contract” organizations (or market bureaucracies) and inherent frames of instrumental accountability in the public sector. It argues for a duality between instrumental accountability and relationa

  14. How to allocate public funding to nongovernmental development organizations: A critical assessment of the Dutch co-financing system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruben, R.; Schulpen, L.W.M.

    2009-01-01

    The Dutch co-financing system for nongovernmental development organizations (NGDOs) is unique in Europe. Almost a quarter of public development aid is channeled through a selective group of NGDOs that have to satisfy a broad range of institutional and operational criteria. The procedures for definin

  15. Benefits of Using a Problem-Solving Scaffold for Teaching and Learning Synthesis in Undergraduate Organic Chemistry I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloop, Joseph C.; Tsoi, Mai Yin; Coppock, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    A problem-solving scaffold approach to synthesis was developed and implemented in two intervention sections of Chemistry 2211K (Organic Chemistry I) at Georgia Gwinnett College (GGC). A third section of Chemistry 2211K at GGC served as the control group for the experiment. Synthesis problems for chapter quizzes and the final examination were…

  16. Resolving the 'nitrogen paradox' of arbuscular mycorrhizas: fertilization with organic matter brings considerable benefits for plant nutrition and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirkell, Tom J; Cameron, Duncan D; Hodge, Angela

    2016-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can transfer nitrogen (N) to host plants, but the ecological relevance is debated, as total plant N and biomass do not generally increase. The extent to which the symbiosis is mutually beneficial is thought to rely on the stoichiometry of N, phosphorus (P) and carbon (C) availability. While inorganic N fertilization has been shown to elicit strong mutualism, characterized by improved plant and fungal growth and mineral nutrition, similar responses following organic N addition are lacking. Using a compartmented microcosm experiment, we determined the significance to a mycorrhizal plant of placing a (15) N-labelled, nitrogen-rich patch of organic matter in a compartment to which only AMF hyphae had access. Control microcosms denied AMF hyphal access to the patch compartment. When permitted access to the patch compartment, the fungus proliferated extensively in the patch and transferred substantial quantities of N to the plant. Moreover, our data demonstrate that allowing hyphal access to an organic matter patch enhanced total plant N and P contents, with a simultaneous and substantial increase in plant biomass. Furthermore, we demonstrate that organic matter fertilization of arbuscular mycorrhizal plants can foster a mutually beneficial symbiosis based on nitrogen transfer, a phenomenon previously thought irrelevant.

  17. Benefits of CHP Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the benefits of being a EPA CHP Partner, which include expert advice and answers to questions, CHP news, marketing resources, publicity and recognition, and being associated with EPA through a demonstrated commitment to CHP.

  18. Self-Organized Public-Key Management for Mobile Ad Hoc Networks Based on a Bidirectional Trust Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In traditional networks ,the authentication is performed by certificate authoritys(CA),which can't be built in distributed mobile Ad Hoc Networks however. In this paper, we propose a fully self-organized public key management based on bidirectional trust model without any centralized authority that allows users to generate their public-private key pairs, to issue certificates, and the trust relation spreads rationally according to the truly human relations. In contrast with the traditional self-organized public-key management, the average certificates paths get more short,the authentication passing rate gets more high and the most important is that the bidirectional trust based model satisfys the trust requirement of hosts better.

  19. THE ROLE AND IMPORTANCE OF “PUBLIC INFORMATION” IN POLITICAL PUBLIC RELATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazım Özkan ERTÜRK

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Public relations is the practice of managing a communication process that aims to build mutual goodwill and trust between organizations and their publics with the help of publicity, information and positive image building efforts. Public information is the public relations approach which aims for providing mutual goodwill and trust by sharing the organization-related information with target audience in complete openness and honesty. Public Information, firstly introduced by Ivy Ledbetter Lee in the United States of America during 1920’s, became prominent as a public relations model which provided an innovative viewpoint on commercial and organizational communication policies. In time, public information practices in public relations began to be utilized for building and maintaining political trust and support of target audience. In this study, application methods of public information activities as a political public relations action and their benefits provided to organization are outlined.

  20. Public health research priorities in Europe seen by non-governmental organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulis, Gabriel; Garrido-Herrero, Lara; Katreniakova, Zuzana; Harvey, Gabrielle; McCarthy, Mark

    2008-12-01

    Public health research is concerned with population health, determinants of health, health systems research, health promotion, environmental health, health protection, disease prevention and research in other fields of public health. During the last decades, non-governmental organisations (NGOs) are more often entering the field of public health research. This paper presents results of work within SPHERE (Strengthening Public Health Research in Europe), a European Commission funded study aimed to gather information and produce knowledge on the state of public health research in Europe. A questionnaire survey was developed and conducted among NGOs enrolled in a database held by the European Public Health Alliance (EPHA). There were 80 replies, and the response rate for NGOs that were members of EPHA was 53%. There were no significant statistical differences in the responses when analysed for three European groups ['old' member states (EU 15), accession members states in 2004 (EU 10) and EU-associated countries]. The NGOs reported a relatively large international experience, expressed by participation in international public health research, and more often practice work. The main research priorities reported were general public health, environmental health, ADHD, obesity, nutrition, tobacco control. NGOs showed low correlation between their work field and their proposed public health research priorities. There are growing numbers of NGOs in Europe concerned with public health. This survey indicates their interest also in public health research priorities.

  1. Benefits of Transplant Procurement Management (TPM) specialized training on professional competence development and career evolutions of health care workers in organ donation and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrate, Melania G; Harrison, Tyler R; Valero, Ricard; Morgan, Susan E; Páez, Gloria; Zhou, Quan; Rébék-Nagy, Gábor; Manyalich, Martí

    2015-04-01

    Training on organ donation and transplantation is relevant for transplantation improvement. This study aimed at investigating the perceived benefits of Transplant Procurement Management training programs on professional competence development and career evolutions of health care workers in organ donation and transplantation. An online survey was developed in 5 languages (Spanish, English, Italian, French, and Portuguese) and its link was emailed to 6839 individuals. They were asked to forward it to other professionals in organ donation and transplantation. The link was also shared on Facebook and at relevant congresses. Two research questions on the perceived influence of specialized training programs were identified. A total of 1102 participants (16.1%) took the survey; 87% reported participating in Transplant Procurement Management training programs, of which 95% selected Transplant Procurement Management courses as the most influential training they had participated in. For research question one, 98% reported influence on knowledge (score 4.5 [out of 5]), 93% on technical (4.2) and communication skills (4.1), 89% on attitude toward organ donation and transplantation (4.1), 92% on motivation to work (4.2), 91% on desire to innovate (4.0), 87% and 79% on ability to change organ donation and trans plantation practices (3.9) and policies (3.5). For research question 2, main and interaction effects for position at the time of training and type of training were reported. Transplant Procurement Management training programs had positive perceived effects.

  2. VOLUNTARY SURGICAL CONTRACEPTION OF WOMEN OF LATE REPRODUCTIVE AGE SUFFERING FROM PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE – FEATURES AND BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigina Nasimova

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been a noticeable "rejuvenation" of pelvic organ prolapse. Inconsistency of the pelvic floor muscles, including the omission of sexual organs, is extremely common pathology, observed almost a third of women of reproductive age. The search for effective, convenient methods of contraception for this category of patients is an important problem of modern gynecology.We proposed a method of transvaginal voluntary surgical contraception, produced in conjunction with surgical treatment of descent and prolapse of the vaginal walls. Studied the nearest and long-term results of surgery in 50 women to which, during the surgical treatment of genital prolapse at the same time was performed transvaginal occlusion of the fallopian tubes. Control groups consisted of 30 women to which in the first step before surgical correction of pelvic organ prolapse have been performed minilaparotomy and voluntary surgical sterilization (VSS. Our method consists in penetrating into the abdominal cavity through the anterior vaginal vault, downgrading the fallopian tubes with a hook of Ramathibodi and tubal sterilization by Pomeroy method. Intra - and postoperative complications were not observed. In the late postoperative periods - the effectiveness of the method was 100%. Marked tendency to improve the quality of sexual life tells about the positive impact of elimination of genital prolapse with simultaneous DCA on the quality of life of women.

  3. Centralizing discovery information: from logistics to knowledge at a public organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbano-Cuadrado, Manuel; Rabal, Obdulia; Oyarzabal, Julen

    2011-07-01

    Due to the huge amount of data generated in drug discovery programs, their success strongly depends on both the workflows and platforms to manage and, more importantly, to integrate different chemical and biological data sources. At Experimental Therapeutics Program in the Spanish National Cancer Research Center (CNIO), we have addressed our efforts in the design and optimal implementation of those key processes that enable dynamic workflows and interfaces between the different information blocks. Our approach focuses on the development of a common chemical and biological repository (CCBR) that gathers all data that pass quality control criteria. An integral web application (WACBIP) was designed to query against CCBR while providing decision making tools. Currently, our CCBR contains more than 43,000 unique structures as well as experimental data from more than 350 different biological assays. As input sources of the CCBR, we federated a series of Laboratory Information Management Systems (LIMS) which cover sections as follows: chemical synthesis, analytical department, compound logistics, biochemical and cellular data (including high-throughput and high-content screenings; HTS and HCS), computational chemistry (in-silico chemogenomics and physico-chemical profiling) and in-vivo pharmacology. With regard to the last section, an integral In-Vivo Management e-Biobook (IVMB) that handles the entire workflow of in-vivo labs was designed and implemented. Herein we describe the processes and tools that we have developed and implemented, balancing purchase and development, for centralizing discovery information as well as providing decision-making and project management tools - a clear unmet need in public organizations and networks.

  4. Validating a work group climate assessment tool for improving the performance of public health organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Allison

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This article describes the validation of an instrument to measure work group climate in public health organizations in developing countries. The instrument, the Work Group Climate Assessment Tool (WCA, was applied in Brazil, Mozambique, and Guinea to assess the intermediate outcomes of a program to develop leadership for performance improvement. Data were collected from 305 individuals in 42 work groups, who completed a self-administered questionnaire. Methods The WCA was initially validated using Cronbach's alpha reliability coefficient and exploratory factor analysis. This article presents the results of a second validation study to refine the initial analyses to account for nested data, to provide item-level psychometrics, and to establish construct validity. Analyses included eigenvalue decomposition analysis, confirmatory factor analysis, and validity and reliability analyses. Results This study confirmed the validity and reliability of the WCA across work groups with different demographic characteristics (gender, education, management level, and geographical location. The study showed that there is agreement between the theoretical construct of work climate and the items in the WCA tool across different populations. The WCA captures a single perception of climate rather than individual sub-scales of clarity, support, and challenge. Conclusion The WCA is useful for comparing the climates of different work groups, tracking the changes in climate in a single work group over time, or examining differences among individuals' perceptions of their work group climate. Application of the WCA before and after a leadership development process can help work groups hold a discussion about current climate and select a target for improvement. The WCA provides work groups with a tool to take ownership of their own group climate through a process that is simple and objective and that protects individual confidentiality.

  5. The "spare parts person"? Conceptions of the human body and their implications for public attitudes towards organ donation and organ sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweda, Mark; Schicktanz, Silke

    2009-02-18

    The increasing debate on financial incentives for organ donation raises concerns about a "commodification of the human body". Philosophical-ethical stances on this development depend on assumptions concerning the body and how people think about it. In our qualitative empirical study we analyze public attitudes towards organ donation in their specific relation to conceptions of the human body in four European countries (Cyprus, Germany, the Netherlands and Sweden). This approach aims at a more context-sensitive picture of what "commodification of the body" can mean in concrete clinical decisions concerning organ donation. We find that moral intuitions concerning organ donation are rooted in various conceptions of the human body and its relation to the self: a) the body as a mechanical object owned by the self, b) the body as a part of a higher order embodying the self, and c) the body as a hierarchy of organs constitutive of the self. The language of commodification is much too simple to capture what is at stake in everyday life intuitions about organ donation and organ sale. We discuss how the plurality of underlying body-self conceptions can be taken into account in the ethical debate, pointing out consequences for an anthropologically informed approach and for a liberal perspective.

  6. What drives public acceptance of nanotechnology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currall, Steven C.; King, Eden B.; Lane, Neal; Madera, Juan; Turner, Stacey

    2006-12-01

    How do the risks and benefits of nanotechnology, as viewed by the public, compare with those associated with other technologies such as genetically modified organisms, stem cells, biotechnology and nuclear power? And when deciding to use a specific nanotechnology product, will consumers consider the risks, the benefits, or both? We report the first large-scale empirical analyses of these questions.

  7. 34 CFR Appendix A to Part 12 - Public Benefit Allowance for Transfer of Surplus Federal Real Property for Educational Purposes 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Specialized schools 70 10 10 10 20 30 10 10 10 10 100 Public libraries or educational museums 2 100 2 100... for the blind, or similar school. Public Library means a public library or public library service... appropriate school classification. Educational Museum means a museum that conducts courses on a...

  8. Wellbeing at work among kitchen workers during organic food conversion in Danish public kitchens: a longitudinal survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Nina N; Løje, Hanne; Tetens, Inge; Wu, Jason H Y; Neal, Bruce; Lassen, Anne D

    2016-04-01

    In 2011, the Danish Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries launched the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020 intending to double the organic agricultural area in Denmark. This study aims to measure experienced physical and psychological wellbeing at work along with beliefs and attitudes among kitchen workers before and after participating in educational training programmes in organic food conversion. This longitudinal study applied an online self-administered questionnaire among kitchen workers before and after the implementation of an organic food conversion programme with 1-year follow-up. The study targeted all staff members in the participating public kitchens taking part in the organic food conversion process funded by the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020. Of the 448 eligible kitchen workers, 235 completed the questionnaire at baseline (52%) and 149 at follow-up (63% of those surveyed at baseline). No substantive differences between baseline and follow-up measurements of organic food conversion were detected on physical or psychological wellbeing at work. Kitchen workers reported a significant improvement in the perceived food quality, motivation to work and application of nutritional guidelines. Reported organic food percentages for the kitchens also increased significantly (Pfood products to producing more food from base was indicated. Within 1 year, a significant increase in motivation to work among kitchen staff was observed with no substantive changes in physical or psychological wellbeing at work identified. The results support the Danish Organic Action Plan 2020 and initiatives of similar kind. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  9. Book Collecting: Personal Rewards and Public Benefits. A Lecture Delivered at the Library of Congress (Washington, DC, December 7, 1983). The Center for the Book Viewpoint Series No. 11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, William P., Jr.

    Containing a lecture given at the Library of Congress by a book collector specializing in the works of the eighteenth century printer John Baskerville, this pamphlet describes the personal rewards and public benefits of book collecting. The lecture first discusses the "true collector," collecting books printed by John Baskerville, and…

  10. 19 CFR 148.87 - Officers and employees of, and representatives to public international organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., 1986. Inter-American Statistical Institute 9751 Do. Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission 11059 Oct..., 1975. World Meteorological Organization 10676 Sept. 1, 1956. World Tourism Organization 12508 Mar. 22...

  11. Public health benefits of reducing air pollution in Shanghai: a proof-of-concept methodology with application to BenMAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voorhees, A Scott; Wang, Jiandong; Wang, Cuicui; Zhao, Bin; Wang, Shuxiao; Kan, Haidong

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, levels of particulate matter (PM) air pollution in China have been relatively high, exceeding China's Class II standards in many cities and impacting public health. This analysis takes Chinese health impact functions and underlying health incidence, applies 2010-2012 modeled and monitored PM air quality data, and estimates avoided cases of mortality and morbidity in Shanghai, assuming achievement of China's Class II air quality standards. In Shanghai, the estimated avoided all cause mortality due to PM10 ranged from 13 to 55 cases per day and from 300 to 800 cases per year. The estimated avoided impact on hospital admissions due to PM10 ranged from 230 cases to 580 cases per day and from 5400 to 7900 per year. The estimated avoided impact on all cause mortality due to PM2.5 ranged from 6 to 26 cases per day and from 39 to 1400 per year. The estimated impact on all cause mortality of a year exposure to an annual or monthly mean PM2.5 concentration ranged from 180 to 3500 per year. In Shanghai, the avoided cases of all cause mortality had an estimated monetary value ranging from 170 million yuan (1 US dollar=4.2 yuan Purchasing Power Parity) to 1200 million yuan. Avoided hospital admissions had an estimated value from 20 to 43 million yuan. Avoided emergency department visits had an estimated value from 5.6 million to 15 million yuan. Avoided outpatient visits had an estimated value from 21 million to 31 million yuan. In this analysis, available data were adequate to estimate avoided health impacts and assign monetary value. Sufficient supporting documentation was available to construct and format data sets for use in the United States Environmental Protection Agency's health and environmental assessment model, known as the Environmental Benefits Mapping and Analysis Program - Community Edition ("BenMAP-CE").

  12. 76 FR 46351 - International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel; Notice of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... Federal Aviation Administration International Civil Aviation Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel... Organization's (ICAO) Dangerous Goods Panel (DGP) to be held October 11-21, 2011, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada... Aviation Organization's Dangerous Goods Panel (ICAO DGP) Meeting. Proposals that are approved by the...

  13. Google Scholar makes it hard - the complexity of organizing one's publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, Hans L.; van Kreveld, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    With Google Scholar, scientists can maintain their publications on personal profile pages, while the citations to these works are automatically collected and counted. Maintenance of publications is done manually by the researcher herself, and involves deleting erroneous ones, merging ones that are t

  14. Google Scholar makes it Hard - the complexity of organizing one's publications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bodlaender, Hans L.; van Kreveld, Marc

    2014-01-01

    With Google Scholar, scientists can maintain their publications on personal prole pages, while the citations to these works are automatically collected and counted. Maintenance of publications is done manually by the researcher herself, and involves deleting erroneous ones, merging ones that are the

  15. Association between Organizational Capacity and Involvement in Chronic Disease Prevention Programming among Canadian Public Health Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanusaik, Nancy; Sabiston, Catherine M.; Kishchuk, Natalie; Maximova, Katerina; O'Loughlin, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    In the context of the emerging field of public health services and systems research, this study (i) tested a model of the relationships between public health organizational capacity (OC) for chronic disease prevention, its determinants (organizational supports for evaluation, partnership effectiveness) and one possible outcome of OC (involvement…

  16. Voluntary surgical contraception women of late reproductive age suffering from pelvic organ prolapse – features and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigina Nasinova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed the method of transvaginal Voluntary Surgical Contraception, conducted in conjunction with surgical treatment of descent and prolapse of the vaginal walls. Were studied the early and late results of the surgery in 50 women to which during the surgical treatment of genital prolapse simultaneously was carries out transvaginal occlusion of the fallopian tubes. Control groups consisted of 30 women to which in the first step before surgical correction of pelvic organ prolapse have been performed minilaparotomy and DCA. Our method consists in penetrating into the abdominal cavity through the front vaginal vault, to downgrade the fallopian tubes with a hook Ramatibodi and tubal sterilization method Pomeroy. Intra - and postoperative complications were not recognized. In the long-term period after surgery - the effectiveness of the method was 100%. Marked tendency to improve the quality of sexual life tells about the positive impact of removing the genital prolapse with simultaneous DCA on the quality of life of women.

  17. TRANSFORMATION OF PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS IN WESTERN SIBERIA WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE “THAW” DURING LATE 1950s-EARLY 1960s BASED ON MATERIALS OF REGIONAL TRADE UNIONS, PUBLIC ENGINEERING ORGANIZATIONS, AND TECHNICAL AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анатолий Николаевич Першиков

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the changes in the structure, personnel, and areas of practical activity of the trade unions, public engineering organizations and technical and scientific societies in the West Siberian region during late 1950s – early 1960s. The impact of national and regional factors on the transformation content, character, and results is investigated.Objective Analyze the transformation process of public organizations in Western Siberia during late 1950s-early 1960s, revel the characteristic trends and regional specific features.Method or methodology of the study: problem and chronological method, historical-and-systematic method, statistical method.Results: it was established that public organizations experienced certain changes, lost the dependence on government  institutions,  enlarged the area of  activity, but they complementely remained in the field of the party control and operations, did not aquire the proper self-reliance and independence of practical actions.Results application scope: scientific research and preparation of training in the field of historical knowledge.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-10-29

  18. Capital management and measuring intangible assets for public organizations, revisiting the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ramirez

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Public administration is not alien to knowledge society or to the "new economy". Thus, it is transforming itself to these new requirements, improving its processes to meet the needs of citizens. In this context intangible assets play an important role and become a source of competitive advantage, but only if they are properly managed. Therefore, it is necessary to previously identify intangible assets. This paper revisited the literature in order to comprehend intellectual capital model reflecting different capitals which make up institutions. This study aims to propose an intellectual capital model that enables measurement and management of intangible assets in public administration, including specific issues of public entities.

  19. Analisis Framing dalam Riset Public Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NARAYANA MAHENDRA PRASTYA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to give description about how to use frame analysis in Public Relations (PR research. The author use two framing models: Entman and Pan & Kosicki. The object is organization official statement about particular issue. Frame analysis method rarely used in Public Relations research. This methods commonly use in journalism study, to analyse the news in media. Meanwhile, the key word of framing is the social construction of reality. Organization can make social construction of realty in their official statement. In acacemic term, frame analysis in PR research is useful to know how organization positioned themselves in particular situation. Other benefit is use to evaluat whether the organization frame is conformable with the public opinion or agenda setting media or not. In practical term, frame analysis give benefit for PR practitioner to create the message that can be undserstood by public, also give positive image for organization.

  20. Assessing Risk Management Capability of Public Sector Organizations Related to PPP Scheme Development for Water Supply in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pangeran M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The success of Public Private Partnership (PPP for water supply investment is inseparable from the capability of risk management of the parties within the project. This study investigates the risk management capability of Indonesian local public sector organizations that are potentially involved in PPP schemes for water supply. A risk management maturity model based assessment tool probing the culture, process, experience, application and partnership aspects is used in the survey. The model describes risk management capability in four levels (ad-hoc, initial, competent, excellent. The survey shows that their risk management capability is still in-average at the initial stage (level 2, meaning that the adopted risk management postures are mostly supported only by unstructured, ad-hoc and non-formal processes. The result of this study can help decision makers in choosing appropriate risk management methods and tools to be used by the local public authorities for managing risks in PPP schemes.

  1. Occurrence of selected volatile organic compounds and soluble pesticides in Texas public water-supply source waters, 1999-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Barbara June; Canova, Michael G.; Gary, Marcus O.

    2002-01-01

    During 1999?2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, collected samples of untreated water from 48 public water-supply reservoirs and 174 public water-supply wells. The samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and soluble pesticides; in addition, well samples were analyzed for nitrite plus nitrate and tritium. This fact sheet summarizes the findings of the source-water sampling and analyses. Both VOCs and pesticides were detected much more frequently in surface water than in ground water. The only constituent detected at concentrations exceeding the maximum contaminant level for drinking water was nitrate. These results will be used in the Texas Source-Water Assessment Program to evaluate the susceptibility of public water-supply source waters to contamination.

  2. Modeling the effects of naturally occurring organic carbon on chlorinated ethene transport to a public supply well.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapelle, Francis H; Kauffman, Leon J; Widdowson, Mark A

    2014-09-01

    The vulnerability of public supply wells to chlorinated ethene (CE) contamination in part depends on the availability of naturally occurring organic carbon to consume dissolved oxygen (DO) and initiate reductive dechlorination. This was quantified by building a mass balance model of the Kirkwood-Cohansey aquifer, which is widely used for public water supply in New Jersey. This model was built by telescoping a calibrated regional three-dimensional (3D) MODFLOW model to the approximate capture zone of a single public supply well that has a history of CE contamination. This local model was then used to compute a mass balance between dissolved organic carbon (DOC), particulate organic carbon (POC), and adsorbed organic carbon (AOC) that act as electron donors and DO, CEs, ferric iron, and sulfate that act as electron acceptors (EAs) using the Sequential Electron Acceptor Model in three dimensions (SEAM3D) code. SEAM3D was constrained by varying concentrations of DO and DOC entering the aquifer via recharge, varying the bioavailable fraction of POC in aquifer sediments, and comparing observed and simulated vertical concentration profiles of DO and DOC. This procedure suggests that approximately 15% of the POC present in aquifer materials is readily bioavailable. Model simulations indicate that transport of perchloroethene (PCE) and its daughter products trichloroethene (TCE), cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC) to the public supply well is highly sensitive to the assumed bioavailable fraction of POC, concentrations of DO entering the aquifer with recharge, and the position of simulated PCE source areas in the flow field. The results are less sensitive to assumed concentrations of DOC in aquifer recharge. The mass balance approach used in this study also indicates that hydrodynamic processes such as advective mixing, dispersion, and sorption account for a significant amount of the observed natural attenuation in this system.

  3. Core benefits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Keith, Brian W

    2010-01-01

    This SPEC Kit explores the core employment benefits of retirement, and life, health, and other insurance -benefits that are typically decided by the parent institution and often have significant governmental regulation...

  4. Related Issues on the Participation of Procuratorial Organs in Civil Public Interest Litigation%检察机关参与民事公益诉讼相关问题探析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓旭

    2012-01-01

    It has been the consensus both in academic and practical circles that we should construct a civil public interest litigation system in China, and the public all appeal that the procuratorial organs should be involved in the civil public interest litigation. The article studies the means and relevant procedural issues of the participation of procuratorial organs in civil public interest litigation, hoping to benefit the construction of our civil public interest litigation system.%我国需要构建民事公益诉讼制度已经成为学术界和实务界的共识,公众对检察机关参与民事公益诉讼的呼声也颇高。文章对检察机关参与民事公益诉讼的方式及相关程序性问题进行探讨,以期对我国民事公益诉讼制度的构建有所裨益。

  5. Measuring and Benchmarking Public Service Organizations: Case studies of back office measurement in Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maheshwari, D.

    2015-01-01

    Most measurement instruments in e-government focus on easily visible aspects and do not measure deep within organizations. In contrast the measurement instrument presented in this thesis focused on measuring elements within organizations. This requires different type of methods which goes beyond

  6. Measuring and Benchmarking Public Service Organizations: Case studies of back office measurement in Pakistan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maheshwari, D.

    2015-01-01

    Most measurement instruments in e-government focus on easily visible aspects and do not measure deep within organizations. In contrast the measurement instrument presented in this thesis focused on measuring elements within organizations. This requires different type of methods which goes beyond vis

  7. Role of the SEAMEO TROPMED Network in health human resources development. Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization. Tropical Medicine and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongsuphajaisiddhi, T; Salazar, N

    1998-06-01

    The Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO) is a chartered international organization for the promotion of regional cooperation in education, science, technology and culture. The Regional Tropical Medicine and Public Health Network (TROPMED) operates through four specialized Centers in Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines and Thailand, with a coordinating unit, the TROPMED Central Office in Bangkok, Thailand. In line with the overall mission of SEAMEO, the role of TROPMED is to promote health and to prevent or control disease, thus improving the quality of life of people in the Asia-Pacific Region. Toward this end, SEAMEO TROPMED serves to facilitate the strengthening of national and institutional capabilities in research and training through postgraduate academic programs; short-term training courses; scientific fora; publications and information dissemination and as such, has been in the mainstream of health human resources development since its inception in 1967. To date, a total of 3,353 TROPMED alumni have benefited from training in 26 regular course offerings; of these, 1,596 were females and 1,757, males. From 1991 to 1995, a total of 434 key health personnel have attended short-term training courses, with increasing attendance from Cambodia, Lao PDR and Vietnam. TROPMED's effectiveness comes from the collective strength of and the spirit of cooperation among its host institutions and partners. Faced with a health scenario of both developing and developed economies, SEAMEO TROPMED aims to further its role as an international forum for health development thus, addressing the need for effective strategies for health sector reform and advocacy of relevant health, environmental and development policies through its various programs and activities.

  8. Tweeting as Health Communication: Health Organizations' Use of Twitter for Health Promotion and Public Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyojung; Reber, Bryan H; Chon, Myoung-Gi

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how major health organizations use Twitter for disseminating health information, building relationships, and encouraging actions to improve health. The sampled organizations were the American Heart Association, American Cancer Society, and American Diabetes Association. A content analysis was conducted on 1,583 tweets to examine these organizations' use of Twitter's interactive features and to understand the message functions and topics of their tweets. The numbers of retweets and favorites were also measured as engagement indicators and compared by different message functions. The results revealed that all of the organizations posted original tweets most, but they differed in the degree to which they used the retweet and reply functions. Hashtags and hyperlinks were the most frequently used interactive tools. The majority of the tweets were about organization-related topics, whereas personal health-related tweets represented a relatively small portion of the sample. Followers were most likely to like and retweet personal health action-based messages.

  9. Moving toward implementation: the potential for accountable care organizations and private-public partnerships to advance active neighborhood design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, Edie E; Carr, Sara Jensen; Robinson, Judy; Kasirye, Olivia; Zell, Bonnie; Miller, William Jahmal; Duarte, Teri; Engel, Adrian B; Hernandez, Monica; Horton, Mark B; Williams, Frank

    2014-12-01

    The 2010 Affordable Care Act's (ACA) aims of lowering costs and improving quality of care will renew focus on preventive health strategies. This coincides with a trend in medicine to reconsider population health approaches as part of the standard curriculum. This intersection of new policy and educational climates presents a unique opportunity to reconsider traditional healthcare structures. This paper introduces and advances an alignment that few have considered. We propose that accountable care organizations (ACOs), which are expected to proliferate under the ACA, present the best opportunity to establish partnerships between healthcare, public health, and community-based organizations to achieve the legislation's goals. One example is encouraging daily physical activity via built environment interventions and programs, which is recommended by numerous groups. We highlight how nonprofit organizations in Sacramento, California have been able to leverage influence, capital, and policy to encourage design for active living, and how their work is coordinating with public health and healthcare initiatives. In conclusion, we critically examine potential barriers to the success of partnerships between ACOs and community organizations and encourage further exploration and evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Public health law research: exploring law in public health systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Jennifer K; Burris, Scott; Hays, Scott

    2012-11-01

    The importance of law in the organization and operation of public health systems has long been a matter of interest to public health lawyers and practitioners, but empirical research on law as a factor in health system performance has been limited in quantity and sophistication. The emergence of Public Health Law Research and Public Health Systems and Services Research within a coordinated effort to strengthen public health research and practice has dramatically changed matters. This article introduces Public Health Law Research as an integral part of Public Health Systems and Services Research, discusses the challenges of integrating the 2 fields, and highlights 2 examples of current research that demonstrate the benefits of an integrated approach to improve the use of law in public health practice.

  11. [Independence in Plastic Surgery - Benefit or Barrier? Analysis of the Publication Performance in Academic Plastic Surgery Depending on Varying Organisational Structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, C D; Leitsch, S; Haertnagl, F; Haas, E M; Giunta, R E

    2015-08-01

    Despite its recognition as an independent specialty, at German university hospitals the field of plastic surgery is still underrepresented in terms of independent departments with a dedicated research focus. The aim of this study was to analyse the publication performance within the German academic plastic surgery environment and to compare independent departments and dependent, subordinate organisational structures regarding their publication performance. Organisational structures and number of attending doctors in German university hospitals were examined via a website analysis. A pubmed analysis was applied to assess the publication performance (number of publications, cumulative impact factor, impact factor/publication, number of publications/MD, number of publications/unit) between 2009 and 2013. In a journal analysis the distribution of the cumulative impact factor and number of publications in different journals as well as the development of the impact factor in the top journals were analysed. Out of all 35 university hospitals there exist 12 independent departments for plastic surgery and 8 subordinate organisational structures. In 15 university hospitals there were no designated plastic surgery units. The number of attending doctors differed considerably between independent departments (3.6 attending doctors/unit) and subordinate organisational structures (1.1 attending doctors/unit). The majority of publications (89.0%) and of the cumulative impact factor (91.2%) as well as most of the publications/MD (54 publications/year) and publications/unit (61 publications/year) were created within the independent departments. Only in departments top publications with an impact factor > 5 were published. In general a negative trend regarding the number of publications (- 13.4%) and cumulative impact factor (- 28.9%) was observed. 58.4% of all publications were distributed over the top 10 journals. Within the latter the majority of articles were published in

  12. Organic Resource Management, Inc., Florissant, Missouri - Clean Water Act Public Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    The EPA is providing notice of proposed Administrative Penalty Assessment against Organic Resource Management, Inc. (“Respondent”), a business located at 13060 County Park Road, Florissant, Missouri for alleged violations of its National Pollutant Discharg

  13. Public engagement in Japanese policy-making: A history of the genetically modified organisms debate

    OpenAIRE

    SHINEHA, Ryuma; Kato, Kazuto

    2009-01-01

    New laws regulating the use of genetically modified organisms have recently been enacted in Japan, and there were many stakeholders involved in the development of this policy. Our review of the history and the debates held in the course of policy development regarding genetically modified organisms in Japan shows that the current regulatory system was developed taking past national and international regulatory contexts into consideration. The turning point in Japanese policy-making occurred e...

  14. 42 CFR 102.33 - Death benefits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... benefits, or retirement benefits on behalf of the dependent(s) or his or her legal guardian or life insurance benefits on behalf of the dependent(s)). ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Death benefits. 102.33 Section 102.33 Public...

  15. Introduction of public benefits in the electric energy regulation process in Uruguay; Introducao de bens publicos no processo de regulacao da energia eletrica no Uruguai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laureiro Agorio, Rafael Mario

    2000-07-01

    Institutional mechanisms for the of power sector-related public goods. For purposes of this analysis, we first considered the power sector reform institutional features in some countries and the use of power sector-related public purpose policies. At a second stage, we consider the international experience in these public goods' supply in light of electricity reform. Next, we explore the historical and institutional conditions under which some of those public goods have been supplied in Uruguay. Finally, we examine the current opportunities for development of power sector-related public purpose policies in Uruguay and propose some institutional mechanisms to ensure the supply of public goods in the country's electricity industry restructured. (author)

  16. In Search of Facilitating Citizens' Problem Solving: Public Libraries' Collaborative Development of Services with Related Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Nozomi; Tamura, Shunsaku; Miwa, Makiko; Koshizuka, Mika; Saito, Seiichi; Kasai, Yumiko

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The paper attempts to understand value constellations in organising and using the business information service that was recently developed by various stakeholders with libraries who were in pursuit of supporting people's problem solving in Japanese public libraries. Method: In-depth interviews were conducted not only with users and…

  17. A Correlational Analysis of Strategic Information Systems Planning in K-12 Public Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Three decades of research has indicated that strategic information systems planning is a vital component to business success. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship strategic information systems planning and financial commitment has within the K-12 public education sector. Data for this study was obtained from top management of…

  18. A Correlational Analysis of Strategic Information Systems Planning in K-12 Public Educational Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Christopher J.

    2012-01-01

    Three decades of research has indicated that strategic information systems planning is a vital component to business success. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship strategic information systems planning and financial commitment has within the K-12 public education sector. Data for this study was obtained from top management of…

  19. Explaining job satisfaction of public professionals: Policy alienation and politicking in organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Tummers (Lars); A.J. Steijn (Bram); V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractAbstract: This paper contributes in two ways to our understanding of the pressures public professionals face in service delivery. First, it theoretically analyses the influence of policy pressures (measured using the policy alienation framework) and politicking pressures on job satisfact

  20. Improving Coordination of Addiction Health Services Organizations with Mental Health and Public Health Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Erick G; Andrews, Christina; Harris, Lesley; Padwa, Howard; Kong, Yinfei; M S W, Karissa Fenwick

    2016-01-01

    In this mixed-method study, we examined coordination of mental health and public health services in addiction health services (AHS) in low-income racial and ethnic minority communities in 2011 and 2013. Data from surveys and semistructured interviews were used to evaluate the extent to which environmental and organizational characteristics influenced the likelihood of high coordination with mental health and public health providers among outpatient AHS programs. Coordination was defined and measured as the frequency of interorganizational contact among AHS programs and mental health and public health providers. The analytic sample consisted of 112 programs at time 1 (T1) and 122 programs at time 2 (T2), with 61 programs included in both periods of data collection. Forty-three percent of AHS programs reported high frequency of coordination with mental health providers at T1 compared to 66% at T2. Thirty-one percent of programs reported high frequency of coordination with public health services at T1 compared with 54% at T2. Programs with culturally responsive resources and community linkages were more likely to report high coordination with both services. Qualitative analysis highlighted the role of leadership in leveraging funding and developing creative solutions to deliver coordinated care. Overall, our findings suggest that AHS program funding, leadership, and cultural competence may be important drivers of program capacity to improve coordination with health service providers to serve minorities in an era of health care reform.

  1. Who Benefits from Public Social Spending in Chad? A Benefit Incidence Analysis (A qui profitent les dépenses sociales au Tchad? Une analyse d'incidence à partir des données d'enquête

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djindil, N.S.; Tabo Symphorien, N.; Mogota Anatole, T.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the impact of public expenditures in the sector of education and maternal and child health in household level in Chad. The results show that there exist a very strong social selectivity in the utilisation and transfer of health and education in Chad. The analysis reveals that an

  2. The Role of Relational Reward Benefits for Developing the Non-Financial Value of a Customer to an Organization: Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enny Kristiani

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Research on the customer value to an organization has been widely explored, yet most studies only determined on the financial value based on the customer’s purchasing behavior. The value of customers beyond their purchasing behavior –defined as the relational worth - has not been commonly captured yet. This non-financial value is one of the drivers in retaining customers, hence it becomes a crucial factor in preserving the profitability of the organization. For this reason, this paper aims to examine the customer non-financial valuations of a loyalty reward program. The scope of the study covered a reward program involving consumer exertions in the context of a Frequent Flyer Program (FFP offered by an airline in Indonesia. The hypotheses are empirically tested with a sample of FFP members conducted through an online survey (n=475. The data were statistically analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM as a first order construct. Results indicate that the perceived social rewards lead to an affective and normative commitment as well as consumers’ satisfaction, while the economic reward did not have an effect on developing affective bonds with members for long-term relationships. The relational benefit offered through the FFP creates affectively and normatively committed members who produce relational behaviors, in terms of WOM, immunity, openness and acquiescence of the members to the airline. Furthermore, the FFP members produced social behaviors toward the airline when they felt satisfied with their relational exchanges.

  3. EMC Dynamic Economic Benefit Analysis of Public Building Lighting Engineering%公共建筑照明工程EMC模式动态经济效益分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨滢

    2014-01-01

    By the Energy Management Contracting (EMC)mode analysis,taking lighting engineering in public buildings as an example,this article verifies the dynamic economic benefit of EMC.%该文通过对合同能源管理(EMC)模式的分析,以公共建筑照明工程为例,验证了 EMC 模式良好的动态经济效益。

  4. Leading public service organizations: How to obtain high employee self-efficacy and organizational performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Christian Bøtcher; Andersen, Lotte Bøgh

    2017-01-01

    Concerns are sometimes raised that transactional leadership harms public organisations’ performance, because demands thwart employees’ self-efficacy. However, the opposite may be argued – conditional rewards strengthen feelings of competence because they provide positive feedback on performance. We...... study ninety-two high school principals’ reported use of contingent rewards and sanctions and self-efficacy among their 1,932 teachers. The results indicate that contingent rewards strengthen self-efficacy, and that sanctions are not negatively related with self-efficacy or performance. Furthermore......, the teachers’ self-efficacy can be linked positively to organisational performance. This suggests that rewards can be an important tool for managers in the public sector....

  5. Academic Community Consumer Assessment an Institution of Public Higher Education in Relation to Green it Practices in Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Hernan Contreras Pinochet

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is understanding the consumers of the academic community community in a public higher education institution in relation to Green IT practices in organizations. This study aims to confirm the model developed by Lunardi et al. (2011 Lunardi et al. (2014 through the application of multivariate statistical technique of Structural Equation Modeling (SEM. The survey research was conducted in a public higher education institution, based in the city of Osasco, using structured questionnaire with five point likert scale options and the respondents were: the students and professors from graduate school in Business Administration, in addition to employees administrative technician education. The results confirmed the highly significant and demonstrate that the model is consistent with proper adjustment can be used in future research.

  6. Incubation Programs from Public Research Organizations as Catalysts for Open Business Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven H. De Cleyn

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In many economies, new knowledge and technology creation and transfer towards local entities and new startups have been recognized as catalysts for industry renewal and tools for safeguarding (or even enhancing a region’s employment and prosperity. This article presents a case study of iMinds, a network organization in Flanders, Belgium. The organization fosters interdisciplinary research in information and communication technologies (ICT and strongly engages in transferring these new technologies towards local actors and in creating and supporting new startups. iMinds’ incubation and entrepreneurship programs act as catalysts for open innovation and company startup activities in the Flemish region.

  7. Implementing and Sustaining Your Strategic Plan A Workbook for Public and Nonprofit Organizations

    CERN Document Server

    Bryson, John M; Alston, Farnum K

    2011-01-01

    Based on John Bryson's acclaimed comprehensive approach to strategic planning, the Implementing and Sustaining Your Strategic Plan workbook provides a step-by-step process, tools, techniques, and worksheets to help successfully implement, manage, and troubleshoot an organization's strategy over the long haul. This new and immensely practical workbook helps organizations work through the typical challenges of leading implementation for sustained change. It spotlights the importance of effective leadership for long-term successful strategic plan implementation. The authors include a wealth of to

  8. Study on organization transform of public organizations based on organization structure%基于组织结构的公共部门组织变革研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汪朗峰; 伏玉林

    2013-01-01

    通过组织变革来提高组织收益是公共部门机构改革的重要课题.已有文献表明,因为无法描述组织的结构特征和公共事务的差异性,组织变革的研究正面临瓶颈.本文根据公共事务发生地区性和职能性特征,构建了描述公共事务多重多任务特征的概率模型,用于分析公共部门的组织结构特征,并从组织收益提高视角研究了组织变革.研究结果表明,基于公共部门组织结构进行的组织变革可以明显提高组织收益.相关结果可以为公共部门的机构改革提供组织变革方面的参考.%It' s an important subject for bureaucracy reform of public sectors to improve the organization' s gain through organizational structure change. Previous studies cannot give efficient methods for organization structure change because they cannot describe the organizational structure features and differences of public affairs. This paper described multiple & the multi-task features of public affairs, presented organizational structures of the public sector based on the probabilistic model, and optimized organizational structures by organizational gains. Mathematical analysis result shows that the organizations gains can be improved significantly based on the organizational structure change in the public sector. Results can be provided for reference to the organizational structure change for bureaucracy reform of public sector.

  9. Reconnaissance of Volatile Synthetic Organic Chemicals at Public Water Supply Wells Throughout Puerto Rico, November 1984-May 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman-Rios, Senen; Garcia, Rene; Aviles, Ada

    1987-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ground water is the principal source of drinking water for about 850,000 people in Puerto Rico (National Water Summary, 1985). Ground-water withdrawals for public supply, agricultural, and industrial water uses in Puerto Rico are about 250 million gallons per day (Mgal/d) (Torres-Sierra and Aviles, 1985). The development of the most accessible surface water supplies will result in an increasing demand for ground water. Recent investigations conducted by the U. S. Geological Survey, WRD (USGS) have shown the presence of toxic synthetic organic chemicals in ground water throughout Puerto Rico (Gomez-Gomez and Guzman-Rios, 1982). Volatile synthetic organic chemicals (VOC's) have been detected in water from public water supply wells in concentrations ranging from 1 to 500 micrograms per liter (Guzman-Rios and Quinones-Marquez, 1984 and Guzman-Rios and Quinones-Marquez, 1985). As result of these findings, pumpage was discontinued at 6 wells operated by the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA), the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico agency responsible for public-water supply. Monitoring of 10 additional wells in the vicinity of those wells is being conducted by the USGS in cooperation with PRASA. In 1985, the USGS began a comprehensive islandwide study of VOC's in drinking water. The study was conducted in cooperation with the Puerto Rico Department of Health (PRDOH) and PRASA. Samples were collected from 243 public-water supply wells operated by PRASA (flgure 1). The authors wish to acknowledge the support, assistance and cooperation of the PRASA staff throughout Puerto Rico in the sample collection effort. The authors are especially grateful to Engineer Carlos Garcia-Troche from the PRASA main office in San Juan.

  10. Making Nature's Wisdom Public: The Affirmation of Planet Earth as a Living Organism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael J.

    Planet Earth is a living organism that preserves and regenerates itself and shares information with humans through sensations, feelings, and actions. After early humans migrated from their tropical origins to colder climates, they developed technologies to impose their tropical memories on their new surroundings and lost touch with their ancient…

  11. Organizational Culture and Discourses: a Case of Change in a Brazilian Public Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindomar Pinto da Silva

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This work analyses the use of the discourse as a strategy for the dissemination of new cultural values in a State Secretary beginning in 1995. For this purpose, discourse analysis was used according to the concept by Fiorin (1997 based on the concepts of figures, themes and ways to manipulate discourses. It is a descriptive and exploratory study. The theoretical discussion was based on the concept of organizational culture in the dimensions of artifacts and cultural values. The analysis was carried out from the documents of the organization, including the projects of modernization, plans of action, reports of strategic planning, laws and decrees. Furthermore, the official journal of the organization from 1998 to 2006 was analyzed. For the years 2007 and 2009, the analysis was conducted based on the organization’s website. The results show that there was deep concern with regard to the theme of organizational culture during the whole process of modernization. They also indicate that the organization used different discourse resources to guide the individual behavior of its members such as seduction, temptation, intimidation and provocation. They also show that the official discourses are not in harmony with the various discourses found in the organization due to the plurality of values that are shared by the organizational actors.

  12. Coordination of Organic Curriculum Development in the Public Schools of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Marjory E.

    This document describes the efforts of program administrators to implement an organic curriculum in the elementary and secondary schools of Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. The chief program administrator coordinated curriculum design and implementation under the continuous progress plan, selected and evaluated instructional materials, and established…

  13. Enabling private and public sector organizations as agents of homeland security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassco, David H. J.; Glassco, Jordan C.

    2006-05-01

    Homeland security and defense applications seek to reduce the risk of undesirable eventualities across physical space in real-time. With that functional requirement in mind, our work focused on the development of IP based agent telecommunication solutions for heterogeneous sensor / robotic intelligent "Things" that could be deployed across the internet. This paper explains how multi-organization information and device sharing alliances may be formed to enable organizations to act as agents of homeland security (in addition to other uses). Topics include: (i) using location-aware, agent based, real-time information sharing systems to integrate business systems, mobile devices, sensor and actuator based devices and embedded devices used in physical infrastructure assets, equipment and other man-made "Things"; (ii) organization-centric real-time information sharing spaces using on-demand XML schema formatted networks; (iii) object-oriented XML serialization as a methodology for heterogeneous device glue code; (iv) how complex requirements for inter / intra organization information and device ownership and sharing, security and access control, mobility and remote communication service, tailored solution life cycle management, service QoS, service and geographic scalability and the projection of remote physical presence (through sensing and robotics) and remote informational presence (knowledge of what is going elsewhere) can be more easily supported through feature inheritance with a rapid agent system development methodology; (v) how remote object identification and tracking can be supported across large areas; (vi) how agent synergy may be leveraged with analytics to complement heterogeneous device networks.

  14. 8 CFR 316.20 - American institutions of research, public international organizations, and designations under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... international organizations, and designations under the International Immunities Act. 316.20 Section 316.20... under the International Immunities Act. (a) American institutions of research. The following-listed... University of Beirut (Near East College Associations). Arctic Institute of North America, Inc. Armour...

  15. Role of Public Outreach in the University Science Mission: Publishing K-12 Curriculum, Organizing Tours, and Other Methods of Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittrich, T. M.

    2015-12-01

    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the importance of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) education in K-12 curriculum for developing a capable workforce. Equally important is the role of the voting public in understanding STEM-related issues that impact public policy debates such as the potential impacts of climate change, hydraulic fracturing in oil and gas exploration, mining impacts on water quality, and science funding. Since voted officials have a major impact on the future of these policies, it is imperative that the general public have an understanding of the basic science behind these issues. By engaging with the public in a more fundamental way, university students can play an important role in educating the public while at the same time enhancing their communication skills and gaining valuable teaching experience. I will talk about my own experiences in (1) evaluating and publishing water chemistry and hazardous waste cleanup curriculum on the K-12 engineering platform TeachEngineering.org, (2) organizing public tours of water and energy sites (e.g., abandoned mine sites, coal power plants, wastewater treatment plants, hazardous waste treatment facilities), and (3) other outreach and communication activities including public education of environmental issues through consultations with customers of a landscaping/lawn mowing company. The main focus of this presentation will be the role that graduate students can play in engaging and educating their local community and lessons learned from community projects (Dittrich, 2014; 2012; 2011). References: Dittrich, T.M. 2014. Adventures in STEM: Lessons in water chemistry from elementary school to graduate school. Abstract ED13E-07 presented at 2014 Fall Meeting, AGU, San Francisco, Calif., 15-19 Dec. Dittrich, T.M. 2012. Collaboration between environmental water chemistry students and hazardous waste treatment specialists on the University of Colorado-Boulder campus. Abstract ED53C

  16. Implementing and translating change in health care and public organizations - what researchers know and what to do about it

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    clear conclusions about the nature of and the cause and effect relationships related to organizational change in all of these communities. The difficulties are related to the study of organizational change as being realism and becoming realism and to the status of the knowledge claims......In Denmark as well in other countries, new innovative ideas are continuously introduced in order to change health care and other public organizations. As a consequence health care and other professionals are often asking themselves how to introduce these ideas effectively. When asking...

  17. IMPLEMENTATION OF A PROJECT MANAGEMENT OFFICE IN A PUBLIC SECTOR ORGANIZATION: A CASE STUDY INVOLVING A SANITATION INSTITUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos Esquierro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes recommendations for improving the implementation of a Project Management Office (PMO in a government organization. Such organizations can face uncertainties due to unpredicted and unexpected environmental events. The methodology used here was based on review of the literature, experience of the authors, and analysis of the process to be employed to create a PMO in the Department of Municipal Water and Sewage Systems (SEMAE, Brazil. This study aims to show how implementing a PMO can ensure proper management of strategic projects related to conservation of water resources. The PMO plays an important role in the implementation of strategic projects for public sanitation. This study also shows that the effectiveness of actions taken by the PMO is strongly influenced by how this process is implemented.

  18. Cultura organizacional em organizações públicas no Brasil Organizational culture in Brazilian public organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Calixto de Souza Pires

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta e discute conceitos e abordagens que contribuem para a compreensão de aspectos e traços relacionados à cultura organizacional de organizações públicas no Brasil. Inicialmente, são tratados os conceitos e diferentes abordagens de cultura e cultura organizacional, especificamente de Fleury, Frost, Schein e Hofstede. A seguir, o artigo aborda a cultura de organizações públicas, apresentando um pequeno histórico das organizações públicas no Brasil, bem como seus conceitos e características, entre as quais se destacam a burocracia, o autoritarismo centralizado, o paternalismo, a descontinuidade e a ingerência política. Essas características interferem no modo como os trabalhadores atuam nessas organizações, observando-se o apego às regras e rotinas, a supervalorização da hierarquia, o paternalismo nas relações e o apego ao poder. Isso é importante na definição dos processos internos, na relação com inovações e mudança, na formação dos valores e crenças organizacionais e nas políticas de recursos humanos. Na conclusão, o artigo salienta os aspectos fundamentais a serem considerados ao se lidar com a cultura de organizações públicas no Brasil.This article presents and discusses concepts and views that help understand features and peculiarities of the organizational culture in public organizations in Brazil. It begins by discussing the concepts and different approaches to culture and organizational culture, specifically by Fleury, Frost, Schein, and Hofstede. It then deals with the culture of public organizations, presenting a brief history of these organizations in Brazil, as well as their concepts and features, among which bureaucracy, centralized authoritarianism, patronizing, lack of continuity, and political interference stand out. Such characteristics interfere with the way people work in these organizations, where attachment to rules and routines, hierarchy overrating, patronizing

  19. The World Health Organization and the transition from "international" to "global" public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Theodore M; Cueto, Marcos; Fee, Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    The term "global health" is rapidly replacing the older terminology of "international health." We describe the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in both international and global health and in the transition from one to the other. We suggest that the term "global health" emerged as part of larger political and historical processes, in which WHO found its dominant role challenged and began to reposition itself within a shifting set of power alliances. Between 1948 and 1998, WHO moved from being the unquestioned leader of international health to being an organization in crisis, facing budget shortfalls and diminished status, especially given the growing influence of new and powerful players. We argue that WHO began to refashion itself as the coordinator, strategic planner, and leader of global health initiatives as a strategy of survival in response to this transformed international political context.

  20. The Public Benefits of Higher Education: Examining the Relationship Between State Spending on Higher Education and the Formation of Human Capital

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, Matthew Craig

    2008-01-01

    This study contributes to the literature on the economic value of higher education by examining the extent to which a set of independent variables, including two measures of state spending on higher education predict the formation of human capital. The findings suggest that, in most states, increases in state spending per full-time equivalent enrollment in public higher education predict decreases in the formation of human capital, while increases in state spending per capita on public and pr...