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Sample records for ptsd treatment adherence

  1. Understanding Factors Associated with Early Therapeutic Alliance in PTSD Treatment: Adherence, Childhood Sexual Abuse History, and Social Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Stephanie M.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Feeny, Norah C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Therapeutic alliance has been associated with better treatment engagement, better adherence, and less dropout across various treatments and disorders. In treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it may be particularly important to establish a strong early alliance to facilitate treatment adherence. However, factors such as…

  2. Understanding factors associated with early therapeutic alliance in PTSD treatment: adherence, childhood sexual abuse history, and social support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Stephanie M; Zoellner, Lori A; Feeny, Norah C

    2010-12-01

    Therapeutic alliance has been associated with better treatment engagement, better adherence, and less dropout across various treatments and disorders. In treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), it may be particularly important to establish a strong early alliance to facilitate treatment adherence. However, factors such as childhood sexual abuse (CSA) history and poor social support may impede the development of early alliance in those receiving PTSD treatment. We sought to examine treatment adherence, CSA history, and social support as factors associated with early alliance in individuals with chronic PTSD who were receiving either prolonged exposure therapy (PE) or sertraline. At pretreatment, participants (76.6% female; 64.9% Caucasian; mean age = 37.1 years, SD = 11.3) completed measures of trauma history, general support (Inventory of Socially Supportive Behaviors), and trauma-related social support (Social Reactions Questionnaire). Over the course of 10 weeks of PE or sertraline, they completed early therapeutic alliance (Working Alliance Inventory) and treatment adherence measures. Early alliance was associated with PE adherence (r = .32, p history was not predictive of a lower early alliance. Given the associations with adherence, clinicians may find it useful to routinely assess alliance early in treatment. Positive trauma support, not CSA history, may be particularly important in the development of a strong early therapeutic alliance. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  3. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... does the current evidence say about treatment for PTSD? Read Psych Health Evidence Briefs , which summarize available ... first-line and emerging PTSD treatments. Psychotherapy for PTSD According to the VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline ...

  4. Feature: Post Traumatic Stres Disorder PTSD: A Growing Epidemic / Neuroscience and PTSD Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Feature PTSD PTSD: A Growing Epidemic Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... 20 percent of Iraqi war veterans Neuroscience and PTSD Treatments Dr. Barbara Rothbaum believes current research is ...

  5. Adherence to antidepressant treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2007-01-01

    Depression is a common disorder with painful symptoms and, frequently, social impairment and decreased quality of life. The disorder has a tendency to be long lasting, often with frequent recurrence of symptoms. The risk of relapse and the severity of the symptoms may be reduced by correct...... of dependence of antidepressant medicine, have a great influence on adherence to treatment....

  6. Adaptive Disclosure: A Combat Specific PTSD Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    to determine whether AD is as least as effective as CPT, cognitive only version (CPT-C), in terms of its impact on deployment-related psychological ...operational stressors develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Evidence-based interventions for treating PTSD, however, were not developed for...be used to determine treatment efficacy. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Active-duty, Marine Corps, Posttraumatic stress disorder, Cognitive Therapy 16

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" (30.5 MB) Close × PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options Right Click here to download "PTSD Treatment: Know Your ...

  8. Complex PTSD and phased treatment in refugees: a debate piece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jackie June ter Heide

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Asylum seekers and refugees have been claimed to be at increased risk of developing complex posttraumatic stress disorder (complex PTSD. Consequently, it has been recommended that refugees be treated with present-centred or phased treatment rather than stand-alone trauma-focused treatment. This recommendation has contributed to a clinical practice of delaying or waiving trauma-focused treatment in refugees with PTSD. Objective: The aim of this debate piece is to defend two theses: (1 that complex trauma leads to complex PTSD in a minority of refugees only and (2 that trauma-focused treatment should be offered to all refugees who seek treatment for PTSD. Methods: The first thesis is defended by comparing data on the prevalence of complex PTSD in refugees to those in other trauma-exposed populations, using studies derived from a systematic review. The second thesis is defended using conclusions of systematic reviews and a meta-analysis of the efficacy of psychotherapeutic treatment in refugees. Results: Research shows that refugees are more likely to meet a regular PTSD diagnosis or no diagnosis than a complex PTSD diagnosis and that prevalence of complex PTSD in refugees is relatively low compared to that in survivors of childhood trauma. Effect sizes for trauma-focused treatment in refugees, especially narrative exposure therapy (NET and culturally adapted cognitive-behaviour therapy (CA-CBT, have consistently been found to be high. Conclusions: Complex PTSD in refugees should not be assumed to be present on the basis of complex traumatic experiences but should be carefully diagnosed using a validated interview. In line with treatment guidelines for PTSD, a course of trauma-focused treatment should be offered to all refugees seeking treatment for PTSD, including asylum seekers.

  9. Stigma associated with PTSD: perceptions of treatment seeking combat veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Dinesh; Drummond, Karen L; Blevins, Dean; Curran, Geoffrey; Corrigan, Patrick; Sullivan, Greer

    2013-06-01

    Although stigma associated with serious mental illness, substance abuse disorders, and depression has been studied very little is known about stigma associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). This study explored stigma related to PTSD among treatment-seeking Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) combat veterans. Sixteen treatment-seeking OEF/OIF veterans with combat-related PTSD participated in focus groups. We used qualitative methods to explore PTSD-related stigma. Common perceived stereotypes of treatment-seeking veterans with PTSD included labels such as "dangerous/violent," or "crazy," and a belief that combat veterans are responsible for having PTSD. Most participants reported avoiding treatment early on to circumvent a label of mental illness. Participants initially reported experiencing some degree of self-stigma; however, following engagement in treatment they predominantly resisted these stereotypes. Although most participants considered combat-related PTSD as less stigmatizing than other mental illnesses, they reported difficulties with reintegration. Such challenges likely stem from both PTSD symptoms and veterans' perceptions of how the public views them. Most reported that fellow combat veterans best understood them. Awareness of public stereotypes impacts help seeking at least early in the course of illness. Peer-based outreach and therapy groups may help veterans engage in treatment early and resist stigma. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. PTSD Treatment Programs in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Programs in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here PTSD Treatment Programs in the U.S. Department of Veterans ...

  11. The dissociative post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subtype: A treatment outcome cohort study in veterans with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haagen, Joris F G; van Rijn, Allison; Knipscheer, Jeroen W; van der Aa, Niels; Kleber, Rolf J

    2018-06-01

    Dissociation is a prevalent phenomenon among veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) that may interfere with the effectiveness of treatment. This study aimed to replicate findings of a dissociative PTSD subtype, to identify corresponding patterns in coping style, symptom type, and symptom severity, and to investigate its impact on post-traumatic symptom improvement. Latent profile analysis (LPA) was applied to baseline data from 330 predominantly (97%) male treatment-seeking veterans (mean age 39.5 years) with a probable PTSD. Multinomial logistic models were used to identify predictors of dissociative PTSD. Eighty veterans with PTSD that commenced with psychotherapy were invited for a follow-up measure after 6 months. The majority (n = 64, 80% response rate) completed the follow-up measure. Changes in post-traumatic stress between baseline and follow-up were explored as a continuous distal outcome. Latent profile analysis revealed four distinct patient profiles: 'low' (12.9%), 'moderate' (33.2%), 'severe' (45.1%), and 'dissociative' (8.8%) PTSD. The dissociative PTSD profile was characterized by more severe pathology levels, though not post-traumatic reactions symptom severity. Veterans with dissociative PTSD benefitted equally from PTSD treatment as veterans with non-dissociative PTSD with similar symptom severity. Within a sample of veterans with PTSD, a subsample of severely dissociative veterans was identified, characterized by elevated severity levels on pathology dimensions. The dissociative PTSD subtype did not negatively impact PTSD treatment. The present findings confirmed the existence of a distinct subgroup veterans that fit the description of dissociative PTSD. Patients with dissociative PTSD subtype symptoms uniquely differed from patients with non-dissociative PTSD in the severity of several psychopathology dimensions. Dissociative and non-dissociative PTSD patients with similar post-traumatic severity levels showed similar levels of

  12. Treatment preferences of psychotherapy patients with chronic PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowitz, John C; Meehan, Kevin B; Petkova, Eva; Zhao, Yihong; Van Meter, Page E; Neria, Yuval; Pessin, Hayley; Nazia, Yasmin

    2016-03-01

    Patient treatment preference may moderate treatment effect in major depressive disorder (MDD) studies. Little research has addressed preference in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); almost none has assessed actual patients' PTSD psychotherapy preferences. From a 14-week trial of chronic PTSD comparing prolonged exposure, relaxation therapy, and interpersonal psychotherapy, we report treatment preferences of the 110 randomized patients, explore preference correlates, and assess effects on treatment outcome. Patients recruited between 2008 and 2013 with chronic DSM-IV PTSD (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale [CAPS] score ≥ 50) received balanced, scripted psychotherapy descriptions prerandomization and indicated their preferences. Analyses assessed relationships of treatment attitudes to demographic and clinical factors. We hypothesized that patients randomized to preferred treatments would have better outcomes, and to unwanted treatment worse outcomes. Eighty-seven patients (79%) voiced treatment preferences or disinclinations: 29 (26%) preferred prolonged exposure, 29 (26%) preferred relaxation therapy, and 56 (50%) preferred interpersonal psychotherapy (Cochran Q = 18.46, P psychotherapy (Cochran Q = 22.71, P psychotherapy preferences to outcome. Despite explanations emphasizing prolonged exposure's greater empirical support, patients significantly preferred interpersonal psychotherapy. Preference subtly affected psychotherapy outcome; depression appeared an important moderator of the effect of unwanted treatment on outcome. Potential biases to avoid in future research are discussed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00739765. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  13. MDMA and PTSD treatment: "PTSD: From novel pathophysiology to innovative therapeutics".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sessa, Ben

    2017-05-10

    There is a range of therapies to treat Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) but treatment resistance remains high, with many sufferers experiencing the chronic condition. Engagement in trauma-focused psychotherapy is difficult for some patients with PTSD, especially those with extreme affect dysregulation associated with recall of traumatic memories. In recent years there have been a number of neuroscientific and clinical studies examining the potential role for adjunctive drug-assisted psychotherapy using 3,4,-methylenedioxmethamphetamine (MDMA) as a treatment for PTSD. re-visiting of a novel approach to trauma-focused psychotherapy with Used just two or three times, under careful medical supervision and specialised psychotherapy support MDMA appears to facilitate the recall of traumatic memories without the user feeling overwhelmed by the negative affect that usually accompanies such memories. This therapeutic approach began in the 1980s and was subsequently shelved in the midst of public health concerns surrounding the recreational use of the drug ecstasy. When pharmaceutical grade MDMA is used in a clinical setting it does not share the same risk profiles as ecstasy. Recent phase one neurophysiological studies and phase two clinical studies are showing promise as a potential new approach to managing treatment-resistant PTSD. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get Help for PTSD Help with VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas en Espanol ...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... All Measures Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention Veterans Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families PTSD ... Security Updating of Web Site Web Site Policies Important Links Linking ... POC Subscribe PTSD Awareness PTSD Consultation More Health ...

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Locations Contact Us FAQs Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers ... it PTSD? Treatment and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get Help for PTSD Help with ...

  17. Sleep Disturbances, TBI and PTSD: Implications for Treatment and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Karina Stavitsky; Kark, Sarah M.; Gehrman, Philip; Bogdanova, Yelena

    2015-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and sleep problems significantly affect recovery and functional status in military personnel and Veterans returning from combat. Despite recent attention, sleep is understudied in the Veteran population. Few treatments and rehabilitation protocols target sleep, although poor sleep remains at clinical levels and continues to adversely impact functioning even after the resolution of PTSD or mild TBI symptoms. Recent developments in non-pharmacologic sleep treatments have proven efficacious as stand-alone interventions and have potential to improve treatment outcomes by augmenting traditional behavioral and cognitive therapies. This review discusses the extensive scope of work in the area of sleep as it relates to TBI and PTSD, including pathophysiology and neurobiology of sleep; existing and emerging treatment options; as well as methodological issues in sleep measurements for TBI and PTSD. Understanding sleep problems and their role in the development and maintenance of PTSD and TBI symptoms may lead to improvement in overall treatment outcomes while offering a non-stigmatizing entry in mental health services and make current treatments more comprehensive by helping to address a broader spectrum of difficulties. PMID:26164549

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get Help for PTSD Help with ... Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Adult Self Report Child Measures Deployment Measures DSM-5 Measures PTSD Screens Trauma Exposure Measures Assessment Request ... Click here to download "What is PTSD?" (30.5 MB) Close × PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options Right ...

  20. Complex PTSD and phased treatment in refugees : a debate piece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ter Heide, F Jackie June; Mooren, Trudy M; Kleber, Rolf J

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asylum seekers and refugees have been claimed to be at increased risk of developing complex posttraumatic stress disorder (complex PTSD). Consequently, it has been recommended that refugees be treated with present-centred or phased treatment rather than stand-alone trauma-focused

  1. Therapist Adherence and Competence with Manualized Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for PTSD Delivered via Videoconferencing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frueh, B. Christopher; Monnier, Jeannine; Grubaugh, Anouk L.; Elhai, Jon D.; Yim, Eunsil; Knapp, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    Using secondary analyses from a randomized trial comparing the effectiveness of manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder, we compared ratings of therapist competency and adherence between two service delivery modes: telepsychiatry (TP) and same room (SR). Patients were 38 male treatment-seeking veterans recruited…

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... to download "What is PTSD?" (30.5 MB) Close × PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options Right Click here ... PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options" (29.5 MB) Close × Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD Right Click here ...

  3. Disseminating evidence-based treatments for PTSD in organizational settings: A high priority focus area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzek, Josef I; Rosen, Raymond C

    2009-11-01

    Dissemination of evidence-based treatments for PTSD has become an important focus of activity in the aftermath of recent terrorist attacks (e.g., London underground and U.S. 9/11 attacks), natural disasters (e.g., Indian Ocean tsunami and Hurricane Katrina), and wars (e.g., in Iraq and Afghanistan). This has become a high priority need for all mental health training and service delivery organizations. Researchers and educators have begun to examine clinician and client perceptions and preferences regarding PTSD treatment processes, and health care systems are organizing more comprehensive efforts at training and system change. As this evolution of services moves forward, effective dissemination should be a major focus of health policy research for the next decade or more. This review critically evaluates the PTSD-related research and emerging theory related to four major sets of variables that affect dissemination: (1) Practitioner factors, (2) Training methods, (3) The practice innovation(s) being disseminated; and (4) Organization or system factors. We evaluate findings from recent studies in light of emerging models of dissemination, and in the final section of the paper, we consider five broad topics with particular implications for dissemination of PTSD-specific treatments. They are: (1) The content of dissemination (i.e., which treatment protocols or intervention methods should be prioritized); (2) Strict adherence versus flexibility in the use of treatment manuals and the role of fidelity assessment; (3) The need for collaboration with user audiences; (4) The potential role of web-based technologies in increasing the effectiveness and efficiency of dissemination; and (5) Development of dissemination infrastructures within organizations.

  4. Can pharmacological and psychological treatment change brain structure and function in PTSD? A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomaes, Kathleen; Dorrepaal, Ethy; Draijer, Nel; Jansma, Elise P.; Veltman, Dick J.; van Balkom, Anton J.

    2014-01-01

    While there is evidence of clinical improvement of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with treatment, its neural underpinnings are insufficiently clear. Moreover, it is unknown whether similar neurophysiological changes occur in PTSD specifically after child abuse, given its enduring nature and

  5. Emergence of Transdiagnostic Treatments for PTSD and Posttraumatic Distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutner, Cassidy A; Galovski, Tara; Bovin, Michelle J; Schnurr, Paula P

    2016-10-01

    Both theoretical and empirical findings have demonstrated similarities across diagnoses, leading to a growing interest in transdiagnostic interventions. Most of the evidence supporting transdiagnostic treatment has accumulated for depression, anxiety, and eating disorders, with minimal attention given to posttraumatic stress disorder and other reactions to traumatic stressors. Although single-diagnosis protocols are effective for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other trauma-related disorders, in principle, transdiagnostic approaches may have beneficial applications within a traumatized population. This paper defines different types of transdiagnostic treatments, reviews transdiagnostic approaches used in related disorders, and discusses their applicability to PTSD. Examples are drawn from existing transdiagnostic treatments in order to provide a framework for the application of such interventions to the field of traumatic stress. Implications for implementation and dissemination are also discussed.

  6. Integrated, exposure-based treatment for PTSD and comorbid substance use disorders: Predictors of treatment dropout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szafranski, Derek D; Snead, Alexandra; Allan, Nicholas P; Gros, Daniel F; Killeen, Therese; Flanagan, Julianne; Pericot-Valverde, Irene; Back, Sudie E

    2017-10-01

    High rates of comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUD) have been noted in veteran populations. Fortunately, there are a number of evidence-based psychotherapies designed to address comorbid PTSD and SUD. However, treatments targeting PTSD and SUD simultaneously often report high dropout rates. To date, only one study has examined predictors of dropout from PTSD/SUD treatment. To address this gap in the literature, this study aimed to 1) examine when in the course of treatment dropout occurred, and 2) identify predictors of dropout from a concurrent treatment for PTSD and SUD. Participants were 51 male and female veterans diagnosed with current PTSD and SUD. All participants completed at least one session of a cognitive-behavioral treatment (COPE) designed to simultaneously address PTSD and SUD symptoms. Of the 51 participants, 22 (43.1%) dropped out of treatment prior to completing the full 12 session COPE protocol. Results indicated that the majority of dropout (55%) occurred after session 6, with the largest amount of dropout occurring between sessions 9 and 10. Results also indicated a marginally significant relationship between greater baseline PTSD symptom severity and premature dropout. These findings highlight inconsistencies related to timing and predictors of dropout, as well as the dearth of information noted about treatment dropout within PTSD and SUD literature. Suggestions for procedural changes, such as implementing continual symptom assessments during treatment and increasing dialog between provider and patient about dropout were made with the hopes of increasing consistency of findings and eventually reducing treatment dropout. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Predicting Treatment Outcome in PTSD : A Longitudinal Functional MRI Study on Trauma-Unrelated Emotional Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooij, Sanne J H; Kennis, Mitzy; Vink, Matthijs; Geuze, Elbert

    2016-01-01

    In about 30-50% of patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), symptoms persist after treatment. Although neurobiological research has advanced our understanding of PTSD, little is known about the neurobiology underlying persistence of PTSD. Two functional MRI scans were collected from 72

  8. Substance use disorders and PTSD: an exploratory study of treatment preferences among military veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, Sudie E; Killeen, Therese K; Teer, Andrew P; Hartwell, Emily E; Federline, Amanda; Beylotte, Frank; Cox, Elizabeth

    2014-02-01

    Substance use disorders (SUDs) and Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) frequently co-occur among Veterans and are associated with poor treatment outcomes. Historically, treatments for SUDs and PTSD have been delivered sequentially and independently. More recently, however, integrated treatments have shown promise. This study investigated Veterans' perceptions of the interrelationship between SUDs and PTSD, as well as treatment preferences. Participants were 35 Veterans of recent military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and prior operations, who completed the Treatment Preferences Questionnaire as well as an in-depth interview. The majority (94.3%) perceived a relationship between their SUD and PTSD symptoms. Veterans reported that PTSD symptom exacerbation was typically (85.3%) associated with an increase in substance use, and PTSD symptom improvement was typically (61.8%) followed by a decrease in substance use (pdevelopment and provision of care for Veterans with SUDs and PTSD. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Communication strategies to improve HIV treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochon, Donna; Ross, Michael W; Looney, Carol; Nepal, Vishnu P; Price, Andrea J; Giordano, Thomas P

    2011-01-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy has increased the survival of HIV-positive patients, traditional approaches to improving medication adherence have failed consistently. Acknowledging the role of communication in health behavior, we conducted a qualitative study to learn about patients' HIV treatment adherence experiences and to identify which communication strategies might influence adherence. Findings indicate that five constructs--cultural beliefs/language, stigma, cues to action, self-efficacy, and mood state--are potentially modifiable by improved communication. Results will be used to create a direct marketing campaign targeted to HIV-infected patients. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse ... Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention Veterans Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families PTSD Consultation ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment and Coping Treatment Self- ... Home PTSD Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment ...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get ... other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview Adult Interviews Adult Self Report Child Measures Deployment Measures DSM-5 Measures ...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Data VA App Store National Resource Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service ... it PTSD? Treatment and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment and Coping Treatment ... Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research (MIRECC) Military Exposures ...

  15. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaip Krasniqi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting. The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB. To our knowledge, the data about patients’ adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. Objective. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. Design. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. Results. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109–0.188. Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. Conclusion. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker’s commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  16. Tuberculosis Treatment Adherence of Patients in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasniqi, Shaip; Jakupi, Arianit; Daci, Armond; Tigani, Bahri; Jupolli-Krasniqi, Nora; Pira, Mimoza; Zhjeqi, Valbona; Neziri, Burim

    2017-01-01

    The poor patient adherence in tuberculosis (TB) treatment is considered to be one of the most serious challenges which reflect the decrease of treatment success and emerging of the Multidrug Resistance-TB (MDR-TB). To our knowledge, the data about patients' adherence to anti-TB treatment in our country are missing. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-TB treatment adherence rate and to identify factors related to eventual nonadherence among Kosovo TB patients. This study was conducted during 12 months, and the survey was a descriptive study using the standardized questionnaires with total 324 patients. The overall nonadherence for TB patient cohort was 14.5%, 95% CI (0.109-0.188). Age and place of residence are shown to have an effect on treatment adherence. Moreover, the knowledge of the treatment prognosis, daily dosage, side effects, and length of treatment also play a role. This was also reflected in knowledge regarding compliance with regular administration of TB drugs, satisfaction with the treatment, interruption of TB therapy, and the professional monitoring in the administration of TB drugs. The level of nonadherence TB treatment in Kosovar patients is not satisfying, and more health care worker's commitments need to be addressed for improvement.

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... The following short animated videos use hand-drawn images to help you learn about PTSD and effective treatments. What is PTSD? Treatment: Know Your Options "Evidence-based" Treatment Cognitive Processing Therapy Prolonged Exposure EMDR for PTSD Medications for ...

  18. Virtual reality exposure versus prolonged exposure for PTSD: Which treatment for whom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norr, Aaron M; Smolenski, Derek J; Katz, Andrea C; Rizzo, Albert A; Rothbaum, Barbara O; Difede, JoAnn; Koenen-Woods, Patricia; Reger, Mark A; Reger, Greg M

    2018-06-01

    The majority of studies comparing active psychological treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) do not find significant differences at posttreatment. This was the case in a recent trial examining prolonged exposure (PE) and virtual reality exposure (VRE) among active-duty soldiers with combat-related PTSD. Matching individual patients to specific treatments provides a potential avenue to improve significantly the public health impact of effective treatments for PTSD. A composite moderator approach was used to identify profiles of patients who would see superior PTSD symptom reduction in VRE or PE to inform future treatment matching. Active duty U.S. army soldiers (N = 108) were enrolled in a randomized clinical trial comparing VRE and PE in the treatment of PTSD stemming from deployments to Iraq or Afghanistan. Eighteen baseline variables were examined to identify treatment response heterogeneity in two patient groups: those with a superior response to PE and those with a superior response to VRE. The final composite moderator comprised four of 18 baseline variables. Results revealed that patients who were predicted to see greater PTSD symptom reduction in VRE were likely to be younger, not taking antidepressant medication, had greater PTSD hyperarousal symptoms, and were more likely to have greater than minimal suicide risk. Results suggest that treatment matching based on patient profiles could meaningfully improve treatment efficacy for combat-related PTSD. Future research can build on these results to improve our understanding of how to improve treatment matching for PTSD. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Assessment Assessment Overview Adult Interviews Adult Self Report Child Measures Deployment Measures DSM-5 Measures PTSD Screens ... Treatment Overview Early Intervention Veterans Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families PTSD Consultation For ...

  3. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Treatment: Know Your Options" (29.5 MB) Close × Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD Right Click here to download "Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD" (22.2 MB) Close × ...

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... What is PTSD?" (30.5 MB) Close × PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options Right Click here to download " ... for PTSD" (22.2 MB) Close × Evidence-based Treatment: What Does It Mean? Right Click here to ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment and ... Search For Professionals Professional Section Home PTSD Overview Types of ... & other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview Adult Interviews Adult ...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... What is PTSD?" (30.5 MB) Close × PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options Right Click here to download " ... Your Options" (29.5 MB) Close × Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD Right Click here to download "Cognitive ...

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  8. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment and ... Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment ... Adults Working with Families PTSD Consultation ...

  9. Gender and Age Differences in Trauma and PTSD Among Dutch Treatment-Seeking Police Officers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Christianne A. I.; Bakker, Anne; Smit, Annika S.; van Buschbach, Susanne; den Dekker, Melissa; Westerveld, Gré J.; Hutter, Renée C.; Gersons, Berthold P. R.; Olff, Miranda

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about how age and gender are associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and traumatic experiences in treatment-seeking police offers. In this study, we examined 967 diagnostic files of police officers seeking treatment for PTSD. Six hundred twelve (63%) of the

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention Veterans Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Form List of All Measures Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention Veterans Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families PTSD Consultation For ...

  12. Self-reported adherence to treatment: A study of socioeconomic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: Adherence to treatment is important and relevant in HIV treatment. Previous studies in sub Sahara Africa and south western Nigeria reported that psychiatric morbidity influence treatment adherence. The present study was to examine treatment adherence among the male and the female patients with HIV infection ...

  13. Predictors of PTSD Treatment Response Trajectories in a Sample of Childhood Sexual Abuse Survivors: The Roles of Social Support, Coping, and PTSD Symptom Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Shelley; Elklit, Ask; Shevlin, Mark; Armour, Cherie

    2017-11-01

    This study aimed to (a) identify posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) trajectories in a sample of Danish treatment-seeking childhood sexual abuse (CSA) survivors and (b) examine the roles of social support, coping style, and individual PTSD symptom clusters (avoidance, reexperiencing, and hyperarousal) as predictors of the identified trajectories. We utilized a convenience sample of 439 CSA survivors attending personalized psychotherapy treatment in Denmark. Four assessments were conducted on a six monthly basis over a period of 18 months. We used latent class growth analysis (LCGA) to test solutions with one to six classes. Following this, a logistic regression was conducted to examine predictors of the identified trajectories. Results revealed four distinct trajectories which were labeled high PTSD gradual response, high PTSD treatment resistant, moderate PTSD rapid response, and moderate PTSD gradual response. Emotional and detached coping and more severe pretreatment avoidance and reexperiencing symptoms were associated with more severe and treatment resistant PTSD. High social support and a longer length of time since the abuse were associated with less severe PTSD which improved over time. The findings suggested that treatment response of PTSD in CSA survivors is characterized by distinct patterns with varying levels and rates of PTSD symptom improvement. Results revealed that social support is protective and that emotional and detached coping and high pretreatment levels of avoidance and reexperiencing symptoms are risk factors in relation to PTSD severity and course. These factors could potentially identify patients who are at risk of not responding to treatment. Furthermore, these factors could be specifically addressed to increase positive outcomes for treatment-seeking CSA survivors.

  14. Therapist adherence to manualized cognitive-behavioral therapy for anger management delivered to veterans with PTSD via videoconferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morland, Leslie A; Greene, Carolyn J; Grubbs, Kathleen; Kloezeman, Karen; Mackintosh, Margaret-Anne; Rosen, Craig; Frueh, B Christopher

    2011-06-01

    Therapist adherence to a manualized cognitive-behavioral anger management group treatment (AMT) was compared between therapy delivered via videoconference (VC) and the traditional in-person modality, using data from a large, randomized controlled trial comparing the effectiveness of AMT for veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder. Therapist adherence was rated for the presence or absence of process and content treatment elements. Secondary analyses were conducted using a repeated measures ANOVA. Overall adherence to the protocol was excellent (M = 96%, SD = 1%). Findings indicate that therapist adherence to AMT is similar across delivery modalities and VC is a viable service delivery strategy that does not compromise a therapist's ability to effectively structure sessions and manage patient care. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Integrated and Holistic Treatment Approach to PTSD and SUD: A Synergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    Individuals living with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and addiction experience a complex and dynamic interaction of symptoms from both diagnoses. However, heretofore, each diagnosis has been approached as if it were a separate treatment consideration. Therefore, an individual may be treated for either a substance use disorder (SUD) or PTSD,…

  16. A Controlled Trial of Topiramate Treatment for Alcohol Dependence in Veterans with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    research on combined relapse prevention and exposure-based interventions in the treatment of AUD and PTSD. Presentation 4: Pharmacologic Therapies...psychological interviews to determine diagnostic eligibility [Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID) and the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale ...Psychology of Addictive Behaviors. PRESENTATION AT MOMRP SUSBSTANCE ABUSE IPR IN FT. DETRICK, MD: Presented overview & progress of study and pilot

  17. Neurobiology of Sleep and Sleep Treatment Response in PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    conducted in PTSD samples, these sleep measurement methods do not allow the identification of neurobio - logical underpinnings of trauma-related...vided valuable insights into the potential neurobio - logical underpinnings of altered REM and NREM sleep mechanisms following stress exposure PTSD...nightmare patients often report improvements In sleep quality, feeling more rested upon awakening and having more davtime energy , and reduction in

  18. Identifying Molecular Targets For PTSD Treatment Using Single Prolonged Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Post - traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD ) is a chronic, debilitating psychiatric disorder that can...SPS animals. Post - traumatic stress disorder ( PTSD ) is associated with neurocognitive impairments that have been attributed to functional deficits...and resilience. 2. KEYWORDS Post - traumatic stress disorder , Single Prolonged Stress , Neurobiological Mechanisms 5 3. ACCOMPLISHMENTS

  19. A qualitative study of determinants of PTSD treatment initiation in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Nina A; Friedemann-Sanchez, Greta; Spoont, Michele; Murdoch, Maureen; Parker, Louise E; Chiros, Christine; Rosenheck, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Although there are effective treatments for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), many PTSD sufferers wait years to decades before seeking professional help, if they seek it at all. An understanding of factors affecting treatment initiation for PTSD can inform strategies to promote help-seeking. We conducted a qualitative study to identify determinants of PTSD treatment initiation among 44 U.S. military veterans from the Vietnam and Afghanistan/Iraq wars; half were and half were not receiving treatment. Participants described barriers to and facilitators of treatment initiation within themselves, the post-trauma socio-cultural environment, the health care and disability systems, and their social networks. Lack of knowledge about PTSD was a barrier that occurred at both the societal and individual levels. Another important barrier theme was the enduring effect of experiencing an invalidating socio-cultural environment following trauma exposure. In some cases, system and social network facilitation led to treatment initiation despite individual-level barriers, such as beliefs and values that conflicted with help-seeking. Our findings expand the dominant model of service utilization by explicit incorporation of factors outside the individual into a conceptual framework of PTSD treatment initiation. Finally, we offer suggestions regarding the direction of future research and the development of interventions to promote timely help-seeking for PTSD.

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments (A-Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research (MIRECC) Military Exposures Polytrauma Rehabilitation ...

  1. Adherence to treatment of patients with past ischemic stroke.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Je. Azarenko

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The main task of the general practitioner is managing patients with the effects of ischemic stroke. The improvement of patients adherence to treatment in a significant way contributes to successful secondary prevention of ischemic stroke. Adherence to treatment can be determined through various questionnaires, including Morissky-Green. Currently, the adherence to a long-term drug therapy remains insufficient.

  2. Are posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and complex-PTSD distinguishable within a treatment-seeking sample of Syrian refugees living in Lebanon?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, P; Ceannt, R; Daccache, F; Abou Daher, R; Sleiman, J; Gilmore, B; Byrne, S; Shevlin, M; Murphy, J; Vallières, F

    2018-01-01

    The World Health Organization will publish its 11 th revision of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) in 2018. The ICD-11 will include a refined model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and a new diagnosis of complex PTSD (CPTSD). Whereas emerging data supports the validity of these proposals, the discriminant validity of PTSD and CPTSD have yet to be tested amongst a sample of refugees. Treatment-seeking Syrian refugees ( N  = 110) living in Lebanon completed an Arabic version of the International Trauma Questionnaire ; a measure specifically designed to capture the symptom content of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD. In total, 62.6% of the sample met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD or CPTSD. More refugees met the criteria for CPTSD (36.1%) than PTSD (25.2%) and no gender differences were observed. Latent class analysis results identified three distinct groups: (1) a PTSD class, (2) a CPTSD class and (3) a low symptom class. Class membership was significantly predicted by levels of functional impairment. Support for the discriminant validity of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD was observed for the first time within a sample of refugees. In support of the cross-cultural validity of the ICD-11 proposals, the prevalence of PTSD and CPTSD were similar to those observed in culturally distinct contexts.

  3. Basal blood DHEA-S/cortisol levels predicts EMDR treatment response in adolescents with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usta, Mirac Baris; Gumus, Yusuf Yasin; Say, Gokce Nur; Bozkurt, Abdullah; Şahin, Berkan; Karabekiroğlu, Koray

    2018-04-01

    In literature, recent evidence has shown that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis can be dysregulated in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and HPA axis hormones may predict the psychotherapy treatment response in patients with PTSD. In this study, it was aimed to investigate changing cortisol and DHEA-S levels post-eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy and the relationship between treatment response and basal cortisol, and DHEA-S levels before treatment. The study group comprised 40 adolescents (age, 12-18 years) with PTSD. The PTSD symptoms were assessed using the Child Depression Inventory (CDI) and Child Post-traumatic Stress Reaction Index (CPSRI) and the blood cortisol and DHEA-S were measured with the chemiluminescence method before and after treatment. A maximum of six sessions of EMDR therapy were conducted by an EMDR level-1 trained child psychiatry resident. Treatment response was measured by the pre- to post-treatment decrease in self-reported and clinical PTSD severity. Pre- and post-treatment DHEA-S and cortisol levels did not show any statistically significant difference. Pre-treatment CDI scores were negatively correlated with pre-treatment DHEA-S levels (r: -0.39). ROC analysis demonstrated that the DHEA-S/cortisol ratio predicts treatment response at a medium level (AUC: 0.703, p: .030, sensitivity: 0.65, specificity: 0.86). The results of this study suggested that the DHEA-S/cortisol ratio may predict treatment response in adolescents with PTSD receiving EMDR therapy. The biochemical parameter of HPA-axis activity appears to be an important predictor of positive clinical response in adolescent PTSD patients, and could be used in clinical practice to predict PTSD treatment in the future.

  4. PTSD and comorbid AUD: a review of pharmacological and alternative treatment options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralevski E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Ralevski, Lening A Olivera-Figueroa, Ismene Petrakis Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, VA Connecticut Healthcare System, West Haven, CT, USA Background: Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and alcohol use disorders (AUD frequently co-occur there are no specific treatments for individuals diagnosed with these comorbid conditions. The main objectives of this paper are to review the literature on pharmacological options for PTSD and comorbid AUD, and to summarize promising behavioral and alternative interventions for those with these dual diagnoses. Methods: We conducted a comprehensive search on PsycINFO and MEDLINE/PubMed databases using Medical Subject Headings terms in various combinations to identify articles that used pharmacotherapy for individuals with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. Similar strategies were used to identify articles on behavioral and alternative treatments for AUD and PTSD. We identified and reviewed six studies that tested pharmacological treatments for patients with PTSD and comorbid AUD. Results: The literature on treatment with US Food and Drug Administration approved medications for patients with dual diagnosis of PTSD and AUD is very limited and inconclusive. Promising evidence indicates that topiramate and prazosin may be effective in reducing PTSD and AUD symptoms in individuals with comorbidity. Seeking safety has had mixed efficacy in clinical trials. The efficacy of other behavioral and alternative treatments (mindfulness-based, yoga, and acupuncture is more difficult to evaluate since the evidence comes from small, single studies without comparison groups. Conclusion: There is a clear need for more systematic and rigorous study of pharmacological, behavioral, and alternative treatments for patients with dual diagnoses of PTSD and AUD. Keywords: dual diagnosis, PTSD, AUD, pharmacotherapy

  5. Effectiveness of Group-Delivered Cognitive Therapy and Treatment Length in Women Veterans with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane T. Castillo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness and length of group-delivered cognitive treatment for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD was examined in a sample of women veterans. The sample included 271 primarily non-Hispanic white (61% and Hispanic (25% women veterans treated in 8-, 10-, or 12-group length sessions with manualized cognitive therapy for PTSD. Outcome was measured with the PTSD Symptom Checklist (PCL in an intention-to-treat analysis (N = 271, in completer subjects (n = 172, and with group as the unit of analysis (n = 47 groups. Significant decreases in PTSD were found in the full sample (effect size [ES] range = 0.27 to 0.38, completers (ES range = 0.37 to 0.54, and group as the unit of analysis (ES range = 0.71 to 0.92, suggesting effectiveness of cognitive group treatment for PTSD. PCL scores significantly improved in the 8, 10, and 12 group lengths, with no differences between each. Clinical improvement showed a third decreasing 10 or more PCL points and 22% no longer meeting PTSD diagnostic criteria, with the best results in the 10-session group. The results suggest group-delivered cognitive therapy is an effective, efficient, time-limited treatment for PTSD.

  6. Pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment in PTSD: a qualitative review

    OpenAIRE

    de Kleine, Rianne A.; Rothbaum, Barbara O.; van Minnen, Agnes

    2013-01-01

    There is a good amount of evidence that exposure therapy is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Notwithstanding its efficacy, there is room for improvement, since a large proportion of patients does not benefit from treatment. Recently, an interesting new direction in the improvement of exposure therapy efficacy for PTSD emerged. Basic research found evidence of the pharmacological enhancement of the underlying learning and memory processes of exposure therapy. Th...

  7. Role of Sleep Deprivation in Fear Conditioning and Extinction: Implications for Treatment of PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    mechanism underlying the most successful treatment for PTSD, Prolonged Exposure. In animal models, sleep deprivation has been shown to impair extinction ...2. 3. 9 +Sleep and Extinction Learning  Animal models show fear conditioning:  Disrupts sleep  Disrupted sleep, in turn  Impairs extinction ...Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0001 TITLE: “Role of Sleep Deprivation in Fear Conditioning and Extinction : Implications for Treatment of PTSD

  8. Role of Sleep Deprivation in Fear Conditioning and Extinction: Implications for Treatment of PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    1 Award Number: W81XWH-11-2-0001 TITLE: Role of Sleep Deprivation in Fear Conditioning and Extinction: Implications for Treatment of PTSD...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 1 Oct 2010 – 30 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Sleep Deprivation in Fear Conditioning and...especially adequate REM during exposure therapy may enhance efficacy and reduce remission after treatment. 15. SUBJECT TERMS PTSD, sleep deprivation , fear

  9. Determinants of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment among HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study investigated factors of adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment (ART), factors or variables that can discriminate between adherent and non-adherent patients on ART were selected. Simple structured questionnaire was employed. The study sample consisted of 145 HIV patients who received ART in the Shashemene ...

  10. Pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment in PTSD: a qualitative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rianne A. de Kleine

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a good amount of evidence that exposure therapy is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Notwithstanding its efficacy, there is room for improvement, since a large proportion of patients does not benefit from treatment. Recently, an interesting new direction in the improvement of exposure therapy efficacy for PTSD emerged. Basic research found evidence of the pharmacological enhancement of the underlying learning and memory processes of exposure therapy. The current review aims to give an overview of clinical studies on pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment for PTSD. The working mechanisms, efficacy studies in PTSD patients, and clinical utility of four different pharmacological enhancers will be discussed: D-cycloserine, MDMA, hydrocortisone, and propranolol.

  11. Pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment in PTSD: a qualitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleine, Rianne A; Rothbaum, Barbara O; van Minnen, Agnes

    2013-10-17

    There is a good amount of evidence that exposure therapy is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Notwithstanding its efficacy, there is room for improvement, since a large proportion of patients does not benefit from treatment. Recently, an interesting new direction in the improvement of exposure therapy efficacy for PTSD emerged. Basic research found evidence of the pharmacological enhancement of the underlying learning and memory processes of exposure therapy. The current review aims to give an overview of clinical studies on pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment for PTSD. The working mechanisms, efficacy studies in PTSD patients, and clinical utility of four different pharmacological enhancers will be discussed: d-cycloserine, MDMA, hydrocortisone, and propranolol.

  12. Psychosocial influencers and mediators of treatment adherence in haemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyun Soo; Park, Ji Suk; Seo, Wha Sook

    2013-09-01

    This article is a report of the development and testing of the hypothetical model that illustrates relationships between treatment adherence and its psychosocial influencing factors and to elucidate the direct and indirect (mediating) effects of factors on treatment adherence. Poor adherence has been consistently reported in haemodialysis patients. Much research has showed various influencing factors of adherence, but these studies have failed to identify consistent influencing factors. This study was performed using a non-experimental, cross-sectional design. The study subjects were 150 end-stage renal failure patients on haemodialysis at a university hospital located in Incheon, South Korea. Data were collected over 10 months (June 2010-April 2011). The hypothetical model provided a good fit with data. Haemodialysis-related knowledge, perceived barrier to adherence, self-efficacy on adherence, and healthcare provider support had significant effects on adherence. Self-efficacy was found to mediate barrier-adherence and family support-adherence relationships. Self-efficacy in combination with barrier, family support, and healthcare provider support was found to mediate the depression-adherence relationship. Strategies aimed at the development of successful adherence interventions should focus on reducing perceived barriers and enhancing self-efficacy and knowledge. It can be suggested that efforts to improve the healthcare provider-patient relationship would enhance adherence. In depressive patients, strategies that promote self-efficacy and the support of family or healthcare providers could diminish the negative impact of depression on adherence. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Psychometric analysis of the PTSD Checklist-5 (PCL-5) among treatment-seeking military service members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Jennifer H; Jordan, Alexander H; Weathers, Frank W; Resick, Patricia A; Dondanville, Katherine A; Hall-Clark, Brittany; Foa, Edna B; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Yarvis, Jeffrey S; Hembree, Elizabeth A; Mintz, Jim; Peterson, Alan L; Litz, Brett T

    2016-11-01

    The Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-5; Weathers et al., 2013) was recently revised to reflect the changed diagnostic criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013). We investigated the psychometric properties of PCL-5 scores in a large cohort (N = 912) of military service members seeking PTSD treatment while stationed in garrison. We examined the internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity, and DSM-5 factor structure of PCL-5 scores, their sensitivity to clinical change relative to PTSD Symptom Scale-Interview (PSS-I; Foa, Riggs, Dancu, & Rothbaum, 1993) scores, and their diagnostic utility for predicting a PTSD diagnosis based on various measures and scoring rules. PCL-5 scores exhibited high internal consistency. There was strong agreement between the order of hypothesized and observed correlations among PCL-5 and criterion measure scores. The best-fitting structural model was a 7-factor hybrid model (Armour et al., 2015), which demonstrated closer fit than all other models evaluated, including the DSM-5 model. The PCL-5's sensitivity to clinical change, pre- to posttreatment, was comparable with that of the PSS-I. Optimally efficient cut scores for predicting PTSD diagnosis were consistent with prior research with service members (Hoge, Riviere, Wilk, Herrell, & Weathers, 2014). The results indicate that the PCL-5 is a psychometrically sound measure of DSM-5 PTSD symptoms that is useful for identifying provisional PTSD diagnostic status, quantifying PTSD symptom severity, and detecting clinical change over time in PTSD symptoms among service members seeking treatment. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. PTSD in Latino patients: illness beliefs, treatment preferences, and implications for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenman, David P; Meredith, Lisa S; Rhodes, Hilary; Green, Bonnie L; Kaltman, Stacey; Cassells, Andrea; Tobin, Jonathan N

    2008-09-01

    Little is known about how Latinos with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) understand their illness and their preferences for mental health treatment. To understand the illness beliefs and treatment preferences of Latino immigrants with PTSD. Semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Sixty foreign-born, Latino adults recruited from five primary care centers in New York and New Jersey and screened for PTSD. Content analytic methods identified common themes, their range, and most frequent or typical responses. Participants identified their primary feelings as sadness, anxiety, nervousness, and fear. The most common feeling was "sad" (triste). Other words frequently volunteered were "angry" (enojada), "nervous" (nerviosa), and "scared" (miedo). Participants viewed their PTSD as impairing health and functioning. They ascribed their somatic symptoms and their general medical problems to the "stress" from the trauma and its consequences on their lives. The most common reason participants volunteered for their work and school functioning being impaired was their poor concentration, often due to intrusive thoughts. Most expressed their desire to receive mental health treatment, to receive it within their primary care center, and preferred psychotherapy over psychotropic medications. Among participants who did not report wanting treatment, most said it was because the trauma was "in the past." Clinicians may consider enquiring about PTSD in Latino patients who report feeling sad, anxious, nervous, or fearful. Our study suggests topics clinicians may include in the psychoeducation of patients with PTSD.

  15. Differences in relationship conflict, attachment, and depression in treatment-seeking veterans with hazardous substance use, PTSD, or PTSD and hazardous substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Gina P; Held, Philip; Blackburn, Laura; Auerbach, John S; Clark, Allison A; Herrera, Catherine J; Cook, Jerome; Stuart, Gregory L

    2014-05-01

    Veterans (N = 133) who were seeking treatment in either the Posttraumatic Stress Program or Substance Use Disorders Program at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) and, based on self-report of symptoms, met clinical norms for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or hazardous substance use (HSU) completed a survey related to relationship conflict behaviors, attachment styles, and depression severity. Participants were grouped into one of three categories on the basis of clinical norm criteria: PTSD only, HSU only, and PTSD + HSU. Participants completed the PTSD Checklist-Military, Experiences in Close Relationships Scale-Short Form, Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression scale, Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test, Drug Use Disorders Identification Test, and Psychological Aggression and Physical Violence subscales of the Conflict Tactics Scale. Most participants were male and Caucasian. Significant differences were found between groups on depression, avoidant attachment, psychological aggression perpetration and victimization, and physical violence perpetration and victimization. Post hoc analyses revealed that the PTSD + HSU group had significantly higher levels of depression, avoidant attachment, and psychological aggression than the HSU only group. The PTSD + HSU group had significantly higher levels of physical violence than did the PTSD only group, but both groups had similar mean scores on all other variables. Potential treatment implications are discussed.

  16. SAFE for PTSD: noncontact psychophysiological measure based on high-resolution thermal imaging to aid in PTSD diagnosis and assessment of treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Familoni, Babajide O.; Ma, Lein; Hutchinson, J. Andrew; Morgan, C. Andrew, III; Rasmusson, Ann; O'Kane, Barbara L.

    2012-06-01

    Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) sometimes develops following exposure to very stressful or traumatic events such as motor vehicle accidents, rape, and war. It is arguably the signature injury of the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Previous studies have demonstrated that PTSD sufferers exhibit autonomic hyper-responsiveness to both neutral and trauma-related stimuli. In this study, we propose using high resolution thermal imaging of sweat-pores to obtain a noncontact, remote, and quantifiable measure of the sympathetic autonomic nervous reactivity to guide diagnosis, assess response to treatment, and tease out important cues to suicidality as a PTSD comorbidity.

  17. Social Support, Treatment Adherence and Outcome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-02

    Jun 2, 2017 ... Access to family support did not positively influence medication adherence, while access to financial support marginally impacted on outcome among hypertensive and T2D patients. However, un- wavering tendency for therapy affordability significantly influenced adherence and outcome, thus, the need for ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... MB) Close × Evidence-based Treatment: What Does It Mean? Right Click here to download "Evidence-based Treatment: What Does It Mean?" (22.7 MB) Close × Prolonged Exposure for PTSD ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a VA Appointment Conditions & Treatments See All Conditions & Treatments (A-Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military Sexual Trauma PTSD Research (MIRECC) Military Exposures Polytrauma Rehabilitation ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview Adult Interviews Adult Self Report Child Measures ... DSM-5 Measures PTSD Screens Trauma Exposure Measures Assessment Request Form List of All Measures Treatment Treatment ...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD Screens Trauma Exposure Measures Assessment Request Form List of All Measures Treatment Treatment Overview Early Intervention ... and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s ...

  2. EMDR therapy for PTSD after motor vehicle accidents: meta-analytic evidence for specific treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maddalena eBoccia

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Motor vehicle accident (MVA victims may suffer both acute and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD. With PTSD affecting social, interpersonal and occupational functioning, clinicians as well as the National Institute of Health are very interested in identifying the most effective psychological treatment to reduce PTSD. From research findings, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR therapy is considered as one of the effective treatment of PTSD. In this paper, we present the results of a meta-analysis of fMRI studies on PTSD after MVA through activation likelihood estimation. We found that PTSD following MVA is characterized by neural modifications in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, a cerebral structure involved in fear-conditioning mechanisms. Basing on previous findings in both humans and animals, which demonstrate that desensitization techniques and extinction protocols act on the limbic system, the effectiveness of EMDR and of cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT may be related to the fact that during these therapies the ACC is stimulated by desensitization.

  3. [Use of hypnosis in the treatment of combat post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramowitz, Eitan G; Bonne, Omer

    2013-08-01

    Clinical reports and observations going back almost two centuries consistently indicate that hypnotherapy is an effective modality for the treatment of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Pierre Janet was the first clinician to describe the successful initiation of stepwise hypnotic techniques in PTSD symptom reduction. Hypnotherapy may accelerate the formation of a therapeutic alliance and contribute to a positive treatment outcome. Hypnotic techniques may be valuable for patients with PTSD who exhibit symptoms such as anxiety, dissociation, widespread somatoform pain complaints and sleep disturbances. Hypnotic techniques may also facilitate the arduous tasks of working through traumatic memories, increasing coping skills, and promoting a sense of competency. In this review we will present guidelines for the stepwise implementation of hypnotherapy in PTSD. Since most data regarding the use of hypnotherapy in PTSD has been gathered from uncontrolled clinical observations, methodologically sound research demonstrating the efficacy of hypnotic techniques in PTSD is required for hypnotherapy to be officially added to the therapeutic armamentarium for this disorder.

  4. EMDR therapy for PTSD after motor vehicle accidents: meta-analytic evidence for specific treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Cordellieri, Pierluigi; Guariglia, Cecilia; Giannini, Anna Maria

    2015-01-01

    Motor vehicle accident (MVA) victims may suffer both acute and post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). With PTSD affecting social, interpersonal and occupational functioning, clinicians as well as the National Institute of Health are very interested in identifying the most effective psychological treatment to reduce PTSD. From research findings, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) therapy is considered as one of the effective treatment of PTSD. In this paper, we present the results of a meta-analysis of fMRI studies on PTSD after MVA through activation likelihood estimation. We found that PTSD following MVA is characterized by neural modifications in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a cerebral structure involved in fear-conditioning mechanisms. Basing on previous findings in both humans and animals, which demonstrate that desensitization techniques and extinction protocols act on the limbic system, the effectiveness of EMDR and of cognitive behavioral therapies (CBT) may be related to the fact that during these therapies the ACC is stimulated by desensitization. PMID:25954183

  5. Treatment adherence in multiple sclerosis: a survey of Belgian neurologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Decoo D

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Danny Decoo,1 Mathieu Vokaer2 1Department of Neurology and Neurorehab, AZ Alma, Sijsele, Belgium; 2Multiple Sclerosis Clinic, Edith Cavell Hospital, CHIREC group, Brussels, Belgium Background: Poor treatment adherence is common among patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. This survey evaluated neurologists’ perception of treatment adherence among MS patients.Materials and methods: This questionnaire-based survey of Belgian neurologists treating MS patients was conducted between June and July 2014. Face-to-face interviews with the neurologists were based on a semistructured questionnaire containing questions regarding the perception of the treatment-adherence level.Results: A total of 41 neurologists participated in the survey. Of these, 88% indicated frequent discussions about treatment adherence as beneficial for treatment efficacy. The mean time spent on the treatment-adherence discussion during the initial consultation was 11 minutes, with 24% of doctors spending 5 minutes and 24% of doctors spending 10 minutes discussing this issue. The majority of neurologists (56% perceived the adherence level in MS as good, and 12% perceived it as excellent. The majority of neurologists (64% indicated intolerance as a main cause of poor adherence, and all neurologists reported insufficient efficacy as a consequence of nonadherence. The importance of adherence in the neurologists’ practice was evaluated on a scale of 1–10, with 1= “not very important” and 10= “very important”: 44% of doctors indicated a score of 10, and the mean score was 9.0.Conclusion: Belgian neurologists consider treatment adherence in MS as essential for the benefits of therapies. However, although neurologists are aware of the consequences of nonadherence, they generally spend limited time discussing the importance of treatment adherence with their patients. Keywords: multiple sclerosis, treatment adherence, physician survey

  6. Psychosocial adjustment and adherence to dialysis treatment regimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownbridge, G; Fielding, D M

    1994-12-01

    Sixty children and adolescents in end-stage renal failure who were undergoing either haemodialysis or continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis at one of five United Kingdom dialysis centres were assessed on psychosocial adjustment and adherence to their fluid intake, diet and medication regimes. Parental adjustment was also measured and data on sociodemographic and treatment history variables collected. A structured family interview and standardised questionnaire measures of anxiety, depression and behavioural disturbance were used. Multiple measures of treatment adherence were obtained, utilising children's and parents' self-reports, weight gain between dialysis, blood pressure, serum potassium level, blood urea level, dietitians' surveys and consultants' ratings. Correlational analyses showed that low treatment adherence was associated with poor adjustment to diagnosis and dialysis by children and parents (P adherence than younger children, P dialysis (P treatment of this group of children. Future research should develop and evaluate psychosocial interventions aimed at improving treatment adherence.

  7. Treatment of OSA with CPAP Is Associated with Improvement in PTSD Symptoms among Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Jeremy E.; Smales, Carolina; Alexander, Thomas H.; Stepnowsky, Carl; Pillar, Giora; Malhotra, Atul; Sarmiento, Kathleen F.

    2017-01-01

    Study Objectives: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is common among veterans of the military, with sleep disturbance as a hallmark manifestation. A growing body of research has suggested a link between obstructive sleep apnea and PTSD, potentially due to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) related sleep disruption, or via other mechanisms. We examined the hypothesis that treatment of OSA with positive airway pressure would reduce PTSD symptoms over 6 months. Methods: A prospective study of Veterans with confirmed PTSD and new diagnosis of OSA not yet using PAP therapy were recruited from a Veteran's Affairs sleep medicine clinic. All subjects were instructed to use PAP each night. Assessments were performed at 3 and 6 months. The primary outcome was a reduction in PTSD symptoms at 6 months. Results: Fifty-nine subjects were enrolled; 32 remained in the study at 6 months. A significant reduction in PTSD symptoms, measured by PCL-S score was observed over the course of the study (60.6 ± 2.7 versus 52.3 ± 3.2 points; p J Clin Sleep Med. 2017;13(1):57–63. PMID:27707436

  8. Evidence-based treatment for adult women with child abuse-related Complex PTSD: a quantitative review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethy Dorrepaal

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Effective first-line treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD are well established, but their generalizability to child abuse (CA-related Complex PTSD is largely unknown. Method: A quantitative review of the literature was performed, identifying seven studies, with treatments specifically targeting CA-related PTSD or Complex PTSD, which were meta-analyzed, including variables such as effect size, drop-out, recovery, and improvement rates. Results: Only six studies with one or more cognitive behavior therapy (CBT treatment conditions and one with a present centered therapy condition could be meta-analyzed. Results indicate that CA-related PTSD patients profit with large effect sizes and modest recovery and improvement rates. Treatments which include exposure showed greater effect sizes especially in completers’ analyses, although no differential results were found in recovery and improvement rates. However, results in the subgroup of CA-related Complex PTSD studies were least favorable. Within the Complex PTSD subgroup, no superior effect size was found for exposure, and affect management resulted in more favorable recovery and improvement rates and less drop-out, as compared to exposure, especially in intention-to-treat analyses. Conclusion: Limited evidence suggests that predominantly CBT treatments are effective, but do not suffice to achieve satisfactory end states, especially in Complex PTSD populations. Moreover, we propose that future research should focus on direct comparisons between types of treatment for Complex PTSD patients, thereby increasing generalizability of results.

  9. Gender and offender status predicting treatment success in refugees and asylum seekers with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Håkon Stenmark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Current knowledge is limited regarding patient characteristics related to treatment outcome of posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD in refugees and asylum seekers. Objective: Gender, torture status, offender status, level of anger, and level of depression were investigated for possible effects on the treatment outcome. Method: Patient characteristics were explored in 54 refugees and asylum seekers who had completed a treatment program for PTSD. Non-responders (10, those who had the same or higher levels of symptom severity after treatment, were compared with responders, those who had lower symptom severity after treatment (44. Symptom severity was measured by Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. The non-responders and responders constituted the dichotomous, dependent variable. The independent variables were gender, torture status, offender status, level of anger, and level of depression. T-tests and Exact Unconditional Homogeneity/Independence Tests for 2X2 Tables were used to study the relationship to treatment outcome. Results: Being male and reporting to have been a violent offender were significantly more frequent characteristics among the non-responders compared to the responders. The levels of pretreatment anger, depression and torture status did not affect the treatment outcome. Conclusions: The study adds support to findings that females benefit more from treatment of PTSD than males and that violent offenders are difficult to treat within the standard treatment programs.

  10. [Adherence to pharmacological treatment in adult patients undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgnaolin, Vanessa; Figueiredo, Ana Elizabeth Prado Lima

    2012-06-01

    Adherence to treatment in patients on hemodialysis is not a simple process. Strategies to promote adherence will meet the need for improvements in the process of orientation concerning the disease and its pharmacological treatment. To identify compliance with pharmacological treatment of patients on hemodialysis and the main factors related to it we used the Adherence Scale. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study. Interviews were conducted to collect socioeconomic, pharmacological data, as well as those regarding self-reported adherence to drug. Out of the 65 participants, 55.4% showed non-compliance. The mean number of drugs used was 4.1 ± 2.5 (self-report) and 6.2 ± 3.0 (prescription). Statistical analysis showed significant differences concerning compliance at different ages (> 60 years are more adherent). A significant proportion of patients have difficulty to comply with treatment and the main factor was forgetfulness. Regarding age, elderly patients are more adherent to treatment. The low level of knowledge about the used drugs may be one of the reasons for the lack of adherence, and the patient's orientation process by a team of multiprofessionals involved in assisting is a strategy to promote adherence.

  11. Trauma-focused treatment in PTSD patients with psychosis : symptom exacerbation, adverse events, and revictimization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, D.P.G.; de Bont, P.A.J.M.; van der Vleugel, B.M.; de Roos, C.; de Jongh, A.; van Minnen, A.; van der Gaag, M.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Most clinicians refrain from trauma treatment for patients with psychosis because they fear symptom exacerbation and relapse. This study examined the negative side effects of trauma-focused (TF) treatment in patients with psychosis and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods:

  12. Prolonged Exposure Treatment of Chronic PTSD in Juvenile Sex Offenders: Promising Results from Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Prolonged exposure (PE) was used to treat chronic PTSD secondary to severe developmental trauma in two adolescent male sex offenders referred for residential sex offender treatment. Both youth were treatment resistant prior to initiation of PE and showed evidence of long-standing irritability and depression/anxiety. Clinical observation and…

  13. Pharmacological enhancement of exposure-based treatment in PTSD: a qualitative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleine, R.A. de; Rothbaum, B.O.; Minnen, A. van

    2013-01-01

    There is a good amount of evidence that exposure therapy is an effective treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Notwithstanding its efficacy, there is room for improvement, since a large proportion of patients does not benefit from treatment. Recently, an interesting new direction in

  14. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Bob F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. Methods Children completed the Dutch Children's Responses to Trauma Inventory at three and nine months after discharge from the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU. Comparison data were available from 355 children survivors who completed the same questionnaire 10 months after a major fire disaster. Results Thirty-six children aged eight to 17 years completed questionnaires at three month follow-up, nine month follow-up, or both. More than one third (34.5% of the children had subclinical PTSD, while 13.8% were likely to meet criteria for PTSD. Maternal PTSD was the strongest predictor for child PTSD. There were no significant differences in (subclinical PTSD symptoms either over time or compared to symptoms of survivors from the fire disaster. Conclusion This study shows that a considerable number of children have persistent PTSD after PICU treatment. Prevention of PTSD is important to minimize the profound adverse effects that PTSD can have on children's well-being and future development.

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care » PTSD: National Center for PTSD » Public » Videos PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... Prescribing for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" ( ...

  16. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care » PTSD: National Center for PTSD » Public » Videos PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... Prescribing for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" ( ...

  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment ... Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview ...

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prescriptions Refills Schedule a VA Appointment Crisis Prevention Mental Health PTSD Public Health Veterans Access, Choice & Accountability Act ... See All Conditions & Treatments (A-Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse Military ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Prescriptions Refills Schedule a VA Appointment Crisis Prevention Mental Health PTSD Public Health Veterans Access, Choice & Accountability ... See All Conditions & Treatments (A-Z) Hepatitis HIV Mental Health Mental Health Home Suicide Prevention Substance Abuse ...

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? Treatment and ... Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview Adult Interviews Adult ...

  1. Treatment of complex PTSD: results of the ISTSS expert clinician survey on best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloitre, Marylene; Courtois, Christine A; Charuvastra, Anthony; Carapezza, Richard; Stolbach, Bradley C; Green, Bonnie L

    2011-12-01

    This study provides a summary of the results of an expert opinion survey initiated by the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies Complex Trauma Task Force regarding best practices for the treatment of complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Ratings from a mail-in survey from 25 complex PTSD experts and 25 classic PTSD experts regarding the most appropriate treatment approaches and interventions for complex PTSD were examined for areas of consensus and disagreement. Experts agreed on several aspects of treatment, with 84% endorsing a phase-based or sequenced therapy as the most appropriate treatment approach with interventions tailored to specific symptom sets. First-line interventions matched to specific symptoms included emotion regulation strategies, narration of trauma memory, cognitive restructuring, anxiety and stress management, and interpersonal skills. Meditation and mindfulness interventions were frequently identified as an effective second-line approach for emotional, attentional, and behavioral (e.g., aggression) disturbances. Agreement was not obtained on either the expected course of improvement or on duration of treatment. The survey results provide a strong rationale for conducting research focusing on the relative merits of traditional trauma-focused therapies and sequenced multicomponent approaches applied to different patient populations with a range of symptom profiles. Sustained symptom monitoring during the course of treatment and during extended follow-up would advance knowledge about both the speed and durability of treatment effects. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  2. Measurement and documentation of complex PTSD in treatment seeking traumatized refugees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palic, Sabina

    The aim of the thesis is to study complex traumatization and its measurement in treatment seeking traumatized refugees. Historically there have been repeated attempts to create a diagnosis for complex posttraumatic stress disorder (complex PTSD) to capture the more diverse, trauma related symptoms...... to measuring symptoms of PTSD, anxiety, and depression. This renders documentation, measurement, and treatment of possible complex traumatic adaptations in traumatized refugees very difficult. The thesis comprises two studies using different measures and different samples. The first study investigated complex...... in the traumatized refugees an important challenge. The second study in the thesis examined the proposed diversity of psychiatric morbidity in complex PTSD using a global psychiatric measure –the Health of Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS). Article 3 showed that a group of consecutive refugees outpatients from a Danish...

  3. Adherence to treatment in adolescents with cystic fibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucks, Romola S.; Hawkins, Katharine; Skinner, T. C.

    2009-01-01

    ObjectivesThis study was conducted to explore the relationships between illness perceptions, emotional representations, treatment beliefs and reported adherence in adolescents with cystic fibrosis (CF). MethodsThirty-eight adolescents completed questionnaires assessing their perceptions of CF, be...... CF as a chronic condition. ConclusionsThe findings provide preliminary support for the self-regulatory model, using the necessity-concerns framework to operationalize treatment beliefs, in explaining adherence to treatment in adolescents with CF....

  4. Non-adherence to topical treatments for actinic keratosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shergill B

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bav Shergill,1 Simon Zokaie,2 Alison J Carr3 1Department of Dermatology, Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals, Elm Grove, Brighton, UK; 2Leo Pharma, Princes Risborough, 3Hamell, London, UK Background: There is limited information on the patterns of use, adherence rates, and factors that impact adherence with topical treatments for actinic keratosis (AK. Objectives: To establish patterns of use and adherence with topical treatments for AK and to identify treatment-related factors that impact on adherence. Methods: A community-based, cross-sectional study was performed using a standardized questionnaire completed online or via telephone interview. Patients were stratified according to the presence of AK lesions on the scalp and/or other extremities; and presence of scarring resulting from treatment. Results: This study included 305 patients with AK who were currently using a patient-applied topical therapy for AK or had used one within the previous 12 months. In total, 88% (n = 268/305 of patients were either non-adherent, non-persistent or both non-adherent and non-persistent to topical therapy. Duration of treatment was associated with increasing rates of non-adherence (adjusted odds ratio [OR]; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.2, P < 0.01: 52% of patients were non-adherent with 3–4 week treatment duration; 69% of patients with 4–8 week treatment duration; and 71% of patients with 6–12 week treatment duration. There were similar increases in non-persistence with increasing treatment duration (adjusted OR; for treatment durations greater than 4 weeks, 2.1, P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study found high rates of non-adherence and non-persistence in patients with AK. Duration of treatment was a significant factor contributing to non-adherence and non-persistence to topical treatments. Patient-applied topical therapies that require less frequent application and have shorter treatment duration may be associated with improved

  5. Evidence-based treatment for adult women with child abuse-related Complex PTSD: a quantitative review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Thomaes, Kathleen; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W.; Veltman, Dick J.; Draijer, Nel; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.

    2014-01-01

    Effective first-line treatments for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are well established, but their generalizability to child abuse (CA)-related Complex PTSD is largely unknown. A quantitative review of the literature was performed, identifying seven studies, with treatments specifically

  6. Non-Antidepressant Long-term Treatment in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerbage, Hala; Richa, Sami

    2015-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a frequent and disabling condition that occurs after exposure to a traumatic event, and Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors (SSRIs) are considered the first-line treatment approach for this disorder. However, a large proportion of patients remain symptomatic and other pharmacological agents have been investigated, based on the understanding of the underlying biological dysfunctions of PTSD. We conducted a review of the literature on the pharmacological options for PTSD other than the antidepressants, using MedLine and Web of Science databases, with search terms including the pharmacologic class of each agent plus PTSD, or pharmacotherapy, or fear conditioning. The literature review covered articles published until august 2012, including reviews and original articles. Agents like antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, benzodiazepines, anti-adrenergic agents, have been studied in randomized clinical trials (RCTs), with general positive results for antipsychotics, especially as adjunct therapy, and for prazosin for sleep-related disturbances. However, one important target for novel medications is the modulation of the fear conditioning process, through the alteration of retrieval/reconsolidation or enhancement of fear extinction. This is traditionally targeted in prolonged exposure therapy, but pre-clinical findings from studies investigating agents like propanolol, clonidine, N-Methyl-D-aspartic Acid Receptor (NMDAR) compounds, 3,4-methylenedioxy-N-methylamphetamine (MDMA) and cannabinoids, indicate promising results in affecting the fear conditioning process and thus improving PTSD core symptoms. Antipsychotics can be considered a reasonable alternative option to PTSD, with the largest body of evidence for risperidone, even though larger RCTs are warranted. Prazosin is also a promising agent, especially for sleep-related disturbances, while anticonvulsants and benzodiazepines lack empirical support. However, the most promising

  7. Treatment Preference among Suicidal and Self-Injuring Women with Borderline Personality Disorder and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Melanie S.; Tkachuck, Mathew A.; Youngberg, Kelly A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examined treatment preferences among suicidal and self-injuring women with borderline personality disorder (BPD) and PTSD. Method Women (N = 42, Mage =34) with BPD, PTSD and recent intentional self-injury were evaluated upon entry into a psychotherapy outcome study. Results The majority preferred a combined dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) and prolonged exposure (PE) treatment (73.8%), followed by DBT alone (26.2%), and PE alone (0%). Women who preferred the combined treatment were more likely to report a desire to obtain relief from PTSD and to receive specific DBT and PE treatment components as reasons underlying this preference. Few women (21.4%) reported concerns about PE, but those who did were more likely to prefer DBT alone. More severe PTSD re-experiencing symptoms, a childhood index trauma, and less reduction in positive affect after a trauma interview predicted a preference for the combined treatment. Conclusions These results may help to inform treatment for these complex patients. PMID:23444147

  8. Social Support, Treatment Adherence and Outcome among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Family source of support was the most available [hypertensive (225; 90.0%); T2D (174; 87.0%)], but government and non-governmental organisation support were largely desired, with financial support preferred, 233(93.2%) hypertensive and 190(95.0%) T2D, respectively. Adherent hypertensive patients with or ...

  9. [Improving treatment adherence in kidney transplantation: a major challenge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Michèle

    2014-06-01

    The kidney transplant recipient is faced not only with the perspective of taking immunosuppressive drugs lifelong, but also the possibility of other long-term treatments prescribed for preexisting conditions, complications, or side effects. Proper management, and most importantly patient adherence, can become a complex challenge. Here we recall current definitions and describe methods for measuring treatment adherence, followed by a discussion on the prevalence of non-adherence in kidney transplant recipients, its effect on graft survival, and factors predictive of non-adherence. Ways of improving adherence are examined, leading to the conviction that helping patients take their medications regularly would probably have a greater impact on graft survival than marketing a new immunosuppressive agent. Copyright © 2014 Association Société de néphrologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie N Fongwa

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Marie N Fongwa1, Lorraines S Evangelista1, Ron D Hays2, David S Martins3, David Elashoff4, Marie J Cowan1, Donald E Morisky51University of California Los Angeles School of Nursing, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 2University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, Division of General Internal Medicine and Health Services Research, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 3To Help Everyone Clinic Inc. Los Angeles, CA, USA; 4University of California Los Angeles Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USA; 5University of California Los Angeles School of Public Health, CA, USABackground: Hypertension among African American women is of epidemic proportions. Nonadherence to treatment contributes to uncontrolled blood pressure in this population. Factors associated with adherence to treatment in African American women are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with adherence to hypertension treatment in African American women.Methods: Five audio-taped focus groups were conducted with hypertensive African American women, 35 years and older receiving treatment for hypertension from an inner-city free clinic. All transcripts from the tapes were analyzed for content describing adherence to treatment factors.Findings: Factors associated with adherence to treatment in hypertensive African American women were in three main categories including: beliefs about hypertension, facilitators of adherence to treatment, and barriers to adherence to treatment.Implications: The study supports the need for education on managing hypertension and medication side effects, early screening for depression in hypertensive African Americans, development of culturally sensitive hypertension educational material, and formation of support groups for promoting adherence to treatment among African American women with hypertension.Keywords: adherence, African American, hypertension treatment factors

  11. Going direct to the consumer: Examining treatment preferences for veterans with insomnia, PTSD, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutner, Cassidy A; Pedersen, Eric R; Drummond, Sean P A

    2018-05-01

    Inclusion of consumer preferences to disseminate evidence-based psychosocial treatment (EBPT) is crucial to effectively bridge the science-to-practice quality chasm. We examined this treatment gap for insomnia, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and comorbid symptoms in a sample of 622 young adult veterans through preference in symptom focus, treatment modality, and related gender differences among those screening positive for each problem. Data were collected from veteran drinkers recruited through targeted Facebook advertisements as part of a brief online alcohol intervention. Analyses demonstrated that veterans reported greater willingness to seek insomnia-focused treatment over PTSD- or depression-focused care. Notably, even when participants screened negative for insomnia, they preferred sleep-focused care to PTSD- or depression-focused care. Although one in five veterans with a positive screen would not consider care, veterans screening for both insomnia and PTSD who would consider care had a preference for in-person counseling, and those screening for both insomnia and depression had similar preferences for in-person and mobile app-based/computer self-help treatment. Marginal gender differences were found. Incorporating direct-to-consumer methods into research can help educate stakeholders about methods to expand EBPT access. Though traditional in-person counseling was often preferred, openness to app-based/computer interventions offers alternative methods to provide veterans with EBPTs. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Do Assault-Related Variables Predict Response to Cognitive Behavioral Treatment for PTSD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hembree, Elizabeth A.; Street, Gordon P.; Riggs, David S.; Foa, Edna B.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the hypothesis that variables such as history of prior trauma, assault severity, and type of assault, previously found to be associated with natural recovery, would also predict treatment outcome. Trauma-related variables were examined as predictors of posttreatment posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) severity in a sample of…

  13. Verbal memory functioning moderates psychotherapy treatment response for PTSD-Related nightmares.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, J Cobb; Harb, Gerlinde; Brownlow, Janeese A; Greene, Jennifer; Gur, Ruben C; Ross, Richard J

    2017-04-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with cognitive deficits in attention, executive control, and memory, although few studies have investigated the relevance of cognitive difficulties for treatment outcomes. We examined whether cognitive functioning and history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) were associated with response to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for PTSD-related sleep problems. In a randomized controlled trial of Imagery Rehearsal (IR) added to components of CBT for Insomnia (IR + cCBT-I) compared to cCBT-I alone for PTSD-related recurrent nightmares, 94 U.S. veterans completed a battery of cognitive tests. TBI was assessed via structured clinical interview. Mixed-effects models examined main effects of cognitive functioning and interactions with time on primary sleep and nightmare outcomes. Significant verbal immediate memory by time interactions were found for nightmare distress, nightmare frequency, and sleep quality, even after controlling for overall cognitive performance and depression. TBI exhibited main effects on outcomes but no interactions with time. Findings indicated that individuals with lower verbal memory performance were less likely to respond to treatment across two sleep interventions. Veterans with TBI displayed greater symptoms but no altered trajectories of treatment response. Together with prior literature, findings suggest that verbal memory functioning may be important to consider in PTSD treatment implementation. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Predictors of long-term treatment outcome in combat and peacekeeping veterans with military-related PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, J Don; Contractor, Ateka A; Armour, Cherie; St Cyr, Kate; Elhai, Jon D; Sareen, Jitender

    2014-11-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a significant psychiatric condition that may result from exposure to combat; it has been associated with severe psychosocial dysfunction. This study examined the predictors of long-term treatment outcomes in a group of veterans with military-related PTSD. The study consisted of a retrospective chart review of 151 consecutive veterans treated at an outpatient clinic for veterans with psychiatric disorders resulting from their military operations between January 2002 and May 2012. The diagnosis of PTSD was made using the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale. As part of treatment as usual, all patients completed the PTSD Checklist-Military version and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) at intake and at each follow-up appointment, the Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) at intake, and either the SF-36 or the 12-item Short-Form Health Survey at follow-up. All patients received psychoeducation about PTSD and combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. Analyses demonstrated a significant and progressive improvement in PTSD severity over the 2-year period ([n = 117] Yuan-Bentler χ²40 = 221.25, P loss of probable PTSD diagnosis, is possible in an outpatient setting for veterans with chronic military-related PTSD. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  15. Divalproex Sodium for the Treatment of PTSD and Conduct Disordered Youth: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Hans; Saxena, Kirti S.; Carrion, Victor; Khanzode, Leena A.; Silverman, Melissa; Chang, Kiki

    2007-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of divalproex sodium (DVP) for the treatment of PTSD in conduct disorder, utilizing a previous study in which 71 youth were enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial. Twelve had PTSD. Subjects (all males, mean age 16, SD 1.0) were randomized into high and low dose conditions. Clinical Global Impression (CGI)…

  16. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronner, M.B.; Knoester, H.; Bos, AP; Last, B.F.; Grootenhuis, M.A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. Methods: Children completed the

  17. Past-Year Treatment Utilization Among Individuals Meeting DSM-5 PTSD Criteria: Results From a Nationally Representative Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hale, Andrew C; Sripada, Rebecca K; Bohnert, Kipling M

    2018-03-01

    Little is known regarding treatment utilization among individuals meeting DSM-5 criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Data were analyzed from the third wave of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a nationally representative sample using DSM-5 criteria. Factors related to increased odds of PTSD treatment utilization for individuals meeting lifetime criteria included some college education versus less than a high school degree (odds ratio [OR]=3.17), having health insurance versus no insurance (OR=2.86), having a comorbid phobia disorder versus not having a phobia disorder (OR=1.36), and greater PTSD symptom count (OR=1.11). Older age (OR=.40), identifying as black or Asian versus white non-Hispanic (OR=.70 and OR=.28, respectively), and greater social functioning (OR=.98) were associated with decreased odds of PTSD treatment utilization. Results highlight factors that may be useful in identifying population subgroups with PTSD that are at risk for underutilization of services.

  18. Can a digital medicine system improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papola, D; Gastaldon, C; Ostuzzi, G

    2018-06-01

    A substantial proportion of people with mental health conditions do not adhere to prescribed pharmacological treatments. Poor adherence is probably one of the most critical elements contributing to relapse in people with schizophrenia and other severe mental disorders. In order to tackle this global issue, in November 2017 the Food and Drug Administration approved a tablet formulation of the atypical antipsychotic aripiprazole embedded with a novel digital adherence-assessment device. In this commentary, we critically appraised the potential beneficial and harmful consequences of this new digital formulation of aripiprazole, and we highlighted expected implications for clinical practice.

  19. Does Reintegration Stress Contribute to Suicidal Ideation Among Returning Veterans Seeking PTSD Treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Moira; Angkaw, Abigail C; Hendricks, Brittany A; Norman, Sonya B

    2016-04-01

    Although posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and other psychiatric symptoms are well-established risk factors for suicidal ideation among returning veterans, less attention has been paid to whether the stress of reintegrating into civilian society contributes to suicidal ideation. Utilizing a sample of 232 returning veterans (95% male, mean age = 33.63 years) seeking PTSD treatment, this study tested whether reintegration difficulties contribute to suicidal ideation over and above the influence of PTSD symptoms, depression symptoms, and potential substance misuse. Logistic regressions indicated that reintegration stress had a unique effect on suicidal ideation over and above PTSD and depression symptoms. Reintegration stress interacted with substance misuse to predict suicidal ideation, such that the effect of reintegration stress on suicidal ideation was much larger for those with potential substance misuse. Exploratory analyses also examined which types of reintegration difficulties were associated with suicidal ideation, and found that difficulty maintaining military friendships, difficulty getting along with relatives, difficulty feeling like you belong in civilian society, and difficulty finding meaning/purpose in life were all significantly associated with suicidal ideation, beyond the effects of psychiatric symptoms and potential substance misuse. Findings highlight the importance of addressing reintegration stress for the prevention of suicide among returning veterans. Implications for treatment are discussed. © Published 2015. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  20. Treatment agreement, adherence, and outcome in cognitive behavioral treatments for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lu; Soehner, Adriane M; Bélanger, Lynda; Morin, Charles M; Harvey, Allison G

    2018-03-01

    Patient adherence has been identified as an important barrier to the implementation of evidence-based psychological treatments. In cognitive behavioral treatments (CBT) for insomnia, the current study examined (a) the validity of therapist ratings of patient agreement and adherence against an established behavioral measure of adherence, and (b) the relationship between treatment agreement, adherence, and outcome. Participants were 188 adults meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for chronic insomnia who were randomized to receive behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, or CBT for insomnia. Treatment agreement/adherence was measured by (a) weekly therapist ratings of patient agreement and homework completion, and (b) adherence to behavioral strategies (ABS) derived from patient-reported sleep diary. Outcome measures were Insomnia Severity Index and insomnia remission (Insomnia Severity Index adherence, and ABS measures during treatment significantly predicted insomnia remission at posttreatment, and all but therapist rating of homework completion predicted remission at 6-month follow-up. Greater patient agreement and adherence (therapist ratings and ABS) during treatment predicted better treatment outcome. Therapist-rated treatment agreement and adherence correspond well with patient-reported sleep diary-derived adherence measure. These simple, deployable therapist-rated patient agreement and adherence can potentially be useful for treatments for other disorders. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Clinical Virtual Reality tools to advance the prevention, assessment, and treatment of PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Albert ‘Skip’; Shilling, Russell

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Numerous reports indicate that the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) military personnel has created a significant behavioural healthcare challenge. These findings have served to motivate research on how to better develop and disseminate evidence-based treatments for PTSD. The current article presents the use of Virtual Reality (VR) as a clinical tool to address the assessment, prevention, and treatment of PTSD, based on the VR projects that were evolved at the University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies since 2004. A brief discussion of the definition and rationale for the clinical use of VR is followed by a description of a VR application designed for the delivery of prolonged exposure (PE) for treating Service Members (SMs) and Veterans with combat- and sexual assault-related PTSD. The expansion of the virtual treatment simulations of Iraq and Afghanistan for PTSD assessment and prevention is then presented. This is followed by a forward-looking discussion that details early efforts to develop virtual human agent systems that serve the role of virtual patients for training the next generation of clinical providers, as healthcare guides that can be used to support anonymous access to trauma-relevant behavioural healthcare information, and as clinical interviewers capable of automated behaviour analysis of users to infer psychological state. The paper will conclude with a discussion of VR as a tool for breaking down barriers to care in addition to its direct application in assessment and intervention. PMID:29372007

  2. Clinical Virtual Reality tools to advance the prevention, assessment, and treatment of PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, Albert 'Skip'; Shilling, Russell

    2017-01-01

    Numerous reports indicate that the incidence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom/Operation New Dawn (OEF/OIF/OND) military personnel has created a significant behavioural healthcare challenge. These findings have served to motivate research on how to better develop and disseminate evidence-based treatments for PTSD. The current article presents the use of Virtual Reality (VR) as a clinical tool to address the assessment, prevention, and treatment of PTSD, based on the VR projects that were evolved at the University of Southern California Institute for Creative Technologies since 2004. A brief discussion of the definition and rationale for the clinical use of VR is followed by a description of a VR application designed for the delivery of prolonged exposure (PE) for treating Service Members (SMs) and Veterans with combat- and sexual assault-related PTSD. The expansion of the virtual treatment simulations of Iraq and Afghanistan for PTSD assessment and prevention is then presented. This is followed by a forward-looking discussion that details early efforts to develop virtual human agent systems that serve the role of virtual patients for training the next generation of clinical providers, as healthcare guides that can be used to support anonymous access to trauma-relevant behavioural healthcare information, and as clinical interviewers capable of automated behaviour analysis of users to infer psychological state. The paper will conclude with a discussion of VR as a tool for breaking down barriers to care in addition to its direct application in assessment and intervention.

  3. Dialectical behavior therapy as a precursor to PTSD treatment for suicidal and/or self-injuring women with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Melanie S; Jackson, Safia C; Comtois, Katherine A; Linehan, Marsha M

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in reducing behaviors commonly used as exclusion criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment. The sample included 51 suicidal and/or self-injuring women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), 26 (51%) of whom met criteria for PTSD. BPD clients with and without PTSD were equally likely to eliminate the exclusionary behaviors during 1 year of DBT. By posttreatment, 50-68% of the BPD clients with PTSD would have been suitable candidates for PTSD treatment. Borderline personality disorder clients with PTSD who began treatment with a greater number of recent suicide attempts and more severe PTSD were significantly less likely to become eligible for PTSD treatment.

  4. Increased Resilience is Associated with Positive Treatment Outcomes for Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Adam P; Mota, Natalie P; Sippel, Lauren M; Connolly, Kevin M; Lyons, Judith A

    2018-04-18

    Resilience has been associated with less severe psychiatric symptomatology and better treatment outcomes among individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders. However, it remains unknown whether resilience increases during psychotherapy within the comorbid PTSD and substance use disorder population with unique features of dual diagnosis, including trauma cue-related cravings. We tested whether veterans seeking psychotherapy for comorbid PTSD and substance use disorder reported increased resilience from pre- to posttreatment. We also tested whether increased resilience was associated with greater decreases in posttreatment PTSD and substance use disorder symptoms. Participants were 29 male veterans (M age = 49.07 years, SD = 11.24 years) receiving six-week residential day treatment including cognitive processing therapy for PTSD and cognitive behavioral therapy for substance use disorder. Resilience, PTSD symptoms, and trauma cue-related cravings were assessed at pre- and posttreatment. Veterans reported a large, significant increase in resilience posttreatment (M diff = 14.24, t = -4.22, p resilience were significantly associated with fewer PTSD symptoms (β = -0.37, p = .049, sr = -.36) and trauma-cued cravings (β = -0.39, p = .006, sr = -.38) posttreatment when controlling for pretreatment scores and baseline depressive symptoms. Results suggest that evidence-based psychotherapy for comorbid PTSD and substance use disorder may facilitate strength-based psychological growth, which may further promote sustained recovery.

  5. Sudden losses and sudden gains during a DBT-PTSD treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder following childhood sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Krüger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure-based treatment approaches are first-line interventions for patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, the dissemination of exposure-based treatments for PTSD is challenging, as a large proportion of clinicians report being concerned about symptoms worsening as a result of this type of intervention and are therefore reluctant to offer it to patients with PTSD. However, there is only little empirical evidence to date on the pattern of symptom worsening during exposure-based treatment for PTSD. Objective: The goal of the present study was to explore the frequency of sudden losses and sudden gains in the course of an exposure-based treatment programme for female patients suffering from PTSD related to childhood sexual abuse who also show severe comorbidity. In addition, the relationship between sudden changes and treatment outcome was examined. Methods: Female participants (N=74 were randomised to either a 12-week residential DBT-PTSD programme or a treatment-as-usual wait list. The pattern of symptom change was assessed via weekly assessments using the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS. Sudden changes were computed as suggested by the literature on sudden gains. Results: During treatment, only one participant (3% experienced a sudden loss, whereas 25% of participants experienced sudden gains. In the waiting condition, 8% of the participants experienced sudden losses and 5% experienced sudden gains during the same time period. No symptom worsening was observed in response to exposure sessions. However, sudden gains occurred during exposure and non-exposure treatment weeks. Patients with sudden gains showed better treatment outcome in the post-treatment and follow-up assessments. Conclusions: Exposure-based treatment did not lead to PTSD symptom worsening in the study sample. Results show that sudden gains occur frequently during PTSD treatment and have a prognostic value for treatment outcome.

  6. Evaluation of adherence to national treatment guidelines among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    to guidelines for standard treatment regimens and DOT has not been investigated previously. Knowledge of the impact of non-adherence to standard regimens and DOT on treatment outcomes will allow programmes and clinicians to recognise practices essential to treat and manage patients with TB effectively. We aimed to ...

  7. Is Trauma Memory Special? Trauma Narrative Fragmentation in PTSD: Effects of Treatment and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedard-Gilligan, Michele; Zoellner, Lori A; Feeny, Norah C

    2017-03-01

    Seminal theories posit that fragmented trauma memories are critical to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD; van der Kolk & Fisler, 1995; Brewin, 2014) and that elaboration of the trauma narrative is necessary for recovery (e.g., Foa, Huppert, & Cahill, 2006). According to fragmentation theories, trauma narrative changes, particularly for those receiving trauma-focused treatment, should accompany symptom reduction. Trauma and control narratives in 77 men and women with chronic PTSD were examined pre- and post-treatment, comparing prolonged exposure (PE) and sertraline. Utilizing self-report, rater coding, and objective coding of narrative content, fragmentation was compared across narrative types (trauma, negative, positive) by treatment modality and response, controlling for potential confounds. Although sensory components increased with PE ( d = 0.23 - 0.44), there were no consistent differences in fragmentation from pre- to post-treatment between PE and sertraline or treatment responders and non-responders. Contrary to theories, changes in fragmentation may not be a crucial mechanism underlying PTSD therapeutic recovery.

  8. Characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimen and treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia da Silveira

    Full Text Available The relationship between characteristics of HIV antiretroviral regimens and treatment adherence was studied in adolescent and adult patients who underwent antiretroviral therapy from January 1998 to September 2000, at the Service for Specialized Assistance in Pelotas. The patients were interviewed on two occasions, and the use of antiretrovirals during the previous 48 hours was investigated by a self-report. Adherence was defined as use of 95% or more of the prescribed medication. Social-demographic variables were collected through direct questionnaires. The antiretroviral regimen and clinical data were copied from the patients' records. Associations between the independent variables and adherence were analyzed by means of logistic regression. The multivariate analysis included characteristics of the antiretroviral regimens, social-demographic variables, as well as perception of negative effects, negative physiological states, and adverse effects of the treatment. Among the 224 selected patients, 194 participated in our study. Their ages varied from 17 to 67 years; most patients were men, with few years of schooling and a low family income. Only 49% adhered to the treatment. Adherence to treatment regimens was reduced when more daily doses were indicated: three to four doses (odds ratio of adherence to treatment (OR=0.47, 95% confidence interval (CI 0.22-1.01 and five to six (OR=0.24, 95% CI 0.09-0.62; two or more doses taken in a fasting state (OR=0.59, 95% CI 0.11-0.68, and for patients who reported adverse effects to the treatment (OR=0.39, 95% CI 0.19-0.77. Most of the regimens with more than two daily doses of medication included at least one dose apart from mealtimes. The results suggest that, if possible, regimens with a reduced number of doses should be chosen, with no compulsory fasting, and with few adverse effects. Strategies to minimize these effects should be discussed with the patients.

  9. Improving Diagnostics and Treatments for GWI Females by Accounting for the Effects of PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0552 TITLE: Improving Diagnostics and Treatments for GWI Females by Accounting for the Effects of PTSD PRINCIPAL...entered data with past data collections efforts containing additional psychological and symptom based measures including the 36 Item Short Form...differences in psychological and symptom measures were run between the low trauma control group (HC), and the three classification of GWI: total GWI

  10. The impact of childhood sexual abuse on the outcome of intensive trauma-focused treatment for PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenmans, Anouk; Van Minnen, Agnes; Sleijpen, Marieke; De Jongh, Ad

    2018-01-01

    Background : It is assumed that PTSD patients with a history of childhood sexual abuse benefit less from trauma-focused treatment than those without such a history. Objective : To test whether the presence of a history of childhood sexual abuse has a negative effect on the outcome of intensive trauma-focused PTSD treatment. Method : PTSD patients, 83% of whom suffered from severe PTSD, took part in a therapy programme consisting of 2 × 4 consecutive days of Prolonged Exposure (PE) and EMDR therapy (eight of each). In between sessions, patients participated in sport activities and psycho-education sessions. No prior stabilization phase was implemented. PTSD symptom scores of clinician-administered and self-administered measures were analysed using the data of 165 consecutive patients. Pre-post differences were compared between four trauma groups; patients with a history of childhood sexual abuse before age 12 (CSA), adolescent sexual abuse (ASA; i.e. sexual abuse between 12 and 18 years of age), sexual abuse (SA) at age 18 and over, or no history of sexual abuse (NSA). Results : Large effect sizes were achieved for PTSD symptom reduction for all trauma groups (Cohen's d  = 1.52-2.09). For the Clinical Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and the Impact of Event Scale (IES), no differences in treatment outcome were found between the trauma (age) groups. For the PTSD Symptom Scale Self Report (PSS-SR), there were no differences except for one small effect between CSA and NSA. Conclusions : The results do not support the hypothesis that the presence of a history of childhood sexual abuse has a detrimental impact on the outcome of first-line (intensive) trauma-focused treatments for PTSD.

  11. Accessibility of hypertensive users to health units and treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Marques Frota

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to analyze the accessibility of hypertensive users to the health system with focus on treatment adherence. A cross-sectional study with quantitative approach was conducted in four Family Health Basic Units of Fortaleza-CE, Brazil. The sample consisted of 400 users. Data collection happened through a form applied from May to August 2011. About 97.5% of users were older than 40 years, and 67.2% were female. The accessibility to the referral service occurred in 47.2% of users to secondary care, of which 101 (25.2% were referred to Emergency Units, and 88 (22.0% were admitted to Inpatient Units. Most hypertensive patients adhered to healthy habits, except the use of dietetic sweeteners (36.0% and physical exercise (35.0%. The hypertensive patients had good treatment adherence and difficulty in accessibility regarding counter-referral services to secondary and tertiary care services.

  12. The Veterans Health Administration’s Treatment of PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury Among Recent Combat Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    make it more difficult for veterans with PTSD to seek or maintain treatment. VHA provides treatment for PTSD at VHA hospitals , outpatient clinics ...measured in days of inpatient hospital care and outpatient clinic visits. A veteran may have had several outpatient visits on a sin- gle day, each...reproduce the same results precisely. The DSS system takes clinical and financial information from other VHA databases and uses algorithms that merge

  13. Addressing adherence to treatment: a longstanding concern. The patients’ perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Mahmoud Hadipour Dehshal

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to treatment is a great concern for patients who need long-life treatment. Thalassaemia is an inherited disease for whose treatment team-working is of a considerable importance. To logically face the problem of poor compliance patients, all members of the team ought to be aware of the causing factors and the ways to handle the problem. The factors which cause the lack of compliance among patients could be stratified into economic and structural facto. Furthermore, patient-related fa...

  14. The Impact of PTSD on Functioning in Patients Seeking Treatment for Chronic Pain and Validation of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkerblom, Sophia; Perrin, Sean; Rivano Fischer, Marcelo; McCracken, Lance M

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the psychometric properties of a Swedish version of the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS); to investigate the prevalence of traumatic experiences, trauma types, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a sample of patients seeking treatment for chronic pain; and to examine how indices of pain-related functioning vary with a history of traumatic exposure and PTSD diagnostic status. Participants were 463 consecutive patients with chronic pain referred for assessment at the Pain Rehabilitation Unit at Skåne University Hospital. The translated version of the PDS demonstrated high levels of internal consistency and a factor structure similar to that reported in previous validation studies using samples identified because of trauma exposure (not chronic pain), both of which provide preliminary support for the validity of this translated version. Based on their responses to the PDS, most patients (71.8%) reported one or more traumatic events with 28.9% fulfilling criteria for a current PTSD diagnosis. The patients with PTSD also reported significantly higher levels of pain interference, kinesiophobia, anxiety, and depression and significantly lower levels of life control, compared to patients exposed to trauma and not fulfilling criteria for PTSD and patients with no history of traumatic exposure. Consistent with previous research, a significant proportion of patients seeking treatment for chronic pain reported a history of traumatic exposure and nearly one third of these met current criteria for PTSD according to a standardized self-report measure. The presence of PTSD was associated with multiple indictors of poorer functioning and greater treatment need and provides further evidence that routine screening of chronic pain patients for PTSD is warranted. Self-report measures like the PDS appear to be valid for use in chronic pain samples and offer a relative low-cost method for screening for PTSD.

  15. Efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy in the treatment of PTSD: a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raquel Gonçalves

    Full Text Available The use of Information and Communication Technologies, such as virtual reality, has been employed in the treatment of anxiety disorders with the goal of augmenting exposure treatment, which is already considered to be the first-line treatment for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. To evaluate the efficacy of virtual reality exposure therapy (VRET in the treatment of PTSD, we performed a systematic review of published articles using the following electronic databases: Web of Science, PubMed, PsycINFO, and PILOTS. Eligibility criteria included the use of patients diagnosed with PTSD according to DSM-IV, the use of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT and the use of virtual reality for performing exposure. 10 articles were selected, seven of which showed that VRET produced statistically significant results in comparison to the waiting list. However, no difference was found between VRET and exposure treatment. Of these 10, four were randomized, two were controlled but not randomized and four were non-controlled. The majority of the articles used head-mounted display virtual reality (VR equipment and VR systems specific for the population that was being treated. Dropout rates do not seem to be lower than in traditional exposure treatment. However, there are a few limitations. Because this is a new field of research, there are few studies in the literature. There is also a need to standardize the number of sessions used. The randomized studies were analyzed to assess the quality of the methodology, and important deficiencies were noted, such as the non-use of intent-to- treat-analysis and the absence of description of possible concomitant treatments and comorbidities. Preliminary data suggest that VRET is as efficacious as traditional exposure treatment and can be especially useful in the treatment of patients who are resistant to traditional exposure.

  16. Noninfectious uveitis: strategies to optimize treatment compliance and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolz-Marco R

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Rosa Dolz-Marco,1 Roberto Gallego-Pinazo,1 Manuel Díaz-Llopis,2 Emmett T Cunningham Jr,3–6 J Fernando Arévalo7,8 1Unit of Macula, Department of Ophthalmology, University and Polytechnic Hospital La Fe, 2Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, Spain; 3Department of Ophthalmology, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, 4Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, 5The Francis I Proctor Foundation, University of California San Francisco Medical Center, 6West Coast Retina Medical Group, San Francisco, CA, USA; 7Vitreoretina Division, King Khaled Eye Specialist Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 8Retina Division, Wilmer Eye Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USA Abstract: Noninfectious uveitis includes a heterogenous group of sight-threatening ocular and systemic disorders. Significant progress has been made in the treatment of noninfectious uveitis in recent years, particularly with regard to the effective use of corticosteroids and non-corticosteroid immunosuppressive drugs, including biologic agents. All of these therapeutic approaches are limited, however, by any given patient’s ability to comply with and adhere to their prescribed treatment. In fact, compliance and adherence are among the most important patient-related determinants of treatment success. We discuss strategies to optimize compliance and adherence. Keywords: noninfectious uveitis, intraocular inflammation, immunosuppressive treatment, adherence, compliance, therapeutic failure

  17. Treatment adherence in South African primary health care

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    system. In the context of meagre financial resources, inadequate public funds di- rected at ... issues that are highlighted as affecting adherence include health locus of control, self-efficacy, ... mined to have little or no effect, a medical .... health as controlled by internal factors .... about information technology in the treatment.

  18. adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Zambia: a qualitative study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients\\' adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important for effective medical treatment of HIV/AIDS. We conducted a qualitative interview study in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia in 2006. The aim of the study was to explore patients\\' and health care professionals\\' perceived barriers and facilitators to patients\\' ...

  19. Improving Voluntary Engagement for PTSD Treatment among Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    treatment (increases in ambivalence, avoidance behavior, concerns about stigma, life chaos), identifying and responding to barriers to participant’s... hope to have a determination from Madigan IRB that they are “not involved” in the current research and thus, will be exempt from acting as an...advertisements and program out data collection systems. We hope to begin recruitment by the end of the next reporting period. 4 IMPACT: What

  20. Response to "Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; ten Broeke, E.

    2014-01-01

    Last November, the European Journal of Psychotraumatology published an interesting paper entitled "Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study". This article

  1. Adherence to a new oral anticoagulant treatment prescription: dabigatran etexilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Bellamy

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available L Bellamy1, N Rosencher1, BI Eriksson21Anaesthesiology Department, Hôpital Cochin (AP-HP, René Descartes University, Paris 75014 France; 2Orthopaedic Department, University Hospital Sahlgrenska/Ostra, Gothenburg, SwedenAbstract: The recent development of new oral anticoagulants, of which dabigatran etexilate is currently at the most advanced stage of development, is the greatest advance in the provision of convenient anticoagulation therapy for many years. A new oral anticoagulation treatment, dabigatran etexilate, is already on the market in Europe. The main interest probably will be to improve the prescription and the adherence to an effective thromboprophylaxis in medical conditions such as atrial fibrillation without bleeding side effects, without the need for monitoring coagulation, and without drug and food interactions such as vitamin K anticoagulant (VKA treatment. Dabigatran is particularly interesting for extended thromboprophylaxis after major orthopedic surgery in order to avoid daily injection for a month. However, oral long-term treatments such as VKA are not systematically associated with a higher compliance level than injected treatments such as low-molecular-weight heparins. Indeed, adherence to an oral treatment, instead of the usual daily injection in major orthopedic surgery, is complex, and based not only on the frequency of dosing but also on patient motivation, understanding, and socio-economic status. New oral anticoagulants may be useful in this way but education and detection of risk factors of nonadherence to treatment are still essential.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, adherence, compliance, education, dabigatran

  2. Perspectives Regarding Adherence to Prescribed Treatment in Highly Adherent HIV-Infected Gay Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brion, John M; Menke, Edna M

    2008-01-01

    Focus group methodology was used to describe the medication adherence experience of 24 HIV-infected gay men who reported being adherent to their medication regimens. A conceptualization of medication adherence as an evolving process consisted of challenges to adherence (learning the diagnosis, starting the medications, struggling with the medications, dealing with side effects, coping with stigma) as well as those factors supportive of adherence (believing in medications, finding motivating factors, using reminders, depending on others, owning the disease). Themes associated with challenges to adherence focused on diagnosis and the physical and emotional adjustments individuals made to incorporate antiretroviral medications into their daily lives and move toward medication adherence. The factors supportive of adherence were related to the ongoing behaviors identified with establishing and maintaining adherence behaviors. What can be taken from the study is that adherence is a complex and dynamic process rather than a static behavior.

  3. Restoring large-scale brain networks in PTSD and related disorders: a proposal for neuroscientifically-informed treatment interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Lanius

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three intrinsic connectivity networks in the brain, namely the central executive, salience, and default mode networks, have been identified as crucial to the understanding of higher cognitive functioning, and the functioning of these networks has been suggested to be impaired in psychopathology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Objective: 1 To describe three main large-scale networks of the human brain; 2 to discuss the functioning of these neural networks in PTSD and related symptoms; and 3 to offer hypotheses for neuroscientifically-informed interventions based on treating the abnormalities observed in these neural networks in PTSD and related disorders. Method: Literature relevant to this commentary was reviewed. Results: Increasing evidence for altered functioning of the central executive, salience, and default mode networks in PTSD has been demonstrated. We suggest that each network is associated with specific clinical symptoms observed in PTSD, including cognitive dysfunction (central executive network, increased and decreased arousal/interoception (salience network, and an altered sense of self (default mode network. Specific testable neuroscientifically-informed treatments aimed to restore each of these neural networks and related clinical dysfunction are proposed. Conclusions: Neuroscientifically-informed treatment interventions will be essential to future research agendas aimed at targeting specific PTSD and related symptoms.

  4. Adherence to Technology-Mediated Insomnia Treatment: A Meta-Analysis, Interviews, and Focus Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Horsch, Corine; Lancee, Jaap; Beun, Robbert Jan; Neerincx, Mark A; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Objective: Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment as a solid base for improving those adherence rates by applying adherence-enhancing strategies. Methods: Adherence to technology-mediated sleep products was studied in three ways. First...

  5. Hypertension: adherence to treatment in rural Bangladesh – findings from a population-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Khanam, Masuma Akter; Lindeboom, Wietze; Koehlmoos, Tracey Lynn Perez; Alam, Dewan Shamsul; Niessen, Louis; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Poor adherence has been identified as the main cause of failure to control hypertension. Poor adherence to antihypertensive treatment is a significant cardiovascular risk factor, which often remains unrecognized. There are no previous studies that examined adherence with antihypertensive medication or the characteristics of the non-adherent patients in Bangladesh.Objective: This paper aims to describe hypertension and factors affecting adherence to treatment among hypertensive per...

  6. Challenges for providing health care in traumatized populations: barriers for PTSD treatments and the need for new developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazlauskas, Evaldas

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing recognition about the effects of traumatic experiences on mental health worldwide. With ongoing conflicts, natural disasters, interpersonal violence, and other traumatic events it is estimated that approximately 70% of the global population have been exposed to at least one lifetime traumatic experience. Research shows a substantial proportion of survivors, especially in low- and middle-income countries, would have a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). During recent decades effective evidence-based treatments for PTSD have been developed. However, there are significant barriers to mental health services and trauma-informed treatments are not easily available for trauma survivors. From the perspective of social psychotraumatology several core barriers to trauma treatments were identified, including the lack of acknowledgment, and avoidance of disclosure. The need for cultural sensitivity in PTSD treatments, the potential of alternative ways of treatment delivery, and the involvement of non-professional volunteers are proposed as directions for future developments in the field.

  7. Symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence among patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, M.P.C.; Waberg, J.; Noort, M.W.M.L. van den; Staudte, H.; Lim, S.; Egger, J.I.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Treatment non-adherence is a common problem in patients suffering from schizophrenia and depression. This study investigated the possible relationships between symptom severity, quality of sleep, and treatment adherence. Methods: Thirty outpatients with schizophrenia and 58 outpatients with

  8. Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethy Dorrepaal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the empirical and clinical literature, complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and personality disorders (PDs are suggested to be predictive of drop-out or reduced treatment effectiveness in trauma-focused PTSD treatment. Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate if personality characteristics would predict treatment compliance and effectiveness in stabilizing complex PTSD treatment. Method: In a randomized controlled trial on a 20-week stabilizing group cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT for child-abuse-related complex PTSD, we included 71 patients of whom 38 were randomized to a psycho-educational and cognitive behavioral stabilizing group treatment. We compared the patients with few PD symptoms (adaptive (N=14 with the non-adaptive patients (N=24 as revealed by a cluster analysis. Results: We found that non-adaptive patients compared to the adaptive patients showed very low drop-out rates. Both non-adaptive patients, classified with highly different personality profiles “withdrawn” and “aggressive,” were equally compliant. With regard to symptom reduction, we found no significant differences between subtypes. Post-hoc, patients with a PD showed lower drop-out rates and higher effect sizes in terms of complex PTSD severity, especially on domains that affect regulation and interpersonal problems. Conclusion: Contrary to our expectations, these preliminary findings indicate that this treatment is well tolerated by patients with a variety of personality pathology. Larger sample sizes are needed to study effectiveness for subgroups of complex PTSD patients.

  9. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Apps Videos Web Links PTSD Site Search For Professionals Professional Section Home PTSD Overview Types of Trauma Trauma ... Watch our whiteboard video for clinicians in the Professional Section: Prescribing for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What ...

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Public Public Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of ... Section Home PTSD Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas en Espanol ... Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA Providers and ...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... PTSD or Get Help with VA PTSD Care, Benefits, or Claims For Web site help: Web Policies PTSD Information Voice Mail: (802) 296-6300 ... Complete Directory EMAIL UPDATES Email Address Required Button ...

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Kit Logos and Badges Materials for Printing PTSD Awareness About the Website Site Map Content Inventory Accessibility ... Links Linking Policies Small Business POC Subscribe PTSD Awareness PTSD Consultation More Health Care Veterans Health Administration ...

  14. Adherence to Technology-Mediated Insomnia Treatment: A Meta-Analysis, Interviews, and Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horsch, Corine; Lancee, Jaap; Beun, Robbert Jan; Neerincx, Mark A; Brinkman, Willem-Paul

    2015-09-04

    Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment as a solid base for improving those adherence rates by applying adherence-enhancing strategies. Adherence to technology-mediated sleep products was studied in three ways. First, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate adherence rates in technology-mediated insomnia therapy. Several databases were queried for technology-mediated insomnia treatments. After inclusion and exclusion steps, data from 18 studies were retrieved and aggregated to find an average adherence rate. Next, 15 semistructured interviews about sleep-support technologies were conducted to investigate perceived adherence. Lastly, several scenarios were written about the usage of a virtual sleep coach that could support adherence rates. The scenarios were discussed in six different focus groups consisting of potential users (n=15), sleep experts (n=7), and coaches (n=9). From the meta-analysis, average treatment adherence appeared to be approximately 52% (95% CI 43%-61%) for technology-mediated insomnia treatments. This means that, on average, half of the treatment exercises were not executed, suggesting there is a substantial need for adherence and room for improvement in this area. However, the users in the interviews believed they adhered quite well to their sleep products. Users mentioned relying on personal commitment (ie, willpower) for therapy adherence. Participants of the focus groups reconfirmed their belief in the effectiveness of personal commitment, which they regarded as more effective than adherence-enhancing strategies. Although adherence rates for insomnia interventions indicate extensive room for improvement, users might not consider adherence to be a problem; they believe willpower to be an

  15. [Novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): facilitating fear extinction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yosuke; Yamamoto, Shigeto; Morinobu, Shigeru

    2012-08-01

    Pharmacological agents enhancing fear extinction may be promising tools for the treatment of PTSD. Histone acetylation is involved in memory formation, and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase histone acetylation and subsequently enhance fear extinction. In this study, we examined whether vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor, facilitated fear extinction, using a contextual fear conditioning (FC) paradigm. We found that vorinostat facilitated fear extinction. Next, the levels of global acetylated histone were measured by Western blotting. We also assessed the effect of vorinostat on the hippocampal levels of NMDA receptor mRNA by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR). The levels of acetylated histone and NR2B mRNA, but not NR1 or NR2A mRNA, were elevated in the hippocampus 2 h after administration of vorinostat. We investigated the levels of acetylated histones and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) binding at the promoter of the NR2B gene using the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay followed by RT-PCR. The levels of acetylated histone and the binding of p-CREB to its binding site at the promoter of the NR2B gene were increased. These findings suggest that vorinostat in conjunction with exposure therapy can be a promising new avenue for the treatment of PTSD.

  16. Narrative exposure therapy for PTSD increases top-down processing of aversive stimuli - evidence from a randomized controlled treatment trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adenauer Hannah

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Little is known about the neurobiological foundations of psychotherapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. Prior studies have shown that PTSD is associated with altered processing of threatening and aversive stimuli. It remains unclear whether this functional abnormality can be changed by psychotherapy. This is the first randomized controlled treatment trial that examines whether narrative exposure therapy (NET causes changes in affective stimulus processing in patients with chronic PTSD. Methods 34 refugees with PTSD were randomly assigned to a NET group or to a waitlist control (WLC group. At pre-test and at four-months follow-up, the diagnostics included the assessment of clinical variables and measurements of neuromagnetic oscillatory brain activity (steady-state visual evoked fields, ssVEF resulting from exposure to aversive pictures compared to neutral pictures. Results PTSD as well as depressive symptom severity scores declined in the NET group, whereas symptoms persisted in the WLC group. Only in the NET group, parietal and occipital activity towards threatening pictures increased significantly after therapy. Conclusions Our results indicate that NET causes an increase of activity associated with cortical top-down regulation of attention towards aversive pictures. The increase of attention allocation to potential threat cues might allow treated patients to re-appraise the actual danger of the current situation and, thereby, reducing PTSD symptoms. Registration of the clinical trial Number: NCT00563888 Name: "Change of Neural Network Indicators Through Narrative Treatment of PTSD in Torture Victims" ULR: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00563888

  17. Adherence to cancer treatment guidelines: influence of general and cancer-specific guideline characteristics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Jong, J.D. de; Spronk, I.; Ho, V.K.; Brink, M.; Korevaar, J.C.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Guideline adherence remains a challenge in clinical practice, despite guidelines’ ascribed potential to improve patient outcomes. We studied the level of adherence to recommendations from Dutch national cancer treatment guidelines, and the influence of general and

  18. Adherence to technology-mediated insomnia treatment: a meta-analysis, interviews, and focus groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsch, C.; Lancee, J.; Beun, R.J.; Neerincx, M.A.; Brinkman, W.-P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Several technologies have been proposed to support the reduction of insomnia complaints. A user-centered assessment of these technologies could provide insight into underlying factors related to treatment adherence. Objective: Gaining insight into adherence to technology-mediated

  19. Predictors of adherence to exercise interventions during and after cancer treatment : A systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, H L; van der Schoot, G G F; Sluiter, W J; Jalving, M; Gietema, J A; Walenkamp, A M E

    Objective: Exercise interventions benefit cancer patients. However, only low numbers of patients adhere to these interventions. This review aimed to identify predictors of exercise intervention adherence in patients with cancer, during and after multimodality cancer treatment. Methods: A literature

  20. Understanding and improving treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorders: Review and a proposed intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staring, A.B.P.; Mulder, C.L.; van der Gaag, M.; Selten, J.P.; Loonen, A.J.M.; Hengeveld, M.W.

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: Non-adherence to treatment of patients with psychotic disorders is related to higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Important predictors of non-adherence include poor social structure, cognitive deficits, negative medication attitude, side effects, depression, a

  1. Understanding and improving treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorders: A review and a proposed intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.B.P. Staring (Anton); C.L. Mulder (Niels); M. van der Gaag (Mark); J.-P. Selten (Jean-Paul); A.J.M. Loonen (Anton); M.W. Hengeveld (Michiel)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractNon-adherence to treatment of patients with psychotic disorders is related to higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Important predictors of non-adherence include poor social structure, cognitive deficits, negative medication attitude, side effects, depression, a

  2. Examining treatment adherence among parents of children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Robert; Kinsman, Anne; Ortaglia, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) participate in a variety of treatments, including medication, behavioral, alternative and developmental treatments. Parent adherence to these treatments is crucial for positive child outcomes. The current study: 1) Explored patterns of parent adherence across the full range of treatments that are prescribed to children with ASD and, 2) Examined whether parent demographics, parent treatment attitudes, and child ASD severity contribute to parents' adherence across ASD treatments. Questionnaires were distributed to parents of children with ASD in a southeastern state. Parents (N = 274) were included if they were parenting a child with ASD who was receiving treatment for ASD symptoms. Paired t-tests and multiple linear regression were used to assess the study aims. Adherence to medication treatment was significantly greater than adherence to behavioral, developmental, or alternative treatments (adjusted p-values 0.0006, 0.0030, 0.0006 respectively). Perceived family burden of a treatment was associated with lower adherence to medication, developmental, and alternative treatments. Finally, greater ASD severity was associated with lower adherence to alternative treatments. Overall, the independent variables accounted for more variance in adherence to medication and alternative treatments than in behavioral and developmental treatments. Parents' adherence to ASD treatment differs significantly by treatment type and is influenced by parental perceptions of the burden of treatment on the family. These findings highlight the importance of understanding and addressing the impact of ASD treatment regimens on family life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Factors associated with treatment adherence for tuberculosis infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Carmen R; Gea Velázquez de Castro, María Teresa; Requena Puche, Juana; Miralles Bueno, Juan José; Rigo Medrano, María Vicenta; Aranaz Andrés, Jesús M

    2014-01-01

    To analyze adherence to treatment of tuberculosis infection and to identify risk factors for its compliance. An observational historical cohort study. Hospital Universitari Sant Joan d'Alacant (Alicante). All patients with a tuberculin skin test (TST) done during tuberculosis contact tracing during 6 years. We included 764 tuberculosis contacts in the analysis. 59.7% of the 566 patients who completed the contact tracing, had tuberculosis infection (TI). Of the patients with TI, 45.6% had not started treatment for tuberculosis infection (TTBI). Factors associated with not starting TTBI were: age (36-65 years, RR: 5.8; 95% CI: 1.2-27.5, and > 65 years, RR: 11.3; 95% CI: 2.0-64.0), the social relationship with TB case (RR: 2.2; 95% CI 1.2-3.8), and the TST reaction (≥ 15mm; RR: 0.5; 95% CI: 0.3-0.9). The completion rate for TTBI was 80.4% among people who started therapy. The treatment regimen was associated with greater compliance to TTBT (7-9H, RR: 12.7; 95% CI: 1.5-107.3). The treatment compliance rate of Tuberculosis infection was high among people who started therapy. Almost a half of the contacts with TI did not start treatment, and associated factors were: age, social relationship, and the TST reaction. The treatment regimen was associated with greater compliance. It is important to know the factors associated with adherence to treatment of TI in each health area, and focus efforts on risk groups; thereby approaching the global control of tuberculosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. How Common Is PTSD?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center for PTSD » Public » How Common Is PTSD? PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... here Enter ZIP code here How Common Is PTSD? Public This section is for Veterans, General Public, ...

  5. How Is PTSD Measured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public » Is it PTSD? » How is PTSD Measured? PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... code here Enter ZIP code here How is PTSD Measured? Public This section is for Veterans, General ...

  6. VA's National PTSD Brain Bank: a National Resource for Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Matthew J; Huber, Bertrand R; Brady, Christopher B; Ursano, Robert J; Benedek, David M; Kowall, Neil W; McKee, Ann C

    2017-08-25

    The National PTSD Brain Bank (NPBB) is a brain tissue biorepository established to support research on the causes, progression, and treatment of PTSD. It is a six-part consortium led by VA's National Center for PTSD with participating sites at VA medical centers in Boston, MA; Durham, NC; Miami, FL; West Haven, CT; and White River Junction, VT along with the Uniformed Services University of Health Sciences. It is also well integrated with VA's Boston-based brain banks that focus on Alzheimer's disease, ALS, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, and other neurological disorders. This article describes the organization and operations of NPBB with specific attention to: tissue acquisition, tissue processing, diagnostic assessment, maintenance of a confidential data biorepository, adherence to ethical standards, governance, accomplishments to date, and future challenges. Established in 2014, NPBB has already acquired and distributed brain tissue to support research on how PTSD affects brain structure and function.

  7. Addressing adherence to treatment: a longstanding concern. The patients’ perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Hadipour Dehshal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to treatment is a great concern for patients who need long-life treatment. Thalassaemia is an inherited disease for whose treatment team-working is of a considerable importance. To logically face the problem of poor compliance patients, all members of the team ought to be aware of the causing factors and the ways to handle the problem. The factors which cause the lack of compliance among patients could be stratified into economic and structural facto. Furthermore, patient-related factors including ethnicity, gender, age, and regimen complexity such as dosing are also noteworthy. The supportive relationship between the health providers and the patients should be also established such as patients’ trust in their doctors. Last but not least, the pattern of health care delivery including the availability of health care requisites and operation of flexible hours and floating working hours. From the patients’ point of view, it is important to be aware of the significance of the adherence to treatment and the importance of providing prompt-routine reminders to patients to understand the consequence of incomplete treatment. Trained and motivated staffs play an effective role to enhance patients’ tendency to pursue the determined treatment. Health decision makers would be better to reinterpret the concept of health to “a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity”. The patients’ role in self-management should not be ignored and “medicalization” has to be altered by the patient centered care.

  8. A clinical plan for MDMA (Ecstasy) in the treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): partnering with the FDA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doblin, Rick

    2002-01-01

    The FDA and the Spanish Ministry of Health have concluded that the risk/benefit ratio is favorable under certain circumstances for clinical studies investigating MDMA-assisted psychotherapy. Both agencies have approved pilot studies in chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients who have failed to obtain relief from at least one course of conventional treatment. These studies, the only ones in the world into the therapeutic use of MDMA, are being funded by a nonprofit research and educational organization, the Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies (MAPS, www.maps.org). A rationale is offered explaining why MAPS chose to focus its limited resources on MDMA, and also on PTSD patients. A Clinical Plan is elaborated for the conduct of the "adequate and well-controlled" trials necessary to evaluate the safety and efficacy of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD, with the studies estimated to cost about 5 million dollars and to take about five years. The Clinical Plan has been developed, in part, through analysis of the studies conducted by Pfizer in its successful effort to have Zoloft approved by the FDA for use with PTSD patients, and through review of transcripts of the FDA's Psychopharmacologic Drugs Advisory Committee meeting that recommended approval of Zoloft for PTSD.

  9. The co-occurrence of PTSD and dissociation: differentiating severe PTSD from dissociative-PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Richardson, J Don

    2014-08-01

    A dissociative-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subtype has been included in the DSM-5. However, it is not yet clear whether certain socio-demographic characteristics or psychological/clinical constructs such as comorbid psychopathology differentiate between severe PTSD and dissociative-PTSD. The current study investigated the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype and explored whether a number of trauma and clinical covariates could differentiate between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The current study utilized a sample of 432 treatment seeking Canadian military veterans. Participants were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and self-report measures of traumatic life events, depression, and anxiety. CAPS severity scores were created reflecting the sum of the frequency and intensity items from each of the 17 PTSD and 3 dissociation items. The CAPS severity scores were used as indicators in a latent profile analysis (LPA) to investigate the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype. Subsequently, several covariates were added to the model to explore differences between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The LPA identified five classes: one of which constituted a severe PTSD group (30.5 %), and one of which constituted a dissociative-PTSD group (13.7 %). None of the included, demographic, trauma, or clinical covariates were significantly predictive of membership in the dissociative-PTSD group compared to the severe PTSD group. In conclusion, a significant proportion of individuals report high levels of dissociation alongside their PTSD, which constitutes a dissociative-PTSD subtype. Further investigation is needed to identify which factors may increase or decrease the likelihood of membership in a dissociative-PTSD subtype group compared to a severe PTSD only group.

  10. Mode of administration of dulaglutide: implications for treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amblee A

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Ambika Amblee1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, John Stroger Hospital of Cook County, 2Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA Background: Medication complexity/burden can be associated with nonadherence in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Patients’ satisfaction with their treatment is an important consideration for physicians. Strategies like using longer acting efficacious agents with less frequent dosing may help adherence. Objective: To explore the mode of administration of dulaglutide and its implications for treatment adherence in T2DM. Methods: PubMed search using the term “Dulaglutide” through October 31, 2015 was conducted. Published articles, press releases, and abstracts presented at national/international meetings were considered. Results/conclusion: Dulaglutide is a once-weekly glucagon like peptide-1 analog with a low intraindividual variability. Phase III trials demonstrated significant improvements in glycemia and weight, with a low hypoglycemia risk similar to liraglutide/exenatide, but with substantially fewer injections. A significant improvement was observed in the total Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire score, Impact of Weight on Self-Perception, and perceived frequency of hyperglycemia with dulaglutide when compared with placebo, exenatide, liraglutide, or metformin. Treatment satisfaction scores showed an improvement with dulaglutide (34%–39% when compared with exenatide (31%. A positive experience with a high initial (97.2% and final (99.1% injection success rate along with a significant reduction in patients’ fear of self-injecting, as measured by the modified self-injecting subscale of the Diabetes Fear of Injecting and Self-Testing Questionnaire and Medication Delivery Device Assessment Battery, was found. Its acceptance was high (>96% among a variety of patients including patients who fear injections and injection-naïve users. Dulaglutide is

  11. Neural changes in extinction recall following prolonged exposure treatment for PTSD: A longitudinal fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liat Helpman, PhD

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Prolonged exposure treatment appears to alter neural activation in PTSD patients during recall of fear extinction, and change in extinction recall (measured by SCR is associated with symptom reduction. We discuss results in the context of neural systems involved in response to affective stimuli.

  12. Current treatment for anorexia nervosa: efficacy, safety, and adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay P Bodell

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lindsay P Bodell, Pamela K KeelDepartment of Psychology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, USAAbstract: Anorexia nervosa (AN is a serious psychiatric illness associated with significant medical and psychiatric morbidity, psychosocial impairment, increased risk of death, and chronicity. Given the severity of the disorder, the establishment of safe and effective treatments is necessary. Several treatments have been tried in AN, but few favorable results have emerged. This paper reviews randomized controlled trials in AN, and provides a synthesis of existing data regarding the efficacy, safety, and adherence associated with pharmacologic and psychological interventions. Randomized controlled trials for the treatment of AN published in peer-reviewed journals were identified by electronic and manual searches. Overall, pharmacotherapy has limited benefits in the treatment of AN, with some promising preliminary findings associated with olanzapine, an antipsychotic agent. No single psychological intervention has demonstrated clear superiority in treating adults with AN. In adolescents with AN, the evidence base is strongest for the use of family therapy over alternative individual psychotherapies. Results highlight challenges in both treating individuals with AN and in studying the effects of those treatments, and further emphasize the importance of continued efforts to develop novel interventions. Treatment trials currently underway and areas for future research are discussed.Keywords: anorexia nervosa, treatment, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, randomized controlled trials

  13. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  14. [Factors that influence treatment adherence in chronic disease patients undergoing hemodialysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldaner, Cláudia Regina; Beuter, Margrid; Brondani, Cecília Maria; Budó, Maria de Lourdes Denardin; Pauletto, Macilene Regina

    2008-12-01

    The following bibliographical research wanted to identify the main factors that influence adherence to treatment in chronic disease. The study focused on patients undergoing hemodialysis, as well as on the support nurses require for the promotion of health education among individuals with low treatment adherence. The identification of bibliographical sources was conducted at Health Virtual Library and Scientific Electronic Library Online (SciELO) data bases. Some printed magazines were also used. The results indicated nine factors influencing treatment adherence or non-adherence: team trust, support nets, educational level; accepting disease, treatment side effects, lack of access to medicines, long-term treatment, complex therapeutic approach, and lack of symptoms. It is advisable that nurses take into account these factors when dealing with chronic-disease patients that present low treatment adherence, getting family and multidisciplinary team support seeking treatment adherence.

  15. University Counseling Center Use of Prolonged Exposure Therapy: In-Clinic Treatment for Students with PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonar, Ted C.

    2015-01-01

    Students utilize university counseling center services to address distress related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Since counseling centers services such as group work or general psychotherapy may not address specific PTSD-symptom reduction, centers often give community referrals in such cases. Evidence-based therapies (EBTs), including…

  16. The patient's duty to adhere to prescribed treatment: an ethical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resnik, David B

    2005-04-01

    This article examines the ethical basis for the patient's duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions. The article argues that patients have a moral duty to adhere to the physician's treatment prescriptions, once they have accepted treatment. Since patients still retain the right to refuse medical treatment, their duty to adhere to treatment prescriptions is a prima facie duty, which can be overridden by their other ethical duties. However, patients do not have the right to refuse to adhere to treatment prescriptions if their non-adherence poses a significant threat to other people. This paper also discusses the use of written agreements between physicians and patients as a strategy for promoting patient adherence.

  17. The effects of an individual, multistep intervention on adherence to treatment in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiee Vardanjani, Leila; Parvin, Neda; Mahmoodi Shan, Gholamreza

    2015-07-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate the effect of individual, multistep intervention on adherence to treatment in hemodialysis patients referred to a hemodialysis center in Shahrekord, Iran. In this interventional study, hemodialysis patients referring the center of the study were randomly assigned into two control and intervention groups (each 33). The control group received routine treatment, recommended dietary and fluid restrictions. The intervention group participated in eight individual interventional sessions accompanied routine treatment. At the beginning and the end of the study, routine laboratory tests and end-stage renal disease-adherence questionnaire were filled out for patients in both groups. The data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon tests. At the end of the study, the two groups showed a significant difference in all domains of adherence except adherence to diet and adherence was better in the intervention group (p adherence to dialysis program (p = 0.04, r = 0.254). After intervention, serum phosphorus decreased significantly in the intervention group (p Adherence to treatment is one of the major problems in hemodialysis patients; however, comprehensive interventions are required in view of individual condition. Implications for Rehabilitation Adherence to treatment means that all patients' behaviors (diet, fluids and drugs intake) should be in line with the recommendations given by healthcare professionals. There is evidence on the association between adherence to treatment and decreased risk of hospitalization in dialysis patients. Individual structured programs are most likely to be successful in encouraging adherence to treatment.

  18. Relationship between Illness Perceptions, Treatment Adherence, And Clinical Outcomes in Patients On Maintenance Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Youngmee; Evangelista, Lorraine S.

    2010-01-01

    Previous data indicate that negative perception of disease and non-adherence to recommended treatment may lead to unfavorable clinical outcomes in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (HD). However, a paucity of research addresses clinical outcomes in the end stage renal disease (ESRD) population as a function of patients’ illness perceptions and their degree of adherence to recommended treatment. The study was conducted to examine illness perceptions and treatment adherence rates in patients...

  19. [Adherence of people with type 2 diabetes mellitus to drug treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes-Villas; Foss-Freitas, Maria Cristina; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional and quantitative study aimed to evaluate the adherence to drug treatment of the people with diabetes mellitus and its relation to clinical, treatment and metabolic control variables. Sample consisted of 162 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus on follow-up outpatient care. The Measure of Treatment Adherence and consultation to the participants' medical records were used for data collection. A high adherence to drug treatment was obtained. For a p<0.05, it was obtained an inverse correlation with diastolic blood pressure and a direct correlation with the frequency of daily administration of insulin and oral antidiabetic agents. There were no statistically significant correlations between adherence and metabolic control variables. Results diverge from the literature regarding the adherence to drug treatment in chronic diseases, as well as in the correlation between adherence and complexity of drug regimen, which points to the need for more studies on this theme.

  20. The co-occurrence of PTSD and dissociation: differentiating severe PTSD from dissociative-PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armour, C.; Karstoft, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    A dissociative-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subtype has been included in the DSM-5. However, it is not yet clear whether certain socio-demographic characteristics or psychological/clinical constructs such as comorbid psychopathology differentiate between severe PTSD and dissociative-PTSD....... The current study investigated the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype and explored whether a number of trauma and clinical covariates could differentiate between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The current study utilized a sample of 432 treatment seeking Canadian military veterans. Participants...... were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and self-report measures of traumatic life events, depression, and anxiety. CAPS severity scores were created reflecting the sum of the frequency and intensity items from each of the 17 PTSD and 3 dissociation items. The CAPS severity...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Help with VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas ... Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless ... ADMINISTRATION Veterans Health Administration Veterans Benefits Administration ...

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  13. [Transcultural adaptation of scales for treatment adherence in hemodialysis: Renal Adherence Behaviour Questionnaire(RABQ) and Renal Adherence Attitudes Questionnaire(RAAQ)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Inês Maria de Jesus; Bandeira, Marina Bittencourt; Pinheiro, Hélady Sanders; Dutra, Nathália Dos Santos

    2015-10-01

    Treatment adherence in hemodialysis is important for guaranteeing better results for patients, but Brazil still lacks validated assessment tools for this purpose. The current study aimed to perform a cross-cultural adaptation of the Renal Adherence Behaviour Questionnaire (RABQ) and the Renal Adherence Attitudes Questionnaire (RAAQ). The two questionnaires were submitted to the following cross-cultural adaptation procedures: translation, back-translation, expert panel review, and pilot study. Changes were made in the items' wording and application, which requires a face-to-face interview. It was not necessary to change the choices of answers. The Brazilian versions of the RABQ and RAAQ showed semantic and cultural equivalence to the original versions and are easy for the target population to understand. The two scales still require validity and reliability studies before use in the field.

  14. How patients take malaria treatment: a systematic review of the literature on adherence to antimalarial drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Bruxvoort

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High levels of patient adherence to antimalarial treatment are important in ensuring drug effectiveness. To achieve this goal, it is important to understand levels of patient adherence, and the range of study designs and methodological challenges involved in measuring adherence and interpreting results. Since antimalarial adherence was reviewed in 2004, there has been a major expansion in the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs in the public sector, as well as initiatives to make them more widely accessible through community health workers and private retailers. These changes and the large number of recent adherence studies raise the need for an updated review on this topic. OBJECTIVE: We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting quantitative results on patient adherence to antimalarials obtained for treatment. RESULTS: The 55 studies identified reported extensive variation in patient adherence to antimalarials, with many studies reporting very high adherence (90-100% and others finding adherence of less than 50%. We identified five overarching approaches to assessing adherence based on the definition of adherence and the methods used to measure it. Overall, there was no clear pattern in adherence results by approach. However, adherence tended to be higher among studies where informed consent was collected at the time of obtaining the drug, where patient consultations were directly observed by research staff, and where a diagnostic test was obtained. CONCLUSION: Variations in reported adherence may reflect factors related to patient characteristics and the nature of their consultation with the provider, as well as methodological variations such as interaction between the research team and patients before and during the treatment. Future studies can benefit from an awareness of the impact of study procedures on adherence outcomes, and the identification of improved measurement methods less dependent on self-report.

  15. How patients take malaria treatment: a systematic review of the literature on adherence to antimalarial drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruxvoort, Katia; Goodman, Catherine; Kachur, S Patrick; Schellenberg, David

    2014-01-01

    High levels of patient adherence to antimalarial treatment are important in ensuring drug effectiveness. To achieve this goal, it is important to understand levels of patient adherence, and the range of study designs and methodological challenges involved in measuring adherence and interpreting results. Since antimalarial adherence was reviewed in 2004, there has been a major expansion in the use of artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs) in the public sector, as well as initiatives to make them more widely accessible through community health workers and private retailers. These changes and the large number of recent adherence studies raise the need for an updated review on this topic. We conducted a systematic review of studies reporting quantitative results on patient adherence to antimalarials obtained for treatment. The 55 studies identified reported extensive variation in patient adherence to antimalarials, with many studies reporting very high adherence (90-100%) and others finding adherence of less than 50%. We identified five overarching approaches to assessing adherence based on the definition of adherence and the methods used to measure it. Overall, there was no clear pattern in adherence results by approach. However, adherence tended to be higher among studies where informed consent was collected at the time of obtaining the drug, where patient consultations were directly observed by research staff, and where a diagnostic test was obtained. Variations in reported adherence may reflect factors related to patient characteristics and the nature of their consultation with the provider, as well as methodological variations such as interaction between the research team and patients before and during the treatment. Future studies can benefit from an awareness of the impact of study procedures on adherence outcomes, and the identification of improved measurement methods less dependent on self-report.

  16. Race and incarceration in an aging cohort of Vietnam veterans in treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Kendell L; Rosenheck, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Cross sectional studies have addressed the incarceration of Vietnam veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but no studies have examined changes in incarceration as they age. This study examines patterns of incarceration among Vietnam veterans treated in specialized veterans affairs (VA) intensive PTSD programs over time. Data was drawn from admission data from the initial episode of treatment of Caucasian and African American Vietnam veterans entering VA specialized intensive PTSD programs between 1993 and 2011 (N = 31,707). Bivariate correlations and logistic regression were used to examine associations among race and incarceration over time and the potentially confounding influence of demographic and clinical covariates on this relationship. Rates of reported incarceration declined from 63 to 43%. Over time, African American veterans were 34% more likely than Caucasian veterans to have a lifetime history of incarceration while interaction analysis showed steeper declines for Caucasians than African Americans. Rates of incarceration among these Vietnam veterans declined as they aged. Furthermore, African American veterans were substantially more likely than Caucasian veterans to have been incarcerated and showed less decline as the cohort aged. While reduced, needs for clinical PTSD services remain among aging combat veterans.

  17. Treatment adherence in heart failure patients followed up by nurses in two specialized clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Andressa Freitas; Cavalcanti, Ana Carla Dantas; Malta, Mauricio; Arruda, Cristina Silva; Gandin, Thamires; da Fé, Adriana; Rabelo-Silva, Eneida Rejane

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: to analyze treatment adherence in heart failure (HF) patients followed up by the nursing staff at specialized clinics and its association with patients' characteristics such as number of previous appointments, family structure, and comorbidities. Methods: a cross-sectional study was conducted at two reference clinics for the treatment of HF patients (center 1 and center 2). Data were obtained using a 10-item questionnaire with scores ranging from 0 to 26 points; adherence was considered adequate if the score was ≥ 18 points, or 70% of adherence. Results: a total of 340 patients were included. Mean adherence score was 16 (±4) points. Additionally, 124 (36.5%) patients showed an adherence rate ≥ 70%. It was demonstrated that patients who lived with their family had higher adherence scores, that three or more previous nursing appointments was significantly associated with higher adherence (p<0.001), and that hypertension was associated with low adherence (p=0.023). Conclusions: treatment adherence was considered satisfactory in less than a half of the patients followed up at the two clinics specialized in HF. Living with the family and attending to a great number of nursing appointments improved adherence, while the presence of hypertension led to worse adherence. PMID:26487139

  18. Psychological distress and treatment adherence among children on dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, J M; Asarnow, J R; Munford, P R; Koprowski, C M; Belin, T R; Salusky, I B

    1997-10-01

    Among 23 pediatric renal dialysis patients, we obtained self-reported assessments of psychological adjustment and biochemical and subjective ratings of adherence. Findings indicate elevated levels of depressive symptoms and substantial nonadherence. Depressive symptoms were associated with higher levels of hopelessness, more negative self-perceptions, and more depressogenic attributional style. The psychological adjustment measures did not significantly correlate with adherence. Nonsignificant associations among different measures of adherence underscore its multifaceted nature. Implications for monitoring the adjustment of children on dialysis, assessing adherence, and future research are discussed.

  19. Factors influencing non-adherence to tuberculosis treatment in Jepara, central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondags, Angelique; Himawan, Ari Budi; Metsemakers, Job Fm; Kristina, Tri Nur

    2014-07-01

    One of the most serious problems for tuberculosis (TB) control is non-adherence to TB treatment. We studied the factors influencing non-adherence to TB treatment in Indonesia to inform TB treatment adherence strategies. We con- ducted semi-structured interviews with non-adherent patients and key informants in Jepara, Central Java, Indonesia. Three major themes were found in reasons for non-adherence to TB treatment: 1) knowledge about TB, 2) knowledge about TB treatment and 3) choosing and changing a health care treatment facility. Respondents had an inadequate knowledge about TB and its treatment. Feeling healthy and having financial problems were the most common reasons for TB treatment non-adherence. Respondents sought treatment from many different health care providers, and often changed the treatment facility location. TB treatment adherence might improve by providing better education about the disease and its treatment to those undergoing treatment. Providing information about where to receive treatment and that treatment is free could also improve compliance.

  20. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? ... Combat Veterans & their Families Readjustment Counseling (Vet Centers) War Related Illness & Injury Study Center Homeless Veterans Returning ...

  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Budget, & Performance VA Center for Innovation (VACI) Agency Financial Report (AFR) Budget Submission Recovery Act Resources Business ... Get Help for PTSD Help with VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas en Espanol Apps, Videos and More Mobile ...

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics Return from War Specific to Women Types of Trauma War Terrorism Violence and Abuse Disasters Is it PTSD? ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center ...

  3. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a-z] More VA More VA Health Health Care Information A-Z Health Topic Finder My Health ... Ask a Question Toll Free Numbers VA » Health Care » PTSD: National Center for PTSD » Public » Videos PTSD: ...

  4. Do improved patient recall and the provision of memory support enhance treatment adherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lu; Lee, Jason Y; Harvey, Allison G

    2017-03-01

    Patient adherence to psychosocial treatment is an important but understudied topic. The aim of this study was to examine whether better patient recall of treatment contents and therapist use of memory support (MS) were associated with better treatment adherence. Data were drawn from a pilot randomized controlled trial. Participants were 48 individuals (mean age = 44.27 years, 29 females) with Major Depressive Disorder randomized to receive either Cognitive Therapy (CT) with an adjunctive Memory Support Intervention (CT + Memory Support) or CT-as-usual. Therapist and patient ratings of treatment adherence were collected during each treatment session. Patient recall was assessed at mid-treatment. Therapist use of MS was manually coded for a random selection of sessions. Patient recall was significantly associated with better therapist and patient ratings of adherence. Therapist use of Application, a specific MS strategy, predicted higher therapist ratings of adherence. Attention Recruitment, another specific MS strategy, appeared to attenuate the positive impact of session number on patient ratings of adherence. Treatment groups, MS summary scores and other specific MS strategies were not significantly associated with adherence. The measure for treatment adherence is in the process of being formally validated. Results were based on small sample. These results support the importance of patient recall in treatment adherence. Although collectively the effects of MS on treatment adherence were not significant, the results support the use of certain specific MS strategy (i.e., application) as a potential pathway to improve treatment adherence. Larger-scale studies are needed to further examine these constructs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the effectiveness of a novel brain and vestibular rehabilitation treatment modality in PTSD patients who have suffered combat related traumatic brain injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Robert Carrick

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Blast-related head injuries are among the most prevalent injuries suffered by military personnel deployed in combat and mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI or concussion on the battlefield in Iraq/Afghanistan has resulted in its designation as a signature injury. Vestibular complaints are the most frequent sequelae of mTBI and vestibular rehabilitation (VR has been established as the most important treatment modality for this group of patients. Material and Methods:We studied the effectiveness of a novel brain and VR treatment PTSD in subjects who had suffered combat related traumatic brain injuries in terms of PTSD symptom reduction. The trial was registered as ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02003352. (http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02003352?term=carrick&rank=6. We analyzed the difference in the Clinician Administered DSM-IV PTSD Scale (CAPS scores pre and post treatment using our subjects as their own matched controls. The study population consisted of 98 combat veterans maintaining an alpha of <0.05 and power of 80%. Results:Prior to treatment, 75 subjects representing 76.53 % of the sample were classified in the 2 most severe categories of PTSD. 41 subjects, representing 41.80 % of the total sample, were classified in the extreme category of PTSD and 34 subjects, representing 34.70 % of the total sample, were classified in the severe category of PTSD. After treatment we observed a large reduction in CAPS severity scores with both statistical and substantive significance. Discussion:Treatment of PTSD as a physical injury rather than a psychiatric disorder is associated with strong statistical and substantive significant outcomes associated with a decrease of PTSD classification. The stigma associated with neuropsychiatric disorders may be lessened when PTSD is treated with brain and VR with a potential decrease in suffering of patients, family and society.

  6. Improving PTSD Symptoms and Preventing Progression of Subclinical PTSD to an Overt Disorder by Treating Comorbid OSA With CPAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, M I; Campbell, Douglas G; Bhagat, Rajesh; Lyons, Judith A; Tamanna, Sadeka

    2017-10-15

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are common in United States veterans. These conditions often coexist and symptoms overlap. Previous studies reported improvement in PTSD symptoms with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for comorbid OSA but its effect has not been assessed in a non-PTSD cohort. We have prospectively assessed the effect of CPAP therapy on clinical symptom improvement as a function of CPAP compliance levels among PTSD and non-PTSD veterans. Veterans in whom OSA was newly diagnosed were enrolled in our study (n = 192). Assignment to PTSD and non-PTSD cohorts was determined by chart review. Each patient completed the military version of the PTSD Checklist (PCL), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and reported nightmare frequency (NMF) at baseline and 6 months after CPAP therapy. CPAP adherence was objectively documented from machine compliance data. We had complete data for 177 veterans (PTSD n = 59, non-PTSD n = 118) for analysis. The mean ages were 51.24 years in the PTSD cohort and 52.36 years in the non-PTSD cohort ( P = .30). In the PTSD cohort, the mean total PCL score (baseline = 66.06, post-CPAP = 61.27, P = .004, d = -0.34) and NMF (baseline = 4.61, post-CPAP = 1.49, P = .0001, d = -0.51) decreased after 6 months of CPAP treatment. Linear regression analysis showed that the CPAP compliance was the only significant predictor for these changes among veterans with PTSD (PCL score: P = .033, R 2 = .65; NMF; P = .03, R 2 = .61). Further analysis by CPAP compliance quartiles in this cohort (Q1 = 0% to 25%, Q2 = 26% to 50%, Q3 = 51% to 75%, Q4 > 75%) revealed that mean total PCL score declined in Q2 (change = -3.91, P = .045, d = 0.43), Q3 (change = -6.6, P = .002, d = 0.59), and Q4 (change = -7.94, P = .037, d = 0.49). In the non-PTSD cohort, the PCL score increased despite CPAP therapy in lower CPAP compliance quartiles Q1 (change = 8.71, P = .0001, d = 0.46) and Q2 (change = 4.51, P = .046, d = 0

  7. Treatment non-adherence among patients with poorly controlled ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-03-01

    Mar 1, 2014 ... Background: Poor adherence to prescribed therapy among patients with chronic diseases is a growing concern which un- dermines the ... consent was obtained from individual patient to signi- .... and SRMAS in binary categories of adherence versus ..... United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study Group.

  8. Reliability of assessment of adherence to an antimicrobial treatment guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mol, PGM; Gans, ROB; Panday, PVN; Degener, JE; Laseur, M; Haaijer-Ruskamp, FM

    Assessment procedures for adherence to a guideline must be reliable and credible. The aim of this study was to explore the reliability of assessment of adherence, taking account of the professional backgrounds of the observers. A secondary analysis explored the impact of case characteristics on

  9. the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is better than cure' may therefore be applicable to the problem of non-adherence among patients on ART even more than in the management of chronic non- infectious diseases in which drug resistance is not an issue of concern. We therefore undertook an analysis of results from the adherence monitoring in our HIV care ...

  10. Baseline psychophysiological and cortisol reactivity as a predictor of PTSD treatment outcome in virtual reality exposure therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrholm, Seth Davin; Jovanovic, Tanja; Gerardi, Maryrose; Breazeale, Kathryn G; Price, Matthew; Davis, Michael; Duncan, Erica; Ressler, Kerry J; Bradley, Bekh; Rizzo, Albert; Tuerk, Peter W; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    2016-07-01

    Baseline cue-dependent physiological reactivity may serve as an objective measure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms. Additionally, prior animal model and psychological studies would suggest that subjects with greatest symptoms at baseline may have the greatest violation of expectancy to danger when undergoing exposure based psychotherapy; thus treatment approaches which enhanced the learning under these conditions would be optimal for those with maximal baseline cue-dependent reactivity. However methods to study this hypothesis objectively are lacking. Virtual reality (VR) methodologies have been successfully employed as an enhanced form of imaginal prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of PTSD. Our goal was to examine the predictive nature of initial psychophysiological (e.g., startle, skin conductance, heart rate) and stress hormone responses (e.g., cortisol) during presentation of VR-based combat-related stimuli on PTSD treatment outcome. Combat veterans with PTSD underwent 6 weeks of VR exposure therapy combined with either d-cycloserine (DCS), alprazolam (ALP), or placebo (PBO). In the DCS group, startle response to VR scenes prior to initiation of treatment accounted for 76% of the variance in CAPS change scores, p < 0.001, in that higher responses predicted greater changes in symptom severity over time. Additionally, baseline cortisol reactivity was inversely associated with treatment response in the ALP group, p = 0.04. We propose that baseline cue-activated physiological measures will be sensitive to predicting patients' level of response to exposure therapy, in particular in the presence of enhancement (e.g., DCS). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Positron emission tomography offers new perspectives for evidence-based treatment development in PTSD

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander Neumeister; Sean Sobin

    2012-01-01

    Background : Combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is increasingly recognized as a primary challenge to the fitness of American military personnel and represents a significant military and national public health concern (Hoge et al. 2004; Thomas et al. 2010). A few available drugs (e.g., selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin–norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors) provide some benefit in the management of PTSD symptoms and have been approved by the Food and Dr...

  12. Impact of combination antiretroviral therapy initiation on adherence to antituberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Knight

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Healthcare workers are often reluctant to start combination antiretroviral therapy (ART in patients receiving tuberculosis (TB treatment because of the fear of high pill burden, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, and side-effects. Object: To quantify changes in adherence to tuberculosis treatment following ART initiation. Design: A prospective observational cohort study of ART-naïve individuals with baseline CD4 count between 50 cells/mm3 and 350 cells/mm3 at start of TB treatment at a primary care clinic in Johannesburg, South Africa. Adherence to TB treatment was measured by pill count,self-report, and electronic Medication Event Monitoring System (eMEMS before and after initiation of ART. Results: ART tended to negatively affect adherence to TB treatment, with an 8% – 10% decrease in the proportion of patients adherent according to pill count and an 18% – 22% decrease in the proportion of patients adherent according to eMEMS in the first month following ART initiation, independent of the cut-off used to define adherence (90%, 95% or 100%. Reasons for non-adherence were multi factorial, and employment was the only predictor for optimal adherence (adjusted odds ratio 4.11, 95% confidence interval 1.06–16.0. Conclusion: Adherence support in the period immediately following ART initiation could optimise treatment outcomes for people living with TB and HIV.

  13. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for persistent pain: does adherence after treatment affect outcome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Charlotte; Williams, Amanda C de C; Potts, Henry W W

    2009-02-01

    It is a tenet of cognitive behavioral treatment of persistent pain problems that ex-patients should adhere to treatment methods over the longer term, in order to maintain and to extend treatment gains. However, no research has quantified the causal influence of adherence on short-term outcome in this field. The aims of this study are to assess determinants of adherence to treatment recommendations in several domains, and to examine the extent to which cognitive and behavioral adherence predicts better outcome of cognitive behavioral treatment for persistent pain. Longitudinal data from a sample of 2345 persistent pain patients who attended a multicomponent treatment programme were subjected to structural equation modeling. Adherence emerged as a mediating factor linking post-treatment and follow-up treatment outcome, but contributed only 3% unique variance to follow-up outcomes. Combined end-of-treatment outcomes and adherence factors accounted for 72% of the variance in outcome at one-month follow-up. Notwithstanding shortcomings in the measurement of adherence, these findings question the emphasis normally given to adherence in the maintenance of behavioral and cognitive change, and clinical implications are discussed.

  14. Biomarkers for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Intern Med 167, 476-82 (2007). 5 P. B. Watson and B. Daniels, Follow up of post - traumatic stress disorder symptoms in Australian servicemen...for DOD and VA as objective indicators of PTSD for use in post - deployment medical screening, treatment selection, treatment outcome monitoring...mitigating the associations between war zone-related PTSD and physical health problems, including cardiovascular and metabolic disorders 6-10. In

  15. Effects of treatment adherence on clinical and economic outcomes in patients with psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jevtić, Tatjana; Bukumirić, Zoran; Janković, Slobodan M

    2013-02-01

    To compare clinical and cost outcomes of psoriasis in non-biological treatment of adherent and non-adherent patients in a developing Balkans country going through socio-economic transition. The study was designed as a retrospective cohort study involving patients with psoriasis adherent and non-adherent to the prescribed treatment regimen. The patients were followed for a period of one year, through four visits with intervals of three months. The adherence to the prescribed regimen was measured at the end of the follow-up period by the medication possession ratio. Clinical outcomes of the treatment were estimated by the Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) at each visit and the treatment costs were collected from patients' files at each visit. The study enrolled 108 patients, 61 (56.5%) were adherent to the prescribed treatment, and 47 (43.5%) were non-adherent. A signiicant decrease of PASI score was noted in the patients adherent to prescribed therapy (p drop of costs was the highest from the visit 3. The decrease in PASI score and costs were less rapid in non-adherent patients. Better treatment adherence leads to faster clinical improvement and a more rapid decrease in costs of treatment, which diminish overall expenditure of the health system and society, leaving room for treatment of other diseases more efficiently. Therefore, health systems of developing countries should support additional research of causes of treatment non-adherence in patients with psoriasis, in order to minimize this fenomenon more efficiently, and make significant savings.

  16. he role of the affective temperament in the treatment adherence in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: adherence to psychotropic medications is affected by factors related to the treatment, to the physician, to the environment and to the patient himself. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the influence of affective temperaments on treatment adherence. Methods: thirty six stabilized outpatients were ...

  17. Chronic subordinate colony housing paradigm: A mouse model for mechanisms of PTSD vulnerability, targeted prevention, and treatment-2016 Curt Richter Award Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Stefan O; Langgartner, Dominik; Foertsch, Sandra; Postolache, Teodor T; Brenner, Lisa A; Guendel, Harald; Lowry, Christopher A

    2016-12-01

    There is considerable individual variability in vulnerability for developing posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD); evidence suggests that this variability is related in part to genetic and environmental factors, including adverse early life experience. Interestingly, recent studies indicate that induction of chronic low-grade inflammation may be a common mechanism underlying gene and environment interactions that increase the risk for development of PTSD symptoms, and, therefore, may be a target for novel interventions for prevention or treatment of PTSD. Development of murine models with face, construct, and predictive validity would provide opportunities to investigate in detail complex genetic, environmental, endocrine, and immunologic factors that determine vulnerability to PTSD-like syndromes, and furthermore may provide mechanistic insight leading to development of novel interventions for both prevention and treatment of PTSD symptoms. Here we describe the potential use of the chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC) paradigm in mice as an adequate animal model for development of a PTSD-like syndrome and describe recent studies that suggest novel interventions for the prevention and treatment of PTSD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Treatment adherence and perception in patients on maintenance hemodialysis: a cross - sectional study from Palestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naalweh, Karam Sh; Barakat, Mohammad A; Sweileh, Moutaz W; Al-Jabi, Samah W; Sweileh, Waleed M; Zyoud, Sa'ed H

    2017-05-30

    Adherence to diet recommendations, fluid restriction, prescribed medications, and attendance at hemodialysis (HD) sessions are essential for optimal and effective treatment of patients with end-stage renal disease. No data regarding this issue are available from Palestine. Therefore, this study was carried out to assess adherence to diet, fluid restriction, medications, and HD sessions. A cross-sectional study of HD patients at An-Najah National University Hospital was carried out during summer, 2016. Self-reported adherence behavior was obtained using a valid and reliable questionnaire (End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire: ESRD-AQ). Predialytic serum levels of potassium and phosphate were obtained as clinical indicator of diet and medication adherence respectively. In addition, interdialytic body weight (IDW) was also obtained from medical records and analyzed in relation to reported adherence of fluid restriction. A total of 220 patients answered all questions pertaining to ESRD-AQ. The mean age ± standard deviation of participants was 56.82 ± 14.51 years. Dietary adherence was observed in 24% while that of fluid restriction adherence was observed in 31% of studied patients. Reported adherence to HD sessions was 52% while that for medications was 81%. Overall, 122 (55.5%) patients had good adherence, 89 (40.5%) had moderate adherence, and 9 (4.1%) had poor adherence behavior. Male patients had significantly higher overall adherence scores than females (p = 0.034). A significant correlation between reported diet adherence and serum pre-HD potassium level (p adherence and IDW (p adherence and pre-HD phosphate level. There was significant correlation between overall perception and overall adherence score (p adherence modalities was lowest for "staying for the entire dialysis time". Multivariate analysis indicated that elderly male patients who were city residents had higher odds of having higher adherence score. There was a good percentage of

  19. Is Inconsistent Pre-treatment Bedtime Related to CPAP Non-Adherence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Amy M.; King, Tonya S.; Sawyer, Douglas A.; Rizzo, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Lack of adherence to continuous positive airway pressure therapy (CPAP) limits the effectiveness of treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We hypothesized that an irregular bedtime would be negatively related to regular use of CPAP treatment. If so, modifying bedtime schedule may address the persistent problem of inconsistent CPAP use in adults with OSA. In a prospective longitudinal study, we examined whether inconsistent self-reported bedtime before initiation of CPAP treatment, operationalized as bedtime variability, was (1) different among those adherent (≥ 4 hours per night) and non-adherent to CPAP treatment at one week and one month; and/or (2) was related to one-week and one-month CPAP use when other variables were accounted for. Consecutively-recruited newly-diagnosed OSA adults (N=79) completed sleep diaries prior to CPAP treatment. One-week and one-month objective CPAP use data were collected. Pre-treatment bedtime variability was different among CPAP non-adherers and adherers at one month and was a significant predictor of non-adherence at one month in multivariate analyses. The odds of one-month CPAP non-adherence were 3.5 times greater in those whose pre-treatment bedtimes varied by >75 minutes. Addressing sleep schedule prior to CPAP initiation may be an opportunity to improve CPAP adherence. PMID:25353159

  20. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART(®)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Kevin E; Elk, Carrie A; Sullivan, Kelly L; Kadel, Rajendra; Lengacher, Cecile A; Long, Christopher J; Rosenzweig, Laney; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F; Street, Jennifer D; Girling, Sue Ann; Diamond, David M

    2012-06-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART(®)) that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1-5 one-hour sessions within three weeks). Eighty adults aged 21-60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants' mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5%) completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8%) provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons). No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD.

  1. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Kevin E.; Elk, Carrie A.; Sullivan, Kelly L.; Kadel, Rajendra; Lengacher, Cecile A.; Long, Christopher J.; Rosenzweig, Laney; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F.; Street, Jennifer D.; Girling, Sue Ann; Diamond, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®) that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1–5 one-hour sessions within three weeks). Eighty adults aged 21–60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants’ mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5%) completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8%) provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons). No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD. PMID:25379218

  2. Adherence to interferon β-1b treatment in patients with multiple sclerosis in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Fernández

    Full Text Available Adherence to interferon β-1b (INFβ-1b therapy is essential to maximize the beneficial effects of treatment in multiple sclerosis (MS. For that reason, the main objectives of this study are to assess adherence to INFβ-1b in patients suffering from MS in Spain, and to identify the factors responsible for adherence in routine clinical practice.This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study including 120 Spanish patients with MS under INFβ-1b treatment. Therapeutic adherence was assessed with Morisky-Green test and with the percentage of doses received. The proportion of adherent patients assessed by Morisky-Green test was 68.3%, being indicative of poor adherence. Nevertheless, the percentage of doses received, which was based on the number of injected medication, was 94.3%. The main reason for missing INFβ-1b injections was forgetting some of the administrations (64%. Therefore, interventions that diminish forgetfulness might have a positive effect in the proportion of adherent patients and in the percentage of doses received. In addition, age and comorbidities had a significant effect in the number of doses injected per month, and should be considered in the management of adherence in MS patients.Among all the available methods for assessing adherence, the overall consumption of the intended dose has to be considered when addressing adherence.

  3. Medication adherence and direct treatment cost among diabetes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Pharmacology, Ekiti State University, Ado-Ekiti,. Nigeria. 2. ... According to the International. Diabetic ... 53% non-adherence among diabetics in Malaysia; similar .... Necessary adjustments were made in the contents and.

  4. Explanatory models of depression and treatment adherence to antidepressant medication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Niels; Johannessen, Helle; Stage, Kurt Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    and medicine were not central. However, taking antidepressant medication was a meaningful part of being admitted to hospital, and the adoption of the rhetoric and practices of biomedicine strengthened patients' sense of control and hope for recovery. If medicine was ineffective, the explanatory models...... legitimised alternative strategies towards recovery, including non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: The patients' reasons for adhering to antidepressants included a range of diverse psychosocial issues, and could be regarded as a central part of their common sense illness management....

  5. Suboptimal treatment adherence in bipolar disorder: impact on clinical outcomes and functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montes JM

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Jose Manuel Montes1, Jorge Maurino2, Consuelo de Dios3, Esteban Medina21Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Universitario del Sureste, 2AstraZeneca Medical Department, 3Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Universitario La Paz, Madrid, SpainBackground: The primary aim of this study was to assess drug treatment adherence in patients with bipolar disorder and to identify factors associated with adherence. The secondary aim was to analyze the impact of suboptimal adherence on clinical and functional outcomes.Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a sample of outpatients receiving an oral antipsychotic drug. Medication adherence was assessed combining the 10-item Drug Attitude Inventory, the Morisky Green Adherence Questionnaire, and the Compliance Rating Scale. Logistic regression was used to determine significant variables associated with suboptimal adherence to medication.Results: Three hundred and three patients were enrolled into the study. The mean age was 45.9 ± 12.8 years, and 59.7% were females. Sixty-nine percent of patients showed suboptimal adherence. Disease severity and functioning were significantly worse in the suboptimal group than in the adherent group. Multivariate analysis showed depressive polarity of the last acute episode, presence of subsyndromal symptoms, and substance abuse/dependence to be significantly associated with suboptimal treatment adherence (odds ratios 3.41, 2.13, and 1.95, respectively.Conclusion: A high prevalence of nonadherence was found in an outpatient sample with bipolar disorder. Identification of factors related to treatment adherence would give clinicians the opportunity to select more adequately patients who are eligible for potential adherence-focused interventions.Keywords: bipolar disorder, treatment adherence, functioning, polarity, subsyndromal symptoms

  6. PTSD in the military: special considerations for understanding prevalence, pathophysiology and treatment following deployment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Vermetten, Eric; McFarlane, Alexander C.; Lehrner, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Given the unique context of warzone engagement, which may include chronic threat, multiple and lengthy deployments, and loss, there is a need to understand whether and to what extent knowledge about PTSD derived from studies of civilian trauma exposure is generalizeable to the military. This special issue on PTSD in the military addresses a range of issues and debates related to mental health in military personnel and combat veterans. This article provides an overview of the issues covered in selected contributions that have been assembled for a special volume to consider issues unique to the military. Several leading scholars and military experts have contributed papers regarding: 1) prevalence rates of PTSD and other post-deployment mental health problems in different NATO countries, 2) the search for biomarkers of PTSD and the potential applications of such findings, and 3) prevention and intervention approaches for service members and veterans. The volume includes studies that highlight the divergence in prevalence rates of PTSD and other post-deployment mental health problems across nations and that discuss potential causes and implications. Included studies also provide an overview of research conducted in military or Veteran's Affairs settings, and overarching reviews of military-wide approaches to research, promotion of resilience, and mental health interventions in the Unites States and across NATO and allied ISAF partners. PMID:25206950

  7. Initial development of a treatment adherence measure for cognitive-behavioral therapy for child anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Southam-Gerow, MA; McLeod, BD; Arnold, CC; Rodríguez, A; Cox, JR; Reise, SP; Bonifay, WE; Weisz, JR; Kendall, PC

    2016-01-01

    © 2015 American Psychological Association.The measurement of treatment adherence (a component of treatment integrity defined as the extent to which a treatment is delivered as intended) is a critical element in treatment evaluation research. This article presents initial psychometric data for scores on the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Adherence Scale for Youth Anxiety (CBAY-A), an observational measure designed to be sensitive to common practice elements found in individual cognitive- behavio...

  8. Social and structural barriers for adherence to methadone maintenance treatment among Vietnamese opioid dependence patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Bach Xuan; Nguyen, Long Hoang; Tran, Tung Thanh; Latkin, Carl A

    2018-01-01

    Methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) services may reduce the risk of HIV transmission if patients completely adhere to the treatment. Identifying adherence patterns and potential related factors is vital for the sustainability of MMT program in Vietnam. This study examined social and structural factors associated with adherence to MMT among patients in different service delivery models. A total of 510 patients at three MMT clinics in Hanoi were interviewed. Measures of self-reported adherence included the number of missed doses in the past 7 days and the level of adherence in the past 30 days using a visual analog scale (VAS) scoring from 0 (non-adherence) to 100 (perfect adherence). Multivariate regressions were employed to identify factors associated with non-adherence to MMT. A total of 17.7% of participants reported incomplete MMT adherence in the last 30 days and 8.3% reported missing a dose in the last seven days, respectively. Living with HIV/AIDS, poor self-care and usual activities, and disclosure of health issues to spouses or intimate partners were associated with non-adherence. Those patients with pain or depression were more likely to report better adherence. Disclosing health status to spouse/partner increased the risk of incomplete adherence, while disclosing to friends reduced the number of missed dose in the last seven days. Patients attending clinics with comprehensive services had a lower VAS score of adherence compared to those enrolling in clinics with only MMT and general health care. Sustaining the compliance of patients to MMT is principal in the rapid expansion of this service in Vietnam. It is necessary to address the complexity of health care demands of drug users, their difficulties to be rehabilitated into workforce and society, and the stigmatization to maximize the outcomes of MMT program.

  9. Adherence to treatment and hospitalization risk in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaiciuniene, Ruta; Kuzminskis, Vytautas; Ziginskiene, Edita; Skarupskiene, Inga; Bumblyte, Inga A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adherence to treatment is associated with hospitalization risk in hemodialysis patients. We completed a cohort analysis of risk factors during 1 census month (November) and 1 year of follow-up during 5 consecutive years (2002-2006) in all end-stage renal disease patients hemodialyzed in the Kaunas region. During the census month, we collected data on noncompliance defined as (i) skipping of a hemodialysis (HD) session, (ii) shortening of 1 or more HD sessions, (iii) presence of hyperkalemia, (iv) presence of hyperphosphatemia, or (v) interdialytic weight gain (IDWG). In addition, data on age, sex, disability status, comorbidities, anemia control, malnutrition and inflammation, calcium-phosphorus metabolism and hospitalization rate were collected. Relative risk of hospitalization was estimated using Cox regression evaluating time to first hospitalization. We analyzed 559 patients for a total of 1,163 patient-years during the 5 years of the study. On multivariate analysis, adjusting for ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, higher number of comorbid conditions, higher systolic blood pressure before dialysis, worse disability status, lower hemoglobin, albumin and urea before dialysis, the relative risk for hospitalization increased by 1.1 for every additional percentage point of IDWG and by 1.19 with each 1 mmol/L rise of serum phosphorus level. Skipping or shortening of hemodialysis sessions and serum potassium level were not associated with hospitalization. Higher IDWG and higher serum levels of phosphorus independently increased the relative risk of hospitalizations in hemodialysis patients. With skipped and shortened dialysis sessions, higher serum potassium level was not associated with hospitalization risk.

  10. Medication adherence levels and differential use of mental-health services in the treatment of schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furiak Nicolas M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adherence to antipsychotics for schizophrenia is associated with favorable clinical outcomes. This study compared annual mental-health service utilization by recent medication adherence levels for patients treated for schizophrenia, and assessed whether adherence levels change from pre- to post-psychiatric hospitalization. Methods We analyzed data from a large prospective, non-interventional study of patients treated for schizophrenia in the United States, conducted between 7/1997 and 9/2003. Detailed mental-health resource utilization was systematically abstracted from medical records and augmented with patients' self report. Medication possession ratio (MPR with any antipsychotic in the 6 months prior to enrollment was used to categorize patients as: adherent (MPR ≥ 80%, N = 1758, partially adherent (MPR ≥ 60% Results Adherent patients had a lower rate of psychiatric hospitalization compared with partially adherent and non-adherent patients (p Conclusion Adherence is associated with lower utilization of acute care services and greater engagement in outpatient mental-health treatment. Adherence is a potentially dynamic phenomenon, which may improve, at least temporarily, following patients' psychiatric hospitalizations.

  11. Non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in schizophrenia and schizophrenia spectrum disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungdalh, P. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objectives The primary treatment for schizophrenia and schizophrenia-spectrum disorders is antipsychotic medication. One of the many public health challenges in mental illness, is to identify contributing factors to non-adherence to pharmacological treatment. The objective...... of this study was to perform an updated systematic review of risk factors for non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in schizophrenia in a European and American context. Methods The study was a systematic literature review of studies that included at least two measurements of pharmacological adherence...... of illness, alcohol or drug abuse and unspecified younger age. Conclusions The findings in this systematic literature review are consistent with previous reviews on non-adherence and schizophrenia. It stresses the methodological challenges in psychiatric adherence research and establishes the need for more...

  12. Strategies to optimize treatment adherence in adolescent patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bishay LC

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lara C Bishay, Gregory S Sawicki Division of Respiratory Diseases, Boston Children’s Hospital, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: While development of new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF has led to a significant improvement in survival age, routine daily treatment for CF is complex, burdensome, and time intensive. Adolescence is a period of decline in pulmonary function in CF, and is also a time when adherence to prescribed treatment plans for CF tends to decrease. Challenges to adherence in adolescents with CF include decreased parental involvement, time management and significant treatment burden, and adolescent perceptions of the necessity and value of the treatments prescribed. Studies of interventions to improve adherence are limited and focus on education, without significant evidence of success. Smaller studies on behavioral techniques do not focus on adolescents. Other challenges for improving adherence in adolescents with CF include infection control practices limiting in-person interactions. This review focuses on the existing evidence base on adherence intervention in adolescents with CF. Future directions for efforts to optimize treatment adherence in adolescents with CF include reducing treatment burden, developing patient-driven technology to improve tracking, communication, and online support, and rethinking the CF health services model to include assessment of individualized adherence barriers. Keywords: compliance, adolescence, medication, self management, intervention

  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Website Site Map Content Inventory Accessibility Privacy and Security Updating of Web Site Web Site Policies Important Links Linking Policies Small Business POC Subscribe PTSD ...

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... a VA Appointment Crisis Prevention Mental Health PTSD Public Health Veterans Access, Choice & Accountability Act Benefits General Benefits Information Disability Compensation Pension GI Bill ® ...

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Home PTSD Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics Disaster and Terrorism Military Trauma Violence & other Trauma Assessment Assessment Overview Adult Interviews Adult Self Report Child ...

  16. Non-adherence to diabetes treatment at Mulago Hospital in Uganda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Non-adherence to diabetes treatment leads to poor glucose control and increases the risk of disease complications. The prevalence and factors associated with non-adherence in resource limited settings should be determined so as to lower the impact of a disease that is on the increase, on the health systems ...

  17. Understanding and improving treatment adherence in patients with psychotic disorders : A review and a proposed intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staring, Anton B.P.; van der Gaag, Mark; Selten, Jean-Paul; Loonen, Anton J.M.; Hengeveld, Michiel W.; Mulder, Cornelis L.

    2006-01-01

    Non-adherence to treatment of patients with psychotic disorders is related to higher rates of relapse, hospitalization, and suicide. Important predictors of non-adherence include poor social structure, cognitive deficits, negative medication attitude, side effects, depression, a sealing-over

  18. Sticker charts: a method for improving adherence to treatment of chronic diseases in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luersen, Kara; Davis, Scott A; Kaplan, Sebastian G; Abel, Troy D; Winchester, Woodrow W; Feldman, Steven R

    2012-01-01

    Poor adherence is a common problem and may be an underlying cause of poor clinical outcomes. In pediatric populations, positive reinforcement techniques such as sticker charts may increase motivation to adhere to treatment regimens. To review the use of sticker charts to improve adherence in children with chronic disease, Medline and PsycINFO searches were conducted using the key words "positive reinforcement OR behavior therapy" and "adherence OR patient compliance" and "child." Randomized controlled retrospective cohort or single-subject-design studies were selected. Studies reporting adherence to the medical treatment of chronic disease in children using positive reinforcement techniques were included in the analysis. The systematic search was supplemented by identifying additional studies identified through the reference lists and authors of the initial articles found. Positive reinforcement techniques such as sticker charts increase adherence to medical treatment regimens. In several studies, this effect was maintained for months after the initial intervention. Better adherence correlated with better clinical outcomes in some, but not all, studies. Few studies examining the use of sticker charts were identified. Although single-subject-design studies are useful in establishing the effect of a behavioral intervention, larger randomized controlled trials would help determine the precise efficacy of sticker chart interventions. Adherence to medical treatments in children can be increased using sticker charts or other positive reinforcement techniques. This may be an effective means to encourage children with atopic dermatitis to apply their medications and improve clinical outcomes. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Improving adherence to acne treatment: the emerging role of application software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park C

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Chanhyun Park,1 Gilwan Kim,1 Isha Patel,2 Jongwha Chang,3 Xi Tan2 1College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USA; 2College of Pharmacy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA; 3McWhorter School of Pharmacy, Samford University, Birmingham, AL, USA Objective: To examine recent studies on the effect of mobile and electronic (ME-health technology on adherence to acne treatment. Background: With emerging use of ME-health technology, there is a growing interest in evaluating the effectiveness of the tools on medication adherence. Examples of ME-health technology-based tools include text message-based pill reminders and Web-based patient education. Methods: MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, and Web of Science were searched for articles on adherence to acne treatment published through November 2013. A combination of search terms such as "acne" and "adherence" or "compliance" were used. Results: Adherence to oral acne medication was higher than for topical acne medication. The frequency of office visits was also an influencing factor for acne treatment adherence. The telephone-based reminders on a daily basis did not improve acne patients' medication adherence, whereas the Web-based educational tools on a weekly basis had a positive effect on medication adherence in acne treatment. Conclusion: In using ME-health interventions, factors such as medication dosage forms, frequency of intervention, and patients' preferences should be taken into consideration. Developing disease-specific text message reminders may be helpful to increase adherence rates. In addition, a combination of text message reminders with another type of intervention may improve medication adherence. Keywords: acne vulgaris, medication adherence, compliance, mobile and electronic health technology, application software, telemedicine

  20. Improving Treatment Adherence in Bipolar Disorder: A Review of Current Psychosocial Treatment Efficacy and Recommendations for Future Treatment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    Treatment adherence is a frequent problem in bipolar disorder, with research showing that more than 60% of bipolar patients are at least partially nonadherent to medications. Treatment nonadherence is consistently predictive of a number of negative outcomes in bipolar samples, and the discontinuation of mood stabilizers places these patients at…

  1. Adverse childhood experiences and risk for suicidal behavior in male Iraq and Afghanistan veterans seeking PTSD treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Timothy D; Currier, Joseph M; McCormick, Wesley H; Drescher, Kent D

    2017-09-01

    Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) are associated with increased risk for suicide and appear to occur in disproportionately high rates among men who served in the U.S. military. However, research has yet to examine a comprehensive range of ACEs among Iraq/Afghanistan veterans with combat-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) or whether these premilitary stressors may contribute to suicidal behavior in this highly vulnerable population. A sample of 217 men entering a residential program for combat-related PTSD completed measures for ACEs, combat exposure, and lifetime suicidal ideation and attempts. The majority of patients had experienced multiple types of adversity or traumas during childhood/adolescence. In particular, 83.4% endorsed at least 1 ACE category and 41.5% reported experiencing 4 or more ACEs. When accounting for effects of deployment-related stressors, we further found that accumulation of ACEs was uniquely linked with thoughts of suicide or attempts among these patients. Namely, for every 1-point increase on the ACE Questionnaire, veterans' risk of suicidal ideation and attempts increased by 23% and 24%, respectively. This brief report provides initial evidence that veterans seeking treatment for combat-related PTSD often have extensive histories of premilitary stressors that may increase suicide risk beyond probable deployment-related traumas. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Measures and predictors of varenicline adherence in the treatment of nicotine dependence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Annie R; Morales, Mark; Wileyto, E Paul; Hawk, Larry W; Cinciripini, Paul; George, Tony P; Benowitz, Neal L; Nollen, Nicole L; Lerman, Caryn; Tyndale, Rachel F; Schnoll, Robert

    2017-12-01

    While adherence to medication in smoking cessation clinical trials is strongly associated with clinical outcome, very few studies have evaluated the validity of pill count as a measure of adherence relative to a biological assay, and evaluated a broad range of correlates of adherence. In a smoking cessation clinical trial of varenicline, we compared pill counts collected over 4 different time periods to varenicline salivary levels taken after 2weeks of treatment, as well as evaluated predictors of adherence to varenicline. Using a binary measure of adherence based on salivary varenicline levels, adherence was higher among older, white, and more educated participants. Relative to 3, 7, and 14-day pill count, 12-week pill count was the only significant measure able to discriminate adherence as defined by salivary varenicline levels (assessed by area under the receiver operating characteristic curve; AUC=0.59, p=0.004). Seventy-two percent of participants who indicated adherence on 12-week pill count were classified as adherent based on varenicline saliva levels (sensitivity=0.80; specificity=0.40). There was modest variability in the relationship between 12-week pill count and varenicline levels across race and rate of nicotine metabolism. Lastly, General Estimating Equation models demonstrated that longitudinal changes in withdrawal, craving, negative and positive affect, and side effect count and severity were not related to adherence based on salivary varenicline levels. These results indicate that 12-week pill count was the best, albeit a relatively weak, measure of varenicline adherence; additional factors associated with treatment adherence need to be identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Treatment Adherence, Competence, and Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Hogue, Aaron; Henderson, Craig E.; Dauber, Sarah; Barajas, Priscilla C.; Fried, Adam; Liddle, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for adolescent substance use and related behavior problems. Participants included 136 adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake, discharge, and 6-month follow-up. Observational ratings of adherence and competence were collected on early and later phases of treatment (192 CBT ...

  4. Understanding the life experience of people on hemodialysis: adherence to treatment and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Guerrerro, Verónica; Plazas, Maria del Pilar Camargo; Cameron, Brenda L; Salas, Anna Valeria Santos; González, Carmen Gloria Cofre

    2014-01-01

    This hermeneutic-phenomenological study explores the lived experiences of patients on hemodialysis in regard to the adherence to treatment and quality of life. Fifteen patients were interviewed, including six women and nine men from three dialysis centers in Chile. Two main themes derived from the analysis: 1) embracing the disease and dialysis, and 2) preventing progression of the disease through treatment management. The findings suggest that patients recognize adherence to treatment and quality of life as conditions that derive from self-care and environmental conditions, which the healthcare provider must constantly assess for care planning to improve the adherence and quality of life in this population.

  5. Treatment of active duty military with PTSD in primary care: A follow-up report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigrang, Jeffrey A; Rauch, Sheila A M; Mintz, Jim; Brundige, Antoinette; Avila, Laura L; Bryan, Craig J; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Peterson, Alan L

    2015-12-01

    First-line trauma-focused therapies offered in specialty mental health clinics do not reach many veterans and active duty service members with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Primary care is an ideal environment to expand access to mental health care. Several promising clinical case series reports of brief PTSD therapies adapted for primary care have shown positive results, but the long-term effectiveness with military members is unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine the long-term outcome of an open trial of a brief cognitive-behavioral primary care-delivered protocol developed specifically for deployment-related PTSD in a sample of 24 active duty military (15 men, 9 women). Measures of PTSD symptom severity showed statistically and clinically significant reductions from baseline to posttreatment that were maintained at the 6-month and 1-year follow-up assessments. Similar reductions were maintained in depressive symptoms and ratings of global mental health functioning. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Adherence to treatment for diabetes mellitus: validation of instruments for oral antidiabetics and insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes-Villas; Lima, Maria Luisa Soares Almeida Pedroso de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2014-01-01

    to verify the face validity, criterion-related validity and the reliability of two distinct forms of presentation of the instrument Measurement of Adherence to Treatment, one being for ascertaining the adherence to the use of oral antidiabetics and the other for adherence to the use of insulin, as well as to assess differences in adherence between these two modes of drug therapy. a methodological study undertaken with 90 adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. The criterion-related validity was verified using the Receiver Operating Characteristic curves; and for the reliability, the researchers calculated the Cronbach alpha coefficient, the item-total correlation, and the Pearson correlation coefficient. the oral antidiabetics and the other showed sensitivity of 0.84, specificity of 0.35 and a Cronbach correlation coefficient of 0.84. For the adherence to the use of insulin, the values found were, respectively, 0.60, 0.21 and 0.68. A statistically significant difference was found between the final scores of the two forms of the instrument, indicating greater adherence to the use of insulin than to oral antidiabetics. it is concluded that the two forms of the Measurement of Adherence to Treatment instrument are reliable and should be used to evaluate adherence to drug treatment among people with diabetes mellitus.

  7. An App Supporting Psoriasis Patients Improves Adherence to Topical Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, M T; Andersen, F; Pottegård, A

    2018-01-01

    Physician's Global Assessment (LS-PGA), and quality of life was measured by Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) scales at all visits. RESULTS: Intention to treat analyses using regression was performed. PRIMARY OUTCOME: more patients in the intervention group were adherent to Cal/BD cutaneous foam...

  8. Associations between patients' risk attitude and their adherence to statin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Lind; Paulsen, Maja Skov; Christensen, Palle Mark

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Poor adherence to medical treatment may have considerable consequences for the patients' health and for healthcare costs to society. The need to understand the determinants for poor adherence has motivated several studies on socio-demographics and comorbidity. Few studies focus...... on the association between risk attitude and adherence. The aim of the present study was to estimate associations between patients' adherence to statin treatment and different dimensions of risk attitude, and to identify subgroups of patients with poor adherence. METHODS: Population-based questionnaire and register......-based study on a sample of 6393 persons of the general. Danish population aged 20-79. Data on risk attitude were based on 4 items uncovering health-related as well as financial dimensions of risk attitude. They were collected through a web-based questionnaire and combined with register data on redeemed statin...

  9. Brief report: Adherence to fluid recommendations in children receiving treatment for retentive encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Elizabeth S; Felt, Barbara T; Patton, Susana R

    2009-01-01

    Limited data are available regarding whether children being treated for retentive encopresis are adherent to recommendations to increase their daily fluid intake. The purpose of this study was to examine fluid adherence in children who received treatment for retentive encopresis. A retrospective chart review was performed using diet diary data for 26 children (ages 3-12) who completed a group behavioral intervention for retentive encopresis. Mean daily intake of clear fluid increased significantly during treatment and children relied primarily on water and juice to make this dietary change. However, adherence rates to clear fluid goals were <50%. Children's increased clear fluid intake did not equate to high fluid adherence. Children's high juice consumption is concerning as it could place them at risk for other negative health consequences. Future research should examine whether enhanced fluid education and use of behavior change strategies yield higher fluid adherence.

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... for PTSD Right Click here to download "Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD" (22.2 MB) Close ... Help Problems viewing videos in pop up windows? See our alternate video page. For information on video formats, and to download an appropriate ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Alerts User Guide Purpose and Scope Find Assessment Measures Instrument Authority List Research and Biology Research on PTSD Biology of PTSD Find Materials by Type List of Materials By Type Assessments Continuing Education Handouts Manuals Mobile Apps Publications Toolkits Videos Web ...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  13. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  14. Factors affecting treatment adherence to atomoxetine in ADHD: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treuer T

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Tamás Treuer,1 Luis Méndez,2 William Montgomery,3 Shenghu Wu4 1Neuroscience Research, Eli Lilly and Company, Budapest, Hungary; 2Eli Lilly de Mexico, Mexico City, Mexico; 3Global Patient Outcomes and Real World Evidence, Eli Lilly Australia Pty Ltd, West Ryde, NSW, Australia; 4Neuroscience Research, Eli Lilly Asia, Inc, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The purpose of this paper was to systematically review the literature related to research about the factors affecting treatment adherence and discontinuation of atomoxetine in pediatric, adolescent, and adult patients with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Medline was systematically searched using the following prespecified terms: “ADHD”, “Adherence”, “Compliance”, “Discontinuation”, and “Atomoxetine”. We identified 31 articles that met all inclusion and exclusion criteria. The findings from this review indicate that persistence and adherence to atomoxetine treatment were generally high. Factors found to influence adherence and nonadherence to atomoxetine treatment in ADHD in this review include age, sex, the definition of response used, length of treatment, initial dose of treatment, comorbid conditions, and reimbursement. Tolerability was cited as an important reason for treatment discontinuation. More research is needed to understand those factors that can help to identify patients at risk for poor adherence and interventions that could improve treatment adherence early in the stage of this illness to secure a better long-term prognosis. Keywords: atomoxetine, treatment discontinuation, adherence, compliance, ADHD medication, relapse

  15. Risk factors for non-adherence to antidepressant treatment in patients with mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Peñate, Wenceslao; Sanz, Emilio J

    2014-01-01

    Adherence to antidepressant therapy by patients with depressive disorders is essential not only to achieve a positive patient outcome but also to prevent a relapse. The aim of this study was to identify potential modelling factors influencing adherence to antidepressant treatment by patients with mood disorders in the community mental health care setting A total of 160 consecutive psychiatric outpatients attending two Community Mental Health Centres on Tenerife Island between September 2011 and May 2012 were asked to participate in the study; of these, 145 accepted. The Morisky self-report scale was used to assess adherence. The potential predictors examined included socio-demographic, clinical and therapeutic variables. The Clinical Global Impression-Severity and -Improvement scales and the Beck Depression Inventory were used for clinical assessment. Drug treatment side-effects were assessed using the "Self-report Antidepressant Side-Effect Checklist." All participants were also asked to complete the "Drug Attitude Inventory" (DAI), "Beliefs about Medicine Questionnaire" (BMQ), and "Leeds Attitude towards concordance Scale". Discriminant analyses were performed to predict non-adherence. There was no clear correlation between adherence and the socio-demographic variables examined, but adherence was related to a positive attitude of the patients towards his/her treatment (DAI) and low scores in the BMQ-Harm and -Concern subscales. Non-adherence was also related to an increasing severity of depression and to the presence and severity of side-effects. Among our study cohort, the profiles of adherent patients to antidepressant treatment were more closely associated with each patient's attitudes and beliefs than to objective socio-demographic variables. The severity of depression played a relevant role in adherence, but whether this role is direct or an interaction with several concurrent factors is not yet clear. Side-effects were also closely related to adherence, as

  16. The relationship among health literacy, health knowledge, and adherence to treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Patricia; Price, Kwanza O; Magid, Steven K; Lyman, Stephen; Mandl, Lisa A; Stone, Patricia W

    2013-02-01

    Patients with poor health literacy often lack the knowledge needed to manage their treatment. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to determine whether health literacy is a predictor of health knowledge and/or adherence to medication treatment in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The study was completed in an urban, outpatient rheumatology setting. Health literacy was measured using the Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. The Arthritis Knowledge Questionnaire was modified to measure medication specific health knowledge, and the Morisky Medication Adherence scale was used to measure adherence. Researchers used regression analyses to determine if health literacy was a predicator of knowledge and/or adherence. Participants (N = 125) had high mean health literacy scores. The average medication knowledge score was 0.73. Adherence to medication regimen was 0.84. Controlling for patient covariates, health literacy was positively associated with education, race, and age. In adjusted analyses, health literacy was a significant predictor of health knowledge but not adherence. Race, neighborhood income, and confidence with contacting provider about medications were predictors of adherence. Study findings indicate that health literacy is independently associated with medication knowledge but not medication adherence in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. These results provide useful information for planning initiatives to support individuals with disease self-management.

  17. Factors associated to acceptable treatment adherence among children with chronic kidney disease in Guatemala.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke M Ramay

    Full Text Available Pediatric patients with Chronic Kidney Disease face several barriers to medication adherence that, if addressed, may improve clinical care outcomes. A cross sectional questionnaire was administered in the Foundation for Children with Kidney Disease (FUNDANIER, Guatemala City from September of 2015 to April of 2016 to identify the predisposing factors, enabling factors and need factors related to medication adherence. Sample size was calculated using simple random sampling with a confidence level of 95%, confidence interval of 0.05 and a proportion of 87%. A total of 103 participants responded to the questionnaire (calculated sample size was 96. Independent variables were defined and described, and the bivariate relationship to dependent variables was determined using Odds Ratio. Multivariate analysis was carried out using logistic regression. The mean adherence of study population was 78% (SD 0.08, max = 96%, min = 55%. The mean adherence in transplant patients was 82% (SD 7.8, max 96%, min 63%, and the mean adherence in dialysis patients was 76% (SD 7.8 max 90%, min 55%. Adherence was positively associated to the mother's educational level and to higher monthly household income. Together predisposing, enabling and need factors illustrate the complexities surrounding adherence in this pediatric CKD population. Public policy strategies aimed at improving access to comprehensive treatment regimens may facilitate treatment access, alleviating economic strain on caregivers and may improve adherence outcomes.

  18. Neurobiological basis of PTSD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasue, Hidenori; Kasai, Kiyoto

    2006-01-01

    This review describes posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from the aspect that it is one of precious neurobiological models where the stress caused by an outer environmental factor affects the livings afterwards. Also described are the actual imaging investigations of PTSD in people encountered the sarin subway terrorism in Tokyo (1995). High resolution MRI has revealed the decreased volume of hippocampus in PTSD patients in recent years. In victims of the terrorism above, authors have found that the volume of anterior cingulate cortical (ACC) gray matter is reduced in voxel-based MRI morphometry and the reduction is well correlated with PTSD severity and lower P300 amplitude. PET and fMRI have shown the hyperactivity of amygdala and hypoactivity of medial prefrontal region around ACC in PTSD. Findings in conditioned animal studies have indicated the importance of ACC neuronal cell activation for fear extinction, where, in humans, fMRI has revealed the cooperation between amygdala and ACC. At present, genetic factors like serotonin transporter polymorphism, environmental ones at infantile stage and their interactive activity are subject to investigation and discussion. Imaging studies will contribute to the clinical diagnosis, treatment and intervention of PTSD. (T.I)

  19. PTSD in Children and Teens

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for PTSD » Public » PTSD in Children and Teens PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here PTSD in Children and Teens Public This section is ...

  20. Effects of PTSD on Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for PTSD » Public » Effects of PTSD on Family PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... code here Enter ZIP code here Effects of PTSD on Family Public This section is for Veterans, ...

  1. Culturally adapted CBT (CA-CBT) for Latino women with treatment-resistant PTSD: a pilot study comparing CA-CBT to applied muscle relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Hofmann, Stefan G; Rivera, Edwin; Otto, Michael W; Pollack, Mark H

    2011-04-01

    We examined the therapeutic efficacy of a culturally adapted form of CBT (CA-CBT) for PTSD as compared to applied muscle relaxation (AMR) for female Latino patients with treatment-resistant PTSD. Participants were randomized to receive either CA-CBT (n = 12) or AMR (n = 12), and were assessed before treatment, after treatment, and at a 12-week follow-up. The treatments were manualized and delivered in the form of group therapy across 14 weekly sessions. Assessments included a measure of PTSD, anxiety, culturally relevant idioms of distress (nervios and ataque de nervios), and emotion regulation ability. Patients receiving CA-CBT improved significantly more than in the AMR condition. Effect size estimates showed very large reductions in PTSD symptoms from pretreatment to posttreatment in the CA-CBT group (Cohen's d = 2.6) but only modest improvements in the AMR group (0.8). These results suggest that CA-CBT can be beneficial for previously treatment-resistant PTSD in Latino women. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Being as an iceberg: hypertensive treatment adherence experiences in southeast of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahid Dehghan Nayeri

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment adherence is often an important issue in the management of hypertension. Deep understanding of adherence behavior as well as its influential factors can expand knowledge about treatment adherence among hypertensives. Objective: The aim of this study was to explore patients, their families, and healthcare providers’ experiences about hypertension treatment adherence in southeast of Iran. Design: A qualitative study was conducted to explore the experience of patients, family members, and healthcare providers (n=18 by using a conventional content analysis. The purposive sampling method was used. Data were collected through semi-structured and deep interviews. Results: Data analysis showed that hypertensive treatment adherence in an Iranian context is like an iceberg with two subthemes. The first subtheme relates to the upper and clear part of this iceberg and it consists of two categories, including 1 healthy and 2 unhealthy regimens. The second subtheme associates with under-water and unanticipated part and it consists of four categories, including 1 the nature of disease and treatment, 2 the individual resources, 3 the healthcare organization, and 4 the socio-cultural environment. Conclusions: The treatment adherence features emerged in this study can be useful in designing and developing context-based hypertension interventions. Further qualitative and quantitative studies with a closer collaboration between the social, natural, and medical sciences in other Iranian populations are needed to confirm the findings.

  3. Anger, hostility, and aggression among Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans reporting PTSD and subthreshold PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakupcak, Matthew; Conybeare, Daniel; Phelps, Lori; Hunt, Stephen; Holmes, Hollie A; Felker, Bradford; Klevens, Michele; McFall, Miles E

    2007-12-01

    Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans were grouped by level of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology and compared on self-report measures of trait anger, hostility, and aggression. Veterans who screened positive for PTSD reported significantly greater anger and hostility than those in the subthreshold-PTSD and non-PTSD groups. Veterans in the subthreshold-PTSD group reported significantly greater anger and hostility than those in the non-PTSD group. The PTSD and subthreshold-PTSD groups did not differ with respect to aggression, though both groups were significantly more likely to have endorsed aggression than the non-PTSD group. These findings suggest that providers should screen for anger and aggression among Iraq and Afghanistan War veterans who exhibit symptoms of PTSD and incorporate relevant anger treatments into early intervention strategies.

  4. Family Functioning and Soldier PTSD: Correlates of Treatment Engagement and Military Job Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    a mother with depression may be less sensitive to her child’s cues, and may feel less efficacious as a parent, decreasing her application of...functioning, spouse depression , spouse anxiety, child mental health symptoms and service use, and Soldier job satisfaction. Spouse depression was the...in Soldiers with PTSD and their spouses, and also to describe rates of spouse depression and anxiety, as well as child mental health problems. The

  5. Role of Sleep Deprivation in Fear Conditioning and Extinction: Implications for Treatment of PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    and thus PTSD, is fear condition - ing. Fear conditioning is a Pavlovian response whereby a neutral stimulus is paired with an aversive stimulus until...for drug use, sleep disorders, and psychiatric and medical conditions via structured interview and laboratory tests. Inclu- sion criteria included the...Annual 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Role of Sleep Deprivation in Fear Conditioning and Extinction: Implications for

  6. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogundele, Olukunle Ayodeji; Moodley, Deshendran; Pillay, Anban W; Seebregts, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB) treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is flexible and extendable and provides new insights into the nature of and interrelationship between factors that influence TB adherence.

  7. Illness perception, coping and adherence to treatment among patients with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vélez-Vélez, Esperanza; Bosch, Ricardo J

    2016-04-01

    To analyse the predictive value of illness representations on treatment adherence and coping strategies in a group of patients on haemodialysis. Understanding the cognitive and emotional factors that influence adherence behaviour and coping strategies and determining their relationship to sociodemographic factors remain a challenge; meeting this challenge would encourage comprehensive patient care, thereby improving their quality of life Cross-sectional study with predictive means in a sample of 135 patients on haemodialysis. Data collection occurred from September 2010-January 2012 and tools included the following: sociodemographic data, Illness Perception Questionnaire-Revised, the Cuestionario de Afrontamiento del Estrés and the Morisky-Green test to study adherence to treatment. Being a woman, having a greater knowledge of the disease and having a poorer sense of personal control affected adherence to treatment on controlling for each factor. 'Identity', 'personal control' and 'adherence' were associated with a proactive coping strategy, whereas 'evolution' and 'gender' were related independently to avoidance coping strategies; those who believed that their illness had a chronic course were more likely to cope by avoiding the problem and this tendency was stronger among women. This study provides evidence supporting the role of gender, knowledge about the disease and sense of personal control in adherence to therapeutic regimens of patients in chronic haemodialysis. The identification and characterization of patients' perception of chronic illness may represent a useful framework to influence disease outcomes such as adherence. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasti, Sharada P; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. A total of 282 (85.5%) respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014); alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035). Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription), followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop appropriate social policy to promote adherence among ART

  9. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in Nepal: a mixed-methods study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharada P Wasti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiretroviral therapy (ART is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. METHODS: A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. RESULTS: A total of 282 (85.5% respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p = 0.014; alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035. Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription, followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. CONCLUSION: Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients' lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop

  10. Factors Influencing Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment in Nepal: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasti, Sharada P.; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Freeman, Jennifer V.; van Teijlingen, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    Background Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is a lifesaver for individual patients treated for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Maintaining optimal adherence to antiretroviral drugs is essential for HIV infection management. This study aimed to understand the factors influencing adherence amongst ART-prescribed patients and care providers in Nepal. Methods A cross-sectional mixed-methods study surveying 330 ART-prescribed patients and 34 in-depth interviews with three different types of stakeholders: patients, care providers, and key people at policy level. Adherence was assessed through survey self-reporting and during the interviews. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with adherence, supplemented with a thematic analysis of the interview transcripts. Results A total of 282 (85.5%) respondents reported complete adherence, i.e. no missed doses in the four-weeks prior to interview. Major factors influencing adherence were: non-disclosure of HIV status (OR = 17.99, p =  0.014); alcohol use (OR = 12.89, p = 1 hour (OR = 2.84, p = 0.035). Similarly, lack of knowledge and negative perception towards ART medications also significantly affected non-adherence. Transport costs (for repeat prescription), followed by pills running out, not wanting others to notice, side-effects, and being busy were the most common reasons for non-adherence. The interviews also revealed religious or ritual obstacles, stigma and discrimination, ART-associated costs, transport problems, lack of support, and side-effects as contributing to non-adherence. Conclusion Improving adherence requires a supportive environment; accessible treatment; clear instructions about regimens; and regimens tailored to individual patients’ lifestyles. Healthcare workers should address some of the practical and cultural issues around ART medicine whilst policy-makers should develop appropriate social

  11. Patient education in groups increases knowledge of osteoporosis and adherence to treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Dorthe; Ryg, Jesper; Nielsen, Winnie

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Non-adherence to pharmacological treatment in osteoporosis is a well-recognized problem. We hypothesized that a group-based educational programme would increase patients' knowledge and level of adherence with medical treatment. METHODS: A total of 300 patients (32 men aged 65 ± 9 years...... and 268 women aged 63 ± 8 years), recently diagnosed with osteoporosis, were randomised to either an osteoporosis school programme (four classes of 8-12 participants over four weeks) or a control group. Teaching was multidisciplinary, based on patients' experiences and background and designed to encourage...... empowerment. Patients' knowledge about osteoporosis and adherence to treatment was assessed with self-completed questionnaires at baseline and after 3, 12, and 24 months. RESULTS: There were no significant differences at baseline between the two groups with respect to knowledge score or level of adherence...

  12. Investigating self-efficacy, disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in adolescents with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faint, Nicholas R; Staton, Janelle M; Stick, Stephen M; Foster, Juliet M; Schultz, André

    2017-05-01

    Patient adherence is integral to the effectiveness of prescribed treatment, and is associated with beneficial disease outcomes, yet in adolescents with cystic fibrosis, adherence is often sub-optimal. Multiple factors may contribute to treatment adherence, including disease knowledge and self-efficacy. In adolescents with cystic fibrosis: (i) to compare the disease knowledge of adolescents and their parents before transition to adult care; (ii) to determine the relationship between disease knowledge (adolescent, parent) and adherence; and (iii) to evaluate self-efficacy and its association with disease knowledge and adherence. Adolescents with cystic fibrosis and their parents were recruited from a tertiary children's hospital. Disease knowledge and self-efficacy was assessed using the Knowledge of Disease Management-CF and General Self-Efficacy Scales respectively. Using pharmacy records, medication possession ratio was calculated to measure treatment adherence in the preceding year. Thirty-nine adolescent (aged 12-17 (median 14) years) and parent pairs were recruited. Adherence to hypertonic saline, but not other medications, was significantly associated with disease knowledge in adolescents (r 2  = 0.40, P = 0.029). Mean (SD) adolescent self-efficacy was 30.8 (4.0), and not associated with disease knowledge or adherence. Mean (SD) disease knowledge was less in adolescents than parents (55 (16)% and 72 (14)% respectively, P < 0.001). Disease knowledge is sub-optimal in adolescents with cystic fibrosis, even in the 2 years immediately before transition to adult care. Given that adherence with some treatments has been associated with disease knowledge our results suggest the need for educational interventions in adolescents with cystic fibrosis to optimise self-management and health outcomes. © 2017 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  13. In rape trauma PTSD, patient characteristics indicate which trauma-focused treatment they are most likely to complete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefe, John R; Wiltsey Stirman, Shannon; Cohen, Zachary D; DeRubeis, Robert J; Smith, Brian N; Resick, Patricia A

    2018-04-01

    Dropout rates for effective therapies for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can be high, especially in practice settings. Although clinicians have intuitions regarding what treatment patients may complete, there are few systematic data to drive those judgments. A multivariable model of dropout risk was constructed with randomized clinical trial data (n = 160) comparing prolonged exposure (PE) and cognitive processing therapy (CPT) for rape-induced PTSD. A two-step bootstrapped variable selection algorithm was applied to identify moderators of dropout as a function of treatment condition. Employing identified moderators in a model, fivefold cross-validation yielded estimates of dropout probability for each patient in each condition. Dropout rates between patients who did and did not receive their model-indicated treatment were compared. Despite equivalent dropout rates across treatments, patients assigned to their model-indicated treatment were significantly less likely to drop out relative to patients who did not (relative risk = 0.49 [95% CI: 0.29-0.82]). Moderators included in the model were: childhood physical abuse, current relationship conflict, anger, and being a racial minority, all of which were associated with higher likelihood of dropout in PE than CPT. Individual differences among patients affect the likelihood they will complete a particular treatment, and clinicians can consider these moderators in treatment planning. In the future, treatment selection models could be used to increase the percentage of patients who will receive a full course of treatment, but replication and extension of such models, and consideration of how best to integrate them into routine practice, are needed. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Higher FKBP5, COMT, CHRNA5, and CRHR1 allele burdens are associated with PTSD and interact with trauma exposure: implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boscarino JA

    2012-03-01

    interacts with risk allele count, such that PTSD is increased in those with higher risk allele counts and higher trauma exposures. Since the single nucleotide polymorphisms studied encompass stress circuitry and addiction biology, these findings may have implications for neuropsychiatric research and treatment.Keywords: posttraumatic stress disorder, genetic association study, single nucleotide polymorphism, risk alleles, trauma exposure, neuroticism, childhood adversity

  15. Patient adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Salla A; Lewin, Simon A; Smith, Helen J; Engel, Mark E; Fretheim, Atle; Volmink, Jimmy

    2007-07-24

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and has received considerable attention in recent years, particularly in low- and middle-income countries where it is closely associated with HIV/AIDS. Poor adherence to treatment is common despite various interventions aimed at improving treatment completion. Lack of a comprehensive and holistic understanding of barriers to and facilitators of, treatment adherence is currently a major obstacle to finding effective solutions. The aim of this systematic review of qualitative studies was to understand the factors considered important by patients, caregivers and health care providers in contributing to TB medication adherence. We searched 19 electronic databases (1966-February 2005) for qualitative studies on patients', caregivers', or health care providers' perceptions of adherence to preventive or curative TB treatment with the free text terms "Tuberculosis AND (adherence OR compliance OR concordance)". We supplemented our search with citation searches and by consulting experts. For included studies, study quality was assessed using a predetermined checklist and data were extracted independently onto a standard form. We then followed Noblit and Hare's method of meta-ethnography to synthesize the findings, using both reciprocal translation and line-of-argument synthesis. We screened 7,814 citations and selected 44 articles that met the prespecified inclusion criteria. The synthesis offers an overview of qualitative evidence derived from these multiple international studies. We identified eight major themes across the studies: organisation of treatment and care; interpretations of illness and wellness; the financial burden of treatment; knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about treatment; law and immigration; personal characteristics and adherence behaviour; side effects; and family, community, and household support. Our interpretation of the themes across all studies produced a line

  16. Patient adherence to tuberculosis treatment: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salla A Munro

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and has received considerable attention in recent years, particularly in low- and middle-income countries where it is closely associated with HIV/AIDS. Poor adherence to treatment is common despite various interventions aimed at improving treatment completion. Lack of a comprehensive and holistic understanding of barriers to and facilitators of, treatment adherence is currently a major obstacle to finding effective solutions. The aim of this systematic review of qualitative studies was to understand the factors considered important by patients, caregivers and health care providers in contributing to TB medication adherence. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We searched 19 electronic databases (1966-February 2005 for qualitative studies on patients', caregivers', or health care providers' perceptions of adherence to preventive or curative TB treatment with the free text terms "Tuberculosis AND (adherence OR compliance OR concordance". We supplemented our search with citation searches and by consulting experts. For included studies, study quality was assessed using a predetermined checklist and data were extracted independently onto a standard form. We then followed Noblit and Hare's method of meta-ethnography to synthesize the findings, using both reciprocal translation and line-of-argument synthesis. We screened 7,814 citations and selected 44 articles that met the prespecified inclusion criteria. The synthesis offers an overview of qualitative evidence derived from these multiple international studies. We identified eight major themes across the studies: organisation of treatment and care; interpretations of illness and wellness; the financial burden of treatment; knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about treatment; law and immigration; personal characteristics and adherence behaviour; side effects; and family, community, and household support. Our interpretation of the

  17. Adherence to COPD treatment in Turkey and Saudi Arabia: results of the ADCARE study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokturk N

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Nurdan Kokturk,1 Mehmet Polatli,2 I Kivilcim Oguzulgen,1 Sarfraz Saleemi,3 Mohammed Al Ghobain,4 Javed Khan,5 Adam Doble,6 Luqman Tariq,7 Fayaz Aziz,7 Abdelkader El Hasnaoui7 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, School of Medicine, Gazi University, Besevler, Turkey; 2Department of Pulmonary Medicine, School of Medicine, Adnan Menderes University, Aydin, Turkey; 3Section of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Medicine, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Medicine, King Fahd Armed Forces Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia; 6Foxymed, Paris, France; 7GlaxoSmithKline, Dubai, UAE Background: COPD affects millions of people worldwide. Poor treatment adherence contributes to increased symptom severity, morbidity and mortality. This study was designed to investigate adherence to COPD treatment in Turkey and Saudi Arabia. Methods: An observational, cross-sectional study in adult COPD patients in Turkey and Saudi Arabia. Through physician-led interviews, data were collected on sociodemographics and disease history, including the impact of COPD on health status using the COPD Assessment Test (CAT; quality of life, using the EuroQol Five-Dimension questionnaire (EQ-5D; and anxiety and depression using the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. Treatment adherence was measured using the 8-item Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS-8. Multivariate logistic regression analysis examined the predictors of non-adherence and the impact of adherence on symptom severity. Results: Four hundred and five COPD patients participated: 199 in Turkey and 206 in Saudi Arabia. Overall, 49.2% reported low adherence (MMAS-8 <6. Of those, 74.7% reported high disease impact (CAT >15 compared to 58.4% reporting medium/high adherence (p=0.0008. Patients with low adherence reported a lower mean 3-level EQ-5D

  18. Responding to the Need for Sleep among Survivors of Interpersonal Violence: A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Cognitive-Behavioral Insomnia Intervention followed by PTSD Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, Wilfred R.; Heffner, Kathi L.; Crean, Hugh; Gallegos, Autumn M.; Walsh, Patrick; Seehuus, Martin; Cerulli, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but is not a focus of standard PTSD treatments. Psychological trauma exposure is associated with considerable physical and mental health morbidity, possibly due to the alterations in neuroendocrine function and inflammation observed in trauma exposed individuals. Although PTSD treatments are efficacious, they are associated with high drop-out rates in clinical trials and clinical practice. Finally, individuals with PTSD stemming from exposure to interpersonal violence represent an especially under-treated population with significant sleep disturbance. Community-based participatory research was utilized to design and prepare a clinical trial that randomizes recent survivors of interpersonal violence who have PTSD, depression, and insomnia to receive either: (1) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTi) followed by Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) for trauma, or (2) attention control followed by CPT. Outcome measures include subjective and objective measures of sleep, clinician-administered PTSD and depression scales, inflammatory cytokines, and salivary cortisol. Assessments are conducted at baseline, following the sleep or control intervention, and again following CPT. The design allows for: (1) the first test of a sleep intervention in this population; (2) the comparison of sequenced CBTi and CPT to attention control followed by CPT, and (3) assessing the roles of neuroendocrine function, inflammatory processes, and objective sleep markers in mediating treatment outcomes. The study’s overarching hypothesis is that treating insomnia will produce reduction in insomnia, PTSD, and depression severity, allowing patients to more fully engage in, and derive optimal benefits from, cognitive processing therapy. PMID:26343743

  19. Responding to the need for sleep among survivors of interpersonal violence: A randomized controlled trial of a cognitive-behavioral insomnia intervention followed by PTSD treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigeon, Wilfred R; Heffner, Kathi L; Crean, Hugh; Gallegos, Autumn M; Walsh, Patrick; Seehuus, Martin; Cerulli, Catherine

    2015-11-01

    Sleep disturbance is a common feature of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but is not a focus of standard PTSD treatments. Psychological trauma exposure is associated with considerable physical and mental health morbidity, possibly due to the alterations in neuroendocrine function and inflammation observed in trauma exposed individuals. Although PTSD treatments are efficacious, they are associated with high drop-out rates in clinical trials and clinical practice. Finally, individuals with PTSD stemming from exposure to interpersonal violence represent an especially under-treated population with significant sleep disturbance. Community-based participatory research was utilized to design and prepare a clinical trial that randomizes recent survivors of interpersonal violence who have PTSD, depression, and insomnia to receive either: (1) Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia (CBTi) followed by Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT) for trauma, or (2) attention control followed by CPT. Outcome measures include subjective and objective measures of sleep, clinician-administered PTSD and depression scales, inflammatory cytokines, and salivary cortisol. Assessments are conducted at baseline, following the sleep or control intervention, and again following CPT. The design allows for: (1) the first test of a sleep intervention in this population; (2) the comparison of sequenced CBTi and CPT to attention control followed by CPT, and (3) assessing the roles of neuroendocrine function, inflammatory processes, and objective sleep markers in mediating treatment outcomes. The study's overarching hypothesis is that treating insomnia will produce reduction in insomnia, PTSD, and depression severity, allowing patients to more fully engage in, and derive optimal benefits from, cognitive processing therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Blood Pressure Treatment Adherence and Control after Participation in the ReHOT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Silva de Jesus

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Lack of adherence to pharmacological treatment is one of the main causes of low control rates in hypertension. Objective: To verify treatment adherence and associated factors, as well as blood pressure (BP control in participants of the Resistant Hypertension Optimal Treatment (ReHOT clinical trial. Method: Cross-sectional study including all 109 patients who had completed the ReHOT for at least 6 months. We excluded those participants who failed to respond to the new recruitment after three phone contact attempts. We evaluated the BP control by ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM; controlled levels: 24-hour systolic and diastolic BP < 130 x 80 mmHg and analyzed the patients' treatment adherence using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS questionnaire validated by Bloch, Melo, and Nogueira (2008. The statistical analysis was performed with the software IBM SPSS statistics 21.0. We tested the normality of the data distribution with kurtosis and skewness. The variables tested in the study are presented with descriptive statistics. Comparisons between treatment adherence and other variables were performed with Student's t test for independent variables and Pearson's chi-square or Fisher's exact test. To conduct analyses among patients considering adherence to treatment and BP control, we created four groups: G0, G1, G2, and G3. We considered a 5% significance level in all tests. Results: During the ReHOT, 80% of the patients had good BP control and treatment adherence. Of 96 patients reevaluated in the present study, only 52.1% had controlled hypertension when assessed by ABPM, while 31.3% were considered adherent by the MMAS. Regarding other ABPM measures, we observed an absence of a nocturnal dip in 64.6% of the patients and a white-coat effect and false BP control in 23% and 12.5%, respectively. Patients' education level showed a trend towards being a determinant factor associated with lack of adherence (p = 0

  1. Hypertension: adherence to treatment in rural Bangladesh – findings from a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanam, Masuma Akter; Lindeboom, Wietze; Koehlmoos, Tracey Lynn Perez; Alam, Dewan Shamsul; Niessen, Louis; Milton, Abul Hasnat

    2014-01-01

    Background Poor adherence has been identified as the main cause of failure to control hypertension. Poor adherence to antihypertensive treatment is a significant cardiovascular risk factor, which often remains unrecognized. There are no previous studies that examined adherence with antihypertensive medication or the characteristics of the non-adherent patients in Bangladesh. Objective This paper aims to describe hypertension and factors affecting adherence to treatment among hypertensive persons in rural Bangladesh. Design The study population included 29,960 men and women aged 25 years and older from three rural demographic surveillance sites of the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b): Matlab, Abhoynagar, and Mirsarai. Data was collected by a cross-sectional design on diagnostic provider, initial, and current treatment. Discontinuation of medication at the time of interview was defined as non-adherence to treatment. Results The prevalence of hypertension was 13.67%. Qualified providers diagnosed only 53.5% of the hypertension (MBBS doctors 46.1 and specialized doctors 7.4%). Among the unqualified providers, village doctors diagnosed 40.7%, and others (nurse, health worker, paramedic, homeopath, spiritual healer, and pharmacy man) each diagnosed less than 5%. Of those who started treatment upon being diagnosed with hypertension, 26% discontinued the use of medication. Age, sex, education, wealth, and type of provider were independently associated with non-adherence to medication. More men discontinued the treatment than women (odds ratio [OR] 1.74, confidence interval [CI] 1.48–2.04). Non-adherence was greater when hypertension was diagnosed by unqualified providers (OR 1.52, CI 1.31–1.77). Hypertensive patients of older age, least poor quintile, and higher education were less likely to be non-adherent. Patients with cardiovascular comorbidity were also less likely to be non-adherent to antihypertensive medication (OR 0

  2. Quality of life and treatment adherence in Parkinson’s disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Mínguez-Mínguez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Quality of life and adherence to treatment are parameters of high relevance in those patients with chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to ascertain the quality of life and adherence to treatment of Parkinson’s disease patients. To this end, we performed a cross sectional study in patients diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease who belong to one of Albacete’s associations of patients and their families. The PDQ-39 and Morisky-Green questioners were used to determine the quality of life and adherence to treatment for a sample of 95 patients. Our data showed an average score of 33.47% in the PDQ-39, being the worst score domains mobility and bodily discomfort. On the other hand, a 31.6% of the patients were classified as adherent to treatment. The main factor associated with adequate adherence is the importance given to the medication by the patient. We found no association between adherence and quality of life.

  3. Psychosocial factors and adherence to drug treatment in patients on chronic haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Vieco, María P; Pérez-García, Rafael; Albalate, Marta; de Sequera, Patricia; Ortega, Mayra; Puerta, Marta; Corchete, Elena; Alcázar, Roberto

    2014-11-17

    The daily pill burden in hemodialysis patients is one of the highest reported to date in any chronic disease. The adherence to prescribed treatment has implications on the quality of life, the survival of patients, and the economic cost of their treatment, this being a priority public health issue. To evaluate the adherence to pharmacological treatment examining, among the possible causes of non-adherence, psychosocial factors such as depression, anxiety, cognitive impairment and social support. Transversal-observational study of thirty five patients that suffer from chronic renal disease and who are on manteinance hemodialysis, evaluated by self-reported measures. Non-adherent patients have significant higher depression index than adherent patients. Anxiety, cognitive impairment and social support do not show a significant relation with the degree of adherence or compliance with farmacological treatment. These results suggest that psychological intervention in chronic haemodialysis patients with a severe depression index could increase the degree of fulfillment and general well-being of renal patients.

  4. Non-adherence to standard treatment guidelines in a rural paediatric hospital in Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bruycker, M; Van den Bergh, R; Dahmane, A; Khogali, M; Schiavetti, B; Nzomukunda, Y; Alders, P; Allaouna, M; Cloquet, C; Enarson, D A; Satyarayanan, S; Magbity, E; Zachariah, R

    2013-06-21

    A rural paediatric hospital in Bo, Sierra Leone. To assess the level of adherence to standard treatment guidelines among clinicians prescribing treatment for children admitted with a diagnosis of malaria and/or lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), and determine the association between (non) adherence and hospital outcomes, given that non-rational use of medicines is a serious global problem. Secondary analysis of routine programme data. Data were collected for 865 children admitted with an entry diagnosis of malaria and 690 children with LRTI during the period January to April 2011; some patients were classified in both categories. Non-adherence to guidelines comprised use of non-standard drug regimens, dosage variations, non-standard frequency of administration and treatment duration. Cumulative non-adherence to guidelines for LRTI cases was 86%. For malaria, this involved 12% of patients. Potentially harmful non-adherence was significantly associated with an unfavourable hospital outcome, both for malaria and for LRTI cases. Overall non-adherence to standard treatment guidelines by clinicians in a routine hospital setting is very high and influences hospital outcomes. This study advocates for the implementation of routine measures to monitor and improve rational drug use and the quality of clinical care in such hospitals.

  5. Web-based depression treatment : Associations of clients' word use with adherence and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Zanden, Rianne; Curie, Keshia; van Londen - Barentsen, Monique|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/072312742; Kramer, Jeannet; Steen, Gerard; Cuijpers, Pim

    Background: The growing number of web-based psychological treatments, based on textual communication, generates a wealth of data that can contribute to knowledge of online and face-to-face treatments. We investigated whether clients' language use predicted treatment outcomes and adherence in Master

  6. Web-based depression treatment: Associations of clients word use with adherence and outocme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanden, R. van der; Curie, K.; van Londen, M.; Kramer, J.; Steen, G.J.; Cuijpers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background The growing number of web-based psychological treatments, based on textual communication, generates a wealth of data that can contribute to knowledge of online and face-to-face treatments. We investigated whether clients language use predicted treatment outcomes and adherence in Master

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  9. Surveying treatment preferences in U.S. Iraq-Afghanistan Veterans with PTSD symptoms: a step toward veteran-centered care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Eric F; Elbogen, Eric B; Wagner, H Ryan; Kudler, Harold; Calhoun, Patrick S; Brancu, Mira; Straits-Troster, Kristy A

    2015-04-01

    This study examined health care barriers and preferences among a self-selected sample of returning U.S. veterans drawn from a representative, randomly selected frame surveyed about posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology and mental health utilization in the prior year. Comparisons between treated (n = 160) and untreated (n = 119) veterans reporting PTSD symptoms were conducted for measures of barriers and preferences, along with logistic models regressing mental health utilization on clusters derived from these measures. Reported barriers corroborated prior research findings as negative beliefs about treatment and stigma were strongly endorsed, but only privacy concerns were associated with lower service utilization (B = -0.408, SE = 0.142; p = .004). The most endorsed preference (91.0%) was for assistance with benefits, trailed by help for physical problems, and particular PTSD symptoms. Help-seeking veterans reported stronger preferences for multiple interventions, and desire for services for families (B = 0.468, SE = 0.219; p = .033) and specific PTSD symptoms (B = 0.659, SE = 0.302; p = .029) were associated with increased utilization. Outcomes of the study suggested PTSD severity drove help-seeking in this cohort. Results also support the integration of medical and mental health services, as well as coordination of health and benefits services. Finally, the study suggested that outreach about privacy protections and treatment options could well improve engagement in treatment. Copyright © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  10. Resilience, religiosity and treatment adherence in hemodialysis patients: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire de Medeiros, Camila Maroni Marques; Arantes, Eder Pinheiro; Tajra, Rafael Dib de Paulo; Santiago, Hendrio Reginaldo; Carvalho, André Ferrer; Libório, Alexandre Braga

    2017-06-01

    Resilience and religiosity have received attention as an important process in the experience and management of chronic comorbidities; however, there is no study evaluating resilience in hemodialysis patients and its association with other psychological dimensions or with treatment adherence. This observational prospective study assessed resilience (25 item Wagnild and Young Resilience Scale), religiosity under three dimensions (organizational, non-organizational and intrinsic) using DUREL scale, depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9) and health-related quality of life (Short Form-36 questionnaire). The main outcomes were medication adherence using the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 (MMAR-8) and the missing/shortened dialysis sessions in the following six months. Of 208 patients approached, 202 (97.1%) agreed to participate. One hundred twenty-three patients (60.9%) were males and mean age was 52.8 ± 14.8 years-old. The median time on hemodialysis was 36 months (IQR, 12, 84). 82 (40.6%) patients obtained a MMAS-8 score adherence'. Overall, the mean score of medication adherence was low (5.7 ± 2.1). About adherence to hemodialysis sessions, patients missed a total of 234 (1.6%) hemodialysis sessions. Forty-eight patients (23.7%) missed an average of at least three sessions in six months. Regarding adherence to medication, there was no association in the uni- or multivariate analysis between religiosity dimensions and MMAS-8 score. After adjustment, resilience was positively associated with MMAS-8 score (standardized β coefficient .239, p = .016). Organized and intrinsic religiosity were associated with adherence to dialysis sessions (standardized β coefficient .258, p = .004 and .231, p = .026, respectively). Interestingly, opposite to medication adherence, more resilient patients were associated with less adherence to hemodialysis sessions (standardized β coefficient -.296, p = .001). Religiosity was associated with dialysis

  11. Measurement of treatment adherence with antipsychotic agents in patients with schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua S Ren

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Xinhua S Ren1,2,3, Lawrence Herz4,5, Shirley Qian1,2,3, Eric Smith3,4, Lewis E Kazis1,2,31The Center for the Assessment of Pharmaceutical Practices (CAPP, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 2Department of Health Policy and Management, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA; 3Center for Health Quality, Outcomes, and Economic Research, Bedford Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Bedford, MA, USA; 4Division of Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 5Mental Health Service Line, Bedford VA Medical Center, Bedford, MA, USAAbstract: The importance of medication adherence in sustaining control of schizophrenic symptoms has generated a great deal of interest in comparing levels of treatment adherence with different antipsychotic agents. However, the bulk of the research has yielded results that are often inconsistent. In this prospective, observational study, we assessed the measurement properties of 3 commonly used, pharmacy-based measures of treatment adherence with antipsychotic agents in schizophrenia using data from the Veterans Health Administration during 2000 to 2005. Patients were selected if they were on antipsychotics and diagnosed with schizophrenia (N = 18,425. A gap of ≥30 days (with no filled index medication was used to define discontinuation of treatment as well as medication “episodes,” or the number of times a patient returned to the same index agent after discontinuation of treatment within a 1-year period. The study found that the 3 existing measures differed in their approaches in measuring treatment adherence, suggesting that studies using these different measures would generate different levels of treatment adherence across antipsychotic agents. Considering the measurement problems associated with each existing approach, we offered a new, medication episode-specific approach, which would provide a fairer comparison of the levels of treatment adherence

  12. Treatment adherence and perception in patients on maintenance hemodialysis: a cross ? sectional study from Palestine

    OpenAIRE

    Naalweh, Karam Sh.; Barakat, Mohammad A.; Sweileh, Moutaz W.; Al-Jabi, Samah W.; Sweileh, Waleed M.; Zyoud, Sa?ed H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Adherence to diet recommendations, fluid restriction, prescribed medications, and attendance at hemodialysis (HD) sessions are essential for optimal and effective treatment of patients with end-stage renal disease. No data regarding this issue are available from Palestine. Therefore, this study was carried out to assess adherence to diet, fluid restriction, medications, and HD sessions. Methods A cross-sectional study of HD patients at An-Najah National University Hospital was carr...

  13. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment to Improve Adherence to Hemodialysis Fluid Restrictions: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Anson, Heather M.; Byrd, Michelle R.; Koch, Ellen I.

    2009-01-01

    This case report describes outpatient psychological treatment targeting adherence to fluid restrictions in a hemodialysis patient. The consequences of nonadherence to fluid restrictions in hemodialysis patients range from minor discomfort to increased hospitalizations and mortality rates. In addition, when patients chronically fail to adhere, they may no longer be candidates for kidney transplant. The interventions focused on polydipsia, characterized by excessive fluid intake. The methods in...

  14. An ontology for factors affecting tuberculosis treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogundele OA

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Olukunle Ayodeji Ogundele,1 Deshendran Moodley,1 Anban W Pillay,1 Christopher J Seebregts1,2 1UKZN/CSIR Meraka Centre for Artificial Intelligence Research and Health Architecture Laboratory, School of Mathematics, Statistics and Computer Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, 2Jembi Health Systems NPC, Cape Town, South Africa Purpose: Adherence behavior is a complex phenomenon influenced by diverse personal, cultural, and socioeconomic factors that may vary between communities in different regions. Understanding the factors that influence adherence behavior is essential in predicting which individuals and communities are at risk of nonadherence. This is necessary for supporting resource allocation and intervention planning in disease control programs. Currently, there is no known concrete and unambiguous computational representation of factors that influence tuberculosis (TB treatment adherence behavior that is useful for prediction. This study developed a computer-based conceptual model for capturing and structuring knowledge about the factors that influence TB treatment adherence behavior in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA.Methods: An extensive review of existing categorization systems in the literature was used to develop a conceptual model that captured scientific knowledge about TB adherence behavior in SSA. The model was formalized as an ontology using the web ontology language. The ontology was then evaluated for its comprehensiveness and applicability in building predictive models. Conclusion: The outcome of the study is a novel ontology-based approach for curating and structuring scientific knowledge of adherence behavior in patients with TB in SSA. The ontology takes an evidence-based approach by explicitly linking factors to published clinical studies. Factors are structured around five dimensions: factor type, type of effect, regional variation, cross-dependencies between factors, and treatment phase. The ontology is

  15. Errors in the 2017 APA Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of PTSD: What the Data Actually Says

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah K. Dominguez

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The American Psychological Association (APA Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD concluded that there was strong evidence for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT, cognitive processing therapy (CPT, cognitive therapy (CT, and exposure therapy yet weak evidence for eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR. This is despite the findings from an associated systematic review which concluded that EMDR leads to loss of PTSD diagnosis and symptom reduction. Depression symptoms were also found to improve more with EMDR than control conditions. In that review, EMDR was marked down on strength of evidence (SOE for symptom reduction for PTSD. However, there were several problems with the conclusions of that review. Firstly, in assessing the evidence in one of the studies, the reviewers chose an incorrect measure that skewed the data. We recalculated a meta-analysis with a more appropriate measure and found the SOE improved. The resulting effect size for EMDR on PTSD symptom reduction compared to a control condition was large for studies that meet the APA inclusion criteria (SMD = 1.28 and the heterogeneity was low (I2= 43%. Secondly, even if the original measure was chosen, we highlight inconsistencies with the way SOE was assessed for EMDR, CT, and CPT. Thirdly, we highlight two papers that were omitted from the analysis. One of these was omitted without any apparent reason. It found EMDR superior to a placebo control. The other study was published in 2015 and should have been part of APA guidelines since they were published in 2017. The inclusion of either study would have resulted in an improvement in SOE. Including both studies results in standard mean difference and confidence intervals that were better for EMDR than for CPT or CT. Therefore, the SOE should have been rated as moderate and EMDR assessed as at least equivalent to these CBT approaches in the APA guidelines. This would bring the APA

  16. Errors in the 2017 APA Clinical Practice Guideline for the Treatment of PTSD: What the Data Actually Says.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Sarah K; Lee, Christopher W

    2017-01-01

    The American Psychological Association (APA) Practice Guidelines for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) concluded that there was strong evidence for cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), cognitive processing therapy (CPT), cognitive therapy (CT), and exposure therapy yet weak evidence for eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR). This is despite the findings from an associated systematic review which concluded that EMDR leads to loss of PTSD diagnosis and symptom reduction. Depression symptoms were also found to improve more with EMDR than control conditions. In that review, EMDR was marked down on strength of evidence (SOE) for symptom reduction for PTSD. However, there were several problems with the conclusions of that review. Firstly, in assessing the evidence in one of the studies, the reviewers chose an incorrect measure that skewed the data. We recalculated a meta-analysis with a more appropriate measure and found the SOE improved. The resulting effect size for EMDR on PTSD symptom reduction compared to a control condition was large for studies that meet the APA inclusion criteria (SMD = 1.28) and the heterogeneity was low ( I 2 = 43%). Secondly, even if the original measure was chosen, we highlight inconsistencies with the way SOE was assessed for EMDR, CT, and CPT. Thirdly, we highlight two papers that were omitted from the analysis. One of these was omitted without any apparent reason. It found EMDR superior to a placebo control. The other study was published in 2015 and should have been part of APA guidelines since they were published in 2017. The inclusion of either study would have resulted in an improvement in SOE. Including both studies results in standard mean difference and confidence intervals that were better for EMDR than for CPT or CT. Therefore, the SOE should have been rated as moderate and EMDR assessed as at least equivalent to these CBT approaches in the APA guidelines. This would bring the APA guidelines in

  17. Improving Adherence to Treatment and Reducing Economic Costs of Hypertension: The Role of Olmesartan-Based Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Francesco Vittorio

    2017-09-01

    Poor adherence to antihypertensive treatment is the single most important factor of unsatisfactory blood pressure (BP) control. This review focuses on therapy-related factors affecting adherence and suggests how to improve it with a wise choice of treatment schedule. Complex drug treatment schemes, poor tolerability and drug substitutions are frequent causes of poor adherence which, in turn, causes insufficient BP control, greater incidence of cardiovascular events and, finally, higher global health costs. The effects of prescribing generic drugs and of drug substitutions on adherence is also discussed. In terms of adherence, generic drugs do not seem to be better than branded drugs, unless patients have to bear very high "out of pocket" expenses to buy original drugs, suggesting no advantages in switching drug with the mere goal of reducing the cost of therapy. An important role in improving adherence (and thus cardiovascular events and health expenditure) is also played by the availability of fixed-dose combinations; among antihypertensive drugs, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) are those associated with higher levels of adherence and persistence. Among ARBs, olmesartan stands out for a wide choice of effective fixed-dose combinations.

  18. Short and long term effectiveness of a subject's specific novel brain and vestibular rehabilitation treatment modality in combat veterans suffering from PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick Robert Carrick

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroduction: Treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD in combat veterans that have a long-term positive clinical effect has the potential to modify the treatment of PTSD. This outcome may result in changed and saved lives of our service personnel and their families. In a previous before-after-intervention study we demonstrated high statistical and substantively significant short-term changes in the Clinician Administered DSM-IV PTSD Scale (CAPS scores after a two week trial of a subject's particular novel brain and vestibular rehabilitation (VR program. The long-term maintenance of PTSD severity reduction was the subject of this study.Material and Methods:We studied the short and long term effectiveness of a subject's particular novel brain and VR treatment of PTSD in subjects who had suffered combat-related traumatic brain injuries in terms of PTSD symptom reduction. The trial was registered as ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02003352. We analyzed the difference in the CAPS scores pre and post treatment (one week and three months using our subjects as their matched controls. Results:The generalized least squares (GLS technique demonstrated that with our 26 subjects in the 3 timed groups the R2 within groups was 0.000, R2 between groups was 0.000 and overall the R2 was 0.000. The GLS regression was strongly statistically significant z = 21.29, p < 0.001, 95% CI [58.7, 70.63]. The linear predictive margins over time demonstrated strong statistical and substantive significance of decreasing PTSD severity scores for all timed CAPS tests.Discussion:Our investigation has the promise of the development of superior outcomes of treatments in this area that will benefit a global society. The length of the treatment intervention involved (two weeks is less that other currently available treatments and has profound implications for cost, duration of disability and outcomes in the treatment of PTSD in combat veterans.

  19. Association Between Adherence to Statins, Illness Perception, Treatment Satisfaction, and Quality of Life among Lebanese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Christine; Hallit, Souheil; Salhab, Mohammad; Hajj, Aline; Sarkis, Antoine; Nasser Ayoub, Eliane; Jabbour, Hicham; Rabbaa Khabbaz, Lydia

    2018-01-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate treatment adherence to statin and health-related quality of life (QOL) in Lebanese patients with dyslipidemia. Secondary objectives were to examine associations between treatment adherence, QOL, treatment satisfaction, and illness perception. This cross-sectional study, conducted in 20 community pharmacies from all districts of Lebanon between August 2016 and April 2017, enrolled 247 adult patients taking any statin. The mean age of the participants was 52.63 ± 11.92 years (57.5% males); the mean duration of treatment with a statin was 59.72 months. A significant association was found between adherence and marital status ( P salary, the marital status, the educational level, smoking cigarettes or waterpipes, and drinking alcohol were all associated with the Illness Perception Questionnaire scores ( P < 0.0001 for all variables). Secondary level of education (β = 13.43), smoking more than 3 waterpipes per week (β = 14.06), global satisfaction score (β = 0.32), convenience score (β = 0.29), and effectiveness score (β = 0.27) would significantly increase the adherence score. Smoking more than 15 cigarettes per day (β = -11.15) and a divorced status (β = -14.81) would however significantly decrease the adherence score. Significant associations were found between the illness perception score, the QOL domains, and the satisfaction domains ( P < .05 for all variables). This study showed that global satisfaction with treatment, convenience, and effectiveness are important factors that increase treatment adherence. Patient adherence results in patient satisfaction and improved QOL and is an important criterion for achieving desired therapeutic outcomes.

  20. Barriers affecting adherence to radiation treatment and strategies to overcome those barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangarajan, R; Jayaraman, K

    2017-01-01

    The WHO defines adherence as the extent to which a patient's behavior coincides with recommendations from a health-care provider. Nonadherence to cancer treatment has a major impact on the therapeutic outcome. To assess the prevalence of nonadherence to radiation regimen and to analyze the factors that affect adherence to cancer treatment. Patients receiving radiation treatment in our hospital were screened for adherence to appointment keeping and to the prescribed radiation regimen and patients who had unplanned treatment breaks during treatment were interviewed. Between January and July 2013, we identified 61 patients who had unplanned breaks during treatment. We analyzed the social, emotional, educational, economic, and therapeutic barriers that led to nonadherence. Of the 61 patients who had unplanned breaks during treatment, 54% were males and 46% were females. Fifty-seven percent of patients had head and neck cancers and 25% had gynecological cancers. Seventy-one percent of patients were planned for concurrent chemoradiation. The number of days of unplanned treatment breaks ranged from 3 to 27 days. Social and therapeutic barriers were found to be the most common factor that led to nonadherence in these patients. Identification of barriers that lead to nonadherence, designing strategies to overcome such barriers and effective communication becomes imperative to ensure uninterrupted treatment. Based on the above analysis, we have designed several strategies to improve adherence to treatment among our patients.

  1. Depression, patient characteristics, and attachment style: correlates and mediators of medication treatment adherence in a racially diverse primary care sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Lisa M; Tomek, Sara; Roter, Debra; Carson, Kathryn A; Mugoya, George; Cooper, Lisa A

    2016-03-01

    The depth and breadth of problems related to depressive symptomatology and optimal treatment outcomes, including medication treatment adherence, have long been documented in the literature. Missing are clear explanations as to what factors and patient characteristics may account for lack of medication treatment adherence. The two objectives of the current study were to examine the predictive strength of depression, patient characteristics, and patient attachment style regarding medication treatment adherence and to consider the extent to which attachment styles mediate the relation between depression and medication treatment adherence. Participants in the present study were 237 racially diverse American primary care patients with a diagnosis of hypertension who were participants in a clinical trial. Depression, patient characteristics, attachment style, and medication treatment adherence were assessed. Partly consistent with our four hypotheses, the following results were found: (a) Black American, younger, never married, and poorer patients had lower medication treatment adherence (b) depression was significantly associated with lower self-reported medication adherence; (c) insecure-dismissing attachment style was related to lower medication adherence; and (d) insecure-dismissing attachment style mediates the relation between depression and medication treatment adherence by exacerbating the negative association. Physicians and other primary care providers should consider how depressive symptomatology, patient characteristics, and attachment style may inform the treatment plans they put forward and the extent to which patients may adhere to those treatment plans.

  2. Antiretroviral treatment adherence as a mediating factor between psychosocial variables and HIV viral load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attonito, Jennifer; Dévieux, Jessy G; Lerner, Brenda D G; Hospital, Michelle M; Rosenberg, Rhonda

    2014-01-01

    Psychosocial factors may directly impact HIV health measures such as viral load (VL) whether or not patients are taking antiretroviral treatment (ART) consistently. Structural equation modeling plus Baron and Kenny's (1986) four-step approach were used to test a mediated model predicting VL among 246 HIV-infected adults who were on ART. Exogenous variables were social support, barriers to adherence, and stress. Moderators were alcohol use, marijuana use, and neurocognitive impairment. A small positive association between marijuana use and ART adherence approached significance. Only barriers to adherence predicted a decrease in adherence rates and an increase in VL. No other factors were significantly associated with either VL or adherence, and no interaction effects between exogenous variables and moderators were identified. The association between barriers to adherence and VL was partially mediated by ART adherence. Findings provide modest support for a direct link between psychosocial variables and a virologic response to ART. Copyright © 2014 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Resolution of trauma-related guilt following treatment of PTSD in female rape victims: a result of cognitive processing therapy targeting comorbid depression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishith, Pallavi; Nixon, Reginald D V; Resick, Patricia A

    2005-06-01

    Although Resick et al. [Resick, P.A., Nishith, P., Weaver, T.L., Astin, M.C., Feuer, C.A., 2002. A comparison of cognitive-processing therapy with prolonged exposure and a waiting condition for the treatment of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder in female rape victims. J. Consult. Clin. Psychol. 70, 867-879.] reported comparable results for treating rape-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) using either cognitive-processing therapy (CPT) or prolonged exposure (PE), there was some suggestion that CPT resulted in better outcomes than PE for certain aspects of trauma-related guilt. The present study revisited these findings to examine whether this effect was a function of improvement in a subset of participants with both PTSD and major depressive disorder (MDD). Results indicated that CPT was just as effective in treating "pure" PTSD and PTSD with comorbid MDD in terms of guilt. Clinical significance testing underscored that CPT was more effective in reducing certain trauma-related guilt cognitions than PE. Findings cannot be generalized to men, and only one measure of guilt was used. The observed superiority of CPT over PE for treating certain guilt cognitions was not due to participant comorbidity. Further research is recommended to untangle the relationship between guilt, depression and differential response to treatment in PTSD following sexual assault trauma.

  4. Contributing factors for therapeutic diet adherence in patients receiving haemodialysis treatment: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oquendo, Lissete González; Asencio, José Miguel Morales; de Las Nieves, Candela Bonill

    2017-12-01

    The objective of this integrative review is to identify the factors that contribute to diet adherence in people suffering from kidney disease who are receiving haemodialysis treatment. Adherence to the therapeutic regimen determines therapeutic success, quality of life and survival in patients on haemodialysis. Lack of diet adherence ranges from 25%-86% in patients receiving haemodialysis treatment and affects patient morbidity and mortality. An integrative literature review was conducted based on the criteria of Whittemore & Knafl. A literature review was performed by two members of the team using twelve databases including PubMed, CUIDEN, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library and ScienceDirect. The main issues identified after analysing the results were as follows: the intrinsic barriers (age, dialysis time, motivation, perceived benefit, distorted perception of adherence) and facilitators (self-efficacy, perception of disease, perception of control), extrinsic barriers (family dysfunction, lack of social support, cultural patterns of consumption of food) and facilitators (social support, relationship with healthcare providers), and interventions to encourage diet adherence, such as the use of motivational interviewing in educational interventions, and the training and education of relevant professionals in communication skills. Diet nonadherence remains a serious health problem and suffers from a lack of solid criteria to identify this condition. The onset of depression signs and the level of social support available to the patient should be assessed, because these are important factors that determine adherence to treatment. Professionals should be trained in health education and communication techniques to contribute to the patient's self-management and motivation for diet adherence. Controlled and randomised clinical studies involving predialysis stages should be performed to investigate the impact of the assessment and control of barriers to diet adherence. © 2017

  5. Adherence to a behavioral weight loss treatment program enhances weight loss and improvements in biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushama D Acharya

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Sushama D Acharya3, Okan U Elci3, Susan M Sereika1,2,3, Edvin Music3, Mindi A Styn3, Melanie Warziski Turk3, Lora E Burke2,31Department of Biostatistics, Graduate School of Public Health, 2Department of Epidemiology, Graduate School of Public Health, 3School of Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USAObjectives: To describe participants’ adherence to multiple components (attendance, energy intake, fat gram, exercise goals, and self-monitoring eating and exercise behaviors of a standard behavioral treatment program (SBT for weight loss and how adherence to these components may influence weight loss and biomarkers (triglycerides, low density lipoproteins [LDL], high density lipoprotein, and insulin during the intensive and less-intensive intervention phases. Methods: A secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial consisting of a SBT with either fat-restricted standard or lacto-ovo vegetarian diet. The 12-month intervention was delivered in 33 group sessions. The first six months reflected the intensive phase; the second six months, the less-intensive intervention phase. We conducted the analysis without regard to treatment assignment. Eligible participants included overweight/obese adults (N = 176; mean body mass index = 34.0 kg/m2. The sample was 86.9% female, 70.5% White, and 44.4 ± 8.6 years old. The outcome measures included weight and biomarkers. Results: There was a significant decline in adherence to each treatment component over time (P < 0.0001. In the first six months, adherence to attendance, self-monitoring and the energy goal were significantly associated with greater weight loss (P < 0.05. Adherence to attendance and exercise remained significantly associated with weight loss in the second six months (P < 0.05. Adherence to attendance, self-monitoring and exercise had indirect effects through weight loss on LDL, triglycerides, and insulin (P < 0.05.Conclusions: We observed a decline in adherence to each

  6. Collaborative decision-making and promoting treatment adherence in pediatric chronic illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Drotar

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dennis Drotar, Peggy Crawford, Margaret BonnerCincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio, USAAbstract: Collaborative or shared decision-making between health care providers and families can facilitate treatment adherence, health outcomes, and satisfaction with care in the management of pediatric chronic illness, but raises special challenges. Barriers such as authoritarian models of medical care as well as absence of time and opportunity for dialogue limit collaborative decision making and can disrupt treatment adherence. However, models of provider-family communication that emphasize communication and shared goal-setting inform an anticipatory guidance model of collaborative decision-making that can enhance treatment adherence. Salient challenges and strategies involved in implementing collaborative decision-making in pediatric chronic illness care are described. Research is needed to: 1 describe the communication and decision-making process in the management of pediatric chronic illness; and 2 evaluate the impact of interventions that enhance collaborative decision-making on provider-family communication, illness management, and treatment adherence.Keywords: collaborative decision-making, shared decision-making, treatment adherence, pediatric chronic illness

  7. Device-based brain stimulation to augment fear extinction: implications for PTSD treatment and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Marie-France; Camprodon, Joan A; Dougherty, Darin D; Milad, Mohammed R

    2014-04-01

    Conditioned fear acquisition and extinction paradigms have been widely used both in animals and humans to examine the neurobiology of emotional memory. Studies have also shown that patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit deficient extinction recall along with dysfunctional activation of the fear extinction network, including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus. A great deal of overlap exists between this fear extinction network and brain regions associated with symptom severity in PTSD. This suggests that the neural nodes of fear extinction could be targeted to reduce behavioral deficits that may subsequently translate into symptom improvement. In this article, we discuss potential applications of brain stimulation and neuromodulation methods, which, combined with a mechanistic understanding of the neurobiology of fear extinction, could be used to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders and develop novel therapeutic tools. To this end, we discuss the following stimulation approaches: deep-brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. We propose new translational research avenues that, from a systems neuroscience perspective, aim to expand our understanding of circuit dynamics and fear processing toward the practical development of clinical tools, to be used alone or in combination with behavioral therapies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Trauma, PTSD, and the Developing Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herringa, Ryan J

    2017-08-19

    PTSD in youth is common and debilitating. In contrast to adult PTSD, relatively little is known about the neurobiology of pediatric PTSD, nor how neurodevelopment may be altered. This review summarizes recent neuroimaging studies in pediatric PTSD and discusses implications for future study. Pediatric PTSD is characterized by abnormal structure and function in neural circuitry supporting threat processing and emotion regulation. Furthermore, cross-sectional studies suggest that youth with PTSD have abnormal frontolimbic development compared to typically developing youth. Examples include declining hippocampal volume, increasing amygdala reactivity, and declining amygdala-prefrontal coupling with age. Pediatric PTSD is characterized by both overt and developmental abnormalities in frontolimbic circuitry. Notably, abnormal frontolimbic development may contribute to increasing threat reactivity and weaker emotion regulation as youth age. Longitudinal studies of pediatric PTSD are needed to characterize individual outcomes and determine whether current treatments are capable of restoring healthy neurodevelopment.

  9. Associations between patients' risk attitude and their adherence to statin treatment - a population based questionnaire and register study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfoed, Benedicte Marie Lind; Paulsen, Maja Skov; Christensen, Palle Mark

    2016-01-01

    the risk-averse patients, OR 0.80 (95 %-CI 0.68-0.95) and OR 0.83 (95 %-CI 0.71-0.98), respectively. No significant association was found between adherence and financial risk attitude. Further, patients in the youngest age group and patients with no CVD were less adherent to statin treatment. CONCLUSION......: We find some indication that risk attitude is associated with adherence to statin treatment, and that risk-neutral and risk-seeking patients may have poorer adherence than risk-averse patients. This is important for clinicians to consider when discussing optimal treatment decisions...... on the association between risk attitude and adherence. The aim of the present study was to estimate associations between patients' adherence to statin treatment and different dimensions of risk attitude, and to identify subgroups of patients with poor adherence. METHODS: Population-based questionnaire and register...

  10. Association Between Adherence to Glasses Wearing During Amblyopia Treatment and Improvement in Visual Acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maconachie, Gail D E; Farooq, Shegufta; Bush, Glen; Kempton, Julie; Proudlock, Frank A; Gottlob, Irene

    2016-12-01

    Occlusion dose monitors have helped establish that better adherence to occlusion is associated with improved visual outcomes in patients undergoing amblyopia treatment. However, the role of adherence to glasses wearing is unknown. To establish the feasibility and reliability of objectively monitoring adherence to glasses wearing using age-based norms, establish the association between adherence to glasses wearing and improvement in visual acuity (VA) after optical treatment and occlusion therapy, and analyze the effect of age, sex, refractive errors, type of amblyopia, and adherence to glasses wearing on improvement in VA. A prospective, observational, nonmasked, cohort study was conducted between June 8, 2008, and June 30, 2013, among patients at a pediatric ophthalmology clinic of a tertiary care hospital who were newly diagnosed with anisometropic and/or strabismic amblyopia and had not undergone previous treatment. The study consisted of a glasses phase (18 weeks) and a patching phase (glasses and occlusion for 10 hours per day for 12 weeks). Reliability of the glasses monitors was assessed by comparing diary entries and monitor recordings in adults. Objective monitoring of glasses wearing and occlusion. Adherence to glasses wearing (hours per day) and effect on VA. Among 20 children with anisometropia (mean [SD] age, 6.20 [2.16] years; 11 boys and 9 girls) and 20 with strabismic or mixed amblyopia (mean [SD] age, 4.90 [1.36] years; 10 boys and 10 girls), adherence to glasses wearing was successfully monitored in all but 1 patient. Agreement between diaries and monitored times wearing glasses in adults was high (intraclass correlation coefficient, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.999-1.00). Median (SD) adherence to glasses wearing was 70% (25.3%). A moderate correlation was observed between adherence to glasses wearing and percentage improvement in VA during the glasses phase (r = 0.462; P = .003). Multiple regression revealed that age (β = -0.535; P = .001

  11. The relationship of gender and gender identity to treatment adherence among individuals with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Micula-Gondek, Weronika; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Bialko, Christopher

    2011-08-01

    It has been demonstrated that 46% to 48% of individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) are at least partially nonadherent with prescribed medication. Reports of whether male gender is a predictor of treatment nonadherence in BD have been inconsistent. The construct of gender may also be a matter of cultural orientation, and psychological gender, as a component of self-perception, may affect the experience of mental illness. Gender identity is the subjective experience of one's individuality as male or female. This cross-sectional study evaluated gender and gender identity among men and women with BD as they relate to self-reported medication treatment adherence. This secondary analysis of a larger study on treatment adherence evaluated men and women with BD being treated with mood-stabilizing medications in a community mental health clinic. Gender identity and treatment adherence were evaluated using the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) and the Tablets Routine Questionnaire, respectively. Other measures included assessing BD symptoms using the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and mania symptoms using the Young Mania Rating Scale, as well as psychosocial support with the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List and locus of control with the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale. Mean age of the 70 men and 70 women with type I BD was 43.1 years for adherent patients and 40.8 years for nonadherent patients. Women with BD had mean scores on the BSRI consistent with general population norms, whereas men with BD had scores suggesting lower levels of self-perceived masculinity than population norms. There were no differences between men and women on adherence; however, men with high BSRI masculinity scores had less adherence than other men in the sample (P = 0.04). Lower scores on the "powerful others" dimension of locus of control were associated with lower adherence. For women, there was no relationship between BSRI masculinity scores and adherence. Gender identity in

  12. Antiretroviral Treatment Adherence: Knowledge and Experiences among Adolescents and Young Adults in Soweto, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie Hornschuh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV management of adolescents and young adults (AYAs is particularly pertinent to sub-Saharan Africa, where the pediatric HIV burden is marked. Antiretroviral treatment (ART adherence is a major challenge for AYAs. This qualitative study explored knowledge and experiences of adherence amongst AYAs attending treatment at the Perinatal HIV Research Unit (PHRU, Soweto, South Africa. Four focus group discussions (FGDs and eight in-depth interviews (IDIs were conducted with HIV-infected 15–25-year-old ART recipients. Transcripts were coded thematically. Participants (n=26 were aged median 18.5 years, 59.1% female and 69.2% virally suppressed <400 cp/ml. Three main themes emerged during FGDs and IDIs: (i correct knowledge about how to be adherent, benefits, and nonadherence consequences, (ii social, personal, and medication-related barriers to adherence, and (iii reminder, concealment, and motivational strategies to optimize adherence. Interventions to improve AYA adherence could focus on practical strategies, including status disclosure and medication concealment.

  13. The guardians' perspective on paediatric cancer treatment in Malawi and factors affecting adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Israëls, Trijn; Chirambo, Chawanangwa; Caron, Huib; de Kraker, Jan; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Reis, Ria

    2008-01-01

    Abandonment of paediatric cancer treatment is a common problem in developing countries. Little is known about the guardians' perspective on cancer treatment in these countries, especially the factors that affect adherence. Following a pilot study enquiring into the possible causes of abandonment, a

  14. The guardians' perspective on paediatric cancer treatment in Malawi and factors affecting adherence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Israels, T.; Chirambo, C.; Caron, H.; de Kraker, J.; Molyneux, E.; Reis, R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Abandonment of paediatric cancer treatment is a common problem in developing countries. Little is known about the guardians' perspective on cancer treatment in these countries, especially the factors that affect adherence. Methods: Following a pilot study enquiring into the possible

  15. Social networks and treatment adherence among Latino offenders with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eno Louden, Jennifer; Manchak, Sarah M

    2018-02-01

    Mental health treatment adherence is often required for offenders with mental illness supervised on probation and parole. However, research on offenders with mental illness has largely overlooked cultural and ethnic responsivity factors that may affect adherence to treatment. Latinos are a quickly growing subgroup of offenders whose social networks differ in meaningful ways from European Americans' (e.g., size, composition, centrality of family). Social networks are known to relate to both clinical and criminal justice outcomes for offenders with mental illness, and there are features of nonoffender Latinos' social networks that suggest that findings distilled from work with non-Latino offenders may not apply to them. The present study examined the social networks of 86 Latino probationers with serious mental illness to (a) describe the size and composition of these networks and (b) to determine which factors of social networks are related to treatment adherence. The authors found that Latino offenders' social networks are small (∼6 individuals), consisting primarily of family and professionals such as treatment providers and probation officers. Supportive relationships with nonprofessionals and treatment providers was related to lower likelihood of missing treatment appointments, whereas social control and pressure from family and friends to attend treatment was not related to treatment adherence. Findings are discussed within the context of improved practices for community corrections and mental health agencies in working with Latino offenders with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Treatment Adherence, Competence, and Outcome in Individual and Family Therapy for Adolescent Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Aaron; Henderson, Craig E.; Dauber, Sarah; Barajas, Priscilla C.; Fried, Adam; Liddle, Howard A.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the impact of treatment adherence and therapist competence on treatment outcome in a controlled trial of individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and multidimensional family therapy (MDFT) for adolescent substance use and related behavior problems. Participants included 136 adolescents (62 CBT, 74 MDFT) assessed at intake,…

  17. Exploring ‘generative mechanisms’ of the antiretroviral adherence club intervention using the realist approach: a scoping review of research-based antiretroviral treatment adherence theories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand C. Mukumbang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Poor retention in care and non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART continue to undermine the success of HIV treatment and care programmes across the world. There is a growing recognition that multifaceted interventions – application of two or more adherence-enhancing strategies – may be useful to improve ART adherence and retention in care among people living with HIV/AIDS. Empirical evidence shows that multifaceted interventions produce better results than interventions based on a singular perspective. Nevertheless, the bundle of mechanisms by which multifaceted interventions promote ART adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we reviewed theories on ART adherence to identify candidate/potential mechanisms by which the adherence club intervention works. Methods We searched five electronic databases (PubMed, EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PsycARTICLES and Google Scholar using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH terms. A manual search of citations from the reference list of the studies identified from the electronic databases was also done. Twenty-six articles that adopted a theory-guided inquiry of antiretroviral adherence behaviour were included for the review. Eleven cognitive and behavioural theories underpinning these studies were explored. We examined each theory for possible ‘generative causality’ using the realist evaluation heuristic (Context-Mechanism-Outcome configuration, then, we selected candidate mechanisms thematically. Results We identified three major sets of theories: Information-Motivation-Behaviour, Social Action Theory and Health Behaviour Model, which explain ART adherence. Although they show potential in explaining adherence bebahiours, they fall short in explaining exactly why and how the various elements they outline combine to explain positive or negative outcomes. Candidate mechanisms indentified were motivation, self-efficacy, perceived social support, empowerment, perceived threat, perceived

  18. Exploring 'generative mechanisms' of the antiretroviral adherence club intervention using the realist approach: a scoping review of research-based antiretroviral treatment adherence theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukumbang, Ferdinand C; Van Belle, Sara; Marchal, Bruno; van Wyk, Brian

    2017-05-04

    Poor retention in care and non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) continue to undermine the success of HIV treatment and care programmes across the world. There is a growing recognition that multifaceted interventions - application of two or more adherence-enhancing strategies - may be useful to improve ART adherence and retention in care among people living with HIV/AIDS. Empirical evidence shows that multifaceted interventions produce better results than interventions based on a singular perspective. Nevertheless, the bundle of mechanisms by which multifaceted interventions promote ART adherence are poorly understood. In this paper, we reviewed theories on ART adherence to identify candidate/potential mechanisms by which the adherence club intervention works. We searched five electronic databases (PubMed, EBSCOhost, CINAHL, PsycARTICLES and Google Scholar) using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms. A manual search of citations from the reference list of the studies identified from the electronic databases was also done. Twenty-six articles that adopted a theory-guided inquiry of antiretroviral adherence behaviour were included for the review. Eleven cognitive and behavioural theories underpinning these studies were explored. We examined each theory for possible 'generative causality' using the realist evaluation heuristic (Context-Mechanism-Outcome) configuration, then, we selected candidate mechanisms thematically. We identified three major sets of theories: Information-Motivation-Behaviour, Social Action Theory and Health Behaviour Model, which explain ART adherence. Although they show potential in explaining adherence bebahiours, they fall short in explaining exactly why and how the various elements they outline combine to explain positive or negative outcomes. Candidate mechanisms indentified were motivation, self-efficacy, perceived social support, empowerment, perceived threat, perceived benefits and perceived barriers. Although these candidate

  19. Stigma, social support, and treatment adherence among HIV-positive patients in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Michael Jonathan; Murray, Jordan Keith; Suwanteerangkul, Jiraporn; Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2014-10-01

    Our study assessed the influence of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence among people living with HIV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and whether social support had a moderating effect on this relationship. We recruited 128 patients living with HIV from Sansai Hospital, a community hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and collected data through structured interviews. All forms of HIV-related stigma considered in this study (personalized experience, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attitudes) were negatively correlated with adherence to anti-retroviral regimens. Multiple linear regression indicated that total HIV-related stigma was more predictive of treatment adherence than any individual stigma type, after adjusting for socio-demographic and health characteristics. Tests of interaction showed that social support did not appear to moderate the association between HIV stigma and treatment adherence. Our findings suggest that community and government efforts to improve public perceptions about people living with HIV might promote treatment adherence behaviors among HIV-positive patients.

  20. Effectiveness of Educational Technology in Promoting Quality of Life and Treatment Adherence in Hypertensive People.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Célia Caetano de Souza

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of an educational intervention with use of educational technology (flipchart to promote quality of life (QOL and treatment adherence in people with hypertension. It was an intervention study of before-and-after type conducted with 116 hypertensive people registered in Primary Health Care Units. The educational interventions were conducted using the flipchart educational technology. Quality of life was assessed through the MINICHAL (lowest score = better QOL and the QATSH (higher score = better adherence was used to assess the adherence to hypertension treatment. Both were measured before and after applying the intervention. In the analysis, we used the Student's t-test for paired data. The average baseline quality of life was 11.66 ± 7.55, and 7.71 ± 5.72 two months after the intervention, showing a statistically significant reduction (p <0.001 and mean of differences of 3.95. The average baseline adherence to treatment was 98.03 ± 7.08 and 100.71 ± 6.88 two months after the intervention, which is statistically significant (p < 0.001, and mean of differences of 2.68. The conclusion was that the educational intervention using the flipchart improved the total score of quality of life in the scores of physical and mental domains, and increased adherence to hypertension treatment in people with the disease.

  1. [Do commercial sex workers who discuss treatment with family and friends adhere to it better?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, A; Traoré, I; Diallo, R; Ouédraogo, A; Andonaba, J; Konate, I; Berthe, A; Huet, C; Msellati, P; Visier, L; Mayaud, P; Nagot, N

    2009-01-01

    The number of HIV trials in Africa is increasing, and they target population groups with high HIV incidence, such as sex workers. Little information, however, is available about the adherence to long-term therapy among such marginalized groups with few economic resources and poor social and family support. A project called "Yerelon" ("know herself" in the Dioula language) began in 1998 in Bobo-Dioulasso to improve the health of women involved in commercial sex through STI/HIV prevention and care adapted to them. This study was conducted before introducing long-term treatment to the population, to assess the effect of communication with those around them on the capacity of these vulnerable women to adhere to drug prescriptions. The study was based on interviews conducted during the pilot phase of a 3-month trial of vitamins with potential participants. It concerned two groups of women: one group was infected with HIV (N = 22), the other was not (N = 20); all women in both groups were infected by HSV-2, however. For 5 weeks, the two psychologists of the study team in charge of adherence assessment carried out weekly in-depth interviews with the participants. The qualitative data analysis was organised around several themes. The data were related to aspects of communication with family and friends, serologic results, and adherence. According to our definition of communication about treatment, 20 participants communicated with their family and friends; adherence was good for all but three of them. Women who reported that they were married or living with someone (7/42) nearly all spoke about the study treatment (06/07) with him. Of 16 participants living in a family, 10 communicated with them about the treatment. On the other hand, as seems logical, single women who lived alone spoke less often about the treatment with family and friends (04/19). Talking about the treatment did not appear to involve the family or friends in the treatment; no one reminded any participant

  2. Strategies to improve adherence to treatment in adolescents and young adults with cancer: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson EG

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Eden G Robertson,1,2 Claire E Wakefield,1,2 Kate H Marshall,2 Ursula M Sansom-Daly1–3 1Discipline of Paediatrics, School of Women's and Children's Health, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, Australia; 2Behavioural Sciences Unit, Kids Cancer Centre, Sydney Children's Hospital, 3Sydney Youth Cancer Service, Prince of Wales/Sydney Children's Hospital, Randwick, NSW, Australia Purpose: Adolescents and young adults (AYAs with cancer have higher rates of nonadherence to treatment relative to younger and older cancer patients. Efforts to improve adherence in this population are therefore increasing. This review aimed: 1 to synthesize recommendations and strategies used to improve treatment adherence in AYAs with cancer, and 2 to summarize the available evidence supporting the efficacy of adherence-promoting strategies for AYAs with cancer.Methods: We conducted a systematic review with two stages: 1 a narrative stage, to analyze expert recommendations, and 2 an evaluative stage, to summarize quantitative evidence for interventions. Four electronic databases were searched for studies involving AYAs, aged 10–39 years, with cancer, published from 2005 to 2015. Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines were used to ensure quality of the review. The Delphi list was used to assess study quality.Results: Nine articles were identified in the narrative stage of the review. For the evaluative stage, out of 113 screened abstracts, only one eligible intervention was identified. Common themes of adherence-promoting strategies were grouped into five domains: developmental, communication, educational, psychological well-being, and logistical/management strategies. Strategies to address developmental stage and to improve communication were the most highly recommended to improve adherence. Few strategies focused on the role of the patient in adherence. One

  3. Exposure and non-fear emotions: A randomized controlled study of exposure-based and rescripting-based imagery in PTSD treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langkaas, Tomas Formo; Hoffart, Asle; Øktedalen, Tuva; Ulvenes, Pål G; Hembree, Elizabeth A; Smucker, Mervin

    2017-10-01

    Interventions involving rescripting-based imagery have been proposed as a better approach than exposure-based imagery when posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with emotions other than fear. Prior research led to the study's hypotheses that (a) higher pretreatment non-fear emotions would predict relatively better response to rescripting as compared to exposure, (b) rescripting would be associated with greater reduction in non-fear emotions, and (c) pretreatment non-fear emotions would predict poor response to exposure. A clinically representative sample of 65 patients presenting a wide range of traumas was recruited from patients seeking and being offered PTSD treatment in an inpatient setting. Subjects were randomly assigned to 10 weeks of treatment involving either rescripting-based imagery (Imagery Rescripting; IR) or exposure-based imagery (Prolonged Exposure; PE). Patients were assessed on outcome and emotion measures at pretreatment, posttreatment and 12 months follow-up. Comparison to control benchmarks indicated that both treatments were effective, but no outcome differences between them appeared. None of the initial hypotheses were supported. The results from this study challenge previous observations and hypotheses about exposure mainly being effective for fear-based PTSD and strengthen the notion that exposure-based treatment is a generally effective treatment for all types of PTSD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. An investigation of outcome expectancies as a predictor of treatment response for combat veterans with PTSD: comparison of clinician, self-report, and biological measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; Maples, Jessica L; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D; Heekin, Mary; Rothbaum, Barbara O

    2015-06-01

    Outcome expectancy, or the degree to which a client believes that therapy will result in improvement, is related to improved treatment outcomes for multiple disorders. There is a paucity of research investigating this relation in regards to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Additionally, the bulk of the research on outcome expectancy and treatment outcomes has relied mostly on self-report outcome measures. The relation between outcome expectancy on self-report measures, clinician-rated measures, and two biological indices (fear-potentiated startle and cortisol reactivity) of PTSD symptoms was explored. The sample included combat veterans (N = 116) treated with virtual reality exposure therapy for PTSD. Results supported a negative association between outcome expectancy and both self-report and clinician-rated symptoms at the conclusion of treatment, but outcome expectancy was related to the magnitude of change during treatment for self-report measures only. Outcome expectancy was unrelated to biological measures of treatment response. These findings suggest that outcome expectancy may be related to patient and clinician perceptions of outcomes, but not biological indices of outcome for PTSD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, treatment adherence and control of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueira, Ana Laura Galhardo; Boas, Lilian Cristiane Gomes Villas; Coelho, Anna Claudia Martins; Freitas, Maria Cristina Foss de; Pace, Ana Emilia

    2017-04-20

    to assess the effect of educational interventions for knowledge on the disease, medication treatment adherence and glycemic control of diabetes mellitus patients. evaluation research with "before and after" design, developed in a sample of 82 type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. To collect the data, the Brazilian version of the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A), the Measure of Adherence to Treatments and the electronic system at the place of study were used. The data were collected before and after the end of the educational interventions. The educational activities were developed within 12 months, mediated by the Diabetes Conversation Maps, using the Cognitive Social Theory to conduct the interventions. the knowledge on the disease (pknowledge about diabetes mellitus, the medication treatment adherence and the glycated hemoglobin rates.

  6. The Effects of Feedback on Adherence to Treatment: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of RCTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seewoodharry, Mansha D; Maconachie, Gail D E; Gillies, Clare L; Gottlob, Irene; McLean, Rebecca J

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this systematic review is to determine whether providing feedback, guided by subjective or objective measures of adherence, improves adherence to treatment. Data sources included MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, and reference lists of retrieved articles. Only RCTs comparing the effect of feedback on adherence outcome were included. Three independent reviewers extracted data for all potentially eligible studies using an adaptation of the Cochrane Library data extraction sheet. The primary outcome, change in adherence, was obtained by measuring the difference between adherence at baseline visit (prior to feedback) and at the last visit (post-feedback). Twenty-four studies were included in the systematic review, and 16 found a significant improvement in adherence in the intervention group (change in adherence range, -13% to +22%), whereas adherence worsened in the control group (change in adherence range, -32% to 10.2%). Meta-analysis included six studies, and the pooled effect showed that mean percentage adherence increased by 10.02% (95% CI=3.15%, 16.89%, p=0.004) more between baseline and follow-up in the intervention groups compared with control groups. Meta-regression confirmed that study quality, form of monitoring adherence, delivery of feedback, or study duration did not influence effect size. Feedback guided by objective or subjective measures of adherence improves adherence and, perhaps more importantly, prevents worsening of adherence over time even when only small absolute improvements in adherence were noted. Increased use of feedback to improve treatment adherence has the potential to reduce avoidable healthcare costs caused by non-adherence. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Delayed unpaired extinction as a treatment for hyperarousal of the rabbit nictitating membrane response and its implications for treating PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, Bernard G; Smith-Bell, Carrie A; Burhans, Lauren B

    2018-04-01

    Treatment for PTSD (Post-traumatic stress disorder) is rarely available immediately after trauma and often delayed for weeks or months after an event. In a rabbit eyeblink conditioning model of PTSD, we have previously shown that presentations of a tone conditioned stimulus (CS) and shock unconditioned stimulus (US) in an explicitly unpaired manner known as unpaired extinction is effective in reducing CS responding and US hyperarousal even if shock intensity is reduced eight-fold and elicits only minimal responding. Here we determined if delayed delivery of unpaired extinction would still be effective in extinguishing hyperarousal. Rabbits were tested for sensitivity to shock before CS-US pairings and after six days of unpaired extinction presented a day, a week or a month after CS-US pairings. Hyperarousal was extinguished a day and a week after conditioning but not after a month suggesting a significant delay in "treatment" can make hyperarousal persist. We next assessed if this persistence of hyperarousal was associative by comparing rabbits given CS-US pairings to those given explicitly unpaired CS and US presentations, measuring hyperarousal a day and a month later, followed by unpaired extinction and hyperarousal assessment. After four weeks, there was an increase in responding for all rabbits but only rabbits receiving CS-US pairings showed a significant increase in associatively-mediated hyperarousal. Importantly, both paired and unpaired groups showed increased levels of responding after unpaired extinction suggesting treatment delayed for too long may no longer be effective and could cause generalized hyperarousal. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving Adherence to Smoking Cessation Treatment: Smoking Outcomes in a Web-based Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Amanda L; Papandonatos, George D; Cha, Sarah; Erar, Bahar; Amato, Michael S

    2018-03-15

    Partial adherence in Internet smoking cessation interventions presents treatment and evaluation challenges. Increasing adherence may improve outcomes. To present smoking outcomes from an Internet randomized trial of two strategies to encourage adherence to tobacco dependence treatment components: (i) a social network (SN) strategy to integrate smokers into an online community and (ii) free nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). In addition to intent-to-treat analyses, we used novel statistical methods to distinguish the impact of treatment assignment from treatment utilization. A total of 5,290 current smokers on a cessation website (WEB) were randomized to WEB, WEB + SN, WEB + NRT, or WEB + SN + NRT. The main outcome was 30-day point prevalence abstinence at 3 and 9 months post-randomization. Adherence measures included self-reported medication use (meds), and website metrics of skills training (sk) and community use (comm). Inverse Probability of Retention Weighting and Inverse Probability of Treatment Weighting jointly addressed dropout and treatment selection. Propensity weights were used to calculate Average Treatment effects on the Treated. Treatment assignment analyses showed no effects on abstinence for either adherence strategy. Abstinence rates were 25.7%-32.2% among participants that used all three treatment components (sk+comm +meds).Treatment utilization analyses revealed that among such participants, sk+comm+meds yielded large percentage point increases in 3-month abstinence rates over sk alone across arms: WEB = 20.6 (95% CI = 10.8, 30.4), WEB + SN = 19.2 (95% CI = 11.1, 27.3), WEB + NRT = 13.1 (95% CI = 4.1, 22.0), and WEB + SN + NRT = 20.0 (95% CI = 12.2, 27.7). Novel propensity weighting approaches can serve as a model for establishing efficacy of Internet interventions and yield important insights about mechanisms. NCT01544153.

  9. Analysis of the factors that prevent adherence to treatment in patients with diabetes mellitus and the strategies that contribute to the improvement in adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Likhodey

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This review examined the current problem of low adherence to treatment in patients with chronic diseases, particularly type 2 diabetes mellitus. According to the definition of the World Health Organization, ‘adherence to treatment’ is the degree to which a patient’s behaviour corresponds to the doctor’s recommendations with respect to medications and implementation of dietary advice and/or lifestyle changes. The current medical literature includes a large number of scientific publications devoted to the study of various factors that lead to low adherence to treatment. The term ‘barriers’ is most often used to designate these factors. The first part of this work contains an analysis of the main factors that impede compliance to the doctor’s recommendations, such as socioeconomic and psychological (personal barriers related to the disease itself, the peculiarities of its treatment and the organisation of medical care (the health care system. The second part of this review examines the different theoretical models of patient behaviour and strategies that improve adherence to treatment. Most researchers believe that there is an unsatisfactory (low adherence to treatment and that none of the existing intervention strategies can improve adherence to treatment among all patients. The cornerstone of the entire diabetes management system is the training of patients within the framework of developed structured programmes. Conversely,, success depends on the individual approach, the course of the disease and the mandatory consideration of the individual psychological characteristics of each person. Establishment of a partnership built on trust between a doctor and a patient contributes to greater patient satisfaction with treatment and improved adherence, and this relationship ultimately affects the treatment efficacy and clinical outcomes.

  10. Nature-based therapy as a treatment for veterans with PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Dorthe Varning

    2017-01-01

    studies. The purpose of this was to give an overview of existing literature, and there can be studies, that are not found in this process. Including qualitative and quantitative methods are useful in a process of understanding the impact of NBT for veterans with PTSD. The quantitative studies, which......, has been comprehensively conducted. This work is the foundation for the recommendations to decision makers and politicians. Design/methodology/approach: This paper provides a conceptual analyses and a general review of the literature. Following steps have been conducted. Based on the research question....... Being in a group of other veterans facing the same problems was highlighted as well. Some studies measured the ability to return to workforce for the veterans and found NBT beneficial in that process. Research limitations/implications: The limitation of the research due to the methods of identifying...

  11. Managing childhood eczema: qualitative study exploring carers' experiences of barriers and facilitators to treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santer, Miriam; Burgess, Hana; Yardley, Lucy; Ersser, Steven J; Lewis-Jones, Sue; Muller, Ingrid; Hugh, Catherine; Little, Paul

    2013-11-01

    To explore parents and carers' experiences of barriers and facilitators to treatment adherence in childhood eczema Childhood eczema is common and causes significant impact on quality of life for children and their families, particularly due to sleep disturbance and itch. Non-adherence to application of topical treatments is the main cause of treatment failure. Qualitative interview study. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 31 carers from 28 families of children with eczema. Participants were recruited through primary care and included if they had a child aged 5 or less with a diagnosis of eczema. Interviews were carried out between December 2010-May 2011. Data were analysed using a constant comparative approach. Barriers to treatment adherence included carer beliefs around eczema treatment, the time consuming nature of applying topical treatments, and child resistance to treatment. Families employed a range of strategies in an attempt to work around children's resistance to treatment with varying success. Strategies included involving the child in treatment, distracting the child during treatment, or making a game of it, using rewards, applying treatment to a sleeping child or, in a few cases, physically restraining the child. Some carers reduced frequency of applications in an attempt to reduce child resistance. Regular application of topical treatments to children is an onerous task, particularly in families where child resistance develops. Early recognition and discussion of resistance and better awareness of the strategies to overcome this may help carers to respond positively and avoid establishing habitual confrontation. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. The association between patients? beliefs about medicines and adherence to drug treatment after stroke: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey

    OpenAIRE

    Sj?lander, Maria; Eriksson, Marie; Glader, Eva-Lotta

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Adherence to preventive drug treatment is a clinical problem and we hypothesised that patients' beliefs about medicines and stroke are associated with adherence. The objective was to examine associations between beliefs of patients with stroke about stroke and drug treatment and their adherence to drug treatment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. SETTING: Patients with stroke from 25 Swedish hospitals were included. MEASUREMENTS: Questionnaires were sent to 989 patient...

  13. Immediate ketamine treatment does not prevent posttraumatic stress responses in an animal model for PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juven-Wetzler, Alzbeta; Cohen, Hagit; Kaplan, Zeev; Kohen, Avi; Porat, Oren; Zohar, Joseph

    2014-03-01

    Clinical studies suggest that administration of ketamine hydrochloride-an antagonist at the N-methyl-d-aspartate ionophore-provides short-term amelioration for depressive symptoms. The effects of a brief course of ketamine given immediately following exposure to psychogenic stress on the behavioral stress responses were assessed in an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder. Animals exposed to stress were treated 1h later with ketamine (0.5, 5, and 15 mg/kg) or vehicle for three days (N = 107). Outcome measures included behavior in the elevated plus maze (EPM) and acoustic startle response (ASR) tests 30 days after initial exposure and freezing behavior upon exposure to a trauma-cue on day 31. Pre-set cut-off behavioral criteria classified exposed animals according to their EPM and ASR response-patterns into "extreme," "minimal," or "partial" behavioral response for analysis of prevalence rates of "PTSD-like behavior." Circulating corticosterone levels were assessed 20 min after injection of ketamine in exposed and unexposed animals (N = 62). The dexamethasone suppression test was used to assess negative feedback inhibition of the HPA axis. Prevalence rates of extremely-, partially-, or minimally-disrupted behavior demonstrated that ketamine administered immediately following stress exposure was ineffective in alleviating "PTSD-like behavior" at day 30 after exposure. Administration of ketamine was associated with increase in freezing behavior after exposure to a trauma-cue on day 31. Corticosterone levels were significantly suppressed by ketamine only in the exposed animals. Administration of ketamine immediately following trauma-exposure may not only be ineffective but actually detrimental in the long term. A disruption of the post-stress HPA-response has been raised as a contributing factor. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V. and ECNP.

  14. HIV/AIDS Adherence: Teaching about Treatment and Stigma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Jena Nicols

    2008-01-01

    Advances in HIV/AIDS treatment have dramatically changed the nature of HIV/AIDS education and prevention, creating new opportunities and challenges. This activity is designed to help participants reflect on the impact that HIV treatment can have on a person's life. It also enables trainers to engage participants in a dialogue about the impact of…

  15. Adherence to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the treatment of chronic heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitepu, A.; Hamdani, K.

    2018-03-01

    Heart failure is a tremendous health problem with significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment of heart failure should be applied appropriately to improve the successful management of patients. This study aims to evaluate the adherence to European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines for the treatment of chronic heart failure and to determine factors associated with guideline adherence. This study is an observational study comprising 97 patients with chronic heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. The guideline adherence was assessed the by the use of guideline adherence indicator (GAI), which consider GAI-3 or GAI-5, by calculating the proportion of recommended drugs was prescribed divided by a number of drugs indicated according to the ESC guidelines, in the absence of contraindications. The results showed the use of each indicated drugs were angiotensin- converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers (78.4%), beta-blockers (61.9%), mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (61.9%), diuretics (89.7%), and digitalis (26.8%). Furthermore, the predominant categories of GAI-3 and GAI-5 were moderate. This study demonstrates that the adherence to ESC guidelines for the treatment of chronic heart failure still needs to be improved compared to recent studies. Also, age, etiology of heart failure and comorbidity were associated factors that influence the implementation of ESC guidelines.

  16. The Impact of Stakeholder Preferences on Service User Adherence to Treatments for Schizophrenia and Metabolic Comorbidities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Poremski

    Full Text Available To determine how stakeholder opinions of treatments influence service user decisions to adhere to courses of actions necessary to treat metabolic conditions.Qualitative open-ended interviews were conducted with 20 service providers, 25 service users, and 9 caregivers. Grounded theory was used to generate an understanding that linked preferences of care with adherence to follow-up treatments.Participants spoke about several considerations when discussing adherence: Resource limitations were the predominant consideration. Social considerations such as stigma and support surfaced in caregiver and service-user interviews. The influence of symptoms, especially their absence could reduce adherence, and organizational considerations related to the opinions they had about the qualifications of professionals.A rational patient model partially organizes our findings, but emotional components related to stigma and the opinion of service providers do not fit well into such a model. If service providers do not consider components of the decision making process which fall outside of the rational patient model, they may incorrectly be leveraging suboptimal values to bring about adherence to treatment plans. Being sensitive to the values of service users and their caregivers may allow service providers to better act on points that may bring about change in non-compliant service users with schizophrenia and metabolic comorbidities.

  17. The Impact of Stakeholder Preferences on Service User Adherence to Treatments for Schizophrenia and Metabolic Comorbidities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poremski, Daniel; Sagayadevan, Vathsala D/O; Wang, Peizhi; Lum, Alvin; Subramaniam, Mythily; Ann, Chong Siow

    2016-01-01

    To determine how stakeholder opinions of treatments influence service user decisions to adhere to courses of actions necessary to treat metabolic conditions. Qualitative open-ended interviews were conducted with 20 service providers, 25 service users, and 9 caregivers. Grounded theory was used to generate an understanding that linked preferences of care with adherence to follow-up treatments. Participants spoke about several considerations when discussing adherence: Resource limitations were the predominant consideration. Social considerations such as stigma and support surfaced in caregiver and service-user interviews. The influence of symptoms, especially their absence could reduce adherence, and organizational considerations related to the opinions they had about the qualifications of professionals. A rational patient model partially organizes our findings, but emotional components related to stigma and the opinion of service providers do not fit well into such a model. If service providers do not consider components of the decision making process which fall outside of the rational patient model, they may incorrectly be leveraging suboptimal values to bring about adherence to treatment plans. Being sensitive to the values of service users and their caregivers may allow service providers to better act on points that may bring about change in non-compliant service users with schizophrenia and metabolic comorbidities.

  18. Adherence to Polyethylene Glycol Treatment in Children with Functional Constipation Is Associated with Parental Illness Perceptions, Satisfaction with Treatment, and Perceived Treatment Convenience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koppen, Ilan Jasper Nader; van Wassenaer, Elsa A; Barendsen, Rinse W; Brand, Paul L; Benninga, Marc A

    2018-05-10

    To assess treatment adherence in children with functional constipation and to evaluate the association with parental beliefs about medication, illness perceptions, treatment satisfaction, and satisfaction with information about medication. A cross-sectional survey was administered among parents of children with functional constipation treated with polyethylene glycol. Adherence was measured via the Medication Adherence Report Scale (MARS-5, score 5-25), with greater scores indicating better adherence (scores ≥23 were defined as adherent). Beliefs about medication, illness perceptions, satisfaction with treatment, and satisfaction with information about treatment were measured with the Beliefs about Medication Questionnaire, the Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication (TSQM), and the Satisfaction with Information about Medication Questionnaire. Associations between the questionnaire scores and adherence (MARS-5 score as a continuous variable) were analyzed with regression analyses. In total, 43 of 115 included children (37%) were adherent (MARS-5 ≥23). Spearman rank correlation test revealed a statistically significant correlation between TSQM-convenience, TSQM-satisfaction, Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire question 8 (emotions), and the MARS-5 score (r s 0.342, P = .000; r s 0.258, P = .006; r s -0.192, P = .044), which suggests that parental perceived treatment convenience, satisfaction with treatment, and illness perceptions may affect adherence in children with functional constipation. In the hierarchical multivariate regression model, 22% of the variability of the MARS-5 score could be explained by the selected predictors. The TSQM-convenience score contributed the most to the model (β: 0.384, P = .000). Parents reported low adherence rates in their children with functional constipation. Treatment inconvenience, dissatisfaction with treatment, and the emotional impact of

  19. Social Support, Insomnia, and Adherence to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia After Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamen, Charles; Garland, Sheila N; Heckler, Charles E; Peoples, Anita R; Kleckner, Ian R; Cole, Calvin L; Perlis, Michael L; Morrow, Gary R; Mustian, Karen M; Roscoe, Joseph A

    2017-01-27

    While cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) has been shown to be efficacious in treating cancer survivors' insomnia, 30-60% of individuals have difficulty adhering to intervention components. Psychosocial predictors of adherence and response to CBT-I, such as social support, have not been examined in intervention studies for cancer survivors. Data from a randomized placebo-controlled 2 x 2 trial of CBT-I and armodafinil (a wakefulness promoting agent) were used to assess adherence. Ninety-six cancer survivors participated in the trial (mean age 56, 86% female, 68% breast cancer). CBT-I and armodafinil were administered over the course of seven weeks, and participants were assessed at baseline, during intervention, postintervention, and at a three-month follow-up. Social support was assessed using a Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy subscale, insomnia severity was assessed using the Insomnia Severity Index, and adherence was measured based on CBT-I sleep prescriptions. At baseline, social support was negatively correlated with insomnia severity (r = -0.30, p = 0.002) and associations between social support, CBT-I, and insomnia were maintained through the three-month follow-up. Social support was positively associated with adherence to CBT-I during intervention weeks 3, 4, and 5, and with overall intervention adherence. At postintervention, both social support and treatment with CBT-I independently predicted decreased insomnia severity (p adherence and improved sleep independent of CBT-I. Additional research is needed to determine whether social support can be leveraged to improve adherence and response to CBT-I.

  20. [Treatment adherence and use of complementary and alternative medicine in patients with inflammatory bowel disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakatos, László; Czeglédi, Zsófia; Dávid, Gyula; Kispál, Zsófi; Kiss, Lajos S; Palatka, Károly; Kristóf, Tünde; Molnár, Tamás; Salamon, Agnes; Demeter, Pál; Miheller, Pál; Szamosi, Tamás; Banai, János; Papp, Mária; Bene, László; Kovács, Agota; Rácz, István; Lakatos, Péter László

    2010-02-14

    Previous studies have suggested an increasing use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, a significant number of IBD patients fail to comply with treatment. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of non-adherence the use of CAM in Hungarian patients with IBD. A total of 655 consecutive IBD patients (Crohn's disease [CD]: 344, age: 38.2 + or - 12.9 years; ulcerative colitis [UC]: 311, age: 44.9 + or - 15.3 years) were interviewed during the visit at specialists by self-administered questionnaire including demographic and disease-related data, as well as items analyzing the extent of non-adherence and CAM use. Patients taking more then 80% of each prescribed medicine were classified as adherent. The overall rate of self reported non-adherence (CD: 20.9%, UC: 20.6%) and CAM (CD: 31.7%, UC: 30.9%) use was not different between CD and UC. The most common causes of non-adherence were: forgetfulness (47.8%), too many/unnecessary pills (39.7%), being afraid of side effects (27.9%) and too frequent dosing. Most common forms of CAM were herbal tee (47.3%), homeopathy (14.6%), special diet (12.2%), and acupuncture (5.8%). In CD, disease duration, date of last follow-up visit, educational level and previous surgeries were predicting factors for non-adherence. Alternative medicine use was associated in both diseases with younger age, higher educational level and immunosuppressant use. In addition, CAM use in UC was more common in females and in patients with supportive psychiatric/psychological therapy. Non-adherence and CAM use is common in patients with IBD. Special attention should be paid to explore the identified predictive factors during follow-up visits to improve adherence to therapy and improving patient-doctor relationship.

  1. Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... South African mining workplace programme and implications for HIV prevention. ... the lived experiences of 19 HIV-positive male participants, between the ages of ... infection and were more confident in their ability to manage their treatment, ...

  2. The social determinants of tuberculosis treatment adherence in a remote region of Papua New Guinea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Diefenbach-Elstob

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papua New Guinea (PNG is a diverse and culturally-rich country with severe infrastructural and health problems. Tuberculosis (TB is widespread, and the number of cases with drug resistance is rising. Treatment adherence is known to be important for both effective treatment and limiting the emergence of drug resistance. The aim of this study was to construct a matrix of the factors that act as facilitators or barriers to TB treatment adherence in a remote region of PNG. Methods The study was based in the Balimo region of the Western Province. People known to have undergone TB treatment, as well as staff involved in managing people with TB, were asked to participate in an in-depth interview about their experiences. Purposive sampling was used to identify a diverse range of participants, from different geographic locations, social backgrounds, and with successful and unsuccessful treatment outcomes. The interview data was analysed based on grounded theory methodology. Results The study identified a range of factors that influence TB treatment adherence, with these being classified as personal, systems, and sociocultural. These factors are presented along with suggested recommendations for adaptations to DOTS-based treatment in this region. Barriers included the challenges associated with travel to treatment sites, and the difficulties of undertaking treatment alongside the daily need to maintain subsistence food production. However, facilitators were also identified, including the positive influence of religious beliefs, and high confidence in the ability of DOTS-based treatment to cure TB. Conclusions Documenting the wide range of factors that influence treatment adherence in a severely affected remote population will assist in improving TB control. These results provide impetus for further community-based efforts aimed at improving access to TB diagnosis and treatment, and maintaining successful treatment outcomes in the face

  3. Evaluation of adherence to the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus: Literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luziane Fatima Kirchner

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to identify methods, objectives and type of studies that assessed adherence to the treatment of type 1 Diabetes Mellitus, published from 2000 to 2013. We analyzed 111 articles, collected in the survey by the Web of Science database. The results indicated that 95 studies are descriptive, with prevalence of adolescents (74 studies and children (34 studies. It was also found that those studies that have prevailed: Used an informer (67 studies, the carrier of the disease who reported more data (72 studies, evaluated one (35 studies or five (25 studies treatment medical, by means of an instrument (68 studies, being standardized instruments the most used procedures in this assessment (40 studies. Data leaded to the conclusion that the methods used to assess adherence, in the studies analyzed, do not comply with the suggestions made in Literature to make the results in adherence more reliable. Discussions about this subject need to be further developed.

  4. Increasing daily water intake and fluid adherence in children receiving treatment for retentive encopresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhl, Elizabeth S; Hoodin, Flora; Rice, Jennifer; Felt, Barbara T; Rausch, Joseph R; Patton, Susana R

    2010-11-01

    To examine the efficacy of an enhanced intervention (EI) compared to standard care (SC) in increasing daily water intake and fluid goal adherence in children seeking treatment for retentive encopresis. Changes in beverage intake patterns and fluid adherence were examined by comparing 7-week diet diary data collected during participation in the EI to achieved data for families who had previously completed the SC. Compared to children in SC (n = 19), children in the EI (n = 18) demonstrated a significantly greater increase in daily water intake from baseline to the conclusion of treatment ( p ≤ .001), and were four and six times more likely to meet fluid targets in Phases 1 (Weeks 3-4) and 2 (Weeks 5-6) of fluid intervention, respectively (both p ≤ .001). Enhanced education and behavioral strategies were efficacious in increasing children's intake of water and improving fluid adherence. Future research should replicate the findings in a prospective randomized clinical trial to discern their effectiveness.

  5. Distinguishing PTSD, Complex PTSD, and Borderline Personality Disorder: A latent class analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylène Cloitre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been debate regarding whether Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD is distinct from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD when the latter is comorbid with PTSD. Objective: To determine whether the patterns of symptoms endorsed by women seeking treatment for childhood abuse form classes that are consistent with diagnostic criteria for PTSD, Complex PTSD, and BPD. Method: A latent class analysis (LCA was conducted on an archival dataset of 280 women with histories of childhood abuse assessed for enrollment in a clinical trial for PTSD. Results: The LCA revealed four distinct classes of individuals: a Low Symptom class characterized by low endorsements on all symptoms; a PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD but low endorsement of symptoms that define the Complex PTSD and BPD diagnoses; a Complex PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD and self-organization symptoms that defined the Complex PTSD diagnosis but low on the symptoms of BPD; and a BPD class characterized by symptoms of BPD. Four BPD symptoms were found to greatly increase the odds of being in the BPD compared to the Complex PTSD class: frantic efforts to avoid abandonment, unstable sense of self, unstable and intense interpersonal relationships, and impulsiveness. Conclusions: Findings supported the construct validity of Complex PTSD as distinguishable from BPD. Key symptoms that distinguished between the disorders were identified, which may aid in differential diagnosis and treatment planning.

  6. Systemic racism moderates effects of provider racial biases on adherence to hypertension treatment for African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Tawanda M; Brondolo, Elizabeth; Brown, Porschia

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine perceived exposure to systemic racism as a moderator of the effects of perceived exposure to provider racial biases on treatment adherence and mistrust of health care for a sample of African American hypertensive patients. We hypothesized that patients who endorsed high levels of systemic racism would exhibit poor adherence to hypertension treatment and increased mistrust in health care in relation to perceptions of exposure to provider racial biases. The sample consisted of 100 African American patients who ranged in age from 24 to 82 years. All were diagnosed with hypertension and were recruited from an outpatient clinic located in the Southeastern region of the United States. Moderated regression analyses were performed to test the study hypotheses. Findings revealed a positive, significant main effect for perceived provider racial biases in predicting mistrust of care. This finding suggested that an increase in mistrust of health care was associated with increased perceptions of provider biases. In predicting treatment adherence, a significant interaction revealed that patients who endorsed low and moderate degrees of exposure to systemic racism displayed poor adherence to treatment in relation to greater perceptions of provider racial biases. The overall findings suggest that patients who perceive themselves as infrequently exposed to systemic racism possess the greatest risk for nonadherence to hypertension treatment in relation to increased perceptions of provider racial biases. Implications of the findings are discussed. 2014 APA, all rights reserved

  7. Internet-based treatment for PTSD reduces distress and facilitates the development of a strong therapeutic alliance: a randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maercker Andreas

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of an internet-based therapy (Interapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD in a German speaking population. Also, the quality of the online therapeutic relationship, its development and its relevance as potential moderator of the treatment effects was investigated. Method Ninety-six patients with posttraumatic stress reactions were allocated at random to ten sessions of Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT conducted over a 5-week period or a waiting list control group. Severity of PTSD was the primary outcome. Secondary outcome variables were depression, anxiety, dissociation and physical health. Follow-up assessments were conducted at the end of treatment and 3 months after treatment. Results From baseline to post-treatment assessment, PTSD severity and other psychopathological symptoms were significantly improved for the treatment group (intent-to-treat group × time interaction effect size d = 1.40. Additionally, patients of the treatment condition showed significantly greater reduction of co-morbid depression and anxiety as compared to the waiting list condition. These effects were sustained during the 3-months follow-up period. High ratings of the therapeutic alliance and low drop-out rates indicated that a positive and stable therapeutic relationship could be established online. Significant improvement of the online working alliance in the course of treatment and a substantial correlation between the quality of the online relationship at the end of treatment and treatment outcome emerged. Conclusion Interapy proved to be a viable treatment alternative for PTSD with large effect sizes and sustained treatment effects. A stable and positive online therapeutic relationship can be established through the Internet which improved during the treatment process. Trial registration Australian Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN012606000401550

  8. Adherence to antihypertensive treatment and its determinants among urban slum dwellers in Kolkata, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Subhasis; Sarma, P Sankara; Thankappan, Kavumpurathu R

    2015-03-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence and predictors of adherence to modern antihypertensive pharmacotherapy among slum dwellers in Kolkata, India. Prevalence of adherence based on patient self-reports of consuming ≥80% of the prescribed medications over a recall period of 1 week was found to be 73% (95% confidence interval = 68%-78%). Compared with their counterparts, the following patients were more likely to be adherent to treatment: patients hypertensive for ≥5 years (2.98 times), those whose hypertension was detected during checkups for conditions related to hypertension (2.35 times), those living with ≤4 family members (2.01 times), those with family income of ≥3000 rupees (2.56 times), those who were getting free drugs (4.16 times), patients perceiving current blood pressure to be under control (2.23 times), and those satisfied with current treatment (3.77). Those adherent to their prescribed medications were 1.71 times more likely to achieve adequate control of hypertension compared with those who were not adherent. © 2011 APJPH.

  9. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available skip to page content Attention A T users. To access the menus on this page please perform the following steps. 1. Please switch auto forms ... Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research ...

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Providers and Clergy Co-Occurring Conditions Continuing Education Publications List of Center Publications Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What is PILOTS? Quick Search Tips Modify ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Care, Benefits, or Claims For Web site help: Web Policies PTSD Information Voice Mail: (802) 296-6300 Contact Us: ncptsd@va.gov Also see: VA Mental Health Connect with us return to top ... Notices Privacy FOIA Regulations Web Policies No FEAR Act Whistleblower Rights & Protections Site ...

  12. Using a treatment partner and text messaging to improve adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on preliminary qualitative research preceding a randomised ... Results: The caregivers interviewed were all mothers of MHSU who took .... combination: (1) pragmatic reasons; (2) the need to compare ..... treatment partner should contact the participants i.e. through ... notes to verbal face to face messages.

  13. Predictors of treatment non-adherence in an inpatient substance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research study aimed to identify the factors contributing to premature termination of treatment for substance addiction. The investigation took the form of a differential research design based on archival data obtained from patient files at an inpatient drug rehabilitation centre in Gauteng. One independent variable ...

  14. Using a treatment partner and text messaging to improve adherence ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mental health service users (MHSU) may also not attend follow-up ... The intervention will entail the support of individuals with serious mental disorder by a treatment partner and ... mental health service users (MHSU) and caregivers through focus group discussions and individual interviews. ... AJOL African Journals Online.

  15. Socio-economic status and adherence to tuberculosis treatment:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    P, Mishra; Hansen, E. H.; Sabroe, Svend

    2005-01-01

    SETTING: A western hill district in Nepal, where tuberculosis (TB) treatment under DOTS was offered by the regional tuberculosis centre, two primary health centres, eight health posts, three sub-health posts and one ward of sub-metropolitan Pokhara. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the contribution...

  16. Prolonged exposure therapy for the treatment of patients diagnosed with psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Lorna; Vaidya-Mathur, Urmi; Lancman, Marcelo

    2017-01-01

    Although there is general consensus that psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are treated with psychotherapy, the effectiveness of most psychotherapeutic modalities remains understudied. In this treatment series of 16 patients dually diagnosed with PNES and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we evaluated the effect of prolonged exposure therapy (PE) on reduction of PNES. Secondary measures included Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II) and Post-Traumatic Disorder Diagnostic Scale (PDS). Subjects diagnosed with video EEG-confirmed PNES and PTSD confirmed through neuropsychological testing and clinical interview were treated with traditional PE psychotherapy with certain modifications for the PNES. Treatment was conducted over the course of 12-15 weekly sessions. Seizure frequency was noted in each session by examining the patients' seizure logs, and mood and PTSD symptomatology was assessed at baseline and on the final session. Eighteen subjects enrolled, and 16 (88.8%) completed the course of treatment. Thirteen of the 16 (81.25%) therapy completers reported no seizures by their final PE session, and the other three reported a decline in seizure frequency (Z=-3.233, p=0.001). Mean scores on scales of depression (M=-13.56, SD=12.27; t (15)=-4.420, pPTSD symptoms (M=-17.1875, SD=13.01; t (15)=-5.281, pPTSD reduced the number of PNES and improved mood and post traumatic symptomatology. Follow-up revealed that gains made in seizure control on the last day of treatment were maintained over time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Level of paranormal beliefs and its relationship with explanatory models, treatment adherence and satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dushad Ram

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Paranormal beliefs are common among patients with mental illness. Such beliefs may mediate conceptualization of illness, treatment satisfaction and medication adherence. Objective To study the level of paranormal beliefs and its relationship with explanatory models, treatment adherence and satisfaction using standardized assessment tool. Methods Eighty nine patients with mental illness in remission were assessed with Sociodemographic proforma, Revised Paranormal Belief Scale (RPBS, Mental Distress Explanatory Model Questionnaire (MMAS, Morisky Medication Adherence Scale (MMAS and Short Assessment of Patient Satisfaction (SAPS. Results Results revealed a high level of paranormal beliefs on RPBS (Mean 83.96, SD ± 23.91. Variables that had a statistically significant group difference on the score of RPBS were domicile status (p < 05, diagnosis (p < 001, method of treatment sought before (p < 001. In a linear regression analysis four variables explained 35.4% of the variance (R2 = .38, R2Adjusted = .35, F = 13.04, p < .001 in RPBS Score. These variables were total score of MDEMQ (Beta = .308, t = 3.435, p < .001, total score of MMAS (beta = .357, t = 3. 716, p < .001 and magico-religious treatment received earlier (beta = .306, t = 3.52, p < .001 and SAPS. Discussion Based on the finding of this study, it may be concluded that the level of paranormal beliefs may vary with some demographic variables. Levels of paranormal beliefs is positively associated with explanatory models and adherence in patients with mental illness in remission.

  18. Adherence to Oral Maintenance Treatment in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Kindermann, Angelika

    Objectives:The aim of this study was to systematically review the rates of nonadherence to oral maintenance treatment in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to describe perceived barriers to adherence and psychosocial factors involved.Methods:The article considered studies

  19. Adherence to Oral Maintenance Treatment in Adolescents With Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spekhorst, Lieke M.; Hummel, Thalia Z.; Benninga, Marc A.; van Rheenen, Patrick F.; Kindermann, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to systematically review the rates of nonadherence to oral maintenance treatment in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and to describe perceived barriers to adherence and psychosocial factors involved. The article considered studies published in MEDLINE,

  20. Treatment Adherence and Quality of Life in Diabetes Mellitus Patients in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Perwitasari

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to treatment of diabetes mellitus (DM can support successful therapy due to drug consumption over longtime periods. The objectives of this study are to evaluate the treatment adherence in DM as related to the quality of life and to evaluate factors associated with adherence and quality of life. This study used the Brief Medication Questionnaire (BMQ to measure patients’ adherence. The Diabetes Quality of Life Clinical Trial Questionnaire (DQLCTQ was used to measure patients’ quality of life. Subjects of this cross-sectional study were DM patients attending two private hospitals in Yogyakarta and who had been taking DM medications for more than 6 months. Statistical analyses used in this study were student’s t test and regression linear test. We recruited 65 DM patients who met the inclusion criteria. There were no significant differences of BMQ screens and DQLCTQ functions between monotherapy and combination therapy groups (p> .05. The BMQ screens’ score of combination therapy were higher than monotherapy groups. The physical function, health distress, and mental health of combination therapy groups were higher than monotherapy group. The male patients had significantly higher score of regimen domain of BMQ than female patients (0.35 and 0.17, respectively. The older age has the lower score of treatment effect of DQLCTQ (p< .05. The belief, recall, and belief about adverse drug reaction of BMQ have positive correlation with physical function (r = .542, .424, and .640, respectively. Our study concluded that the quality of care, sex, and age may predict patients’ adherence and quality of life. There were positive correlation between patients’ adherence and quality of life.

  1. Biomarkers of PTSD: military applications and considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Lehrner

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although there are no established biomarkers for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD as yet, biological investigations of PTSD have made progress identifying the pathophysiology of PTSD. Given the biological and clinical complexity of PTSD, it is increasingly unlikely that a single biomarker of disease will be identified. Rather, investigations will more likely identify different biomarkers that indicate the presence of clinically significant PTSD symptoms, associate with risk for PTSD following trauma exposure, and predict or identify recovery. While there has been much interest in PTSD biomarkers, there has been less discussion of their potential clinical applications, and of the social, legal, and ethical implications of such biomarkers. Objective: This article will discuss possible applications of PTSD biomarkers, including the social, legal, and ethical implications of such biomarkers, with an emphasis on military applications. Method: Literature on applications of PTSD biomarkers and on potential ethical and legal implications will be reviewed. Results: Biologically informed research findings hold promise for prevention, assessment, treatment planning, and the development of prophylactic and treatment interventions. As with any biological indicator of disorder, there are potentially positive and negative clinical, social, legal, and ethical consequences of using such biomarkers. Conclusions: Potential clinical applications of PTSD biomarkers hold promise for clinicians, patients, and employers. The search for biomarkers of PTSD should occur in tandem with an interdisciplinary discussion regarding the potential implications of applying biological findings in clinical and employment settings.

  2. Biomarkers of PTSD: military applications and considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrner, Amy; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Although there are no established biomarkers for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as yet, biological investigations of PTSD have made progress identifying the pathophysiology of PTSD. Given the biological and clinical complexity of PTSD, it is increasingly unlikely that a single biomarker of disease will be identified. Rather, investigations will more likely identify different biomarkers that indicate the presence of clinically significant PTSD symptoms, associate with risk for PTSD following trauma exposure, and predict or identify recovery. While there has been much interest in PTSD biomarkers, there has been less discussion of their potential clinical applications, and of the social, legal, and ethical implications of such biomarkers. This article will discuss possible applications of PTSD biomarkers, including the social, legal, and ethical implications of such biomarkers, with an emphasis on military applications. Literature on applications of PTSD biomarkers and on potential ethical and legal implications will be reviewed. Biologically informed research findings hold promise for prevention, assessment, treatment planning, and the development of prophylactic and treatment interventions. As with any biological indicator of disorder, there are potentially positive and negative clinical, social, legal, and ethical consequences of using such biomarkers. Potential clinical applications of PTSD biomarkers hold promise for clinicians, patients, and employers. The search for biomarkers of PTSD should occur in tandem with an interdisciplinary discussion regarding the potential implications of applying biological findings in clinical and employment settings.

  3. Evaluation of adherence to ambulatory liquid oxygen treatment: are commercialized dual-pressure transducers helpful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zeller, Mafalda; Eusébio, Ermelinda; Almeida, João; Winck, João Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Treatment adherence is widely recognized as a critical problem in long-term oxygen therapy, particularly in ambulatory liquid oxygen (LOX) systems. Adherence-monitoring strategies may be helpful in managing patients. We evaluated subjects' adherence to LOX using VisionOx and compared these results with the subjects' own adherence diaries and self-reported perceptions of use. Patients using LOX were recruited for a clinical interview; the number of days/week and the mean time of use according to subjects' perceptions were recorded. A 14-day diary was provided for every subject while VisionOx was attached to the LOX. VisionOx is a small device that uses pressure transducers to detect oxygen flow and the subject's breathing frequency. Information is stored and downloaded using dedicated software. Nineteen subjects were included (57.9% male with a median age of 63 years). When asked about the perception of LOX use, subjects self-reported using the device for a median of 100.0% of days (78.9% reported to have used it every day) for a median time of 180 min/day. According to data from VisionOx and subjects' diaries during the 14-day evaluation period, the median use was 92.8% of days for 210 min/day. No difference was found between the diaries and VisionOx data. Regarding subjects' perceptions of use, the declared use of LOX percent was significantly higher than reported in the diaries (P = .045) and VisionOx monitoring (P = .045) even though both underestimated the median use per day. Subjects overestimated adherence to LOX therapy (when measuring percent of days of use) compared to adherence diary and objective adherence monitoring. Because no significant difference was found comparing the diaries and VisionOx use, either may be helpful in clinical practice. Copyright © 2014 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  4. Self-Efficacy and Short-Term Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xanthopoulos, Melissa S; Kim, Ji Young; Blechner, Michael; Chang, Ming-Yu; Menello, Mary Kate; Brown, Christina; Matthews, Edward; Weaver, Terri E; Shults, Justine; Marcus, Carole L

    2017-07-01

    Infants, children, and adolescents are increasingly being prescribed continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), yet adherence is often poor. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between caregiver and patient-reported health cognitions about CPAP prior to starting CPAP and CPAP adherence at 1 month. We hypothesized that greater caregiver-reported self-efficacy would be positively associated with CPAP adherence in children. We also evaluated patient-reported self-efficacy and caregiver- and patient-reported risk perception and outcome expectations as they related to adherence, as well as how demographic factors influenced these relationships. A pediatric modification of the Self-Efficacy Measure for Sleep Apnea Questionnaire was administered to children and adolescents with OSAS-prescribed CPAP and their caregivers during the clinical CPAP-initiation visit. The primary outcome variable for adherence was the average total minutes of CPAP usage across all days from the date that CPAP was initiated to 31 days later. Unadjusted ordinary least-square regression showed a significant association between caregiver-reported self-efficacy and adherence (p = .007), indicating that mean daily CPAP usage increased by 48.4 minutes when caregiver-reported self-efficacy increased by one point (95% confidence interval 13.4-83.4 minutes). No other caregiver- or patient-reported cognitive health variables were related to CPAP use. This study indicates that caregiver CPAP-specific self-efficacy is an important factor to consider when starting youth on CPAP therapy for OSAS. Employing strategies to improve caregiver self-efficacy, beginning at CPAP initiation, may promote CPAP adherence. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Adherence to Follow-up Recommendations Among Individuals in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hark, Lisa A; Leiby, Benjamin E; Waisbourd, Michael; Myers, Jonathan S; Fudemberg, Scott J; Mantravadi, Anand V; Dai, Yang; Gilligan, John P; Resende, Arthur F; Katz, L Jay

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate rates of adherence to free follow-up eye exam appointments among participants in the Philadelphia Glaucoma Detection and Treatment Project. Ophthalmologists and testing equipment were brought directly to participants at risk for glaucoma at 43 community sites in Philadelphia. Those diagnosed with glaucoma-related pathology were recommended to return for follow-up to be reexamined on site. Rates of adherence and clinical and demographic risk factors for adherence were evaluated. Five hundred thirty-one participants were diagnosed with glaucoma-related conditions and recommended to attend community-based follow-up exams. Follow-up adherence rate was 61.2% (n=325/531). Significant factors associated with greater eye exam appointment adherence, based on our univariable analysis, included final diagnosis of glaucoma (risk ratio [RR]=1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.13-1.57), male sex (RR=1.19; 95% CI, 1.04-1.36), white race (RR=1.26; 95% CI, 1.08-1.48), age (RR=1.17; 95% CI, 1.00-1.37) recommendation for glaucoma medication (RR=1.52; 95% CI, 1.35-1.71), recommendation for laser peripheral iridotomy (RR=1.18; 95% CI, 1.02-1.35), diagnosis of age-related macular degeneration (RR=1.42; 95% CI, 1.13-1.77) and an increased intraocular pressure (>22 mm Hg in the worse eye) (RR=1.23; 95% CI, 1.06-1.42). On the basis of our multivariable model, diagnosis, sex, and recommended glaucoma medications were significantly associated with follow-up adherence. This study demonstrates that individuals living in underserved urban communities would take advantage of free eye exams in community sites and return for follow-up eye exams in these same settings. Future studies could investigate interventions to improve eye exam appointment adherence in community-based settings to detect glaucoma-eye conditions.

  6. Long-term adherence to follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barken, Sidsel S; Lynge, Elsebeth; Andersen, Erik S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure adherence to annual follow-up among women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. DESIGN: Prospective, population-based, register study. SETTING: Denmark, 1996-2007. POPULATION: All women treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with conization. METHODS: Treated...... was poor in Denmark. Our findings suggest that because of this poor adherence, recommendations for long-term annual follow-up after treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia may not be highly effective. Shorter follow-up schedules using highly sensitive tests appear attractive....

  7. Poor adherence to medication as assessed by the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 and low satisfaction with treatment in 237 psoriasis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Hidehisa; Imafuku, Shinichi; Abe, Masatoshi; Shintani, Yoichi; Onozuka, Daisuke; Hagihara, Akihito; Katoh, Norito; Murota, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Sugaya, Makoto; Tanioka, Miki; Kaneko, Sakae; Masuda, Koji; Hiragun, Takaaki; Inomata, Naoko; Kitami, Yuki; Tsunemi, Yuichiro; Abe, Shinya; Kobayashi, Miwa; Morisky, Donald E; Furue, Masutaka

    2015-04-01

    Previously we assessed the medication adherence for oral and topical remedies by a translated Japanese version of the Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-8 (MMAS-8) together with socioeconomic backgrounds in 3096 Japanese dermatological patients, and found the medication adherence, especially to topical drugs, was poor in these patients. In order to elucidate the disease-specific sociomedical factors, we further sub-analyzed the medication adherence in 237 psoriasis patients and compared it with that in other dermatological diseases such as atopic dermatitis, urticaria or tinea. This study was conducted among patients registered in monitoring system and 3096 eligible patients were enrolled. Our web-based questionnaire included the following items such as age, sex, annual income, main health-care institution, experience of effectiveness by oral or topical medication, overall satisfaction with treatment, and MMAS-8 for oral or topical medication. Mean adherence score by MMAS-8 was 5.2 for oral and 4.3 for topical medication. More patients with psoriasis used a university hospital and fewer used a private clinic compared with those with the other skin disease patients. Experience of drug effectiveness by oral medication and overall satisfaction with treatment was lower in psoriasis patients than in other patients. In oral medication, significantly better adherence was observed in those of higher age and with higher annual income. The adherence to medication, especially to topical drugs, was poor in 237 psoriasis patients. We speculated that some severe psoriasis patients were not sufficiently treated systemically and were resistant to topical therapy, leading to poor adherence. © 2015 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  8. Social position, gender role, and treatment adherence among Colombian women living with HIV/AIDS: social determinants of health approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrivillaga, Marcela; Ross, Michael; Useche, Bernardo; Alzate, Martha Lucia; Correa, Diego

    2009-12-01

    To assess and analyze the associations between adherence to treatment and social position in women living with HIV/AIDS. A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational study among 269 Colombian women was conducted. Participants completed three questionnaires: a socio-demographic and clinical characteristics survey, a treatment adherence scale, and a social position survey. Women of low social position had a significantly higher probability of low treatment adherence (OR = 5.651, P effect on adherence. A general model considering the variables 'type of national health care plan' ('contributive,' 'subsidized,' or, in the case of vinculadas or the uninsured, 'none'); 'having HIV-positive children'; and 'level of viral load' was statistically reliable in predicting study participants' treatment adherence. Membership in the subsidized plan or being uninsured had a greater effect on the probability of low adherence than membership in the contributive plan (OR = 3.478, P 400 copies/ml were more likely to have low adherence than women without those characteristics (OR = 2.395, P = 0.0274 and OR = 2.178, P = 0.0050, respectively). Improving women's adherence to HIV/AIDS treatment in Colombia would require eliminating barriers to national health care system and comprehensive health care services and implementing programs that take into account women's role as maternal caregivers The findings underscore the need to integrate variables related to gender inequality and social position in treatment adherence analysis, as advocated in the social determinants of health approach.

  9. Web-based depression treatment: associations of clients' word use with adherence and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Zanden, Rianne; Curie, Keshia; Van Londen, Monique; Kramer, Jeannet; Steen, Gerard; Cuijpers, Pim

    2014-05-01

    The growing number of web-based psychological treatments, based on textual communication, generates a wealth of data that can contribute to knowledge of online and face-to-face treatments. We investigated whether clients' language use predicted treatment outcomes and adherence in Master Your Mood (MYM), an online group course for young adults with depressive symptoms. Among 234 participants from a randomised controlled trial of MYM, we tested whether their word use on course application forms predicted baseline levels of depression, anxiety and mastery, or subsequent treatment adherence. We then analysed chat session transcripts of course completers (n=67) to investigate whether word use changes predicted changes in treatment outcomes. Depression improvement was predicted by increasing use of 'discrepancy words' during treatment (e.g. should). At baseline, more discrepancy words predicted higher mastery level. Adherence was predicted by more words used at application, more social words and fewer discrepancy words. Many variables were included, increasing the chance of coincidental results. This risk was constrained by examining only those word categories that have been investigated in relation to depression or adherence. This is the first study to link word use during treatment to outcomes of treatment that has proven to be effective in an RCT. The results suggest that paying attention to the length of problem articulation at application and to 'discrepancy words' may be wise, as these seem to be psychological markers. To expand knowledge of word use as psychological marker, research on web-based treatment should include text analysis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Effect of Sociodemographic Features and Beliefs about Medicines on Adherence to Chronic Kidney Disease Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paraskevi Theofilou

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Several studies have shown that non-adherence is a common and increasing problem regarding those with chronic illnesses, including chronic kidney disease (CKD patients undergoinghemodialysis (HD.Objective: The present study aimed to investigate the influence of sociodemographic features as well as beliefs about medicines on adherence to medication treatment among HD patients.Methodology: A sample of 168 individuals was recruited from six General Hospitals in the broader area of Athens, consisting of patients undergoing in - centre HD. Measurements were conducted withthe following instruments: the Medication Adherence Rating Scale (MARS and the Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaire (BMQ.Results: Medication adherence was associated positively with family (r= 0.24, p= 0.00 and work status (r= 0.26, p= 0.00 as well as BMQ - concern (r= 0.19, p= 0.02.Conclusions: The present study demonstrates the importance of sociodemographic characteristics in understanding medication adherence in HD patients as well as the contribution of beliefs aboutmedicines.

  11. Effectiveness of Educational Technology in Promoting Quality of Life and Treatment Adherence in Hypertensive People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Ana Célia Caetano; Moreira, Thereza Maria Magalhaes; Oliveira, Edmar Souza de; Menezes, Anaíze Viana Bezerra de; Loureiro, Aline Maria Oliveira; Silva, Camila Brasileiro de Araújo; Linard, Jair Gomes; Almeida, Italo Lennon Sales de; Mattos, Samuel Miranda; Borges, José Wicto Pereira

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effectiveness of an educational intervention with use of educational technology (flipchart) to promote quality of life (QOL) and treatment adherence in people with hypertension. It was an intervention study of before-and-after type conducted with 116 hypertensive people registered in Primary Health Care Units. The educational interventions were conducted using the flipchart educational technology. Quality of life was assessed through the MINICHAL (lowest score = better QOL) and the QATSH (higher score = better adherence) was used to assess the adherence to hypertension treatment. Both were measured before and after applying the intervention. In the analysis, we used the Student's t-test for paired data. The average baseline quality of life was 11.66 ± 7.55, and 7.71 ± 5.72 two months after the intervention, showing a statistically significant reduction (p educational intervention using the flipchart improved the total score of quality of life in the scores of physical and mental domains, and increased adherence to hypertension treatment in people with the disease.

  12. Information and communication technologies for adherence to antiretroviral treatment in adults with HIV/AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Ivana Cristina Vieira de; Galvão, Marli Teresinha Gimeniz; Alexandre, Herta de Oliveira; Lima, Francisca Elisângela Teixeira; Araújo, Thelma Leite de

    2016-08-01

    Information and communication technologies support interventions directed at the prevention of HIV transmission and patient monitoring by promoting improved accessibility and quality of care. To evaluate the efficacy of information and communication technologies in the adherence to antiretroviral treatment in adults with HIV/AIDS. Systematic review conducted from March to May of 2015 in three databases-the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); the Latin-American and Caribbean Literature in Health Sciences (LILACS/BIREME) and SCOPUS; and the Cochrane library and the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online portal (MEDLINE/PubMed). The sample consisted of nine randomized clinical trials based on the use of information and communication technologies for adherence to antiretroviral treatment in adults with HIV/AIDS. Three studies analysed the use of a short message service - SMS - two phone calls, two alarm devices, one web-enabled Hand-held device and one web electronic intervention. Improvements in the levels of adherence in the group subjected to the intervention were identified in seven studies. The phone was the type of information and communication technology with proven efficacy with respect to adherence. It was used to make calls, as well as to send alert messages and reminders about taking medications. Pagers were not considered to be effective regarding adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The integrated use of information and communication technologies with standard care promotes increased access to care, strengthening the relationship between patients and health services, with the possibility of mitigating the difficulties experienced by people with HIV in achieving optimal levels of adherence to drug therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Adherence to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) among women following primary breast cancer treatment: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Ellyn E; Schmiege, Sarah J; Cook, Paul F; Berger, Ann M; Aloia, Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) has proven efficacy, yet 32%-89% of patients fail to consistently follow recommendations. This pilot study examines adherence to CBTI in breast cancer survivors with insomnia. There was a significant decline in adherence to prescribed rise time, and total time in bed, but no change in adherence to prescribed bedtime during six weekly sessions. Factors associated with higher adherence included lower fatigue and higher baseline motivation. Higher adherence was associated with worse subjective sleep quality at the beginning of CBTI and fewer nocturnal awakenings at the end of treatment. Results provide preliminary evidence supporting the impact of adherence on sleep outcomes such as fewer nocturnal awakenings. Attention to adherence as part of CBTI may yield greater sleep improvements.

  14. A daily SMS reminder increases adherence to asthma treatment: a three-month follow-up study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strandbygaard, Ulla; Thomsen, Simon Francis; Backer, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Poor adherence to asthma treatment is a well-recognised challenge and is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and consumption of health care resources. This study examined the impact of receiving a daily text message reminder on one's cell phone on adherence to asthma treatment....

  15. Post-Stress Combined Administration of Beta-Receptor and Glucocorticoid Antagonists as a Novel Preventive Treatment in an Animal Model of PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    reduced extinction of cue- conditioned fear. The temporal characteristics of the model must be amenable to testing acute drug treatment in the...that is sensitive to both enhanced and attenuated fear conditioning and extinction -Established a drug treatment regimen that is feasible in the...nonassociative theories of the UCS preexposure phenomenon: Implications for Pavlovian conditioning . Psychol Bull 86: 523-548 Stam R (2007) PTSD and stress

  16. clinical: ptsd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-10-01

    Oct 1, 2009 ... adherence, disease progression and quality of life, it is clear that correctly identifying ... Personality (external locus of control greater than internal locus of control) .... able services. .... fast-food restaurant and living with a friend.

  17. The Efficacy and Safety of Add-on Ginko TD (Ginkgo Biloba Treatment for PTSD: Results of a 12-Week Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh Koohi Habibi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available "nObjective: Exposure to traumatic stressors lead to activation of arousal responses mediated by serotonergic and noradrenergic systems and it may cause a change in numerous neurotransmitters and neuroendocrine systems. There is ample experimental and clinical evidence to suggest that Ginkgo biloba extract is neuroprotective and has antioxidant properties and can restore stress-induced elevation in brain levels of catecholamines, 5-HT and plasma corticosterone to normal level. "nMethod: In a 12-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, the efficacy and safety of adding-on a fixed-dose (200mg of Ginkgo TD to the previous treatment regime of adults with PTSD were examined. Subjects were forty male and female outpatients from a public-owned psychiatric clinic who met criteria for PTSD seven month after a 6.3 Richter earthquake in Bam city on December 26, 2003. The changes in five symptom domains including posttraumatic stress, anxiety and affective symptoms, general health and subjective stress after trauma were ssessed at weeks 0, 12 and 16 to examine effectiveness of the added-on Ginkgo TD and stability of its effects. "nResults: Ginkgo TD was associated with a significantly greater improvement than placebo in PTSD patients as measured by five symptom domain scales including: GHQ-28; Watson PTSD Scale; HAM-D; HAM-A and IES (p= 0.02, 0.01, 0.001, 0.01, 0.02 respectively Four weeks after the discontinuation of intervention, no significant difference was determined between the two groups in the five outcome measures (p= 0.005, 0.01, 0.004, 0.005, 0.01 respectively. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in terms of side effects. "nConclusions: We found Ginkgo TD to be superior to placebo as an adding-on in the treatment of PTSD. Although we did not examine the comparative efficacy of Ginkgo TD on the three main elements of PTSD, beneficial effects both on specific PTSD symptomatology and general conditions including

  18. Treatment adherence and persistence with long-acting somatostatin analog therapy for the treatment of acromegaly: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurel, Michelle H; Han, Yi; Stevens, Andrea L; Furtado, Aaron; Cox, David

    2017-04-04

    Many patients with acromegaly require medical treatment that includes somatostatin analogs (SSAs). Long-acting SSA formulations are widely used, due in part to increased patient convenience and increased treatment adherence vs daily medications. Although medication compliance can be poor in patients with chronic conditions, adherence and persistence with these SSAs in patients with acromegaly has not been evaluated. This analysis utilized claims data to estimate treatment adherence and persistence for lanreotide depot and long-acting octreotide in this population. This retrospective analysis used the MarketScan® database (~100 payors, 500 million claims in the US), which was searched between January 2007 and June 2012 to identify patients with acromegaly taking either lanreotide depot or long-acting octreotide. Patients switching treatments were excluded. Treatment adherence was assessed using medication possession ratio (MPR; number of doses dispensed in relation to dispensing period; ≥80% is considered adherent), injection count, and treatment time. Persistence was estimated by Kaplan-Meier analyses and Cox proportional hazards modeling. A washout period, defined as no acromegaly-related prescription activity 180 days prior to the index date, was employed to minimize effects of prior therapy and focus on patients more likely to be treatment-naïve. Altogether 1308 patients with acromegaly receiving a single SSA for treatment (1127 octreotide, 181 lanreotide) who had not switched treatments were identified. Mean MPR in patients with a 180-day washout (n = 663) was 89% for those receiving octreotide (n = 545) and 87% for those receiving lanreotide (n = 118). Median number of days on therapy was 169 (95% CI 135-232) for octreotide patients and 400 (95% CI 232-532) for lanreotide patients. The point estimate of the Cox proportional hazard ratio for stopping treatment was 1.385 for octreotide vs lanreotide (95% CI 1.079-1.777), suggesting a 38

  19. Predictors of adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment in a cessation trial among smokers in Aleppo, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Taleb, Ziyad; Ward, Kenneth D; Asfar, Taghrid; Bahelah, Raed; Maziak, Wasim

    2015-08-01

    The development of evidence-based smoking cessation programs is in its infancy in developing countries, which continue to bear the main brunt of the tobacco epidemic. Adherence to treatment recommendations is an important determinant of the success of smoking cessation programs, but little is known about factors influencing adherence to either pharmacological or behavioral treatment in developing countries settings. Our study represents the first attempt to examine the predictors of adherence to cessation treatment in a low-income developing country. Predictors of adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment were identified by analyzing data from a multi-site, two-group, parallel-arm, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled smoking cessation trial in primary care clinics in Aleppo, Syria. Participants received 3 in-person behavioral counseling sessions plus 5 brief follow-up phone counseling sessions, and were randomized to either 6 weeks of nicotine or placebo patch. Of the 269 participants, 68% adhered to pharmacological treatment, while 70% adhered to behavioral counseling. In logistic regression modeling, lower adherence to pharmacological and behavioral treatment was associated with higher daily smoking at baseline, greater withdrawal symptoms, and perception of receiving placebo instead of active nicotine patch. Women showed lower adherence than men to behavioral treatment, while being assigned to placebo condition and baseline waterpipe use were associated with lower adherence to pharmacological treatment. Adherence to cessation treatment for cigarette smokers in low-income countries such as Syria may benefit from integrated cessation components that provide intensive treatment for subjects with higher nicotine dependence, and address concurrent waterpipe use at all stages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Hepatitis C treatment experience: Patients' perceptions of the facilitators of and barriers to uptake, adherence and completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublette, Victoria A; Smith, Sian K; George, Jacob; McCaffery, Kirsten; Douglas, Mark W

    2015-01-01

    This study explores the perceptions of patients receiving treatment for Hepatitis C to determine what factors influence their decision to commence treatment, ability to maintain adherence and complete their treatment program. Semi-structured interview techniques were used in a qualitative study of 20 patients undergoing treatment for Chronic Hepatitis C (CHC). To explore patients' perceived barriers and facilitators of Hepatitis C treatment adherence and completion. Analysis of patient interviews identified four key themes: (1) motivations for commencing CHC treatment - fear of death and ridding themselves of stigma and shame; (2) the influential role of provider communication - patients reported that information and feedback that was personalised to their needs and lifestyles was the most effective for improving adherence to treatment; (3) facilitators of treatment adherence and completion - social, emotional and practical support improved adherence and completion, as did temporarily ceasing employment; (4) barriers to treatment adherence and completion - these included side effects, stigma, a complicated dosing schedule and limitations of the public healthcare system. To increase treatment adherence and completion rates, a patient-centred approach is required that addresses patients' social, practical, and emotional support needs and adaptive coping strategies.

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment to Improve Adherence to Hemodialysis Fluid Restrictions: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather M. Anson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This case report describes outpatient psychological treatment targeting adherence to fluid restrictions in a hemodialysis patient. The consequences of nonadherence to fluid restrictions in hemodialysis patients range from minor discomfort to increased hospitalizations and mortality rates. In addition, when patients chronically fail to adhere, they may no longer be candidates for kidney transplant. The interventions focused on polydipsia, characterized by excessive fluid intake. The methods involved 11-sessions of individual psychotherapy incorporating strategies including increasing awareness, decreasing motivation, increasing effort, engaging in competing events, conducting thought stopping, breaking repetitive routines, eliciting social support, and receiving reinforcement. Results demonstrated that the patient successfully restricted his fluid intake at or below recommended levels 83% of days after fading of treatment began. This case report demonstrates the success of cognitive behavioral treatment strategies with a nonpsychiatric hemodialysis patient.

  2. Significance of age and comorbidity on treatment modality, treatment adherence, and prognosis in elderly ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Trine Lembrecht; Teiblum, Sandra; Paludan, Merete

    2012-01-01

    surgery, standard combination chemotherapy (TC), adherence to TC treatment, and prognosis. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study of all women registered in a nation-wide database with ovarian or peritoneal cancer in 2005-2006. Logistic regression was employed for determining the predictive value of age...

  3. Application of heat treatment and dispersive strengthening concept in interlayer deposition to enhance diamond film adherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin Chiiruey [Tatung Inst. of Technol., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mech. Eng.; Kuo Chengtzu; Chang Rueyming [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 Ta-Hsueh Road, Hsinchu 30050 (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1997-10-31

    Two different deposition processes were carried out to enhance adherence of diamond films on WC+3-5%Co substrate with Ti-Si as the interlayer. One process can be called two-step diamond deposition process. Another process can be called interlayer heat treatment process. Diamond films were deposited by a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition system. Ti and Si interlayer are deposited by DC sputter and an E-gun, respectively. Film morphologies, interface structure and film quality were examined by SEM, XRD, Auger electron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The residual stresses and adhesion strengths of the films were determined by Raman spectroscopy and indentation adhesion testing, respectively. Comparing the regular one-step diamond deposition process with the present two different new processes, the average dP/dX values, which are a measure of the adherence of the film, are 354 kgf/mm, 494 kgf/mm and 787 kgf/mm, respectively. In other words, the interlayer heat treatment process gives the best film adherence on average. For the two-step diamond deposition process, the interlayer thickness and the percent diamond surface coverage of the first diamond deposition step are the main parameters, and there exists an optimum Ti thickness and percent diamond coverage for the best film adherence. The main contribution to better film adherence is not a large difference in residual stress, but is due to the following reasons. The interlayer heat treatment can transform amorphous Si to polycrystalline Si, and may form strong TiC and SiC bonding. The polycrystalline Si and the diamond particles from the first diamond deposition step can be an effective seeds to enhance diamond nucleation. (orig.) 11 refs.

  4. Relevance of dosage in adherence to treatment with long-acting anticholinergics in patients with COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izquierdo JL

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available José Luis Izquierdo,1 José Manuel Paredero,2 Raul Piedra3 1Department of Pneumology, Hospital Universitario de Guadalajara, 2Department of Pharmacy, 3Department of Primary Care, Guadalajara Integrated Care Management, Guadalajara, Spain Introduction: The aim of this study was to assess the degree of adherence for two standard regimens for administrating anticholinergic drugs (12 and 24 hours in patients with chronic obstruction of the airflow and to establish whether the use of a once-daily dose improves the level of treatment adherence.Methods: We used long-acting anticholinergics (LAMAs as a study variable, and included the entire health area of Castile-La Mancha, numbering 2,100,998 inhabitants, as the study population. We analyzed a total of 16,446 patients who had been prescribed a LAMA between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013. The follow-up period, based on a centralized system of electronic prescription management, was extended until December 2014.Results: During 2013, the medication collected was 7.4%–10.7% higher than indicated by labeling. This was very similar for all LAMAs, irrespective of the patient’s sex, the molecule, the device, and the drug dosage. We did not observe seasonal variations in the consumption of LAMAs, nor did we detect differences between prescription drugs for once-daily (every 24 hours versus twice-daily (every 12 hours administration, between the different molecules, or between different types of inhalers for the same molecule. The results were similar in 2014.Conclusion: The principal conclusion of this study is that, in an area with a centralized management system of pharmacological prescriptions, adherence to treatment with LAMAs is very high, irrespective of the molecules or inhalation device. We did not find that patients who used twice-daily medication had a lower adherence. Keywords: COPD, treatment, adherence, LABAs, LAMAs, PDC, asthma

  5. A review of studies concerning treatment adherence of patients with anxiety disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santana L

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Lívia Santana1, Leonardo F Fontenelle1–31Anxiety and Depression Research Program, Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; 2Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Institute of Community Health, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Brazil; 3D’Or Institute for Research and Education (IDOR, Rio de Janeiro, BrazilObjective: This paper aimed at describing the most consistent correlates and/or predictors of nonadherence to treatment of patients with different anxiety disorders.Method: The authors retrieved studies indexed in PubMed/MedLine, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge using the following search terms: attrition OR dropout OR attrition rates OR patient dropouts OR treatment adherence AND anxiety disorders. Research was limited to articles published before January 2010.Results: Sixteen studies were selected that investigated the impact of sociodemographic, clinical, or cognitive variables on adherence to treatment for anxiety disorders. While no consistent pattern of sociodemographic or clinical features associated with nonadherence emerged, all studies that investigated cognitive variables in panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder found that expectations and opinions about treatment were related to adherence.Conclusion: The findings of this study suggest that it is essential to consider anxiety disorder patients’ beliefs about illness and treatment strategies to increase their compliance with the therapeutic plan.Keywords: attrition, dropout, OCD, obsessive-compulsive disorder, social anxiety disorder

  6. Determinants of adherence to treatment in first-episode psychosis: a comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Leclerc

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective:To conduct a comprehensive review of current evidence on factors for nonadherence to treatment in individuals with first-episode psychosis (FEP.Methods:MEDLINE, LILACS, PsycINFO, and SciELO databases were searched with the keywords first episode psychosis, factor, adherence, nonadherence, engagement, disengagement, compliance, and intervention. References of selected studies were consulted for relevant articles.Results:A total of 157 articles were screened, of which 33 articles were retained for full review. The factors related to nonadherence were: a patient-related (e.g., lower education level, persistent substance use, forensic history, unemployment, history of physical abuse; b environment-related (e.g., no family involved in treatment, social adjustment difficulties; c medication-related (e.g., rapid remission of negative symptoms when starting treatment, therapeutic alliance; and d illness-related (e.g., more positive symptoms, more relapses. Treatment factors that improve adherence include a good therapeutic alliance and a voluntary first admission when hospitalization occurs.Conclusion:The results of this review suggest that nonadherence to treatment in FEP is multifactorial. Many of these factors are modifiable and can be specifically targeted in early intervention programs. Very few studies have assessed strategies to raise adherence in FEP.

  7. Patient medical costs for tuberculosis treatment and impact on adherence in China: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Tuohong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Charging for tuberculosis (TB treatment could reduce completion rates, particularly in the poor. We identified and synthesised studies that measure costs of TB treatment, estimates of adherence and the potential impact of charging on treatment completion in China. Methods Inclusion criteria were primary research studies, including surveys and studies using qualitative methods, conducted in mainland China. We searched MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, Science Direct, HEED, CNKI to June 2010; and web pages of relevant Chinese and international organisations. Cost estimates were extracted, transformed, and expressed in absolute values and as a percentage of household income. Results Low income patients, defined at household or district level, pay a total of US$ 149 to 724 (RMB 1241 to 5228 for medical costs for a treatment course; as a percentage of annual household income, estimates range from 42% to 119%. One national survey showed 73% of TB patients at the time of the survey had interrupted or suspended treatment, and estimates from 9 smaller more recent studies showed that the proportion of patients at the time of the survey who had run out of drugs or were not taking them ranged from 3 to 25%. Synthesis of surveys and qualitative research indicate that cost is the most cited reason for default. Conclusions Despite a policy of free drug treatment for TB in China, health services charge all income groups, and costs are high. Adherence measured in cross sectional surveys is often low, and the cumulative failure to adhere is likely to be much higher. These findings may be relevant to those concerned with the development and spread of multi-drug resistant TB. New strategies need to take this into account and ensure patient adherence.

  8. Adherence to treatment, emotional state and quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    García-Llana, Helena; Remor, Eduardo; Selgas, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    A low rate of adherence to treatment is a widespread problem of great clinical relevance among dialysis patients. The objective of the present study is to determine the relationship between adherence, emotional state (depression, anxiety, and perceived stress), and healthrelated quality of life (HRQOL) in renal patients undergoing dialysis. Method: Two patient groups (30 in hemodialysis and 31 in peritoneal dialysis) participated in this study. We evaluated aspects of adhere...

  9. An Immersive Virtual Reality Therapy Application for Iraq War Veterans with PTSD: From Training to Toy to Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rizzo, A. A; Pair, J; McNerney, P. J; Eastlund, E; Manson, B; Gratch, J; Hill, R; Swartout, B; Roy, M

    2004-01-01

    .... The aim of the current paper is to briefly describe the rationale, design and development of an Iraq War PTSD VR therapy application created from assets that were initially developed for a combat...

  10. Identification of validated questionnaires to measure adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pérez-Escamilla B

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Beatriz Pérez-Escamilla,1 Lucía Franco-Trigo,1 Joanna C Moullin,2 Fernando Martínez-Martínez,1 José P García-Corpas1 1Academic Centre in Pharmaceutical Care, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Granada, Granada, Spain; 2Graduate School of Health, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: Low adherence to pharmacological treatments is one of the factors associated with poor blood pressure control. Questionnaires are an indirect measurement method that is both economic and easy to use. However, questionnaires should meet specific criteria, to minimize error and ensure reproducibility of results. Numerous studies have been conducted to design questionnaires that quantify adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments. Nevertheless, it is unknown whether questionnaires fulfil the minimum requirements of validity and reliability. The aim of this study was to compile validated questionnaires measuring adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments that had at least one measure of validity and one measure of reliability. Methods: A literature search was undertaken in PubMed, the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE, and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde [LILACS]. References from included articles were hand-searched. The included papers were all that were published in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish from the beginning of the database’s indexing until July 8, 2013, where a validation of a questionnaire (at least one demonstration of the validity and at least one of reliability was performed to measure adherence to antihypertensive pharmacological treatments. Results: A total of 234 potential papers were identified in the electronic database search; of these, 12 met the eligibility criteria. Within these 12 papers, six questionnaires were validated: the Morisky

  11. Identification of validated questionnaires to measure adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Escamilla, Beatriz; Franco-Trigo, Lucía; Moullin, Joanna C; Martínez-Martínez, Fernando; García-Corpas, José P

    2015-01-01

    Background Low adherence to pharmacological treatments is one of the factors associated with poor blood pressure control. Questionnaires are an indirect measurement method that is both economic and easy to use. However, questionnaires should meet specific criteria, to minimize error and ensure reproducibility of results. Numerous studies have been conducted to design questionnaires that quantify adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments. Nevertheless, it is unknown whether questionnaires fulfil the minimum requirements of validity and reliability. The aim of this study was to compile validated questionnaires measuring adherence to pharmacological antihypertensive treatments that had at least one measure of validity and one measure of reliability. Methods A literature search was undertaken in PubMed, the Excerpta Medica Database (EMBASE), and the Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature database (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde [LILACS]). References from included articles were hand-searched. The included papers were all that were published in English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish from the beginning of the database’s indexing until July 8, 2013, where a validation of a questionnaire (at least one demonstration of the validity and at least one of reliability) was performed to measure adherence to antihypertensive pharmacological treatments. Results A total of 234 potential papers were identified in the electronic database search; of these, 12 met the eligibility criteria. Within these 12 papers, six questionnaires were validated: the Morisky–Green–Levine; Brief Medication Questionnaire; Hill-Bone Compliance to High Blood Pressure Therapy Scale; Morisky Medication Adherence Scale; Treatment Adherence Questionnaire for Patients with Hypertension (TAQPH); and Martín–Bayarre–Grau. Questionnaire length ranged from four to 28 items. Internal consistency, assessed by Cronbach’s α, varied from 0

  12. Early PTSD Symptom Trajectories: Persistence, Recovery, and Response to Treatment: Results from the Jerusalem Trauma Outreach and Prevention Study (J-TOPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Ankri, Yael; Freedman, Sara; Israeli-Shalev, Yossi; Roitman, Pablo; Gilad, Moran; Shalev, Arieh Y.

    2013-01-01

    Context Uncovering heterogeneities in the progression of early PTSD symptoms can improve our understanding of the disorder's pathogenesis and prophylaxis. Objectives To describe discrete symptom trajectories and examine their relevance for preventive interventions. Design Latent Growth Mixture Modeling (LGMM) of data from a randomized controlled study of early treatment. LGMM identifies latent longitudinal trajectories by exploring discrete mixture distributions underlying observable data. Setting Hadassah Hospital unselectively receives trauma survivors from Jerusalem and vicinity. Participants Adult survivors of potentially traumatic events consecutively admitted to the hospital's emergency department (ED) were assessed ten days and one-, five-, nine- and fifteen months after ED admission. Participants with data at ten days and at least two additional assessments (n = 957) were included; 125 received cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) between one and nine months. Approach We used LGMM to identify latent parameters of symptom progression and tested the effect of CBT on these parameters. CBT consisted of 12 weekly sessions of either cognitive therapy (n = 41) or prolonged exposure (PE, n = 49), starting 29.8±5.7 days after ED admission, or delayed PE (n = 35) starting at 151.8±42.4 days. CBT effectively reduced PTSD symptoms in the entire sample. Main Outcome Measure Latent trajectories of PTSD symptoms; effects of CBT on these trajectories. Results Three trajectories were identified: Rapid Remitting (rapid decrease in symptoms from 1- to 5-months; 56% of the sample), Slow Remitting (progressive decrease in symptoms over 15 months; 27%) and Non-Remitting (persistently elevated symptoms; 17%). CBT accelerated the recovery of the Slow Remitting class but did not affect the other classes. Conclusions The early course of PTSD symptoms is characterized by distinct and diverging response patterns that are centrally relevant to understanding the disorder

  13. Quality of life and adherence to treatment in early-treated Brazilian phenylketonuria pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, E; Maia, H S; Monteiro, C B; Carvalho, L M; Tonon, T; Vanz, A P; Schwartz, I V D; Ribeiro, M G

    2017-12-11

    Early dietary treatment of phenylketonuria (PKU), an inborn error of phenylalanine (Phe) metabolism, results in normal cognitive development. Although health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of PKU patients has been reported as unaffected in high-income countries, there are scarce data concerning HRQoL and adherence to treatment of PKU children and adolescents from Brazil. The present study compared HRQoL scores in core dimensions of Brazilian early-treated PKU pediatric patients with those of a reference population, and explored possible relationships between adherence to treatment and HRQoL. Early-treated PKU pediatric patient HRQoL was evaluated by self- and parent-proxy reports of the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) core scales. Adherence to treatment was evaluated by median Phe levels and percentage of results within the therapeutic target range in two periods. Means for total and core scales scores of PedsQL self- and parent proxy-reports of PKU patients were significantly lower than their respective means for controls. Adequacy of median Phe concentrations and the mean percentage of values in the target range fell substantially from the first year of life to the last year of this study. There was no significant difference in mean total and core scale scores for self- and parent proxy-reports between patients with adequate and those with inadequate median Phe concentrations. The harmful consequences for intellectual capacity caused by poor adherence to dietary treatment could explain the observed decrease in all HRQoL scales, especially in school functioning. Healthcare system and financial difficulties may also have influenced negatively all HRQoL dimensions.

  14. Initial development of a treatment adherence measure for cognitive-behavioral therapy for child anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southam-Gerow, Michael A; McLeod, Bryce D; Arnold, Cassidy C; Rodríguez, Adriana; Cox, Julia R; Reise, Steven P; Bonifay, Wesley E; Weisz, John R; Kendall, Philip C

    2016-01-01

    The measurement of treatment adherence (a component of treatment integrity defined as the extent to which a treatment is delivered as intended) is a critical element in treatment evaluation research. This article presents initial psychometric data for scores on the Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Adherence Scale for Youth Anxiety (CBAY-A), an observational measure designed to be sensitive to common practice elements found in individual cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT) for youth anxiety. Therapy sessions (N = 954) from 1 efficacy and 1 effectiveness study of ICBT for youth anxiety were independently rated by 2 coders. Interrater reliability (as gauged by intraclass correlation coefficients) for the item scores averaged 0.77 (SD = 0.15; range .48 to .80). The CBAY-A item and scale (skills, model, total) scores demonstrated evidence of convergent and discriminant validity with an observational measure of therapeutic interventions and an observational measure of the alliance. The CBAY-A item and scale scores also discriminated between therapists delivering ICBT in research and practice settings and therapists delivering nonmanualized usual clinical care. We discuss the importance of replicating these psychometric findings in different samples and highlight possible application of an adherence measure in testing integrity-outcome relations. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  15. LOW ADHERENCE TO TREATMENT AFTER MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION: CAUSES AND WAYS OF ADJUSTMENT CONSIDERING PSYCHO-EMOTIONAL STATE OF PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Kuzheleva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study the reasons of low adherence to treatment in patients after myocardial infarction as well as methods of its correction considering the mental and emotional state of patients. Material and methods. Patients (n=115 after myocardial infarction registered in "Acute Myocardial Infarction Register» were enrolled into the study. The Moriscos-Green scale was used to determine the degree of adherence to treatment, and psycho-emotional state of patients was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS. The special questionnaire was used to study the causes of poor adherence. Results. Only 45% of patients after myocardial infarction have a high commitment to the doctor's recommendations. The main reason for low adherence was forgetfulness (42%. Among other reasons were: fear of side effects (16%; lack of therapeutic effect according to patients' opinion (12%; doubts about the doctor's prescriptions (14%; a large number of prescribed drugs (12%; high cost of drugs (4%. The structure of the causes of poor adherence to treatment varied greatly depending on the psycho-emotional status. Adherence to treatment can be improved by specific physician’s actions (48.5% of patients. At the same time 14% of patients did not want to take drugs for a long time under any circumstances. Conclusion. Adherence to treatment of patients after myocardial infarction deserves attention from doctors. The personalized approach considering patient’s opinion, as well as their specific features, is essential for the development of ways to improve adherence.

  16. Music therapy versus treatment as usual for refugees diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Bolette Daniels; Lund, Steen; Søgaard, Ulf

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Meta-analyses of studies on psychological treatment of refugees describe highly varying outcomes, and research on multi-facetted and personalized treatment of refugees with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is needed. Music therapy has been found to affect arousal regulation...... session. DISCUSSION: The effect of music therapy can be explained by theories on affect regulation and social engagement, and the impact of music on brain regions affected by PTSD. The study will shed light on the role of therapy for the attainment of a safe attachment style, which recently has been shown...... and emotional processing, and a pilot study on the music therapy method Trauma-focused Music and Imagery (TMI) with traumatized refugees resulted in significant changes of trauma symptoms, well-being and sleep quality. The aim of the trial is to test the efficacy of TMI compared to verbal psychotherapy. METHODS...

  17. Contributions of Nursing in adherence to treatment of hypertension: a systematic review of Brazilian literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernandes Gonçalves Dias

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Hypertension is a prevalent chronic disease in health services in Brazil and the nursing is co-responsible in the development of strategies to improve adherence of hypertensive treatment. This study aimed to verify the contributions of the nursing team, active in Basic Health Units to facilitate adherence to treatment of hypertension. Contents: We conducted a systematic review of the Brazilian literature of descriptive and qualitative kind, carried with 17 original scientific articles and research published in national journals in Portuguese between the years 2010 and 2015, indexed in the Virtual Library Database in health / BIREME, Medline, Lilacs and SciELO. Conclusion: The Nursing is present and active in assisting the hypertensive patients of the Health Units and shows evolution incorporating the use of technology as a way of innovation and management of care.

  18. CHILDREN'S ADHERENCE TO HAART ADHERENCE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    han or equal IQ 2 log" and in 64% of children wirh smaller man 2 log,o decrease in viral load. Secondly, i caregivers are not well prepared for adherence issues before starting HAART, or if regimens are too onerous to follow, treatment is likely to fail. Every effort should be made to see the burden of adherence from the.

  19. Addressing adherence to treatment: a longstanding concern. The health care professional

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    Farrukh Shah

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Today a patient born with thalassaemia major can expect to have a near normal life expectancy and remain free of complications of iron overload with good monitoring and excellent transfusion and chelation regimes. Unfortunately patients still develop complications as a consequence of iron overload including endocrinopathies and cardiac failure. The main reason behind this failure of effective treatment is inadequate treatment. This can be due to either clinician related factors, patient related factors or lack of adequate provision of medicines and services. In this short paper I will highlight where the challenges lie with regards adherence to treatment and suggest approaches to manage this.

  20. Factors influencing adherence to antiretroviral treatment in\\ud Asian developing countries: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Wasti, Sharada Prasad; Van Teijlingen, Edwin; Simkhada, Padam; Randall, Julian; Baxter, Susan; Kirkpatrick, P.; Vijay Singh, G.C.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To systematically review the literature of factors affecting adherence to Antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Asian developing countries.\\ud Methods Database searches in Medline ⁄ Ovid, Cochrane library, CINAHL, Scopus and PsychINFO for studies published between 1996 and December 2010. The reference lists of included papers were also checked, with citation searching on key papers.\\ud Results A total of 437 studies were identified, and 18 articles met the inclusion criteria and were ex...

  1. STIGMA, SOCIAL SUPPORT, AND TREATMENT ADHERENCE AMONG HIV-POSITIVE PATIENTS IN CHIANG MAI, THAILAND

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Michael Jonathan; Murray, Jordan Keith; Suwanteerangkul, Jiraporn; Wiwatanadate, Phongtape

    2014-01-01

    Our study assessed the influence of HIV-related stigma on treatment adherence among people living with HIV in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and whether social support had a moderating effect on this relationship. We recruited 128 patients living with HIV from Sansai Hospital, a community hospital in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and collected data through structured interviews. All forms of HIV-related stigma considered in this study (personalized experience, disclosure, negative self-image, and public attit...

  2. An Analysis of Patient Adherence to Treatment during a 1-Year, Open-Label Study of OROS[R] Methylphenidate in Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraone, Stephen V.; Biederman, Joseph; Zimmerman, Brenda

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Treatment adherence is an important aspect of ADHD symptom management, but there are many factors that may influence adherence. Method: This analysis assessed adherence to OROS methylphenidate during a 1-year, open-label study in children. Adherence was defined as the number of days medication was taken divided by the number of days in…

  3. Nurses’ Roles and Experiences with Enhancing Adherence to Tuberculosis Treatment among Patients in Burundi: A Qualitative Study

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    Marie Carlsson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In TB control, poor treatment adherence is a major cause of relapse and drug resistance. Nurses have a critical role in supporting patients in TB treatment process. Yet, very little research has been done to inform policymakers and practitioners on nurses’ experiences of treatment adherence among patients with TB. Aim. To describe nurses’ experiences of supporting treatment adherence among patients with tuberculosis in Burundi. Method. The study adopted qualitative approach with a descriptive design. A purposive sampling was performed. Eight nurses were selected from two TB treatment centers in Burundi. Content analysis was used to analyze the data. Result. According to the nurses, most patients complete their treatment. Educating patients, providing the medication, observing and following up treatment, and communicating with the patients were the key tasks by nurses to support adherence. Causes for interruption were medication-related difficulties, poverty, and patients’ indiscipline. Treatment adherence could also be affected by patients’ and nurses’ feelings. Providing transportation and meals could enhance treatment compliance. Conclusion. Nurses are critical resources to TB treatment success. In a poverty stricken setting, nurses’ work could be facilitated and adherence further could be enhanced if socioeconomic problems (transportation and nutritional support were alleviated.

  4. Quality of life associated with treatment adherence in patients with type 2 diabetes: a cross-sectional study

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    Valdivia-Martínez José J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite certain contradictions, an association has been identified between adherence to drug treatment and the quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes. The contradictions observed emphasize the importance of using different methods to measure treatment adherence, or the association of psychological precursors of adherence with quality of life. For this reason, we have used an indirect method to measure adherence (pill count, as well as two adherence behaviour precursors (attitude and knowledge, to assess the association between adherence and the quality of life in type 2 diabetes patients. Methods A cross-sectional comparative study on a random sample of 238 type 2 diabetic patients was carried out over one year in four family medicine units of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS in Aguascalientes, Mexico. Treatment adherence was measured using the indirect method of pill count to assess adherence behaviour, obtaining information at two home visits. In the first we recorded the medicine prescribed and in the second, we counted the medicine remaining to determine the proportion of the medicine taken. We also assessed two adherence behaviour precursors: the patients' knowledge regarding their medical prescription measured through a structured questionnaire; and attitudes to treatment adherence using a Likert scale. Quality of life was measured through the WHOQOL-100 (the WHO Quality of Life questionnaire. Information concerning both knowledge and attitude was obtained through interviews with the patients. A multiple linear regression model was constructed to establish the relationship between each quality of life domain and the variables related to adherence, controlling for covariates. Results There was no association between quality of life and treatment adherence behaviour. However, the combination of strong knowledge and a positive attitude was associated with five of the six quality of life domains

  5. The potential impact of recruitment method on sample characteristics and treatment outcomes in a psychosocial trial for women with co-occurring substance use disorder and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winhusen, Theresa; Winstanley, Erin L; Somoza, Eugene; Brigham, Gregory

    2012-01-01

    Recruitment method can impact the sample composition of a clinical trial and, thus, the generalizability of the results, but the importance of recruitment method in substance use disorder trials has received little attention. The present paper sought to address this research gap by evaluating the association between recruitment method and sample characteristics and treatment outcomes in a substance use disorder trial. In a multi-site trial evaluating Seeking Safety (SS), relative to Women's Health Education (WHE), for women with co-occurring PTSD (either sub-threshold or full PTSD) and substance use disorders, one site assessed the method by which each participant was recruited. Data from this site (n=106), which recruited participants from newspaper advertising and clinic intakes, were analyzed. Participants recruited through advertising, relative to those from the clinic, had significantly higher levels of baseline drug use and higher rates of meeting DSM-IV-TR criteria for full PTSD. Results suggest that the effectiveness of SS in decreasing PTSD symptoms was greater for participants recruited through advertising relative to those recruited from the clinic. Conversely, the results revealed a significant treatment effect in the clinic-recruited participants, not seen in the advertising-recruited participants, with SS, relative to WHE, participants being more likely to report past week drug use during the follow-up phase. Recruitment method may impact sample composition and treatment effects. Replication of this finding would have important implications for substance use disorder efficacy trials which often utilize advertising to recruit participants. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Relationship Between Treatment Adherence and Non-picked Up Medications in Community Pharmacies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Phan Hoang Nguyen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Medication adherence is one of the major factors that determine an outcome of a treatment. Despite the effort of healthcare providers to improve the adherence rate, it still remains a serious issue in our health care system today. Many patients do not take their medications as directed or just simply do not want to fill or refill their prescriptions. A small survey performed by pharmacy students at Temple School of Pharmacy showed that there is a significant number of patients did not pick up their medications. Cardiovascular medications are the most common non-picked up drugs. There are various reasons that patients use to justify for this non-adherence behavior. However, they are unaware that their actions create a tremendous negative effect not only on the treatment itself but also on the entire health care system. The consequences include expensive therapies, inaccurate research data, and poor treatment outcomes. Many solutions have been utilized to solve this problem, but it is still the major problem for healthcare providers to keep in mind when planning a drug regimen. Although many people believed that pharmacists are responsible for solving this problem, it should be a multidisciplinary effort of all healthcare providers to improve the medication adherence. Conflict of Interest We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties.   Type: Student Project

  7. Evidence for proposed ICD-11 PTSD and complex PTSD: a latent profile analysis

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    Marylène Cloitre

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The WHO International Classification of Diseases, 11th version (ICD-11, has proposed two related diagnoses, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and complex PTSD within the spectrum of trauma and stress-related disorders. Objective: To use latent profile analysis (LPA to determine whether there are classes of individuals that are distinguishable according to the PTSD and complex PTSD symptom profiles and to identify potential differences in the type of stressor and severity of impairment associated with each profile. Method: An LPA and related analyses were conducted on 302 individuals who had sought treatment for interpersonal traumas ranging from chronic trauma (e.g., childhood abuse to single-incident events (e.g., exposure to 9/11 attacks. Results: The LPA revealed three classes of individuals: (1 a complex PTSD class defined by elevated PTSD symptoms as well as disturbances in three domains of self-organization: affective dysregulation, negative self-concept, and interpersonal problems; (2 a PTSD class defined by elevated PTSD symptoms but low scores on the three self-organization symptom domains; and (3 a low symptom class defined by low scores on all symptoms and problems. Chronic trauma was more strongly predictive of complex PTSD than PTSD and, conversely, single-event trauma was more strongly predictive of PTSD. In addition, complex PTSD was associated with greater impairment than PTSD. The LPA analysis was completed both with and without individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD yielding identical results, suggesting the stability of these classes regardless of BPD comorbidity. Conclusion: Preliminary data support the proposed ICD-11 distinction between PTSD and complex PTSD and support the value of testing the clinical utility of this distinction in field trials. Replication of results is necessary.For the abstract or full text in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Article Tools online

  8. Adherence to treatment, emotional state and quality of life in patients with end-stage renal disease undergoing dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Llana, Helena; Remor, Eduardo; Selgas, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    A low rate of adherence to treatment is a widespread problem of great clinical relevance among dialysis patients. The objective of the present study is to determine the relationship between adherence, emotional state (depression, anxiety, and perceived stress), and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in renal patients undergoing dialysis. Two patient groups (30 in hemodialysis and 31 in peritoneal dialysis) participated in this study. We evaluated aspects of adherence, depression, anxiety, perceived stress, and HRQOL with self-report and standardized instruments. Peritoneal dialysis patients reported significantly higher levels of adherence to treatment and better HRQOL in Physical Function and Bodily Pain domains. Depression level is associated with HRQOL indicators. We did not find any differences regarding specific adherence to antihypertensive and phosphate binder drugs or in psychological variables depending on the modality of dialysis. Patients with adherence to antihypertensive drugs show better physical HRQOL. The predictors of HRQOL in dialysis patients were: work, gender and depression. Our results suggest that the modality of dialysis does not differentially affect the emotional state or specific adherence to drugs, but it is nevertheless related to their overall adherence to treatment and to their HRQOL.

  9. PTSD and Sexual Dysfunction in Men and Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehuda, Rachel; Lehrner, Amy; Rosenbaum, Talli Y

    2015-05-01

    Difficulties in sexual desire and function often occur in persons with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but many questions remain regarding the mechanisms underlying the occurrence of sexual problems in PTSD. The aim of this review was to present a model of sexual dysfunction in PTSD underpinned by an inability to regulate and redirect the physiological arousal needed for healthy sexual function away from aversive hyperarousal and intrusive memories. A literature review pertaining to PTSD and sexual function was conducted. Evidence for the comorbidity of sexual dysfunction and PTSD is presented, and biological and psychological mechanisms that may underlie this co-occurrence are proposed. This manuscript presents evidence of sexual dysfunction in conjunction with PTSD, and of the neurobiology and neuroendocrinology of PTSD and sexual function. Sexual dysfunction following trauma exposure may be mediated by PTSD-related biological, cognitive, and affective processes. The treatment of PTSD must include attention to sexual dysfunction and vice versa. © 2015 International Society for Sexual Medicine.

  10. IMPACT OF THE FORM OF MEDICATION ON TREATMENT ADHERENCE IN RESPIRATORY TUBERCULOSIS PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Tyulkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the study: to investigate treatment adherence in respiratory tuberculosis patients depending on the choice of therapy.Subjects and methods: retrospective full-design study. The case histories of adult new tuberculosis cases who were treated in TB Dispensary in 2015 were analyzed. The groups were formed based on the intake of combined drugs with fixed doses (1 tablet contained 60 mg of isoniazid, 120 mg of rifampicin, 300 mg of pyrazinamide, 225 mg of ethambutol, and 20 mg of pyridoxine – Group 1 (n = 38; or separate tablets in the doses as per drug use instructions (isoniazid, rifampicin, pyrazinamide, ethambutol – Group 2 (n = 78. The groups were compatible as per sex, age, and clinical manifestations of tuberculosis. Patients from Group 1 with the weight of 60 kg received 5 tablets and patients from Group 2 received more than 12 tablets. Patients' adherence to treatment was assessed as per regularity of intake and number of doses during the intensive phase of treatment.Results. Patients from Group 1 were regularly taking anti-tuberculosis drugs, while in Group 2 there were interruptions of treatment (7-21 days in 12 (15.4% patients. In Group, the intensive phase increased up to 90.2 ± 30.6 doses and in Group 2 this increase made 131.6 ± 65.4 doses due to late sputum conversion. In Group 1, sputum conversion was achieved during the first month of treatment in 60% of patients; and in Group 2 – in 10% of cases (p = 0.044. The frequency of transaminase elevation as a side effect was higher in Group 1, but it did not result in discontinuation of drugs. Thus, the intake of combined medication with fixed doses improved tuberculosis patients' adherence to treatment.

  11. The differential outcomes procedure enhances adherence to treatment: A simulated study with healthy adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eMolina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Memory for medical recommendations is a prerequisite for good adherence to treatment, and therefore to ameliorate the negative effects of the disease, a problem that mainly affects people with memory deficits. We conducted a simulated study to test the utility of a procedure (the differential outcomes procedure, DOP that may improve adherence to treatment by increasing the patient’s learning and retention of medical recommendations regarding medication. The DOP requires the structure of a conditional discriminative learning task in which correct choice responses to specific stimulus-stimulus associations are reinforced with a particular reinforcer or outcome. In two experiments, participants had to learn and retain in their memory the pills that were associated with particular disorders. To assess whether the DOP improved long-term retention of the learned disorder/pill associations, participants were asked to perform two recognition memory tests, 1 hour and 1 week after completing the learning phase. The results showed that compared with the standard non-differential outcomes procedure (NOP, the DOP produced better learning and long-term retention of the previously learned associations. These findings suggest that the DOP can be used as a useful complementary technique in intervention programs targeted at increasing adherence to clinical recommendations.

  12. Assessment of adherence to visual correction and occlusion therapy in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Drews-Botsch

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Occlusion therapy throughout early childhood is believed to be efficacious in treating deprivation amblyopia but has not been rigorously assessed in clinical trials. Further, tools to assess adherence to such therapy over an extended period of time are lacking. Using data from the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study, a randomized clinical trial of treatment for unilateral congenital cataract, we examined the use of quarterly 48-h recall interviews and annual 7-day prospective diaries to assess reported hours of patching in 114 children throughout the first 5 years of life. Consistency of data reported was assessed using correlation coefficients and intraclass correlation coefficients. Both interview and diary data showed excellent consistency with Cronbach’s Alpha’s ranging from 0.69 to 0.88 for hours of patching and 0.60 to 0.73 for hours of sleep. However, caregivers reported somewhat more adherence in prospective diaries than retrospective interviews. Completion rates, on the other hand, were substantially higher for telephone interviews than prospective diaries. For example, four years after surgery response rates to telephone interviews exceeded 75% versus completion rates of only 54% for diaries. In situations where occlusion dose monitors cannot be used for assessing adherence to occlusion therapy, such as in infants or over an extended period of time, quantitative assessments of occlusion therapy can be obtained by parental report, either as a series of prospective diaries or a series of recall interviews.

  13. Women with breast cancer taking chemotherapy: depression symptoms and treatment adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Fresche de Souza

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective to verify depressive symptoms and adherence to chemotherapy among women with breast cancer who are served by the Pharmacy of the Chemotherapy Center of a university hospital.METHOD: cross-sectional study with quantitative approach conducted with 112 women receiving chemotherapy. Structured interviews guided by a script addressing socio-demographic, clinical and therapeutic information, the Morisky Test, and the Beck Depression Inventory were used to collect data.RESULTS: 12.50% and 1.78% of the patients experienced "moderate" and "severe" depression, respectively, while 10.59% did not use antidepressant medication. A statistically significant association was found between levels of depression and the use of antidepressants. Lack of adherence was identified in 46.43% of the participants.CONCLUSION: these findings show the need to regularly screen for depressive symptoms and for adherence to chemotherapy treatment among women with breast cancer, in order to provide early detection and appropriate treatment centered on patients, and to improve their quality of life.

  14. Sleep and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Center for PTSD » Public » Sleep and PTSD PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... code here Enter ZIP code here Sleep and PTSD Public This section is for Veterans, General Public, ...

  15. PTSD and Problems with Alcohol Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PTSD » Public » PTSD and Problems with Alcohol Use PTSD: National Center for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here PTSD and Problems with Alcohol Use Public This section ...

  16. African American Women's Recollected Experiences of Adherence to Breast Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiney, Sue P; Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K; Felder, Tisha M; Phelps, Kenneth W; Quinn, Jada C

    2017-03-01

    To explore African American women's recollected experiences of breast cancer treatment.
. Qualitative description and narrative analysis.
. South Carolina Oncology Associates, an outpatient oncology clinic serving rural and urban populations.
. 16 African American women with breast cancer previously enrolled in the control arm (n = 93) of a completed randomized, controlled trial. 
. Feminist narrative analysis of in-depth individual interviews.
. The authors identified three themes within the African American breast cancer survivors' recollected experiences of treatment adherence. Although little evidence was presented of shared decision making with providers, patients were committed to completing the prescribed therapies. The narratives highlighted the value of in-depth examination of patients' perspectives, particularly among minority and underserved groups. With the exception of voicing personal choice of surgical treatment, the women trusted providers' recommendations with a resolve to "just do it." Although trust may enhance treatment adherence, it may also reflect power differentials based on gender, race, education, and culture.
. Nurses should listen to patients describe their experience with cancer treatment and compare the themes from this study with their patients' story. This comparison will help nurses support patients through various aspect of diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Longitudinal Analysis of Adherence to First-Line Antiretroviral Therapy: Evidence of Treatment Sustainability from an Indian HIV Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shet, Anita; Kumarasamy, N; Poongulali, Selvamuthu; Shastri, Suresh; Kumar, Dodderi Sunil; Rewari, Bharath B; Arumugam, Karthika; Antony, Jimmy; De Costa, Ayesha; D'Souza, George

    2016-01-01

    Given the chronic nature of HIV infection and the need for life-long antiretroviral therapy (ART), maintaining long-term optimal adherence is an important strategy for maximizing treatment success. In order to understand better the dynamic nature of adherence behaviors in India where complex cultural and logistic features prevail, we assessed the patterns, trajectories and time-dependent predictors of adherence levels in relation to virological failure among individuals initiating first-line ART in India. Between July 2010 and August 2013, eligible ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals newly initiating first-line ART within the national program at three sites in southern India were enrolled and monitored for two years. ART included zidovudine/stavudine/tenofovir plus lamivudine plus nevirapine/efavirenz. Patients were assessed using clinical, laboratory and adherence parameters. Every three months, medication adherence was measured using pill count, and a structured questionnaire on adherence barriers was administered. Optimal adherence was defined as mean adherence ≥95%. Statistical analysis was performed using a bivariate and a multivariate model of all identified covariates. Adherence trends and determinants were modeled as rate ratios using generalized estimating equation analysis in a Poisson distribution. A total of 599 eligible ART-naïve patients participated in the study, and contributed a total of 921 person-years of observation time. Women constituted 43% and mean CD4 count prior to initiating ART was 192 cells/mm3. Overall mean adherence among all patients was 95.4%. The proportion of patients optimally adherent was 75.6%. Predictors of optimal adherence included older age (≥40 years), high school-level education and beyond, lower drug toxicity-related ART interruption, full disclosure, sense of satisfaction with one's own health and patient's perception of having good access to health-care services. Adherence was inversely proportional to virological

  18. The association between patients' beliefs about medicines and adherence to drug treatment after stroke: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjölander, Maria; Eriksson, Marie; Glader, Eva-Lotta

    2013-09-24

    Adherence to preventive drug treatment is a clinical problem and we hypothesised that patients' beliefs about medicines and stroke are associated with adherence. The objective was to examine associations between beliefs of patients with stroke about stroke and drug treatment and their adherence to drug treatment. Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Patients with stroke from 25 Swedish hospitals were included. Questionnaires were sent to 989 patients to assess their perceptions about stroke (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, Brief IPQ), beliefs about medicines (Beliefs about Medicines Questionnaires, BMQ) and adherence to treatment (Medication Adherence Report Scale, MARS) 3 months after stroke onset. Only patients living at home were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was self-reported adherence as measured on MARS. MARS scores were dichotomised into adherent/non-adherent. Background and clinical data from the Swedish Stroke register were included. 811 patients were still living at home and 595 answered the questionnaire. Complete MARS data were available for 578 patients and 72 (12.5%) of these were classified as non-adherent. Non-adherent patients scored lower on positive beliefs as measured on BMQ-necessity (OR = 0.90, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.98) and BMQ-benefit (OR=0.77, 95% CI 0.68 to 0.87), and higher on negative beliefs as measured on BMQ-concern (OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.21), BMQ-overuse (OR=1.29, 95% CI 1.14 to 1.45), and BMQ-harm (OR=1.12, 95% CI 1.01 to 1.24). The Brief IPQ showed that non-adherent patients believed their current treatment to be less useful (p=0.001). This study showed associations between beliefs of Swedish patients with stroke about medicines and adherence. Positive beliefs were less common and negative more common among non-adherent. To improve adherence, patients' beliefs about medicines should be considered.

  19. Patient satisfaction on tuberculosis treatment service and adherence to treatment in public health facilities of Sidama zone, South Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Patient compliance is a key factor in treatment success. Satisfied patients are more likely to utilize health services, comply with medical treatment, and continue with the health care providers. Yet, the national tuberculosis control program failed to address some of these aspects in order to achieve the national targets. Hence, this study attempted to investigate patient satisfaction and adherence to tuberculosis treatment in Sidama zone of south Ethiopia. Methods A facility based cross sectional study was conducted using quantitative method of data collection from March to April 2011. A sample of 531 respondents on anti TB treatment from 11 health centers and 1 hospital were included in the study. The sample size to each facility was allocated using probability proportional to size allocation, and study participants for the interview were selected by systematic random sampling. A Pre tested, interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect the data. Collected data was edited, coded and entered to Epi data version 3.1 and exported to SPSS version 16. Confirmatory factor analysis was done to identify factors that explain most of the variance observed in most of the manifested variables. Bivariate and Multivariate analysis were computed to analyze the data. Result The study revealed 90% of the study participants were satisfied with TB treatment service. However, 26% of respondents had poor adherence to their TB treatment. Patient perceived on professional care, time spent with health care provider, accessibility, technical competency, convenience (cleanliness) and consultation and relational empathy were independent predictors of overall patient satisfaction (P patient satisfaction (Beta = 0.262). In multivariate analysis occupational status, area of residence, perceived time spent with health care provider, perceived accessibility, perceived waiting time, perceived professional care and over all patient satisfaction were significantly

  20. Adherence to malaria diagnosis and treatment guidelines among healthcare workers in Ogun State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluyomi F. Bamiselu

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria case management remains a vital component of malaria control strategies. Despite the introduction of national malaria treatment guidelines and scale-up of malaria control interventions in Nigeria, anecdotal evidence shows some deviations from the guidelines in malaria case management. This study assessed factors influencing adherence to malaria diagnosis and treatment guidelines among healthcare workers in public and private sectors in Ogun State, Nigeria. Methods A comparative cross-sectional study was carried out among 432 (216 public and 216 private healthcare workers selected from nine Local Government Areas using a multistage sampling technique. A pre-tested interviewer administered questionnaire was used to collect information on availability and use of malaria Rapid Diagnostic Test (mRDT and artemisinin combination therapy (ACT, for management of uncomplicated malaria. Adherence was defined as when choice of antimalarials for parasitological confirmed malaria cases was restricted to recommended antimalarial medicines. Association between adherence and independent variables were tested using Chi-square at 5 % level of significance. Results Malaria RDT was available in 81.9 % of the public health facilities and 19.4 % of the private health facilities (p = 0.001. Its use was higher among public healthcare workers (85.2 % compared to 32.9 % in private facilities (p = 0.000. Presumptive diagnosis of malaria was higher among private healthcare workers (94.9 % compared to 22.7 % public facilities (p = <0.0001. The main reason for non-usage of mRDT among private healthcare workers was its perceived unreliability of mRDT (40.9 %. Monotherapy including artesunate (58.3 % vs 12.5 %, amodiaquine (38.9 % vs 8.3 % and chloroquine (26.4 % vs 4.2 % were significantly more available in private than public health facilities, respectively. Adherence to guidelines was significantly higher among public

  1. Patterns of geographic mobility predict barriers to engagement in HIV care and antiretroviral treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barbara S; Reyes, Emily; Levine, Elizabeth A; Khan, Shah Z; Garduño, L Sergio; Donastorg, Yeycy; Hammer, Scott M; Brudney, Karen; Hirsch, Jennifer S

    2014-06-01

    Migration and geographic mobility increase risk for HIV infection and may influence engagement in HIV care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy. Our goal is to use the migration-linked communities of Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, and New York City, New York, to determine the impact of geographic mobility on HIV care engagement and adherence to treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with HIV+Dominicans receiving antiretroviral therapy, reporting travel or migration in the past 6 months and key informants (n=45). Mobility maps, visual representations of individual migration histories, including lifetime residence(s) and all trips over the past 2 years, were generated for all HIV+ Dominicans. Data from interviews and field observation were iteratively reviewed for themes. Mobility mapping revealed five distinct mobility patterns: travel for care, work-related travel, transnational travel (nuclear family at both sites), frequent long-stay travel, and vacation. Mobility patterns, including distance, duration, and complexity, varied by motivation for travel. There were two dominant barriers to care. First, a fear of HIV-related stigma at the destination led to delays seeking care and poor adherence. Second, longer trips led to treatment interruptions due to limited medication supply (30-day maximum dictated by programs or insurers). There was a notable discordance between what patients and providers perceived as mobility-induced barriers to care and the most common barriers found in the analysis. Interventions to improve HIV care for mobile populations should consider motivation for travel and address structural barriers to engagement in care and adherence.

  2. Treatment approaches and adherence to urate-lowering therapy for patients with gout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung T

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Thanda Aung,* Gihyun Myung,* John D FitzGerald Division of Rheumatology/Department of Internal Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Gout is the most common inflammatory arthritis characterized by painful disabling acute attacks. It is caused by hyperuricemia and deposition of urate crystals in and around the joints. Long-standing untreated hyperuricemia can lead to chronic arthritis with joint damage, tophi formation and urate nephropathy. Gout is associated with significant morbidity and health care associated cost. The goal of long-term therapy is to lower the serum urate level to promote dissolution of urate crystals, reduce recurrent acute gout flares, resolve tophi and prevent joint damage. Despite the presence of established gout treatment guidelines and effective medications to manage gout, patient outcomes are often poor. Etiology for these shortcomings is multifactorial including both physician and patient characteristics. Poor adherence to urate-lowering therapy (ULT is prevalent and is a significant contributor to poor patient outcomes. This article reviews the treatment strategies for the management of hyperuricemia in chronic gout, gaps in quality of care in gout management, factors contributing to poor adherence to ULT and discusses potential interventions to achieve improved gout-related outcomes. These interventions include initiation of prophylactic anti-inflammatory medication when starting ULT, frequent follow-ups, regular serum urate monitoring and improved patient education, which can be achieved through pharmacist- or nurse-assisted programs. Interventions such as these could improve adherence to ULT and, ultimately, result in optimal gout-related outcomes. Keywords: gout, adherence, urate-lowering therapy 

  3. A five-day inpatient EMDR treatment programme for PTSD: pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zepeda Méndez, Mayaris; Nijdam, Mirjam J.; ter Heide, F. Jackie June; van der Aa, Niels; Olff, Miranda

    2018-01-01

    Conclusions: The majority of patients in our pilot study experienced symptom reduction consistent with reliable changes in this five-day inpatient treatment with EMDR and yoga. Randomized controlled trials - with longer follow up periods - are needed to properly determine efficacy and efficiency of

  4. [Rational Rehabilitation in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A pilot study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasoa, A T; Appelo, M T

    2007-01-01

    In a randomised controlled study, a type of cognitive behavior therapy known as Rational Rehabilitation proved effective in the treatment of patients with chronic mental symptoms. Post-traumatic stress disorder is a serious illness that occurs frequently and can last for many years. Rational Rehabilitation may also be an effective treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. To investigate, via a pilot study, on the effect of Rational Rehabilitation in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, whether a randomised controlled study is called for. Nineteen patients with post-traumatic stress disorder, who were awaiting regular treatment, opted to join the study. The effect of Rational Rehabilitation was studied in relation to: symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, degree of happiness experienced, autonomy, social support and need for further treatment. results Rational Rehabilitation seems to have a positive effect on all outcome measures, except flashbacks. A controlled study of the effect of Rational Rehabilitation in patients with post-traumatic stress disorder seems justified.

  5. Examining various subthreshold definitions of PTSD using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, C Laurel; Raines, Amanda M; Chambliss, Jessica L; Walton, Jessica L; Maieritsch, Kelly P

    2018-07-01

    The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013) includes Other- and Unspecified- Trauma and Stressor-Related Disorders to capture subthreshold Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms. However, the DSM-5 does not specify the number or type of symptoms needed to assign them. The purpose of the current study was to extend our understanding of subthreshold PTSD by comparing four commonly used definitions adapted to the DSM-5 PTSD criteria in an outpatient treatment-seeking sample. Veterans (N = 193) presenting to PTSD clinics were assessed using the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5). Participants reported a criterion A traumatic event, but did not meet criteria for threshold-PTSD. We hypothesized that the number of veterans captured would be highest when fewer specific criterion sets were required by the subthreshold definition. Our hypothesis was upheld in that the more criteria required by the subthreshold PTSD definition, the lower the number of veterans counted within the group. The study consisted primarily of trauma treatment-seeking male veterans, with chronic PTSD symptoms. In addition, the sample size was small and was collected as part of routine clinical care. These results support previous contentions around careful decision making when defining what constitutes subthreshold PTSD in research and clinical work. It also points to the need for continued research to better understand the diagnostic and treatment implications of subthreshold PTSD. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. The impact of 5-hydroxytryptamine-receptor antagonists on chemotherapy treatment adherence, treatment delay, and nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palli SR

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Swetha Rao Palli,1 Michael Grabner,1 Ralph A Quimbo,1 Hope S Rugo2 1HealthCore, Wilmington, DE, 2University of California San Francisco Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, San Francisco, CA, USA Purpose: To determine the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV and chemotherapy treatment delay and adherence among patients receiving palonosetron versus other 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (5-HT3 RA antiemetics. Materials and methods: This retrospective claims analysis included adults with primary malignancies who initiated treatment consisting of single-day intravenous highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC or moderately EC (MEC regimens. Treatment delay was defined as a gap in treatment at least twice the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-specified cycle length, specific to each chemotherapy regimen. Treatment adherence was determined by the percentage of patients who received the regimen-specific recommended number of chemotherapy cycles within the recommended time frame. Results: We identified 1,832 palonosetron and 2,387 other 5-HT3 RA (“other” patients who initiated HEC therapy, and 1,350 palonosetron users and 1,379 patients on other antiemetics who initiated MEC therapy. Fewer patients receiving palonosetron experienced CINV versus other (HEC, 27.5% versus 32.2%, P=0.0011; MEC, 36.1% versus 41.7%, P=0.0026, and fewer treatment delays occurred among patients receiving palonosetron versus other (HEC, 3.2% versus 6.0%, P<0.0001; MEC, 17.0% versus 26.8%, P<0.0001. Compared with the other cohort, patients receiving palonosetron were significantly more adherent to the index chemotherapy regimen with respect to the recommended time frame (HEC, 74.7% versus 69.7%, P=0.0004; MEC, 43.1% versus 37.3%, P=0.0019 and dosage (HEC, 27.3% versus 25.8%, P=0.0004; MEC, 15.0% versus 12.6%, P=0.0019. Conclusion: Palonosetron more effectively reduced occurrence of CINV in patients receiving HEC or MEC compared with

  7. Women's experiences of factors affecting treatment engagement and adherence in internet delivered Behavioural Activation for Postnatal Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather A. O'Mahen

    2015-03-01

    Discussion: Open access, self-help internet interventions are acceptable to women with postnatal depression, but it is critical to provide tailoring and support to help overcome barriers and improve treatment adherence.

  8. Strategies for improving adherence to antiepileptic drug treatment in people with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aqeel, Sinaa; Gershuni, Olga; Al-Sabhan, Jawza; Hiligsmann, Mickael

    2017-02-03

    of all ages, one study included participants older than two years, one study targeted caregivers of children with epilepsy, and one study targeted families of children with epilepsy. We identified six ongoing trials. Follow-up time was generally short in most trials, ranging from one to 12 months. The trials examined three main types of interventions: educational interventions, behavioural interventions and mixed interventions. All studies compared treatment versus usual care or 'no intervention', except for two studies. Due to heterogeneity between studies in terms of interventions, methods used to measure adherence and the way the studies were reported, we did not pool the results and these findings were inappropriate to be included in a meta-analysis. Education and counselling of participants with epilepsy resulted in mixed success (moderate-quality evidence). Behavioural interventions such as use of intensive reminders provided more favourable effects on adherence (moderate-quality evidence). The effect on adherence to antiepileptic drugs described by studies of mixed interventions showed improved adherence in the intervention groups compared to the control groups (high-quality evidence). Behavioural interventions such as intensive reminders and the use of mixed interventions demonstrate some positive results; however, we need more reliable evidence on their efficacy, derived from carefully-designed randomised controlled trials before we can draw a firm conclusion. Since the last version of this review, none of the new relevant studies have provided additional information that would lead to significant changes in our conclusions. This current update includes 12 studies, of which six came from the latest searches.

  9. Adherence to antiretroviral treatment and associated factors in people living with HIV/AIDS in Quindío, Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    Deisy Viviana Cardona-Duque; Oscar Adolfo Medina-Pérez; Sandra Milena Herrera-Castaño; Paula Andrea Orozco-Gómez

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: HIV/AIDS is a chronic disease; therefore, recognizing which factors favor adherence to antiretroviral treatment is necessary. Objective: To determine the association between adherence to antiretroviral treatment and depression, anxiety, perception of social support and sociodemographic variables in people living with HIV/AIDS in Quindío, Colombia. Materials and methods: An observational, cross-sectional study was performed in an intentional sample of 70 adults, who were ap...

  10. [Adherence to treatment, by active ingredient, in patients over 65 years on multiple medication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez Montenegro, Antonio J; Montiel Luque, Alonso; Martín Aurioles, Esther; Torres Verdú, Barbara; Lara Moreno, Celinda; González Correa, José Antonio

    2014-05-01

    To assess the level of adherence, by active ingredient, to treatment and associated factors in polymedicated patients over 65 years-old. Observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study over polymedicated patients over 65 years of the Costa del Sol Health District and the North Malaga Health Area. The study was performed between January 2011 and September 2012 on 375 subjects obtained by simple random sampling from lists provided by each health centre. Data was collected by means of an interview with structured questions. Informed consent was given and signed by all patients before interview. Main results variable adherence to treatment (Morisky-Green's test). Prescription by active ingredient, socio-demographic variables, health care centre variables, and treatment associated variables. A descriptive analysis of variables was performed. Statistical inference was determined using univariate analysis (t test of Student or Mann-Whitney U, and Chi-squared), and controlling for confounding factors by multivariate analysis (linear and logistic regression). The result for therapeutic compliance was 51.7%. No statistically significant differences were observed as regards sex and age. A relationship was found in those who resided in rural areas (P=.001), lived with family (P<.05), and were not at risk of suffering from anxiety (P=.046). We found similar patient adherence to treatment despite the prescribing generic drugs. Failure to therapeutic compliance was greater in those patients who lived by themselves, in a city close to the coast, or in those patients who were at risk of suffering from anxiety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Interventions targeting absences increase adherence and reduce abandonment of childhood cancer treatment in El Salvador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salaverria, Carmen; Rossell, Nuria; Hernandez, Angelica; Fuentes Alabi, Soad; Vasquez, Roberto; Bonilla, Miguel; Lam, Catherine G; Ribeiro, Raul C

    2015-09-01

    In El Salvador, about 200 new cases of pediatric cancer are diagnosed each year, and survival rates approach 70%. Although treatment is available at no cost, abandonment of therapy has remained at a steady yearly rate of 13% during the past decade. A time sensitive adherence tracking procedure (TS-ATP) was recently implemented to detect missed appointments, identify their causes, and intervene promptly. Procedure The study team was informed daily of patient/family failure to attend medical appointments in the pediatric oncology unit; the families were contacted and interviewed to ascertain and address the reasons. Patients who did not return after this initial contact were contacted again through local health clinics and municipalities. Law enforcement was a last resort for patients undergoing frontline treatment with a good prognosis., The system was adapted to clinical urgency: families of patients undergoing induction therapy were contacted within 24 hr, those in other therapy phases, within 48 hr, and those who had completed treatment, within one week. Reasons for absence were obtained by telephone or in person. The annual rate of abandonment was reduced from 13-3% during the 2 years period. There were 1,111 absences reported and 1,472 contacts with caregivers and institutions. The three main reasons for absences were financial needs (165, 23%), unforeseen barriers (116, 16%), and domestic needs (86, 12%). Use of the treatment adherence tracking system to locate and communicate with patients/families after missed appointments and the allocated aid stemming from these interviews substantially reduced abandonment and non-adherence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Adherence to clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of candidemia at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashong, Chester N.; Hunter, Andrew S.; Mansouri, M. David; Cadle, Richard M.; Hamill, Richard J.; Musher, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The primary objective of this study was to examine the appropriateness of candidemia management at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center as recommended by the 2009 Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) guidelines for treatment of Candida infections. Methods: A retrospective analysis of 94 adult patients with blood cultures positive for Candida spp. was performed. Patients were stratified by severity of disease into two groups: non-neutropenic, mild-moderate disease (Group 1, n = 54, 56%) and non-neutropenic, moderate-severe disease (Group 2, n = 40, 42%). Results: Adherence to the IDSA recommendations for recommended antifungal drug, dose, and duration of therapy was low in both groups (16.7% in Group 1 and 17.5% in Group 2). Although adherence was not associated with higher clinical resolution of infection (P = 0.111), it was associated with a significantly lower mortality rate (P = 0.001) when compared to variance from the guidelines at 6 weeks. Conclusion: Although adherence to published guidelines for treating patients with candidemia was suboptimal at our institution, patients that were managed based on the guidelines had a statistically lower mortality rate. PMID:28936146

  13. Prevention is better than cure – the art of avoiding non-adherence to antiretroviral treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leith Kwaan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The much-used phrase ‘prevention is better than cure’ is applicable to many circumstances, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. In recent years suggestions have been made for a move towards treatment strategies that emphasise prevention of foreseeable adherence problems on a patient-by-patient basis, through focused patient preparation before commencing antiretroviral therapy (ART. This is well elucidated in a statement made in 2004 by Coetzee et al.:1 ‘As it is difficult to ascertain robust predictors of adherence, there has been a move to concentrate on patient preparation before the initiation of ART rather than the use of non-clinical predictors of adherence or selection criteria. A paradigm focused on preparation rather than selection is better suited to the aggressive targets for the scaling up of ART in countries with large epidemics (such as in South Africa, where the view of ART as a very expensive rationed intervention is rapidly changing.’

  14. The impact of 5-hydroxytryptamine-receptor antagonists on chemotherapy treatment adherence, treatment delay, and nausea and vomiting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palli, Swetha Rao; Grabner, Michael; Quimbo, Ralph A; Rugo, Hope S

    2015-01-01

    To determine the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV) and chemotherapy treatment delay and adherence among patients receiving palonosetron versus other 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (5-HT3 RA) antiemetics. This retrospective claims analysis included adults with primary malignancies who initiated treatment consisting of single-day intravenous highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) or moderately EC (MEC) regimens. Treatment delay was defined as a gap in treatment at least twice the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-specified cycle length, specific to each chemotherapy regimen. Treatment adherence was determined by the percentage of patients who received the regimen-specific recommended number of chemotherapy cycles within the recommended time frame. We identified 1,832 palonosetron and 2,387 other 5-HT3 RA ("other") patients who initiated HEC therapy, and 1,350 palonosetron users and 1,379 patients on other antiemetics who initiated MEC therapy. Fewer patients receiving palonosetron experienced CINV versus other (HEC, 27.5% versus 32.2%, P=0.0011; MEC, 36.1% versus 41.7%, P=0.0026), and fewer treatment delays occurred among patients receiving palonosetron versus other (HEC, 3.2% versus 6.0%, PHEC, 74.7% versus 69.7%, P=0.0004; MEC, 43.1% versus 37.3%, P=0.0019) and dosage (HEC, 27.3% versus 25.8%, P=0.0004; MEC, 15.0% versus 12.6%, P=0.0019). Palonosetron more effectively reduced occurrence of CINV in patients receiving HEC or MEC compared with other agents in this real-world setting. Additionally, patients receiving palonosetron had better adherence and fewer treatment delays than patients receiving other 5-HT3 RAs.

  15. Factors associated to adherence to different treatment schemes with meglumine antimoniate in a clinical trial for cutaneous leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Madelon Novato; Pimentel, Maria Inês Fernandes; Schubach, Armando de Oliveira; Oliveira, Raquel de Vasconcellos Carvalhães de; Teixeira, José Liporage; Leite, Madson Pedro da Silva; Fonseca, Monique; Santos, Ginelza Peres Lima dos; Salgueiro, Mariza Matos; Ferreira e Vasconcellos, Erica de Camargo; Lyra, Marcelo Rosandiski; Saheki, Mauricio Naoto; Valete-Rosalino, Claudia Maria

    2014-01-01

    The favorable outcome of the treatment of a disease is influenced by the adherence to therapy. Our objective was to assess factors associated with adherence to treatment of patients included in a clinical trial of equivalence between the standard and alternative treatment schemes with meglumine antimoniate (MA) in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Between 2008 and 2011, 57 patients with CL were interviewed using a questionnaire to collect socioeconomic data. The following methods were used for adherence monitoring: counting of vial surplus, monitoring card, Morisky test and modified Morisky test (without the question regarding the schedule); we observed 82.1% (vial return), 86.0% (monitoring card), 66.7% (Morisky test) and 86.0% (modified Morisky test) adherence. There was a strong correlation between the method of vial counting and the monitoring card and modified Morisky test. A significant association was observed between greater adherence to treatment and low dose of MA, as well as with a lower number of people sleeping in the same room. We recommend the use of the modified Morisky test to assess adherence to treatment of CL with MA, because it is a simple method and with a good performance, when compared to other methods.

  16. FACTORS ASSOCIATED TO ADHERENCE TO DIFFERENT TREATMENT SCHEMES WITH MEGLUMINE ANTIMONIATE IN A CLINICAL TRIAL FOR CUTANEOUS LEISHMANIASIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madelon Novato Ribeiro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The favorable outcome of the treatment of a disease is influenced by the adherence to therapy. Our objective was to assess factors associated with adherence to treatment of patients included in a clinical trial of equivalence between the standard and alternative treatment schemes with meglumine antimoniate (MA in the treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL, in the state of Rio de Janeiro. Between 2008 and 2011, 57 patients with CL were interviewed using a questionnaire to collect socioeconomic data. The following methods were used for adherence monitoring: counting of vial surplus, monitoring card, Morisky test and modified Morisky test (without the question regarding the schedule; we observed 82.1% (vial return, 86.0% (monitoring card, 66.7% (Morisky test and 86.0% (modified Morisky test adherence. There was a strong correlation between the method of vial counting and the monitoring card and modified Morisky test. A significant association was observed between greater adherence to treatment and low dose of MA, as well as with a lower number of people sleeping in the same room. We recommend the use of the modified Morisky test to assess adherence to treatment of CL with MA, because it is a simple method and with a good performance, when compared to other methods.

  17. Return to work: Police personnel and PTSD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plat, Marie-Christine J.; Westerveld, Gre J.; Hutter, Renée C.; Olff, Miranda; Frings-Dresen, Monique H. W.; Sluiter, Judith K.

    2013-01-01

    This study i) describes the number of police personnel with PTSD who are working and those who are on sick leave before and after an out-patient-clinic treatment program and ii) examines which factors are related to return to work. Police personnel treated for PTSD (n=121). In this retrospective

  18. Children and Adolescents with Perinatal HIV-1 Infection: Factors Associated with Adherence to Treatment in the Brazilian Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Letícia Santos Cruz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Challenges to the adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy among the pediatric population should be understood in the context of the trajectories of families, their interaction with healthcare services, and their access to material and symbolic goods. The present study analyzed individual, institutional and social factors that might be associated with the caregivers’ role in the treatment adherence of children and adolescents living with HIV (CALHIV. Based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires applied to 69 caregivers seen at pediatric AIDS services of five Brazilian macro-regions, we observed that adherent caregivers had better acceptance of diagnosis and treatment, were less likely to face discrimination and social isolation secondary to AIDS-related stigma and tended to believe in the efficacy of treatment, and to be more optimistic about life perspectives of CALHIV. Interventions aiming to improve adherence and to promote the health of CALHIV should take in consideration the interplay of such different factors.

  19. Children and Adolescents with Perinatal HIV-1 Infection: Factors Associated with Adherence to Treatment in the Brazilian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Cardoso, Claudete A. Araújo; Darmont, Mariana Q.; Dickstein, Paulo; Bastos, Francisco I.; Souza, Edvaldo; Andrade, Solange D.; Fabbro, Marcia D’All; Fonseca, Rosana; Monteiro, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Challenges to the adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy among the pediatric population should be understood in the context of the trajectories of families, their interaction with healthcare services, and their access to material and symbolic goods. The present study analyzed individual, institutional and social factors that might be associated with the caregivers’ role in the treatment adherence of children and adolescents living with HIV (CALHIV). Based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires applied to 69 caregivers seen at pediatric AIDS services of five Brazilian macro-regions, we observed that adherent caregivers had better acceptance of diagnosis and treatment, were less likely to face discrimination and social isolation secondary to AIDS-related stigma and tended to believe in the efficacy of treatment, and to be more optimistic about life perspectives of CALHIV. Interventions aiming to improve adherence and to promote the health of CALHIV should take in consideration the interplay of such different factors. PMID:27338431

  20. Children and Adolescents with Perinatal HIV-1 Infection: Factors Associated with Adherence to Treatment in the Brazilian Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Maria Letícia Santos; Cardoso, Claudete A Araújo; Darmont, Mariana Q; Dickstein, Paulo; Bastos, Francisco I; Souza, Edvaldo; Andrade, Solange D; Fabbro, Marcia D'All; Fonseca, Rosana; Monteiro, Simone

    2016-06-21

    Challenges to the adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy among the pediatric population should be understood in the context of the trajectories of families, their interaction with healthcare services, and their access to material and symbolic goods. The present study analyzed individual, institutional and social factors that might be associated with the caregivers' role in the treatment adherence of children and adolescents living with HIV (CALHIV). Based on semi-structured interviews and questionnaires applied to 69 caregivers seen at pediatric AIDS services of five Brazilian macro-regions, we observed that adherent caregivers had better acceptance of diagnosis and treatment, were less likely to face discrimination and social isolation secondary to AIDS-related stigma and tended to believe in the efficacy of treatment, and to be more optimistic about life perspectives of CALHIV. Interventions aiming to improve adherence and to promote the health of CALHIV should take in consideration the interplay of such different factors.

  1. Study of determinants of Adherence to Antiretroviral Treatment among HIV Patients covered by Ahwaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Moradi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to antiretroviral therapy is essential for achieving durable clinical outcomes in patients with HIV. In addition, suboptimal adherence can accelerate development of drug-resistant HIV and mitigate HAART’s role in reducing HIV incidence and transmission. The present research has been conducted to study treatment adherence and determine its effective factors on HIV/AIDS patients with the support of Ahvaz JundiShapur University of Medical Sciences in 2015. This is a cross-sectional study in which 158 HIV/AIDS patients who had been registered in the counseling centers of behavioral diseases of Ahvaz and were receiving antiretroviral treatment. They had been selected by census method. Data were collected using the AACTG (Adult Aids Clinical Trials Group questionnaire. The collected data was analyzed and interpreted using descriptive statistical tests, χ2 and step by step regression by spss-16 software. The mean age of patients was 32.8±10.36. Among them 20.8% were female, 47.5% were single and 35.6% had a job. Also 33.7% of the respondents had CD4+ cell count less than 350 cells/μL. and average treatment duration was 9 months at study entry. According to the findings of this study, the degree of adherence was reported as % 63.9.The main reasons for non-adherence were forgetfulness (26% and side effects (19%. There were no significant differences between highly adherent and less adherent patients with regard to age, gender, education Employment status, Treatment duration, time of diagnosis. Adherence to HAART is a key factor in disease course in persons with HIV/AIDS. Low-level adherence in subjects of the study indicated that educational and intervention is quite necessary for patients in order to improve their medication self-management.

  2. Impact of the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention on adherence to national obesity clinical practice guidelines in a primary care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Emily R; Theeke, Laurie A; Mallow, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    Obesity is significantly underdiagnosed and undertreated in primary care settings. The purpose of this clinical practice change project was to increase provider adherence to national clinical practice guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity in adults. Based upon the National Institutes of Health guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of obesity, a clinical change project was implemented. Guided by the theory of planned behaviour, the Provider and Healthcare team Adherence to Treatment Guidelines (PHAT-G) intervention includes education sessions, additional provider resources for patient education, a provider reminder system and provider feedback. Primary care providers did not significantly increase on documentation of diagnosis and planned management of obesity for patients with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30. Medical assistants increased recording of height, weight and BMI in the patient record by 13%, which was significant. Documentation of accurate BMI should lead to diagnosis of appropriate weight category and subsequent care planning. Future studies will examine barriers to adherence to clinical practice guidelines for obesity. Interventions are needed that include inter-professional team members and may be more successful if delivered separately from routine primary care visits. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Adherence to CDC Recommendations for the Treatment of Uncomplicated Gonorrhea - STD Surveillance Network, United States, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Emily J; Workowski, Kimberly; Torrone, Elizabeth; Weinstock, Hillard; Stenger, Mark R

    2018-04-27

    Gonorrhea, the sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by Neisseria gonorrhoeae, is the second most common notifiable disease in the United States after chlamydia; 468,514 cases were reported to state and local health departments in 2016, an increase of 18.5% from 2015 (1). N. gonorrhoeae has progressively developed resistance to most antimicrobials used to treat the infection (2). As a result, CDC recommends two antimicrobials (250 mg of ceftriaxone [IM] plus 1 g of azithromycin [PO]) for treating uncomplicated gonorrhea to improve treatment efficacy and, potentially, to slow the emergence and spread of antimicrobial resistance. To monitor adherence to the current CDC-recommended regimen for uncomplicated gonorrhea, CDC reviewed enhanced data collected on a random sample of reported cases of gonorrhea in seven jurisdictions participating in the STD Surveillance Network (SSuN) and estimated the proportion of patients who received the CDC-recommended regimen for uncomplicated gonorrhea, by patient characteristics and diagnosing facility type. In 2016, the majority of reported patients with gonorrhea (81%) received the recommended regimen. There were no differences in the proportion of patients receiving the recommended regimen by age or race/ethnicity; however, patients diagnosed with gonorrhea in STD (91%) or family planning/reproductive health (94%) clinics were more likely to receive this regimen than were patients diagnosed in other provider settings (80%). These data document high provider adherence to CDC gonorrhea treatment recommendations in specialty STD clinics, indicating high quality of care provided in those settings. Local and state health departments should monitor adherence with recommendations in their jurisdictions and consider implementing interventions to improve provider and patient compliance with gonorrhea treatment recommendations where indicated.

  4. A pilot investigation of a mobile phone application and progressive reminder system to improve adherence to daily prevention treatment in adolescents and young adults with migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Rachelle R; Holbein, Christina E; Powers, Scott W; Hershey, Andrew D; Kabbouche, Marielle A; O'Brien, Hope L; Kacperski, Joanne; Shepard, Jeffrey; Hommel, Kevin A

    2018-01-01

    Background Effective management of migraine requires adherence to treatment recommendations; however, adolescents with migraine take their daily medications only 75% of the time. Low-cost adherence-focused interventions using technology may improve adherence, but have not been investigated. Methods Thirty-five adolescents and young adults (13-21 years) with migraine participated in an AB-design pilot study to assess the use of a mobile phone adherence-promotion application ("app") and progressive reminder system. Adherence was calculated using electronic monitoring during the baseline period and medication adherence intervention. Results Relative to baseline, adherence significantly improved during the first month of the intervention. Specifically, improvements existed for older participants with lower baseline adherence. Self-reported app-based adherence rates were significantly lower than electronically monitored adherence rates. Participants rated the intervention as acceptable and easy to use. Conclusions "Apps" have the potential to improve medication adherence and are a promising intervention for adolescents and young adults with low adherence. Involving parents in the intervention is also helpful. Providers should assess barriers to adherence and use of technology-based interventions, encourage parents to incorporate behavioral incentives, and provide referrals for more intensive interventions to improve long-term outcomes. Further, tracking adherence in an app may result in an underestimation of adherence. Future full-scale studies should be conducted to examine adherence promotion app interventions.

  5. Impact of a pharmaceutical care program on clinical evolution and antiretroviral treatment adherence: a 5-year study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández Arroyo MJ

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available María Jesús Hernández Arroyo,1 Salvador Enrique Cabrera Figueroa,2 Rosa Sepúlveda Correa,3 María de la Paz Valverde Merino,1 Alicia Iglesias Gómez,4 Alfonso Domínguez-Gil Hurlé5 On behalf of the Tormes Team 1Pharmacy Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 2Pharmacy Institute, University Austral of Chile, Valdivia, Chile; 3Department of Statistics, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 4Infectious Disease Service, University Hospital of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain; 5Department of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain Background: Antiretroviral treatments (ART form the basis of adequate clinical control in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients, and adherence plays a primary role in the grade and duration of the antiviral response. The objectives of this study are: (1 to determine the impact of the implementation of a pharmaceutical care program on improvement of ART adherence and on the immunovirological response of the patients; and (2 to detect possible correlations between different adherence evaluation measurements. Methods: A 60-month long retrospective study was conducted. Adherence measures used were: therapeutic drug monitoring, a simplified medication adherence questionnaire, and antiretroviral dispensation records (DR. The number of interviews and interventions related to adherence made for each patient in yearly periods was related to the changes in the adherence variable (measured with DR in these same yearly periods. The dates when the laboratory tests were drawn were grouped according to proximity with the study assessment periods (February–May, 2005–2010. Results: A total of 528 patients were included in the study. A significant relationship was observed between the simplified medication adherence questionnaire and DR over the 60-month study period (P < 0.01. Improvement was observed in the mean adherence level (P < 0.001, and there was a

  6. Patterns of disclosure and antiretroviral treatment adherence in a South African mining workplace programme and implications for HIV prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhagwanjee, Anil; Govender, Kaymarlin; Akintola, Olagoke; Petersen, Inge; George, Gavin; Johnstone, Leigh; Naidoo, Kerisha

    2011-01-01

    Social and psychological barriers to the disclosure of one's seropositive HIV status to significant others and poor adherence to taking medications pose significant challenges to the scaling-up of access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) in the workplace. Such barriers are predictive of sub-optimal treatment outcomes and bedevil HIV-prevention interventions at a societal level. Against this background, this article explores the lived experiences of 19 HIV-positive male participants, between the ages of 33 and 57 years, who were enrolled in an ART programme managed at an occupational health clinic at a mining company in South Africa. The majority of these mineworkers had been aware of their HIV status for between 5 and 7 years. The study explored psychological and relational factors, as aspects of these participants lived experiences, which had a bearing on their adherence to their ART regimen and the disclosure choices that they made regarding their HIV status. In our sample, those participants who were adherent demonstrated higher levels of control and acceptance of their HIV infection and were more confident in their ability to manage their treatment, while the group who were non-adherent presented with lower levels of adherence motivation and self-efficacy, difficulties in maintaining a healthy lifestyle and significant challenges in maintaining control over their lives. While most of the men favoured disclosing their HIV status to their partners for the sake of treatment support, they were less sure about disclosing to family members and non-family members, respectively, because of their need to protect these persons and due to their fear of being stigmatised. It was evident that treatment adherence choices and behaviours were impacted by psychological and relational factors, including disclosure decisions. We conclude with a bivariate model for understanding the adherence behaviours that influenced different patterns of ART adherence among the sample, and

  7. The impact of text message reminders on adherence to antimalarial treatment in northern Ghana: a randomized trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia R G Raifman

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low rates of adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT regimens increase the risk of treatment failure and may lead to drug resistance, threatening the sustainability of current anti-malarial efforts. We assessed the impact of text message reminders on adherence to ACT regimens. METHODS: Health workers at hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and other stationary ACT distributors in Tamale, Ghana provided flyers advertising free mobile health information to individuals receiving malaria treatment. The messaging system automatically randomized self-enrolled individuals to the control group or the treatment group with equal probability; those in the treatment group were further randomly assigned to receive a simple text message reminder or the simple reminder plus an additional statement about adherence in 12-hour intervals. The main outcome was self-reported adherence based on follow-up interviews occurring three days after treatment initiation. We estimated the impact of the messages on treatment completion using logistic regression. RESULTS: 1140 individuals enrolled in both the study and the text reminder system. Among individuals in the control group, 61.5% took the full course of treatment. The simple text message reminders increased the odds of adherence (adjusted OR 1.45, 95% CI [1.03 to 2.04], p-value 0.028. Receiving an additional message did not result in a significant change in adherence (adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI [0.50 to 1.20], p-value 0.252. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that a simple text message reminder can increase adherence to antimalarial treatment and that additional information included in messages does not have a significant impact on completion of ACT treatment. Further research is needed to develop the most effective text message content and frequency. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01722734.

  8. The impact of text message reminders on adherence to antimalarial treatment in northern Ghana: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raifman, Julia R G; Lanthorn, Heather E; Rokicki, Slawa; Fink, Günther

    2014-01-01

    Low rates of adherence to artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) regimens increase the risk of treatment failure and may lead to drug resistance, threatening the sustainability of current anti-malarial efforts. We assessed the impact of text message reminders on adherence to ACT regimens. Health workers at hospitals, clinics, pharmacies, and other stationary ACT distributors in Tamale, Ghana provided flyers advertising free mobile health information to individuals receiving malaria treatment. The messaging system automatically randomized self-enrolled individuals to the control group or the treatment group with equal probability; those in the treatment group were further randomly assigned to receive a simple text message reminder or the simple reminder plus an additional statement about adherence in 12-hour intervals. The main outcome was self-reported adherence based on follow-up interviews occurring three days after treatment initiation. We estimated the impact of the messages on treatment completion using logistic regression. 1140 individuals enrolled in both the study and the text reminder system. Among individuals in the control group, 61.5% took the full course of treatment. The simple text message reminders increased the odds of adherence (adjusted OR 1.45, 95% CI [1.03 to 2.04], p-value 0.028). Receiving an additional message did not result in a significant change in adherence (adjusted OR 0.77, 95% CI [0.50 to 1.20], p-value 0.252). The results of this study suggest that a simple text message reminder can increase adherence to antimalarial treatment and that additional information included in messages does not have a significant impact on completion of ACT treatment. Further research is needed to develop the most effective text message content and frequency. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01722734.

  9. Relationship between treatment adherence and quality of life: integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samilly Márjore Dantas Liberato

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to investigate the relationships between treatment adherence and quality of life that have been published in scientific literature. This is an integrative review performed on the Virtual Health Library database, SCOPUS, ISI Web of Knowledge and CINAHL, including articles published in the period between 2007 and 2012. Considering the inclusion and exclusion criterion, 14 articles were selected. Most articles studied adults (61.5% with evidence level VI (69.2%. The number of participants involved in the studies ranged between 25 and 1,860. All studies were on chronic diseases. Of all articles, 69.2% of the studies found a significant relationship between treatment adhesion and quality of life. The studies pointed at a relationship between treatment adherence and quality of life, but it was not possible to determine the causality of the phenomenon. Including the studies that found no statistical significance, the referred relationships proved positive. Descriptors: Patient Compliance; Quality of Life; Comprehensive Health Care.

  10. Insomnia complaints in lean patients with obstructive sleep apnea negatively affect positive airway pressure treatment adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eysteinsdottir, Bjorg; Gislason, Thorarinn; Pack, Allan I; Benediktsdottir, Bryndís; Arnardottir, Erna S; Kuna, Samuel T; Björnsdottir, Erla

    2017-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the determinants of long-term adherence to positive airway pressure treatment among patients with obstructive sleep apnea, with special emphasis on patients who stop positive airway pressure treatment within 1 year. This is a prospective long-term follow-up of subjects in the Icelandic Sleep Apnea Cohort who were diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea between 2005 and 2009, and started on positive airway pressure treatment. In October 2014, positive airway pressure adherence was obtained by systematically evaluating available clinical files (n = 796; 644 males, 152 females) with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 events per h). The mean follow-up time was 6.7 ± 1.2 years. In total, 123 subjects (15.5%) returned their positive airway pressure device within the first year, 170 (21.4%) returned it later and 503 (63.2%) were still using positive airway pressure. The quitters within the first year had lower body mass index, milder obstructive sleep apnea, less sleepiness, and more often had symptoms of initial and late insomnia compared with long-term positive airway pressure users at baseline. Both initial and late insomnia were after adjustment still significantly associated with being an early quitter among subjects with body mass index insomnia are associated with early quitting on positive airway pressure among non-obese subjects. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. Thai people living with tuberculosis and how they adhere to treatment: A grounded theory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choowong, Jiraporn; Tillgren, Per; Söderbäck, Maja

    2017-12-01

    To develop a conceptual framework of adherence to treatment among Thai people living with tuberculosis, a grounded theory approach was used. A purposive sample of 20 Thai people living with tuberculosis, aged from 23 to 85 years, was interviewed. From the participants' perspective, a core category of social belonging was highlighted, with three categories of conditions connected: personal barriers, personal resilience, and social facilitation. Personal barriers encompassed fear of stigma, concealing the illness, and lack of knowledge and motivation to complete the treatment regime. Personal resilience encompassed positive thinking and self-awareness. Social facilitation encompassed the ease of access to health services, continuity in the health service's ability to choose a directly-observed therapy observer, and social support. This study contributes a deeper understanding of the perspective of Thai people living with tuberculosis with regards to adherence to tuberculosis treatment. It might improve how local healthcare workers provide tuberculosis care, and inspire them to tailor care to people living with tuberculosis in a local community to increase personal resilience and reduce stigma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. The impact of 5-hydroxytryptamine-receptor antagonists on chemotherapy treatment adherence, treatment delay, and nausea and vomiting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palli, Swetha Rao; Grabner, Michael; Quimbo, Ralph A; Rugo, Hope S

    2015-01-01

    To determine the incidence of chemotherapy-induced nausea/vomiting (CINV) and chemotherapy treatment delay and adherence among patients receiving palonosetron versus other 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor antagonist (5-HT 3 RA) antiemetics. This retrospective claims analysis included adults with primary malignancies who initiated treatment consisting of single-day intravenous highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) or moderately EC (MEC) regimens. Treatment delay was defined as a gap in treatment at least twice the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-specified cycle length, specific to each chemotherapy regimen. Treatment adherence was determined by the percentage of patients who received the regimen-specific recommended number of chemotherapy cycles within the recommended time frame. We identified 1,832 palonosetron and 2,387 other 5-HT 3 RA (“other”) patients who initiated HEC therapy, and 1,350 palonosetron users and 1,379 patients on other antiemetics who initiated MEC therapy. Fewer patients receiving palonosetron experienced CINV versus other (HEC, 27.5% versus 32.2%, P=0.0011; MEC, 36.1% versus 41.7%, P=0.0026), and fewer treatment delays occurred among patients receiving palonosetron versus other (HEC, 3.2% versus 6.0%, P<0.0001; MEC, 17.0% versus 26.8%, P<0.0001). Compared with the other cohort, patients receiving palonosetron were significantly more adherent to the index chemotherapy regimen with respect to the recommended time frame (HEC, 74.7% versus 69.7%, P=0.0004; MEC, 43.1% versus 37.3%, P=0.0019) and dosage (HEC, 27.3% versus 25.8%, P=0.0004; MEC, 15.0% versus 12.6%, P=0.0019). Palonosetron more effectively reduced occurrence of CINV in patients receiving HEC or MEC compared with other agents in this real-world setting. Additionally, patients receiving palonosetron had better adherence and fewer treatment delays than patients receiving other 5-HT 3 RAs

  13. [Evaluation of adherence to treatment with calcium and vitamin D in the elderly in a basic health area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo Pascual, C; Julián Viñals, R; Castell Alcalá, M V; Queipo, R; Otero Piume, A

    2016-01-01

    The vitamin D deficiency is high in the elderly population. Calcium and vitamin D supplements is a frequently used measure in individuals at risk for falls and/or fractures. However, this practice has achieved a low level of compliance. The aim is to assess the adherence to treatment with calcium and vitamin D in elders with hypovitaminosis D in an urban area of Madrid. Intervention study performed on 438 individuals ≥65years from the 'Peñagrande Cohort' with hypovitaminosis D that were treated with calcium and vitamin D. Adherence at 3 and 12 months was assessed using the Morisky-Green and counting of prescriptions written. A total of 413 of the 438 individuals with hypovitaminosis D were analysed (18 patients were not treated because of contraindications, and 7 were considered lost). At 3 and 12 months, 63.9% and 47.2%, respectively, were adherents. After a brief educational intervention, 19.3% of individuals without adherence at 3 months became good compliers when measured at one year. Comorbidity was associated with lower rates of adherence to treatment after one year (46.3% versus 35.2%, P=.027). The main cause of non-adherence to calcium was digestive intolerance, and due to oversights for vitamin D. Concordance between adherence assessed by the Morisky test and counting of prescriptions written was high (Kappa index=69.8%). Non-adherence to chronic treatment with calcium and vitamin D is a relevant problem in elderly. It is important to assess adherence and implement health education strategies in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. Interventions for enhancing medication compliance/adherence with benefits in treatment outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen, Anja

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Scientific background: Poor compliance or adherence in drug therapy can cause increased morbidity, mortality and enormous costs in the healthcare system (in Germany annually approximately 10 billion euros. Different methods are used for enhancing the compliance or adherence. Research questions: The evaluation addresses the questions about existence, efficacy, cost-benefit relation as well as ethical-social and juridical implications of strategies for enhancing compliance or adherence in drug therapy with concomitant improvements in treatment outcomes. Methods: A systematic literature search was conducted in the medical, also health economic relevant, literature databases in January 2007, beginning from 2002. Systematic reviews on the basis of (randomised controlled trials (RCT concerning interventions to enhance compliance or adherence with regard to treatment outcomes as well as systematic reviews of health economic analyses were included in the evaluation. Additionally, it was also searched for publications which primarily considered ethical-social and juridical aspects of these interventions for the German context. Results: One systematic review with data for 57 RCT was included in the medical evaluation and one systematic review with data for six studies into the health economic evaluation. No publication primary concerning ethical-social or juridical implications could be identified. A significant positive effect on the treatment outcome was reported for 22 evaluated interventions. For many interventions the results can be classified as reliable: counseling with providing an information leaflet and compliance diary chart followed by phone consultation for helicobacter pylori positive patients, repeated counseling for patients with acute asthma symptoms, telephone calls to establish the level of compliance and to make recommendations based on that for the therapy of cardiovascular diseases, calls of an automated telephone system with phone

  15. Model for Simulating Fasting Glucose in Type 2 Diabetes and the Effect of Adherence to Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aradóttir, Tinna Björk; Boiroux, Dimitri; Bengtsson, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    trial results where a dose guidance algorithm was used. We investigate sources of variance and through simulations evaluate the contribution of adherence to variance and dose guidance quality. The results suggest that the model for simulation of T2D patients is sufficient for simulating fasting glucose......The primary goal of this paper is to predict fasting glucose levels in type 2 diabetes (T2D) in long-acting insulin treatment. The paper presents a model for simulating insulin-glucose dynamics in T2D patients. The model combines a physiological model of type 1 diabetes (T1D) and an endogenous...... insulin production model in T2D. We include a review of sources of variance in fasting glucose values in long-acting insulin treatment, with respect to dose guidance algorithms. We use the model to simulate fasting glucose levels in T2D long-acting insulin treatment and compare the results with clinical...

  16. Impact of previous virological treatment failures and adherence on the outcome of antiretroviral therapy in 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Ballif

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Combination antiretroviral treatment (cART has been very successful, especially among selected patients in clinical trials. The aim of this study was to describe outcomes of cART on the population level in a large national cohort. METHODS: Characteristics of participants of the Swiss HIV Cohort Study on stable cART at two semiannual visits in 2007 were analyzed with respect to era of treatment initiation, number of previous virologically failed regimens and self reported adherence. Starting ART in the mono/dual era before HIV-1 RNA assays became available was counted as one failed regimen. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for virological failure between the two consecutive visits. RESULTS: Of 4541 patients 31.2% and 68.8% had initiated therapy in the mono/dual and cART era, respectively, and been on treatment for a median of 11.7 vs. 5.7 years. At visit 1 in 2007, the mean number of previous failed regimens was 3.2 vs. 0.5 and the viral load was undetectable (4 previous failures compared to 1 were 0.9 (95% CI 0.4-1.7, 0.8 (0.4-1.6, 1.6 (0.8-3.2, 3.3 (1.7-6.6 respectively, and 2.3 (1.1-4.8 for >2 missed cART doses during the last month, compared to perfect adherence. From the cART era, odds ratios with a history of 1, 2 and >2 previous failures compared to none were 1.8 (95% CI 1.3-2.5, 2.8 (1.7-4.5 and 7.8 (4.5-13.5, respectively, and 2.8 (1.6-4.8 for >2 missed cART doses during the last month, compared to perfect adherence. CONCLUSIONS: A higher number of previous virologically failed regimens, and imperfect adherence to therapy were independent predictors of imminent virological failure.

  17. Adherence to treatment with denosumab, its efficacy and safety in women with postmenopausal osteoporosis in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Toroptsova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Adherence to treatment with antiosteoporotic drugs is one of the most important factors contributing to their efficacy during longterm therapy. The adherence is assessed by two main lines: firstly, how long a drug is taken and, secondly, whether its dosage regimen is adhered.Subjects and methods. The paper gives the data of a 12-month prospective follow-up study of 40 women with postmenopausal osteoporosis (OP who initiated treatment with the biological agent denosumab.Results and discussion. After the 12-month follow-up, the significant bone mineral density increase was 4.9% in the lumbar spine, 3.2% in the femoral neck, and 3.0% in the total hip. The previous administration of other antiosteoporotic drugs did not lower the efficiency of denosumab therapy. There were no cases of osteoporotic fractures during 1-year follow-up. 95% of the patients received two denosumab injections (an annual cycle; moreover, 90% of the women were noted to adhere to the dosage regimen. Age, marital status, level of education, time taken to reach the clinic, parental femoral fractures, a history of fractures, duration of OP, and previous therapy had no impact on treatment adherence during 12 months.Conclusion. The one-year prospective follow-up study of the outpatients demonstrated that denosumab was an effective and safe agent for the treatment of patients with postmenopausal OP and its dosage regimen implying its rare subcutaneous administration (twice yearly ensured the high patient adherence to therapy.

  18. Adherence is associated with the quality of professional-patient interaction in Directly Observed Treatment Short-course, DOTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Pranaya; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Sabroe, Svend

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the behaviour of health professionals as reported by patients, the quality of communication, patients' communication about their disease, and non-adherence to Directly Observed Tuberculosis Treatment Short-course, DOTS. METHODS: This study...... was designed as a case-control study based on 50 cases (non-adherents) and 100 controls (adherents), conducted in a hilly western district in Nepal. The participation rate was 80% for 50 cases and 95% for 100 controls. All covariates with p-value

  19. Adherence to Tuberculosis Therapy among Patients Receiving Home-Based Directly Observed Treatment: Evidence from the United Republic of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mkopi, Abdallah; Range, Nyagosya; Lwilla, Fred; Egwaga, Saidi; Schulze, Alexander; Geubbels, Eveline; van Leth, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Background: Non-adherence to tuberculosis (TB) treatment is the leading contributor to the selection of drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and subsequent treatment failure. Tanzania introduced a TB Patient Centred Treatment (PCT) approach which gives new TB patients the choice

  20. Adherence to tuberculosis treatment, sputum smear conversion and mortality: a retrospective cohort study in 48 rwandan clinics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kayigamba, Felix R.; Bakker, Mirjam I.; Mugisha, Veronicah; de Naeyer, Ludwig; Gasana, Michel; Cobelens, Frank; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten

    2013-01-01

    Adherence to treatment and sputum smear conversion after 2 months of treatment are thought to be important for successful outcome of tuberculosis (TB) treatment. Retrospective cohort study of new adult TB patients diagnosed in the first quarter of 2007 at 48 clinics in Rwanda. Data were abstracted