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Sample records for ptsd panic disorder

  1. Reexperiencing symptoms, dissociation, and avoidance behaviors in daily life of patients with PTSD and patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaltz, Monique C; Michael, Tanja; Meyer, Andrea H; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2013-08-01

    Panic attacks are frequently perceived as life threatening. Panic disorder (PD) patients may therefore experience symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The authors explored this in 28 healthy controls, 17 PTSD patients, and 24 PD patients with agoraphobia who completed electronic diaries 36 times during 1 week. Patient groups frequently reported dissociation as well as thoughts, memories, and reliving of their trauma or panic attacks. PTSD patients reported more trauma/panic attack thoughts (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 2.9) and memories (IRR = 2.8) than PD patients. Patient groups relived their trauma or panic attacks equally frequently, and reported comparable bodily reactions and distress associated with trauma or panic attack memories. Clinical groups avoided trauma or panic attack reminders more often than healthy controls (avoidance of trauma- or panic attack-related thoughts (IRR = 8.0); avoidance of things associated with the trauma or panic attack (IRR = 40.7). PD patients avoided trauma or panic attack reminders less often than PTSD patients (avoidance of trauma- or panic attack-related thoughts [IRR = 2.5]; avoidance of things associated with the trauma or panic attack [IRR = 4.1]), yet these differences were nonsignificant when controlling for functional impairment. In conclusion, trauma-like symptoms are common in PD with agoraphobia and panic attacks may be processed similarly as trauma in PTSD.

  2. [Factors that influence comorbidity from panic disorder and PTSD after earthquakes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Bianchi, Marcelo; Candia, Claudia; Montecino, Karla

    2014-01-01

    After the earthquake and tsunami in Chile (F-27), we studied the effect of socio-demographic factors, exposure to the event, and state aid received on comorbidity from panic disorder (PD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Surveys that include the administration of the Davidson Trauma Scale (DTS) to 246 inhabitants. 19.1 % comorbidity was found (r=.583, R2=.340, pearthquakes/tsunamis and an instrument to detect cases at risk of PTSD. We suggest guidelines so that the government can improve its role after disasters.

  3. Panic disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recalling a past attack may trigger panic attacks. Exams and Tests Many people with panic disorder first ... of exercise Getting enough sleep Reducing or avoiding caffeine, certain cold medicines, and stimulants Support Groups You ...

  4. Screening for Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Disorder Specific Phobias Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Depression Bipolar Disorder Suicide and Prevention Stress Related Illnesses Myth-Conceptions Find ...

  5. Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This is the basis for a condition called agoraphobia. A person who has agoraphobia finds it difficult to leave home (or another ... Disorders Education Program Last Updated: April 2014 Tags: agoraphobia, Alprazolam, antidepressants, anxiety disorders, behavior therapy, clonazepam, klonopin, ...

  6. Panic Disorder in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Families Guide Panic Disorder In Children And Adolescents No. 50; Updated July 2013 Panic disorder is a common and treatable disorder. Children and adolescents with panic disorder have unexpected and repeated periods ...

  7. Pharmacotherapy of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles B Pull

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Charles B Pull1, Cristian Damsa21Department of Neurosciences, Centre Hospitalier de Luxembourg, Luxembourg; 2Department of Psychiatry, Clinical Investigation Program, University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, USAAbstract: Panic disorder (PD is a common, persistent and disabling mental disorder. It is often associated with agoraphobia. The present article reviews the current status of pharmacotherapy for PD with or without agoraphobia as well as the current status of treatments combing pharmacotherapy with cognitive behavior therapy (CBT. The review has been written with a focus on randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses, and reviews that have been published over the past few years. Effective pharmacological treatments include tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, and various benzodiazepines. Treatment results obtained with CBT compare well with pharmacotherapy, with evidence that CBT is at least as effective as pharmacotherapy. Combining pharmacotherapy with CBT has been found to be superior to antidepressant pharmacotherapy or CBT alone, but only in the acute-phase treatment. Long term studies on treatments combining pharmacotherapy and CBT for PD with or without agoraphobia have found little benefit, however, for combination therapies versus monotherapies. New investigations explore the potential additional value of sequential versus concomitant treatments, of cognitive enhancers and virtual reality exposure therapy, and of education, self management and Internet-based interventions.Keywords: Panic disorder, agoraphobia, pharmacotherapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, combination treatments.

  8. Neurobiological correlates of panic disorder and agoraphobia.

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    Al-Haddad M

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Panic Disorder and agoraphobia offer considerable diagnostic and management challenges, particularly in general practice. We describe a typical case of panic disorder in a young adult. The recent advances in our understanding of brain functions can be used to explain to a certain extent the biologic basis of panic disorder. A hypothetical model integrating current views on panic disorder and agoraphobia has been proposed. The management principles including the role of cognitive therapy and pharmacotherapy have been discussed.

  9. Modeling panic disorder in rodents.

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    Moreira, Fabrício A; Gobira, Pedro H; Viana, Thércia G; Vicente, Maria A; Zangrossi, Hélio; Graeff, Frederico G

    2013-10-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a subtype of anxiety disorder in which the core phenomenon is the spontaneous occurrence of panic attacks. Although studies with laboratory animals have been instrumental for the understanding of its neurobiology and treatment, few review articles have focused on the validity of the currently used animal models for studying this psychopathology. Therefore, the aim of the present paper is to discuss the strengths and limits of these models in terms of face, construct and predictive validity. Based on the hypothesis that panic attacks are related to defensive responses elicited by proximal threat, most animal models measure the escape responses induced by specific stimuli. Some apply electrical or chemical stimulation to brain regions proposed to modulate fear and panic responses, such as the dorsal periaqueductal grey or the medial hypothalamus. Other models focus on the behavioural consequences caused by the exposure of rodents to ultrasound or natural predators. Finally, the elevated T-maze associates a one-way escape response from an open arm with panic attacks. Despite some limitations, animal models are essential for a better understanding of the neurobiology and pharmacology of PD and for discovering more effective treatments.

  10. Panic Disorder among Adults

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    ... Among U.S. Adults Any Disorder Among Children Any Anxiety Disorder Among Adults Any Anxiety Disorder Among Children Agoraphobia Among Adults Agoraphobia Among Children Generalized Anxiety Disorder Among Adults Generalized Anxiety Disorder Among Children Obsessive Compulsive Disorder ...

  11. Electroencephalographic findings in panic disorder

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    Marcele Regine de Carvalho

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Some studies have reported the importance of electroencephalography (EEG as a method for investigating abnormal parameters in psychiatric disorders. Different findings in time and frequency domain analysis with regard to central nervous system arousal during acute panic states have already been obtained. This study aimed to systematically review the EEG findings in panic disorder (PD, discuss them having a currently accepted neuroanatomical hypothesis for this pathology as a basis, and identify limitations in the selected studies. Literature search was conducted in the databases PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge, using the keywords electroencephalography and panic disorder; 16 articles were selected. Despite the inconsistency of EEG findings in PD, the major conclusions about the absolute power of alpha and beta bands point to a decreased alpha power, while beta power tends to increase. Different asymmetry patterns were found between studies. Coherence studies pointed to a lower degree of inter-hemispheric functional connectivity at the frontal region and intra-hemispheric at the bilateral temporal region. Studies on possible related events showed changes in memory processing in PD patients when exposed to aversive stimuli. It was noticed that most findings reflect the current neurobiological hypothesis of PD, where inhibitory deficits of the prefrontal cortex related to the modulation of amygdala activity, and the subsequent activation of subcortical regions, may be responsible to trigger anxiety responses. We approached some important issues that need to be considered in further researches, especially the use of different methods for analyzing EEG signals. Keywords: Electroencephalography, panic disorder, neurobiology, brain mapping.

  12. Electroencephalographic findings in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marcele Regine de; Velasques, Bruna Brandao; Cagy, Mauricio; Marques, Juliana Bittencourt; Teixeira, Silmar; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Piedade, Roberto; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2013-12-01

    Some studies have reported the importance of electroencephalography (EEG) as a method for investigating abnormal parameters in psychiatric disorders. Different findings in time and frequency domain analysis with regard to central nervous system arousal during acute panic states have already been obtained. This study aimed to systematically review the EEG findings in panic disorder (PD), discuss them having a currently accepted neuroanatomical hypothesis for this pathology as a basis, and identify limitations in the selected studies. Literature search was conducted in the databases PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge, using the keywords electroencephalography and panic disorder; 16 articles were selected. Despite the inconsistency of EEG findings in PD, the major conclusions about the absolute power of alpha and beta bands point to a decreased alpha power, while beta power tends to increase. Different asymmetry patterns were found between studies. Coherence studies pointed to a lower degree of inter-hemispheric functional connectivity at the frontal region and intra-hemispheric at the bilateral temporal region. Studies on possible related events showed changes in memory processing in PD patients when exposed to aversive stimuli. It was noticed that most findings reflect the current neurobiological hypothesis of PD, where inhibitory deficits of the prefrontal cortex related to the modulation of amygdala activity, and the subsequent activation of subcortical regions, may be responsible to trigger anxiety responses. We approached some important issues that need to be considered in further researches, especially the use of different methods for analyzing EEG signals.

  13. [Panic disorder and angina pectoris].

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    Prenninger, Markus; Giefing, Georg; Auer, Johann; Windhager, Elmar; Eber, Bernd

    2004-02-01

    Panic attacks are a frequently cited cause of noncardiac chest pain. A strict separation of the internist's job (i. e., ruling out an "organic" cause of the patient's complaints) from the psychiatrist's job (e. g., diagnosing and treating panic disorder if present) may not always be the most efficient way of diagnostic work-up. We present the case of a 56-year-old female referred to our institution for elective coronary arteriography. Significant cardiovascular risk factors and symptoms compatible with unstable angina illustrate the common problem of a high probability of cardiac pathology in a patient with possible psychiatric symptoms. A modified SCID-interview complementing the coronary angiography results finally led to the definite diagnosis in this patient after symptoms had been present for over 20 years.

  14. Multiple Channel Exposure Therapy: Combining Cognitive-Behavioral Therapies for the Treatment of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder with Panic Attacks

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    Falsetti, Sherry A.; Resnick, Heidi S.; Davis, Joanne

    2005-01-01

    A large proportion of patients who present for treatment of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) experience comorbid panic attacks, yet it is unclear to what extent currently available PTSD treatment programs address this problem. Here we describe a newly developed treatment, multiple-channel exposure therapy (M-CET), for comorbid PTSD and panic…

  15. Charles Darwin and panic disorder.

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    Barloon, T J; Noyes, R

    1997-01-08

    Charles Darwin (1809-1882) suffered from a chronic illness that, throughout much of his adult life, impaired his functioning and severely limited his activities. The writings of this famous scientist as well as biographical materials indicate that he probably suffered from an anxiety disorder. His symptoms, when considered individually, suggest a variety of conditions, but taken together they point toward panic disorder with agoraphobia. This diagnosis brings coherence to Darwin's activities and explains his secluded lifestyle, including difficulty in speaking before groups and meeting with colleagues.

  16. The genetic basis of panic disorder.

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    Na, Hae-Ran; Kang, Eun-Ho; Lee, Jae-Hon; Yu, Bum-Hee

    2011-06-01

    Panic disorder is one of the chronic and disabling anxiety disorders. There has been evidence for either genetic heterogeneity or complex inheritance, with environmental factor interactions and multiple single genes, in panic disorder's etiology. Linkage studies have implicated several chromosomal regions, but no research has replicated evidence for major genes involved in panic disorder. Researchers have suggested several neurotransmitter systems are related to panic disorder. However, to date no candidate gene association studies have established specific loci. Recently, researchers have emphasized genome-wide association studies. Results of two genome-wide association studies on panic disorder failed to show significant associations. Evidence exists for differences regarding gender and ethnicity in panic disorder. Increasing evidence suggests genes underlying panic disorder overlap, transcending current diagnostic boundaries. In addition, an anxious temperament and anxiety-related personality traits may represent intermediate phenotypes that predispose to panic disorder. Future research should focus on broad phenotypes, defined by comorbidity or intermediate phenotypes. Genome-wide association studies in large samples, studies of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, and pharmacogenetic studies are needed.

  17. Anchoring the Panic Disorder Severity Scale

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    Keough, Meghan E.; Porter, Eliora; Kredlow, M. Alexandra; Worthington, John J.; Hoge, Elizabeth A.; Pollack, Mark H.; Shear, M. Katherine; Simon, Naomi M.

    2012-01-01

    The Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) is a clinician-administered measure of panic disorder symptom severity widely used in clinical research. This investigation sought to provide clinically meaningful anchor points for the PDSS both in terms of clinical severity as measured by the Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale (CGI-S) and to extend…

  18. Panic Disorder: When Fear Overwhelms

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    ... have: Sudden and repeated panic attacks of overwhelming anxiety and fear A feeling of being out of control, or ... to react differently to the physical sensations of anxiety and fear that occur during panic attacks. For more information ...

  19. Candidate genes in panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howe, A. S.; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Bani-Fatemi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of molecular genetics approaches in examination of panic disorder (PD) has implicated several variants as potential susceptibility factors for panicogenesis. However, the identification of robust PD susceptibility genes has been complicated by phenotypic diversity, underpowered...... association studies and ancestry-specific effects. In the present study, we performed a succinct review of case-control association studies published prior to April 2015. Meta-analyses were performed for candidate gene variants examined in at least three studies using the Cochrane Mantel-Haenszel fixed......-effect model. Secondary analyses were also performed to assess the influences of sex, agoraphobia co-morbidity and ancestry-specific effects on panicogenesis. Meta-analyses were performed on 23 variants in 20 PD candidate genes. Significant associations after correction for multiple testing were observed...

  20. Empirically Supported Treatments for Panic Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McHugh, R.K.; Smits, J.A.J.; Otto, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    This article provides an empirical review of the elements and efficacy of both pharmacologic and psychosocial treatments for panic disorder. Both monotherapies and combination treatment strategies are considered. The available evidence suggests that both cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and

  1. The hyperventilation syndrome in panic disorder, agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; Garssen, B.; Rijken, H.; Kraaimaat, F.

    1989-01-01

    The symptom complex of panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder suggests an etiological role for hyperventilation. The present study investigates the overlap between DSM-III-R panic disorder, panic disorder with agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder with hyperventilation syndrome

  2. Anxiety sensitivity, catastrophic misinterpretations and panic self-efficacy in the prediction of panic disorder severity: towards a tripartite cognitive model of panic disorder.

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    Sandin, Bonifacio; Sánchez-Arribas, Carmen; Chorot, Paloma; Valiente, Rosa M

    2015-04-01

    The present study examined the contribution of three main cognitive factors (i.e., anxiety sensitivity, catastrophic misinterpretations of bodily symptoms, and panic self-efficacy) in predicting panic disorder (PD) severity in a sample of patients with a principal diagnosis of panic disorder. It was hypothesized that anxiety sensitivity (AS), catastrophic misinterpretation of bodily sensations, and panic self-efficacy are uniquely related to panic disorder severity. One hundred and sixty-eight participants completed measures of AS, catastrophic misinterpretations of panic-like sensations, and panic self-efficacy prior to receiving treatment. Results of multiple linear regression analyses indicated that AS, catastrophic misinterpretations and panic self-efficacy independently predicted panic disorder severity. Results of path analyses indicated that AS was direct and indirectly (mediated by catastrophic misinterpretations) related with panic severity. Results provide evidence for a tripartite cognitive account of panic disorder.

  3. Panic disorder: Psychobiological aspects of personality dimensions

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    Draganić-Gajić Saveta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Attempts to understand the underlying mechanisms of association between psychological factors and panic disorder have been mostly based on psychodynamic description. Evidence of the importance of serotonergic (5-HT system in panic disorder (PD, however, has substanti ally increased in recent years. OBJECTIVE The objective of our study was to determine whether there was a specific personality profile of panic disorder patients and how it was related to possible neurobiological mechanisms underlying personality dimensions. PATIENTS AND METHODS Sample consisted of 14 inpatients with ICD-X diagnosis of panic disorder and 34 healthy control subjects. Personality dimensions were assessed by Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI-201 and Tridimensional Personality Questionnaire (TPQ. To assess central 5-HT function, platelet monoamine-oxidase (MAO activity was measured. RESULTS In panic disorder group, higher scores of histrionic, depressive and hypochondriac subscales and significant increase of harm avoidance (HA scale as well as low MAO activity were found. Negative correlation was established between MAO activity and psychopathic deviance MMPI scale. CONCLUSION The obtained results might indicate a specific personality profile of patients with panic disorder, which is characterized by high neuroticism, fearfulness, inhibition, shyness and apprehensive worry. Low MAO activity and high HA scores possibly indicate underlying hyperserotonergic state. The observed correlation between personality traits and MAO activity provide additional support for the hypothesized functional relationship between underlying central monoaminergic activity and temperament traits associated with anxiety, depression and impulsivity.

  4. Learning Processes Associated with Panic-Related Symptoms in Families with and without Panic Disordered Mothers

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    de Albuquerque, Jiske E. G.; Munsch, Simone; Margraf, Jurgen; Schneider, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    The present study compared learning processes associated with panic-related symptoms in families with and without panic disordered mothers. Using a multi-informant approach, 86 mothers [of whom 58 had a primary diagnosis of panic disorder (PD)], their partners and teenage children (mean age, 16.67 years) reported about parents' behavior (modeling…

  5. Panic symptoms and elevated suicidal ideation and behaviors among trauma exposed individuals: Moderating effects of post-traumatic stress disorder.

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    Albanese, Brian J; Norr, Aaron M; Capron, Daniel W; Zvolensky, Michael J; Schmidt, Norman B

    2015-08-01

    Panic attacks (PAs) are highly prevalent among trauma exposed individuals and have been associated with a number of adverse outcomes. Despite high suicide rates among trauma exposed individuals, research to date has not examined the potential relation between panic symptoms and suicidal ideation and behaviors among this high risk population. The current study tested the association of panic with suicidal ideation and behaviors among a large sample of trauma exposed smokers. Community participants (N=421) who reported a lifetime history of trauma exposure were assessed concurrently for current panic, suicidal ideation and behaviors, and psychiatric diagnoses. Those who met criteria for a current panic disorder diagnosis were removed from analyses to allow for the assessment of non-PD related panic in line with the recent addition of the PA specifier applicable to all DSM-5 disorders. Findings indicated that panic symptoms were significantly associated with suicidal ideation and behaviors beyond the effects of depression and number of trauma types experienced. Further, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnostic status significantly moderated this relationship, indicating that the relationship between panic and suicidal ideation and behaviors is potentiated among individuals with a current PTSD diagnosis. This investigation suggests that panic symptoms may be a valuable clinical target for the assessment and treatment of suicidal ideation and behaviors among trauma exposed individuals.

  6. Embarrassment about the first panic attack predicts agoraphobia in panic disorder patients.

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    Amering, M; Katschnig, H; Berger, P; Windhaber, J; Baischer, W; Dantendorfer, K

    1997-06-01

    In order to find out whether contextual variables of the first panic attack and the person's reaction to it predict the development of agoraphobia in panic disorder patients, 60 patients with a DSM-III-R diagnosis of panic disorder with agoraphobia and 30 patients suffering from panic disorder without agoraphobia were interviewed about their first panic attack. Single comparisons between groups of agoraphobic and non-agoraphobic patients were carried out and a logistic regression model was applied. Occurrence of the first panic attack in public and the feeling of embarrassment were found to be significantly associated with the development of agoraphobia. It is concluded that eliciting this specific form of social concern at an early stage might help to identify patients at risk for later agoraphobia, which could, in turn, help to further specify early therapeutic interventions and concentrate therapeutic efforts on a high-risk group of panic disorder patients.

  7. Cognitive factors in panic disorder, agoraphobic avoidance and agoraphobia.

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    Berle, David; Starcevic, Vladan; Hannan, Anthony; Milicevic, Denise; Lamplugh, Claire; Fenech, Pauline

    2008-02-01

    There remains a lack of consensus regarding the possibility that especially high levels of panic-related cognitions characterise panic disorder with agoraphobia. We administered the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire and the Anxious Thoughts and Tendencies Scale as well as measures of agoraphobic avoidance to patients diagnosed with panic disorder with agoraphobia (n=75) and without agoraphobia (n=26). Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia did not score significantly higher on any of the cognitive variables than did panic disorder patients without agoraphobia. However, most of the cognitive variables showed small to moderate-strength correlations with self-report measures of agoraphobic avoidance. Our findings suggest that anxiety sensitivity, catastrophising of the consequences of panic and a general anxiety-prone cognitive style, although to some extent associated with agoraphobic avoidance, do not discriminate panic disorder with agoraphobia from panic disorder without agoraphobia.

  8. Medications for Panic Disorder and Generalized Anxiety Disorder During Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rubinchik, Sofya M.; Kablinger, Anita S.; Gardner, J. Suzette

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Approximately 30% of women experience some type of anxiety disorder during their lifetime. In addition, some evidence exists that anxiety disorders can affect pregnancy outcomes. This article reviews the literature on the course of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder during pregnancy and the postpartum period and presents guidelines for management.

  9. Double-blind clonazepam vs placebo in panic disorder treatment

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    VALENÇA ALEXANDRE MARTINS

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of clonazepam, in a fixed dose (2 mg/day, compared with placebo in the treatment of panic disorder patients. METHOD: 24 panic disorder patients with agoraphobia were randomly selected. The diagnosis was obtained using the structured clinical interview for DSM-IV . All twenty-four subjects were randomly assigned to either treatment with clonazepam (2 mg/day or placebo, during 6 weeks. Efficacy assessments included: change from baseline in the number of panic attacks; CGI scores for panic disorder; Hamilton rating scale for anxiety; and panic associated symptoms scale. RESULTS: At the therapeutic endpoint, only one of 9 placebo patients (11.1% were free of panic attacks, compared with 8 of 13 (61.5% clonazepam patients (Fisher exact test; p=0,031. CONCLUSION: the results provide evidence for the efficacy of clonazepam in panic disorder patients.

  10. Health Anxiety in Panic Disorder, Somatization Disorder and Hypochondriasis

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    Özgün Karaer KARAPIÇAK

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Health anxiety is the fear of being or getting seriously sick due to the misinterpretation of physical symptoms. Severe health anxiety is also named as hypochondriasis. Belief of having a disease due to the misinterpretation of physical symptoms is also seen in panic disorder and somatization disorder. The aim of this study is to search the health anxiety in panic disorder, somatization disorder and hypochondriasis and compare it with healthy volunteers. Method: SCID-I was used to determine psychiatric disorders in patient group. In order to assess the clinical state and disease severity of the patient group; Panic and Agoraphobia Scale, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology were used for patients with panic disorder and Symptom Interpretation Questionnaire, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology were used for patients with somatization disorder and hypochondriasis. Brief Symptom Inventory was used to assess psychopathology in healthy group. In order to evaluate health anxiety of both groups, Health Anxiety Inventory-Short Form was used. Results: Results of this study support that health anxiety is a significant major component of hypochondriasis. On the other hand, health anxiety seems to be common in panic disorder and somatization disorder. Health anxiety also may be a part of depression or present in healthy people. Conclusion: Further studies are needed in order to search how to manage health anxiety appropriately and which psychotherapeutic interventions are more effective.

  11. Lamotrigine administration in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

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    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Papadimitriou, George N; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2010-05-01

    Several anticonvulsants, although as yet not lamotrigine (LTG), have been found useful in the treatment of panic disorder with (PDA) or without agoraphobia. We administered LTG (200 mg/d) to 4 outpatients with PDA, as an augmentation therapy (3 patients with chronic and severe agoraphobia) or monotherapy (1 drug-naive patient with first-onset PDA) in a 14-week trial. The patient under LTG monotherapy improved significantly, whereas PDA symptoms in 2 of the other patients improved to some extent.

  12. The relationship between panic disorder/agoraphobia and personality disorders.

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    Mavissakalian, M

    1990-12-01

    This selective review of the relationship between panic disorder/agoraphobia and DSM-III personality disorders points to a preponderance of dependent, avoidant, and histrionic features and reveals a certain degree of covariation between severity of Axis I disorder and personality functioning. However, the link between panic/agoraphobia and Axis II disorders does not appear to be specific because (1) general features such as neuroticism, stress, dysphoric mood, and interpersonal sensitivity, rather than duration and severity of panic attacks and phobias, emerge as unique predictors or determinants of personality disorder; and (2) similar personality profiles are obtained in a heterogenous population of psychiatric outpatients or patients with social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and major depression.

  13. Cardiac sarcoidosis resembling panic disorder: a case report.

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    Tokumitsu, Keita; Demachi, Jun; Yamanoi, Yukichi; Oyama, Shigeto; Takeuchi, Junko; Yachimori, Koji; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2017-01-13

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disease of unknown etiology, in which granulomas develop in various organs, including the skin, lungs, eyes, or heart. It has been reported that patients with sarcoidosis are more likely to develop panic disorder than members of the general population. However, there are many unknown factors concerning the causal relationship between these conditions. We present the case of a 57-year-old woman who appeared to have panic disorder, as she experienced repeated panic attacks induced by transient complete atrioventricular block, associated with cardiac sarcoidosis. Psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy were not effective in the treatment of her panic attacks. However, when we implanted a permanent pacemaker and initiated steroid treatment for cardiac sarcoidosis, panic attacks were ameliorated. Based on these findings, we diagnosed the patient's symptoms as an anxiety disorder associated with cardiac sarcoidosis, rather than panic disorder. This report highlights the importance of considering cardiac sarcoidosis in the differential diagnosis of panic disorder. This cardiac disease should be considered especially in patients have a history of cardiac disease (e.g., arrhythmia) and atypical presentations of panic symptoms. Panic disorder is a psychiatric condition that is typically diagnosed after other medical conditions have been excluded. Because the diagnosis of sarcoidosis is difficult in some patients, caution is required. The palpitations and symptoms of heart failure associated with cardiac sarcoidosis can be misdiagnosed as psychiatric symptoms of panic disorder. The condition described in the current case study appears to constitute a physical disease, the diagnosis of which requires significant consideration and caution.

  14. [The psychoimmunological network og panic disorders, agoraphobia and allergic reactions].

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    Schmidt-Traub, S

    1995-02-01

    While treating panic and agoraphobia patients with behaviour therapy, a high frequency of allergic reaction of the IgE-mediated type I was observed. Panic disorder, agoraphobia, allergic disorder, and vasomotor reactions are briefly discussed in the framework of psycho-endocrino-immunological research. A pilot study had shown a high correlation between panic disorder with and without agoraphobia and allergic reaction. A controlled study was then planned to test the hypothesized psychoimmunological relationship. 100 allergic patients, 79 panic/agoraphobic patients, and 66 controls underwent psychodiagnostic and allergic screening. 70% of the anxiety patients responded to test allergens with IgE-mediated type-I immediate reactions in comparison to 28% of the control persons. Another 15% of the panic patients reacted to nickle compound with type-IV delayed skin reactions (7% of the controls). Conversely, 10% of the allergic patients suffered from panic disorder (45% had experienced panic attacks) in contrast to 2% of the controls (24% of these reported panic attacks). The relative risk for allergic patients to develop panic disorder with and without agoraphobia is obviously five times as high as for controls. With this assumption of a psychoimmunological preparedness in mind, a behavioural medical diagnostic and therapeutic concept seems more adequate in coping both with panic/agoraphobia and allergic disorder.

  15. Panic disorder: the psychobiology of external treat and introceptive distress.

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    Stein, Dan J

    2008-01-01

    Panic disorder seems to be mediated by the neuronal circuitry and neurochemical systems that have evolved to respond to external threatening stimuli. Distant threats activate prefrontal cortex (involved in complex planning of avoidance strategies), while immediate threats activate midbrain structures (involved in fast reflexive behaviors). Panic disorder may, however, also involve more specific interoceptive mechanisms. For example, the association between respiratory dysfunction and panic disorder has bolstered a false suffocation alarm hypothesis. Genetic and environmental contributors to panic disorder are beginning to be delineated. Effective pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy are able to normalize the relevant psychobiology.

  16. Panic Disorder: Is the PAG Involved?

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    Cristina Marta Del-Ben

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Data from studies with humans have suggested that abnormalities of midbrain structures, including the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG, could be involved in the neurobiology of panic disorder (PD. The electrical stimulation of the PAG in neurosurgical patients induces panic-like symptoms and the effect of drugs that are effective in the treatment of PD in the simulation of public speaking model of anxiety is in agreement with data from animal models of PD. Structural neuroimaging studies have shown increases in gray matter volume of midbrain and pons of PD patients. There is also evidence of lower serotonin transporter and receptor binding, and increases of metabolism in the midbrain of PD patients. Nevertheless, these midbrain abnormalities can not be considered as specific findings, since neuroimaging data indicate that PD patients have abnormalities in other brain structures that process fear and anxiety.

  17. Panic disorder: is the PAG involved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del-Ben, Cristina Marta; Graeff, Frederico Guilherme

    2009-01-01

    Data from studies with humans have suggested that abnormalities of midbrain structures, including the periaqueductal gray matter (PAG), could be involved in the neurobiology of panic disorder (PD). The electrical stimulation of the PAG in neurosurgical patients induces panic-like symptoms and the effect of drugs that are effective in the treatment of PD in the simulation of public speaking model of anxiety is in agreement with data from animal models of PD. Structural neuroimaging studies have shown increases in gray matter volume of midbrain and pons of PD patients. There is also evidence of lower serotonin transporter and receptor binding, and increases of metabolism in the midbrain of PD patients. Nevertheless, these midbrain abnormalities can not be considered as specific findings, since neuroimaging data indicate that PD patients have abnormalities in other brain structures that process fear and anxiety.

  18. Ambulatory Assessment in Panic Disorder and Specific Phobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpers, Georg W.

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders. In panic disorder, panic attacks often occur at unpredictable times, making it difficult to study these episodes in the laboratory. In specific phobias, symptoms occur in very circumscribed situations and specific triggers are sometimes difficult to reproduce in the laboratory.…

  19. [Panic disorders and agoraphobia: Freudian concepts and DSM IV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredi de Poderoso, Clelia; Linetzky, Leonardo

    2003-01-01

    This paper refers to the relationship between panic and agoraphobia, regarding Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia (DSM IV), from two different points of view coming from Psychoanalysis and Psychiatry. Psychoanalysis (S. Freud) considers agoraphobia as a defensive organization to avoid anxiety, not bound to the original conflict, but to substitutive formation. The exposure to space (its unconscious significance) provokes panic attack. The psychiatric approach considers agoraphobia, meaningless by its own, as a consequence of spontaneous panic attacks. The etiology is referred to neurophysiological mechanisms. The authors reviewd D Klein's hypothesis about panic and Freud's theories on anxiety, partiularly Anxiety Neurosis.

  20. The hyperventilation syndrome in panic disorder, agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; Garssen, B.; Rijken, H.; Kraaimaat, F.

    1989-01-01

    The symptom complex of panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder suggests an etiological role for hyperventilation. The present study investigates the overlap between DSM-III-R panic disorder, panic disorder with agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder with hyperventilation syndrome (HVS)

  1. The Reliability and Validity of the Panic Disorder Self-Report: A New Diagnostic Screening Measure of Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Michelle G.; Holmes, Marilyn; Zuellig, Andrea R.; Kachin, Kevin E.; Behar, Evelyn

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the Panic Disorder Self-Report (PDSR), a new self-report diagnostic measure of panic disorder based on the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1994). PDSR diagnoses were compared with structured interview diagnoses of individuals with generalized anxiety…

  2. Panic disorder: a review of DSM-IV panic disorder and proposals for DSM-V.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craske, Michelle G; Kircanski, Katharina; Epstein, Alyssa; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Pine, Danny S; Lewis-Fernández, Roberto; Hinton, Devon

    2010-02-01

    This review covers the literature since the publication of DSM-IV on the diagnostic criteria for panic attacks (PAs) and panic disorder (PD). Specific recommendations are made based on the evidence available. In particular, slight changes are proposed for the wording of the diagnostic criteria for PAs to ease the differentiation between panic and surrounding anxiety; simplification and clarification of the operationalization of types of PAs (expected vs. unexpected) is proposed; and consideration is given to the value of PAs as a specifier for all DSM diagnoses and to the cultural validity of certain symptom profiles. In addition, slight changes are proposed for the wording of the diagnostic criteria to increase clarity and parsimony of the criteria. Finally, based on the available evidence, no changes are proposed with regard to the developmental expression of PAs or PD. This review presents a number of options and preliminary recommendations to be considered for DSM-V.

  3. Duloxetine in panic disorder with somatic gastric pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preve M

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Matteo Preve,1 Cristiana Nisita,1 Massimo Bellini,2 Liliana Dell'Osso1 1Department of Psychiatry, Neurobiology, Pharmacology and Biotechnology, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal Unit, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: Panic disorder is the most common type of anxiety disorder, and its most common expression is panic attacks characterized with sudden attacks of anxiety with numerous symptoms, including palpitations, tachycardia, tachypnea, nausea, and vertigo: ie, cardiovascular, gastroenterologic, respiratory, and neuro-otologic symptoms. In clinical practice, panic disorder manifests with isolated gastroenteric or cardiovascular symptoms, requiring additional clinical visits after psychiatric intervention. The first-line treatment for anxiety disorders, and in particular for panic disorder, is the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. However, these drugs can have adverse effects, including sexual dysfunction, increased bodyweight, and abnormal bleeding, that may be problematic for some patients. Here we report the case of a 29-year-old Caucasian woman affected by panic disorder with agoraphobia who was referred to our clinic for recurrent gastroenteric panic symptoms. The patient reported improvement in her anxiety symptoms and panic attacks while on a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, but not in her gastric somatic problems, so the decision was taken to start her on duloxetine, a serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor. After 6 months of treatment, the patient achieved complete remission of her gastric and panic-related symptoms, and was able to stop triple gastric therapy. Other authors have hypothesized and confirmed that duloxetine has greater initial noradrenergic effects than venlafaxine and is effective in patients with panic disorder. This case report underscores the possibility of tailoring therapeutic strategies for the gastroenteric expression of panic disorder. Keywords: anxiety disorder, panic

  4. Pharmacotherapy treatment of PTSD and comorbid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozarić-Kovacić, Dragica

    2009-09-01

    Comorbity is very high in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients. PTSD is very often complicated with depressive disorder, substance abuse, other anxiety disorders, personality disorders, psychotic features, etc. There have been few pharmacotherapy studies in this complicated field. In the past few years the literature on pharmacotherapy treatment for PTSD and comorbidity has arisen. From empirical evidence (level A) exist three sertraline studies in PTSD comorbid with: 1) anxiety, 2) depression, and 3) anxiety and depression, and one risperidone study in PTSD comorbid with psychotic symptoms. From empirical evidence (level B) exist two disulfiram, naltrexone, and their combination studies in patients with PTSD comorbid with alcohol dependence and one paroxetine or bupropion versus cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) versus community mental health referral study in PTSD women outpatients with major depressive disorder. The results from our label trials in the Croatian war veterans with chronic PTSD comorbid with psychotic features treated with novel antipsychotics (olanzapine, risperidone, or quetiapine) are promising. In the future more rigorously designed, comparative studies are needed to determine the usefulness, efficacy, tolerability, and safety of particular psychopharmaceutical drugs in the treatment of this therapeutically and functionally challenging disorder, especially the trials from level A.

  5. Pituitary volume in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kartalci, Sukru; Dogan, Metin; Unal, Suheyla; Ozcan, A Cemal; Ozdemir, Serdal; Atmaca, Murad

    2011-01-15

    Panic patients have many functional deficiencies in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Previous studies have shown changed pituitary gland volume in some psychiatric disorders that have functional deficiencies in the HPA axis. However, to date no study has evaluated the pituitary gland volume in patients with panic disorder (PD). We investigated the pituitary gland volume in patients with PD (n=27) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=27), using 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging in this study. Analysis showed that patients with PD had significantly smaller pituitary volume compared to healthy subjects. Patients with agoraphobia especially had a significantly smaller pituitary volume than patients without agoraphobia. There was a significant relationship between the pituitary volume and both the severity of symptoms and the illness duration in the patient group. The results show that patients with PD have reduced pituitary volume, which may reflect the functional abnormalities seen in this disorder. These findings may help us better understand the pathology of PD. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Gender differences in psychopathologic features of agoraphobia with panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latas Milan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. To examine gender differences in the major psychopathologic features in agoraphobia with panic disorder. Method. The study was conducted as a clinical study. The sample consisted of 119 patients, 32 men (26.9% and 87 women (73.1% with the basic diagnosis of agoraphobia with panic disorder. All the patients were evaluated with the clinical instruments suitable for the assessment of various clinical features associated with agoraphobia with panic disorder - questionnaires (the Hopkins Symptom Checklist 90, the Panic Appraisal Inventory, the Fear Questionnaire, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Beck Depression Inventory, and the clinical rating scale (the Panic and Agoraphobia Scale. After the data collection, the sample was divided into two groups by the gender. Then the groups were compared. Results. There were no differences between the genders in the global psychopathologic features (the age at the onset of a disorder, duration of a disorder, severity and frequency of panic attacks, intensity of general psychiatric symptoms, intensity of general anxiety and depression. The women, however, reported a subjective perception of a more severe agoraphobic avoidance and males were significantly more likely than the females to anticipate the serious somatic consequences of panic attacks and worry about somatic health. Conclusion. There were a few gender specific psychopathologic features in patients with agoraphobia with panic disorder, so further studies would be necessary to come to a more precise conclusion.

  7. Caffeine challenge test and panic disorder: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilarim, Marina Machado; Rocha Araujo, Daniele Marano; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-08-01

    This systematic review aimed to examine the results of studies that have investigated the induction of panic attacks and/or the anxiogenic effect of the caffeine challenge test in patients with panic disorder. The literature search was performed in PubMed, Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde and the ISI Web of Knowledge. The words used for the search were caffeine, caffeine challenge test, panic disorder, panic attacks and anxiety disorder. In total, we selected eight randomized, double-blind studies where caffeine was administered orally, and none of them controlled for confounding factors in the analysis. The percentage of loss during follow-up ranged between 14.3% and 73.1%. The eight studies all showed a positive association between caffeine and anxiogenic effects and/or panic disorder.

  8. Therapeutic response to benzodiazepine in panic disorder subtypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Martins Valença

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: This study makes a comparison between two subtypes of panic disorder regarding the clinical efficacy of clonazepam, a benzodiazepine. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of clonazepam in a fixed dosage (2 mg/day, compared to placebo, in the treatment of panic disorder patients and to verify whether there are any differences in the responses to clonazepam between panic disorder patients with the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes. TYPE OF STUDY: Randomized study with clonazepam and placebo. SETTING: Outpatient Anxiety and Depression Unit of the Institute of Psychiatry, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: 34 patients with a diagnosis of panic disorder with agoraphobia, between 18 and 55 years old. PROCEDURES: Administration of clonazepam or placebo for 6 weeks, in panic disorder patients, after they were classified within two subtypes of panic disorder: respiratory and non-respiratory. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Changes in the number of panic attacks in comparison with the period before the beginning of the study; Hamilton Anxiety Scale; Global Clinical Impression Scale; and Patient's Global Impression scale. RESULTS: In the group that received clonazepam, by the end of the 6th week there was a statistically significant clinical improvement, shown by the remission of panic attacks (p < 0.001 and decrease in anxiety (p = 0.024. In the group that received clonazepam there was no significant difference between the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes of panic disorder, regarding the therapeutic response to clonazepam. CONCLUSION: Clonazepam was equally effective in the treatment of the respiratory and non-respiratory subtypes of panic disorder, suggesting there is no difference in the therapeutic response between the two subtypes.

  9. Beyond Exposure for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms: Broad-Spectrum PTSD Treatment Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Thomas W.; Gray, Matt J.

    2005-01-01

    Although cases of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with comorbid disorders are common, the first generation of PTSD treatment approaches, including exposure and cognitive-behavioral therapy, generally ignore symptoms beyond those specific to PTSD. Optimum PTSD treatment outcome requires more comprehensive strategies, and the development and…

  10. Impact of comorbid panic and posttraumatic stress disorder on outcomes of collaborative care for late-life depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegel, Mark T; Unützer, Jürgen; Tang, Lingqi; Areán, Patricia A; Katon, Wayne; Noël, Polly Hitchcock; Williams, John W; Lin, Elizabeth H B

    2005-01-01

    Comorbid anxiety disorders may result in worse depression treatment outcomes. The authors evaluated the effect of comorbid panic disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on response to a collaborative-care intervention for late-life depression in primary care. A total of 1,801 older adults with depression were randomized to a collaborative-care depression treatment model versus usual care and assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months, comparing differences among participants with comorbid panic disorder (N=262) and PTSD (N=191) and those without such comorbid anxiety disorders. At baseline, patients with comorbid anxiety reported higher levels of psychiatric and medical illness, greater functional impairment, and lower quality of life. Participants without comorbid anxiety who received collaborative care had early and lasting improvements in depression compared with those in usual care. Participants with comorbid panic disorder showed similar outcomes, whereas those with comorbid PTSD showed a more delayed response, requiring 12 months of intervention to show a significant effect. At 12 months, however, outcomes were comparable. Interactions of intervention status by comorbid PTSD or panic disorder were not statistically significant, suggesting that the collaborative-care model performed significantly better than usual care in depressed older adults both with and without comorbid anxiety. Collaborative care is more effective than usual care for depressed older adults with and without comorbid panic disorder and PTSD, although a sustained treatment response was slower to emerge for participants with PTSD. Intensive and prolonged follow-up may be needed for depressed older adults with comorbid PTSD.

  11. Agoraphobia and Panic Disorder: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Kart

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study we aim to get more information about agoraphobia (AG which is an independent diagnosis in Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5 and to evaluate overlaps or differences between agoraphobia and panic disorder (PD upon sociodemographic features and comorbidity with considering relation of these two disorders. Material and Method: Sociodemographic Data Form was given and Structural Clinical Interview for DSM Axis I Disorders (SCID-I was applied to 33 patients diagnosed as AG and 34 patients diagnosed as PD with AG (PDA.Results: AG group consisted of 21 females (63.1%, 12 males (36%, totally 33 patients and PDA group consisted of 23 females (67.6%, 11 males (32.4%, totally 34 patients. Mean age of onset was 32.4±10.2 in PDA group and 31.1±12.1 in AG group. According to sociodemographic features, violence in family and smoking rates were significantly higher in PDA group than AG group. Major Depressive Disorder (MDD as a comorbidity was higher in PDA group. Discussion: In this study, we tried to identify the overlaps and differences of PDA and AG. For a better recognition of AG, further studies are needed.

  12. Quality of life and cost factors in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, J R

    1996-01-01

    Quality of life encompasses domains of personal happiness, role fulfillment, and health status. Increasing attention has been paid to the relationship between quality of life and panic disorder, with accumulating evidence now available to suggest impairment in several domains among subjects with panic disorder. This review summarizes the results of community-based and treatment-seeking populations of subjects with panic disorder. Impaired personal happiness, restricted role functioning, and increased use of health services are all described. Evidence suggests that accurate diagnosis and effective treatment can significantly lessen health service utilization, resulting in substantial cost offset and also leading to increased work productivity and personal effectiveness.

  13. Recognition of facial expressions of emotion in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Liqiang; Chen, Wanzhen; Shen, Yuedi; Wang, Xinling; Wei, Lili; Zhang, Yingchun; Wang, Wei; Chen, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Whether patients with panic disorder behave differently or not when recognizing the facial expressions of emotion remains unsettled. We tested 21 outpatients with panic disorder and 34 healthy subjects, with a photo set from the Matsumoto and Ekman Japanese and Caucasian facial expressions of emotion, which includes anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, sadness, and surprise. Compared to the healthy subjects, patients showed lower accuracies when recognizing disgust and fear, but a higher accuracy when recognizing surprise. These results suggest that the altered specificity to these emotions leads tso self-awareness mechanisms to prevent further emotional reactions in panic disorder patients. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Cardiorespiratory concerns shape brain responses during automatic panic-related scene processing in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldker, Katharina; Heitmann, Carina Yvonne; Neumeister, Paula; Brinkmann, Leonie; Bruchmann, Maximillan; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Straube, Thomas

    2017-09-26

    Increased automatic processing of threat-related stimuli has been proposed as a key element in panic disorder. Little is known about the neural basis of automatic processing, in particular to task-irrelevant, panic-related, ecologically valid stimuli, or about the association between brain activation and symptomatology in patients with panic disorder. The present event-related fMRI study compared brain responses to task-irrelevant, panic-related and neutral visual stimuli in medication-free patients with panic disorder and healthy controls. Panic-related and neutral scenes were presented while participants performed a spatially nonoverlapping bar orientation task. Correlation analyses investigated the association between brain responses and panic-related aspects of symptomatology, measured using the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI). We included 26 patients with panic disorder and 26 heatlhy controls in our analysis. Compared with controls, patients with panic disorder showed elevated activation in the amygdala, brainstem, thalamus, insula, anterior cingulate cortex and midcingulate cortex in response to panic-related versus neutral task-irrelevant stimuli. Furthermore, fear of cardiovascular symptoms (a subcomponent of the ASI) was associated with insula activation, whereas fear of respiratory symptoms was associated with brainstem hyperactivation in patients with panic disorder. The additional implementation of measures of autonomic activation, such as pupil diameter, heart rate, or electrodermal activity, would have been informative during the fMRI scan as well as during the rating procedure. Results reveal a neural network involved in the processing of panic-related distractor stimuli in patients with panic disorder and suggest an automatic weighting of panic-related information depending on the magnitude of cardiovascular and respiratory symptoms. Insula and brainstem activations show function-related associations with specific components of panic symptomatology.

  15. Agoraphobia Related to Unassertiveness in Panic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Michelle Nigri; Simoes, Pedro; Sardinha, Aline G; Nardi, Antonio E

    2016-05-01

    Despite developments in panic disorder (PD) research, a significant percentage of patients do not benefit from conventional treatments. Interpersonal factors have been identified as potential predictors of treatment failures. We aimed to evaluate assertiveness in a sample of patients with PD and its implications for treatment. Forty-six symptomatic patients with PD and 46 college students responded to assessment scales regarding assertiveness and clinical data. Seventy-five percent of the patients had a secondary diagnosis of agoraphobia. We found that the PD group was characterized as nonassertive and slightly less assertive than control subjects. Furthermore, the deficit in the level of assertiveness correlated with the severity of the PD. The diagnosis of agoraphobia was correlated with unassertiveness (p Agoraphobia predisposes individuals to dependency and insecurity about their ability to overcome anxiogenic situations. These data demonstrate the importance of managing assertiveness in patients with PD accompanied by agoraphobia.

  16. Comorbid personality disorders in subjects with panic disorder: which personality disorders increase clinical severity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ozkan

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Personality disorders are common in subjects with panic disorder. Personality disorders have shown to affect the course of panic disorder. The purpose of this study was to examine which personality disorders effect clinical severity in subjects with panic disorder. This study included 122 adults (71 female, 41 male, who met DSM-IV criteria for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia. Clinical assessment was conducted by using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I Disorders (SCID-I, the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis II Personality Disorders (SCID-II and the Panic and Agoraphobia Scale (PAS, Global Assessment Functioning Scale (GAF, Beck Depression Inventory (BDI, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI. Patients who had a history of sexual abuse were assessed with Sexual Abuse Severity Scale. Logistic regressions were used to identify predictors of suicide attempts, suicidal ideation, agoraphobia, different panic attack symptoms, sexual abuse, and early onset of disorders. The rates of comorbid Axis I and Axis II psychiatric disorders were 80.3% and 33.9%, consecutively, in patients with panic disorder. Panic disorder patients with comorbid personality disorders had more severe anxiety, depression and agoraphobia symptoms, and had earlier ages of onset, and lower levels of functioning. The rates of suicidal ideation and suicide attempts were 34.8% and 9.8%, consecutively, in subjects with panic disorder. The rate of patients with panic disorder had a history of childhood sexual abuse was 12.5%. The predictor of sexual abuse was more than one comorbid Axis II diagnosis. The predictors of suicide attempt were comorbid paranoid and borderline personality disorders, and the predictor of suicidal ideation was major depressive disorder in subjects with panic disorder. In conclusion, this study documents that comorbid personality disorders increase the clinical severity of panic disorder. Patients with more than one

  17. The epidemiology of panic disorder and agoraphobia in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, R D; Faravelli, C; Rosi, S; Cosci, F; Truglia, E; de Graaf, R; Wittchen, H U

    2005-08-01

    A literature search, in addition to expert survey, was performed to estimate the size and burden of panic disorder in the European Union (EU). Epidemiologic data from EU countries were critically reviewed to determine the consistency of prevalence estimates across studies and to identify the most pressing questions for future research. A comprehensive literature search focusing on epidemiological studies in community and clinical settings in European countries since 1980 was conducted (Medline, Web of Science, Psychinfo). Only studies using established diagnostic instruments on the basis of DSM-III-R or DSM-IV, or ICD-10 were considered. Thirteen studies from a total of 14 countries were identified. Epidemiological findings are relatively consistent across the EU. The 12-month prevalence of panic disorder and agoraphobia without history of panic were estimated to be 1.8% (0.7-2.2) and 1.3% (0.7-2.0) respectively across studies. Rates are twice as high in females and age of first onset for both disorders is in adolescence or early adulthood. In addition to comorbidity with agoraphobia, panic disorder is strongly associated with other anxiety disorders, and a wide range of somatoform, affective and substance use disorders. Even subclinical forms of panic disorder (i.e., panic attacks) are associated with substantial distress, psychiatric comorbidity and functional impairment. In general health primary care settings, there appears to be substantial underdiagnosis and undertreatment of panic disorder. Moreover, panic disorder and agoraphobia are poorly recognized and rarely treated in mental health settings, despite high health care utilization rates and substantial long-term disability.

  18. The Psycho-social Context of Panic Disorder (Barriers in Communication with the Client's Immediate Environment)

    OpenAIRE

    Svitáková, Marie

    2010-01-01

    The thesis entitled Psychosocial Context of the Panic Disorder; Barriers in Communication with the Client's Immediate Environment traces the influence of panic disorder on the social aspects of the client's life. The thesis attempts to define the term panic disorder, traces selected treatment possibilities, characterizes the panic attack and describes the impact of the panic disorder on the behaviour and mentality of the patient. Further, it focuses on the communication of non-psychiatric med...

  19. The efficacy of milnacipran in panic disorder: an open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Carolina; Seganfredo, Ana Carolina; Dornelles, Marina; Torres, Mariana; Paludo, Angela; Heldt, Elizeth; Manfro, Gisele G

    2007-05-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of milnacipran in the acute treatment of patients with panic disorder. Thirty-one patients who met Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders-IV criteria for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia were included in the study. Patients were initially treated with milnacipran 25 mg twice daily and then 50 mg twice daily until the 10th week. The treatment outcome and panic disorder severity were determined by the Panic Disorder Severity Scale, Panic Inventory, Clinical Global Impression and Hamilton Anxiety Scale, all of which were applied during every evaluation interview. Quality of life (WHOQOL-bref) was evaluated at baseline and at the end of the study. Missing data were handled by using the last observation carried forward for all participants who had taken at least one dose of study medication. Intention-to-treat was used in the analyses. Pharmacological treatment resulted in a clinically and statistically significant mean reduction in all severity measures. Remission (Clinical Global Impression < or = 2) was obtained in 58.1% of the sample. Regarding WHOQOL, we found a significant improvement (P<0.05) across treatment in all the domains studied. Although results may be influenced by the open design of this pilot study and by the small sample size, our findings suggest that milnacipran may be effective for the treatment of panic disorder and justify further research.

  20. Biomarkers for PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    anxiety disorders. Ressler hopes that by understanding how fear works in the mammalian brain in the laboratory, it will improve understanding of and...provide translational treatments and possibly prevention for fear-based disorders, such as PTSD, phobic disorders and panic disorder. Dr. Ressler...PROVE (Project for Return and Opportunity in Veterans Education) Queens Vet Center Rutgers Anxiety Disorders Clinic Veteran PTSD Support Group

  1. Quality of Smartphone Apps Related to Panic Disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Van Singer, Mathias; Chatton, Anne; Khazaal, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Quality of smartphone apps related to panic: smartphone apps have a growing role in health care. This study assessed the quality of English-language apps for panic disorder (PD) and compared paid and free apps. Keywords related to PD were entered into the Google Play Store search engine. Apps were assessed using the following quality indicators: accountability, interactivity, self-help score (the potential of smartphone apps to help users in daily life), and evidence-based content quality. Th...

  2. CRHR1 promoter hypomethylation: An epigenetic readout of panic disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartner, Christoph; Ziegler, Christiane; Schiele, Miriam A; Kollert, Leonie; Weber, Heike; Zwanzger, Peter; Arolt, Volker; Pauli, Paul; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas; Domschke, Katharina

    2017-02-20

    The corticotropin releasing hormone receptor 1 (CRHR1) is crucially involved in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and thus a major regulator of the stress response. CRHR1 gene variation is associated with several mental disorders including anxiety disorders. Studies in rodents have demonstrated epigenetic regulation of CRHR1 gene expression to moderate response to stressful environment. In the present study, we investigated CRHR1 promoter methylation for the first time regarding its role in panic disorder applying a case-control approach (N=131 patients, N=131 controls). In an independent sample of healthy volunteers (N=255), CRHR1 methylation was additionally analyzed for association with the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) score as a dimensional panic-related intermediate phenotype. The functional relevance of altered CRHR1 promoter methylation was investigated by means of luciferase-based reporter gene assays. In panic disorder patients, a significantly decreased CRHR1 methylation was discerned (p<0.001). Accordingly, healthy controls with high BAI scores showed significantly decreased CRHR1 methylation. Functional analyses revealed an increased gene expression in presence of unmethylated as compared to methylated pCpGl_CRHR1 reporter gene vectors. The present study identified a potential role of CRHR1 hypomethylation - conferring increased CRHR1 expression - in panic disorder and a related dimensional intermediate phenotype. This up-regulation of CRHR1 gene expression driven by de-methylation might constitute a link between the stress response and panic disorder risk.

  3. Emotional vulnerability as a function of physical activity among individuals with panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, J.A.J.; Zvolensky, M.J.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation evaluated the association between physical inactivity and emotional vulnerability in panic disorder. Participants were 39 adults (69% females) with a primary diagnosis of panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia), recruited through the community. Consistent with prediction, cur

  4. QT wave dispersion in patients with panic disorder

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murad Atmaca; Mustafa Yavuzkir; Filiz Izci; M. Gurkan Gurok; Sahin Adiyaman

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] QT dispersion (QTd),defined as the maximal inter-lead difference in QT intervals on 12 leads of the surface electrocardiogram (ECG),reflects the regional heterogeneity of ventricular repolarization and has been suggested as an important marker for risk of arrhythmia in addition to the QT interval.Some investigators proposed that it might be a predisposing factor for arrhythmic events and sudden death.Thus,we aimed to investigate whether QTd differs in patients with panic disorder from that in healthy controls.[Methods] In 40 panic disorder patients and 40 healthy controls,Qmax,Qmin,and QTd values were measured.In addition,the Hamilton depression rating scale and the panic agoraphobia scale were scored for both patients and healthy volunteers.[Results] Qmax and Qmin values in the panic disorder patients were significantly higher than those in healthy controls.The mean corrected QTd was significantly greater in the patients than in the controls.One-way analysis of covariance (ANCOVA,using left atrial size,age and heart rate as covariates) also corrected the significant difference.In addition,ANCOVA revealed a significant main effect for the diagnosis,indicating a significantly higher QTd for patients compared with controls.[Conclusion]QTd might be associated with panic disorder.Future studies in larger samples evaluating the effects of treatment are required.

  5. Distinguishing PTSD, Complex PTSD, and Borderline Personality Disorder: A latent class analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylène Cloitre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: There has been debate regarding whether Complex Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (Complex PTSD is distinct from Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD when the latter is comorbid with PTSD. Objective: To determine whether the patterns of symptoms endorsed by women seeking treatment for childhood abuse form classes that are consistent with diagnostic criteria for PTSD, Complex PTSD, and BPD. Method: A latent class analysis (LCA was conducted on an archival dataset of 280 women with histories of childhood abuse assessed for enrollment in a clinical trial for PTSD. Results: The LCA revealed four distinct classes of individuals: a Low Symptom class characterized by low endorsements on all symptoms; a PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD but low endorsement of symptoms that define the Complex PTSD and BPD diagnoses; a Complex PTSD class characterized by elevated symptoms of PTSD and self-organization symptoms that defined the Complex PTSD diagnosis but low on the symptoms of BPD; and a BPD class characterized by symptoms of BPD. Four BPD symptoms were found to greatly increase the odds of being in the BPD compared to the Complex PTSD class: frantic efforts to avoid abandonment, unstable sense of self, unstable and intense interpersonal relationships, and impulsiveness. Conclusions: Findings supported the construct validity of Complex PTSD as distinguishable from BPD. Key symptoms that distinguished between the disorders were identified, which may aid in differential diagnosis and treatment planning.

  6. TREATMENT OF PANIC DISORDER IN THE REAL WORLD

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Panic disorder is classified as an anxiety disorder in the DSM-IV.1 It affects between. 2% and 4% of the ... there is a rapid escalation of symptoms over approxi- ... Electrolyte. Heart failure ... these, medications have a more rapid onset of effect ...

  7. The effects of extraverted temperament on agoraphobia in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosellini, Anthony J; Lawrence, Amy E; Meyer, Joseph F; Brown, Timothy A

    2010-05-01

    Although situational avoidance is viewed as the most disabling aspect of panic disorder, few studies have evaluated how dimensions of neurotic (i.e., neuroticism, behavioral inhibition) and extraverted (i.e., extraversion, behavioral activation) temperament may influence the presence and severity of agoraphobia. Using logistic regression and structural equation modeling, we examined the unique effects of extraverted temperament on situational avoidance in a sample of 274 outpatients with a diagnosis of panic disorder with and without agoraphobia. Results showed low extraverted temperament (i.e., introversion) to be associated with both the presence and the severity of situational avoidance. Findings are discussed in regard to conceptualizations of conditioned avoidance, activity levels, sociability, and positive emotions within the context of panic disorder with agoraphobia.

  8. Decreased mean platelet volume in panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Göğçegöz Gül I

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Işil Göğçegöz Gül, Gül Eryilmaz, Eylem Özten, Gökben Hizli Sayar Neuropsychiatry Health, Practice, and Research Center, Uskudar University, Istanbul, Turkey Aim: The relationship between psychological stress and platelet activation has been widely studied. It is well known that platelets may reflect certain biochemical changes that occur in the brain when different mental conditions occur. Platelet 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT is also extensively studied in psychiatry. The mean platelet volume (MPV, the accurate measure of platelet size, has been considered a marker and determinant of platelet function. The aim of the present study was to search for any probable difference in the MPV of subjects with panic disorder (PD.Methods: A total of 37 drug-free subjects, aged 18 to 65 years, diagnosed with PD, with or without agoraphobia, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth edition (DSM-IV criteria and 45 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Platelet count and MPV were measured and recorded for each subject.Results: There were no statistically significant differences between groups in terms of female/male ratio, age, or body mass index between the PD group and control group (P=0.91, P=0.82, and P=0.93, respectively. The MPV was found to be significantly lower in the PD group compared with the control group (8.8±0.9 fL vs 9.2±0.8 fL; P=0.02. All the participants had MPV values in the standard range of 6.9–10.8 fL.Conclusion: We concluded that abnormalities of the 5-HT1A receptor function in the central nervous system of subjects with a diagnosis of PD are also mirrored in as an alteration in platelet activity. Measurements of platelet activity may be used as a tool for neuropsychiatric and psychopharmacological research and for studying how certain mental diseases and medications affect the central nervous system. Keywords: 5-HT, thrombocyte, anxiety 

  9. Review of current treatment in panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    den Boer, JA; Slaap, BR

    1998-01-01

    The ideal properties for an antipanic agent include the ability to provide complete recovery from panic attacks, resolution of associated anxiety and avoidance behavior, relapse prevention, good tolerability, and efficacy in comorbid conditions including depression. We compared the properties of cur

  10. Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): NIH Research to Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... virtual reality" (VR) exposure therapy. The VR therapy combines traditional therapy and exposure via VR technology that ... families. Read More "Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)" Articles PTSD: A Growing Epidemic / Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment / NIH ...

  11. Virtual reality: a new tool for panic disorder therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincelli, Francesco; Riva, Giuseppe

    2002-05-01

    The use of a multicomponent cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy for panic disorder with agoraphobia is actually one of the preferred therapeutical approach for this disturbance. This method involves a mixture of cognitive and behavioral techniques which are intended to help patients identify and modify their dysfunctional anxiety-related thoughts, beliefs and behavior. Emphasis is placed on reversing the maintaining factors identified in the cognitive and behavioral patterns. The treatment protocol includes exposure to the feared situation, interoceptive exposure and cognitive restructuring. The paper presents a treatment protocol for panic disorder and agoraphobia, named experiential-cognitive therapy, that integrates the use of virtual reality in a multicomponent cognitive-behavioral treatment strategy. The goal of experiential-cognitive therapy is to decondition fear reactions, to modify misinterpretational cognition related to panic symptoms and to reduce anxiety symptoms.

  12. The effects of comorbid personality disorders on cognitive behavioral treatment for panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Telch, M.J.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Schmidt, N.B.

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of personality pathology assessed both dimensionally and categorically on acute clinical response to group cognitive-behavioral treatment in a large sample of panic disorder patients (N = 173) meeting DSMIII-R criteria for panic disorder with or without

  13. The effects of comorbid personality disorders on cognitive behavioral treatment for panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Telch; J.H. Kamphuis; N.B. Schmidt

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the influence of personality pathology assessed both dimensionally and categorically on acute clinical response to group cognitive-behavioral treatment in a large sample of panic disorder patients (N = 173) meeting DSMIII-R criteria for panic disorder with or without a

  14. The genetic basis of panic and phobic anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoller, Jordan W; Gardner-Schuster, Erica; Covino, Jennifer

    2008-05-15

    Panic disorder and phobic anxiety disorders are common disorders that are often chronic and disabling. Genetic epidemiologic studies have documented that these disorders are familial and moderately heritable. Linkage studies have implicated several chromosomal regions that may harbor susceptibility genes; however, candidate gene association studies have not established a role for any specific loci to date. Increasing evidence from family and genetic studies suggests that genes underlying these disorders overlap and transcend diagnostic boundaries. Heritable forms of anxious temperament, anxiety-related personality traits and neuroimaging assays of fear circuitry may represent intermediate phenotypes that predispose to panic and phobic disorders. The identification of specific susceptibility variants will likely require much larger sample sizes and the integration of insights from genetic analyses of animal models and intermediate phenotypes.

  15. Diagnosis and treatment of agoraphobia with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perugi, Giulio; Frare, Franco; Toni, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    Agoraphobia with panic disorder is a phobic-anxious syndrome where patients avoid situations or places in which they fear being embarrassed, or being unable to escape or get help if a panic attack occurs. During the last half-century, agoraphobia has been thought of as being closely linked to the recurring panic attack syndrome, so much so that in most cases it appears to be the typical development or complication of panic disorder. Despite the high prevalence of agoraphobia with panic disorder in patients in primary-care settings, the condition is frequently under-recognised and under-treated by medical providers. Antidepressants have been demonstrated to be effective in preventing panic attacks, and in improving anticipatory anxiety and avoidance behaviour. These drugs are also effective in the treatment of the frequently coexisting depressive symptomatology. Among antidepressant agents, SSRIs are generally well tolerated and effective for both anxious and depressive symptomatology, and these compounds should be considered the first choice for short-, medium- and long-term pharmacological treatment of agoraphobia with panic disorder. The few comparative studies conducted to date with various SSRIs reported no significant differences in terms of efficacy; however, the SSRIs that are less liable to produce withdrawal symptoms after abrupt discontinuation should be considered the treatments of first choice for long-term prophylaxis. Venlafaxine is not sufficiently studied in the long-term treatment of panic disorder, while TCAs may be considered as a second choice of treatment when patients do not seem to respond to or tolerate SSRIs. High-potency benzodiazepines have been shown to display a rapid onset of anti-anxiety effect, having beneficial effects during the first few days of treatment, and are therefore useful options for short-term treatment; however, these drugs are not first-choice medications in the medium and long term because of the frequent development

  16. Dropout prediction in cognitive behavior therapy for panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijsers, G.P.J.; Kampman, M.; Hoogduin, C.A.L.

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this study was to attempt to identify reliable factors associated with dropout risk in a sample of 161 panic disorder patients treated with manualized cognitive behavior therapy. Four possible predictors of dropout were selected from the literature: level of education, treatment motivatio

  17. Personality in panic disorder with agoraphobia: a Rorschach study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, C.; Cohen, L.

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we tested several hypotheses derived from self psychology (Diamond, 1987) regarding personality features of patients suffering from panic disorder and agoraphobia (PDA). PDA patients are thought to suffer from a deficit in negative affect-regulating capacity, surrounded by defenses su

  18. Increased opioid dependence in a mouse model of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Gallego

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Panic disorder is a highly prevalent neuropsychiatric disorder that shows co-occurrence with substance abuse. Here, we demonstrate that TrkC, the high affinity receptor for neurotrophin-3, is a key molecule involved in panic disorder and opiate dependence, using a transgenic mouse model (TgNTRK3. Constitutive TrkC overexpression in TgNTRK3 mice dramatically alters spontaneous firing rates of locus coeruleus neurons and the response of the noradrenergic system to chronic opiate exposure, possibly related to the altered regulation of neurotrophic peptides observed. Notably, TgNTRK3 locus coeruleus neurons showed an increased firing rate in saline-treated conditions and profound abnormalities in their response to met5-enkephalin. Behaviorally, chronic morphine administration induced a significantly increased withdrawal syndrome in TgNTRK3 mice. In conclusion, we show here that the NT-3/TrkC system is an important regulator of neuronal firing in locus coeruleus and could contribute to the adaptations of the noradrenergic system in response to chronic opiate exposure. Moreover, our results indicate that TrkC is involved in the molecular and cellular changes in noradrenergic neurons underlying both panic attacks and opiate dependence and support a functional endogenous opioid deficit in panic disorder patients.

  19. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Noomi O; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  20. Sertraline versus paroxetine in the treatment of panic disorder: an acute, double-blind noninferiority comparison.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandelow, B.; Behnke, K.; Lenoir, S.; Hendriks, G.J.; Alkin, T.; Goebel, C.; Clary, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Several classes of medications have demonstrated efficacy in panic disorder, but direct comparison of 2 proven treatments is still uncommon. The purpose of this study was to compare sertraline and paroxetine in the acute treatment of panic disorder. METHOD: Adult outpatients with panic di

  1. The therapeutic potential of escitalopram in the treatment of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark H Townsend

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mark H Townsend, Erich J ConradDepartment of Psychiatry, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center New Orleans, New Orleans, Louisiana, USAAbstract: Panic disorder is a chronic and disabling condition that is often accompanied by other psychiatric and medical conditions. The serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs and serotoninnorepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs have been used effectively with panic disorder (PD and conditions in which panic attacks frequently occur. Escitalopram is the most selective SSRI and a variety of evidence suggests it is of great value in the treatment of panic disorder. In this paper, we review the theoretical and practical implications of its use.Keywords: panic disorder, escitalopram, antidepressant, serotonin

  2. Predicting Child Ptsd: The Relationship between Acute Stress Disorder and PTSD in Injured Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassam-Adams, Nancy; Winston, Flaura Koplin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the prevalence of acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in injured children and to evaluate the utility of ASD as a predictor of PTSD. Method: Children hospitalized for injuries sustained in a traffic crash were enrolled in a prospective study. ASD was assessed in 243 children within 1 month…

  3. Validation of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and complex PTSD using the International Trauma Questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, P; Shevlin, M; Brewin, C R; Cloitre, M; Downes, A J; Jumbe, S; Karatzias, T; Bisson, J I; Roberts, N P

    2017-09-01

    The 11th version of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-11) has proposed two related trauma diagnoses: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and Complex PTSD (CPTSD). Using a newly developed, disorder-specific measure of PTSD and CPTSD called the International Trauma Questionnaire (ITQ) the current study will (i) assess the factorial validity of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD; (ii) provide the first test of the discriminant validity of these constructs; and (iii) provide the first comparison of ICD-11, and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, Fifth Edition (DSM-5), PTSD diagnostic rates using disorder-specific measures. ICD-11 and DSM-5 PTSD-specific measures were completed by a British clinical sample of trauma-exposed patients (N = 171). The structure and validity of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD were assessed by means of factor analysis and assessing relationships with criterion variables. Diagnostic rates under ICD-11 were significantly lower than those under DSM-5. A two-factor second-order model reflecting the distinction between PTSD and CPTSD best represented the data from the ITQ; and the PTSD and CPTSD factors differentially predicted multiple psychological variables. The factorial and discriminant validity of ICD-11 PTSD and CPTSD was supported, and ICD-11 produces fewer diagnostic cases than DSM-5. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Examining the Panic Attack Specifier in Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Nicholas P; Oglesby, Mary E; Short, Nicole A; Schmidt, Norman B

    2016-04-01

    Panic attacks (PAs) are characterized by overwhelming surges of fear and discomfort and are one of the most frequently occurring symptoms in psychiatric populations. The most recent version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (i.e. DSM-5) allows for a panic attack (PA) specifier for all disorders, including social anxiety disorder (SAD). However, there is little research examining differences between individuals diagnosed with SAD with the PA specifier versus individuals diagnosed with SAD without the PA specifier. The current study examined social anxiety, mood, anxiety, and anxiety sensitivity social concerns, a risk factor for social anxiety in SAD-diagnosed individuals without (N = 52) and with (N = 14) the PA specifier. The groups differed only in somatic symptoms of anxiety. Result of the current study provides preliminary evidence that the presence of the PA specifier in social anxiety does not result in elevated levels of comorbidity or a more severe presentation of social anxiety.

  5. Assessment of automatic associations with bodily sensations and agoraphobic situations in panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woud, M.L.; Becker, E.S.; Rinck, M.; Harmer, C.J.; Reinecke, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and objectives: One of the central assumptions of cognitive models of Panic Disorder (PD) is that automatic panic-related associations are a core feature of PD. However, empirical findings are mixed and inconsistent, rendering it difficult to evaluate the role of panic-related association

  6. Complex PTSD, affect dysregulation, and borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Julian D; Courtois, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Complex PTSD (cPTSD) was formulated to include, in addition to the core PTSD symptoms, dysregulation in three psychobiological areas: (1) emotion processing, (2) self-organization (including bodily integrity), and (3) relational security. The overlap of diagnostic criteria for cPTSD and borderline personality disorder (BPD) raises questions about the scientific integrity and clinical utility of the cPTSD construct/diagnosis, as well as opportunities to achieve an increasingly nuanced understanding of the role of psychological trauma in BPD. We review clinical and scientific findings regarding comorbidity, clinical phenomenology and neurobiology of BPD, PTSD, and cPTSD, and the role of traumatic victimization (in general and specific to primary caregivers), dissociation, and affect dysregulation. Findings suggest that BPD may involve heterogeneity related to psychological trauma that includes, but extends beyond, comorbidity with PTSD and potentially involves childhood victimization-related dissociation and affect dysregulation consistent with cPTSD. Although BPD and cPTSD overlap substantially, it is unwarranted to conceptualize cPTSD either as a replacement for BPD, or simply as a sub-type of BPD. We conclude with implications for clinical practice and scientific research based on a better differentiated view of cPTSD, BPD and PTSD.

  7. Milnacipran in panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mu-Hong; Liou, Ying-Jay

    2011-01-01

    A 51-year-old woman had panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder sequentially. The aforementioned symptoms subsided significantly after treatment with milnacipran, 125 mg, administered daily for 2 months. However, panic attacks with agoraphobia were noted frequently when she tapered down milnacipran to 50 mg daily. She consequently experienced depression that gradually increased in degree, with poor energy, poor sleep, thoughts of helplessness, and ideas of death. After administration of a daily dose of 125 mg of milnacipran for 1 month, her panic attacks with agoraphobia and depressed mood were again alleviated. The present report shows significant effects of milnacipran on the comorbidity of panic disorder with agoraphobia and major depressive disorder.

  8. Personality disorder traits as predictors of subsequent first-onset panic disorder or agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienvenu, O Joseph; Stein, Murray B; Samuels, Jack F; Onyike, Chiadi U; Eaton, William W; Nestadt, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Determining how personality disorder traits and panic disorder and/or agoraphobia relate longitudinally is an important step in developing a comprehensive understanding of the etiology of panic/agoraphobia. In 1981, a probabilistic sample of adult (> or =18 years old) residents of east Baltimore were assessed for Axis I symptoms and disorders using the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS); psychiatrists reevaluated a subsample of these participants and made Axis I diagnoses, as well as ratings of individual Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition personality disorder traits. Of the participants psychiatrists examined in 1981, 432 were assessed again in 1993 to 1996 using the DIS. Excluding participants who had baseline panic attacks or panic-like spells from the risk groups, baseline timidity (avoidant, dependent, and related traits) predicted first-onset DIS panic disorder or agoraphobia over the follow-up period. These results suggest that avoidant and dependent personality traits are predisposing factors, or at least markers of risk, for panic disorder and agoraphobia-not simply epiphenomena.

  9. Correlates of DSM-III personality disorder in panic disorder and agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavissakalian, M; Hamann, M S

    1988-01-01

    One hundred eighty-seven patients meeting DSM-III criteria for panic disorder (n = 26) or agoraphobia with panic (n = 161) were assessed with the Personality Diagnostic Questionnaire (PDQ), a self-rating scale designed to assess Axis II personality disorders and traits. Results replicated our earlier findings of a preponderance of dependent, avoidant, and histrionic features and the finding that patients exhibiting a greater number of personality traits were also significantly more symptomatic. Patients with the diagnosis of panic disorder did not differ on any personality disorder variables from patients with the diagnosis of agoraphobia with panic. Furthermore, none of the specific symptom dimensions, i.e., panic, anxiety, or agoraphobia, was selected as a unique predictor of any personality variables in the regression analyses. Rather, the most important correlates of personality disorder in these patients consisted of general factors such as dysphoric mood, social phobia, or interpersonal sensitivity, and Eysenck's neuroticism dimension. The results are discussed in light of recent findings suggesting a nonspecific link between panic disorder or agoraphobia and personality disorder.

  10. Affective comorbidity in panic disorder: is there a bipolar connection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, M; Perugi, G; Simonini, E; Soriani, A; Cassano, G B; Akiskal, H S

    1993-07-01

    Although theoretical explanations for comorbidity in panic disorder (PD) abound in the literature, the complex clinical challenges of these patients have been neglected, especially where panic, obsessive-compulsive and 'soft' bipolar (e.g., hypomanic, cyclothymic and hyperthymic) conditions might co-exist. The aim of the present study has been to systematically explore the spectrum of intra-episodic and longitudinal comorbidity of 140 DSM-III-R PD patients--67.1% of whom concomitantly met the criteria for Agoraphobia--and who were consecutively admitted to the ambulatory service of the Psychiatric Clinic of the University of Pisa over a 2-year period. Comorbidity with strictly defined anxiety disorders--i.e., not explained as mere symptomatic extensions of PD--was relatively uncommon, and included Simple Phobia (10.7%), Social Phobia (6.4%), Generalized Anxiety Disorder (3.6%), and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (4.2%). Comorbidity with Major Depression--strictly limited to the melancholic subtype--occurred in 22.9%. Comorbidity with Bipolar Disorders included 2.1% with mania, 5% with hypomania, as well as 6.4% with cyclothymia, for a total of 13.5%; an additional 34.3% of PD patients met the criteria for hyperthymic temperament. We submit that such comorbid patterns are at the root of unwieldy clinical constructs like 'atypical depression' and 'borderline personality'. The relationship of panic disorder to other anxious-phobic and depressive states has been known for some time. Our data extend this relationship to soft bipolar disorders. Studies from other centers are needed to verify that the proposed new link is not merely due to referral bias to a tertiary university setting.

  11. The norepinephrine transporter gene is a candidate gene for panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buttenschøn, H N; Kristensen, A S; Buch, H N

    2011-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is an anxiety disorder characterized by recurrent panic attacks with a lifetime prevalence of 4.7%. Genetic factors are known to contribute to the development of the disorder. Several lines of evidence point towards a major role of the norepinephrine system in the pathogenesis...

  12. Startle reflex modulation and autonomic responding during anxious apprehension in panic disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzig, Christiane A; Weike, Almut I; Zimmermann, Jörg; Hamm, Alfons O

    2007-11-01

    The present study explored anxious apprehension in panic disorder patients and controls in two threat conditions, darkness and threat of shock. Autonomic arousal and startle eyeblink reflexes were recorded in 26 panic disorder patients and 22 controls during adaptation, a safe condition, threat of shock, and darkness. Exposure to darkness resulted in a clear potentiation of the startle reflex. Panic patients but not controls responded with an increase in heart rate that was positively related to severity of agoraphobic avoidance. Threat of shock resulted in a startle potentiation that tended to be stronger in panic patients without comorbid depression than controls and attenuated in those patients who suffered from severe depression. These data suggest that only panic patients without depression belong to the fear disorders spectrum whereas panic patients with comorbid depression might rather belong to the distress disorders profile.

  13. Newer antidepressants and panic disorder: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrisano, Costanza; Chiesa, Alberto; Serretti, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and venlafaxine are currently considered as first-line agents for patients with panic disorder (PD). However, a systematic comparison of newer antidepressants for the treatment of PD is lacking thus far. Eligible studies focusing on PD patients treated with newer antidepressants were entered in the Cochrane Collaboration Review Manager. Our primary outcome measure was the mean change in panic symptoms from the baseline to the endpoint in patients treated with antidepressants as compared with those treated with placebo. Secondary outcome measures included the mean change in the overall anxiety scores and dropout rates. Sensitivity analyses were also carried out. Fifty studies focusing on 5236 patients were included. The following antidepressants were significantly superior to placebo for PD patients with the following increasing order of effectiveness: citalopram, sertraline, paroxetine, fluoxetine, and venlafaxine for panic symptoms and paroxetine, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, citalopram, venlafaxine, and mirtazapine for overall anxiety symptoms. Aside from reboxetine and fluvoxamine, all drugs were associated with significantly lower dropout rates as compared with placebo. Several clinical variables moderated clinical outcomes. However, because of some inconsistencies across the studies and limited evidence for some drugs under investigation, further head-to-head comparisons are required.

  14. Treatment-resistant panic disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freire, Rafael C; Zugliani, Morena M; Garcia, Rafael F; Nardi, Antonio E

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of panic disorder (PD) in the population is high and these patients have work impairment, high unemployment rates, seek medical treatment more frequently and have more hospitalizations than people without panic symptoms. Despite the availability of pharmacological, psychological and combined treatments, approximately one-third of all PD patients have persistent panic attacks and other PD symptoms after treatment. MEDLINE/Pubmed, CENTRAL, PsycINFO and Web of Science databases were searched for clinical trials in treatment-resistant PD. Only studies published between 1980 and 2015, in English, with human subjects, considered "journal articles" and clinical trial were included. We included trials recruiting only adult subjects with treatment-resistant PD, consistent with criteria from DSM-III to DSM5. We included all prospective experimental studies. Case, case series, retrospective studies or studies with <10 PD subjects were not included. Only 11 articles were included in this review. There were few quality studies, only two were randomized, controlled and double blind. Augmentation of the pharmacological treatment with cognitive-behavioral therapy demonstrated some short-term efficacy in treatment-resistant PD. There were also preliminary evidences of efficacy for monotherapy with reboxetine and olanzapine, and augmentation with pindolol, divalproex sodium, aripiprazole and olanzapine in short-term treatment.

  15. Efficacy of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Joane; Marchand, Andre; Dugas, Michel J.; Letarte, Andree

    2007-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy for comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) by combining treatment strategies for both disorders. A single-case, multiple-baseline design across participants was used. Three participants with primary PDA and secondary…

  16. Routine general practice care for panic disorder within the lifestyle approach to managing panic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodney A. Lambert

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Routine general practice (GP care is rarely comprehensively described in clinical trials. This paper examines routine GP care within the lifestyle approach to managing panic (LAMP study. The aim of this paper is to describe/discuss routine GP care for panic disorder (PD patients within both study arms in the LAMP study. An unblinded pragmatic randomised controlled trial in 15 East of England GP practices (2 primary care trusts. Participants met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for PD with/without agoraphobia. Follow-up measures recorded at 20 weeks/10 months following randomisation. Control arm, unrestricted routine GP care (practice appointments, referrals and prescriptions. Trial arm, occupational therapyled lifestyle treatment comprising lifestyle review of fluid intake, diet pattern, exercise, caffeine, alcohol and nicotine. Primary outcome measure: beck anxiety inventory. At baseline, participants attended 2-3 times more GP appointments than population average, reducing at 10 months to 1.6 times population average for routine GP care and 0.97 population average for lifestyle arm. At 10 months, 33% fewer referrals (6 referrals; 0 mental health than at baseline (9 referrals; 2 mental health were made for lifestyle arm patients compared with 42% increase (from 12 referrals; 8 mental health at baseline to 17 referrals; 7 mental health in GP care arm. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors were prescribed most often. Benzodiazepines and beta-blockers were prescribed more often than tricyclic against current clinical guidelines. In conclusion, we found that PD patients at baseline were high healthcare resource users. Treatment in both study arms reduced resource use. Routine GP care requires further review for this patient group.

  17. [Deleterious Results of Safety Seeking Behaviours in Panic Disorder: Polydipsia and Diabetes Mellitus Type 2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurt, Emel; Karabaş, Özer; Yorguner, Neşe; Wurz, Axel; Topçuoğlu, Volkan

    2016-01-01

    Panic disorder is an anxiety disorder that involves recurrent panic attacks, which emerge when a harmless stimulus is interpreted as "catastrophic". In an attempt to avoid the panic attack or prevent confrontation, the patient exhibits a dysfunctional attitude and behavior, such as evasion and safety-seeking behavior (SSB). Dysfunctional behavior leads to an increase in the recurrence of panic attacks and affects the patient's life in a negative way. According to the cognitive behavioral therapy model, SSB contributes to the continuation of unrealistic beliefs (e.g. physical experiences) regarding and prevents the patient from grasping new information that may potentially contradict the unrealistic cognitions. In this paper, we present a case with a primary diagnosis of panic disorder. Interestingly, this patient developed diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 and psychogenic polydipsia (PPD) as a consequence of his SSB. PPD is a common occurrence in patients with psychiatric disorders, especially in schizophrenia. Up to now, no case of a panic disorder with either DM or PPD has been reported in the literature. While it is accepted that major depression poses a risk for DM type 2, panic disorder may also increase this risk. Treatment of the panic disorder with cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) resulted in improvement of PPD and DM type 2. In conclusion, the role of SSB in medical disorders accompanied by psychiatric disorders should be kept in mind when treating these patients.

  18. The relationships among separation anxiety disorder, adult attachment style and agoraphobia in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Stefano; Abelli, Marianna; Troisi, Alfonso; Siracusano, Alberto; Cassano, Giovanni B; Shear, Katherine M; Baldwin, David

    2014-12-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that separation anxiety disorder occurs more frequently in adults than children. It is unclear whether the presence of adult separation anxiety disorder (ASAD) is a manifestation of anxious attachment, or a form of agoraphobia, or a specific condition with clinically significant consequences. We conducted a study to examine these questions. A sample of 141 adult outpatients with panic disorder participated in the study. Participants completed standardized measures of separation anxiety, attachment style, agoraphobia, panic disorder severity and quality of life. Patients with ASAD (49.5% of our sample) had greater panic symptom severity and more impairment in quality of life than those without separation anxiety. We found a greater rate of symptoms suggestive of anxious attachment among panic patients with ASAD compared to those without ASAD. However, the relationship between ASAD and attachment style is not strong, and adult ASAD occurs in some patients who report secure attachment style. Similarly, there is little evidence for the idea that separation anxiety disorder is a form of agoraphobia. Factor analysis shows clear differentiation of agoraphobic and separation anxiety symptoms. Our data corroborate the notion that ASAD is a distinct condition associated with impairment in quality of life and needs to be better recognized and treated in patients with panic disorder.

  19. Risk factors for fearful spells, panic attacks and panic disorder in a community cohort of adolescents and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselmann, Eva; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Lieb, Roselind; Beesdo-Baum, Katja

    2016-03-15

    Panic attacks (PA) and panic disorder (PD) as well as fearful spells only (FS-only, attacks of anxiety not meeting full criteria for PA or PD) increase the risk for various mental disorders. It is unclear so far whether FS-only, PA and PD share the same etiologies and risk factors. A representative community sample of adolescents and young adults (n=3021, aged 14-24 at baseline) was prospectively followed up over up to 10 years. Panic pathology and putative risk factors were assessed using the DSM-IV/M-CIDI and its embedded assessment modules and questionnaires. In Cox regressions stratified by sex and age, female sex, parental anxiety and depression, behavioral inhibition, harm avoidance, lower coping-efficacy and parental rejection predicted the onset of FS-only, PA and PD (Hazard Ratios 1.2-3.0). Associations with other risk factors partially differed for FS-only, PA and PD and tended to be stronger for PA and PD than for FS-only. No strictly prospective analytical approach was used. Time intervals between some risk factors and their retrospective assessment were relatively long. Findings suggest that FS-only, PA and PD are etiologically similar and represent qualitatively equal, albeit differently severe forms of panic pathology that lie on different points of the same fear-panic dimension. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Panic disorder and agoraphobia: An overview and commentary of DSM-5 changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmundson, G.J.G.; Taylor, S.; Smits, J.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The recently published DSM-5 contains a number of changes pertinent to panic disorder and agoraphobia. These changes include separation of panic disorder and agoraphobia into separate diagnoses, the addition of criteria and guidelines for distinguishing agoraphobia from specific phobia, the addition

  1. Preventing panic disorder: Cost-effectiveness analysis alongside a pragmatic randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Smit (Filip); G. Willemse (Godelief); P. Meulenbeek (Peter); M.A. Koopmanschap (Marc); A.J.L.M. van Balkom (Anton); P. Spinhoven (Philip); P. Cuijpers (Pim)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Panic disorder affects many people, is associated with a formidable disease burden, and imposes costs on society. The annual influx of new cases of panic disorder is substantial. From the public health perspective it may therefore be a sound policy to reduce the influx of new

  2. Panic disorder and agoraphobia: An overview and commentary of DSM-5 changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asmundson, G.J.G.; Taylor, S.; Smits, J.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The recently published DSM-5 contains a number of changes pertinent to panic disorder and agoraphobia. These changes include separation of panic disorder and agoraphobia into separate diagnoses, the addition of criteria and guidelines for distinguishing agoraphobia from specific phobia, the addition

  3. Separation anxiety and panic disorder in clinically referred youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Leonard A; Toscano, Peter F; Connor, Daniel F

    2008-05-01

    This study examined whether youngsters with separation anxiety disorder (SAD) and panic disorder (PD) had experienced more separation-related events than youngsters with SAD (without comorbid PD). We also examined whether age of onset of SAD and comorbidity with other psychological disorders was related to the occurrence of PD. We compared youngsters who were diagnosed with SAD and PD (N=31) with youngsters who were diagnosed with SAD without comorbid PD (N=63) for the number of separation-related events, severity of psychopathology, and parent and child CBCL ratings, age of onset of SAD, and the number of comorbid diagnoses. The findings indicate that youngsters with SAD and PD had a later age of onset of SAD and more extensive psychopathology and functional impairment than youngsters with SAD (without comorbid PD). Contrary to hypothesis, there were no differences between the groups in the occurrence or number of separation-related events.

  4. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Comorbid Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J.; Marchand, Andre; Letarte, Andree

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral treatment package for comorbid generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA). A single-case, multiple-baseline, across-subjects design was used with 3 primary GAD patients with secondary PDA. The efficacy of the treatment was evaluated with…

  5. The effect of Korean-group cognitive behavioural therapy among patients with panic disorder in clinic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y S; Lee, E J; Cho, Y

    2017-02-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Panic disorder patients display various panic-related physical symptoms and catastrophic misinterpretation of bodily sensations, which lower their quality of life by interfering with daily activities. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a useful strategy for panic disorder patients to manage symptoms associated with inaccurate cognitive interpretation of situations resulting from the patient's cognitive vulnerability. In South Korea, however, despite the increasing prevalence of panic disorder, CBT is not a common element of nursing care plans for panic disorder patients. Moreover, few Korean researchers have attempted to assess the effects of CBT on such patients. WHAT THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In a strategy combining CBT and routine treatments, patients with panic disorder can experience greater positive effects in the acute treatment phase than those they experience when receiving only routine treatment. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Mental health professionals, especially psychiatric nurses in local clinics who operate most special mental health programmes for panic disorder patients, should apply a panic disorder management programme that integrates CBT and routine treatments. The integrated approach is more effective for reducing the number of panic attacks and cognitive misinterpretation in patients than providing routine treatment alone. For patients with panic disorder, the objective of CBT is to understand the relationship between psychological panic disorder sensations, emotions, thoughts and behaviours. Therefore, nurses can help patients address and improve biological, social and psychological aspects of physical health problems as well as help them improve their coping skills in general. Introduction In panic disorder, sensitivity to bodily sensations increases due to the patient's cognitive vulnerability. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help to decrease sensitivity to bodily sensations

  6. Maternal panic disorder: Infant prematurity and low birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Susan L; Racu, Camellia; Gregg, Vanessa; Simmens, Samuel J

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this pilot research was to investigate whether infants of mothers with panic disorder (PD) would be at higher risk for prematurity and low birth weight (corrected for gestational age) than controls. Medical records were reviewed for 25 mothers with PD and 33 mothers without a lifetime history of anxiety disorders or other major psychopathology as determined by diagnostic interview. Mothers also completed questionnaires concerning demographic information and life stresses. Compared to controls, infants with PD mothers were not significantly more likely to be born prematurely or earlier than controls but did show smaller birth weight corrected for gestational age, even after accounting for possible confounding influences. Additional research is needed to confirm these preliminary findings. Studying PD mothers during pregnancy could provide insight concerning mechanisms for the development of low birth weight and psychopathology.

  7. Quality of Smartphone Apps Related to Panic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Singer, Mathias; Chatton, Anne; Khazaal, Yasser

    2015-01-01

    Quality of smartphone apps related to panic: smartphone apps have a growing role in health care. This study assessed the quality of English-language apps for panic disorder (PD) and compared paid and free apps. Keywords related to PD were entered into the Google Play Store search engine. Apps were assessed using the following quality indicators: accountability, interactivity, self-help score (the potential of smartphone apps to help users in daily life), and evidence-based content quality. The Brief DISCERN score and the criteria of the "Health on the Net" label were also used as content quality indicators as well as the number of downloads. Of 247 apps identified, 52 met all inclusion criteria. The content quality and self-help scores of these PD apps were poor. None of the assessed indicators were associated with payment status or number of downloads. Multiple linear regressions showed that the Brief DISCERN score significantly predicted the content quality and self-help scores. Poor content quality and self-help scores of PD smartphone apps highlight the gap between their technological potential and the overall quality of available products.

  8. Acceptability of Virtual Reality Interoceptive Exposure for the Treatment of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Soledad; Pérez-Ara, M. Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa M.; Botella, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Interoceptive exposure (IE) is a standard component of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for panic disorder and agoraphobia. The virtual reality (VR) program "Panic-Agoraphobia" has several virtual scenarios designed for applying exposure to agoraphobic situations; it can also simulate physical sensations. This work examines…

  9. Virtual Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Helena Villa; Botella, Cristina; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Osma, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present a case example of the use of virtual reality exposure for the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia. The assessment protocol and procedure (including a baseline period) and the cognitive-behavioral treatment program are described. The clinical measures were categorized into target behaviors, panic and agoraphobia…

  10. Panic disorder and agoraphobia: an overview and commentary on DSM-5 changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmundson, Gordon J G; Taylor, Steven; Smits, Jasper A J

    2014-06-01

    The recently published DSM-5 contains a number of changes pertinent to panic disorder and agoraphobia. These changes include separation of panic disorder and agoraphobia into separate diagnoses, the addition of criteria and guidelines for distinguishing agoraphobia from specific phobia, the addition of a 6-month duration requirement for agoraphobia, the addition of panic attacks as a specifier to any DSM-5 diagnosis, changes to descriptors of panic attack types, as well as various changes to the descriptive text. It is crucial that clinicians and researchers working with individuals presenting with panic attacks and panic-like symptoms understand these changes. The purpose of the current paper is to provide a summary of the main changes, to critique the changes in the context of available empirical evidence, and to highlight clinical implications and potential impact on mental health service utilization. Several of the changes have the potential to improve access to evidence-based treatment; yet, although certain changes appear justified in that they were based on converging evidence from different empirical sources, other changes appear questionable, at least based on the information presented in the DSM-5 text and related publications. Ongoing research of DSM-5 panic disorder and agoraphobia as well as application of the new diagnostic criteria in clinical contexts is needed to further inform the strengths and limitations of DSM-5 conceptualizations of panic disorder and agoraphobia.

  11. Changes in respiration mediate changes in fear of bodily sensations in panic disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meuret, A.E.; Rosenfield, D.; Hofmann, S.G.; Suvak, M.K.; Roth, W.T.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine whether changes in pCO(2) mediate changes in fear of bodily sensation (as indexed by anxiety sensitivity) in a bio-behavioral treatment for panic disorder that targets changes in end-tidal pCO(2). Thirty-five panic patients underwent 4 weeks of capnometry-assi

  12. Acceptability of Virtual Reality Interoceptive Exposure for the Treatment of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Soledad; Pérez-Ara, M. Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa M.; Botella, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Interoceptive exposure (IE) is a standard component of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for panic disorder and agoraphobia. The virtual reality (VR) program "Panic-Agoraphobia" has several virtual scenarios designed for applying exposure to agoraphobic situations; it can also simulate physical sensations. This work examines patients'…

  13. Acceptability of Virtual Reality Interoceptive Exposure for the Treatment of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, Soledad; Pérez-Ara, M. Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa M.; Botella, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Interoceptive exposure (IE) is a standard component of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for panic disorder and agoraphobia. The virtual reality (VR) program "Panic-Agoraphobia" has several virtual scenarios designed for applying exposure to agoraphobic situations; it can also simulate physical sensations. This work examines patients'…

  14. [The present and future of anxiety disorders: a view and problems to DSM-5: panic disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shioiri, Toshiki

    2012-01-01

    Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare shows that the estimated number of all patients with any anxiety disorders is more than ten million, while the number of all depressive patients is about six million. Thus, anxiety disorders are very important in daily clinical situation of psychiatry. Recently, DSM-5 draft posted online (http://www.dsm5.org). Many of the disorders that were previously listed in the anxiety disorders chapter in DSM-IV have been distributed throughout this chapter as well as separate chapters on obsessive-compulsive and related disorders and trauma-and stressor-related disorders. As for panic disorder that was one of the new concepts of psychiatric disorder in DSM-III, there are some changes in the criteria, for instance subcategory according to with/without agoraphobia are discontinued since agoraphobia is proposed to be a codable disorder in DSM-5. In this paper, we will review the history and pathogenesis of panic disorder and the relationships between DSM and ICD, and then discuss the present and future of panic disorder viewed in DSM-5 draft.

  15. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... relevant brain structures, biological or genetic traits, and psychosocial factors. Some examples include: In 2009, NIH-funded ... the optimal time to begin exposure therapy after trauma exposure to prevent the development of PTSD. This ...

  16. Treatment of internet addiction in patient with panic disorder and obsessive compulsive disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Veruska; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; King, Anna Lucia Spear

    2015-01-01

    Problematic Internet use is a worldwide social issue and it can be found in any age, social, educational, or economic range. In some countries like China and South Korea internet addiction (IA) is considered a public health condition and this governments support research, education and treatment. Internet addiction has been associated with others psychiatric disorders. Panic disorder (PD) and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) are anxiety disorders that involve a lot of damages in patient's life. We report a treatment of a patient with Panic Disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and internet addition involving pharmacotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). The Cognitive Behavioral Therapy was conducted 1 time per week during 10 weeks and results suggest that the treatment was an effective treatment for the anxiety and for the internet addiction.

  17. Low-dose imipramine for treatment of panic disorder during pregnancy: a retrospective chart review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uguz, Faruk; Sahingoz, Mine; Gungor, Buket; Askin, Rustem

    2014-08-01

    Although imipramine is one of the antidepressants that could be effective in the treatment of panic disorder, data on its usage for this diagnosis in the pregnancy period are limited. This report presents the results of 16 pregnant women with panic disorder without comorbid diagnosis who underwent low-dose imipramine (10-40 mg/d) treatment. According to the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement Scale, 12 (75%) of 16 women responded to the treatment. The results suggest that low-dose imipramine may be useful for the treatment of panic disorder during pregnancy.

  18. Efficacy of atropine combined with paroxetine in vagus nerve excitatory panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Du N

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Na Du, Xue-Li Sun Department of Psychiatry, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Panic disorder is often associated with the autonomic nervous system pattern – sympathetic activation and parasympathetic (vagal withdrawal. However, we present one special case here to show a totally reversed pathogenesis – vagal activation occupying the leading role, which requires atropine to cure the patient’s symptoms. Through this report, it is reasonably proven that panic disorder may be a heterogeneous condition, whose mechanism might be the imbalance between the sympathetic and parasympathetic tone. Keywords: panic disorder, vagal activation, bradycardia, atropine

  19. Cognitive processing of emotional information in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, R J; Riemann, B C; Louro, C E; Lukach, B M; Kim, E

    1992-03-01

    Panic-disordered (PD) patients, obsessive-compulsive (OCD) patients, and normal control subjects were exposed to either a high (i.e. exercise) or low arousal manipulation prior to performing a computerized version of the modified Stroop color-naming paradigm. Subjects named the colors of neutral nonlexical stimuli, positive words, and threat words associated with fear, bodily sensations, and catastrophes. After the Stroop task, subjects rated the personal emotional significance of the words. Inconsistent with the emotionality hypothesis of Stroop interference, PD patients rated positive words as more emotional than catastrophe words, but took longer to color-name the latter than the former. Yet consistent with the emotionality hypothesis, PD patients took as long to color-name positive words as to color-name fear and bodily sensation words. Contrary to expectation, OCD patients resembled PD patients in terms of interference, and arousal did not enhance interference for threat words in PD patients.

  20. The mediational role of panic self-efficacy in cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fentz, Hanne Nørr; Arendt, Mikkel; OToole, Mia Skytte

    2014-01-01

    -efficacy, has also been proposed to play a key role in therapeutic change; however, this cognitive factor has received much less attention in research. The aim of the present review is to evaluate panic self-efficacy as a mediator of outcome in CBT for PD using descriptive and meta-analytic procedures. We......Cognitive models of panic disorder (PD) with and without agoraphobia have stressed the role of catastrophic beliefs of bodily symptoms as a central mediating variable of the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). Perceived ability to cope with or control panic attacks, panic self...

  1. Cost-effectiveness of psychological and pharmacological interventions for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzenroeder, Louise; Donnelly, Marie; Haby, Michelle M; Mihalopoulos, Cathrine; Rossell, Ruth; Carter, Rob; Andrews, Gavin; Vos, Theo

    2004-08-01

    To assess from a health sector perspective the incremental cost-effectiveness of interventions for generalized anxiety disorder (cognitive behavioural therapy [CBT] and serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors [SNRIs]) and panic disorder (CBT, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] and tricyclic antidepressants [TCAs]). The health benefit is measured as a reduction in disability-adjusted life years (DALYs), based on effect size calculations from meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials. An assessment on second stage filter criteria ("equity", "strength of evidence", "feasibility" and "acceptability to stakeholders") is also undertaken to incorporate additional factors that impact on resource allocation decisions. Costs and benefits are calculated for a period of one year for the eligible population (prevalent cases of generalized anxiety disorder/panic disorder identified in the National Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing, extrapolated to the Australian population in the year 2000 for those aged 18 years and older). Simulation modelling techniques are used to present 95% uncertainty intervals (UI) around the incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs). Compared to current practice, CBT by a psychologist on a public salary is the most cost-effective intervention for both generalized anxiety disorder (A$6900/DALY saved; 95% UI A$4000 to A$12 000) and panic disorder (A$6800/DALY saved; 95% UI A$2900 to A$15 000). Cognitive behavioural therapy results in a greater total health benefit than the drug interventions for both anxiety disorders, although equity and feasibility concerns for CBT interventions are also greater. Cognitive behavioural therapy is the most effective and cost-effective intervention for generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder. However, its implementation would require policy change to enable more widespread access to a sufficient number of trained therapists for the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  2. Serum biomarkers predictive of depressive episodes in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottschalk, M G; Cooper, J D; Chan, M K; Bot, M; Penninx, B W J H; Bahn, S

    2016-02-01

    Panic disorder with or without comorbid agoraphobia (PD/PDA) has been linked to an increased risk to develop subsequent depressive episodes, yet the underlying pathophysiology of these disorders remains poorly understood. We aimed to identify a biomarker panel predictive for the development of a depressive disorder (major depressive disorder and/or dysthymia) within a 2-year-follow-up period. Blood serum concentrations of 165 analytes were evaluated in 120 PD/PDA patients without depressive disorder baseline diagnosis (6-month-recency) in the Netherlands Study of Depression and Anxiety (NESDA). We assessed the predictive performance of serum biomarkers, clinical, and self-report variables using receiver operating characteristics curves (ROC) and the area under the ROC curve (AUC). False-discovery-rate corrected logistic regression model selection of serum analytes and covariates identified an optimal predictive panel comprised of tetranectin and creatine kinase MB along with patient gender and scores from the Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS) rating scale. Combined, an AUC of 0.87 was reached for identifying the PD/PDA patients who developed a depressive disorder within 2 years (n = 44). The addition of biomarkers represented a significant (p = 0.010) improvement over using gender and IDS alone as predictors (AUC = 0.78). For the first time, we report on a combination of biological serum markers, clinical variables and self-report inventories that can detect PD/PDA patients at increased risk of developing subsequent depressive disorders with good predictive performance in a naturalistic cohort design. After an independent validation our proposed biomarkers could prove useful in the detection of at-risk PD/PDA patients, allowing for early therapeutic interventions and improving clinical outcome.

  3. Integrated Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders: The Mediating Role of PTSD Improvement in the Reduction of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina J. Korte

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD represents one of the most common mental health disorders, particularly among veterans, and is associated with significant distress and impairment. This highly debilitating disorder is further complicated by common comorbid psychiatric disorders, such as substance use disorders (SUD. Individuals with PTSD and co-occurring SUD also commonly present with secondary symptoms, such as elevated depression. Little is known, however, about how these secondary symptoms are related to treatment outcome. The aim of the present study, therefore, was to examine (1 the effects of treatment of comorbid PTSD/SUD on depressive symptoms; and (2 whether this effect was mediated by changes in PTSD severity or changes in SUD severity. Participants were 81 U.S. military veterans (90.1% male with PTSD and SUD enrolled in a randomized controlled trial examining the efficacy of an integrated, exposure-based treatment (Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure; n = 54 versus relapse prevention (n = 27. Results revealed significantly lower depressive symptoms at post-treatment in the COPE group, as compared to the relapse prevention group. Examination of the mechanisms associated with change in depression revealed that reduction in PTSD severity, but not substance use severity, mediated the association between the treatment group and post-treatment depression. The findings underscore the importance of treating PTSD symptoms in order to help reduce co-occurring symptoms of depression in individuals with PTSD/SUD. Clinical implications and avenues for future research are discussed.

  4. Behavioral, Cognitive, and Pharmacological Treatments of Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: Critique and Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Larry K.; Marchione, Karen

    1991-01-01

    Examines theoretical, methodologic, and research issues as well as strengths, limitations, and possible interactions pertaining to behavioral, cognitive, and pharmacological treatments of panic disorder with agoraphobia. Compares attrition, outcome, and maintenance effects and presents composite indices of significant improvement, endstate…

  5. "But it might be a heart attack" : intolerance of uncertainty and panic disorder symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Duranceau, Sophie; Freeston, Mark H; Boelen, Paul A; McCabe, Randi E; Antony, Martin M

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder models describe interactions between feared anxiety-related physical sensations (i.e., anxiety sensitivity; AS) and catastrophic interpretations therein. Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has been implicated as necessary for catastrophic interpretations in community samples. The current

  6. "But it might be a heart attack" : intolerance of uncertainty and panic disorder symptoms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carleton, R Nicholas; Duranceau, Sophie; Freeston, Mark H; Boelen, Paul A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/174011954; McCabe, Randi E; Antony, Martin M

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder models describe interactions between feared anxiety-related physical sensations (i.e., anxiety sensitivity; AS) and catastrophic interpretations therein. Intolerance of uncertainty (IU) has been implicated as necessary for catastrophic interpretations in community samples. The current

  7. Influence of spatial frequency and emotion expression on face processing in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Miseon; Kim, Do-Won; Yoon, Sunkyung; Park, Gewnhi; Im, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-06-01

    Deficits in facial emotion processing is a major characteristic of patients with panic disorder. It is known that visual stimuli with different spatial frequencies take distinct neural pathways. This study investigated facial emotion processing involving stimuli presented at broad, high, and low spatial frequencies in patients with panic disorder. Eighteen patients with panic disorder and 19 healthy controls were recruited. Seven event-related potential (ERP) components: (P100, N170, early posterior negativity (EPN); vertex positive potential (VPP), N250, P300; and late positive potential (LPP)) were evaluated while the participants looked at fearful and neutral facial stimuli presented at three spatial frequencies. When a fearful face was presented, panic disorder patients showed a significantly increased P100 amplitude in response to low spatial frequency compared to high spatial frequency; whereas healthy controls demonstrated significant broad spatial frequency dependent processing in P100 amplitude. Vertex positive potential amplitude was significantly increased in high and broad spatial frequency, compared to low spatial frequency in panic disorder. Early posterior negativity amplitude was significantly different between HSF and BSF, and between LSF and BSF processing in both groups, regardless of facial expression. The possibly confounding effects of medication could not be controlled. During early visual processing, patients with panic disorder prefer global to detailed information. However, in later processing, panic disorder patients overuse detailed information for the perception of facial expressions. These findings suggest that unique spatial frequency-dependent facial processing could shed light on the neural pathology associated with panic disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Serotonin function in panic disorder: intravenous administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzler, S; Asnis, G M; DeLecuona, J M; Kalus, O

    1996-09-27

    A placebo-controlled study of the direct serotonin receptor agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP), intravenously infused over 90 s in a 0.06 mg/kg dose, was conducted in 10 patients with panic disorder and 9 normal control subjects. Cortisol, MCPP serum levels, and behavioral responses in both groups. Differences between intravenous and oral administration of MCPP are discussed, and the present findings are related to the serotonergic hypothesis of panic disorder.

  9. Gender differences in associations of glutamate decarboxylase 1 gene (GAD1 variants with panic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Weber

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Panic disorder is common (5% prevalence and females are twice as likely to be affected as males. The heritable component of panic disorder is estimated at 48%. Glutamic acid dehydrogenase GAD1, the key enzyme for the synthesis of the inhibitory and anxiolytic neurotransmitter GABA, is supposed to influence various mental disorders, including mood and anxiety disorders. In a recent association study in depression, which is highly comorbid with panic disorder, GAD1 risk allele associations were restricted to females. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Nineteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs tagging the common variation in GAD1 were genotyped in two independent gender and age matched case-control samples (discovery sample n = 478; replication sample n = 584. Thirteen SNPs passed quality control and were examined for gender-specific enrichment of risk alleles associated with panic disorder by using logistic regression including a genotype×gender interaction term. The latter was found to be nominally significant for four SNPs (rs1978340, rs3762555, rs3749034, rs2241165 in the discovery sample; of note, the respective minor/risk alleles were associated with panic disorder only in females. These findings were not confirmed in the replication sample; however, the genotype×gender interaction of rs3749034 remained significant in the combined sample. Furthermore, this polymorphism showed a nominally significant association with the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire sum score. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study represents the first systematic evaluation of gender-specific enrichment of risk alleles of the common SNP variation in the panic disorder candidate gene GAD1. Our tentative results provide a possible explanation for the higher susceptibility of females to panic disorder.

  10. Psychological features in panic disorder: a comparison with major depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Yasmin A.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We aim to evaluate the psychodymanic model for panic disorder (PD formulated by Shear et al. (1993, comparing PD patients and major depression (MD patients. METHOD: We evaluated these parameters in open interviews in 10 PD patients and 10 patients with MD (DSM-IV. The data were recorded on videotape and were examined by 5 diagnostic blind appraisers. RESULTS: The data allowed a comparative analysis that underscores the existence of a psychological model for PD vs MD: 1 the protracted symbiotic phase of development and the existence of problems with separation in PD patients; 2 patients with MD tended to have a particularly negative impression of relationship with the first objects; furthermore, they had remarkable experiences of loss; and 3 while the PD patients tended to be shy and inhibited in childhood, especially showing a clear difficulty in expressing aggressiveness, the depressed patients tended to disclose an impulsive aggressiveness from infancy to adulthood. CONCLUSION: Exposure to parental behaviours that augment fearfulness may result in disturbances in object relations and persistence of conflicts between dependence and independence may predispose to anxiety symptoms and fears of PD.

  11. Neuropsychological impairments in panic disorder: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Kate; Newman, Emily F

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature investigating the neuropsychological profile of panic disorder (PD), some of which suggests potential cognitive dysfunction. This paper systematically reviews the existing literature on neuropsychological performance in PD. PsycINFO, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycARTICLES databases were searched to identify articles reporting on neuropsychological function in PD published in English during the time period 1980 to March 2012. 14 studies were identified. There was limited support for impairment in short term memory among individuals with PD, although this was not found across all studies. Overall, the reviewed studies did not support the presence of impairment in other areas of cognitive functioning, including executive function, long term memory, visuospatial or perceptual abilities and working memory. Studies with samples of fewer than 15 participants per group were excluded from this review. A limited amount of research has been published on this topic and small sample sizes (under 25 per group) have been used by many studies. Therefore, the current review is based on a small number of studies with limited power. There is limited evidence of specific neuropsychological impairments in participants with PD. Impairments in short term memory warrant further investigation to establish their relevance to clinical practice. Larger sample sizes and appropriate statistical adjustment for multiple comparisons in future studies is highly recommended. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychological vulnerabilities in patients with major depression vs panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, B J; Enns, M W; Walker, J R; Kjernisted, K; Pidlubny, S R

    2001-05-01

    The tripartite model (Clark & Watson, 1991: Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1991). Tripartite model of anxiety and depression: Psychometric evidence and taxonomic implications. Journal of Abnormal Psychology, 100, 316-336) posits that anxiety and depression share nonspecific features of neuroticism but that somatic arousal appears unique to anxiety, and low positive affect appears unique to depression. The present study controlled for these higher-order effects and evaluated the relative contributions of four, specific lower-order vulnerabilities (anxiety sensitivity, rumination, self-criticism, self-oriented perfectionism). Participants were 38 depressed patients and 38 patients with panic disorder matched as closely as possible for age and gender, and all were diagnosed using the same structured interview by an experienced clinician. Results from hierarchical logistic regression analysis were consistent with predictions from the tripartite model in that only the unique features of arousal and positive affectivity differentiated the two diagnostic groups. At a lower-order level, only anxiety sensitivity (and its facet of fear of physical symptoms) and a ruminative response style demonstrated incremental predictive ability. The discussion focuses on the relationships among these higher-order and lower-order variables, and their potential importance for understanding specific manifestations of psychopathology.

  13. Quality of smartphone apps related to panic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mathias eVan-Singer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone apps have a growing role in health care. This study assessed the quality of English-language apps for panic disorder (PD and compared paid and free apps. Keywords related to PD were entered into the Google Play Store search engine. Apps were assessed using the following quality indicators: accountability, interactivity, self-help score (the potential of smartphone apps to help users in daily life, and evidence-based content quality. The Brief DISCERN score and the criteria of the Health on the Net label were also used as content quality indicators as well as the number of downloads. Of 247 apps identified, 52 met all inclusion criteria. The content quality and self-help scores of these PD apps were poor. None of the assessed indicators were associated with payment status or number of downloads. Multiple linear regressions showed that the Brief DISCERN score significantly predicted content quality and self-help scores. Poor content quality and self-help scores of PD smartphone apps highlight the gap between their technological potential and the overall quality of available products

  14. Gender differences in brain serotonin transporter availability in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Eduard; Tõru, Innar; Hirvonen, Jussi; Tuominen, Lauri; Lumme, Ville; Vasar, Veiko; Shlik, Jakov; Nutt, David J; Helin, Semi; Någren, Kjell; Tiihonen, Jari; Hietala, Jarmo

    2011-07-01

    The role of the serotonin (5-HT) system in the neurobiology and treatment of panic disorder (PD) remains unproven. Previously we detected lower brain 5-HT transporter (SERT) availability in PD, but the findings were preliminary and mainly limited to female patients. The aim of this study was to assess non-displaceable brain SERT binding potential (BP (ND)) in male and female patients with PD. The SERT BP (ND) was measured in groups of patients with PD (five males and six females) and matched healthy control subjects (12 males and 12 females) using positron emission tomography (PET) and [¹¹C]MADAM tracer. SERT BP (ND) were significantly higher in 13 of 20 studied brain regions, including several cortical and raphe areas, but lower in the hippocampus in males with PD as compared with healthy males. No significant differences in SERT BP (ND) were observed between female patients and controls. The results suggest gender-dependent regional differences in brain SERT availability and converge with previous PET findings of reduced 5-HT(1A) receptor binding in similar brain areas in PD. Distinctive functioning of the 5-HT system in males and females may underlie certain gender-dependent differences in expressions of PD.

  15. Face-Emotion Processing in Offspring at Risk for Panic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Daniel S.; Klein, Rachel G.; Mannuzza, Salvatore; Moulton, John L., III; Lissek, Shmuel; Guardino, Mary; Woldehawariat, Girma

    2005-01-01

    Objective: Panic disorder (PD) has been linked to perturbed processing of threats. This study tested the hypotheses that offspring of parents with PD and offspring with anxiety disorders display relatively greater sensitivity and attention allocation to fear provocation. Method: Offspring of adults with PD, major depressive disorder (MDD), or no…

  16. Hypophosphatemia. From retrospective analysis to the analysis of the potential role of phosphatemia in panic disorders

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    Alessandro Riccardi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The detection of a low serum phosphate level is not unusual in an Emergency Department, especially in clinical conditions linked to hyperventilation and subsequent respiratory alkalosis, asthma, sepsis, severe pain, anxiety. Symptoms of hypophosphatemia are typically not specific when the imbalance is not particularly severe, but if hyphophosphatemia does not resolve rhabdomyolisis, hemolysis, decreased tissue oxygenation and respiratory failure can be observed. Only recently some authors have pointed out that the level of serum phosphate in patient with anxiety and panic disorders can give information on the severity of the attacks as well on the clinical course of the disease. In a retrospective analysis on 599 case of hypophosphatemia observed in our ED, the percentage of case of panic disorders was particularly high among patients with lower phosphatemia. Therefore, we decided to examine this aspect closely, assessing if the determination of serum phosphate could be useful in the management of panic attacks at first approach in emergency room. Our observation are consistent with the statement that hypophosphatemia is one of the main clinical aspect of panic attack, and strongly support the hypothesis that hypophosphatemia correlates with the most severe symptoms of panic attack and should be itself considered as one of the most important aspect of this syndrome. Serum phosphate levels appear to mirror its clinical course, and can be used in the clinical setting of an Emergency Department, for the confirmation of a diagnosis of anxiety-panic disorder and as marker of the response to therapy

  17. Comparison of the DSM-5 and ICD-10: panic and other anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin

    2017-10-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental disorders and are associated with substantial healthcare costs and a high burden of disease. In this article, changes in the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (the DSM-5) with respect to panic disorder/agoraphobia, generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, specific phobias, and selective mutism are compared with the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) system.

  18. PTSD contributes to teen and young adult cannabis use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelius, Jack R; Kirisci, Levent; Reynolds, Maureen; Clark, Duncan B; Hayes, Jeanine; Tarter, Ralph

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies involving adults suggest that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) increases the prevalence of cannabis use disorders (CUD) (cannabis dependence and cannabis abuse). However, little work with PTSD and CUD has been conducted involving adolescents, despite the fact that CUD typically have their onset during adolescence. This study addresses the effect of PTSD on CUD among teenagers transitioning to young adulthood. The subjects in this ongoing study were the offspring of adult men with a lifetime history of a substance use disorder (SUD) (SUD+probands, N=343) vs those with no lifetime history of a SUD (SUD-probands, N=350). The participants were initially recruited when the index sons of these fathers were 10-12 years of age, and subsequent assessments were conducted at age 12-14, 16, 19, 22, and 25. Other variables examined were an index of behavioral undercontrol associated with future risk for developing SUD, known as the Transmissible Liability Index, or TLI, and affiliation with deviant peers. Multivariate logistic regression and path analyses were conducted. Of these 693 subjects, 31 subjects were diagnosed with PTSD, and 161 were diagnosed with a CUD. The CUD subjects included 136 male participants and 25 female participants, including 103 (64%) Caucasian participants and 58 (36%) participants of other races. Logistic regression demonstrated that the development of a CUD was associated with deviance of peers (Wald=63.4, p=0.000), the TLI (Wald=28.8, p=0.000), African American race (Wald=14.2, p=0.000), PTSD (Wald=12.7, p=0.000), male gender (Wald=12.0, p=0.001), household SES (Wald=9.2, p=0.002), and being an offspring of a SUD+proband (Wald=6.9, p=0.009). Path analyses demonstrated that PTSD is directly associated with the presence of a CUD and with peer deviance, that higher peer deviance is associated with the presence of a CUD, and that PTSD mediated the association between peer deviance and CUD. These findings suggest that PTSD

  19. Validation of two screening instruments for PTSD in Dutch substance use disorder inpatients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, T.; Haan, H.A. de; Velden, H.J.W. van der; Meer, M. van der; Jong, C.A.J. de

    2013-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is highly prevalent in substance use disorder (SUD) populations. Because resources for extensive and thorough diagnostic assessment are often limited, reliable screening instruments for PTSD are needed. The aim of the current study was to test two short PTSD meas

  20. Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder

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    Michelle Nigri Levitan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To present the most relevant findings regarding the Brazilian Medical Association guidelines for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of panic disorder. Methods: We used the methodology proposed by the Brazilian Medical Association for the Diretrizes Project. The MEDLINE (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and LILACS online databases were queried for articles published from 1980 to 2012. Searchable questions were structured using the PICO format (acronym for “patient” [or population], “intervention” [or exposure], “comparison” [or control], and “outcome”. Results: We present data on clinical manifestations and implications of panic disorder and its association with depression, drug abuse, dependence and anxiety disorders. In addition, discussions were held on the main psychiatric and clinical differential diagnoses. Conclusions: The guidelines are proposed to serve as a reference for the general practitioner and specialist to assist in and facilitate the diagnosis of panic disorder.

  1. Neuropeptide S receptor gene -- converging evidence for a role in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, K; Reif, A; Weber, H; Richter, J; Hohoff, C; Ohrmann, P; Pedersen, A; Bauer, J; Suslow, T; Kugel, H; Heindel, W; Baumann, C; Klauke, B; Jacob, C; Maier, W; Fritze, J; Bandelow, B; Krakowitzky, P; Rothermundt, M; Erhardt, A; Binder, E B; Holsboer, F; Gerlach, A L; Kircher, T; Lang, T; Alpers, G W; Ströhle, A; Fehm, L; Gloster, A T; Wittchen, H-U; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Hamm, A; Deckert, J

    2011-09-01

    Animal studies have suggested neuropeptide S (NPS) and its receptor (NPSR) to be involved in the pathogenesis of anxiety-related behavior. In this study, a multilevel approach was applied to further elucidate the role of NPS in the etiology of human anxiety. The functional NPSR A/T (Asn¹⁰⁷Ile) variant (rs324981) was investigated for association with (1) panic disorder with and without agoraphobia in two large, independent case-control studies, (2) dimensional anxiety traits, (3) autonomic arousal level during a behavioral avoidance test and (4) brain activation correlates of anxiety-related emotional processing in panic disorder. The more active NPSR rs324981 T allele was found to be associated with panic disorder in the female subgroup of patients in both samples as well as in a meta-analytic approach. The T risk allele was further related to elevated anxiety sensitivity, increased heart rate and higher symptom reports during a behavioral avoidance test as well as decreased activity in the dorsolateral prefrontal, lateral orbitofrontal and anterior cingulate cortex during processing of fearful faces in patients with panic disorder. The present results provide converging evidence for a female-dominant role of NPSR gene variation in panic disorder potentially through heightened autonomic arousal and distorted processing of anxiety-relevant emotional stimuli.

  2. Assessing the clinical utility of agoraphobia in the context of panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B; Cromer, Kiara R

    2008-01-01

    In the DSM-IV, a panic disorder (PD) diagnosis includes specification of agoraphobia, which is primarily an index of situational avoidance due to fear of panic. No other anxiety diagnosis requires specification of level of avoidance. This raises the question as to whether agoraphobia provides unique information beyond the core features of PD (i.e., panic attacks and panic-related worry). The incremental validity of agoraphobia, defined using DSM-IV specifiers versus level of situational avoidance, was examined in relation to the expression and treatment of PD (N=146). Analyses indicate that agoraphobia status adds uniquely to the prediction of PD symptoms, impairment, and response to treatment. However, level of situational avoidance, defined either as a continuous or dichotomous variable, appears to have greater utility compared to the DSM-IV method of classifying agoraphobia. In summary, the agoraphobia specifier seems to have clinical utility but this could be improved by focusing on a dimensional assessment of situational avoidance.

  3. Insomnia Symptoms Following Treatment for Comorbid Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousineau, Héloïse; Marchand, André; Bouchard, Stéphane; Bélanger, Claude; Gosselin, Patrick; Langlois, Frédéric; Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel J; Belleville, Geneviève

    2016-04-01

    Patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) or generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) frequently also suffer from insomnia. However, the impact of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders on insomnia has been understudied. Furthermore, comorbidity between anxiety disorders is common. Our main objective was to assess the impact of CBT for PDA or GAD on insomnia. In a quasi-experimental design, 86 participants with PDA and GAD received conventional CBT for their primary disorder or combined CBT for both disorders. Overall, CBTs had a significant impact on reducing insomnia symptoms (η = 0.58). However, among people with insomnia at pretest (67%), 33% still had an insomnia diagnosis, and the majority (63%) had clinically significant residual insomnia following treatment. In conclusion, the CBTs had a positive effect on the reduction of insomnia, but a significant proportion of participants still had insomnia problems following treatment. Clinicians should address insomnia during CBT for PDA and GAD.

  4. Quality of Life Impairment in Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Social Phobia, and Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Terri L.; Norton, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Interest in the assessment of quality of life in the anxiety disorders is growing. The present study examined quality of life impairments in individuals with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), Social Phobia, and Panic Disorder. Results showed that individuals with these disorders reported less satisfaction with their quality of life than non-anxious adults in the community. However, the degree of quality of life impairment is similar across these three disorders. Additionally, comorbid depression, but not anxiety, was found to negatively impact quality of life in these individuals. Finally, diagnostic symptom severity was not found to influence quality of life, indicating that subjective measures of quality of life offer unique information on the effects of anxiety disorders. PMID:19640675

  5. What fMRI can tell as about panic disorder: bridging the gap between neurobiology and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grambal, Aleš; Hluštík, Petr; Praško, Ján

    2015-01-01

    Fifty years ago, when the effect of antidepressants on panic disorder was described, a significant progress in understanding this anxiety disorder has been made. Theoretical mechanisms and models of fear and panic disorder were proposed and tested in animal models and humans. With growing possibilities of non-invasive neuroimaging techniques, there is an increasing amount of information on the panic disorder. Unfortunately, a number of circumstances lead to inconsistent findings and its interpretations. In our review, we focused on functional MRI in panic disorder, limitations of current studies, possible interpretations and proposals for future direction. In our opinion, the current findings support the neuroanatomical model of panic disorder at the level of group data analysis. But at the same time, the results suggest significant inter-individual differences across the patients, which may be related to each patient's individual history, woven into their neural network and affecting the individual symptoms and response to therapy.

  6. Common paths to ASD and PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Wittmann, Lutz

    Numerous studies have investigated the prediction of acute and long term posttraumatic symptoms following traumatic exposure. As a result several factors have been shown to be predictive of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) respectively. Furthermore, research...... suggests a strong relationship between ASD severity and subsequent PTSD severity. However, little is known in relation to whether there are common pathways to the development of ASD and PTSD. Peritraumatic responses to trauma are found to be associated with both the development of ASD and PTSD. Although...... of peritraumatic factors such as symptoms of tonic immobility, panic, and dissociation on the development of ASD (N = 458) and PTSD (n = 378) symptoms in a national study of Danish bank robbery victims. The estimated ASD rate was 11.1 % (n = 41) and the estimated PTSD rate was 6.2 % (n = 23). The results...

  7. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Treatment of Panic Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kacar Basaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review empirical studies that evaluate effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy programs for treatment for panic disorder. Articles in English and Turkish that were published between the years of 2000 and 2015 (February have been searched in the national and international databases. The articles that were not therapy effectiveness studies, and group therapies that not based on cognitive behavioral approach were eliminated. The remaining 19 studies that were met the criteria were introduced in terms of method, therapy characteristics and results. The results of the studies showed that cognitive behavioral group therapies have similar efficacy with individual cognitive behavioral therapy on panic disorder symptoms (panic attacks frequency, the level of agoraphobia etc. and comorbid disorders (depression, anxiety sensitivity. However, cognitive behavioral group therapy is more cost-effective. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 79-94

  8. Addressing Relapse in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: Methods for Optimizing Long-Term Treatment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Joanna J.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present a client with panic disorder and agoraphobia who relapses following a full course of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT). To frame the client's treatment, the major components of CBT for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PD/A) are reviewed. Likely reasons for the treatment's failure and strategies for improving…

  9. Cognitive Behavioral Treatment of Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia in a Multiethnic Urban Outpatient Clinic: Initial Presentation and Treatment Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Steven; Braunstein, Jeffrey W.; Halpern, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Few studies examine the effectiveness of panic control treatment across diverse ethnic groups. In this paper we present data on 40 patients (African American, n = 24; Caucasian, n = 16) with panic disorder and comorbid agoraphobia who presented at an anxiety disorder clinic in an inner-city area. On initial assessment both groups were similar on…

  10. Common paths to ASD and PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Wittmann, Lutz

    Numerous studies have investigated the prediction of acute and long term posttraumatic symptoms following traumatic exposure. As a result several factors have been shown to be predictive of Acute Stress Disorder (ASD) and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) respectively. Furthermore, research...... of peritraumatic factors such as symptoms of tonic immobility, panic, and dissociation on the development of ASD (N = 458) and PTSD (n = 378) symptoms in a national study of Danish bank robbery victims. The estimated ASD rate was 11.1 % (n = 41) and the estimated PTSD rate was 6.2 % (n = 23). The results...

  11. Temporal patterns of change in panic disorder during cognitive behaviour therapy: an Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, M; Prasadarao, P S D V; Kumaraiah, V; Raguram, R

    2014-09-01

    CBT has been proven to be effective in the treatment of panic disorder; however, attempts to study the process of change are limited. The study evaluated the temporal patterns of change in the panic symptoms, cognitions, behaviours, and anxiety sensitivity in subjects with panic disorder being treated with CBT. Thirty subjects with panic disorder were allocated to two groups: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT, n = 15) and Behaviour Therapy (BT, n = 15). Assessments were carried out weekly for five consecutive weeks using the Semi-Structured Interview Schedule, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, and the Texas Panic Attack Record Form. The CBT group received comprehensive CBT and the BT group received psycho-education and Applied Relaxation. Following intervention the change was continuous and gradual on all the variables in the CBT group and the scores reduced to a functional range after 4-5 weeks of therapy. Such a change was not evident in the BT group. Significant change was evident in cognitive domains following the introduction of the exposure and cognitive restructuring within the CBT group. Both cognitive and behavioural techniques contributed to the overall change. CBT had an impact on the cognitive domains and significant changes were evident corresponding to the addition of cognitive restructuring and exposure techniques in the 3rd to 5th week. Both cognitive and behavioural components are therefore crucial for overall improvement to occur.

  12. Trajectories of change across outcomes in intensive treatment for adolescent panic disorder and agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Kaitlin P; Cooper-Vince, Christine E; Hardway, Christina L; Pincus, Donna B; Comer, Jonathan S

    2014-01-01

    Much remains to be learned about typical and individual growth trajectories across treatment for adolescent panic disorder with and without agoraphobia and about critical treatment points associated with key changes. The present study examined the rate and shape of change across an 8-day intensive cognitive behavioral therapy for adolescent panic disorder with and without agoraphobia (N = 56). Participants ranged in age from 12 to 17 (M = 15.14, SD = 1.70; 58.9% female, 78.6% Caucasian). Multilevel modeling evaluated within-treatment linear and nonlinear changes across three treatment outcomes: panic severity, fear, and avoidance. Overall panic severity showed linear change, decreasing throughout treatment. In contrast, fear and avoidance ratings both showed cubic change, peaking slightly at the first session of treatment, starting to decrease at the second session of treatment, and with large gains continuing then plateauing at the fourth session. Findings are considered with regard to the extent to which they may elucidate critical treatment components and sessions for adolescents with panic disorder with and without agoraphobia.

  13. Transtorno do pânico Panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Abrahão Salum

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Revisar o transtorno do pânico (TP, considerando seus aspectos clínicos, epidemiológicos, diagnósticos e etiológicos, bem como os avanços no tratamento, uma vez que o TP é uma entidade nosológica acompanhada de importante prejuízo psíquico e funcional. MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma revisão narrativa da literatura nas principais bases de dados existentes (MEDLINE, PsychINFO e SciELO e em livros-textos atualizados. RESULTADOS: Devido à sintomatologia predominantemente física desse transtorno, os pacientes geralmente procuram vários atendimentos clínicos até que o diagnóstico seja feito. Em função desses aspectos e da sua cronicidade, o TP está associado a elevados custos econômicos. O tratamento do TP pode ser feito com psicoterapia e/ou psicofármacos. As diversas abordagens terapêuticas são apresentadas com o nível de evidência de cada recomendação. Em virtude da cronicidade e morbidade do TP, pesquisas têm se voltado para o estudo de estratégias de prevenção já na infância. CONCLUSÕES: O TP é um transtorno crônico e com baixas taxas de remissão dos sintomas em longo prazo. Sendo assim, sugere-se que sejam delineados novos estudos para tratamento precoce dos transtornos de ansiedade ou mesmo para prevenção em crianças de risco.OBJECTIVE: To review panic disorder (PD considering its clinical, epidemiological, diagnostic, and etiologic aspects, as well as the advances in its treatment, since PD is a nosologic entity characterized by important psychiatric and functional impairment. METHODS: A review of the literature was carried out using the main databases available (MEDLINE, PsychINFO and SciELO and up-to-date textbooks. RESULTS: Due to the prevalence of physical symptoms in this disorder, patients usually have to seek clinical care for several times before the diagnosis is established. As a result of these aspects and because of its chronicity, PD is associated with high economic costs. PD

  14. Diagnosis and management of generalized anxiety disorder and panic disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Amy B; Kirst, Nell; Shultz, Cameron G

    2015-05-01

    Generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder (PD) are among the most common mental disorders in the United States, and they can negatively impact a patient's quality of life and disrupt important activities of daily living. Evidence suggests that the rates of missed diagnoses and misdiagnosis of GAD and PD are high, with symptoms often ascribed to physical causes. Diagnosing GAD and PD requires a broad differential and caution to identify confounding variables and comorbid conditions. Screening and monitoring tools can be used to help make the diagnosis and monitor response to therapy. The GAD-7 and the Severity Measure for Panic Disorder are free diagnostic tools. Successful outcomes may require a combination of treatment modalities tailored to the individual patient. Treatment often includes medications such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and/or psychotherapy, both of which are highly effective. Among psychotherapeutic treatments, cognitive behavior therapy has been studied widely and has an extensive evidence base. Benzodiazepines are effective in reducing anxiety symptoms, but their use is limited by risk of abuse and adverse effect profiles. Physical activity can reduce symptoms of GAD and PD. A number of complementary and alternative treatments are often used; however, evidence is limited for most. Several common botanicals and supplements can potentiate serotonin syndrome when used in combination with antidepressants. Medication should be continued for 12 months before tapering to prevent relapse.

  15. Stress disorder and PTSD after burn injuries: a prospective study of predictors of PTSD at Sina Burn Center, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeghi-Bazargani H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Homayoun Sadeghi-Bazargani1, Hemmat Maghsoudi2, Mohsen Soudmand-Niri3, Fatemeh Ranjbar4, Hossein Mashadi-Abdollahi51Neuroscience Research Center, Statistics and Epidemiology Department, School of Health and Nutrition, 2Department of Surgery, 3School of Psychology, 4Department of Psychiatry, 5National Public Health Management Centre, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranBackground: A burn injury can be a traumatic experience with tremendous social, physical, and psychological consequences. The aim of this study was to investigate the existence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD and predictors of PTSD Checklist score initially and 3 months after injury in burns victims admitted to the Sina Burn Center in north-west Iran.Methods: This prospective study examined adult patients aged 16–65 years with unintentional burns. The PTSD Checklist was used to screen for PTSD.Results: Flame burns constituted 49.4% of all burns. Mean PTSD score was 23.8 ± 14.7 early in the hospitalization period and increased to 24.2 ± 14.3, 3 months after the burn injury. Twenty percent of victims 2 weeks into treatment had a positive PTSD screening test, and this figure increased to 31.5% after 3 months. The likelihood of developing a positive PTSD screening test increased significantly after 3 months (P < 0.01. Using multivariate regression analysis, factors independently predicting PTSD score were found to be age, gender, and percentage of total body surface area burned.Conclusion: PTSD was a problem in the population studied and should be managed appropriately after hospital admission due to burn injury. Male gender, younger age, and higher total body surface area burned may predict a higher PTSD score after burn injury. Keywords: post-traumatic stress disorder, burn injury, predictors, Iran

  16. [Comorbidity of panic disorder and alcoholism in a sample of 100 alcoholic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segui, J; Salvador, L; Canet, J; Herrera, C; Aragón, C

    1994-01-01

    Among one hundred patients with alcohol dependence (DSM-III-R) studied in a drug abuse center in the "Bajo Llobregat" area (Barcelona industrial belt it was detected that 27% had life time rate of panic disorder. The age of onset of alcoholism was earlier than the one for panic disorder. In 78.8% of these patients alcoholismo appeared first. 70.4% refer worsening of the panic attacks when drinking large amounts of alcohol. Patients with Panic Disorder: a) are younger (p < 0.05); b) have attended school longer and have higher education (p < 0.01); c) have more alcoholism family history (p < 0.05); d) have more major depressive disorders (0.05) and dysthimic disorder (p < 0.01); e) Worse social functioning according to the GAS (p < 0.01); f) higher score for the Psychological disorders Scale (p < 0.001) and a lower performance at work (p < 0.001) measured by the ASI. The clinical significance of these findings is discussed.

  17. Life events in panic disorder-an update on "candidate stressors".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauke, Benedikt; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas; Pauli, Paul; Domschke, Katharina

    2010-08-01

    Studies on gene-environment interactions in mental disorders are characterized by powerful genetic techniques and well defined "candidate genes," whereas a definition of "candidate stressors," in most cases assessed in the form of life events (LEs), is inconsistent or not even provided. This review addresses this problem, with particular attention to the clinical phenotype of panic disorder (PD), by providing an overview and critical discussion for which life events are known to contribute to the etiology of the disease and how they may be conceptualized. There is converging evidence for a significant impact of cumulative as well as specific life events, such as threat, interpersonal and health-related events in adulthood, and abuse or loss/separation experiences in childhood, respectively, on the pathogenesis of panic disorder with some overlapping effect across the anxiety disorder spectrum as well as on comorbid major depression. Besides genetic vulnerability factors, personality and behavioral characteristics, such as anxiety sensitivity, neuroticism, and cognitive appraisal might moderate the influence of LEs on the development of panic disorder. The present state of knowledge regarding the specification and conceptualization of LEs in PD within a more complex multifactorial model, involving mediating and moderating factors in between genes and the clinical phenotype, is hoped to aid in informing future gene-environment interaction studies in panic disorder.

  18. Panic disorder in a breath-holding challenge test: a simple tool for a better diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nardi Antonio E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to observe if anxiety disorder patients - DSM-IV - respond in a similar way to the induction of panic attacks by a breath-holding challenge test. METHOD: We randomly selected 29 panic disorder (PD patients, 27 social anxiety disorder (SAD patients, 21 generalized anxiety disorder (GAD patients. They were induced to breath-hold for as long as possible four times with two-minute interval between them. Anxiety scales were applied before and after the test. RESULTS: A total of 44.8% (n=13 PD patients, 14.8% (n=4 SAD patients, 9.5% (n=2 GAD patients had a panic attack after the test (c²= 21.44, df= 2, p=0.001. There was no heart rate or anxiety levels difference among the groups before and after the test. CONCLUSION: In this breath-holding challenge test the panic disorder patients were more sensitive than other anxiety disorder patients.

  19. Nomophobia: the mobile phone in panic disorder with agoraphobia: reducing phobias or worsening of dependence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anna Lucia S; Valença, Alexandre M; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2010-03-01

    In this report, we present and discuss a hypothesis for the development, in individuals with panic disorder and agoraphobia, of dependence on his or her mobile phone (MP). This disorder, termed nomophobia, is a result of the development of new technologies. Nomophobia is considered a disorder of the modern world and refers to discomfort or anxiety caused by being out of contact with a MP or computer. It is the pathologic fear of remaining out of touch with technology. We present, the case report of a patient who has continuously kept his MP with him since 1995 because of his overwhelming need to feel safe and to be able to immediately call emergency services and people he trusts should he feel sick. The patient was treated with medication and cognitive-behavior psychotherapy. He has remained asymptomatic for 4 years. The patient showed significant medical improvement in his panic disorder and phobias, but there has been no change in his nomophobia. The case presented here illustrates the dependence of an individual with panic disorder on his MP. A specific approach for this dependence should be used in some panic disorder patients.

  20. Psychopharmacotherapy of panic disorder: 8-week randomized trial with clonazepam and paroxetine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.E. Nardi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present randomized, open-label, naturalistic 8-week study was to compare the efficacy and safety of treatment with clonazepam (N = 63 and paroxetine (N = 57 in patients with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Efficacy assessment included number of panic attacks and clinician ratings of the global severity of panic disorders with the clinical global impression (CGI improvement (CGI-I and CGI severity (CGI-S scales. Most patients were females (69.8 and 68.4% in the clonazepam and paroxetine groups, respectively and age (mean ± SD was 35.9 ± 9.6 years for the clonazepam group and 33.7 ± 8.8 years for the paroxetine group. Treatment with clonazepam versus paroxetine resulted in fewer weekly panic attacks at week 4 (0.1 vs 0.5, respectively; P < 0.01, and greater clinical improvements at week 8 (CGI-I: 1.6 vs 2.9; P = 0.04. Anxiety severity was significantly reduced with clonazepam versus paroxetine at weeks 1 and 2, with no difference in panic disorder severity. Patients treated with clonazepam had fewer adverse events than patients treated with paroxetine (73 vs 95%; P = 0.001. The most common adverse events were drowsiness/fatigue (57%, memory/concentration difficulties (24%, and sexual dysfunction (11% in the clonazepam group and drowsiness/fatigue (81%, sexual dysfunction (70%, and nausea/vomiting (61% in the paroxetine group. This naturalistic study confirms the efficacy and tolerability of clonazepam and paroxetine in the acute treatment of patients with panic disorder.

  1. Disability and Comorbidity: Diagnoses and Symptoms Associated with Disability in a Clinical Population with Panic Disorder

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    Caroline A. Bonham

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Anxiety disorders are associated with considerable disability in the domains of (1 work, (2 social, and (3 family and home interactions. Psychiatric comorbidity is also known to be associated with disability. Methods. Data from the Cross-National Collaborative Panic Study was used to identify rates of comorbid diagnoses, anxiety and depression symptom ratings, and Sheehan disability scale ratings from a clinical sample of 1165 adults with panic disorder. Results. Comorbid diagnoses of agoraphobia, major depression, and social phobia were associated with disability across the three domains of work, social, and family and home interactions. The symptom of agoraphobic avoidance makes the largest contribution to disability but there is no single symptom cluster that entirely predicts impairment and disability. Limitations. The findings about the relative contributions that comorbid diagnoses make to disability only apply to a population with panic disorder. Conclusions. Although panic disorder is not generally considered to be among the serious and persistent mental illnesses, when it is comorbid with other diagnoses, it is associated with considerable impairment. In particular, the presence of agoraphobic avoidance should alert the clinician to the likelihood of important functional impairment. When measuring the functional impact of comorbid anxiety disorders, both the categorical and the dimensional approaches to diagnosis make valuable contributions.

  2. Anxiety disorders and onset of cardiovascular disease: the differential impact of panic, phobias and worry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batelaan, Neeltje M; ten Have, Margreet; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Tuithof, Marlous; de Graaf, Ron

    2014-03-01

    Anxiety has been linked to onset of cardiovascular disease. This study examines the differential impact of types of anxiety (panic, phobia and worry) on 3-year onset of non-fatal cardiovascular disease (CVD). By investigating anxiety disorders as opposed to anxiety symptoms and by using a reliable diagnostic instrument to assess anxiety, limitations of previous studies are considered. 5149 persons at risk for CVD were interviewed using the Composite International Diagnostic Interview. The panic-type included panic disorder and panic attacks; the phobic-type included agoraphobia and social phobia, and the worry-type included generalized anxiety disorder. CVD was self-reported and required treatment or monitoring by a doctor. Analyses were adjusted for sociodemographics, behavioral variables, and comorbid somatic and psychiatric disorders. During follow-up, 62 persons (1.2%) developed CVD. Baseline generalized anxiety disorder was strongly associated with onset of CVD (adjusted OR: 3.39). Further research should replicate findings and focus on biological underpinnings of this association.

  3. Methylation of the SLC6a2 gene promoter in major depression and panic disorder.

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    Richard Bayles

    Full Text Available Reduced function of the noradrenaline transporter (NET has been demonstrated in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD and panic disorder. Attempts to explain NET dysfunction in MDD and panic disorder by genetic variation in the NET gene SLC6a2 have been inconclusive. Transcriptional silencing of the SLC6a2 gene may be an alternative mechanism which can lead to NET dysfunction independent of DNA sequence. The objective of this study was to characterise the DNA methylation state of the SLC6a2 gene promoter in patients with MDD and panic disorder. SLC6a2 promoter methylation was also analysed before and after antidepressant treatment. This study was performed with DNA from blood, using bisulphite sequencing and EpiTYPER methylation analyses. Patients with MDD or panic disorder were not found to differ significantly from healthy controls in the pattern of methylation of the SLC6a2 gene promotor. While significant correlations between methylation levels at some CpG sites and physiological measures were identified, overall the variation in DNA methylation between patients was small, and the significance of this variation remains equivocal. No significant changes in SLC6a2 promoter methylation were observed in response to antidepressant treatment. Further in-depth analysis of alternative mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of the SLC6a2 gene in human health and disease would be of value.

  4. Agoraphobia, panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder: some implications of recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, M

    1984-01-01

    The nature of the relationship between 'panic disorder', agoraphobia and general anxiety disorder remains open. The aetiological theories which have tried to link them with the aid of biological and psychological concepts fail to take account of conflicting observations. 'Panic' attacks are not confined to agoraphobic and related disorders, being indistinguishable from the attacks of acute anxiety and phobic aversion manifest in a wide range of anxiety and affective disorders. There is continuity and discontinuity in the evolution of agoraphobia; those affected differ in respect of a range of premorbid features from patients with other disorders and control subjects. These variables include family history, life development, trait anxiety and other personality characteristics including introversion, neuroticism and probably emotional dependence on others. Not all the claims made on behalf of the efficacy of pharmacological treatment on the one hand and behavioural therapies on the other are substantiated. The success achieved by behavioural treatment appear to endure over some years. But the residual disabilities and defects that follow all forms of treatment and the problems posed by patient selection and high drop-out rates have received insufficient attention. Aetiological theories of agoraphobia and related conditions have been advanced along biomedical, psychological and psychodynamic lines. Some evidence supports each kind of theory. But none is wholly consistent with the findings regarding its phenomenology and evolution. Recent biological investigations have led to the formulation of hypotheses in relation to anticipatory and chronic anxiety in terms of changes in synaptic connections, enhancement of transmitter release as well as alterations in molecular configuration and regulation of gene expression. It would be premature to conclude that these findings can provide a unitary conceptual framework for the explanation of human anxiety disorders. The

  5. Panic disorder cases in Japanese-Brazilians in Japan: their ethnic and cultural confusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, K; Miyasaka, L S; Otsuka, K; Honda, G; Kato, S; Abe, Y

    2001-04-01

    The comparatively high salaries made in Japan are attractive to many Japanese-Brazilians. The number of individuals from this ethnic group being treated in Japanese mental hospitals has increased. We hypothesized that Japanese-Brazilian patients with panic disorders adjusted better to Japanese society and culture than those with other mental disorders. The subjects in the present study are 40 Japanese-Brazilian patients undergoing treatment at the Department of Psychiatry at Jichi Medical School, Japan, from May 1990 to September 1998. Patients were divided into a panic disorder group, a schizophrenic group, a mood disorder group and a neurosis group. Demographic data (Japanese language ability, duration of residence in Japan etc.) were collected. A comparison was made among the four groups. Patients in the panic disorder group showed a significant tendency to be fluent speakers of Japanese. Patients in the panic disorder group also had been in Japan for a significantly longer period of time than those in the other three groups. Japanese ability and length of residence in Japan rule out exacerbating factors due to a foreign living environment. Panic disorder patients usually have resolved the problems inherent in living and working in a foreign country. In general, Japanese-Brazilians are more comfortable both financially and socially in Japan than other foreign laborers because of their cultural and family background. The emotional conflict experienced by such patients may result from concern over whether to live in Brazil or Japan in the future. Their ethnic and cultural identity may be confused, fluctuating between identifying with Brazil and with Japan, and this may cause vague feelings of anxiety.

  6. Cluster A personality pathology in social anxiety disorder: a comparison with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Mia Skytte; Arendt, Mikkel; Fentz, Hanne Nørr; Hougaard, Esben; Rosenberg, Nicole K

    2014-10-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) has been associated with cluster A personality disorder (PD) traits, mainly paranoid and schizoid traits. The aim of the study was to further investigate cluster A personality pathology in patients with SAD. Self-reported PD traits were investigated in a clinical sample of 161 participants with SAD and in a clinical comparison group of 145 participants with panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PAD). A diagnosis of SAD was associated with more paranoid and schizotypal PD traits, and an association between depression and personality pathology could indicate a state-effect of depression on PD traits. Patients with SAD had more cluster A personality pathology than patients with PAD, with the most solid indication for paranoid personality pathology.

  7. Two-Day, Intensive Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deacon, Brett

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a highly effective treatment for panic disorder. However, few patients have access to this treatment, particularly those living in rural areas. In a pilot study, the author previously described the efficacy of a 2-day, intensive, exposure-based CBT intervention that was developed for the purpose of delivering…

  8. Impact of Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment on Quality of Life in Panic Disorder Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telch, Michael J.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Patients (n=156) meeting criteria for panic disorder with agoraphobia were randomly assigned to group cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) or a delayed-treatment control. Compared with the control group, CBT-treated patients showed significant reductions in impairment that were maintained at follow-up. Anxiety and phobic avoidance were…

  9. Consensus statement on panic disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballenger, JC; Lecrubier, Y; Nutt, DJ; Baldwin, DS; den Boer, JA; Kasper, S; Shear, MK

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To provide primary care clinicians with a better understanding of management issues in panic disorder and guide clinical practice with recommendations for appropriate pharmacotherapy. Participants: The 4 members of the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety were James C.

  10. Causes and Management of Treatment-Resistant Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia: A Survey of Expert Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, William C.; Bruce, Timothy J.

    2007-01-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is recognized as an effective psychological treatment for panic disorder (PD). Despite its efficacy, some clients do not respond optimally to this treatment. Unfortunately, literatures on the prediction, prevention, and management of suboptimal response are not well developed. Considering this lack of empirical…

  11. Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment for Panic Disorder with Moderate to Severe Agoraphobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morissette, Sandra Baker; Spiegel, David A.; Heinrichs, Nina

    2005-01-01

    The current article presents a detailed description of an intensive treatment program for panic disorder with moderate to severe levels of agoraphobia (PDA), called Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment (SFIT). Although the efficacy of traditional CBT treatment programs has been well established for the treatment of PDA, patients with moderate to…

  12. Monoamine oxidase A gene DNA hypomethylation - a risk factor for panic disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, Katharina; Tidow, Nicola; Kuithan, Henriette; Schwarte, Kathrin; Klauke, Benedikt; Ambrée, Oliver; Reif, Andreas; Schmidt, Hartmut; Arolt, Volker; Kersting, Anette; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen

    2012-10-01

    The monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene has been suggested as a prime candidate in the pathogenesis of panic disorder. In the present study, DNA methylation patterns in the MAOA regulatory and exon 1/intron 1 region were investigated for association with panic disorder with particular attention to possible effects of gender and environmental factors. Sixty-five patients with panic disorder (44 females, 21 males) and 65 healthy controls were analysed for DNA methylation status at 42 MAOA CpG sites via direct sequencing of sodium bisulfate treated DNA extracted from blood cells. The occurrence of recent positive and negative life events was ascertained. Male subjects showed no or only very minor methylation with some evidence for relative hypomethylation at one CpG site in intron 1 in patients compared to controls. Female patients exhibited significantly lower methylation than healthy controls at 10 MAOA CpG sites in the promoter as well as in exon/intron 1, with significance surviving correction for multiple testing at four CpG sites (p≤0.001). Furthermore, in female subjects the occurrence of negative life events was associated with relatively decreased methylation, while positive life events were associated with increased methylation. The present pilot data suggest a potential role of MAOA gene hypomethylation in the pathogenesis of panic disorder particularly in female patients, possibly mediating a detrimental influence of negative life events. Future studies are warranted to replicate the present finding in independent samples, preferably in a longitudinal design.

  13. Adding cognitive-behavioral therapy to pharmacotherapy for panic disorder: Issues and strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, M.W.; Powers, M.B.; Smits, J.A.J.

    2005-01-01

    Despite ample evidence of the efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for the treatment of patients with panic disorder (PD), dissemination of this evidence is proceeding slowly. This article highlights some of the issues surrounding the dissemination of CBT for PD and suggests strategies for

  14. Concordance between Measures of Anxiety and Physiological Arousal Following Treatment of Panic Disorder in Adolescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacow, Terri Landon; May, Jill Ehrenreich; Choate-Summers, Molly; Pincus, Donna B.; Mattis, Sara G.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the concordance (or synchrony/desynchrony) between adolescents' self-reports of anxiety and physiological measures of arousal (heart rate) both prior to and after treatment for panic disorder. Results indicated a decline in reported subjective units of distress (SUDS) for the treatment group only at the post-treatment…

  15. Bipolar and panic disorders may be associated with hereditary defects in the innate immune system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foldager, Leslie; Köhler, Karl Ole; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2014-01-01

    Background: Mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and mannan-binding lectin-associated serine protease-2 (MASP-2) represent important arms of the innate immune system, and different deficiencies may result in infections or autoimmune diseases. Both bipolar and panic disorders are associated with increased...

  16. Panic attacks as a dimension of psychopathology: evidence for associations with onset and course of mental disorders and level of functioning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batelaan, N.M.; Rhebergen, D.; Graaf, R. de; Spijker, J.; Beekman, A.T.; Penninx, B.W.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: One of the proposed revisions for DSM-5 is to rate panic attacks as a separate dimension across all mental disorders. The idea is that panic attacks occurring outside panic disorder are a dimension predicting important clinical outcomes. The aim of this study was to validate the propositi

  17. Heart rate variability (HRV) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Gabriel; Dao, Tam K; Farmer, Lorie; Sutherland, Roy John; Gevirtz, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Exposure to combat experiences is associated with increased risk of developing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. Prolonged exposure therapy and cognitive processing therapy have garnered a significant amount of empirical support for PTSD treatment; however, they are not universally effective with some patients continuing to struggle with residual PTSD symptoms. Heart rate variability (HRV) is a measure of the autonomic nervous system functioning and reflects an individual's ability to adaptively cope with stress. A pilot study was undertaken to determine if veterans with PTSD (as measured by the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale and the PTSD Checklist) would show significantly different HRV prior to an intervention at baseline compared to controls; specifically, to determine whether the HRV among veterans with PTSD is more depressed than that among veterans without PTSD. The study also aimed at assessing the feasibility, acceptability, and potential efficacy of providing HRV biofeedback as a treatment for PTSD. The findings suggest that implementing an HRV biofeedback as a treatment for PTSD is effective, feasible, and acceptable for veterans. Veterans with combat-related PTSD displayed significantly depressed HRV as compared to subjects without PTSD. When the veterans with PTSD were randomly assigned to receive either HRV biofeedback plus treatment as usual (TAU) or just TAU, the results indicated that HRV biofeedback significantly increased the HRV while reducing symptoms of PTSD. However, the TAU had no significant effect on either HRV or symptom reduction. A larger randomized control trial to validate these findings appears warranted.

  18. Electroconvulsive therapy in a physically restrained man with comorbid major depression, severe agoraphobia with panic disorder, and histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapinesi, Chiara; Serata, Daniele; Del Casale, Antonio; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Romano, Silvia; Milioni, Mara; Capezzuto, Silvia; Carbonetti, Paolo; Angeletti, Gloria; Fensore, Claudio; Tatarelli, Roberto; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-03-01

    A 36-year-old man with comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia, major depression, and histrionic personality disorder since age 21 was resistant to combined drug and psychotherapy treatment. His conditions had progressively worsened with time, causing him to withdraw socially and to simultaneously require continuous physical restraint, which further worsened his functioning. He spent almost 3 consecutive years in restraint, until he consented to receive bilateral ECT treatment. He improved after 13 sessions in all areas (social and role functioning, and panic, depressive, and histrionic symptoms) and is well 3 months later with a lithium-atypical antipsychotic combination.

  19. Weekly and holiday-related patterns of panic attacks in panic disorder: a population-based study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Ting Kao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: While chronobiological studies have reported seasonal variation in panic attacks (PA episodes, information on the timing of PA by week-days may enable better understanding of the triggers of PA episodes and thereby provide pointers for suitable interventional approaches to minimize PA attacks. This study investigated weekly variation in potential PA admissions including associations with holidays using a population-based longitudinal, administrative claims-based dataset in an Asian population. METHODS: This study used ambulatory care data from the "Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000. We identified 993 patients with panic disorder (PD, and they had 4228 emergency room (ER admissions for potential PA in a 3-year period between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2011. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA was used to examine associations between the potential PA admissions and holidays/weekend days/work-days of the week. RESULTS: The daily mean number of potential PA admissions was 3.96 (standard deviation 2.05. One-way ANOVA showed significant differences in potential PA admissions by holiday and day of the week (p<0.001. Daily frequencies showed a trough on Wednesday-Thursday, followed by a sharp increase on Saturday and a peak on Sunday. Potential PA admissions were higher than the daily mean for the sample patients by 29.4% and 22.1%, respectively on Sundays and holidays. Furthermore, the weekly variations were similar for females and males, although females always had higher potential PA admissions on both weekdays and holidays than the males. CONCLUSIONS: We found that potential PA admissions among persons with PD varied systematically by day of the week, with a significant peak on weekends and holidays.

  20. Childhood Traumatic Experiences, Dissociative Symptoms, and Dissociative Disorder Comorbidity Among Patients With Panic Disorder: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ural, Cenk; Belli, Hasan; Akbudak, Mahir; Tabo, Abdulkadir

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed childhood trauma history, dissociative symptoms, and dissociative disorder comorbidity in patients with panic disorder (PD). A total of 92 psychotropic drug-naive patients with PD, recruited from outpatient clinics in the psychiatry department of a Turkish hospital, were involved in the study. Participants were assessed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (SCID-D), Dissociation Questionnaire, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale, Panic Disorder Severity Scale, and Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Of the patients with PD, 18 (19%) had a comorbid dissociative disorder diagnosis on screening with the SCID-D. The most prevalent disorders were dissociative disorder not otherwise specified, dissociative amnesia, and depersonalization disorders. Patients with a high degree of dissociation symptoms and dissociative disorder comorbidity had more severe PD than those without (p dissociation and PD. Among all of the subscales, the strongest relationship was with childhood emotional abuse. Logistic regression analysis showed that emotional abuse and severity of PD were independently associated with dissociative disorder. In our study, a significant proportion of the patients with PD had concurrent diagnoses of dissociative disorder. We conclude that the predominance of PD symptoms at admission should not lead the clinician to overlook the underlying dissociative process and associated traumatic experiences among these patients.

  1. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Children of Conflict Region of Kashmir (India): A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Raheel; Shah, Tabindah; Mushtaq, Sahil

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs due to traumatic events. The last two decades have seen various traumatic events in Kashmiri population, which has led to psychological impact on all population, especially children. PTSD is one of the psychiatric disorders occurring after witnessing of traumatic events. A review of literature regarding PTSD in children of Kashmir (India) has been done to assess the prevalence, causes, neurobiology, risk factors and psychiatric co morbidity associated with it.

  2. Responses to panic induction procedures in subjects with multiple chemical sensitivity/idiopathic environmental intolerance: understanding the relationship with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarlo, Susan M; Poonai, Naveen; Binkley, Karen; Antony, Martin M; Swinson, Richard P

    2002-08-01

    Idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI), also known as multiple chemical sensitivity, is a clinical description for a cluster of symptoms of unknown etiology that have been attributed by patients to multiple environmental exposures when other medical explanations have been excluded. Because allergy has not been clearly demonstrated and current toxicological paradigms for exposure-symptom relationships do not readily accommodate IEI, psychogenic theories have been the focus of a number of investigations. A significantly higher lifetime prevalence of major depression, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and somatization disorder has been reported among patients with environmental illness compared with that in controls. Symptoms often include anxiety, lightheadedness, impaired mentation, poor coordination, breathlessness (without wheezing), tremor, and abdominal discomfort. Responses to intravenous sodium lactate challenge or single-breath inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide versus a similar breath inhalation of clean air have shown a greater frequency of panic responses in subjects with IEI than in control subjects, although such responses did not occur in all subjects. Preliminary genetic findings suggest an increased frequency of a common genotype with panic disorder patients. The panic responses in a significant proportion of IEI patients opens a therapeutic window of opportunity. Patients in whom panic responses may at least be a contributing factor to their symptoms might be responsive to intervention with psychotherapy to enable their desensitization or deconditioning of responses to odors and other triggers, and/or may be helped by anxiolytic medications, relaxation training, and counseling for stress management.

  3. Validation of the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder screening questionnaire (PC-PTSD) in civilian substance use disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. van Dam; T. Ehring; E. Vedel; P.M.G. Emmelkamp

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed to cross-validate and extend earlier findings regarding the diagnostic efficiency of the four-item Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Screen (PC-PTSD) as a screening questionnaire for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among civilian patients with substance use disorder (S

  4. Cardio-respiratory symptoms in panic disorder: a contribution from cognitive-behaviour therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lucia Spear King

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia treated with cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT associated with the medication with patients treated only with medication and verify the behaviour of the cardio-respiratory symptoms of both groups. Methods: Randomized sample in the Psychiatry Institute of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, divided in two groups of 25 participants each. Group 1 undertook 10 weekly sessions of CBT with one hour of duration each together with medication. Group 2, Control, were administered medication that only consisted of tricyclic anti-depressants and selective inhibitors of the re-uptake of serotonin. Evaluation instruments were applied at the beginning and to the end of the interventions. Results: According to the applied scales, group 1 showed statistically more significant results than group 2, with: reduction of panic attacks, cardio-respiratory symptoms, anticipatory anxiety, agoraphobia avoidance and fear of bodily sensations. Conclusion: Exposures (in vivo and interoceptive, especially for induction symptom exercises and relaxation, were considered essential to prepare patients with panic disorder to handle future cardio-respiratory symptoms and panic attacks with agoraphobia.

  5. A Memory-Based Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Evaluating Basic Assumptions Underlying the PTSD Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David C.; Berntsen, Dorthe; Bohni, Malene Klindt

    2008-01-01

    In the mnemonic model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the current memory of a negative event, not the event itself, determines symptoms. The model is an alternative to the current event-based etiology of PTSD represented in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association,…

  6. A Memory-Based Model of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Evaluating Basic Assumptions Underlying the PTSD Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, David C.; Berntsen, Dorthe; Bohni, Malene Klindt

    2008-01-01

    In the mnemonic model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), the current memory of a negative event, not the event itself, determines symptoms. The model is an alternative to the current event-based etiology of PTSD represented in the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association,…

  7. The Neuroanatomical Basis of Panic Disorder and Social Phobia in Schizophrenia: A Voxel Based Morphometric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picado, Marisol; Carmona, Susanna; Hoekzema, Elseline; Pailhez, Guillem; Bergé, Daniel; Mané, Anna; Fauquet, Jordi; Hilferty, Joseph; Moreno, Ana; Cortizo, Romina; Vilarroya, Oscar; Bulbena, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    Objective It is known that there is a high prevalence of certain anxiety disorders among schizophrenic patients, especially panic disorder and social phobia. However, the neural underpinnings of the comorbidity of such anxiety disorders and schizophrenia remain unclear. Our study aims to determine the neuroanatomical basis of the co-occurrence of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia. Methods Voxel-based morphometry was used in order to examine brain structure and to measure between-group differences, comparing magnetic resonance images of 20 anxious patients, 20 schizophrenic patients, 20 schizophrenic patients with comorbid anxiety, and 20 healthy control subjects. Results Compared to the schizophrenic patients, we observed smaller grey-matter volume (GMV) decreases in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and precentral gyrus in the schizophrenic-anxiety group. Additionally, the schizophrenic group showed significantly reduced GMV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, temporal gyrus and angular/inferior parietal gyrus when compared to the control group. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the comorbidity of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia might be characterized by specific neuroanatomical and clinical alterations that may be related to maladaptive emotion regulation related to anxiety. Even thought our findings need to be replicated, our study suggests that the identification of neural abnormalities involved in anxiety, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-anxiety may lead to an improved diagnosis and management of these conditions. PMID:25774979

  8. The neuroanatomical basis of panic disorder and social phobia in schizophrenia: a voxel based morphometric study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Picado

    Full Text Available It is known that there is a high prevalence of certain anxiety disorders among schizophrenic patients, especially panic disorder and social phobia. However, the neural underpinnings of the comorbidity of such anxiety disorders and schizophrenia remain unclear. Our study aims to determine the neuroanatomical basis of the co-occurrence of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia.Voxel-based morphometry was used in order to examine brain structure and to measure between-group differences, comparing magnetic resonance images of 20 anxious patients, 20 schizophrenic patients, 20 schizophrenic patients with comorbid anxiety, and 20 healthy control subjects.Compared to the schizophrenic patients, we observed smaller grey-matter volume (GMV decreases in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and precentral gyrus in the schizophrenic-anxiety group. Additionally, the schizophrenic group showed significantly reduced GMV in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, precentral gyrus, orbitofrontal cortex, temporal gyrus and angular/inferior parietal gyrus when compared to the control group.Our findings suggest that the comorbidity of schizophrenia with panic disorder and social phobia might be characterized by specific neuroanatomical and clinical alterations that may be related to maladaptive emotion regulation related to anxiety. Even thought our findings need to be replicated, our study suggests that the identification of neural abnormalities involved in anxiety, schizophrenia and schizophrenia-anxiety may lead to an improved diagnosis and management of these conditions.

  9. Brain responses to disorder-related visual threat in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldker, Katharina; Heitmann, Carina Yvonne; Neumeister, Paula; Bruchmann, Maximilian; Vibrans, Laura; Zwitserlood, Pienie; Straube, Thomas

    2016-12-01

    Panic disorder (PD) patients show aberrant neural responses to threatening stimuli in an extended fear network, but results are only partially comparable, and studies implementing disorder-related visual scenes are lacking as stimuli. The neural responses and functional connectivity to a newly developed set of disorder-related, ecologically valid scenes as compared with matched neutral visual scenes, using event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in 26 PD patients and 26 healthy controls (HC) were investigated. PD patients versus HC showed hyperactivation in an extended fear network comprising brainstem, insula, thalamus, anterior, and mid-cingulate cortex and (dorso-)medial prefrontal cortex for disorder-related versus neutral scenes. Amygdala differences between groups failed significance. Subjective levels of anxiety significantly correlated with brainstem activation in PD patients. Analysis of functional connectivity by means of beta series correlation revealed no emotion-specific alterations in connectivity in PD patients versus HC. The results suggest that subjective anxiety evoked by external stimuli is directly related to altered activation in the homeostatic alarm system in PD. With novel disorder-related stimuli, the study sheds new light on the neural underpinnings of pathological threat processing in PD. Hum Brain Mapp 37:4439-4453, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A new paradigm (Westphal-Paradigm) to study the neural correlates of panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, A; Schlagenhauf, F; John, T; Guhn, A; Rehbein, H; Siegmund, A; Stoy, M; Held, D; Schulz, I; Fehm, L; Fydrich, T; Heinz, A; Bruhn, H; Ströhle, A

    2011-04-01

    Agoraphobia (with and without panic disorder) is a highly prevalent and disabling anxiety disorder. Its neural complexity can be characterized by specific cues in fMRI studies. Therefore, we developed a fMRI paradigm with agoraphobia-specific stimuli. Pictures of potential agoraphobic situations were generated. Twenty-six patients, suffering from panic disorder and agoraphobia, and 22 healthy controls rated the pictures with respect to arousal, valence, and agoraphobia-related anxiety. The 96 pictures, which discriminated best between groups were chosen, split into two parallel sets and supplemented with matched neutral pictures from the International Affective Picture System. Reliability, criterion, and construct validity of the picture set were determined in a second sample (44 patients, 28 controls). The resulting event-related "Westphal-Paradigm" with cued and uncued pictures was tested in a fMRI pilot study with 16 patients. Internal consistency of the sets was very high; parallelism was given. Positive correlations of picture ratings with Mobility Inventory and Hamilton anxiety scores support construct validity. FMRI data revealed activations in areas associated with the fear circuit including amygdala, insula, and hippocampal areas. Psychometric properties of the Westphal-Paradigm meet necessary quality requirements for further scientific use. The paradigm reliably produces behavioral and fMRI patterns in response to agoraphobia-specific stimuli. To our knowledge, it is the first fMRI paradigm with these properties. This paradigm can be used to further characterize the functional neuroanatomy of panic disorder and agoraphobia and might be useful to contribute data to the differentiation of panic disorder and agoraphobia as related, but conceptually different clinical disorders.

  11. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Disorders of Extreme Stress (DESNOS) symptoms following prostitution and childhood abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunjung; Klein, Carolin; Shin, Min-Sup; Lee, Hoon-Jin

    2009-08-01

    With the participation of 46 prostituted women in Korea, this study investigates the relationship between prostitution experiences, a history of childhood sexual abuse (CSA), and symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and disorders of extreme stress not otherwise specified (DESNOS). Prostituted women showed higher levels of PTSD and DESNOS symptoms compared to a control group. Women who had experienced both CSA by a significant other and prostitution showed the highest levels of traumatic stress. However, posttraumatic reexperiencing and avoidance and identity, relational, and affect regulation problems were significant for prostitution experiences even when the effects of CSA were controlled.

  12. A genome-wide study of panic disorder suggests the amiloride-sensitive cation channel 1 as a candidate gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Noomi; Dahl, Hans A.; Buttenschön, Henriette N.

    2012-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is a mental disorder with recurrent panic attacks that occur spontaneously and are not associated to any particular object or situation. There is no consensus on what causes PD. However, it is recognized that PD is influenced by environmental factors, as well as genetic factor...... of PD in a larger outbred population.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 3 August 2011; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2011.148....

  13. Comorbidity of PTSD in anxiety and depressive disorders: prevalence and shared risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinhoven, Philip; Penninx, Brenda W; van Hemert, Albert M; de Rooij, Mark; Elzinga, Bernet M

    2014-08-01

    The present study aims to assess comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in anxiety and depressive disorders and to determine whether childhood trauma types and other putative independent risk factors for comorbid PTSD are unique to PTSD or shared with anxiety and depressive disorders. The sample of 2402 adults aged 18-65 included healthy controls, persons with a prior history of affective disorders, and persons with a current affective disorder. These individuals were assessed at baseline (T0) and 2 (T2) and 4 years (T4) later. At each wave, DSM-IV-TR based anxiety and depressive disorder, neuroticism, extraversion, and symptom severity were assessed. Childhood trauma was measured at T0 with an interview and at T4 with a questionnaire, and PTSD was measured with a standardized interview at T4. Prevalence of 5-year recency PTSD among anxiety and depressive disorders was 9.2%, and comorbidity, in particular with major depression, was high (84.4%). Comorbidity was associated with female gender, all types of childhood trauma, neuroticism, (low) extraversion, and symptom severity. Multivariable significant risk factors (i.e., female gender and child sexual and physical abuse) were shared among anxiety and depressive disorders. Our results support a shared vulnerability model for comorbidity of anxiety and depressive disorders with PTSD. Routine assessment of PTSD in patients with anxiety and depressive disorders seems warranted.

  14. Epigenetic signature of panic disorder: a role of glutamate decarboxylase 1 (GAD1) DNA hypomethylation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domschke, Katharina; Tidow, Nicola; Schrempf, Marie; Schwarte, Kathrin; Klauke, Benedikt; Reif, Andreas; Kersting, Anette; Arolt, Volker; Zwanzger, Peter; Deckert, Jürgen

    2013-10-01

    Glutamate decarboxylases (GAD67/65; GAD1/GAD2) are crucially involved in gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) synthesis and thus were repeatedly suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders. In the present study, DNA methylation patterns in the GAD1 and GAD2 promoter and GAD1 intron 2 regions were investigated for association with panic disorder, with particular attention to possible effects of environmental factors. Sixty-five patients with panic disorder (f=44, m=21) and 65 matched healthy controls were analyzed for DNA methylation status at 38 GAD1 promoter/intron2 and 10 GAD2 promoter CpG sites via direct sequencing of sodium bisulfate treated DNA extracted from blood cells. Recent positive and negative life events were ascertained. Patients and controls were genotyped for GAD1 rs3762556, rs3791878 and rs3762555, all of which are located in the analyzed promoter region. Patients with panic disorder exhibited significantly lower average GAD1 methylation than healthy controls (p<0.001), particularly at three CpG sites in the promoter as well as in intron 2. The occurrence of negative life events was correlated with relatively decreased average methylation mainly in the female subsample (p=0.01). GAD1 SNP rs3762555 conferred a significantly lower methylation at three GAD1 intron 2 CpG sites (p<0.001). No differential methylation was observed in the GAD2 gene. The present pilot data suggest a potentially compensatory role of GAD1 gene hypomethylation in panic disorder possibly mediating the influence of negative life events and depending on genetic variation. Future studies are warranted to replicate the present finding in independent samples, preferably in a longitudinal design.

  15. Which panic disorder patients benefit from which treatment: cognitive therapy or antidepressants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusseldorp, Elise; Spinhoven, Philip; Bakker, Abraham; van Dyck, Richard; van Balkom, Anton J L M

    2007-01-01

    Beliefs about the controllability of a disorder may be relevant in the causation, maintenance and treatment of disorders. We investigated whether congruence between patients' beliefs about controllability of a panic disorder and the type of treatment provided predicted outcome. The differential effectiveness of cognitive therapy and antidepressant treatment (paroxetine or clomipramine) was investigated in a sample of 129 panic disorder patients in a 12-week, pretest posttest placebo-controlled study. Panic frequency, agoraphobic avoidance, anxiety, depression, and disability were measured with various validated interviewer and self-report measures. Beliefs about controllability were measured with the Multidimensional Anxiety Locus of Control Scale measuring an internal, chance, therapist and medication locus of control. In order to analyze aptitude-treatment interactions a new strategy called the Regression Trunk Approach was used in addition to classical hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Using the Regression Trunk Approach we found that locus of control orientation (LOC) predicted the differential effectiveness of cognitive therapy. Those patients with a medium internal LOC who received cognitive therapy performed significantly better than all patients who received a placebo pill on 8 of the 10 outcome variables. We did not find a differential LOC effect for antidepressant treatment. No evidence for aptitude-treatment interactions using hierarchical multiple regression analysis was found. Moderately strong beliefs about self-control of panic disorder congruent with the cognitive intervention provided seem to moderate treatment effectiveness. Future studies must be more attentive to the nonlinear effects of patient characteristics on the outcome of different types of treatments. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Reactivity to 35% carbon dioxide in bulimia nervosa and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woznica, Andrea; Vickers, Kristin; Koerner, Naomi; Fracalanza, Katie

    2015-08-30

    The inhalation of 35% carbon dioxide (CO₂) induces panic and anxiety in people with panic disorder (PD) and in people with various other psychiatric disorders. The anxiogenic effect of CO₂ in people with eating disorders has received sparse attention despite the fact that PD and bulimia nervosa (BN) have several common psychological and neurobiological features. This study compared CO₂-reactivity across three groups of participants: females with BN, females with PD, and female controls without known risk factors for enhanced CO₂-reactivity (e.g., social anxiety disorder, first degree relatives with PD). Reactivity was measured by self-reported ratings of panic symptomatology and subjective anxiety, analyzed as both continuous variables (change from room-air to CO₂) and dichotomous variables (positive versus negative responses to CO₂). Analyses of each outcome measure demonstrated that CO₂-reactivity was similar across the BN and PD groups, and reactivity within each of these two groups was significantly stronger than that in the control group. This is the first study to demonstrate CO₂-hyperreactivity in individuals with BN, supporting the hypothesis that reactivity to this biological paradigm is not specific to PD. Further research would benefit from examining transdiagnostic mechanisms in CO₂-hyperreactivity, such as anxiety sensitivity, which may account for this study's results.

  17. Association between latent toxoplasmosis and major depression, generalised anxiety disorder and panic disorder in human adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, Shawn D; Brown, Bruce L; Berrett, Andrew; Erickson, Lance D; Hedges, Dawson W

    2014-08-01

    Latent infection with the apicomplexan Toxoplasma gondii (Nicolle et Manceaux, 1908) has been associated with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and self-harm behaviour. However, the potential relationship between T. gondii immunoglobulin G antibody (IgG) seropositivity and generalised-anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder (PD) has not been investigated. The associations between serum reactivity to T. gondii and major depressive disorder (MDD), GAD and PD were evaluated in a total sample of 1 846 adult participants between the ages of 20 and 39 years from the United States Center for Disease Control's National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Approximately 16% of the overall sample was seropositive for T. gondii and 7% of the sample met criteria for MDD, 2% for GAD and 2% for PD. There were no significant associations between T. gondii IgG seroprevalence and MDD (OR = 0.484, 95% CI = 0.186-1.258), GAD (OR = 0.737, 95% CI = 0.218-2.490) or PD (OR = 0.683, 95% CI = 0.206-2.270) controlling for sex, ethnicity, poverty-to-income ratio and educational attainment. However, limited evidence suggested a possible association between absolute antibody titres for T. gondii and GAD and PD but not MDD. Toxoplasma gondii seroprevalence was not associated with MDD, GAD or PD within the context of the limitations of this study, although there may be an association of T. gondii serointensity with and GAD and PD, which requires further study.

  18. Prevalence rate of post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD and other psychological disorders among Saudi firefighters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alghamd

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Firefighters have a high probability of being exposed to a variety of traumatic events. Potentially traumatic events can occur during a single rescue such as: providing aid to seriously injured or helpless victims. Moreover, firefighters who are injured in the line of duty may have to retire as a consequence of their injury. The psychological cost of this exposure may increase the risk of long-term problems, such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms, depression, and anxiety. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of PTSD symptoms, depression, anxiety, and assess related variables such as coping strategies and social support among Saudi firefighters. Method: Two hundred firefighters completed the Fire-fighter Trauma History Screen (FTHS to measure the number of traumatic events, Screen for Post-traumatic Stress Symptoms (SPTSS scale to assess the prevalence of PTSD symptoms, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scales (HADS to assess depression and anxiety, Brief Cope (BC scale to measure coping strategies used, and Social Support scale was used to evaluate the firefighter's support received. Results: The results showed that 84% (169/200 of firefighters were exposed to at least one traumatic event. The result presented that 57% (96/169 of exposure firefighters fully met the DSM-IV criteria for PTSD with high levels of depression and anxiety; 39% (66/169 partially met the PTSD criteria. However, only 4% participants have not met the PTSD criteria. The results also revealed that adaptive coping strategies and higher perceived social support was associated with lower levels of PTSD. Conclusion: The high prevalence rate of PTSD related to the type and severity of the traumatic events and years of experience in the job. Accordingly, many firefighters were severely affected by their experiences, and we should be developing methods to help them.

  19. Is there a specific relationship between asthma and panic disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Peski-Oosterbaan, A S; Spinhoven, P; Van der Does, A J; Willems, L N; Sterk, P J

    1996-04-01

    The objective of the present study was three-fold: (1) to assess the prevalence of PD in asthmatic patients in comparison with non-asthmatic patients; (2) to investigate possible differences in pulmonary function and anxiety symptomatology between asthmatic patients with PD and those without; and (3) to evaluate possible differences in symptom perception during histamine-induced bronchoconstriction between asthmatic patients with PD versus asthmatic controls without PD matched for age, sex and bronchial responsiveness to histamine (PC20). The study was performed on 123 consecutive patients referred to the lung function laboratory of a university hospital for a histamine challenge test. Firstly, baseline measures for FEV1, anxiety (ADIS-R, ACQ, BSQ, and STAI) and depression (SDS) were collected. Subsequently, before and during induced bronchoconstriction FEV1, perceived breathlessness (Borg scale), subjective anxiety (SUDS), and somatic panic symptoms (PAQ) were assessed. The prevalence of PD in asthmatic patients, although higher than in the general population, was very similar to the rate observed in non-asthmatic patients. Baseline level of FEV1 and bronchial responsiveness to histamine (PC20) were also not significantly different between asthmatic patients with and without PD. Moreover, in comparison with matched controls, PD cases reported significantly higher levels of perceived breathlessness during induced bronchoconstriction, although their mean fall in FEV1 was very comparable. It is concluded that the higher prevalence of PD in asthma is non-specific and probably due to selection bias.

  20. Nocturnal panic attacks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Fabiana L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The panic-respiration connection has been presented with increasing evidences in the literature. We report three panic disorder patients with nocturnal panic attacks with prominent respiratory symptoms, the overlapping of the symptoms with the sleep apnea syndrome and a change of the diurnal panic attacks, from spontaneous to situational pattern. The implication of these findings and awareness to the distinct core of the nocturnal panic attacks symptoms may help to differentiate them from sleep disorders and the search for specific treatment.

  1. Women’s experiences of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after traumatic childbirth: a review and critical appraisal

    OpenAIRE

    James, Stella

    2015-01-01

    This paper critically analyses nine studies on postnatal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following traumatic childbirth, in order to find common themes of PTSD symptoms, using the cognitive model of PTSD as a guide; it critically appraised one of the studies in depth and it attempted to explain the lived experience of women suffering from postnatal PTSD following traumatic childbirth and the suitability of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for postnatal PTSD. This paper found that wome...

  2. Panic disorder and hyperventilation Transtorno do pânico e hiperventilação

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    ANTONIO EGIDIO NARD

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory abnormalities are associated with anxiety, particularly with panic attacks. Symptoms such as shortness of breath, "empty-head" feeling, dizziness, paresthesias and tachypnea have been described in the psychiatric and respiratory physiology related to panic disorder. Panic disorder patients exhibit both behaviorally and physiologically abnormal responses to respiratory challenges tests. Objective: We aim to observe the induction of panic attacks by hyperventilation in a group of panic disorder patients (DSM-IV. Method: 13 panic disorder patients and 11 normal volunteers were randomly selected. They were drug free for a week. They were induced to hyperventilate (30 breaths/min for 3 minutes. Anxiety scales were taken before and after the test. Results: 9 (69.2% panic disorder patients and one (9.1% of control subjects had a panic attack after hyperventilating (pDistúrbios respiratórios estão associados à ansiedade, especialmente aos ataques de pânico. Sufocamento, sensação de "cabeça leve", tonteira, parestesias e taquipnéia aparecem na descrição psiquiátrica e respiratória do transtorno do pânico. Pacientes com transtorno do pânico apresentam respostas comportamentais e fisiológicas anormais a testes respiratórios. Objetivo: Observamos a indução de ataques de pânico através de hiperventilação em um grupo de pacientes com transtorno do pânico (DSM-IV. Método: Selecionamos de forma randomizada 13 pacientes com transtorno do pânico e 11 voluntários normais. Todos estavam sem medicação há uma semana. Foram induzidos a hiperventilar (30 inspirações/minuto durante 3 minutos. Escalas de ansiedade foram utilizadas antes e após o teste. Resultados: No grupo com transtorno de pânico, 9 (69,2% pacientes apresentaram ataque de pânico após a hiperventilação e apenas 1 (9,1% no grupo controle (p<0,05. Conclusão: Os pacientes com transtorno do pânico foram mais sensíveis à hiperventilação que o grupo

  3. A risk-benefit assessment of pharmacological treatments for panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, J A; Moioffer, M; Stanton, S P; Dwight, M; Keck, P E

    1998-06-01

    Panic disorder, a psychiatric disorder characterised by frequent panic attacks, is the most common anxiety disorder, affecting 2 to 6% of the general population. No one line of treatment has been found to be superior, making a risk-benefit assessment of the treatments available useful for treating patients. Choice of treatment depends on a number of issues, including the adverse effect profile, efficacy and the presence of concomitant syndromes. Tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) are beneficial in the treatment of panic disorder. They have a proven efficacy, are affordable and are conveniently administered. Adverse effects, including jitteriness syndrome, bodyweight gain, anticholinergic effects and orthostatic hypotension are commonly associated with TCAs, but can be managed successfully. Selective serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5HT) reuptake inhibitors are also potential first line agents and are well tolerated and effective, with a favourable adverse effects profile. There is little risk in overdose or of anticholinergic effects. Adverse effects include sedation, dyspepsia and headache early in treatment, and sexual dysfunction and increased anxiety, but these can be effectively managed with proper dosage escalation and management. Benzodiazepines are an effective treatment, providing short-term relief of panic-related symptoms. Patients respond to treatment quickly, providing rapid relief of symptoms. Adverse effects include ataxia and drowsiness, and cognitive and psycho-motor impairment. There are reservations over their first-line use because of concerns regarding abuse and dependence. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors, because of their adverse effects profile, potential drug interactions, dietary restrictions, gradual onset of effect and overdose risk, are not considered to be first-line agents. They are effective however, and should be considered for patients with refractory disease. Valproic acid (valproate sodium), while not intensively studied, shows

  4. Plasma anti-serotonin and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies are elevated in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplan, J D; Tamir, H; Calaprice, D; DeJesus, M; de la Nuez, M; Pine, D; Papp, L A; Klein, D F; Gorman, J M

    1999-04-01

    The psychoneuroimmunology of panic disorder is relatively unexplored. Alterations within brain stress systems that secondarily influence the immune system have been documented. A recent report indicated elevations of serotonin (5-HT) and ganglioside antibodies in patients with primary fibromyalgia, a condition with documented associations with panic disorder. In line with our interest in dysregulated 5-HT systems in panic disorder (PD), we wished to assess if antibodies directed at the 5-HT system were elevated in patients with PD in comparison to healthy volunteers. Sixty-three patients with panic disorder and 26 healthy volunteers were diagnosed by the SCID. Employing ELISA, we measured anti-5-HT and 5-HT anti-idiotypic antibodies (which are directed at 5-HT receptors). To include all subjects in one experiment, three different batches were run during the ELISA. Plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies: there was a significant group effect [patients > controls (p = .007)] and batch effect but no interaction. The mean effect size for the three batches was .76. Following Z-score transformation of each separate batch and then combining all scores, patients demonstrated significantly elevated levels of plasma serotonin anti-idiotypic antibodies. Neither sex nor age as covariates affected the significance of the results. There was a strong correlation between anti-serotonin antibody and serotonin anti-idiotypic antibody measures. Plasma anti-serotonin antibodies: there was a significant diagnosis effect [patients > controls (p = .037)]. Mean effect size for the three batches was .52. Upon Z-score transformation, there was a diagnosis effect with antibody elevations in patients. Covaried for sex and age, the result falls below significance to trend levels. The data raise the possibility that psychoimmune dysfunction, specifically related to the 5-HT system, may be present in PD. Potential interruption of 5-HT neurotransmission through autoimmune mechanisms may be of

  5. Executive function in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the influence of comorbid depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olff, Miranda; Polak, A Rosaura; Witteveen, Anke B; Denys, D.

    BACKGROUND: Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with neurocognitive deficits, such as impaired verbal memory and executive functioning. Less is known about executive function and the role of comorbid depression in PTSD. Recently, studies have shown that verbal memory impairments

  6. Virtual reality assisted cognitive behavioral therapy for the treatment of Panic Disorders with Agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincelli, F; Choi, H; Molinari, E; Wiederhold, B K; Bouchard, S; Riva, G

    2002-01-01

    The chapter describes the characteristics of the Experiential-Cognitive Therapy (ECT) protocol for Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia. The goal of ECT is to decondition fear reactions, to modify misinterpretational cognition related to panic symptoms and to reduce anxiety symptoms. This is possible in an average of eight sessions of treatment plus an assessment phase and booster sessions, through the integration of Virtual Experience and traditional cognitive-behavioral techniques. We decided to employ the techniques included in the cognitive-behavioral approach because they showed high levels of efficacy. Through virtual environments we can gradually expose the patient to feared situation: virtual reality consent to re-create in our clinical office a real experiential world. The patient faces the feared stimuli in a context that is nearer to reality than imagination. For ECT we developed the Virtual Environments for Panic Disorders--VEPD--virtual reality system. VEPD is a 4-zone virtual environment developed using the Superscape VRT 5.6 toolkit. The four zones reproduce different potentially fearful situations--an elevator, a supermarket, a subway ride, and large square. In each zone the characteristics of the anxiety-related experience are defined by the therapist through a setup menu.

  7. Respiratory panic disorder subtype and sensitivity to the carbon dioxide challenge test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valença A.M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to verify the sensitivity to the carbon dioxide (CO2 challenge test of panic disorder (PD patients with respiratory and nonrespiratory subtypes of the disorder. Our hypothesis is that the respiratory subtype is more sensitive to 35% CO2. Twenty-seven PD subjects with or without agoraphobia were classified into respiratory and nonrespiratory subtypes on the basis of the presence of respiratory symptoms during their panic attacks. The tests were carried out in a double-blind manner using two mixtures: 1 35% CO2 and 65% O2, and 2 100% atmospheric compressed air, 20 min apart. The tests were repeated after 2 weeks during which the participants in the study did not receive any psychotropic drugs. At least 15 of 16 (93.7% respiratory PD subtype patients and 5 of 11 (43.4% nonrespiratory PD patients had a panic attack during one of two CO2 challenges (P = 0.009, Fisher exact test. Respiratory PD subtype patients were more sensitive to the CO2 challenge test. There was agreement between the severity of PD measured by the Clinical Global Impression (CGI Scale and the subtype of PD. Higher CGI scores in the respiratory PD subtype could reflect a greater sensitivity to the CO2 challenge due to a greater severity of PD. Carbon dioxide challenges in PD may define PD subtypes and their underlying mechanisms.

  8. Cortisol awakening response in drug-naïve panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakuszkowiak-Wojten K

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Katarzyna Jakuszkowiak-Wojten, Jerzy Landowski, Mariusz S Wiglusz, Wiesław Jerzy Cubała Department of Psychiatry, Medical University of Gdansk, Gdansk, Poland Background: It is unclear whether hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis is involved in the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD. The findings remain inconsistent. Cortisol awakening response (CAR is a noninvasive biomarker of stress system activity. We designed the study to assess CAR in drug-naïve PD patients.   Materials and methods: We assessed CAR in 14 psychotropic drug-naïve outpatients with PD and 14 healthy controls. The severity of PD was assessed with Panic and Agoraphobia Scale. The severity of anxiety and depression was screened with Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale.   Results: No significant difference in CAR between PD patients and control group was found. No correlations were observed between CAR and anxiety severity measures in PD patients and controls.   Limitations: The number of participating subjects was relatively small, and the study results apply to nonsuicidal drug-naïve PD patients without agoraphobia and with short-illness duration. There was a lack of control on subjects’ compliance with the sampling instructions.  Conclusion: The study provides no support for elevated CAR levels in drug-naïve PD patients without agoraphobia. Keywords: panic disorder, PD, CAR, cortisol awakening response, HPA axis, hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis

  9. Imipramine for vestibular dysfunction in panic disorder: a prospective case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Andre Mezzasalma

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and effectiveness of imipramine on the treatment of comorbid chronic dizziness and panic disorder. METHOD: Nine patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia associated with chronic dizziness underwent otoneurological screening and were treated with a 3-months course of imipramine. Anxiety levels were measured with the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (HAM-A, dizziness levels were evaluated using the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI, and panic severity and treatment outcome were assessed with the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI. RESULTS: At the baseline 33.3% (n=3 had a bilateral peripheral deficit vestibulopathy, the mean scores for HAM-A were 27.2±10.4, for DHI were 51.7±22.7, and for CGI-S were 4.8±0.9. All patients had a significant reduction in their HAM-A (11.1±5.5, p=0.008, DHI (11.5±8.1, p=0.008 and CGI-I (1.8±0.7, p=0.011 levels after 3-months imipramine treatment (mean=72.2±23.2 mg/day. CONCLUSION: This study found a decrease in anxiety levels and in the impact of dizziness in the patients' quality of life after a 3-months treatment course with imipramine.

  10. A comparative study of early maladaptive schemas in obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Kyung-Hwa; Lee, Seung Jae

    2015-12-30

    Schema theory and therapy may be an additional therapeutic approach to identify and treat chronic psychological problems, namely early maladaptive schemas (EMSs), in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and panic disorder (PAD). In the current study, we investigated the characteristics in EMSs between patients with OCD and PAD. Fifty-one patients with OCD, 46 patients with PAD, and 70 normal controls participated in this study. EMSs and depressive symptoms were measured using the Young Schema Questionnaire and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), respectively. Analysis of covariance was conducted with age, sex, BDI score, and education level as covariates to assess group differences. Direct comparisons among the three groups revealed that the defectiveness/shame and social isolation/alienation schemas were prominently activated in patients with OCD, whereas the vulnerability to harm or illness and self-sacrifice were activated in patients with PAD. In subgroup analysis, these differences were observed between subgroups with lower BDI scores, but not between the patient subgroups with higher BDI scores. However, the differences between the patient groups in the defectiveness/shame and vulnerability to harm or illness schemas almost reached significance. Patients with OCD and PAD differed in particular EMS characteristics, which could have potential therapeutic implications.

  11. Relationships between a Dissociative Subtype of PTSD and Clinical Characteristics in Patients with Substance Use Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergler, Michaela; Driessen, Martin; Lüdecke, Christel; Ohlmeier, Martin; Chodzinski, Claudia; Weirich, Steffen; Schläfke, Detlef; Wedekind, Dirk; Havemann-Reinecke, Ursula; Renner, Walter; Schäfer, Ingo

    2017-01-01

    The increasing support for a dissociative subtype of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD-D) has led to its inclusion in DSM-5. We examined relationships between PTSD-D and relevant variables in patients with substance use disorders (SUD). The sample comprised N = 459 patients with SUD. The International Diagnostic Checklist and the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale were used to diagnose PTSD. In addition, participants completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and the Dissociative Experiences Scale. The course of SUD was assessed by means of the European Addiction Severity Index. One-fourth of participants fulfilled a diagnosis of PTSD (25.3%). Patients with PTSD-D (N = 32, 27.6% of all patients with PTSD) reported significantly more current depressive symptoms, more current suicidal thoughts, more lifetime anxiety/tension, and more suicide attempts. The PTSD-D group also showed a significantly higher need for treatment due to drug problems, higher current use of opiates/analgesics, and a higher number of lifetime drug overdoses. In a regression model, symptoms of depression in the last month and lifetime suicide attempts significantly predicted PTSD-D. These findings suggest that PTSD-D is related to additional psychopathology and to a more severe course of substance-related problems in patients with SUD, indicating that this group also has additional treatment needs.

  12. Reducing the symptomatology of panic disorder: the effects of a yoga program alone and in combination with cognitive behavioral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Ferreira Vorkapic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Yoga is a holistic system of different mind body practices that can be used to improve mental and physical health. It has been shown to reduce perceived stress and anxiety as well as improve mood and quality of life. Research documenting the therapeutic benefits of yoga has grown progressively for the past decades. Objectives: The primary goal of this study was to investigate the effects of yoga in patients suffering from panic disorder. We aimed at observing the efficacy of yoga techniques on reducing the symptomatology of panic disorder, compared to a combined intervention of yoga and psychotherapy. Method: Twenty subjects previously diagnosed with panic disorder were selected. Subjects were randomly assigned to both experimental groups: Group 1 (G1-Yoga: 10 subjects attended yoga classes and Group 2 (G2-CBT + Yoga: 10 subjects participated in a combined intervention of yoga practice followed by a cognitive behavioral therapy session. Subjects were evaluated two times during the study: pre-test and post-test. Psychometric tools included the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A, The Panic Beliefs Inventory (PBI and Body Sensations Questionnaire (BSQ. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant reductions in anxiety levels associated with panic disorder, panic-related beliefs and panic-related body sensations both in G1 and G2. However, the combination of yoga and cognitive behavioral therapy (G2 showed even further reductions in all observed parameters (mean values. Conclusion: This study observed significant improvement in panic symptomatology following both the practice of yoga and the combination of yoga and psychotherapy. While contemplative techniques such as yoga promote a general change in dealing with private events, CBT teaches how to modify irrational beliefs and cognitive distortions. This indicates that the techniques might have complemented each other, increasing the intervention

  13. Women's experiences of symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after traumatic childbirth: a review and critical appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Stella

    2015-12-01

    This paper critically analyses nine studies on postnatal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following traumatic childbirth, in order to find common themes of PTSD symptoms, using the cognitive model of PTSD as a guide; it critically appraised one of the studies in depth and it attempted to explain the lived experience of women suffering from postnatal PTSD following traumatic childbirth and the suitability of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for postnatal PTSD. This paper found that women following traumatic childbirth do experience postnatal PTSD; postnatal PTSD symptoms are similar to PTSD symptoms of other events and that CBT for PTSD of other events is just as effective for postnatal PTSD. Future recommendations include more qualitative studies with interpretative phenomenological approach in order to establish evidence-based CBT treatment for this client group, and more referrals need to be sent to the psychological services for CBT intervention.

  14. Relationships between GAT1 and PTSD, Depression, and Substance Use Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bountress, Kaitlin E.; Wei, Wei; Sheerin, Christina; Chung, Dongjun; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Mandel, Howard; Wang, Zhewu

    2017-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), Major Depressive Disorder (MDD), and Substance Use Disorder (SUD) have large public health impacts. Therefore, researchers have attempted to identify those at greatest risk for these phenotypes. PTSD, MDD, and SUD are in part genetically influenced. Additionally, genes in the glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system are implicated in the encoding of emotional and fear memories, and thus may impact these phenotypes. The current study examined the associations of single nucleotide polymorphisms in GAT1 individually, and at the gene level, using a principal components (PC) approach, with PTSD, PTSD comorbid with MDD, and PTSD comorbid with SUD in 486 combat-exposed veterans.  Findings indicate that several GAT1 SNPs, as well as one of the GAT1 PCs, was associated with PTSD, with and without MDD and SUD comorbidity. The present study findings provide initial insights into one pathway by which shared genetic risk influences PTSD-MDD and PTSD-SUD comorbidities, and thus identify a high-risk group (based on genotype) on whom prevention and intervention efforts should be focused. PMID:28067785

  15. The Genetics of Stress-Related Disorders: PTSD, Depression, and Anxiety Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoller, Jordan W

    2016-01-01

    Research into the causes of psychopathology has largely focused on two broad etiologic factors: genetic vulnerability and environmental stressors. An important role for familial/heritable factors in the etiology of a broad range of psychiatric disorders was established well before the modern era of genomic research. This review focuses on the genetic basis of three disorder categories-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and the anxiety disorders-for which environmental stressors and stress responses are understood to be central to pathogenesis. Each of these disorders aggregates in families and is moderately heritable. More recently, molecular genetic approaches, including genome-wide studies of genetic variation, have been applied to identify specific risk variants. In this review, I summarize evidence for genetic contributions to PTSD, MDD, and the anxiety disorders including genetic epidemiology, the role of common genetic variation, the role of rare and structural variation, and the role of gene-environment interaction. Available data suggest that stress-related disorders are highly complex and polygenic and, despite substantial progress in other areas of psychiatric genetics, few risk loci have been identified for these disorders. Progress in this area will likely require analysis of much larger sample sizes than have been reported to date. The phenotypic complexity and genetic overlap among these disorders present further challenges. The review concludes with a discussion of prospects for clinical translation of genetic findings and future directions for research.

  16. Overlap of symptom domains of separation anxiety disorder in adulthood with panic disorder-agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silove, Derrick; Marnane, Claire

    2013-01-01

    There is a need to explain the high level of comorbidity between separation anxiety disorder (SAD) in adulthood and panic disorder with agoraphobia (Pd-Ag). One possibility is that inadequate specification of symptom domains and/or diagnostic questions accounts for some of the comorbidity. The present anxiety clinic study examined responses of adult patients (n = 646) with SAD and/or Pd-Ag on eight symptom domains based on a previous factor analysis of a commonly used separation anxiety measure, the ASA-27, as well as on the Anxiety Sensitivity Index. We also examined questionnaire items that did not load on the factor structure. All separation anxiety domains distinguished strongly between SAD and Pd-Ag. Comparisons across three groups (SAD alone, Pd-Ag alone and comorbid SAD/Pd-Ag) revealed that two symptom domains (anxiety about embarking on trips, and sleep disturbances) showed some overlap between Pd-Ag and SAD. Two of the items of the ASA-27 that did not load with other items in the factor analysis also showed overlap with Pd-Ag, with both referring to anxieties about leaving home. Patients with SAD (with or without Pd-Ag) returned higher scores on anxiety sensitivity than those with Pd-Ag alone. The findings support the distinctiveness of the construct of SAD and the capacity of the ASA-27 to discriminate between that disorder and Pd-Ag. SAD appears to be a more severe form of anxiety than Pd-Ag. There may be a need to refine items to include the reasons for avoiding leaving home, reluctance to sleep alone and to embark on trips, to ensure accurate discrimination between Pd-Ag and SAD in adulthood.

  17. Behavioral, neuroendocrine and biochemical effects of different doses of 5-HTP in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, I M; Slaap, B R; Westenberg, H G; Den Boer, J A

    1996-05-01

    To investigate the role of serotonin (5-HT) in the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD) a challenge test with L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP) was conducted. Seven patients suffering from PD and seven healthy controls received an i.v. challenge with 10 mg, 20 mg and 40 mg 5-HTP and placebo in random order on four different occasions. Before, during and until 2 h after 5-HTP administration anxious and depressive symptomatology was assessed. In addition, plasma levels of 5-HTP, cortisol, and 5-HIAA were measured at several timepoints. During and after infusion of placebo or any of the different dosages of 5-HTP, none of the patients or controls experienced a panic attack or showed an increase in anxiety or depressive symptoms. There was a dose-related increase in side effects, like nausea, dizziness and fatigue. Only infusion with 40 mg 5-HTP led to an increase in plasma cortisol in both patients and controls. The observed increase in plasma cortisol level was higher for patients compared to controls only at 30 min after infusion. In conclusion, stimulation of the serotonergic neuronal system by three different dosages of 5-HTP did not induce panic or anxiety in PD patients and healthy controls. The 5-HT hypersensitivity hypothesis of PD could not be confirmed in the present study.

  18. Neuronal network of panic disorder: the role of the neuropeptide cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwanzger, P; Domschke, K; Bradwejn, J

    2012-09-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is characterized by panic attacks, anticipatory anxiety and avoidance behavior. Its pathogenesis is complex and includes both neurobiological and psychological factors. With regard to neurobiological underpinnings, anxiety in humans seems to be mediated through a neuronal network, which involves several distinct brain regions, neuronal circuits and projections as well as neurotransmitters. A large body of evidence suggests that the neuropeptide cholecystokinin (CCK) might be an important modulator of this neuronal network. Key regions of the fear network, such as amygdala, hypothalamus, peraqueductal grey, or cortical regions seem to be connected by CCKergic pathways. CCK interacts with several anxiety-relevant neurotransmitters such as the serotonergic, GABA-ergic and noradrenergic system as well as with endocannabinoids, NPY and NPS. In humans, administration of CCK-4 reliably provokes panic attacks, which can be blocked by antipanic medication. Also, there is some support for a role of the CCK system in the genetic pathomechanism of PD with particularly strong evidence for the CCK gene itself and the CCK-2R (CCKBR) gene. Thus, it is hypothesized that genetic variants in the CCK system might contribute to the biological basis for the postulated CCK dysfunction in the fear network underlying PD. Taken together, a large body of evidence suggests a possible role for the neuropeptide CCK in PD with regard to neuroanatomical circuits, neurotransmitters and genetic factors. This review article proposes an extended hypothetical model for human PD, which integrates preclinical and clinical findings on CCK in addition to existing theories of the pathogenesis of PD.

  19. “Nomophobia”: Impact of Cell Phone Use Interfering with Symptoms and Emotions of Individuals with Panic Disorder Compared with a Control Group

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder refers to the frequent and recurring acute attacks of anxiety. Objective : This study describes the routine use of mobiles phones (MPs) and investigates the appearance of possible emotional alterations or symptoms related to their use in patients with panic disorder (PD). Background : We compared patients with PD and agoraphobia being treated at the Panic and Respiration Laboratory of The Institute of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to a control group ...

  20. Executive function in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the influence of comorbid depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olff, Miranda; Polak, A Rosaura; Witteveen, Anke B; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-07-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with neurocognitive deficits, such as impaired verbal memory and executive functioning. Less is known about executive function and the role of comorbid depression in PTSD. Recently, studies have shown that verbal memory impairments may be associated with comorbid depressive symptoms, but their role in executive function impairments is still unclear. To examine several domains of executive functioning in PTSD and the potentially mediating role of comorbid depressive symptoms in the relationship between executive function and PTSD. Executive functioning was assessed in 28 PTSD patients and 28 matched trauma-exposed controls. The Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) with subtests measuring response inhibition (SST), flexibility/set shifting (IED), planning/working memory (OTS) and spatial working memory (SWM) was administered in PTSD patients and trauma-exposed controls. Regression analyses were used to assess the predictive factor of PTSD symptoms (CAPS) and depressive symptoms (HADS-D) in relation to executive function when taking into account the type of trauma. Pearson's correlations were used to examine the association between PTSD symptom clusters (CAPS) and executive function. The mediating effects of depression and PTSD were assessed using regression coefficients and the Sobel's test for mediation. Our findings indicate that PTSD patients performed significantly worse on executive function than trauma-exposed controls in all domains assessed. PTSD symptoms contributed to executive functioning impairments (SST median correct, IED total errors, OTS latency to correct, SWM total errors and SWM strategy). Adding depressive symptoms to the model attenuated these effects. PTSD symptom clusters 'numbing' and to a lesser extent 'avoidance' were more frequently associated with worse executive function (i.e., IED total errors, OTS latency to correct and SWM total errors) than

  1. The development and validation of static and adaptive screeners to measure the severity of panic disorder, social anxiety disorder, and obsessive compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Matthew; Batterham, Philip J; Calear, Alison L; Carragher, Natacha

    2017-04-03

    A series of static and adaptive screeners for panic disorder, social anxiety disorder (SAD), and obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) were developed and compared using data-driven methods to facilitate the measurement of each disorder in community samples. Data comprised 3175 respondents for the development sample and 3755 respondents for the validation sample, recruited independently using Facebook advertising. Item Response Theory (IRT) was utilized to develop static continuous screeners and to simulate computerized adaptive algorithms. The screeners consisted of a small subset of items from each bank (79% reduction in items for panic disorder, 85% reduction in items for SAD, and 84% reduction in items for OCD) that provided similar scores (r = 0.88-0.96). Both static and adaptive screeners were valid with respect to existing scales that purportedly measure similar constructs (r > 0.70 for panic disorder, r > 0.76 for SAD, and r > 0.68 for OCD). The adaptive scales were able to maintain a higher level of precision in comparison to the static scales and evidenced slightly higher concordance with scores generated by the full item banks. The screeners for panic disorder, SAD, and OCD could be used as a flexible approach to measure and monitor the severity of psychopathology in tailored treatment protocols.

  2. Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia: Considerations for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Norr, Aaron M.; Korte, Kristina J.

    2014-01-01

    With the upcoming release of the fifth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-V) there has been a necessary critique of the DSM-IV including questions regarding how to best improve the next iteration of the DSM classification system. The aim of this article is to provide commentary on the probable…

  3. Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia: Considerations for DSM-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Norman B.; Norr, Aaron M.; Korte, Kristina J.

    2014-01-01

    With the upcoming release of the fifth edition of the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders" (DSM-V) there has been a necessary critique of the DSM-IV including questions regarding how to best improve the next iteration of the DSM classification system. The aim of this article is to provide commentary on the probable…

  4. Pentagastrin has panic inducing properties in obsessive compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deLeeuw, AS; DenBoer, JA; Slaap, BR; Westenberg, HGM

    1996-01-01

    The effects of the CCKB-receptor agonist pentagastrin, a synthetic analogue of the cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4), were studied in seven patients suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and seven healthy controls. All subjects were challenged with an IV dose of 0.6 mu g/kg pentagast

  5. Pentagastrin has panic inducing properties in obsessive compulsive disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deLeeuw, AS; DenBoer, JA; Slaap, BR; Westenberg, HGM

    The effects of the CCKB-receptor agonist pentagastrin, a synthetic analogue of the cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK-4), were studied in seven patients suffering from obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) and seven healthy controls. All subjects were challenged with an IV dose of 0.6 mu g/kg

  6. Changes in Regional Cerebral Blood Flow with Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in the Treatment of Panic Disorder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, K. S.; Jun, S. K.; Kim, J. B.; Jang, E. J. [College of Medicine, Univ. of Kyemyoung, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    This study attempted to prospectively investigate changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) on SPECT and clinical response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with panic disorder with (PDA) and without (PD) agoraphobia. Using 99mTc-ECD brain SPECT, we assessed brain perfusion in 5 out patients at rest before and after CBT. The subjects received 12 weekly sessions of CBT. Subjects were assessed by Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, Body Sensations Questionnaire, Beck Anxiety Inventory, Anxiety Sensitivity Index, Beck Depression Inventory-II, Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS) and clinical global improvement (CGI) scale measurement were used as outcome measures. Patients were considered responders to CBT if they are much or very much improved on CGI scale and have a PDSS score at least 30% below their baseline. The scans were statistically analyzed by using statistical parametric mapping (SPM99). The baseline scans were compared to the post-CBT scans by using the statistics option multi subject, different conditions. Of 5 subjects 4 were male, 3 diagnosed PDA, and 4 on anti-anxiety medication. All of the subjects were classified as CBT responders. Their mean pretreatment and posttreatment PDSS were 17.4 (SD=8.2) and 4.2 (SD=3.1), respectively. The results of SPM analysis showed a significant decrease in blood flow after CBT in the thalamus bilaterally and right middle frontal gyrus (Brodmann's area 6). All results were thresholded at an uncorrected p<0.001 (for voxel height) and a corrected p<0.04 (for spatial extent). These preliminary data suggest that SPM analysis of 99mTc-ECD brain SPECT can reveal the change of rCBF in patient with panic disorder before and after CBT and the CBT effect may be associated with limbic and thalamic networks. However this study was a short trial with small number of subjects. Further studies with larger patient cohorts are needed.

  7. Health anxiety and fear of fear in panic disorder and agoraphobia vs. social phobia: a prospective longitudinal study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudaz, M.; Craske, M.; Becker, E.S.; Ledermann, T.; Margraf, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: This study is aimed to evaluate the role of two vulnerability factors, health anxiety and fear of :Par in the prediction of the onset of panic disorder/agoraphobia (PDA) relative to a comparison anxiety disorder Methods: Young women, aged between 18 and 24 years, were investigated at bas

  8. Common paths to ASD severity and PTSD severity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Maj; Armour, Cherie; Wittmann, Lutz

    Numerous studies have identified risk factors for acute and long term posttraumatic symptoms following traumatic exposure. However, little is known about possible common pathways to the development of acute stress disorder (ASD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Research suggests...... that a common pathway to ASD and PTSD may lie in peritraumatic responses and cognitions. Using structural equation modeling we examined the role of three peritraumatic factors (tonic immobility, panic and dissociation) and three cognitive factors (anxiety sensitivity, negative cognitions about the world......, and negative cognitions about self ) on the development of ASD and PTSD severity in a national study of Danish bank robbery victims (N = 450). Peritraumatic panic, anxiety sensitivity, and negative cognitions about self were found to be significant common risk factors, whereas peritraumatic dissociation...

  9. Combination of psychotherapy and benzodiazepines versus either therapy alone for panic disorder: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furukawa Toshi A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The efficacy of combined psychotherapy and benzodiazepine treatment for panic disorder is still unclear despite its widespread use. The present systematic review aims to examine its efficacy compared with either monotherapy alone. Methods: All randomised trials comparing combined psychotherapy and benzodiazepine for panic disorder with either therapy alone were identified by comprehensive electronic search on the Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews, and by contacting experts in the field. Two reviewers independently checked eligibility of trials, assessed quality of trials and extracted data from eligible trials using a standardized data extraction form. Our primary outcome was "response" defined by global judgement. Authors of the original trials were contacted for further unpublished data. Meta-analyses were undertaken synthesizing data from all relevant trials. Results: Only two studies, which compared the combination with behaviour (exposure therapy, met our eligibility criteria. Both studies had a 16-week intervention. Unpublished data were retrieved for one study. The relative risk for response for the combination was 1.25 (95%CI: 0.78 to 2.03 during acute phase treatment, 0.78 (0.45 to 1.35 at the end of treatment, and 0.62 (0.36 to 1.07 at 6–12 months follow-up. Some secondary outcomes hinted at superiority of the combination during acute phase treatment. One study was identified comparing the combination to benzodiazepine. The relative risk for response was 1.57 (0.83 to 2.98, 3.39 (1.03 to 11.21, statistically significant and 2.31 (0.79 to 6.74 respectively. The superiority of the combination was observed on secondary outcomes at all the time points. No sub-group analyses were conducted due to the limited number of included trials. Conclusion: Unlike some narrative reviews in the literature, our systematic search established the paucity of high quality evidence for

  10. Coincidence of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and panic disorder: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breithardt Günter

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Panic disorder (PD is characterised by sudden attacks of intense fear with somatic symptoms including palpitations and tachycardia. Reciprocally, palpitations caused by paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT are commonly associated with anxiety and may therefore be misdiagnosed as PD. As demonstrated by two case reports, PSVT and PD can occur comorbidly in a chronological sequence, with PSVT possibly precipitating and maintaining PD via interoceptive processes or, alternatively, with PD increasing the risk for PSVT by elevating stress levels. As both PSVT and PD require different treatments, potentially helpful differential clinical diagnostic criteria are proposed.

  11. Prevalence, incidence and determinants of PTSD and other mental disorders: design and methods of the PID-PTSD+3 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Schönfeld, Sabine; Thurau, Christin; Trautmann, Sebastian; Galle, Michaela; Mark, Kathleen; Hauffa, Robin; Zimmermann, Peter; Schaefer, Judith; Steudte, Susann; Siegert, Jens; Höfler, Michael; Kirschbaum, Clemens

    2012-06-01

    Investigation of the prevalence, incidence, and determinants of post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD) and other mental disorders associated with military deployment in international missions poses several methodological and procedural challenges. This paper describes the design and sampling strategies, instruments, and experimental procedures applied in a study programme aimed to examine military deployment-related mental health and disorders (prevalence and trajectories) and to identify vulnerability and risk factors (e.g. age, gender, type of mission, rank, and duration of deployment and a wide range of neurobiological, psychological, social, and behavioural factors). The study comprised two components. The first component, a cross-sectional study, included 1483 deployed and 889 non-deployed German soldiers (response rate, 93%) who served during the 2009 International Security Assistance Force (ISAF) mission. A standardized diagnostic instrument (Composite International Diagnostic Interview, CIDI) coupled with established questionnaires was administered to detect and diagnose PTSD and a broad spectrum of mental disorders and mental health problems. The second component, a prospective-longitudinal study, included 621 soldiers examined before (2011) and after return (2012) from the ISAF mission. In addition to the CIDI and questionnaires, several experimental behavioural tests and biological markers were implemented to probe for incident mental disorders, mental health problems and risk factors. Our methods are expected to provide greater precision than previous studies for estimating the risk for incident deployment-related and non-deployment-related disorders and their risk factors. We expect the findings to advance our understanding of a wide spectrum of adverse mental health outcomes beyond PTSD.

  12. A Pilot Study of Sensation-Focused Intensive Treatment for Panic Disorder with Moderate to Severe Agoraphobia: Preliminary Outcome and Benchmarking Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitran, Stella; Morissette, Sandra B.; Spiegel, David A.; Barlow, David H.

    2008-01-01

    This report presents results of a treatment for panic disorder with moderate to severe agoraphobia (PDA-MS) called sensation-focused intensive treatment (SFIT). SFIT is an 8-day intensive treatment that combines features of cognitive-behavioral treatment for panic disorder, such as interoceptive exposure and cognitive restructuring with ungraded…

  13. Which factors influence onset and latency to treatment in generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benatti, Beatrice; Camuri, Giulia; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Cremaschi, Laura; Sembira, Ester; Palazzo, Carlotta; Oldani, Lucio; Dobrea, Cristina; Arici, Chiara; Primavera, Diego; Carpiniello, Bernardo; Castellano, Filippo; Carrà, Giuseppe; Clerici, Massimo; Baldwin, David S; Altamura, Alfredo Carlo

    2016-11-01

    Anxiety disorders are common, comorbid, and disabling conditions, often underdiagnosed and under-treated, typically with an early onset, chronic course, and prolonged duration of untreated illness. The present study aimed to explore the influence of sociodemographic and clinical factors in relation to onset and latency to treatment in patients with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), panic disorder (PD), and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). A total of 157 patients with a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR) diagnosis of PD (n=49), GAD (n=68), and OCD (n=40) were recruited, and epidemiological and clinical variables were collected through a specific questionnaire. Statistical analyses were carried out to compare variables across diagnostic groups. PD, GAD, and OCD patients showed a duration of untreated illness of 53.9±81.5, 77.47±95.76, and 90.6±112.1 months, respectively. Significant differences between groups were found with respect to age, age of first diagnosis, age of first treatment, family history of psychiatric illness, onset-related stressful events, benzodiazepine prescription as first treatment, antidepressant prescription as first treatment, and help-seeking (self-initiated vs. initiated by others). Patients with GAD, PD, and OCD showed significant differences in factors influencing onset and latency to treatment, which may, in turn, affect condition-related outcome and overall prognosis. Further studies with larger samples are warranted in the field.

  14. A longitudinal fMRI investigation in acute post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Jun; Zhang, Li; Qi, Rongfeng; Li, Weihui; Hou, Cailan; Zhong, Yuan; He, Zhong; Li, Lingjiang; Lu, Guangming

    2016-11-01

    Background Neuroimaging studies have implicated limbic, paralimbic, and prefrontal cortex in the pathophysiology of chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, little is known about the neural substrates of acute PTSD and how they change with symptom improvement. Purpose To examine the neural circuitry underlying acute PTSD and brain function changes during clinical recovery from this disorder. Material and Methods Nineteen acute PTSD patients and nine non-PTSD subjects who all experienced a devastating mining accident underwent clinical assessment as well as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning while viewing trauma-related and neutral pictures. Two years after the accident, a subgroup of 17 patients completed a second clinical evaluation, of which 13 were given an identical follow-up scan. Results Acute PTSD patients demonstrated greater activation in the vermis and right posterior cingulate, and greater deactivation in the bilateral medial prefrontal cortex and inferior parietal lobules than controls in the traumatic versus neutral condition. At follow-up, PTSD patients showed symptom reduction and decreased activation in the right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral posterior cingulate/precuneus, and cerebellum. Correlation results confirmed these findings and indicated that brain activation in the posterior cingulate/precuneus and vermis was predictive of PTSD symptom improvement. Conclusion The findings support the involvement of the medial prefrontal cortex, inferior parietal lobule, posterior cingulate, and vermis in the pathogenesis of acute PTSD. Brain activation in the vermis and posterior cingulate/precuneus appears to be a biological marker of recovery potential from PTSD. Furthermore, decreased activation of the middle frontal gyrus, posterior cingulate/precuneus, and cerebellum may reflect symptom improvement.

  15. Transdiagnostic group CBT vs. standard group CBT for depression, social anxiety disorder and agoraphobia/panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse Marie Hemmingsen; Aharoni, Ruth; Pedersen, Morten Hvenegaard

    2017-01-01

    , Social Anxiety Disorder and Agoraphobia/Panic Disorder. In total, 248 patients are recruited from three regional MHS centers across Denmark and included in two intervention arms. The primary outcome is patient-ratings of well-being (WHO Well-being Index, WHO-5), secondary outcomes include level...... Disorders” (UP-CBT) for group delivery in Mental Health Service (MHS), and shown effects comparable to traditional CBT in a naturalistic study. As the use of one manual instead of several diagnosis-specific manuals could simplify logistics, reduce waiting time, and increase therapist expertise compared...

  16. Patient Characteristics and Variability in Adherence and Competence in Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boswell, James F.; Gallagher, Matthew W.; Sauer-Zavala, Shannon E.; Bullis, Jacqueline; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Although associations with outcome have been inconsistent, therapist adherence and competence continues to garner attention, particularly within the context of increasing interest in the dissemination, implementation, and sustainability of evidence-based treatments. To date, research on therapist adherence and competence has focused on average levels across therapists. With a few exceptions, research has failed to address multiple sources of variability in adherence and competence, identify important factors that might account for variability, or take these sources of variability into account when examining associations with symptom change. Objective (a) statistically demonstrate between- and within-therapist variability in adherence and competence ratings and examine patient characteristics as predictors of this variability and (b) examine the relationship between adherence/competence and symptom change. Method Randomly selected audiotaped sessions from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder were rated for therapist adherence and competence. Patients completed a self-report measure of panic symptom severity prior to each session and the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems-Personality Disorder Scale prior to the start of treatment. Results Significant between- and within-therapist variability in adherence and competence were observed. Adherence and competence deteriorated significantly over the course of treatment. Higher patient interpersonal aggression was associated with decrements in both adherence and competence. Neither adherence nor competence predicted subsequent panic severity. Conclusions Variability and “drift” in adherence and competence can be observed in controlled trials. Training and implementation efforts should involve continued consultation over multiple cases in order to account for relevant patient factors and promote sustainability across sessions and patients. PMID:23339537

  17. Mediational Significance of PTSD in the Relationship of Sexual Trauma and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Sarah R.; Uppala, Saritha; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Simonich, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the mediational significance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the development of eating disorder symptomatology following sexually traumatic experiences. Method: Seventy-one victims of sexual trauma and 25 control subjects completed interviews and questionnaires assessing eating disorder psychopathology and…

  18. Mediational Significance of PTSD in the Relationship of Sexual Trauma and Eating Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer, Sarah R.; Uppala, Saritha; Wonderlich, Stephen A.; Crosby, Ross D.; Simonich, Heather

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To examine the mediational significance of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the development of eating disorder symptomatology following sexually traumatic experiences. Method: Seventy-one victims of sexual trauma and 25 control subjects completed interviews and questionnaires assessing eating disorder psychopathology and…

  19. Feasibility and Efficacy of Prolonged Exposure for PTSD among Individuals with a Psychotic Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk L. Grubaugh

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Few empirical studies have examined the feasibility of trauma-focused treatment among individuals with schizophrenia. This lack of research is important given the substantial overlap of trauma exposure and subsequent PTSD with psychotic spectrum disorders, and the potential for PTSD to complicate the course and prognosis of schizophrenia and other variants of severe mental illness.Method: As part of a larger study, 14 veterans with a psychotic spectrum disorder were enrolled to receive prolonged exposure (PE for PTSD within a single arm open trial study design. Patient reactions and responses to PE were examined using feasibility indices such as attrition, survey reactions, and treatment expectancy; pre and post-changes in PTSD severity and diagnostic status; and thematic interviews conducted post-intervention.Results: Quantitative and qualitative data indicate that implementation of PE is feasible, subjectively well-tolerated, and may result in clinically significant reductions in PTSD symptoms in patients with psychotic spectrum disorders.Conclusion: Consistent with treatment outcome data in clinical populations with a broader range of severe mental illnesses, the current results support the use of PTSD exposure-based interventions, such as PE, for individuals with psychotic spectrum disorders.

  20. Can pill placebo augment cognitive-behavior therapy for panic disorder?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Churchill Rachel

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In a number of drug and psychotherapy comparative trials, psychotherapy-placebo combination has been assumed to represent psychotherapy. Whether psychotherapy plus pill placebo is the same as psychotherapy alone is an empirical question which however has to date never been examined systematically. Methods We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs that directly compared cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT alone against CBT plus pill placebo in the treatment of panic disorder. Results Extensive literature search was able to identify three relevant RCTs. At the end of the acute phase treatment, patients who received CBT plus placebo had 26% (95%CI: 2 to 55% increased chances of responding than those who received CBT alone. At follow-up the difference was no longer statistically significant (22%, 95%CI: -10% to 64%. Conclusion The act of taking a pill placebo may enhance the placebo effect already contained in the effective psychotherapeutic intervention during the acute phase treatment. Theoretically this is an argument against the recently claimed null hypothesis of placebo effect in general and clinically it may point to some further room for enhancing the psychotherapeutic approach for panic disorder.

  1. Anxiety Sensitivity, the Menstrual Cycle, and Panic Disorder: A Putative Neuroendocrine and Psychological Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nillni, Yael I.; Toufexis, Donna J.; Rohan, Kelly J.

    2011-01-01

    The 2:1 female-to-male sex difference in the prevalence of Panic Disorder (PD) suggests that there is a sex-specific vulnerability involved in the etiology and/or maintenance of this disorder. The purpose of this paper is to present a new conceptual model, which emphasizes the interaction between a cognitive vulnerability for PD, anxiety sensitivity, and the effects of progesterone and its metabolite, allopregnanolone, on behavioral and physiological responses to stress during the premenstrual phase. This interaction is proposed to be a potential sex-specific pathway that may initiate and/or maintain panic and anxiety symptoms in women. This review paper presents preliminary evidence from both the human and animal literatures to support this new model. Specific topics reviewed include: psychopathology related to the menstrual cycle, anxiety sensitivity and its relationship to the menstrual cycle, PMS, and PMDD, anxiety-modulating effects of progesterone and its neuroactive metabolite, allopregnanolone, and how results from the neuroendocrine literature relate to psychopathology or symptoms associated with the menstrual cycle. PMID:21855828

  2. Black Monday on stock markets throughout the world - a new phenomenon of collective panic disorder? A psychiatric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, Wolfgang; Bleich, Stefan; Reulbach, Udo

    2008-12-01

    Drastic losses on the stock markets within short periods have been the subject of numerous investigations in view of the fact that they are often irrational. Stock exchanges around the world suffered dramatic losses on Monday 21 January 2008, and again recently on Monday 17 March 2008. Regardless of cultural affiliation, public reporting of the global collapse in stock prices on Monday was striking in its almost unified mood of panic, anxiety and general fear of further partially arbitrary trading losses. These partly irrational mechanisms of an international financial crisis seem to fulfil several criteria of typical panic disorders according to classification systems like ICD-10 or DSM-IV. The new phenomenon affects international stock markets in the sense of a global panic disorder (GPD).

  3. Changes in Galanin Systems in a Rat Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnabas, Karen; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Huiying; Kirouac, Gilbert; Vrontakis, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic syndrome triggered by exposure to trauma and a failure to recover from a normal negative emotional reaction to traumatic stress. The neurobiology of PTSD and the participation of neuropeptides in the neural systems and circuits that control fear and anxiety are not fully understood. The long-term dysregulation of neuropeptide systems contributes to the development of anxiety disorders, including PTSD. The neuropeptide galanin (Gal) and its receptors participate in anxiety-like and depression-related behaviors via the modulation of neuroendocrine and monoaminergic systems. The objective of this research was to investigate how Gal expression changes in the brain of rats 2 weeks after exposure to footshock. Rats exposed to footshocks were subdivided into high responders (HR; immobility>60%) and low responders (LR; immobilityanxiety and PTSD development.

  4. Screening for posttraumatic stress disorder in civilian substance use disorder patients: cross-validation of the Jellinek-PTSD screening questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dam, Debora; Ehring, Thomas; Vedel, Ellen; Emmelkamp, Paul M G

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to cross-validate earlier findings regarding the diagnostic efficiency of a modified version of the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PC-PTSD) screening questionnaire (A. Prins, P. Ouimette, R. Kimerling, R. P. Cameron, D. S. Hugelshofer, J. Shaw-Hegwer, et al., 2004). The PC-PTSD is a four-item screening questionnaire for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Based on former research, we adapted the PC-PTSD for use among civilian substance use disorder (SUD) patients (D. Van Dam, T. Ehring, E. Vedel, & P. M. G. Emmelkamp, 2010). This version will be referred to as the Jellinek-PTSD (J-PTSD) screening questionnaire. Results showed a high sensitivity (.87), specificity (.75), and overall efficiency (.77) of the J-PTSD in detecting PTSD when using a cutoff score of 2. This confirms findings in former research, and suggests that the J-PTSD is a useful screening instrument for PTSD within a civilian SUD population. Both PTSD and SUD are severe and disabling disorders causing great psychological distress. An early recognition of PTSD among SUD patients makes it possible to address PTSD symptoms in time, which may ultimately lead to an improvement of symptoms in this complex patient group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroticism moderates the effect of maximum smoking level on lifetime panic disorder: a test using an epidemiologically defined national sample of smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvolensky, Michael J; Sachs-Ericsson, Natalie; Feldner, Matthew T; Schmidt, Norman B; Bowman, Carrie J

    2006-03-30

    The present study evaluated a moderational model of neuroticism on the relation between smoking level and panic disorder using data from the National Comorbidity Survey. Participants (n=924) included current regular smokers, as defined by a report of smoking regularly during the past month. Findings indicated that a generalized tendency to experience negative affect (neuroticism) moderated the effects of maximum smoking frequency (i.e., number of cigarettes smoked per day during the period when smoking the most) on lifetime history of panic disorder even after controlling for drug dependence, alcohol dependence, major depression, dysthymia, and gender. These effects were specific to panic disorder, as no such moderational effects were apparent for other anxiety disorders. Results are discussed in relation to refining recent panic-smoking conceptual models and elucidating different pathways to panic-related problems.

  6. The Relationship Between Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms and Career Outcomes of Army Enlisted Servicemembers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    less likely to get promoted or promoted quickly (Lyness & Thompson, 1997; Powell, Butterfield, & Parent , 2002; Ragins, 1997). As a result, the career ...PTSD) Symptoms and Career Outcomes of Army Enlisted Servicemembers 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d...Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms and Career Outcomes of Army Enlisted Servicemembers Jennifer N. Walters Dissertation The Relationship

  7. [Clinical, neurophysiological and psychological characteristics of neurosis in patients with panic disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuter, N V

    2008-01-01

    Forty-eight patients with panic disorders (PD), aged 31,5 years, 17 men, 31 women, were studied. The results were analyzed in comparison to a control group which comprised 16 healthy people, 6 men, 10 women, mean age 29,5 years. A traditional clinical approach, including somatic, neurologic and psychiatric examination, was used in the study. Also, a neurophysiological study using compression and spectral analyses, EEG, cognitive evoked potentials, skin evoked potentials, was conducted. A psychological examination included assessment of personality traits (Cattell's test), MMPI personality profile, mechanisms of psychological defense, the "Life style index" and Sondy test. A decrease of - and -rhythms was found that implied the reduction of activation processes. The psychological data mirror as common signs characteristic of all PD, as well as psychological features characteristic of neurotic disorders. The results obtained confirm the heterogeneity of PD in nosological aspect that demands using differential approach to the problems of their diagnostics and treatment.

  8. Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Randomized, Controlled Trial and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, Pasquale; Marchand, Andre; Reinharz, Daniel; Savard, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    A randomized, controlled trial was conducted to examine the cost-effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) for panic disorder with agoraphobia. A total of 100 participants were randomly assigned to standard (n = 33), group (n = 35), and brief (n = 32) treatment conditions. Results show significant clinical and statistical improvement…

  9. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia in older people : a comparison with younger patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Gert-Jan; Kampman, Mirjam; Keijsers, Ger P. J.; Hoogduin, Cees A. L.; Oude Voshaar, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Older adults with panic disorder and agoraphobia (PDA) are underdiagnosed and undertreated, while studies of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are lacking. This study compares the effectiveness of CBT for PDA in younger and older adults. METHODS: A total of 172 patients with PDA (DSM-IV

  10. The cholecystokinin-B receptor antagonist CI-988 failed to affect CCK-4 induced symptoms in panic disorder patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanMegen, HJGM; Westenberg, HGM; denBoer, JA; Slaap, B; vanEsRadhakishun, F; Pande, AC

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the cholecystokinin-B (CCK-B) receptor antagonist CI-988 on symptoms elicited by the cholecystokinin tetrapeptide (CCK4) were studied in DSM-IIIR patients with panic disorder. The study employed a double-blind, two-period incomplete block design. Patients (n = 14) received two differe

  11. Health functioning impairments associated with posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorders, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayfert, Claudia; Dums, Aricca R; Ferguson, Robert J; Hegel, Mark T

    2002-04-01

    Although anxiety disorders have been associated with impairments in self-reported health functioning, the relative effect of various anxiety disorders has not been studied. We compared health functioning of patients with a principal diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), panic disorder (PD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), and major depressive disorder (MDD). Patients with PTSD and MDD were equally impaired on overall mental health functioning, and both were significantly worse than patients with PD and GAD. PTSD was associated with significantly worse physical health functioning relative to PD, GAD, and MDD. Hierarchical regression showed that the association of PTSD with physical health functioning was unique and was not caused by the effects of age, depression, or comorbid anxiety disorders. Both PTSD and comorbid anxiety accounted for unique variance in mental functioning. These results highlight the association of PTSD with impaired physical and mental functioning and suggest that effective treatment of PTSD may affect overall health.

  12. [Gabapentin treatment in a female patient with panic disorder and adverse effects under carbamazepine during benzodiazepine withdrawal].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himmerich, Hubertus; Nickel, Thomas; Dalal, Mira A; Müller, Marianne B

    2007-03-01

    Despite their addictive potential, benzodiazepines belong to the most often prescribed drugs. We report on a patient with alprazolam dependence, who initially was treated with carbamazepine because of severe withdrawal symptoms. Due to liver enzyme elevation related to carbamazepine, we had to stop this treatment and instead of that started gabapentin treatment. Under this new therapy, the patient showed a dramatic relief of withdrawal symptoms and of the panic attacks recurring during withdrawal. Hence, due to their effectiveness and tolerability, newer anticonvulsants could be considered as medication for benzodiazepine withdrawal and as an alternative for benzodiazepine treatment in panic disorders.

  13. Prazosin Augmentation of Outpatient Treatment of Alcohol Use Disorders in Active Duty Soldiers with and without PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    treatment and 2) to determine if the presence of PTSD affects prazosin efficacy for AUD. AUD are major causes of behavioral, medical, family , and...debilitating problem in active duty Service Members and is a frequent comorbidity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Our pilot placebo...durability of prazosin effect on AUD in those randomized to prazosin in the RCT. 2. KEYWORDS: alcohol use disorder, prazosin, Service Member , PTSD

  14. Specific side effects of long-term imipramine management of panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavissakalian, Matig; Perel, James; Guo, Shenyang

    2002-04-01

    In a recent study, the authors suggested that tachycardia, dry mouth, and sweating continued to burden patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia who have shown marked and stable response to 6 months of imipramine treatment at the fixed, weight-adjusted dose of 2.25 mg/kg/day. Although sexual dysfunction and weight gain were not a significant burden in that study, they are important problems in long-term treatment with antidepressant drugs. In the present study, in the context of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 1-year discontinuation and maintenance study of 53 patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia who respond to imipramine, the authors examine the extent and the specificity of these five side effects of imipramine maintenance using data at pretreatment, at the end of 24 weeks of open imipramine treatment (or month 0 of randomization), and at months 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 of randomized treatment. Hierarchical linear modeling and repeated measures of analyses of variance in subsamples of completers confirmed that dry mouth, sweating, and increased heart rate constitute a significant and specific enduring burden of imipramine maintenance treatment. The data also revealed that weight gain is a significant and specific side effect of 1-year imipramine maintenance treatment; however, the likelihood of reporting sexual dysfunction decreased over time, with no difference between the placebo and imipramine maintenance conditions. The results are discussed in the context of previous studies of imipramine side effects in the management of depression and the available literature of sexual and weight side effects of antidepressant medications in the treatment of anxiety disorders.

  15. O tabagismo e o transtorno do pânico: gravidade e comorbidades Smoking and panic disorder: severity and comorbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Christophe da Rocha Freire

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: Estudos indicam que há uma associação entre tabagismo e transtorno do pânico, e alguns autores sugerem que o tabagismo aumenta o risco de ataques de pânico e transtorno do pânico. Este estudo analisa a hipótese de que pacientes fumantes com esse transtorno apresentam um quadro clínico mais grave. MÉTODO: Sessenta e quatro pacientes em tratamento no Laboratório do Pânico e Respiração (Instituto de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, com transtorno do pânico, segundo critérios do Manual de Diagnóstico e Estatística das Perturbações Mentais (DSM, 4ª edição, foram divididos em grupos de tabagistas e não-tabagistas. Os grupos foram avaliados quanto a características sociodemográficas, comorbidades e gravidade do quadro clínico. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença significativa em relação à gravidade do transtorno do pânico; no entanto, tabagistas tiveram prevalência de depressão significativamente maior (p = 0,014 do que não-tabagistas. CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo não evidenciou que o transtorno do pânico em tabagistas é mais grave, porém indicou que esses pacientes têm mais comorbidade com depressão.INTRODUCTION: Several studies indicate that panic disorder and tobacco smoking are associated, and some authors hypothesize that smoking increases the risk of panic attacks and panic disorder. The objective of this study is to investigate whether smokers have a more severe form of panic disorder than non-smokers. METHOD: Sixty-four patients already in treatment at the Laboratory of Panic and Respiration (Instituto de Psiquiatria da Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro with panic disorder as established by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, were divided into groups of smokers and non-smokers. Both groups were compared regarding sociodemographic data, comorbidities and clinical status severity. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant

  16. GUIDED IMAGERY: KONSEP KONSELING KREATIF UNTUK PENANGGANAN POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    author Yulianto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Everyone has a different reaction in facing the extraordinary events that are triggered by the teribble events. They clash psychic cause post traumatic stress disorder or in Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. To solve it can be done through treatment with pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy. In psychotherapy handling, one of the techniques that can be used is the technique of guided imagery as one of the PTSD treatment efforts. This technique is an effort that can be used to deal with a difficult client to communicate verbally. Communication is the basis of the counseling relationship. Implementation of counseling through guided imagery techniques are considered able to help clients resolve client’s problems. In this technique, clients are guided to be able to focus on positive thoughts and imaginations that lead to negative events experienced to be able to create a positive picture of the imagination.Keywords: Guided imagery, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, Creative counseling

  17. Biomarkers of Risk for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    NPY ). None of these genes predicted PTSD diagnoses in this sample. Next, because there was variability in the degree of combat exposure as...Lappalainen J. A sequencing -based survey of functional APAF1 alleles in a large sample of individuals with affective illness and population controls. Am J

  18. Identification of Risk Factors for Chronic Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Miller, Wolf, Martin , Kaloupek, & Keane, 2008). Furthermore, PTSD hyperarousal symptoms have been linked to greater aggressive tendencies among male...dimensional conceptualization of posttraumatic stress reactions on the basis of taxometric procedures (e.g. Forbes, Haslam, Williams, & Creamer , 2005) and...New York State Psychiatric Institute, Biometrics Research. Forbes, D., Haslam, N., Williams, B. J., & Creamer , M. (2005). Testing the latent

  19. Whole-exome sequencing implicates DGKH as a risk gene for panic disorder in the Faroese population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Noomi; Lescai, Francesco; Liang, Jieqin

    2016-01-01

    The demographic history of the isolated population of the Faroe Islands may have induced enrichment of variants rarely seen in outbred European populations, including enrichment of risk variants for panic disorder (PD). PD is a common mental disorder, characterized by recurring and unprovoked panic...... associations were found, however several single variants and genes showed strong association with PD, where DGKH was found to be the strongest PD associated gene. Interestingly DGKH has previously demonstrated genome-wide significant association with bipolar disorder as well as evidence of association to other...... mental disorders. Additionally, we found an enrichment of PD risk variants in the Faroese population; variants with otherwise low frequency in more outbreed European populations. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  20. The effect of fear on paralinguistic aspects of speech in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagenaars, Muriel A; van Minnen, Agnes

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of fear on paralinguistic aspects of speech in patients suffering from panic disorder with agoraphobia (N = 25). An experiment was conducted that comprised two modules: Autobiographical Talking and Script Talking. Each module consisted of two emotional conditions: Fearful and Happy. Speech was recorded digitally and analyzed using PRAAT, a computer program designed to extract paralinguistic measures from digitally recorded spoken sound. In addition to subjective fear, several speech characteristics were measured as a reflection of psychophysiology: rate of speech, mean pitch and pitch variability. Results show that in Autobiographical Talking speech was slower, had a lower pitch, and a lower pitch variability than in Script Talking. Pitch variability was lower in Fearful than in Happy speech. The findings indicate that paralinguistic aspects of speech, especially pitch variability, are promising measures to gain information about fear processing during the recollection of autobiographical memories.

  1. Pituitary hormone responses to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in panic disorder and healthy control subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, R S; Wetzler, S; Asnis, G M; Kling, M A; Suckow, R F; van Praag, H M

    1991-04-01

    The present study reports adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and prolactin responses after oral administration of 0.25 mg/kg of the serotonin agonist, meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP), in patients with panic disorder (PD) and in healthy subjects. MCPP blood levels were similar for the two groups, but almost twice as high in males as in females. Female patients had augmented ACTH and prolactin release as compared to healthy females, while ACTH and prolactin release in male patients was similar to that of male controls. These results suggest that female PD patients have hypersensitive serotonin receptors. Moreover, they indicate that pharmacokinetic gender differences may affect challenge studies, and that different doses may be required to study neuroendocrine responses in males and females.

  2. Possible cross-sensitivity between sertraline and paroxetine in a panic disorder patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khairkar Praveen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cross-sensitivity due to paroxetine and sertraline, the SSRIs, is rarely reported in the literature. We report an adverse drug reaction to paroxetine and sertraline in a patient of panic disorder, who initially developed a maculopapular, erythematous, pruritic rash in the third week with sertraline 50 mg/day. The rash resolved within 2 days of its discontinuation and oral supplementation of diphenhydramine and betamethasone. 10 days following discontinuation of sertraline, the patient was shifted on sustain release paroxetine 12.5 mg/day when another skin reaction with the same appearance and distribution appeared on day 4 of it, suggesting a possibility of cross-sensitivity, a drug class effect. This case report intends to improve the awareness among clinicians to use caution when choosing an alternative SSRIs.

  3. Translational approach to the pathophysiology of panic disorder: Focus on serotonin and endogenous opioids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, Frederico G

    2017-05-01

    Panic patients experience recurrent panic attacks. Two main neurochemical hypotheses have been proposed to explain this vulnerability. The first suggests that panic patients have deficient serotonergic inhibition of neurons localized in the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter of the midbrain that organizes defensive reactions to cope with proximal threats as well as of sympathomotor control areas of the rostral ventrolateral medulla that generate neurovegetative symptoms of the panic attack. The second proposes that endogenous opioids buffer panic attacks in normal subjects, and their deficit results in heightened sensitivity to suffocation and separation anxiety in panic patients. Experimental results obtained in rat models of panic indicate that serotonin interacts synergistically with endogenous opioids in the dorsal periaqueductal gray through 5-HT1A and μ-opioid receptors to inhibit proximal defense and, supposedly, panic attacks. These findings allow reconciliation of the serotonergic and opioidergic hypotheses of panic pathophysiology. They also indicate that endogenous opioids are likely to participate in the panicolytic action of antidepressants and suggest that exogenous opioids may be useful for treating panic patients resistant to conventional pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Metabolic decoupling in daily life in patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaltz, Monique C; Kolodyazhniy, Vitaliy; Blechert, Jens; Margraf, Jürgen; Grossman, Paul; Wilhelm, Frank H

    2015-09-01

    Various studies have assessed autonomic and respiratory underpinnings of panic attacks, yet the psychophysiological functioning of panic disorder (PD) patients has rarely been examined under naturalistic conditions at times when acute attacks were not reported. We hypothesized that emotional activation in daily life causes physiologically demonstrable deviations from efficient metabolic regulation in PD patients. Metabolic coupling was estimated as within-individual correlations between heart rate (HR) and indices of metabolic activity, i.e., physical activity (measured by 3-axial accelerometry, Acc), and minute ventilation (Vm, measured by calibrated inductive plethysmography, as proxy for oxygen consumption). A total of 565 daytime hours were recorded in 19 PD patients and 20 healthy controls (HC). Pairwise cross-correlations of minute-by-minute averages of these metabolic indices were calculated for each participant and then correlated with several indices of self-reported anxiety. Ambulatory HR was elevated in PD (p = .05, d = 0.67). Patients showed reduced HR-Acc (p < .006, d = 0.97) and HR-Vm coupling (p < .009, d = 0.91). Combining Vm and Acc to predict HR showed the strongest group separation (p < .002, d = 1.07). Discriminant analyses, based on the combination of Vm and Acc to predict HR, classified 77% of all participants correctly. In PD, HR-Acc coupling was inversely related to trait anxiety sensitivity, as well as tonic and phasic daytime anxiety. The novel method that was used demonstrates that anxiety in PD may reduce efficient long-term metabolic coupling. Metabolic decoupling may serve as physiological characteristic of PD and might aid diagnostics for PD and other anxiety disorders. This measure deserves further study in research on health consequences of anxiety and psychosocial stress.

  5. Multivariate analysis of anxiety disorders yields further evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21, and 7p in panic disorder families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logue, M.W.; Bauver, S.R.; Knowles, J.A.; Gameroff, M.J.; Weissman, M.M.; Crowe, R.R.; Fyer, A.J.; Hamilton, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    Replication has been difficult to achieve in linkage studies of psychiatric disease. Linkage studies of panic disorder have indicated regions of interest on chromosomes 1q, 2p, 2q, 3, 7, 9, 11, 12q13, 12q23, and 15. Few regions have been implicated in more than one study. We examine two samples, the Iowa and the Columba panic disorder families. We use the fuzzy clustering method presented by Kaabi et al. (2006) to summarize liability to panic disorder, agoraphobia, simple phobia, and social phobia. Kaabi et al. applied this method to the Yale panic disorder linkage families and found evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21, 4q32, 7p, and 8. When we apply the same method to the Iowa families, we obtain overlapping evidence of linkage to chromosomes 4q21 and 7p. Additionally, we find evidence of linkage on chromosomes 1, 5, 6, 16, and 22. The Columbia data does not indicate linkage to any of the Kaabi et al. peaks, instead implicating chromosomes 2 and 22q11 (2 Mb from COMT). There is some evidence of overlapping linkage between the Iowa and Columbia datasets on chromosomes 1 and 14. While use of fuzzy clustering has not produced complete concordance across datasets, it has produced more than previously seen in analyses of panic disorder proper. We conclude that chromosomes 4q21 and 7p should be considered strong candidate regions for panic and fear-associated anxiety disorder loci. More generally, this suggests that analyses including multiple aspects of psychopathology may lead to greater consistency across datasets. PMID:22253211

  6. Dissociation, shame, complex PTSD, child maltreatment and intimate relationship self-concept in dissociative disorder, chronic PTSD and mixed psychiatric groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorahy, Martin J; Middleton, Warwick; Seager, Lenaire; McGurrin, Patrick; Williams, Mary; Chambers, Ron

    2015-02-01

    Whilst a growing body of research has examined dissociation and other psychiatric symptoms in severe dissociative disorders (DDs), there has been no systematic examination of shame and sense of self in relationships in DDs. Chronic child abuse often associated with severe DDs, like dissociative identity disorder, is likely to heighten shame and relationship concerns. This study investigated complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), borderline and Schneiderian symptoms, dissociation, shame, child abuse, and various markers of self in relationships (e.g., relationship esteem, relationship depression, fear of relationships). Participants were assessed via clinical interview with psychometrically sound questionnaires. They fell into three diagnostic groups, dissociative disorder (n=39; primarily dissociative identity disorder), chronic PTSD (Chr-PTSD; n=13) or mixed psychiatric presentations (MP; n=21; primarily mood and anxiety disorders). All participants had a history of child abuse and/or neglect, and the groups did not differ on age and gender. The DD group was higher on nearly all measured variables than the MP group, and had more severe dissociative, borderline and Schneiderian symptoms than the Chr-PTSD sample. Shame and complex PTSD symptoms fell marginally short of predicting reductions in relationship esteem, pathological dissociative symptoms predicted increased relationship depression, and complex PTSD symptoms predicted fear of relationships. The representativeness of the samples was unknown. Severe psychiatric symptoms differentiate DDs from chronic PTSD, while dissociation and shame have a meaningful impact on specific markers of relationship functioning in psychiatric patients with a history of child abuse and neglect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Evaluation of therapeutic effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with panic disorder using serial {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain perfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hee; Song, Ho Chun; Yang, Jong Chul; Lee, Byeong Il; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Min, Jung Joon [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Tae Jin [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    Although several neuroanatomical models of panic disorder have been proposed, little is known regarding the neurological mechanisms underlying cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with panic disorder. This study was performed to identify the brain structures that show changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) after CBT in patients with panic disorder. Seven patients who were diagnosed as panic disorder by DSM-IV were treated with CBT for 8 weeks and twelve healthy volunteers joined in this study. Serial {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain perfusion SPECT images were aquisited and PDSS-SR (Self-Report version of Panic Disorder Severity Scale) and ACQ (Agoraphobic Cognitive Question) scores were measured just before and after CBT in all patients. Data were analyzed using SPM2. Subjective symptoms were improved, and PDSS-SR and ACQ scores were significantly reduced (14.9 {+-} 3.9 vs. 7.0 {+-} 1.8, {rho} < 0.05; 30.3 {+-} 8.5 vs. 21.6 {+-} 3.4, {rho} < 0.05, respectively) after CBT in panic patients. Before CBT, a significant increase of rCBF was found in the cingulate gylus, thalamus, midbrain, both medial frontal and temporal lobes of the panic patients compared to the normal volunteers. After CBT, we observed a significant rCBF decrease in the left parahippocamus, right insula and cingulate gyrus, both frontal and temporal lobes, and a significant rCBF increase in both the occipital lobes, left insula, both frontal and left parietal lobes. These data suggested that CBT is effective for panic disorder and diminish the activity of the brain areas associated with fear in panic disorder.

  8. Posttraumatic stress disorders (PTSD) from different perspectives: a transdisciplinary integrative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakovljević, Miro; Brajković, Lovorka; Jakšić, Nenad; Lončar, Mladen; Aukst-Margetić, Branka; Lasić, Davor

    2012-09-01

    Psychotraumatization continues to be a pervasive aspect of life in the 21st century all over the world so we should better understand psychological trauma and PTSD for the sake of prevention and healing. We have made an overview of available literature on PTSD to identify explanatory models, hypotheses and theories. In this paper we describe our transdisciplinary multiperspective integrative model of PTSD based on the seven perspective explanatory approach, on the fifth discipline, the art and practice of the learning organization as well as on the method of multiple working hypotheses.Trauma vulnerability, strengths, resilience and posttraumatic growth are key concepts that enable an integration of the distinct perspectives into a coherent transdisciplinary multiperspective explanatory and treatment model of PTSD. PTSD is a complex highly disabling and suffering disorder where the past is always present in people haunted by the dread frozen in memory of the traumatic events. However, PTSD also represents an oportunity for psychological and spiritual growth due to the human ability to adapt and thrive despite experiencing adversity and tough times.

  9. Risk factors for chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in SARS survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Ivan Wing Chit; Chu, Chung Ming; Pan, Pey Chyou; Yiu, Michael Gar Chung; Ho, Suzanne C; Chan, Veronica Lee

    2010-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is one of the most prevalent long-term psychiatric diagnoses among survivors of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The objective of this study was to identify the predictors of chronic PTSD in SARS survivors. PTSD at 30 months after the SARS outbreak was assessed by the Structured Clinical Interview for the DSM-IV. Survivors' demographic data, medical information and psychosocial variables were collected for risk factor analysis. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that female gender as well as the presence of chronic medical illnesses diagnosed before the onset of SARS and avascular necrosis were independent predictors of PTSD at 30 months post-SARS. Associated factors included higher-chance external locus of control, higher functional disability and higher average pain intensity. The study of PTSD at 30 months post-SARS showed that the predictive value of acute medical variables may fade out. Our findings do not support some prior hypotheses that the use of high dose corticosteroids is protective against the development of PTSD. On the contrary, the adversity both before and after the SARS outbreak may be more important in hindering recovery from PTSD. The risk factor analysis can not only improve the detection of hidden psychiatric complications but also provide insight for the possible model of care delivery for the SARS survivors. With the complex interaction of the biopsychosocial challenges of SARS, an integrated multidisciplinary clinic setting may be a superior approach in the long-term management of complicated PTSD cases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ataques de pânico são realmente inofensivos? O impacto cardiovascular do transtorno de pânico Are panic attacks really harmless? The cardiovascular impact of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Sardinha

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estresse e depressão já são considerados fatores de risco para o desenvolvimento e o agravamento de doenças cardiovasculares. Os transtornos de ansiedade têm sido fortemente associados às cardiopatias nos últimos anos. O transtorno de pânico em cardiopatas representa um desafio em termos de diagnóstico e tratamento. Atualizar o leitor quanto ao status da associação entre transtornos de ansiedade, especialmente transtorno de pânico, e cardiopatias. MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma busca nas bases de dados ISI e Medline, com as palavras-chave: "heart disease", "coronary disease", "anxiety", "panic disorder" e "autonomic function". Foram selecionados os artigos publicados a partir de 1998. DISCUSSÃO: O padrão autonômico encontrado em pacientes com transtorno de pânico, em particular a redução da variabilidade cardíaca, é apontado como o provável fator mediador do impacto cardiovascular do transtorno de pânico. CONCLUSÕES: Apesar de a associação entre transtornos de ansiedade e doenças cardiovasculares estar atualmente bastante estabelecida, existem ainda diversas lacunas no estado atual do conhecimento. São recomendadas a terapia cognitivo-comportamental e a prática de exercícios físicos supervisionados como potenciais coadjuvantes na intervenção terapêutica.OBJECTIVE: Psychosocial stress and depression have already been established as risk factors for developing and worsening cardiovascular diseases. Anxiety disorders are been strongly associated to cardiac problems nowadays. Panic disorder in cardiac patients represents a challenge for diagnose and treatment. Update the reader on the status of the association between anxiety disorders, particularly panic disorder, in cardiac patients. METHOD: Were retrieved papers published at ISI and Medline databases since 1998. Key-words used were: "heart disease", "coronary disease", "anxiety", "panic disorder" and "autonomic function". DISCUSSION: The characteristic

  11. From Pavlov to PTSD: the extinction of conditioned fear in rodents, humans, and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanElzakker, Michael B; Dahlgren, M Kathryn; Davis, F Caroline; Dubois, Stacey; Shin, Lisa M

    2014-09-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Ivan Pavlov demonstrated that dogs could learn to use a neutral cue to predict a biologically relevant event: after repeated predictive pairings, Pavlov's dogs were conditioned to anticipate food at the sound of a bell, which caused them to salivate. Like sustenance, danger is biologically relevant, and neutral cues can take on great salience when they predict a threat to survival. In anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this type of conditioned fear fails to extinguish, and reminders of traumatic events can cause pathological conditioned fear responses for decades after danger has passed. In this review, we use fear conditioning and extinction studies to draw a direct line from Pavlov to PTSD and other anxiety disorders. We explain how rodent studies have informed neuroimaging studies of healthy humans and humans with PTSD. We describe several genes that have been linked to both PTSD and fear conditioning and extinction and explain how abnormalities in fear conditioning or extinction may reflect a general biomarker of anxiety disorders. Finally, we explore drug and neuromodulation treatments that may enhance therapeutic extinction in anxiety disorders.

  12. From Pavlov to PTSD: The extinction of conditioned fear in rodents, humans, and in anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanElzakker, Michael B.; Dahlgren, M. Kathryn; Davis, F. Caroline; Dubois, Stacey; Shin, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Ivan Pavlov demonstrated that dogs could learn to use a neutral cue to predict a biologically relevant event: after repeated predictive pairings, Pavlov's dogs were conditioned to anticipate food at the sound of a bell, which caused them to salivate. Like sustenance, danger is biologically relevant, and neutral cues can take on great salience when they predict a threat to survival. In anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this type of conditioned fear fails to extinguish, and reminders of traumatic events can cause pathological conditioned fear responses for decades after danger has passed. In this review, we use fear conditioning and extinction studies to draw a direct line from Pavlov to PTSD and other anxiety disorders. We explain how rodent studies have informed neuroimaging studies of healthy humans and humans with PTSD. We describe several genes that have been linked to both PTSD and fear conditioning and extinction and explain how abnormalities in fear conditioning or extinction may reflect a general biomarker of anxiety disorders. Finally, we explore drug and neuromodulation treatments that may enhance therapeutic extinction in anxiety disorders. PMID:24321650

  13. Prolonged exposure and EMDR for PTSD v. a PTSD waiting-list condition: effects on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning in patients with chronic psychotic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bont, P.A.J.M.; van den Berg, D.P.G.; van der Vleugel, B.M.; de Roos, C.; de Jongh, A.; van der Gaag, M.; van Minnen, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In patients with psychotic disorders, the effects of psychological post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning are largely unknown Method. In a single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) 155 outpatients in treatment for

  14. Prolonged exposure and EMDR for PTSD v. a PTSD waiting-list condition: Effects on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning in patients with chronic psychotic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, P.A.J.M. de; Berg, D.P.G. van den; Vleugel, B.M. van der; Roos, C.J.A.M. de; Jongh, A. de; Gaag, M. van der; Minnen, A. van

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with psychotic disorders, the effects of psychological post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning are largely unknown Method: In a single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) 155 outpatients in treatment for

  15. Prolonged exposure and EMDR for PTSD v. a PTSD waiting-list condition: effects on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning in patients with chronic psychotic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bont, P.A.J.M.; van den Berg, D.P.G.; van der Vleugel, B.M.; de Roos, C.; de Jongh, A.; van der Gaag, M.; van Minnen, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. In patients with psychotic disorders, the effects of psychological post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning are largely unknown Method. In a single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) 155 outpatients in treatment for

  16. Prolonged exposure and EMDR for PTSD v. a PTSD waiting-list condition: Effects on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning in patients with chronic psychotic disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, P.A.J.M. de; Berg, D.P.G. van den; Vleugel, B.M. van der; Roos, C.J.A.M. de; Jongh, A. de; Gaag, M. van der; Minnen, A. van

    2016-01-01

    Background: In patients with psychotic disorders, the effects of psychological post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment on symptoms of psychosis, depression and social functioning are largely unknown Method: In a single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) 155 outpatients in treatment for

  17. MAOA gene hypomethylation in panic disorder-reversibility of an epigenetic risk pattern by psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, C; Richter, J; Mahr, M; Gajewska, A; Schiele, M A; Gehrmann, A; Schmidt, B; Lesch, K-P; Lang, T; Helbig-Lang, S; Pauli, P; Kircher, T; Reif, A; Rief, W; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, A N; Arolt, V; Wittchen, H-U; Hamm, A O; Deckert, J; Domschke, K

    2016-04-05

    Epigenetic signatures such as methylation of the monoamine oxidase A (MAOA) gene have been found to be altered in panic disorder (PD). Hypothesizing temporal plasticity of epigenetic processes as a mechanism of successful fear extinction, the present psychotherapy-epigenetic study for we believe the first time investigated MAOA methylation changes during the course of exposure-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in PD. MAOA methylation was compared between N=28 female Caucasian PD patients (discovery sample) and N=28 age- and sex-matched healthy controls via direct sequencing of sodium bisulfite-treated DNA extracted from blood cells. MAOA methylation was furthermore analyzed at baseline (T0) and after a 6-week CBT (T1) in the discovery sample parallelized by a waiting time in healthy controls, as well as in an independent sample of female PD patients (N=20). Patients exhibited lower MAOA methylation than healthy controls (P<0.001), and baseline PD severity correlated negatively with MAOA methylation (P=0.01). In the discovery sample, MAOA methylation increased up to the level of healthy controls along with CBT response (number of panic attacks; T0-T1: +3.37±2.17%), while non-responders further decreased in methylation (-2.00±1.28%; P=0.001). In the replication sample, increases in MAOA methylation correlated with agoraphobic symptom reduction after CBT (P=0.02-0.03). The present results support previous evidence for MAOA hypomethylation as a PD risk marker and suggest reversibility of MAOA hypomethylation as a potential epigenetic correlate of response to CBT. The emerging notion of epigenetic signatures as a mechanism of action of psychotherapeutic interventions may promote epigenetic patterns as biomarkers of lasting extinction effects.

  18. Effects of baseline problematic alcohol and drug use on internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy outcomes for depression, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Gajecki

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Patients' problematic substance use prevalence and effects were explored in relation to internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT outcomes for depression, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder. METHODS: At baseline and treatment conclusion, 1601 ICBT patients were assessed with self-rated measures for alcohol and drug use (AUDIT/DUDIT, depressive symptoms (MADRS-S, panic disorder symptoms (PDSS-SR and social anxiety symptoms (LSAS-SR. RESULTS: Problematic substance use (AUDIT ≥ 8 for men, ≥ 6 for women; DUDIT ≥ 1 occurred among 32.4% of the patients; 24.1% only alcohol, 4.6% only drugs, and 3.7% combined alcohol and drug use. Hazardous alcohol use and probable alcohol dependence negatively affected panic disorder outcomes, and hazardous drug use led to worse social anxiety outcomes. Depression outcomes were not affected by substance use. Treatment adherence was negatively affected by problematic drug use among men and 25-34 year olds; combined substance use negatively affected adherence for women and 35-64 year olds. CONCLUSION: Problematic substance use does not preclude ICBT treatment but can worsen outcomes, particularly problematic alcohol use for panic disorder patients and hazardous drug use for social anxiety patients. ICBT clinicians should exercise particular caution when treating men and younger patients with problematic drug use, and women or older patients with combined substance use.

  19. Effects of baseline problematic alcohol and drug use on internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy outcomes for depression, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajecki, Mikael; Berman, Anne H; Sinadinovic, Kristina; Andersson, Claes; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Hedman, Erik; Rück, Christian; Lindefors, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Patients' problematic substance use prevalence and effects were explored in relation to internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy (ICBT) outcomes for depression, panic disorder and social anxiety disorder. At baseline and treatment conclusion, 1601 ICBT patients were assessed with self-rated measures for alcohol and drug use (AUDIT/DUDIT), depressive symptoms (MADRS-S), panic disorder symptoms (PDSS-SR) and social anxiety symptoms (LSAS-SR). Problematic substance use (AUDIT ≥ 8 for men, ≥ 6 for women; DUDIT ≥ 1) occurred among 32.4% of the patients; 24.1% only alcohol, 4.6% only drugs, and 3.7% combined alcohol and drug use. Hazardous alcohol use and probable alcohol dependence negatively affected panic disorder outcomes, and hazardous drug use led to worse social anxiety outcomes. Depression outcomes were not affected by substance use. Treatment adherence was negatively affected by problematic drug use among men and 25-34 year olds; combined substance use negatively affected adherence for women and 35-64 year olds. Problematic substance use does not preclude ICBT treatment but can worsen outcomes, particularly problematic alcohol use for panic disorder patients and hazardous drug use for social anxiety patients. ICBT clinicians should exercise particular caution when treating men and younger patients with problematic drug use, and women or older patients with combined substance use.

  20. Facing the fear--clinical and neural effects of cognitive behavioural and pharmacotherapy in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Carolin; Wittmann, André; Gechter, Johanna; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Lueken, Ulrike; Plag, Jens; Straube, Benjamin; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Fehm, Lydia; Gerlach, Alexander L; Kircher, Tilo; Fydrich, Thomas; Deckert, Jürgen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Heinz, Andreas; Arolt, Volker; Ströhle, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and pharmacological treatment with selective serotonin or serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI/SSNRI) are regarded as efficacious treatments for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG). However, little is known about treatment-specific effects on symptoms and neurofunctional correlates. We used a comparative design with PD/AG patients receiving either two types of CBT (therapist-guided (n=29) or non-guided exposure (n=22)) or pharmacological treatment (SSRI/SSNRI; n=28) as well as a wait-list control group (WL; n=15) to investigate differential treatment effects in general aspects of fear and depression (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale HAM-A and Beck Depression Inventory BDI), disorder-specific symptoms (Mobility Inventory MI, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale subscale panic attacks PAS-panic, Anxiety Sensitivity Index ASI, rating of agoraphobic stimuli) and neurofunctional substrates during symptom provocation (Westphal-Paradigm) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Comparisons of neural activation patterns also included healthy controls (n=29). Both treatments led to a significantly greater reduction in panic attacks, depression and general anxiety than the WL group. The CBT groups, in particular, the therapist-guided arm, had a significantly greater decrease in avoidance, fear of phobic situations and anxiety symptoms and reduction in bilateral amygdala activation while the processing of agoraphobia-related pictures compared to the SSRI/SSNRI and WL groups. This study demonstrates that therapist-guided CBT leads to a more pronounced short-term impact on agoraphobic psychopathology and supports the assumption of the amygdala as a central structure in a complex fear processing system as well as the amygdala's involvement in the fear system's sensitivity to treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  1. Terapia cognitivo-comportamental no transtorno de pânico Cognitive-behavioral therapy in panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Gus Manfro

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O transtorno de pânico é uma condição crônica e recorrente que prejudica a qualidade de vida e o funcionamento psicossocial dos portadores. Embora os medicamentos sejam efetivos na redução dos ataques de pânico, muitos pacientes não respondem adequadamente a essas intervenções. A terapia cognitivo-comportamental fornece um método alternativo eficaz para tratar transtorno de pânico e evitação agorafóbica. O objetivo do estudo é o de descrever o uso de técnicas cognitivo-comportamentais no tratamento do transtorno de pânico. MÉTODO: Revisão narrativa a partir dos bancos de dados do Medline, SciELO e PsycInfo e de livros-texto especializados. RESULTADOS: Foram descritos os fundamentos da terapia cognitivo-comportamental no tratamento do transtorno pânico e revisadas as evidências de eficácia em curto e longo prazos. O uso de medicação concomitante a terapia cognitivo-comportamental foi também discutido. CONCLUSÕES: A terapia cognitivo-comportamental individual ou em grupo é eficaz para pacientes com transtorno de pânico, seja como tratamento de primeira linha ou como um próximo passo para pacientes com resposta parcial a outros tratamentos.OBJECTIVE: Panic disorder is a chronic and recurrent condition that impairs an individual's psychosocial functioning and quality of life. Despite the efficacy of psychopharmacological treatment in reducing panic attacks, many patients fail to respond adequately to these interventions. Cognitive behavioral therapy provides an alternative and efficacious method for treating panic disorder and agoraphobic avoidance. The objective of the study is to describe the use of cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder. METHOD: Narrative review of data collected from Medline, SciELO and PsycInfo and specialized textbooks. RESULTS: We describe the cognitive-behavioral model for the treatment of panic disorder, and review both short and long-term efficacy findings. We also discuss

  2. The dual role of serotonin in defense and the mode of action of antidepressants on generalized anxiety and panic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, Frederico G; Zangrossi, Hélio

    2010-09-01

    Antidepressants are widely used to treat several anxiety disorders, among which generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder (PD). Serotonin (5-HT) is believed to play a key role in the mode of action of these agents, a major question being which pathways and receptor subtypes are involved in each type of anxiety disorder. The dual role of 5-HT in defense hypothesis assumes that 5-HT facilitates defensive responses to potential threat, like inhibitory avoidance, related to anxiety, whereas it inhibits defensive responses to proximal danger, like one-way escape, related to panic. The former action would be exerted at the forebrain, chiefly the amygdala and medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), while the latter would be exerted at the dorsal periaqueductal gray (DPAG) matter of the midbrain. The present review is focused on studies designed to test this hypothesis, performed in animal models of anxiety and panic, as well as in human experimental anxiety tests. The reviewed results suggest that chronic, but not acute, administration of antidepressants suppress panic attacks by increasing the release of 5-HT and enhancing the responsivity of post-synaptic 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A receptors in the DPAG. The attenuation of generalized anxiety, also caused by the same drug treatment, would be due to the desensitization of 5-HT2C receptors and, less certainly, to increased stimulation of 5-HT1A receptors in forebrain structures. This action would result in less activation of the amygdala, medial PFC and insula by warning signals, as shown by the reviewed results obtained with functional neuroimaging in healthy volunteers and patients with anxiety disorders.

  3. Impact of Cannabis Use on Treatment Outcomes among Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesia M. Ruglass

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Background: Research has demonstrated a strong link between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and substance use disorders (SUDs in general and cannabis use disorders in particular. Yet, few studies have examined the impact of cannabis use on treatment outcomes for individuals with co-occurring PTSD and SUDs. Methods: Participants were 136 individuals who received cognitive-behavioral therapies for co-occurring PTSD and SUD. Multivariate regressions were utilized to examine the associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment outcomes. Multilevel linear growth models were fit to the data to examine the cross-lagged associations between weekly cannabis use and weekly PTSD symptom severity and primary substance use during treatment. Results: There were no significant positive nor negative associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment PTSD symptom severity and days of primary substance use. Cross-lagged models revealed that as cannabis use increased, subsequent primary substance use decreased and vice versa. Moreover, results revealed a crossover lagged effect, whereby higher cannabis use was associated with greater PTSD symptom severity early in treatment, but lower weekly PTSD symptom severity later in treatment. Conclusion: Cannabis use was not associated with adverse outcomes in end-of-treatment PTSD and primary substance use, suggesting independent pathways of change. The theoretical and clinical implications of the reciprocal associations between weekly cannabis use and subsequent PTSD and primary substance use symptoms during treatment are discussed.

  4. Impact of Cannabis Use on Treatment Outcomes among Adults Receiving Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment for PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruglass, Lesia M.; Shevorykin, Alina; Radoncic, Vanja; Smith, Kathryn M. Z.; Smith, Philip H.; Galatzer-Levy, Isaac R.; Papini, Santiago; Hien, Denise A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Research has demonstrated a strong link between trauma, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders (SUDs) in general and cannabis use disorders in particular. Yet, few studies have examined the impact of cannabis use on treatment outcomes for individuals with co-occurring PTSD and SUDs. Methods: Participants were 136 individuals who received cognitive-behavioral therapies for co-occurring PTSD and SUD. Multivariate regressions were utilized to examine the associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment outcomes. Multilevel linear growth models were fit to the data to examine the cross-lagged associations between weekly cannabis use and weekly PTSD symptom severity and primary substance use during treatment. Results: There were no significant positive nor negative associations between baseline cannabis use and end-of-treatment PTSD symptom severity and days of primary substance use. Cross-lagged models revealed that as cannabis use increased, subsequent primary substance use decreased and vice versa. Moreover, results revealed a crossover lagged effect, whereby higher cannabis use was associated with greater PTSD symptom severity early in treatment, but lower weekly PTSD symptom severity later in treatment. Conclusion: Cannabis use was not associated with adverse outcomes in end-of-treatment PTSD and primary substance use, suggesting independent pathways of change. The theoretical and clinical implications of the reciprocal associations between weekly cannabis use and subsequent PTSD and primary substance use symptoms during treatment are discussed. PMID:28178207

  5. Mean platelet volume and red cell distribution width levels in initial evaluation of panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asoglu M

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Mehmet Asoglu,1 Mehmet Aslan,2 Okan Imre,1 Yuksel Kivrak,3 Oznur Akil,1 Emin Savik,4 Hasan Buyukaslan,5 Ulker Fedai,1 Abdurrahman Altındag6 1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, Sanliurfa, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Yuzuncu Yil University, Van, 3Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Kafkas University, Kars, 4Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, 5Department of Emergency Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Harran University, Sanliurfa, 6Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Gaziantep University, Gaziantep, Turkey Background: As the relationship between psychological stress and platelet activation has been widely studied in recent years, activated platelets lead to certain biochemical changes, which occur in the brain in patients with mental disorders. However, data relating to the mean platelet volume (MPV in patients with panic disorder (PD are both limited and controversial. Herein, we aimed to evaluate, for the first time, the red cell distribution width (RDW levels combined with MPV levels in patients with PD.Patients and methods: Between January 2012 and June 2015, data of 30 treatment-naïve patients (16 females, 14 males; mean age: 37±10 years; range: 18–59 years who were diagnosed with PD and 25 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers (10 females, 15 males; mean age: 36±13 years; range: 18–59 years (control group were retrospectively analyzed. The white blood cell count (WBC, MPV, and RDW levels were measured in both groups.Results: The mean WBC, MPV, and RDW levels were 9,173.03±2,400.31/mm3, 8.19±1.13 fl, and 12.47±1.14%, respectively, in the PD group. These values were found to be 7,090.24±1,032.61, 6.85±0.67, and 11.63±0.85, respectively, in the healthy controls. The WBC, MPV, and RDW levels were significantly higher in the patients with PD compared to the healthy controls (P=0.001, P=0.001, and P=0

  6. Defense mechanisms after brief cognitive-behavior group therapy for panic disorder: one-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Elizeth; Blaya, Carolina; Kipper, Leticia; Salum, Giovanni A; Otto, Michael W; Manfro, Gisele G

    2007-06-01

    Changes in defense mechanisms have been shown in long-term psychodynamic treatment. The aim of this study was to examine the changes that occurred after brief cognitive-behavior group therapy in the defense style of panic disorder patients that had failed to respond to pharmacotherapy. Forty-seven patients participated in the study and severity of panic disorder was evaluated by Clinical Global Impression. Defense mechanisms were evaluated by the Defense Style Questionnaire. Patients decreased the use of maladaptive defenses after cognitive-behavior group therapy, and the change in immature defenses was maintained at 1-year follow-up evaluation (p = 0.022). These modifications were associated with reduction of symptoms (F = 0.359; p = 0.047). These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that defense styles are malleable in short-term treatment and are, at least partially, symptom-state dependent.

  7. The management of post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in the primary care setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobo, William V; Warner, Christopher H; Warner, Carolynn M

    2007-08-01

    Recent geopolitical events, including the terrorist attacks on the United States on September 11, 2001, and ongoing military operations in Iraq, have raised awareness of the often severe psychological after-effects of these and other types of traumatic events. Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) represents the most severe of these sequelae. PTSD is an under-recognized and under-treated chronic anxiety disorder associated with significant psychosocial morbidity, substance abuse, and a number of other negative health outcomes. Fortunately, the biologic underpinnings of this complex disorder and new advances in treatment are being realized. Early detection by primary care providers and rapid initiation of treatment are the keys to successful management of the disorder.

  8. Treatment modality preferences and adherence to group treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Michel; Julien, Dominic; White, Noé Djawn; Bélanger, Claude; Marchand, André; Katerelos, Theodora; Milton, Diana

    2014-06-01

    To examine the relationship between preference for group psychotherapy and adherence to group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for clients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA), 109 participants experiencing PDA completed a questionnaire measuring preference for group treatment (PGTQ) before beginning CBT groups. A t test was used to compare preference scores for group treatment to investigate whether participants who completed treatment differed from those who abandoned treatment. Participants who completed group therapy expressed higher preference for group treatment than participants who dropped out of treatment (t[107] = 1.99; p < 0.05). The PGTQ-4 presented adequate psychometric properties. Reliability analyses of the items retained after factorization demonstrated an acceptable level of internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha of 0.76). Preference for individual or group therapy appears to impact treatment retention for patients with PDA. Matching patients' preferences to the type of treatment modality used appears to be pertinent, especially for the treatment of anxiety disorders. In terms of practical implications, the rationale and benefits of group therapy should be explained to participants reluctant to engage in group therapy. Individual intervention or a combination of group and individual treatment could be considered for clients who are likely to drop out of group therapy.

  9. Aerobic exercise training facilitates the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudlitz, Katharina; Plag, Jens; Dimeo, Fernando; Ströhle, Andreas

    2015-03-01

    Physical activity has been discussed as a therapeutic alternative or add-on for the treatment of anxiety disorders. We studied whether aerobic exercise compared to physical activity with low impact can improve the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with panic disorder (PD) with/without agoraphobia. Forty-seven patients received group CBT treatment over 1 month, which was augmented with an 8-week protocol of either aerobic exercise (three times/week, 30 min, 70% VO(2) max; n = 24) or a training program including exercises with very low intensity (n = 23) in a randomized controlled double-blind design. The primary outcome measure was the total score on the Hamilton Anxiety Scale (Ham-A). A 2 × 3 analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) with baseline value as a covariate was conducted for data analysis. Time × group interaction for the Ham-A revealed a significant effect (P = .047, η(2) p = .072), which represented the significant group difference at a 7-month follow-up. For the other clinical outcome measures no statistical significance emerged, although improvement was more sustained in the exercise group. For patients with PD, regular aerobic exercise adds an additional benefit to CBT. This supports previous results and provides evidence about the intensity of exercise that needs to be performed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. From Pavlov to PTSD: The extinction of conditioned fear in rodents, humans, and in anxiety disorders

    OpenAIRE

    VanElzakker, Michael B; Dahlgren, M. Kathryn; Davis, F. Caroline; Dubois, Stacey; Shin, Lisa M

    2013-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, Ivan Pavlov demonstrated that dogs could learn to use a neutral cue to predict a biologically relevant event: after repeated predictive pairings, Pavlov's dogs were conditioned to anticipate food at the sound of a bell, which caused them to salivate. Like sustenance, danger is biologically relevant, and neutral cues can take on great salience when they predict a threat to survival. In anxiety disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), this ...

  11. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Function in Dissociative Disorders, PTSD, and Healthy Volunteers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeon, Daphne; Knutelska, Margaret; Yehuda, Rachel; Putnam, Frank; Schmeidler, James; Smith, Lisa M.

    2007-01-01

    Background This study investigated basal and stress-induced HPA axis alterations in dissociative disorders (DD). Methods Forty-six subjects with DD without lifetime PTSD, 35 subjects with PTSD, and 58 HC subjects, free of current major depression, were studied as inpatients. After a 24-hour urine collection and hourly blood sampling for ambient cortisol determination, a low-dose dexamethasone suppression test was administered, followed by the Trier Social Stress Test. Results The DD group had significantly elevated urinary cortisol compared to the HC group, more pronounced in the absence of lifetime major depression, whereas the PTSD and HC groups did not differ. The DD group demonstrated significantly greater resistance to, and faster escape from, dexamethasone suppression compared to the HC group, whereas the PTSD and HC groups did not differ. The three groups did not differ in cortisol stress reactivity, but both psychiatric groups demonstrated a significant inverse correlation between dissociation severity and cortisol reactivity, after controlling for all other symptomatology. The PTSD subgroup with comorbid DD tended to have blunted reactivity compared to the HC group. Conclusions The study demonstrates a distinct pattern of HPA axis dysregulation in DD, emphasizing the importance of further study of stress response systems in dissociative psychopathology. PMID:17137559

  12. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in a Patient with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) and Posttraumatic stress disorder(PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Sahar; Arbabi, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) has currently become the standard treatment for preventing sudden cardiac death. There are some psychological consequences in patients with ICD such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after the shocks induced by ICD. This report aimed to present the case of a 54-year-old man with ICD who had developed PTSD; his PTSD was treated, using cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy consisting of relaxation, mindfulness and problem solving techniques. In patients with ICD who are experiencing PTSD using cognitive behavioral interventions may be helpful to reduce their psychological sufferings.

  13. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in a Patient with Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD and Posttraumatic stress disorder(PTSD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahar Ansari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD has currently become the standard treatment for preventing sudden cardiac death. There are some psychological consequences in patients with ICD such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD after the shocks induced by ICD. This report aimed to present the case of a 54-year-old man with ICD who had developed PTSD; his PTSD was treated, using cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy consisting of relaxation, mindfulness and problem solving techniques. In patients with ICD who are experiencing PTSD using cognitive behavioral interventions may be helpful to reduce their psychological sufferings.

  14. Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in children after paediatric intensive care treatment compared to children who survived a major fire disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Last Bob F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goals were to determine the presence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in children after paediatric intensive care treatment, to identify risk factors for PTSD, and to compare this data with data from a major fire disaster in the Netherlands. Methods Children completed the Dutch Children's Responses to Trauma Inventory at three and nine months after discharge from the paediatric intensive care unit (PICU. Comparison data were available from 355 children survivors who completed the same questionnaire 10 months after a major fire disaster. Results Thirty-six children aged eight to 17 years completed questionnaires at three month follow-up, nine month follow-up, or both. More than one third (34.5% of the children had subclinical PTSD, while 13.8% were likely to meet criteria for PTSD. Maternal PTSD was the strongest predictor for child PTSD. There were no significant differences in (subclinical PTSD symptoms either over time or compared to symptoms of survivors from the fire disaster. Conclusion This study shows that a considerable number of children have persistent PTSD after PICU treatment. Prevention of PTSD is important to minimize the profound adverse effects that PTSD can have on children's well-being and future development.

  15. Divalproex Sodium for the Treatment of PTSD and Conduct Disordered Youth: A Pilot Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Hans; Saxena, Kirti S.; Carrion, Victor; Khanzode, Leena A.; Silverman, Melissa; Chang, Kiki

    2007-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of divalproex sodium (DVP) for the treatment of PTSD in conduct disorder, utilizing a previous study in which 71 youth were enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial. Twelve had PTSD. Subjects (all males, mean age 16, SD 1.0) were randomized into high and low dose conditions. Clinical Global Impression (CGI)…

  16. Integrating Dialectical Behavior Therapy and Prolonged Exposure to Treat Co-Occurring Borderline Personality Disorder and PTSD: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Melanie S.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2008-01-01

    Despite the high rate of trauma and PTSD among individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD), no studies have specifically evaluated the treatment of PTSD in a BPD population. These case studies illustrate the use of a protocol based on prolonged exposure therapy that can be integrated into standard dialectical behavior therapy to treat…

  17. The Effectiveness of Art Therapy Interventions in Reducing Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms in Pediatric Trauma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Linda M.; Morabito, Diane; Ladakakos, Chris; Schreier, Herbert; Knudson, M. Margaret

    2001-01-01

    Chapman Art Therapy Intervention (CATTI), an art therapy research project at an urban trauma center, was designed to reduce Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms in pediatric patients. Early analysis does not indicate statistically significant differences in reduction of PTSD symptoms between experimental and control groups. Children…

  18. Mechanisms of Efficacy of CBT for Cambodian Refugees with PTSD: Improvement in Emotion Regulation and Orthostatic Blood Pressure Response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hinton, D.E.; Hofmann, S.G.; Pollack, M.H.; Otto, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of a randomized controlled trial, we examined a model of the mechanisms of efficacy of culturally adapted cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for Cambodian refugees with pharmacology-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comordid orthostatic panic attacks (PAs). Twelve

  19. Induced abortion and anxiety, mood, and substance abuse disorders: isolating the effects of abortion in the national comorbidity survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Priscilla K; Coyle, Catherine T; Shuping, Martha; Rue, Vincent M

    2009-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between abortion history and a wide range of anxiety (panic disorder, panic attacks, PTSD, Agoraphobia), mood (bipolar disorder, mania, major depression), and substance abuse disorders (alcohol and drug abuse and dependence) using a nationally representative US sample, the national comorbidity survey. Abortion was found to be related to an increased risk for a variety of mental health problems (panic attacks, panic disorder, agoraphobia, PTSD, bipolar disorder, major depression with and without hierarchy), and substance abuse disorders after statistical controls were instituted for a wide range of personal, situational, and demographic variables. Calculation of population attributable risks indicated that abortion was implicated in between 4.3% and 16.6% of the incidence of these disorders. Future research is needed to identify mediating mechanisms linking abortion to various disorders and to understand individual difference factors associated with vulnerability to developing a particular mental health problem after abortion.

  20. Virtual Reality and Cellular Phones as a Complementary Intervention for Veterans with PTSD and Substance Use Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    study; found study too difficult 9097 PE+VR 3.00 Participant couldn’t get past the fear of talking about his past trauma and didn’t want to...Anxiety Disorders Panic Disorder 15% 15% Agoraphobia 0% 0% Social Phobia 5% 0% Specific Phobia 0

  1. Allelic variation in CRHR1 predisposes to panic disorder: evidence for biased fear processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, H; Richter, J; Straube, B; Lueken, U; Domschke, K; Schartner, C; Klauke, B; Baumann, C; Pané-Farré, C; Jacob, C P; Scholz, C-J; Zwanzger, P; Lang, T; Fehm, L; Jansen, A; Konrad, C; Fydrich, T; Wittmann, A; Pfleiderer, B; Ströhle, A; Gerlach, A L; Alpers, G W; Arolt, V; Pauli, P; Wittchen, H-U; Kent, L; Hamm, A; Kircher, T; Deckert, J; Reif, A

    2016-06-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is a major regulator of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. Binding to its receptor CRHR1 triggers the downstream release of the stress response-regulating hormone cortisol. Biochemical, behavioral and genetic studies revealed CRHR1 as a possible candidate gene for mood and anxiety disorders. Here we aimed to evaluate CRHR1 as a risk factor for panic disorder (PD). Allelic variation of CRHR1 was captured by 9 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which were genotyped in 531 matched case/control pairs. Four SNPs were found to be associated with PD, in at least one sub-sample. The minor allele of rs17689918 was found to significantly increase risk for PD in females after Bonferroni correction and furthermore decreased CRHR1 mRNA expression in human forebrains and amygdalae. When investigating neural correlates underlying this association in patients with PD using functional magnetic resonance imaging, risk allele carriers of rs17689918 showed aberrant differential conditioning predominantly in the bilateral prefrontal cortex and safety signal processing in the amygdalae, arguing for predominant generalization of fear and hence anxious apprehension. Additionally, the risk allele of rs17689918 led to less flight behavior during fear-provoking situations but rather increased anxious apprehension and went along with increased anxiety sensitivity. Thus reduced gene expression driven by CRHR1 risk allele leads to a phenotype characterized by fear sensitization and hence sustained fear. These results strengthen the role of CRHR1 in PD and clarify the mechanisms by which genetic variation in CRHR1 is linked to this disorder.

  2. Separating depressive comorbidity from panic disorder: A combined functional magnetic resonance imaging and machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Straube, Benjamin; Yang, Yunbo; Hahn, Tim; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Konrad, Carsten; Ströhle, Andreas; Wittmann, André; Gerlach, Alexander L; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Arolt, Volker; Kircher, Tilo

    2015-09-15

    Depression is frequent in panic disorder (PD); yet, little is known about its influence on the neural substrates of PD. Difficulties in fear inhibition during safety signal processing have been reported as a pathophysiological feature of PD that is attenuated by depression. We investigated the impact of comorbid depression in PD with agoraphobia (AG) on the neural correlates of fear conditioning and the potential of machine learning to predict comorbidity status on the individual patient level based on neural characteristics. Fifty-nine PD/AG patients including 26 (44%) with a comorbid depressive disorder (PD/AG+DEP) underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Comorbidity status was predicted using a random undersampling tree ensemble in a leave-one-out cross-validation framework. PD/AG-DEP patients showed altered neural activation during safety signal processing, while +DEP patients exhibited generally decreased dorsolateral prefrontal and insular activation. Comorbidity status was correctly predicted in 79% of patients (sensitivity: 73%; specificity: 85%) based on brain activation during fear conditioning (corrected for potential confounders: accuracy: 73%; sensitivity: 77%; specificity: 70%). No primary depressed patients were available; only medication-free patients were included. Major depression and dysthymia were collapsed (power considerations). Neurofunctional activation during safety signal processing differed between patients with or without comorbid depression, a finding which may explain heterogeneous results across previous studies. These findings demonstrate the relevance of comorbidity when investigating neurofunctional substrates of anxiety disorders. Predicting individual comorbidity status may translate neurofunctional data into clinically relevant information which might aid in planning individualized treatment. The study was registered with the ISRCTN80046034. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Relative effects of cognitive and behavioral therapies on generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder and panic disorder: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijpers, Pim; Gentili, Claudio; Banos, Rosa M; Garcia-Campayo, Javier; Botella, Cristina; Cristea, Ioana A

    2016-10-01

    Although cognitive and behavioral therapies are effective in the treatment of anxiety disorders, it is not clear what the relative effects of these treatments are. We conducted a meta-analysis of trials comparing cognitive and behavioral therapies with a control condition, in patients with social anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic disorder. We included 42 studies in which generic measures of anxiety were used (BAI, HAMA, STAI-State and Trait). Only the effects of treatment for panic disorder as measured on the BAI (13.33 points; 95% CI: 10.58-16.07) were significantly (p=0.001) larger than the effect sizes on GAD (6.06 points; 95% CI: 3.96-8.16) and SAD (5.92 points; 95% CI: 4.64-7.20). The effects remained significant after adjusting for baseline severity and other major characteristics of the trials. The results should be considered with caution because of the small number of studies in many subgroups and the high risk of bias in most studies.

  4. Association between personality traits and Escitalopram treatment efficacy in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Võhma, Ülle; Raag, Mait; Tõru, Innar; Aluoja, Anu; Maron, Eduard

    2017-08-01

    There is strong evidence to suggest that personality factors may interact with the development and clinical expression of panic disorder (PD). A greater understanding of these relationships may have important implications for clinical practice and implications for searching reliable predictors of treatment outcome. The study aimed to examine the effect of escitalopram treatment on personality traits in PD patients, and to identify whether the treatment outcome could be predicted by any personality trait. A study sample consisting of 110 outpatients with PD treated with 10-20 mg/day of escitalopram for 12 weeks. The personality traits were evaluated before and after 12 weeks of medication by using the Swedish universities Scales of Personality (SSP). Although almost all personality traits on the SSP measurement were improved after 12 weeks of medication in comparison with the baseline scores, none of these changes reached a statistically significant level. Only higher impulsivity at baseline SSP predicted non-remission to 12-weeks treatment with escitalopram; however, this association did not withstand the Bonferroni correction in multiple comparisons. All patients were treated in a naturalistic way using an open-label drug, so placebo responses cannot be excluded. The sample size can still be considered not large enough to reveal statistically significant findings. Maladaptive personality disposition in patients with PD seems to have a trait character and shows little trend toward normalization after 12-weeks treatment with the antidepressant, while the association between impulsivity and treatment response needs further investigation.

  5. Empirically supported treatments for panic disorder with agoraphobia in a Spanish psychology clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballesteros, Francisco; Labrador, Francisco J

    2014-10-27

    The aim of this work is to study the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients diagnosed with Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia (PD/Ag), as well as the characteristics of the treatment and its results and cost in a University Psychology Clinic. Fifty patients demanded psychological assistance for PD/Ag; 80% were women, with an average age of 29.22 years (SD = 9.03). Mean number of evaluation sessions was 3.26 (SD = 1.03), and of treatment sessions, 13.39 (SD = 9.237). Of the patients, 83.33% were discharged (that is, questionnaire scores were below the cut-off point indicated by the authors, and no PD/Ag was observed at readministration of the semistructured interview), 5.5% refused treatment, and 11% were dropouts. The average number of treatment sessions of patients who achieved therapeutic success was 15.13 (SD = 8.98). Effect sizes (d) greater than 1 were obtained in all the scales. Changes in all scales were significant (p < .05). The estimated cost of treatment for patients who achieved therapeutic success was 945.12€. The treatment results are at least similar to those of studies of efficacy and effectiveness for PD/Ag. The utility of generalizing treatments developed in research settings to a welfare clinic is discussed.

  6. Therapist effects and the outcome-alliance correlation in cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Jonathan D; Kivity, Yogev; Barlow, David H; Gorman, Jack M; Shear, M Katherine; Woods, Scott W

    2014-01-01

    Although the alliance-outcome correlation is well established, no published studies to date have separated between therapists' and patients' contributions while controlling for early symptom change. In this study, we examined therapist effects in two trials of CBT for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and the impact of therapists' and patients' contribution to the alliance on outcome and attrition in one trial. Alliance ratings were obtained from patients and therapists early and late in treatment (n = 133). Data were analyzed using multi-level modeling controlling for early symptom change. No therapist effects were found. The patients' contribution to the alliance predicted outcome (in both panic severity and anxiety sensitivity) and attrition. The therapists' contribution to the alliance predicted attrition but not outcome. Results suggest that the patient's contribution to the alliance plays an important role in CBT for PDA and that including common factors into research on CBT may help elucidate treatment processes.

  7. Intermittent explosive disorder: associations with PTSD and other Axis I disorders in a US military veteran sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Annemarie F; Hein, Christina L; Wolf, Erika J; Prince, Lauren B; Ryabchenko, Karen; Miller, Mark W

    2014-06-01

    This study examined the prevalence of intermittent explosive disorder (IED) and its associations with trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and other psychiatric diagnoses in a sample of trauma-exposed veterans (n=232) with a high prevalence of PTSD. Structural associations between IED and latent dimensions of internalizing and externalizing psychopathology were also modeled to examine the location of IED within this influential structure. Twenty-four percent of the sample met criteria for a lifetime IED diagnosis and those with the diagnosis were more likely to meet criteria for lifetime PTSD than those without (30.3% vs. 14.3% respectively). Furthermore, regression analyses revealed lifetime PTSD severity to be a significant predictor of IED severity after controlling for combat, trauma exposure, and age. Finally, confirmatory factor analysis revealed significant cross-loadings of IED on both the externalizing and distress dimensions of psychopathology, suggesting that the association between IED and other psychiatric disorders may reflect underlying tendencies toward impulsivity and aggression and generalized distress and negative emotionality, respectively.

  8. Influence of visual acuity on anxiety, panic and depression disorders among young and middle age adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loprinzi, Paul D; Codey, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    Previous research, albeit limited, has demonstrated an association of visual acuity with depression and anxiety. However, these studies are limited in that they have focused on older adults, used a convenient sample, and/or used a subjective assessment of visual function. As a result, the purpose of this study was to examine the association of objectively-measured visual acuity with depression and anxiety (and panic disorder) among a national sample of young- and middle-age U.S. adults (20-39 years). Using data from the 2003-2004 NHANES (n=602), the presence of anxiety, depression, and panic disorders was assessed from a diagnostic interview. Visual acuity was assessed from a vision exam using the Nidek Auto Lensmeter Model (LM-990A) and expressed as LogMAR units. After adjusting for age, gender, race-ethnicity, body mass index, mean arterial pressure, cotinine, diabetes, and physical activity, visual acuity was not associated with panic disorder (p=0.71) or depression disorder (p=0.20), but for every 0.1 LogMAR unit change in vision, participants had a 14% (OR=1.14; p=0.04) higher odds of having an anxiety disorder. The main limitation of this study was the cross-sectional design. Young- and middle-age U.S. adults with worse visual function are at increased odds of having an anxiety disorder. Strategies to prevent and treat anxiety among those with worse visual function are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Changes in cerebral blood flow after cognitive behavior therapy in patients with panic disorder: a SPECT study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo HJ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ho-Jun Seo,1 Young Hee Choi,2 Yong-An Chung,3 Wangku Rho,1 Jeong-Ho Chae11Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 2Metta Institute of Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South KoreaAim: Inconsistent results continue to be reported in studies that examine the neural correlates of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT in patients with panic disorder. We examined the changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF associated with the alleviation of anxiety by CBT in panic patients.Methods: The change in rCBF and clinical symptoms before and after CBT were assessed using single photon emission computed tomography and various clinical measures were analyzed.Results: Fourteen subjects who completed CBT showed significant improvements in symptoms on clinical measures, including the Panic and Agoraphobic Scale and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index-Revised. After CBT, increased rCBF was detected in the left postcentral gyrus (BA 43, left precentral gyrus (BA 4, and left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 9 and BA 47, whereas decreased rCBF was detected in the left pons. Correlation analysis of the association between the changes in rCBF and changes in each clinical measure did not show significant results.Conclusion: We found changes in the rCBF associated with the successful completion of CBT. The present findings may help clarify the effects of CBT on changes in brain activity in panic disorder.Keyword: single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT, anxiety, neural correlate, brain activity

  10. Dialectical behavior therapy as a precursor to PTSD treatment for suicidal and/or self-injuring women with borderline personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Melanie S; Jackson, Safia C; Comtois, Katherine A; Linehan, Marsha M

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the efficacy of dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) in reducing behaviors commonly used as exclusion criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) treatment. The sample included 51 suicidal and/or self-injuring women with borderline personality disorder (BPD), 26 (51%) of whom met criteria for PTSD. BPD clients with and without PTSD were equally likely to eliminate the exclusionary behaviors during 1 year of DBT. By posttreatment, 50-68% of the BPD clients with PTSD would have been suitable candidates for PTSD treatment. Borderline personality disorder clients with PTSD who began treatment with a greater number of recent suicide attempts and more severe PTSD were significantly less likely to become eligible for PTSD treatment.

  11. Lack of cortisol response in patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD undergoing a diagnostic interview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Quervain Dominique JF

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background According to DSM-IV, the diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD requires the experience of a traumatic event during which the person's response involved intense fear, helplessness, or horror. In order to diagnose PTSD, clinicians must interview the person in depth about his/her previous experiences and determine whether the individual has been traumatized by a specific event or events. However, asking questions about traumatic experiences can be stressful for the traumatized individual and it has been cautioned that subsequent "re-traumatization" could occur. This study investigated the cortisol response in traumatized refugees with PTSD during a detailed and standardized interview about their personal war and torture experiences. Methods Participants were male refugees with severe PTSD who solicited an expert opinion in the Psychological Research Clinic for Refugees of the University of Konstanz. 17 patients were administered the Vivo Checklist of War, Detention, and Torture Events, a standardized interview about traumatic experiences, and 16 subjects were interviewed about absorption behavior. Self-reported measures of affect and arousal, as well as saliva cortisol were collected at four points. Before and after the experimental intervention, subjects performed a Delayed Matching-to-Sample (DMS task for distraction. They also rated the severity of selected PTSD symptoms, as well as the level of intrusiveness of traumatic memories at that time. Results Cortisol excretion diminished in the course of the interview and showed the same pattern for both groups. No specific response was detectable after the supposed stressor. Correspondingly, ratings of subjective well-being, memories of the most traumatic event(s and PTSD symptoms did not show any significant difference between groups. Those in the presumed stress condition did not perform worse than persons in the control condition after the stressor. However, both

  12. Impulsivity in patients with panic disorder-agoraphobia: the role of cyclothymia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carlo, Alessandra; Benvenuti, Marzia; Toni, Cristina; Dell'osso, Liliana; Perugi, Giulio

    2013-10-01

    The relationship between Panic Disorder (PD) and impulsivity is not well explored. The present investigation aims to compare impulsivity, measured by different rating tools, in PD patients vs. healthy controls and to explore the influence of co-morbid Cyclothymic Disorder (CD) on the relationship between PD and impulsivity. Sixty-four subjects with PD and 44 matched controls underwent a diagnostic and symptomatological evaluations by the Mini Neuropsychiatric Interview (M.I.N.I) Plus 5.0; the Bech-Rafaelsen Depression and Mania Scale (BRDMS), the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), the Hypomania Check List (HCL-32) and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI); the Questionnaire for the Affective and Anxious Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris and San Diego-Modified (TEMPS-M), the Separation Anxiety Sensitivity Index (SASI), the Interpersonal Sensitivity Symptoms Inventory (ISSI). Finally, psychometric and neurocognitive evaluations of impulsivity was carried out using the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) and the Immediate and Delayed Memory Task (IMT/DMT). Subjects with PD were more impulsive than the controls in all the explored measures, reporting higher scores in symptomatological and temperamental scales. The comparison between PD patients with (Cyclo+) and without (Cyclo-) comorbid CD and controls showed that Cyclo+ are the most impulsive subjects in all the investigated measures and are characterized by the greatest symptomatological impairment, the highest scores in temperamental scales, and the highest levels of interpersonal sensitivity and separation anxiety. In our patients with PD, without lifetime comorbidity with major mood episodes, trait and state impulsivity may be related to the presence of comorbid cyclothymic mood instability.

  13. Neuropsychological functions and visual contrast sensitivity in schizophrenia: the potential impact of comorbid posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibolya eHalasz

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have revealed a high prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in patients with other severe mental disorders, including schizophrenia. However, the neuropsychological and psychophysical correlates of comorbid PTSD are less exactly defined. The purpose of the present study was to assess immediate and delayed memory, attention, visuospatial skills, language, and basic visual information processing in patients with schizophrenia with or without PTSD. We recruited 125 patients with schizophrenia and 70 healthy controls matched for visual acuity, age, gender, education, and socioeconomic status. Twenty-one of patients with schizophrenia exhibited comorbid PTSD. We administered the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS and visual contrast sensitivity tasks for low spatial/high temporal frequency (0.3 cycle/degree and 18 Hz and high spatial/low temporal frequency (10 cycles/degree and 1Hz sinusoidal gratings. All patients were clinically stable and received antipsychotic medications. Results revealed that relative to healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia exhibited significant and generalized neuropsychological dysfunctions and reduced visual contrast sensitivity, which was more pronounced at low spatial/high temporal frequency. When we compared schizophrenia patients with and without PTSD, we found that patients with comorbid PTSD displayed lower scores for RBANS attention, immediate and delayed memory, and visuospatial scores. Schizophrenia patients with or without PTSD displayed similar visual contrast sensitivity. In conclusion, comorbid PTSD in schizophrenia may be associated with worse neuropsychological functions, whereas it does not affect basic visual information processing.

  14. Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Exposure Simultaneously Addressing Panic Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, Andrea; Hoyer, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Massed exposure has gained acceptance as an effective method to treat anxiety disorders. When using this intervention in patients presenting with more than one anxiety disorder, specific treatment options need to be discussed. Should exposure be applied in sequential order for each of the comorbid disorders? Or can exposure sessions also be…

  15. Killing Two Birds with One Stone: Exposure Simultaneously Addressing Panic Disorder and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, Andrea; Hoyer, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    Massed exposure has gained acceptance as an effective method to treat anxiety disorders. When using this intervention in patients presenting with more than one anxiety disorder, specific treatment options need to be discussed. Should exposure be applied in sequential order for each of the comorbid disorders? Or can exposure sessions also be…

  16. Agoraphobia With and Without Panic Disorder: A 20-Year Follow-up of Integrated Exposure and Psychodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffart, Asle; Hedley, Liv M; Svanøe, Karol; Langkaas, Tomas Formo; Sexton, Harold

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the current study was to compare the 20-year outcome in panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD with AG) and agoraphobia without panic disorder (AG without PD) patients after inpatient psychological treatment. Of 53 eligible patients having completed a medication-free integrated exposure and psychodynamic treatment, 38 (71.7%)-25 PD with AG and 13 AG without PD patients-attended 20-year follow-up. AG without PD patients improved less than PD with AG patients did on primary outcome measures. In the PD with AG group, there were large uncontrolled effect sizes (<-2.30). More of the AG without PD patients had avoidant personality disorder at pretreatment, but the presence of this disorder did not predict outcome. The follow-up results support that PD with AG and AG without PD are two different disorders. The results also suggest that the very long-term outcome in PD with AG patients is excellent for this integrated treatment.

  17. Visuospatial and mathematical dysfunction in major depressive disorder and/or panic disorder: A study of parietal functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Brady D; Shankman, Stewart A

    2016-01-01

    The parietal cortex is critical for several different cognitive functions, including visuospatial processing and mathematical abilities. There is strong evidence indicating parietal dysfunction in depression. However, it is less clear whether anxiety is associated with parietal dysfunction and whether comorbid depression and anxiety are associated with greater impairment. The present study compared participants with major depression (MDD), panic disorder (PD), comorbid MDD/PD and controls on neuropsychological measures of visuospatial processing, Judgement of Line Orientation (JLO), and mathematical abilities, Wide Range Achievement Test (WRAT) Arithmetic. Only comorbid MDD/PD was associated with decreased performance on JLO, whereas all psychopathological groups exhibited comparably decreased performance on WRAT Arithmetic. Furthermore, the results were not accounted for by other comorbid disorders, medication use or psychopathology severity. The present study suggests comorbid depression and anxious arousal are associated with impairment in visuospatial processing and provides novel evidence indicating mathematical deficits across depression and/or anxiety. Implications for understanding parietal dysfunction in internalising psychopathology are discussed.

  18. Accounting for sex differences in PTSD: A multi-variable mediation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Dorte M.; Hansen, Maj

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Approximately twice as many females as males are diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, little is known about why females report more PTSD symptoms than males. Prior studies have generally focused on few potential mediators at a time and have often used...... specifically to test a multiple mediator model. Results: Females reported more PTSD symptoms than males and higher levels of neuroticism, depression, physical anxiety sensitivity, peritraumatic fear, horror, and helplessness (the A2 criterion), tonic immobility, panic, dissociation, negative posttraumatic...... that females report more PTSD symptoms because they experience higher levels of associated risk factors. The results are relevant to other trauma populations and to other trauma- related psychiatric disorders more prevalent in females, such as depression and anxiety. Keywords: Posttraumatic stress disorder...

  19. The impact of an 8-day intensive treatment for adolescent panic disorder and agoraphobia on comorbid diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Kaitlin P; Chan, Priscilla T; Buzzella, Brian A; Whitton, Sarah W; Pincus, Donna B

    2012-03-01

    Previous research findings have shown positive effects of cognitive-behavioral therapy for primary anxiety disorders as well as for nonprimary, co-occurring anxiety disorders. In this study, we analyzed data from an existing randomized controlled trial of intensive treatment for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia (PDA) to examine the effects of the treatment on comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. The overall frequency and severity of aggregated comorbid diagnoses decreased in a group of adolescents who received an 8-day treatment for PDA. Results suggest that an 8-day treatment for PDA can alleviate the symptoms of some specific comorbid clinical diagnoses; in particular specific phobias, generalized anxiety disorder, and social phobia. These findings suggest that an intensive treatment for PDA is associated with reductions in comorbid symptoms even though disorders other than PDA are not specific treatment targets.

  20. Timing matters: change depends on the stage of treatment in cognitive behavioral therapy for panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloster, Andrew T; Klotsche, Jens; Gerlach, Alexander L; Hamm, Alfons; Ströhle, Andreas; Gauggel, Siegfried; Kircher, Tilo; Alpers, Georg W; Deckert, Jürgen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    The mechanisms of action underlying treatment are inadequately understood. This study examined 5 variables implicated in the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG): catastrophic agoraphobic cognitions, anxiety about bodily sensations, agoraphobic avoidance, anxiety sensitivity, and psychological flexibility. The relative importance of these process variables was examined across treatment phases: (a) psychoeducation/interoceptive exposure, (b) in situ exposure, and (c) generalization/follow-up. Data came from a randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for PD/AG (n = 301). Outcomes were the Panic and Agoraphobia Scale (Bandelow, 1995) and functioning as measured in the Clinical Global Impression scale (Guy, 1976). The effect of process variables on subsequent change in outcome variables was calculated using bivariate latent difference score modeling. Change in panic symptomatology was preceded by catastrophic appraisal and agoraphobic avoidance across all phases of treatment, by anxiety sensitivity during generalization/follow-up, and by psychological flexibility during exposure in situ. Change in functioning was preceded by agoraphobic avoidance and psychological flexibility across all phases of treatment, by fear of bodily symptoms during generalization/follow-up, and by anxiety sensitivity during exposure. The effects of process variables on outcomes differ across treatment phases and outcomes (i.e., symptomatology vs. functioning). Agoraphobic avoidance and psychological flexibility should be investigated and therapeutically targeted in addition to cognitive variables. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure (COPE): A Pilot Study in Alcohol-dependent Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Anna; Back, Sudie E; Killeen, Therese K; Brady, Kathleen T; Schwandt, Melanie L; Heilig, Markus; Magnusson, Åsa

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and substance use disorders are highly comorbid. Effective treatments are largely lacking. This pilot study evaluated the safety and feasibility of a novel intervention, Concurrent Treatment of PTSD and Substance Use Disorders Using Prolonged Exposure (COPE), in preparation for a randomized controlled trial. Twenty-two treatment-seeking women with current DSM-IV-TR PTSD and alcohol dependence (AD) were recruited. Participants received COPE. Safety and feasibility were evaluated, as were efficacy-related outcomes: PTSD and depression symptom severity, alcohol use, craving, and dependence severity. No adverse events occurred. COPE was implemented in routine clinical practice. Among the assessed women, 95.8% were eligible to participate. Treatment attendance and completion were higher than in previous studies. Post treatment, all efficacy-related outcomes, including PTSD and depression symptom severity, alcohol use, craving, and dependence severity, were significantly reduced. COPE was safe and feasible to use. Concerns that trauma-focused, exposure-based therapy might promote relapse in this population appear unwarranted. Our findings provide initial evidence suggestive of COPE efficacy for comorbid PTSD and AD in women. These results provide a strong rationale for investigating the efficacy of COPE for comorbid PTSD and AD in women in a randomized controlled trial.

  2. A subtle grey-matter increase in first-episode, drug-naive major depressive disorder with panic disorder after 6 weeks' duloxetine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chien-Han; Hsu, Yuan-Yu

    2011-03-01

    We designed this study to investigate the modulating effects of duloxetine on symptoms and grey matter of patients with major depressive disorder combined with panic disorder. We also aimed to discover if there was any persistence of grey-matter deficits after remission and to find 'trait markers' for this comorbidity. High-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometric measurements were performed on 15 patients at baseline and remitted status (week 6) compared to 15 healthy control subjects who were scanned twice within 6 wk. The rating scales of depressive and panic symptoms improved with statistical significance (corrected pgrey-matter deficits in infero-frontal, limbic, occipital, temporo-parietal, cerebellar areas (trait marker regions) in drug-naive patients were observed compared to controls at baseline (family-wise error corrected pgrey matter in healthy controls over the 6-wk period. Duloxetine-induced increases of grey matter were very subtle in left infero-frontal cortex, right fusiform gyrus, and right cerebellum VIIIa areas (state marker regions) after 6-wk therapy (uncorrected pgrey matter to the level of control subjects and grey-matter deficits in patients appear largely unaffected by duloxetine. We suggest that short-term duloxetine therapy improved the clinical symptoms of patients with major depressive disorder combined with panic disorder. These improvements might be related to a modest increase of grey matter in state marker regions of the brain. The deficits of trait marker regions were more evident and are likely to be important for pathogenesis.

  3. Altered lipid peroxidation markers are related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and not trauma itself in earthquake survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atli, Abdullah; Bulut, Mahmut; Bez, Yasin; Kaplan, İbrahim; Özdemir, Pınar Güzel; Uysal, Cem; Selçuk, Hilal; Sir, Aytekin

    2016-06-01

    The traumatic life events, including earthquakes, war, and interpersonal conflicts, cause a cascade of psychological and biological changes known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Malondialdehyde (MDA) is a reliable marker of lipid peroxidation, and paraoxonase is a known antioxidant enzyme. The aims of this study were to investigate the relationship between earthquake trauma, PTSD effects on oxidative stress and the levels of serum paraoxonase 1 (PON1) enzyme activity, and levels of serum MDA. The study was carried out on three groups called: the PTSD group, the traumatized with earthquake exercise group, and healthy control group, which contained 32, 31, and 38 individuals, respectively. Serum MDA levels and PON1 enzyme activities from all participants were measured, and the results were compared across all groups. There were no significant differences between the PTSD patients and non-PTSD earthquake survivors in terms of the study variables. The mean PON1 enzyme activity from PTSD patients was significantly lower, while the mean MDA level was significantly higher than that of the healthy control group (p earthquake survivors who did not develop PTSD showed higher MDA levels and lower PON1 activity when compared to healthy controls. However, the differences between these groups did not reach a statistically significant level. Increased MDA level and decreased PON1 activity measured in PTSD patients after earthquake and may suggest increased oxidative stress in these patients. The nonsignificant trends that are observed in lipid peroxidation markers of earthquake survivors may indicate higher impact of PTSD development on these markers than trauma itself. For example, PTSD diagnosis seems to add to the effect of trauma on serum MDA levels and PON1 enzyme activity. Thus, serum MDA levels and PON1 enzyme activity may serve as biochemical markers of PTSD diagnosis.

  4. Cardiorespiratory optimal point: a submaximal exercise variable to assess panic disorder patients.

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    Plínio Santos Ramos

    Full Text Available Panic disorder (PD patients often report respiratory symptoms and tend to perform poorly during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX, at least partially, due to phobic anxiety. Thus, we hypothesized that a submaximal exercise variable, minimum VE/VO2 - hereafter named cardiorespiratory optimal point (COP -, may be useful in their clinical assessment. Data from 2,338 subjects were retrospectively analyzed and 52 (2.2% patients diagnosed with PD (PDG (70% women; aged 48±13 years. PD patients were compared with a healthy control group (CG precisely matched to number of cases, age and gender profiles. PDG was further divided into two subgroups, based on having achieved a maximal or a submaximal CPX (unwilling to continue until exhaustion. We compared COP, VO2 max, maximum heart rate (HR max between PDG and CG, and also COP between maximal and submaximal PD subgroups. COP was similar between PDG and CG (21.9±0.5 vs. 23.4±0.6; p = 0.07, as well as, for PD subgroups of maximal and submaximal CPX (22.0±0.5 vs. 21.6±1.3; p = 0.746. Additionally, PD patients completing a maximal CPX obtained VO2 max (mL x kg-1 x min-1 (32.9±1.57 vs 29.6±1.48; p = 0.145 and HR max (bpm similar to controls (173±2.0 vs 168±2.7; p = 0.178. No adverse complications occurred during CPX. Although clinically safe, it is sometimes difficult to obtain a true maximal CPX in PD patients. Normalcy of cardiorespiratory interaction at submaximal effort as assessed by COP may contribute to reassure both patients and physicians that there is no physiological substrate for exercise-related respiratory symptoms often reported by PD patients.

  5. Cardiorespiratory optimal point: a submaximal exercise variable to assess panic disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Plínio Santos; Sardinha, Aline; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; de Araújo, Claudio Gil Soares

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder (PD) patients often report respiratory symptoms and tend to perform poorly during maximal cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPX), at least partially, due to phobic anxiety. Thus, we hypothesized that a submaximal exercise variable, minimum VE/VO2 - hereafter named cardiorespiratory optimal point (COP) -, may be useful in their clinical assessment. Data from 2,338 subjects were retrospectively analyzed and 52 (2.2%) patients diagnosed with PD (PDG) (70% women; aged 48±13 years). PD patients were compared with a healthy control group (CG) precisely matched to number of cases, age and gender profiles. PDG was further divided into two subgroups, based on having achieved a maximal or a submaximal CPX (unwilling to continue until exhaustion). We compared COP, VO2 max, maximum heart rate (HR max) between PDG and CG, and also COP between maximal and submaximal PD subgroups. COP was similar between PDG and CG (21.9±0.5 vs. 23.4±0.6; p = 0.07), as well as, for PD subgroups of maximal and submaximal CPX (22.0±0.5 vs. 21.6±1.3; p = 0.746). Additionally, PD patients completing a maximal CPX obtained VO2 max (mL x kg-1 x min-1) (32.9±1.57 vs 29.6±1.48; p = 0.145) and HR max (bpm) similar to controls (173±2.0 vs 168±2.7; p = 0.178). No adverse complications occurred during CPX. Although clinically safe, it is sometimes difficult to obtain a true maximal CPX in PD patients. Normalcy of cardiorespiratory interaction at submaximal effort as assessed by COP may contribute to reassure both patients and physicians that there is no physiological substrate for exercise-related respiratory symptoms often reported by PD patients.

  6. Expanding the limits of bibliotherapy for panic disorder: randomized trial of self-help without support but with a clear deadline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Sara; Carlbring, Per; Cuijpers, Pim; Andersson, Gerhard

    2010-09-01

    Cognitive behavioral bibliotherapy for panic disorder has been found to be less effective without therapist support. In this study, participants were randomized to either unassisted bibliotherapy (n=20) with a scheduled follow-up telephone interview or to a waiting list control group (n=19). Following a structured psychiatric interview, participants in the treatment group were sent a self-help book consisting of 10 chapters based on cognitive behavioral strategies for the treatment of panic disorder. No therapist contact of any kind was provided during the treatment phase, which lasted for 10 weeks. Results showed that the treatment group had, in comparison to the control group, improved on all outcome measures at posttreatment and at 3-month follow-up. The tentative conclusion drawn from these results is that pure bibliotherapy with a clear deadline can be effective for people suffering from panic disorder with or without agoraphobia.

  7. Factors Related to the Delay in Diagnosis of Panic Disorder%惊恐障碍诊断延迟的相关因素分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田志宏; 张震; 王东林; 严善明

    2001-01-01

    Objective:To find out factors related to the delay in diagnosis of panic disorder. Methods: One hundred patients with panic disorder were assessed and investigated with SCL-90 and a self-compiled questionnaire.Linear regression was applied in the multivariate statistical analysis,with the delayed time (from the age at onset to the age at being definitely diagnosed) as dependent variable and SCL-90 factorial scores, the existing symptoms and the demographic factors as independent variables. Results:Factors negatively correlated with the delayed time were depression ,nausea/abdominal discomfort and fear of dying while those positively correlated with it were phobia and depersonalization/derealization. Conclusion: Depression may contribute to early diagnosis of panic disorder.

  8. Actual neurosis as the underlying psychic structure of panic disorder, somatization, and somatoform disorder: an integration of Freudian and attachment perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaeghe, Paul; Vanheule, Stijn; De Rick, Ann

    2007-10-01

    Starting from a contemporary critique of the DSM-IV, this paper argues that the diagnostic categories of panic disorder somatization, and undifferentiated somatoform disorders can be understood as belonging to a common type of psychopathology--i.e., the Freudian actual neuroses. In addition to their strong clinical similarity, these disorders share an etiological similarity; and the authors propose a combination of Freud's focus on this type of patient's inability to represent an endogenous drive arousal with the post-Freudian focus on separation anxiety. An etiological hypothesis is put forward based on contemporary psychoanalytic attachment theory, highlighting mentalization. Concrete implications for a psychoanalytically based treatment are proposed.

  9. Guided and unguided Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for social anxiety disorder and/or panic disorder provided via the Internet and a smartphone application: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Ekaterina; Lindner, Philip; Ly, Kien Hoa; Dahlin, Mats; Vernmark, Kristofer; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per

    2016-12-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) can be effective in treating anxiety disorders, yet there has been no study on Internet-delivered ACT for social anxiety disorder (SAD) and panic disorder (PD), nor any study investigating whether therapist guidance is superior to unguided self-help when supplemented with a smartphone application. In the current trial, n=152 participants diagnosed with SAD and/or PD were randomized to therapist-guided or unguided treatment, or a waiting-list control group. Both treatment groups used an Internet-delivered ACT-based treatment program and a smartphone application. Outcome measures were self-rated general and social anxiety and panic symptoms. Treatment groups saw reduced general (d=0.39) and social anxiety (d=0.70), but not panic symptoms (d=0.05) compared to the waiting-list group, yet no differences in outcomes were observed between guided and unguided interventions. We conclude that Internet-delivered ACT is appropriate for treating SAD and potentially PD. Smartphone applications may partially compensate for lack of therapist support. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public Public Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics Return from War ... Web Links PTSD Site Search For Professionals Professional Section Home PTSD Overview Types of Trauma Trauma Basics ...

  11. Two-year course of generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and panic disorder with agoraphobia in a sample of Latino adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornsson, Andri S; Sibrava, Nicholas J; Beard, Courtney; Moitra, Ethan; Weisberg, Risa B; Benítez, Carlos I Pérez; Keller, Martin B

    2014-12-01

    It is imperative to study the clinical course of anxiety disorders among Latinos, given the implications for culturally sensitive treatment in this population. The current study is the first prospective, observational, longitudinal study of anxiety disorders among Latinos. Data are reported on 139 adult Latinos (M age = 34.65 years, SD = 10.98, 70.5% female) diagnosed with social anxiety disorder (SAD; n = 86), generalized anxiety disorder (GAD; n = 90), or panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA; n = 62). The participants were interviewed with standardized clinical interviews at intake and annually over 2 years of follow-up. Probabilities of recovery were calculated using standard survival analysis methods. The 2-year recovery rates in this study were 0.07 for SAD, 0.14 for GAD, 0.03 for PDA, and 0.50 for major depressive disorder (MDD). Overall functioning, social adjustment, and life satisfaction in this sample were poor. The recovery rates for anxiety disorders in this Latino sample were markedly low. Although caution must be used in comparing these data with prior longitudinal studies, these recovery rates seem to be much lower than in non-Latino White samples. However, the clinical course of MDD in this sample was similar to its course among non-Latino Whites, invoking the pressing question of whether there is something about the experience of anxiety disorders (but not MDD) among Latinos that makes them more impairing and persistent. The answer to that question should inform future treatment development for this population.

  12. Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Post Partum: The Impact of Birth on the Prevalence of Post-traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in Multiparous Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, W; Marth, C; Bergant, A M

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic birth experiences may lead to serious psychological impairment. Recent studies show that a considerable number of women can develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in some cases in a subsyndromal form. Until now, the possibility that postpartum psychological symptoms might be a continuum of a pre-existing disorder in pregnancy has rarely been considered. This study therefore aimed to evaluate the proportion of women who develop post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of childbirth. Materials and Methods: 56 multiparous women were recruited for the study. The diagnosis of PTSD was made according to the criteria for psychological disorders in the DSM-IV (Diagnostics and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders). The data were collected in structured interviews in the 30th to 38th week of gestation and in the 6th week post partum. Results: Of the 56 women participating, 52 (93 %) completed the survey. Uncontrolled results showed that 21.15 % of the multiparous women met the full diagnostic PTSD criteria in the 6th week post partum. After the exclusion of all cases already characterised by all criteria or a subsyndromal form of PTSD caused by previous traumatisation, the PTSD rate was below 8 % at 6 weeks postpartum (= incidence rate of PTSD post partum). Conclusions: The present study is the first prospective longitudinal study to demonstrate the occurrence of full criteria PTSD in multiparous women as a result of childbirth after having excluded pre-existing PTSD. The results of our study show a high prevalence rate of PTSD during pregnancy. A number of women report all aspects of post-traumatic stress disorder as a result of childbirth.

  13. Panic disorder with agoraphobia from a behavioral neuroscience perspective: Applying the research principles formulated by the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Alfons O; Richter, Jan; Pané-Farré, Christiane; Westphal, Dorte; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Vossbeck-Elsebusch, Anna N; Gerlach, Alexander L; Gloster, Andrew T; Ströhle, Andreas; Lang, Thomas; Kircher, Tilo; Gerdes, Antje B M; Alpers, Georg W; Reif, Andreas; Deckert, Jürgen

    2016-03-01

    In the current review, we reconceptualize a categorical diagnosis-panic disorder and agoraphobia-in terms of two constructs within the domain "negative valence systems" suggested by the Research Domain Criteria initiative. Panic attacks are considered as abrupt and intense fear responses to acute threat arising from inside the body, while anxious apprehension refers to anxiety responses to potential harm and more distant or uncertain threat. Taking a dimensional view, panic disorder with agoraphobia is defined with the threat-imminence model stating that defensive responses are dynamically organized along the dimension of the proximity of the threat. We tested this model within a large group of patients with panic disorder and agoraphobia (N = 369 and N = 124 in a replication sample) and found evidence that panic attacks are indeed instances of circa strike defense. This component of the defensive reactivity was related to genetic modulators within the serotonergic system. In contrast, anxious apprehension-characterized by attentive freezing during postencounter defense-was related to general distress and depressive mood, as well as to genetic modulations within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Patients with a strong behavioral tendency for active and passive avoidance responded better to exposure treatment if the therapist guides the patient through the exposure exercises. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  14. Internet-versus group-administered cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a psychiatric setting: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet administered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT is a promising new way to deliver psychological treatment, but its effectiveness in regular care settings and in relation to more traditional CBT group treatment has not yet been determined. The primary aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Internet-and group administered CBT for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia in a randomised trial within a regular psychiatric care setting. The second aim of the study was to establish the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. Methods Patients referred for treatment by their physician, or self-referred, were telephone-screened by a psychiatric nurse. Patients fulfilling screening criteria underwent an in-person structured clinical interview carried out by a psychiatrist. A total of 113 consecutive patients were then randomly assigned to 10 weeks of either guided Internet delivered CBT (n = 53 or group CBT (n = 60. After treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up, patients were again assessed by the psychiatrist, blind to treatment condition. Results Immediately after randomization 9 patients dropped out, leaving 104 patients who started treatment. Patients in both treatment conditions showed significant improvement on the main outcome measure, the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS after treatment. For the Internet treatment the within-group effect size (pre-post on the PDSS was Cohen's d = 1.73, and for the group treatment it was d = 1.63. Between group effect sizes were low and treatment effects were maintained at 6-months follow-up. We found no statistically significant differences between the two treatment conditions using a mixed models approach to account for missing data. Group CBT utilised considerably more therapist time than did Internet CBT. Defining effect as proportion of PDSS responders, the cost-effectiveness analysis concerning therapist time showed that Internet treatment had superior cost

  15. The clinical-familial correlates and naturalistic outcome of panic-disorder-agoraphobia with and without lifetime bipolar II comorbidity

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    Toni Cristina

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Much of the literature on panic disorder (PD-bipolar disorder (BP cormorbidity concerns BP-I. This literature emphasizes the difficulties encountered in pharmacologic treatment and outcome when such comorbidity is present. The present report explores these issues with respect to BP-II. Methods The sample comprised 326 outpatients (aged 34.5 ± 11.5 years old; 222 females with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 3rd edn, revised (DSM-III-R PD-agoraphobia; among them 52 subjects (16% were affected by lifetime comorbidity with BP-II. Patients were evaluated by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID, the Panic-Agoraphobia Interview, and the Longitudinal Interview Follow-up Examination (Life-Up and treated according to routine clinical practice at the University of Pisa, Italy, for a period of 3 years. Clinical and course features were compared between subjects with and without BP-II. All patients received the clinicians' choice of antidepressants and, in the case of the subsample with BP-II, mood stabilizers (for example, valproate, lithium were among the mainstays of treatment. Results In comparison to patients without bipolar comorbidity, those with BP-II showed a significantly greater frequency of social phobia, obsessive-compulsive disorder, alcohol-related disorders, and separation anxiety during childhood and adolescence. Regarding family history, a significantly greater frequency of PD and mood disorders was present among the BP-II. No significant differences were observed in the long-term course of PD or agoraphobic symptoms under pharmacological treatment or the likelihood of spontaneous pharmacological treatment interruptions. Conclusion Although the severity and outcome of panic-agoraphobic symptomatology appear to be similar in patients with and without lifetime bipolar comorbidity, the higher number of concomitant disorders in our PD patients with BP-II does indicate a greater

  16. Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder Symptom Domains Relate Differentially to PTSD and Depression: A Study of War-Exposed Bosnian Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, Meredith A; Charak, Ruby; Kaplow, Julie; Layne, Christopher M; Pynoos, Robert; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-10-01

    Persistent Complex Bereavement Disorder (PCBD) is a newly proposed diagnosis placed in the Appendix of the 5th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) as an invitation for further research. To date, no studies have examined the dimensionality of PCBD or explored whether different PCBD criteria domains relate in similar, versus differential, ways to other psychological conditions common to war-exposed bereaved youth, including symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and depression. We evaluated the dimensionality of proposed PCBD B and C symptom domains, and their respective relations with measures of PTSD and depression, in 1142 bereaved Bosnian adolescents exposed to the 1992-1995 Bosnian civil war. Instruments included the UCLA PTSD Reaction Index, the Depression Self-Rating Scale, and the UCLA Grief Screening Scale (a prototype measure of PCBD symptoms). We investigated potential differences in grief, PTSD, and depression scores as a function of cause of death. We then examined hypothesized differential relations between PCBD B and C symptom domain subscales and selected external correlates, specifically measures of depression and the four-factor emotional numbing model of PTSD. Results of both analyses provide preliminary evidence of a multidimensional structure for PCBD in this population, in that the PCBD Criterion C subscale score covaried more strongly with each of the four PTSD factors and with depression than did PCBD Criterion B. We conclude by discussing theoretical, methodological, clinical, and policy-related implications linked to the ongoing study of essential features of PCBD.

  17. Panic Attacks and Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For example, yoga, deep breathing and progressive muscle relaxation — tensing one muscle at a time, and then completely releasing the tension until every muscle in the body is relaxed — also may be helpful. Get physically active. Aerobic activity may have a calming effect on ...

  18. Behavioural effects of rapid intravenous administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) in patients with generalized social anxiety disorder, panic disorder and healthy controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Veen, J F; Van der Wee, N J A; Fiselier, J; Van Vliet, I M; Westenberg, H G M

    2007-10-01

    Findings from epidemiological, pharmacotherapeutical, genetic and neurobiological studies suggest a possible overlap in the neurobiology of generalized social anxiety disorder (gSAD) and panic disorder (PD). Previously we have found a rapid intravenous m-CPP challenge of 0.1 mg/kg to be highly sensitive and selective in the provocation of panic attacks in patients with PD. We therefore directly compared the behavioural, neuroendocrine and physiological effects of this rapid m-CPP challenge in a small sample of patients with gSAD, patients with PD and matched healthy controls. Panic attacks were significantly more provoked in patients with PD (85%), but not in patients with gSAD (14%) as compared to healthy controls (0%). Effects on the other behavioural parameters, but not on the neuroendocrine and physiological parameters, were significantly greater in patients with PD compared to patients with gSAD and controls. Our preliminary data do not support a shared neurobiology of gSAD and PD.

  19. Prospective impact of panic disorder and panic-anxiety on asthma control, health service use, and quality of life in adult patients with asthma over a 4-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favreau, Helene; Bacon, Simon L; Labrecque, Manon; Lavoie, Kim L

    2014-02-01

    Background Panic disorder (PD) is a common anxiety disorder among asthmatic patients with overlapping symptoms (e.g., hyperventilation). However, the longitudinal impact of PD on asthma control remains poorly understood. This study assessed the impact of PD and panic-anxiety on asthma control over a 4.3-year follow-up in 643 adult asthmatic patients. Methods Consecutive patients presenting to a tertiary asthma clinic underwent a sociodemographic, medical history, and psychiatric (Primary Care Evaluation of Mental Disorders) interview and completed questionnaires including the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) to assess panic-anxiety. At follow-up, patients completed the Asthma Control (ACQ) and Asthma Quality of Life (AQLQ) questionnaires and reported emergency department visits and hospitalizations during the follow-up. Results Baseline frequency of PD was 10% (n = 65). In fully adjusted models, analyses revealed that PD and ASI scores predicted worse follow-up ACQ total scores (β = 0.292, p = .037; β = 0.012, p = .003) but not AQLQ total scores. ASI scores also predicted greater nocturnal and waking symptoms, activity limitations, and bronchodilator use on the ACQ (β = 0.012-0.018, p anxiety sensitivity are prospectively associated with poorer asthma control and may be important targets for treatment.

  20. Neuroanatomia do transtorno de pânico Neuroanatomy of panic disorder

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    Marco Andre Mezzasalma

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: O Transtorno de Pânico (TP é um transtorno de ansiedade que permite um estudo comparativo de modelos animais visando à elucidação dos circuitos cerebrais envolvidos na sua gênese, embora estes ainda tenham sido pouco discutidos. MÉTODOS: Os autores realizam uma revisão da literatura sobre neurobiologia e neuroanatomia do TP. RESULTADOS: Uma revisão de dados demonstra a existência de uma "rede de medo", que tem como ponto principal o núcleo central da amígdala e compreende o hipotálamo, o tálamo, o hipocampo, a substância cinzenta periaquedutal, o locus ceruleus e outras estruturas do tronco cerebral. Sua presença é evidenciada em estudos de modelos animais de estados emocionais e comportamentais, e sua presença e importância podem ser extrapoladas para o TP em humanos. CONCLUSÃO: Esta rede de medo pode permitir que novos avanços e estudos utilizando técnicas de neuroimagem e/ou psicofármacos possam auxiliar na maior elucidação da circuitos cerebrais do TP.OBJECTIVES: Animal model studies may allow greater elucidation of the cerebral circuits involved in the genesis of panic disorder (PD, but these studies have not yet been fully analyzed. METHODS: The authors review recent literature on the neurobiology and neuroanatomy of PD. RESULTS: In this update, the authors present a revision of data that demonstrates the existence of a "fear network", which has as its main point the central nucleus of the amygdale and includes the hypothalamus, the thalamus, the hippocampus, the periaqueductal gray region, the locus ceruleus and other brainstem structures. Its existence is evidenced in animal studies of emotional and behavioral states, and its presence and importance can be extrapolated to the study of PD in humans. CONCLUSION: This fear network can allow new progresses and studies using neuroimaging techniques and/or psychopharmacological trials, further elucidating the cerebral circuits of PD.

  1. Longitudinal course of panic disorder with and without agoraphobia using the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nay, William; Brown, Ruth; Roberson-Nay, Roxann

    2013-06-30

    Few naturalistic, longitudinal studies of panic disorder with and without agoraphobia (PD/PDA) exist, limiting our knowledge of the temporal rates of incidence, relapse, and chronicity, or the factors that predict category transition. Data from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) wave 1 (n=43,093) and wave 2 (n=34,653) were utilized to determine transitional rates, and predictors of category transitions, over a 3-year period. Analyses revealed very high 3-year remission rates for PD and PDA (75% and 67%, respectively), although relapse also was relatively frequent (PD=12%; PDA=21%). Logistic regression revealed previous history of panic attacks, generalized anxiety disorder/major depression (GAD/MDD), nicotine dependence, female sex, younger age, and major financial crises to be reliable predictors of incidence and relapse. The direction and magnitude of association of many predictor variables were similar for PD and PDA, with notable exceptions for social anxiety and romantic relationship factors. Clinicians should be aware of the relapsing-remitting nature of PD and PDA and, thus, take caution to not reduce or eliminate effective treatments prematurely. Similarly, the current study suggests clinicians pay particular attention to concurrent factors relevant to relapse in PD/PDA that may also be clinically addressed (e.g., co-morbid MDD/GAD and nicotine dependence).

  2. Frontal white matter alterations in short-term medicated panic disorder patients without comorbid conditions: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borah Kim

    Full Text Available The frontal cortex might play an important role in the fear network, and white matter (WM integrity could be related to the pathophysiology of panic disorder (PD. A few studies have investigated alterations of WM integrity in PD. The aim of this study was to determine frontal WM integrity differences between patients with PD without comorbid conditions and healthy control (HC subjects by using diffusion tensor imaging. Thirty-six patients with PD who had used medication within 1 week and 27 age- and sex-matched HC subjects participated in this study. Structural brain magnetic resonance imaging was performed on all participants. Panic Disorder Severity Scale and Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI scores were assessed. Tract-based spatial statistics (TBSS was used for image analysis. TBSS analysis showed decreased fractional anisotropy (FA in frontal WM and WM around the frontal lobe, including the corpus callosum of both hemispheres, in patients with PD compared to HC subjects. Moreover, voxel-wise correlation analysis revealed that the BAI scores for patients with PD were positively correlated with their FA values for regions showing group differences in the FA of frontal WM of both hemispheres. Altered integrity in frontal WM of patients with PD without comorbid conditions might represent the structural pathophysiology in these patients, and these changes could be related to clinical symptoms of PD.

  3. A model of suicidal behavior in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): the mediating role of defeat and entrapment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagioti, Maria; Gooding, Patricia; Taylor, Peter James; Tarrier, Nicholas

    2013-08-30

    The aim of this study was to examine whether depression, hopelessness and perceptions of defeat and entrapment mediated the effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms on suicidal behavior. Participants were 73 individuals (mean age=29.2, S.D.=10.9, 79.5% female) diagnosed with current or lifetime PTSD who reported at least one PTSD symptom in the past month. Participants completed a series of self-report measures assessing depression, hopelessness and perceptions of defeat and entrapment. The Clinician Administrated Posttraumatic Scale for DSM-IV was administered to assess the presence and severity of PTSD symptoms. The results of Structural Equation Modeling supported a model whereby perceptions of defeat and entrapment fully mediated the effects of PTSD symptom severity upon suicidal behavior. The finding that perceptions of defeat and entrapment mediate the relationship between PTSD symptom severity and suicidal behavior was replicated in a subgroup of participants (n=50) who met the full criteria for a current PTSD diagnosis. The results support a recent theoretical model of suicide (The Schematic Appraisal Model of Suicide) which argues that perceptions of defeat and entrapment have a key role in the development of suicidal behaviors. We discuss the clinical implications of the findings.

  4. Beyond symptom self-report: use of a computer "avatar" to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Catherine E; Radell, Milen L; Shind, Christine; Ebanks-Williams, Yasheca; Beck, Kevin D; Gilbertson, Mark W

    2016-11-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) can occur in the wake of exposure to a traumatic event. Currently, PTSD symptoms are assessed mainly through self-report in the form of questionnaire or clinical interview. Self-report has inherent limitations, particularly in psychiatric populations who may have limited awareness of deficit, reduced attention span, or poor vocabulary and/or literacy skills. Diagnosis and evaluation of treatment efficacy would be aided by behavioral measures. A viable alternative may be virtual environments, in which the participant guides an on-screen "avatar" through a series of onscreen events meant to simulate real-world situations. Here, a sample of 82 veterans, self-assessed for PTSD symptoms was administered such a task, in which the avatar was confronted with situations that might evoke avoidant behavior, a core feature of PTSD. Results showed a strong correlation between PTSD symptom burden and task performance; in fact, the ability to predict PTSD symptom burden based on simple demographic variables (age, sex, combat exposure) was significantly improved by adding task score as a predictor variable. The results therefore suggest that virtual environments may provide a new way to assess PTSD symptoms, while avoiding at least some of the limitations associated with symptom self-report, and thus might be a useful complement to questionnaire or clinical interview, potentially facilitating both diagnosis and evaluation of treatment efficacy.

  5. Disorder-specific versus transdiagnostic and clinician-guided versus self-guided internet-delivered treatment for panic disorder and comorbid disorders: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogliati, V J; Dear, B F; Staples, L G; Terides, M D; Sheehan, J; Johnston, L; Kayrouz, R; Dear, R; McEvoy, P M; Titov, N

    2016-04-01

    Transdiagnostic cognitive behaviour therapy (TD-CBT) aims to target the symptoms of multiple disorders whereas disorder-specific CBT (DS-CBT) targets the symptoms of principal disorders. This study compared the relative benefits of internet-delivered TD-CBT and DS-CBT when provided in clinician-guided (CG-CBT) and self-guided (SG-CBT) formats for people with a principal diagnosis of Panic Disorder (PD). Participants (n=145) were randomly allocated to receive TD-CBT or DS-CBT and CG-CBT or SG-CBT. Large reductions in symptoms of PD (Cohen's d ≥ 0.71; avg. reduction ≥ 36%) and moderate-to-large reductions in symptoms of comorbid depression (Cohen's d ≥ 0.71; avg. reduction ≥ 33%), generalised anxiety disorder (Cohen's d ≥ 0.91; avg. reduction ≥ 34%) and social anxiety disorder (Cohen's d ≥ 0.50; avg. reduction ≥ 15%) were found over the 24-month follow-up period. Highlighting their efficacy and acceptability, no marked and consistent differences were observed between TD-CBT and DS-CBT or CG-CBT and DS-CBT.

  6. Two-year course of generalized anxiety disorder, social anxiety disorder, and panic disorder in a longitudinal sample of African American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibrava, Nicholas J; Beard, Courtney; Bjornsson, Andri S; Moitra, Ethan; Weisberg, Risa B; Keller, Martin B

    2013-12-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most common group of psychiatric disorders in adults. In addition to high prevalence, anxiety disorders are associated with significant functional impairment, and published research has consistently found them to have a chronic course. To date, very little research has explored the clinical characteristics and prospective course of anxiety disorders in racial and ethnic minority samples. The aims of this article are to present clinical and demographic characteristics at intake and prospective 2-year course findings in a sample of African American adults. Data are presented from 152 African Americans diagnosed with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD, n = 94), social anxiety disorder (SAD, n = 85), and panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA, n = 77) who are participating in the Harvard/Brown Anxiety Research Project-Phase II (HARP-II). HARP-II is an observational, prospective, longitudinal study of the course of anxiety disorders. Participants were interviewed at intake and annually for 2 years of follow-up. Probabilities of recovery over 2 years of follow-up were calculated using standard survival analysis methods. Survival analyses revealed a chronic course for all anxiety disorders, with rates of recovery of 0.23, 0.07, and 0.00 over 2 years for GAD, SAD, and PDA, respectively. These rates of recovery were lower than those reported in predominantly non-Latino White longitudinal samples, especially for SAD and PDA, suggesting that anxiety disorders may have a more chronic course for African Americans, with increased psychosocial impairment and high rates of comorbid Axis-I disorders. Clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  7. The effects of trauma exposure and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on the emotion-induced memory trade-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickley Steinmetz, Katherine R; Scott, Laurie A; Smith, David; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2012-01-01

    Many past examinations of memory changes in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have focused on changes in memory for trauma. However, it is unclear if these mnemonic differences extend beyond the memory of the trauma to memory for other positive and negative information and if they are specific to individuals with PTSD or extend to other individuals who have experienced trauma. The present study examined the influences of trauma exposure and PTSD on an effect that may parallel tunnel memory in PTSD: the emotion-induced memory trade-off, whereby emotional aspects of an experience are remembered at the expense of the nonemotional context. Three groups of participants (25 with current PTSD, 27 who had experienced trauma but did not have current PTSD, and 25 controls who had neither experienced significant trauma nor met criteria for current PTSD) were shown complex visual scenes that included an item (positive, negative, or neutral) placed on a neutral background. Forty-five minutes later, participants underwent a recognition memory test for the items and backgrounds separately. An emotion-induced memory trade-off was said to occur when there was a significant difference in item and background memory for emotional scenes, but not for neutral scenes. Results indicated that people with PTSD, like the other groups, were more likely to remember positive and negative items than neutral items. Moreover, people with PTSD exhibited a memory trade-off comparable in magnitude to that exhibited by the non-trauma control group. In contrast, trauma-exposed people without a current diagnosis of PTSD did not show a trade-off, because they remembered items within scenes better than their accompanying contexts not only for emotional but also for neutral scenes. These results suggest that (1) the effect of emotion on memory for visual scenes is similar in people with PTSD and control participants, and (2) people who have experienced trauma, but do not have PTSD, may

  8. Altered olfactory processing of stress-related body odors and artificial odors in patients with panic disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria-Beatrice Wintermann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Patients with Panic Disorder (PD direct their attention towards potential threat, followed by panic attacks, and increased sweat production. Onés own anxiety sweat odor influences the attentional focus, and discrimination of threat or non-threat. Since olfactory projection areas overlap with neuronal areas of a panic-specific fear network, the present study investigated the neuronal processing of odors in general and of stress-related sweat odors in particular in patients with PD. METHODS: A sample of 13 patients with PD with/ without agoraphobia and 13 age- and gender-matched healthy controls underwent an fMRI investigation during olfactory stimulation with their stress-related sweat odors (TSST, ergometry as well as artificial odors (peach, artificial sweat as non-fearful non-body odors. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The two groups did not differ with respect to their olfactory identification ability. Independent of the kind of odor, the patients with PD showed activations in fronto-cortical areas in contrast to the healthy controls who showed activations in olfaction-related areas such as the amygdalae and the hippocampus. For artificial odors, the patients with PD showed a decreased neuronal activation of the thalamus, the posterior cingulate cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex. Under the presentation of sweat odor caused by ergometric exercise, the patients with PD showed an increased activation in the superior temporal gyrus, the supramarginal gyrus, and the cingulate cortex which was positively correlated with the severity of the psychopathology. For the sweat odor from the anxiety condition, the patients with PD showed an increased activation in the gyrus frontalis inferior, which was positively correlated with the severity of the psychopathology. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest altered neuronal processing of olfactory stimuli in PD. Both artificial odors and stress-related body odors activate specific parts of a fear

  9. Restoring large-scale brain networks in PTSD and related disorders: a proposal for neuroscientifically-informed treatment interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Lanius

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three intrinsic connectivity networks in the brain, namely the central executive, salience, and default mode networks, have been identified as crucial to the understanding of higher cognitive functioning, and the functioning of these networks has been suggested to be impaired in psychopathology, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Objective: 1 To describe three main large-scale networks of the human brain; 2 to discuss the functioning of these neural networks in PTSD and related symptoms; and 3 to offer hypotheses for neuroscientifically-informed interventions based on treating the abnormalities observed in these neural networks in PTSD and related disorders. Method: Literature relevant to this commentary was reviewed. Results: Increasing evidence for altered functioning of the central executive, salience, and default mode networks in PTSD has been demonstrated. We suggest that each network is associated with specific clinical symptoms observed in PTSD, including cognitive dysfunction (central executive network, increased and decreased arousal/interoception (salience network, and an altered sense of self (default mode network. Specific testable neuroscientifically-informed treatments aimed to restore each of these neural networks and related clinical dysfunction are proposed. Conclusions: Neuroscientifically-informed treatment interventions will be essential to future research agendas aimed at targeting specific PTSD and related symptoms.

  10. Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study

    OpenAIRE

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Thomaes, Kathleen; Smit, Johannes H; Veltman, Dick J.; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W.; van Balkom, Anton J. L. M.; Draijer, Nel

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the empirical and clinical literature, complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and personality disorders (PDs) are suggested to be predictive of drop-out or reduced treatment effectiveness in trauma-focused PTSD treatment.Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate if personality characteristics would predict treatment compliance and effectiveness in stabilizing complex PTSD treatment. Method: In a randomized controlled trial on a 20-week stabilizing group cognitive ...

  11. Differences in trauma history and psychopathology between PTSD patients with and without co-occurring dissociative disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Wabnitz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The interplay between different types of potentially traumatizing events, posttraumatic symptoms, and the pathogenesis of PTSD or major dissociative disorders (DD has been extensively studied during the last decade. However, the phenomenology and nosological classification of posttraumatic disorders is currently under debate. The current study was conducted to investigate differences between PTSD patients with and without co-occurring major DD with regard to general psychopathology, trauma history, and trauma-specific symptoms. Methods: Twenty-four inpatients were administered the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV (CAPS and the Mini-Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (MINI-SKID-D to assess DD and PTSD. Additionally, participants completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology and health status. Results: Symptom profiles and axis I comorbidity were similar in all patients. Traumatic experiences did not differ between the two groups, with both reporting high levels of childhood trauma. Only trauma-specific avoidance behavior and dissociative symptoms differed between groups. Conclusion: Results support the view that PTSD and DD are affiliated disorders that could be classified within the same diagnostic category. Our results accord with a typological model of dissociation in which profound forms of dissociation are specific to DD and are accompanied with higher levels of trauma-specific avoidance in DD patients.

  12. Differences in trauma history and psychopathology between PTSD patients with and without co-occurring dissociative disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wabnitz, Pascal; Gast, Ursula; Catani, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    The interplay between different types of potentially traumatizing events, posttraumatic symptoms, and the pathogenesis of PTSD or major dissociative disorders (DD) has been extensively studied during the last decade. However, the phenomenology and nosological classification of posttraumatic disorders is currently under debate. The current study was conducted to investigate differences between PTSD patients with and without co-occurring major DD with regard to general psychopathology, trauma history, and trauma-specific symptoms. Twenty-four inpatients were administered the Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-IV (CAPS) and the Mini-Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Dissociative Disorders (MINI-SKID-D) to assess DD and PTSD. Additionally, participants completed questionnaires to assess general psychopathology and health status. Symptom profiles and axis I comorbidity were similar in all patients. Traumatic experiences did not differ between the two groups, with both reporting high levels of childhood trauma. Only trauma-specific avoidance behavior and dissociative symptoms differed between groups. Results support the view that PTSD and DD are affiliated disorders that could be classified within the same diagnostic category. Our results accord with a typological model of dissociation in which profound forms of dissociation are specific to DD and are accompanied with higher levels of trauma-specific avoidance in DD patients.

  13. Amygdala habituation to emotional faces in adolescents with internalizing disorders, adolescents with childhood sexual abuse related PTSD and healthy adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca G. van den Bulk

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents with internalizing disorders and adolescents with childhood sexual abuse related post-traumatic stress disorder (CSA-related PTSD show a large overlap in symptomatology. In addition, brain research indicated hyper-responsiveness and sustained activation instead of habituation of amygdala activation to emotional faces in both groups. Little is known, however, about whether the same patterns of amygdala habituation are present in these two groups. The current study examined habituation patterns of amygdala activity to emotional faces (fearful, happy and neutral in adolescents with a DSM-IV depressive and/or anxiety disorder (N = 25, adolescents with CSA-related PTSD (N = 19 and healthy controls (N = 26. Behaviourally, the adolescents from the internalizing and CSA-related PTSD group reported more anxiety to fearful and neutral faces than adolescents from the control group and adolescents from the CSA-related PTSD group reacted slower compared to the internalizing group. At the whole brain level, there was a significant interaction between time and group within the left amygdala. Follow-up ROI analysis showed elevated initial activity in the amygdala and rapid habituation in the CSA-related PTSD group compared to the internalizing group. These findings suggest that habituation patterns of amygdala activation provide additional information on problems with emotional face processing. Furthermore, the results suggest there are differences in the underlying neurobiological mechanisms related to emotional face processing for adolescents with internalizing disorders and adolescents with CSA-related PTSD. Possibly CSA-related PTSD is characterized by a stronger primary emotional response driven by the amygdala.

  14. Examination of the interrelations between the factors of PTSD, major depression, and generalized anxiety disorder in a heterogeneous trauma-exposed sample using DSM 5 criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Matthew; van Stolk-Cooke, Katherine

    2015-11-01

    Exposure to traumatic events places individuals at high risk for multiple psychiatric disorders, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). The high rates of comorbidity among these conditions merit evaluation in order to improve diagnosis and treatment approaches. The current study evaluated the association between PTSD, MDD, and GAD factors as presented in the DSM 5. 602 trauma-exposed individuals who experienced an event that met Criterion A for the DSM 5 PTSD diagnosis were recruited through Amazon.com, Inc.'s Mechanical Turk (MTurk) to complete an assessment of the impact of stressful events on their lives. High interrelations were detected among the 4 PTSD factors, 2 MDD factors that corresponded to somatic and affective symptoms, and the single GAD factor. The affective factor of MDD was most strongly related to the emotional numbing factor of PTSD, whereas the somatic factor of MDD was most strongly related to the hyperarousal factor of PTSD. The GAD factor was most strongly related to the hyperarousal factor of PTSD, relative to the other PTSD factors. The strength of the interrelations between factors of the three disorders is largely a function of the overlap in symptoms and calls into question the uniqueness of negative affective symptoms of PTSD, MDD and GAD. Results suggest that improved understanding of the trauma reaction requires a focus on the unique presentation of each individual and assessment of multiple disorders.

  15. OVERPREDICTION OF FEAR IN PANIC DISORDER PATIENTS WITH AGORAPHOBIA - DOES THE (MIS)MATCH MODEL GENERALIZE TO EXPOSURE IN-VIVO THERAPY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANHOUT, WJPJ; EMMELKAMP, PMG

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the (mis)match model of Rachman and co-workers during real life exposure therapy in panic disorder patients with agoraphobic avoidance. The results showed that although the patients tended to overpredict their expected fear before the exposure sessions, their pr

  16. Overprediction of fear in panic disorder patients with agoraphobia: Does the (mis)match model generalize to exposure in vivo therapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, W.J.P.J.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the (mis)match model of Rachman and co-workers during real life exposure therapy in panic disorder patients with agoraphobic avoidance. The results showed that although the patients tended to overpredict their expected fear before the exposure sessions, their pr

  17. THE ROLE OF NEGATIVE SELF-STATEMENTS DURING EXPOSURE IN-VIVO - A PROCESS STUDY OF 8 PANIC DISORDER PATIENTS WITH AGORAPHOBIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANHOUT, WJPJ; EMMELKAMP, PMG; SCHOLING, A

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the pattern of cognitive change, and in particular the role of negative self-statements, in relation to improvement during an in vivo exposure treatment. Eight panic disordered patients with agoraphobia, of whom 4 were most and 4 were least improved on a com

  18. Expanding the limits of bibliotherapy for panic disorder. Randomized trial of self-help without support but with a clear deadline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordin, S; Carlbring, P.; Cuijpers, P.; Andersson, G.

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral bibliotherapy for panic disorder has been found to be less effective without therapist support. In this study, participants were randomized to either unassisted bibliotherapy (n = 20) with a scheduled follow-up telephone interview or to a waiting list control group (n = 19). Fol

  19. Psychological Treatment for Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Examine the Role of Therapist-Guided Exposure in situ in CBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloster, Andrew T.; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Einsle, Franziska; Lang, Thomas; Helbig-Lang, Sylvia; Fydrich, Thomas; Fehm, Lydia; Hamm, Alfons O.; Richter, Jan; Alpers, George W.; Gerlach, Alexander L.; Strohle, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Deckert, Jurgen; Zwanzger, Peter; Hofler, Michael; Arolt, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG). Nevertheless, an understanding of its mechanisms and particularly the role of therapist-guided exposure is lacking. This study was aimed to evaluate whether therapist-guided exposure in situ is associated with more pervasive and…

  20. Psychological Treatment for Panic Disorder with Agoraphobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial to Examine the Role of Therapist-Guided Exposure in situ in CBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloster, Andrew T.; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Einsle, Franziska; Lang, Thomas; Helbig-Lang, Sylvia; Fydrich, Thomas; Fehm, Lydia; Hamm, Alfons O.; Richter, Jan; Alpers, George W.; Gerlach, Alexander L.; Strohle, Andreas; Kircher, Tilo; Deckert, Jurgen; Zwanzger, Peter; Hofler, Michael; Arolt, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG). Nevertheless, an understanding of its mechanisms and particularly the role of therapist-guided exposure is lacking. This study was aimed to evaluate whether therapist-guided exposure in situ is associated with more pervasive and…

  1. Does Maintenance CBT Contribute to Long-Term Treatment Response of Panic Disorder with or without Agoraphobia? A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kamila S.; Payne, Laura A.; Gorman, Jack M.; Shear, M. Katherine; Woods, Scott W.; Saksa, John R.; Barlow, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: We examined the possibility that maintenance cognitive behavior therapy (M-CBT) may improve the likelihood of sustained improvement and reduced relapse in a multi-site randomized controlled clinical trial of patients who met criteria for panic disorder with or without agoraphobia. Method: Participants were all patients (N = 379) who…

  2. Is a combined therapy more effective than either CBT or SSRI alone? Results of a multicenter trial on panic disorder with or without agoraphobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.J. van Apeldoorn; W.J.P.J. Hout; P.P.A. Mersch; M. Huisman; B.R. Slaap; W.W., III Hale; S. Visser; R. van Dyck; J.A. den Boer

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish whether the combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy (SSRI) was more effective in treating panic disorder (PD) than either CBT or SSRI alone, and to evaluate any differential effects between the monotreatments. Method: Patients with PD (n = 150) w

  3. Is a combined therapy more effective than either CBT or SSRI alone? Results of a multicenter trial on panic disorder with or without agoraphobia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Apeldoorn, F. J.; van Hout, W. J. P. J.; Huisman, J.M.E.; Slaap, B. R.; Hale, W. W.; Visser, S.; van Dyck, R.; den Boer, J. A.; Mersch, P.P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To establish whether the combination of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy (SSRI) was more effective in treating panic disorder (PD) than either CBT or SSRI alone, and to evaluate any differential effects between the mono-treatments. Method: Patients with PD (n = 150)

  4. Therapygenetics: anterior cingulate cortex-amygdala coupling is associated with 5-HTTLPR and treatment response in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Straube, Benjamin; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Konrad, Carsten; Ströhle, Andreas; Wittmann, André; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Arolt, Volker; Kircher, Tilo; Deckert, Jürgen; Reif, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the 5'-flanking promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene SLC6A4, the 5-HTT-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) has been inconclusively associated with response to cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). As genomic functions are stronger related to neural than to behavioural markers, we investigated the association of treatment response, 5-HTTLPR and functional brain connectivity in patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG). Within the national research network PANIC-NET 231 PD/AG patients who provided genetic information underwent a manualized exposure-based CBT. A subset of 41 patients participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) add-on study prior to treatment applying a differential fear conditioning task. Neither the treatment nor the reduced fMRI sample showed a direct effect of 5-HTTLPR on treatment response as defined by a reduction in the Hamilton Anxiety Scale score ≥50 % from baseline to post assessment. On a neural level, inhibitory anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)-amygdala coupling during fear conditioning that had previously been shown to characterize treatment response in this sample was driven by responders with the L/L genotype. Building upon conclusive evidence from basic and preclinical findings on the association of the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism with emotion regulation and related brain connectivity patterns, present findings translate these to a clinical sample of PD/AG patients and point towards a potential intermediate connectivity phenotype modulating response to exposure-based CBT.

  5. Behavioural effects of rapid intravenous administration of meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in patients with panic disorder and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wee, Nic J A; Fiselier, Jasha; van Megen, Harold J G M; Westenberg, Herman G M

    2004-10-01

    Oral and intravenous challenge paradigms with the direct 5-HT agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP) in panic disorder (PD) have shown only moderate sensitivity or selectivity of the panicogenic effects in PD. However, the results of a study examining the effects of rapid intravenous administration of 0.1 mg/kg of m-CPP in healthy volunteers suggested that this approach may be a more selective and sensitive panicogenic paradigm in PD. We therefore compared the behavioural, neuroendocrine and physiological effects of rapid intravenous administration of 0.1 mg/kg of m-CPP in 10 patients with PD and 10 healthy controls. Panic attacks were significantly more provoked in patients with PD (90%) compared to healthy controls (0%). Effects on the behavioural, but not on the neuroendocrine and physiological parameters, were significantly greater in patients. Our data suggests that the behavioural effects of rapid intravenous administration of 0.1 mg/kg of m-CPP in patients with PD indeed show a unique combination of high sensitivity and selectivity.

  6. Response to meta-chlorophenylpiperazine in panic disorder patients and healthy subjects: influence of reduction in intravenous dosage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germine, M; Goddard, A W; Sholomskas, D E; Woods, S W; Charney, D S; Heninger, G R

    1994-11-01

    As a further test of the hypothesis of serotonin hypersensitivity in panic disorder (PD), the serotonin agonist meta-chlorophenylpiperazine (MCPP) was administered intravenously in a dose of 0.05 mg/kg to 27 PD patients and 22 normal control subjects. This is one-half the dose used in our previous study of PD patients, where the dose may have been too high to provide evidence of hypersensitivity to the agent. Responses of anxiety and nervousness were statistically indistinguishable by analysis of variance in the two groups, replicating our previous findings. Panic attack symptom score (PASS) ratings were significantly higher in the PD group, compared with a trend toward higher PASS ratings in the 0.1 mg/kg study. Cortisol, human growth hormone, and male prolactin responses showed no significant differences in the two groups by analysis of variance. Prolactin responses were significantly blunted in the female patients. The unexpected blunted prolactin response to MCPP in female PD patients may reflect a nonspecific blunting of prolactin response to stress. The PASS data provide some evidence of serotonergic hypersensitivity in PD.

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Service Organizations Whistleblower Rights & Protections Media Room Inside the Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos ... for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public Public Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics ...

  8. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Organizations Whistleblower Rights & Protections Transparency Media Room Inside the Media Room Public Affairs News Releases Speeches Videos ... for PTSD Menu Menu PTSD PTSD Home For the Public Public Section Home PTSD Overview PTSD Basics ...

  9. Telling the story and re-living the past: How speech analysis can reveal emotions in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, van den Egon L.; Sluis, van der Frans; Dijkstra, Ton; Westerink, Joyce; Krans, Martijn; Ouwerkerk, Martin

    2011-01-01

    A post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a severe stress disorder and, as such, a severe handicap in daily life. To this date, its treatment is still a big endeavor for therapists. This chapter discusses an exploration towards automatic assistance in treating patients suffering from PTSD. Such ass

  10. Ethnic Differences in Personality Disorder Patterns among Women Veterans Diagnosed with PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet C'de Baca

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Personality Disorders (PDs impair the ability to function socially and occupationally. PD prevalence rates among veterans who have also been diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD range from 45%–79%. This study examined ethnic differences in PDs assessed with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III in 260 non-Hispanic white (64%, Hispanic (27%, and African American (9%, mostly single, women veterans in treatment for PTSD. After adjusting for covariates including number and sexual-nature of trauma, findings revealed the adjusted odds ratio of having a cluster A PD was almost three times higher for African Americans (p = 0.046 then the other two ethnic groups, which may be driven by the paranoid PD scale and potentially reflects an adaptive response to racial discrimination. In cluster designation analysis, the odds were twice as high of having a cluster B PD with childhood trauma (p = 0.046, and a cluster C PD with sexual trauma (p = 0.004, demonstrating the significance of childhood and sexual trauma on long-term chronic personality patterns in women veterans. These results highlight the importance of using instruments with demonstrated diagnostic validity for minority populations.

  11. Ethnic Differences in Personality Disorder Patterns among Women Veterans Diagnosed with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C'de Baca, Janet; Castillo, Diane T; Mackaronis, Julia E; Qualls, Clifford

    2014-03-01

    Personality Disorders (PDs) impair the ability to function socially and occupationally. PD prevalence rates among veterans who have also been diagnosed with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) range from 45%-79%. This study examined ethnic differences in PDs assessed with the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III in 260 non-Hispanic white (64%), Hispanic (27%), and African American (9%), mostly single, women veterans in treatment for PTSD. After adjusting for covariates including number and sexual-nature of trauma, findings revealed the adjusted odds ratio of having a cluster A PD was almost three times higher for African Americans (p = 0.046) then the other two ethnic groups, which may be driven by the paranoid PD scale and potentially reflects an adaptive response to racial discrimination. In cluster designation analysis, the odds were twice as high of having a cluster B PD with childhood trauma (p = 0.046), and a cluster C PD with sexual trauma (p = 0.004), demonstrating the significance of childhood and sexual trauma on long-term chronic personality patterns in women veterans. These results highlight the importance of using instruments with demonstrated diagnostic validity for minority populations.

  12. Lack of specific association between panicogenic properties of caffeine and HPA-axis activation. A placebo-controlled study of caffeine challenge in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Markianos, Manolis; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2015-09-30

    A subgroup of patients with Panic Disorder (PD) exhibits increased sensitivity to caffeine administration. However, the association between caffeine-induced panic attacks and post-caffeine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activation in PD patients remains unclear. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over experiment, 19 PD patients underwent a 400-mg caffeine-challenge and a placebo-challenge, both administered in the form of instant coffee. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were assessed at both baseline and post-challenge. No patient panicked after placebo-challenge, while nine patients (47.3%) panicked after caffeine-challenge. Placebo administration did not result in any significant change in hormones' plasma levels. Overall, sample's patients demonstrated significant increases in ACTH, cortisol, and DHEAS plasma levels after caffeine administration. However, post-caffeine panickers and non-panickers did not differ with respect to the magnitude of the increases. Our results indicate that in PD patients, caffeine-induced panic attacks are not specifically associated with HPA-axis activation, as this is reflected in post-caffeine increases in ACTH, cortisol and DHEAS plasma levels, suggesting that caffeine-induced panic attacks in PD patients are not specifically mediated by the biological processes underlying fear or stress. More generally, our results add to the evidence that HPA-axis activation is not a specific characteristic of panic.

  13. Depression, anxiety and panic disorders in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: correlations with tobacco use, disease severity and quality of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, Oana Irinel; Trofor, Antigona Carmen; Lotrean, Lucia Maria; Filipeanu, Dumitru; Trofor, Letitia

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess anxiety, depression and panic disorders among patients diagnosed with COPD and to investigate their correlation with disease severity, quality of life as well as tobacco use. An observational study was performed between January and September 2014 among 60 patients diagnosed with COPD. COPD staging according to GOLD criteria, while anxiety and depression were assessed using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and panic attacks were evaluated based on ICD 10 criteria. Almost 40% of the sample were smokers, the medium packs-years was 34.3 and the medium Fagerstrom score was 7.5. Overall, mean Modified Medical Research Council Dyspnea Scale (mMRC) was 2.86, mean COPD Assessment Test (CAT) score was 21.75 and study participants had 1.93 COPD exacerbations/year. Mean distribution of anxiety and depression symptoms scores among COPD subjects was 10.65 ± 3.5 and 9.93 ± 3.8, respectively. Smokers and ex-smokers had similar scores with regard to anxiety, depression or the presence of panic attacks. The results of the bivariate correlations indicated associations between anxiety, depression, panic attacks and disease severity, as well as poor quality of life of patients with COPD, regardless of their current tobacco use status. In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that anxiety, depression and panic attacks were constant characteristics among COPD patients- regardless of their current tobacco use.

  14. Discrepancy in diagnosis and treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): treatment for the wrong reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meltzer, Ellen C; Averbuch, Tali; Samet, Jeffrey H; Saitz, Richard; Jabbar, Khelda; Lloyd-Travaglini, Christine; Liebschutz, Jane M

    2012-04-01

    In primary care (PC), patients with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are often undiagnosed. To determine variables associated with treatment, this cross-sectional study assessed 592 adult patients for PTSD. Electronic medical record (EMR) review of the prior 12 months assessed mental health (MH) diagnoses and MH treatments [selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and/or ≥1 visit with MH professional]. Of 133 adults with PTSD, half (49%; 66/133) received an SSRI (18%), a visit with MH professional (14%), or both (17%). Of those treated, 88% (58/66) had an EMR MH diagnosis, the majority (71%; 47/66) depression and (18%; 12/66) PTSD. The odds of receiving MH treatment were increased 8.2 times (95% CI 3.1-21.5) for patients with an EMR MH diagnosis. Nearly 50% of patients with PTSD received MH treatment, yet few had this diagnosis documented. Treatment was likely due to overlap in the management of PTSD and other mental illnesses.

  15. Sudden losses and sudden gains during a DBT-PTSD treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder following childhood sexual abuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje Krüger

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Exposure-based treatment approaches are first-line interventions for patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, the dissemination of exposure-based treatments for PTSD is challenging, as a large proportion of clinicians report being concerned about symptoms worsening as a result of this type of intervention and are therefore reluctant to offer it to patients with PTSD. However, there is only little empirical evidence to date on the pattern of symptom worsening during exposure-based treatment for PTSD. Objective: The goal of the present study was to explore the frequency of sudden losses and sudden gains in the course of an exposure-based treatment programme for female patients suffering from PTSD related to childhood sexual abuse who also show severe comorbidity. In addition, the relationship between sudden changes and treatment outcome was examined. Methods: Female participants (N=74 were randomised to either a 12-week residential DBT-PTSD programme or a treatment-as-usual wait list. The pattern of symptom change was assessed via weekly assessments using the Posttraumatic Diagnostic Scale (PDS. Sudden changes were computed as suggested by the literature on sudden gains. Results: During treatment, only one participant (3% experienced a sudden loss, whereas 25% of participants experienced sudden gains. In the waiting condition, 8% of the participants experienced sudden losses and 5% experienced sudden gains during the same time period. No symptom worsening was observed in response to exposure sessions. However, sudden gains occurred during exposure and non-exposure treatment weeks. Patients with sudden gains showed better treatment outcome in the post-treatment and follow-up assessments. Conclusions: Exposure-based treatment did not lead to PTSD symptom worsening in the study sample. Results show that sudden gains occur frequently during PTSD treatment and have a prognostic value for treatment outcome.

  16. Lifetime history of traumatic events in an American Indian community sample: heritability and relation to substance dependence, affective disorder, conduct disorder and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Cindy L; Gizer, Ian R; Gilder, David A; Yehuda, Rachael

    2013-02-01

    American Indians appear to experience a higher rate of traumatic events than what has been reported in general population surveys. American Indians also suffer higher alcohol related death rates than any other ethnic group in the U.S. population. Therefore efforts to delineate factors which may uniquely contribute to increased likelihood of trauma, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and substance use disorders (SUD) over the lifetime in American Indians are important because of the high burden of morbidity and mortality that they pose to American Indian communities. Participants were American Indians recruited from reservations that were assessed with the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism (SSAGA), family history assessment and the stressful-life-events scale. Of the 309 participants, equivalent numbers of men and women (94%) reported experiencing traumas; however, a larger proportion of women received a PTSD diagnosis (38%) than men (29%). Having experienced multiple trauma and sexual abuse were most highly associated with PTSD. Having experienced assaultive trauma and having PTSD symptoms were both found to be moderately heritable (30-50%). Logistic regression revealed that having an anxiety and/or affective disorder and having a substance dependent diagnosis, but not having antisocial personality disorder/conduct disorder, were significantly correlated with having a diagnosis of PTSD. These studies suggest that trauma is highly prevalent in this American Indian community, it is heritable, is associated with PTSD, affective/anxiety disorders and substance dependence. Additionally, trauma, PTSD and substance dependence appear to all co-emerge in early adulthood in this high-risk population.

  17. Generalized Anxiety Disorder and Social Anxiety Disorder, but Not Panic Anxiety Disorder, Are Associated with Higher Sensitivity to Learning from Negative Feedback: Behavioral and Computational Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khdour, Hussain Y; Abushalbaq, Oday M; Mughrabi, Ibrahim T; Imam, Aya F; Gluck, Mark A; Herzallah, Mohammad M; Moustafa, Ahmed A

    2016-01-01

    Anxiety disorders, including generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), social anxiety disorder (SAD), and panic anxiety disorder (PAD), are a group of common psychiatric conditions. They are characterized by excessive worrying, uneasiness, and fear of future events, such that they affect social and occupational functioning. Anxiety disorders can alter behavior and cognition as well, yet little is known about the particular domains they affect. In this study, we tested the cognitive correlates of medication-free patients with GAD, SAD, and PAD, along with matched healthy participants using a probabilistic category-learning task that allows the dissociation between positive and negative feedback learning. We also fitted all participants' data to a Q-learning model and various actor-critic models that examine learning rate parameters from positive and negative feedback to investigate effects of valence vs. action on performance. SAD and GAD patients were more sensitive to negative feedback than either PAD patients or healthy participants. PAD, SAD, and GAD patients did not differ in positive-feedback learning compared to healthy participants. We found that Q-learning models provide the simplest fit of the data in comparison to other models. However, computational analysis revealed that groups did not differ in terms of learning rate or exploration values. These findings argue that (a) not all anxiety spectrum disorders share similar cognitive correlates, but are rather different in ways that do not link them to the hallmark of anxiety (higher sensitivity to negative feedback); and (b) perception of negative consequences is the core feature of GAD and SAD, but not PAD. Further research is needed to examine the similarities and differences between anxiety spectrum disorders in other cognitive domains and potential implementation of behavioral therapy to remediate cognitive deficits.

  18. A Pilot Study of Group Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) for Combat Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anthony P.; Erickson, Thane M.; Giardino, Nicholas D.; Favorite, Todd; Rauch, Sheila A. M.; Robinson, Elizabeth; Kulkarni, Madhur; Liberzon, Israel

    2015-01-01

    Background “Mindfulness-based” interventions show promise for stress-reduction in general medical conditions, and initial evidence suggests that they are well accepted in trauma-exposed individuals. Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) shows substantial efficacy for prevention of depression relapse, but it has been less studied in anxiety disorders. This study investigated the feasibility, acceptability, and clinical outcomes of an MBCT group intervention adapted for combat PTSD. Methods Consecutive patients seeking treatment for chronic PTSD (veterans of Vietnam, Korea, WWII, Desert Storm) at a VA outpatient clinic were enrolled in eight week MBCT groups, modified for PTSD (four groups, n=20) or brief treatment-as-usual (TAU) comparison group interventions (three groups, n=16). MBCT consisted of PTSD psychoeducation, mindfulness of body, breath, and emotions, mindful movement, exercises for managing intrusive thoughts and feelings, and daily home practice though audio recording. Pre- and post-therapy psychological assessments with clinician administered PTSD scale (CAPS) were performed with all patients, and self-report measures (PTSD diagnostic scale, PDS, and Posttraumatic cognitions inventory, PTCI) were administered in the MBCT group. Results Pre- to post-treatment effects analysis demonstrated significant improvement in PTSD symptoms. Intent to treat analyses showed significant improvement in CAPS (t(19)=4.8, p<.001) in the MBCT condition but not the TAU conditions, and a significant Condition*Time interaction (F[1,26]=16.4, p<.005). MBCT completers analysis (n =15, 75%) also showed good compliance with assigned homework exercises, and significant and clinically meaningful improvement in PTSD symptom severity on post-treatment assessment in CAPS and PDS (particularly in avoidance/numbing symptoms), and reduced PTSD-relevant cognitions in PTCI (in particular, self-blame). Conclusions These data suggest group mindfulness-based cognitive therapy as an

  19. The Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Blueberries in an Animal Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebenezer, Philip J; Wilson, C Brad; Wilson, Leslie D; Nair, Anand R; J, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a trauma and stressor-related disorder that results in a prolonged stress response. It is associated with increased oxidative stress and inflammation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HC). The only approved therapy for PTSD is selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs), but their efficacy is marginal. Recently, we demonstrated that over-production of norepinephrine (NE) as the possible reason for the lack of efficacy of SSRIs. Hence, there is a need for novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment of PTSD. In this study, we investigated the anti-inflammatory role of blueberries in modulating inflammatory markers and neurotransmitter levels in PTSD. Rats were fed either a blueberry enriched (2%) or a control diet. Rats were exposed to cats for one hour on days 1 and 11 of a 31-day schedule to simulate traumatic conditions. The rats were also subjected to psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. At the end of the study, the rats were euthanized and the PFC and HC were isolated. Monoamines were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), gene and protein expression levels of inflammatory cytokines were also measured. In our PTSD model, NE levels were increased and 5-HT levels were decreased when compared to control. In contrast, a blueberry enriched diet increased 5-HT without affecting NE levels. The rate limiting enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and tryptophan hydroxylase were also studied and they confirmed our findings. The enhanced levels free radicals, gene and protein expression of inflammatory cytokines seen in the PTSD group were normalized with a blueberry enriched diet. Decreased anxiety in this group was shown by improved performance on the elevated plus-maze. These findings indicate blueberries can attenuate oxidative stress and inflammation and restore neurotransmitter imbalances in a rat model of PTSD.

  20. A systematic literature review of PTSD's latent structure in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders: DSM-IV to DSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Műllerová, Jana; Elhai, Jon D

    2016-03-01

    The factor structure of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been widely researched, but consensus regarding the exact number and nature of factors is yet to be reached. The aim of the current study was to systematically review the extant literature on PTSD's latent structure in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) in order to identify the best-fitting model. One hundred and twelve research papers published after 1994 using confirmatory factor analysis and DSM-based measures of PTSD were included in the review. In the DSM-IV literature, four-factor models received substantial support, but the five-factor Dysphoric arousal model demonstrated the best fit, regardless of gender, measurement instrument or trauma type. The recently proposed DSM-5 PTSD model was found to be a good representation of PTSD's latent structure, but studies analysing the six- and seven-factor models suggest that the DSM-5 PTSD factor structure may need further alterations.

  1. Comparison between two models of experimental anxiety in healthy volunteers and panic disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graeff, F G; Silva, M; Del Ben, C M; Zuardi, A W; Hetem, L A; Guimarães, F S

    2001-12-01

    To further investigate the role of serotonin (5-HT) in anxiety, two tests were used in human subjects. The first was the conditioning of skin conductance response (CSCR) that associates a tone to a loud noise. The second was simulated public speaking (SPS), which is believed to represent unconditioned fear. In healthy volunteers the 5-HT(2A) receptor blocker and 5-HT reuptake inhibitor nefazodone reduced subjective anxiety and the number of spontaneous fluctuations of skin conductance during CSCR, but enhanced anxiety induced by SPS. Opposite effects had been reported with the 5-HT releasing and uptake-inhibiting agent D-fenfluramine. Panic patients behaved like controls in the CSCR. However, they had a higher level of baseline anxiety and were insensitive to SPS. This profile resembles the reported effect of the non-selective 5-HT receptor blocker metergoline in healthy volunteers. Therefore, panic patients seem to process unconditioned fear abnormally, which may be due to lack of 5-HT inhibition in brain structures commanding flight from proximal danger stimuli.

  2. A pharmacotherapeutic approach to the management of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Adam Michael

    2012-10-01

    Due to relatively recent and ongoing world events (eg, terrorist attacks, wars, and natural disasters), there has been a shift in attention from some of the more common psychiatric illnesses to one of the more elusive, namely, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). PTSD is a severe, and often chronic, condition that can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Although originally a condition seen primarily among war veterans, PTSD is now becoming more prevalent in the general community. PTSD often presents concurrently with other conditions, such as depression, bipolar, anxiety/panic disorders, and alcohol and drug abuse. Because of this, PTSD often goes unrecognized and is underdiagnosed in clinical practice. Thus, an opportunity for pharmacist intervention exists, both in the institution and in the community. With proper education and training, pharmacists can be efficient in screening for signs and symptoms of PTSD, triaging appropriate patients, and can play an integral role in managing the diverse array of drug therapy options for PTSD.

  3. Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD): What We Have Learned and What We Still Have Not Found Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flouri, Eirini

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the biomedical and the social constructionist models applied to response to trauma, presents the prevalence and the etiology of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and describes its biological and psychological correlates in children and adults. It concludes that future research might benefit from investigating factors…

  4. Effect of Song Writing versus Recreational Music on Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Symptoms and Abuse Attribution in Abused Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Susan J.

    2000-01-01

    Attempts to develop a song-writing technique to reduce posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms in abused children from 9 to 17 years old, all patients of an inpatient psychiatric child/adolescent unit who had been physically and/or sexually abused. Finds no significant change in overall scores due to treatment condition. (SR)

  5. “Nomophobia”: Impact of Cell Phone Use Interfering with Symptoms and Emotions of Individuals with Panic Disorder Compared with a Control Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Sancassiani, Federica; Machado, Sergio; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder refers to the frequent and recurring acute attacks of anxiety. Objective: This study describes the routine use of mobiles phones (MPs) and investigates the appearance of possible emotional alterations or symptoms related to their use in patients with panic disorder (PD). Background: We compared patients with PD and agoraphobia being treated at the Panic and Respiration Laboratory of The Institute of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to a control group of healthy volunteers. Methods: An MP-use questionnaire was administered to a consecutive sample of 50 patients and 70 controls. Results: People with PD showed significant increases in anxiety, tachycardia, respiratory alterations, trembling, perspiration, panic, fear and depression related to the lack of an MP compared to the control group. Conclusions: Both groups exhibited dependence on and were comforted by having an MP; however, people with PD and agoraphobia showed significantly more emotional alterations as well as intense physical and psychological symptoms when they were apart from or unable to use an MP compared to healthy volunteers. PMID:24669231

  6. "Nomophobia": impact of cell phone use interfering with symptoms and emotions of individuals with panic disorder compared with a control group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Anna Lucia Spear; Valença, Alexandre Martins; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Sancassiani, Federica; Machado, Sergio; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2014-01-01

    Panic disorder refers to the frequent and recurring acute attacks of anxiety. This study describes the routine use of mobiles phones (MPs) and investigates the appearance of possible emotional alterations or symptoms related to their use in patients with panic disorder (PD). We compared patients with PD and agoraphobia being treated at the Panic and Respiration Laboratory of The Institute of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, to a control group of healthy volunteers. An MP-use questionnaire was administered to a consecutive sample of 50 patients and 70 controls. People with PD showed significant increases in anxiety, tachycardia, respiratory alterations, trembling, perspiration, panic, fear and depression related to the lack of an MP compared to the control group. Both groups exhibited dependence on and were comforted by having an MP; however, people with PD and agoraphobia showed significantly more emotional alterations as well as intense physical and psychological symptoms when they were apart from or unable to use an MP compared to healthy volunteers.

  7. Examining PTSD Treatment Choice Among Individuals with Subthreshold PTSD

    OpenAIRE

    Bergman, Hannah E.; Kline, Alexander C.; Feeny, Norah C.; Zoellner, Lori A.

    2015-01-01

    Subthreshold posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with impairment and has a prevalence rate comparable to full PTSD. Yet, little is known regarding treatment preferences among individuals with subthreshold PTSD, even though they seek trauma-related treatment at a similar rate to those with full PTSD. This study explored subthreshold diagnostic PTSD diagnostic category and treatment preference in undergraduate (N = 439) and trauma-exposed community (N = 203) samples. Participants...

  8. Lack of association between the serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) and personality traits in asymptomatic patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachleski, Cláudia; Blaya, Carolina; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Vargas, Verônica; Leistner-Segal, Sandra; Manfro, Gisele Gus

    2008-01-31

    The serotonin transporter promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR) has been investigated regarding its association with neuroticism, which, in its turn, is a personality dimension often found in patients with panic disorder (PD). It has been recently evidenced that the long 5-HTTLPR polymorphism has a genetic variation (Lg), which is related to its lower expression. The objective of this study was to assess the association between the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism in the triallelic system and the neurotic personality traits in patients in PD remission. Sixty-seven Caucasian patients with PD diagnosis according to the DSM-IV-TR assessed with the MINI (mini international neuropsychiatric interview) were included. The MMPI (Minnesota multiphasic personality inventory) was used to assess the personality. The remission of PD symptoms was defined as CGI (clinical global impression) panic attacks. The patients' genotypes were grouped according to the level of expression: low expression (SS, SLg and LgLg), intermediate expression (SLa, LgLa) and high expression (LaLa). There was no significant deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (chi2=0.52, d.f.=1, p=0.471). According to the triallelic classification, the distribution of alleles in these patients was as follows: S 58 (43.3%), Lg 17 (12.7%) and La 59 (44.0%). There were no significant differences on the MMPI scales between different genotype classifications and allele analyses. Larger samples are necessary to exclude the less relevant genetic influences on these traits. In addition, other polymorphisms should be considered in the characterization of a heritable phenotype in the PD.

  9. Predicting Response Trajectories during Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: No Association with the BDNF Gene or Childhood Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacana, Martí; Arias, Bárbara; Mitjans, Marina; Bonillo, Albert; Montoro, María; Rosado, Sílvia; Guillamat, Roser; Vallès, Vicenç; Pérez, Víctor; Forero, Carlos G.; Fullana, Miquel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and result in low quality of life and a high social and economic cost. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders is well established, but a substantial proportion of patients do not respond to this treatment. Understanding which genetic and environmental factors are responsible for this differential response to treatment is a key step towards “personalized medicine”. Based on previous research, our objective was to test whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and/or childhood maltreatment are associated with response trajectories during exposure-based CBT for panic disorder (PD). Method We used Growth Mixture Modeling to identify latent classes of change (response trajectories) in patients with PD (N = 97) who underwent group manualized exposure-based CBT. We conducted logistic regression to investigate the effect on these trajectories of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and two different types of childhood maltreatment, abuse and neglect. Results We identified two response trajectories (“high response” and “low response”), and found that they were not significantly associated with either the genetic (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism) or childhood trauma-related variables of interest, nor with an interaction between these variables. Conclusions We found no evidence to support an effect of the BDNF gene or childhood trauma-related variables on CBT outcome in PD. Future studies in this field may benefit from looking at other genotypes or using different (e.g. whole-genome) approaches. PMID:27355213

  10. Predicting Response Trajectories during Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: No Association with the BDNF Gene or Childhood Maltreatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Santacana

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and result in low quality of life and a high social and economic cost. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT for anxiety disorders is well established, but a substantial proportion of patients do not respond to this treatment. Understanding which genetic and environmental factors are responsible for this differential response to treatment is a key step towards "personalized medicine". Based on previous research, our objective was to test whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and/or childhood maltreatment are associated with response trajectories during exposure-based CBT for panic disorder (PD.We used Growth Mixture Modeling to identify latent classes of change (response trajectories in patients with PD (N = 97 who underwent group manualized exposure-based CBT. We conducted logistic regression to investigate the effect on these trajectories of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and two different types of childhood maltreatment, abuse and neglect.We identified two response trajectories ("high response" and "low response", and found that they were not significantly associated with either the genetic (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism or childhood trauma-related variables of interest, nor with an interaction between these variables.We found no evidence to support an effect of the BDNF gene or childhood trauma-related variables on CBT outcome in PD. Future studies in this field may benefit from looking at other genotypes or using different (e.g. whole-genome approaches.

  11. Effect of combined cognitive-behavioural therapy and endurance training on cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plag, Jens; Gaudlitz, Katharina; Schumacher, Sarah; Dimeo, Fernando; Bobbert, Thomas; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Ströhle, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Current data point to an alteration of both the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-system and the peripheral transmission of catecholamines in anxiety disorders. There is also some evidence for the effect of several components of cognitive-behavioural interventions such as coping and control and for an effect of exercise training on the neuroendocrine stress response in healthy subjects as well as patients suffering from distinct (mental) disorders. This double-blind, controlled study investigated the effect of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in combination with either high-level endurance training or low-level exercise on salivary cortisol (sC) and on levels of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) in patients suffering from panic disorder (PD) with and without agoraphobia. In comparison to the low-level exercise condition, there were significantly lower sC-levels in the experimental group performing high-level endurance training at a 7-month follow-up. In contrast, there were no group differences in sAA levels during the study period. In this trial, we found evidence for a decelerated effect of endurance-training on HPA-system's functioning in PD. Further studies addressing the alteration of sAA levels in this population might investigate physical exercise different in intensity and duration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Ashamed and Afraid: A Scoping Review of the Role of Shame in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanya Saraiya

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite considerable progress in the treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD, a large percentage of individuals remain symptomatic following gold-standard therapies. One route to improving care is examining affective disturbances that involve other emotions beyond fear and threat. A growing body of research has implicated shame in PTSD’s development and course, although to date no review of this specific literature exists. This scoping review investigated the link between shame and PTSD and sought to identify research gaps. Methods: A systematic database search of PubMed, PsycInfo, Embase, Cochrane, and CINAHL was conducted to find original quantitative research related to shame and PTSD. Results: Forty-seven studies met inclusion criteria. Review found substantial support for an association between shame and PTSD as well as preliminary evidence suggesting its utility as a treatment target. Several design limitations and under-investigated areas were recognized, including the need for a multimodal assessment of shame and more longitudinal and treatment-focused research. Conclusion: This review provides crucial synthesis of research to date, highlighting the prominence of shame in PTSD, and its likely relevance in successful treatment outcomes. The present review serves as a guide to future work into this critical area of study.

  13. Joint Effect of Childhood Abuse and Family History of Major Depressive Disorder on Rates of PTSD in People with Personality Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janine D. Flory

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Childhood maltreatment and familial psychopathology both lead to an increased risk of the development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD in adulthood. While family history of psychopathology has traditionally been viewed as a proxy for genetic predisposition, such pathology can also contribute to a stress-laden environment for the child. Method. Analyses were conducted to evaluate the joint effect of childhood abuse and a family history of major depressive disorder (MDD on diagnoses of PTSD and MDD in a sample of 225 adults with DSM-IV Axis II disorders. Results. Results showed that the rate of PTSD in the presence of both childhood abuse and MDD family history was almost six-fold (OR=5.89,  P=.001 higher relative to the absence of both factors. In contrast, the rate of MDD in the presence of both factors was associated with a nearly three-fold risk relative to the reference group (OR=2.75,  P=.01. Conclusions. The results from this observational study contribute to a growing understanding of predisposing factors for the development of PTSD and suggest that joint effects of family history of MDD and childhood abuse on PTSD are greater than either factor alone.

  14. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for PTSD What We Do Mission and Overview Goals and Objectives Looking Ahead Annual Reports Research Initiatives Education Initiatives ... for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" (30. ...

  15. Study on the cognitive behavioral therapy in panic disorder%惊恐障碍的认知行为治疗研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    喻瑶; 余斌

    2012-01-01

    惊恐障碍的认知行为治疗是以认知历程处理焦虑障碍的研究方法,其过程包括恐慌教育、认知重建、呼吸控制、内在感知暴露治疗等,接受认知行为治疗的患者疗效能得到更为持久的巩固,且在个人或团体中都可以获得有效地应用.%Panic disorder is a cognitive behavioral therapy is a research method that treats anxiety disorders through cognitive progress, which includes panic education, cognitive reconstruction, respiratory control and inner perception exposure therapy. The patients who receive cognitive behavioral therapy can get a more lasting effect, and the method can be applied both in group and individuals.

  16. Cognitive-behavioral therapy helps prevent relapse and recurrence of panic disorder following alprazolam discontinuation: a long-term follow-up of the Peoria and Dartmouth studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, T J; Spiegel, D A; Hegel, M T

    1999-02-01

    The present research evaluated patients from 2 previous studies (1 conducted in Peoria, the other at Dartmouth) during a 2- to 5-year posttreatment period. Results showed that 75% of the Peoria sample and 76% of the Dartmouth sample were able to discontinue alprazolam therapy, remain abstinent of any type of treatment for panic disorder, and maintain their acute-treatment clinical gains over this follow-up period. The degree to which patients' anxiety sensitivity declined during treatment predicted relapse versus survival during the 1st 6 months of follow-up, when most relapses occurred. Implications of these findings for benzodiazepine discontinuation, combined pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, and relapse prevention in panic disorder are discussed.

  17. examining the relationship between anxiety disorders and depression

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    ... may select cer- tain environmental elements and overlook others in their effort to prove that they ... behaviours may be worsened. In patients with post-traumatic stress dis- order (PTSD), feelings of ... of suicide in the longer term (especial- ly with panic ... Table I. Neurobiology of general anxiety disorders. Neuroanatomy.

  18. An updated animal model capturing both the cognitive and emotional features of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Andrea; Trezza, Viviana; Palmery, Maura; Trabace, Luigia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Campolongo, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    The new-released Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) defines post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) as a "trauma and stressor-related disorder". PTSD pathogenesis relies on paradoxical changes of emotional memory processing induced by the trauma exposure and associated with emotional dysfunction. Several animal models of PTSD have been validated and are currently used. Each one mimics a particular subset of the disorder with particular emphasis, mainly driven by the past classification of PTSD in the DSM-4, on the emotional features. In view of the recent update in the DSM-5, our aim was to develop, by using well-validated paradigms, a modified model of PTSD able to mimic at the same time both the cognitive and emotional features of the disease. We exposed male rats to either a piece of worn cat collar or to a series of inescapable footshocks paired with a PTSD risk factor, i.e., social isolation. Animals were subsequently re-exposed to the conditioned contexts at different time intervals in order to test memory retention for the stressors. In addition, footshock-exposed rats were tested in the elevated-plus-maze and social interaction tests. We found that rats exposed to a cat collar exhibited an acute fear response that did not lead to enduring memory retention. Conversely, footshock-exposed rats expressed a successful retention of the stressful experience at 1, 7, 14, 21 and 56 post-exposure days. Footshock-exposed rats displayed an anxious behavioral profile in the social interaction test and a significantly reduced locomotor activity in the elevated-plus-maze test. These dysfunctions were not observed when animals were socially housed, thus highlighting a social buffering effect in the development of the pathology. Our results underline the good validity of a footshock-based paradigm paired with social isolation as a PTSD animal model, able to mimic at the same time both some of the enduring cognitive and emotional facets of the

  19. Capturing both the cognitive and emotional features of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD in rats: An updated animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBerardi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The new-released Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5 defines post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD as a trauma and stressor-related disorder. PTSD pathogenesis relies on paradoxical changes of emotional memory processing induced by the trauma exposure and associated with emotional dysfunction. Several animal models of PTSD have been validated and are currently used. Each one mimics a particular subset of the disorder with particular emphasis, mainly driven by the past classification of PTSD in the DSM-4, on the emotional features. In view of the recent update in the DSM-5, our aim was to develop, by using well-validated paradigms, a modified model of PTSD able to mimic at the same time both the cognitive and emotional features of the disease. We exposed male rats to either a piece of worn cat collar or to a series of inescapable footshocks paired with a PTSD risk factor, i.e. social isolation. Animals were subsequently re-exposed to the conditioned contexts at different time intervals in order to test memory retention for the stressors. In addition, footshock-exposed rats were tested in the elevated-plus-maze and social interaction tests. We found that rats exposed to a cat collar exhibited an acute fear response that did not lead to enduring memory retention. Conversely, footshock-exposed rats expressed a successful retention of the stressful experience at 1, 7, 14, 21 and 56 post-exposure days. Footshock-exposed rats displayed an anxious behavioral profile in the social interaction test and a significantly reduced locomotor activity in the elevated-plus-maze test. These dysfunctions were not observed when animals were socially housed, thus highlighting a social buffer effect in the development of the pathology. Our results underline the good validity of a footshock-based paradigm paired with social isolation as a PTSD animal model, able to mimic at the same time both some of the enduring cognitive and emotional facets

  20. Mechanisms of efficacy of CBT for Cambodian refugees with PTSD: improvement in emotion regulation and orthostatic blood pressure response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon E; Hofmann, Stefan G; Pollack, Mark H; Otto, Michael W

    2009-01-01

    Based on the results of a randomized controlled trial, we examined a model of the mechanisms of efficacy of culturally adapted cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) for Cambodian refugees with pharmacology-resistant posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and comordid orthostatic panic attacks (PAs). Twelve patients were in the initial treatment condition, 12 in the delayed treatment condition. The patients randomized to CBT had much greater improvement than patients in the waitlist condition on all psychometric measures and on one physiological measure-the systolic blood pressure response to orthostasis (d = 1.31)-as evaluated by repeated-measures MANOVA and planned contrasts. After receiving CBT, the Delayed Treatment Group improved on all measures, including the systolic blood pressure response to orthostasis. The CBT treatment's reduction of PTSD severity was significantly mediated by improvement in orthostatic panic and emotion regulation ability. The current study supports our model of the generation of PTSD in the Cambodian population, and suggests a key role of decreased vagal tone in the generation of orthostatic panic and PTSD in this population. It also suggests that vagal tone is involved in emotion regulation, and that both vagal tone and emotion regulation improve across treatment.

  1. Predicting rapid response to cognitive-behavioural treatment for panic disorder: the role of hippocampus, insula, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, Andrea; Thilo, Kai; Filippini, Nicola; Croft, Alison; Harmer, Catherine J

    2014-11-01

    Although cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective first-line intervention for anxiety disorders, treatments remain long and cost-intensive, difficult to access, and a subgroup of patients fails to show any benefits at all. This study aimed to identify functional and structural brain markers that predict a rapid response to CBT. Such knowledge will be important to establish the mechanisms underlying successful treatment and to develop more effective, shorter interventions. Fourteen unmedicated patients with panic disorder underwent 3 T functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before receiving four sessions of exposure-based CBT. Symptom severity was measured before and after treatment. During functional MRI, patients performed an emotion regulation task, either viewing negative images naturally, or intentionally down-regulating negative affect by using previously taught strategies of cognitive reappraisal. Structural MRI images were analysed including left and right segmentation and volume estimation. Improved response to brief CBT was predicted by increased pre-treatment activation in bilateral insula and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during threat processing, as well as increased right hippocampal gray matter volume. Previous work links these regions to improved threat processing and fear memory activation, suggesting that the activation of such mechanisms is crucial for exposure-based CBT to be effective.

  2. Cingulo-insular structural alterations associated with psychogenic symptoms, childhood abuse and PTSD in functional neurological disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, David L; Matin, Nassim; Barsky, Arthur; Costumero-Ramos, Victor; Makaretz, Sara J; Young, Sigrid S; Sepulcre, Jorge; LaFrance, W Curt; Keshavan, Matcheri S; Dickerson, Bradford C

    2017-06-01

    Adverse early-life events are predisposing factors for functional neurological disorder (FND) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Cingulo-insular regions are implicated in the biology of both conditions and are sites of stress-mediated neuroplasticity. We hypothesised that functional neurological symptoms and the magnitude of childhood abuse would be associated with overlapping anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and insular volumetric reductions, and that FND and PTSD symptoms would map onto distinct cingulo-insular areas. This within-group voxel-based morphometry study probes volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptoms, adverse life events and PTSD symptoms in 23 mixed-gender FND patients. Separate secondary analyses were also performed in the subset of 18 women with FND to account for gender-specific effects. Across the entire cohort, there were no statistically significant volumetric associations with self-report measures of functional neurological symptom severity or childhood abuse. In women with FND, however, parallel inverse associations were observed between left anterior insular volume and functional neurological symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionnaire-15 and the Screening for Somatoform Symptoms Conversion Disorder subscale. Similar inverse relationships were also appreciated between childhood abuse burden and left anterior insular volume. Across all subjects, PTSD symptom severity was inversely associated with dorsal ACC volume, and the magnitude of lifetime adverse events was inversely associated with left hippocampal volume. This study reveals distinct cingulo-insular alterations for FND and PTSD symptoms and may advance our understanding of FND. Potential biological convergence between stress-related neuroplasticity, functional neurological symptoms and reduced insular volume was identified. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017

  3. POSTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDERS (PTSD) FROM DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVES: A TRANSDISCIPLINARY INTEGRATIVE APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Jakovljević, Miro; Brajković, Lovorka; Jakšić, Nenad; Lončar, Mladen; Aukst-Margetić, Branka; Lasić, Davor

    2012-01-01

    Background: Psychotraumatization continues to be a pervasive aspect of life in the 21st century all over the world so we should better understand psychological trauma and PTSD for the sake of prevention and healing. Method: We have made an overview of available literature on PTSD to identify explanatory models, hypotheses and theories. Results: In this paper we describe our transdisciplinary multiperspective integrative model of PTSD based on the seven perspective explanatory appr...

  4. Validation of the diagnoses of panic disorder and phobic disorders in the US National Comorbidity Survey Replication Adolescent (NCS-A) supplement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer Greif; Avenevoli, Shelli; Finkelman, Matthew; Gruber, Michael J; Kessler, Ronald C; Merikangas, Kathleen R; Sampson, Nancy A; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2011-06-01

    Validity of the adolescent version of the World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) Version 3.0, a fully-structured research diagnostic interview designed to be used by trained lay interviewers, is assessed in comparison to independent clinical diagnoses based on the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-age Children (K-SADS). This assessment is carried out in the clinical reappraisal sub-sample (n = 347) of the US National Comorbidity Survey Adolescent (NCS-A) supplement, a large (n = 10,148) community epidemiological survey of the prevalence and correlates of adolescent mental disorders in the United States. The diagnoses considered are panic disorder and phobic disorders (social phobia, specific phobia, agoraphobia). CIDI diagnoses are found to have good concordance with K-SADS diagnoses [area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) = 0.81-0.94], although the CIDI diagnoses are consistency somewhat higher than the K-SADS diagnoses. Data are also presented on criterion-level concordance in an effort to pinpoint CIDI question series that might be improved in future modifications of the instrument. Finally, data are presented on the factor structure of the fears associated with social phobia, the only disorder in this series where substantial controversy exists about disorder subtypes. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. The prevalence of common mental disorders and PTSD in the UK military: using data from a clinical interview-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotopf Matthew

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mental health of the Armed Forces is an important issue of both academic and public interest. The aims of this study are to: a assess the prevalence and risk factors for common mental disorders and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD symptoms, during the main fighting period of the Iraq War (TELIC 1 and later deployments to Iraq or elsewhere and enlistment status (regular or reserve, and b compare the prevalence of depression, PTSD symptoms and suicidal ideation in regular and reserve UK Army personnel who deployed to Iraq with their US counterparts. Methods Participants were drawn from a large UK military health study using a standard two phase survey technique stratified by deployment status and engagement type. Participants undertook a structured telephone interview including the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ and a short measure of PTSD (Primary Care PTSD, PC-PTSD. The response rate was 76% (821 participants. Results The weighted prevalence of common mental disorders and PTSD symptoms was 27.2% and 4.8%, respectively. The most common diagnoses were alcohol abuse (18.0% and neurotic disorders (13.5%. There was no health effect of deploying for regular personnel, but an increased risk of PTSD for reservists who deployed to Iraq and other recent deployments compared to reservists who did not deploy. The prevalence of depression, PTSD symptoms and subjective poor health were similar between regular US and UK Iraq combatants. Conclusion The most common mental disorders in the UK military are alcohol abuse and neurotic disorders. The prevalence of PTSD symptoms remains low in the UK military, but reservists are at greater risk of psychiatric injury than regular personnel.

  6. The prevalence of common mental disorders and PTSD in the UK military: using data from a clinical interview-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iversen, Amy C; van Staden, Lauren; Hughes, Jamie Hacker; Browne, Tess; Hull, Lisa; Hall, John; Greenberg, Neil; Rona, Roberto J; Hotopf, Matthew; Wessely, Simon; Fear, Nicola T

    2009-01-01

    Background The mental health of the Armed Forces is an important issue of both academic and public interest. The aims of this study are to: a) assess the prevalence and risk factors for common mental disorders and post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, during the main fighting period of the Iraq War (TELIC 1) and later deployments to Iraq or elsewhere and enlistment status (regular or reserve), and b) compare the prevalence of depression, PTSD symptoms and suicidal ideation in regular and reserve UK Army personnel who deployed to Iraq with their US counterparts. Methods Participants were drawn from a large UK military health study using a standard two phase survey technique stratified by deployment status and engagement type. Participants undertook a structured telephone interview including the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) and a short measure of PTSD (Primary Care PTSD, PC-PTSD). The response rate was 76% (821 participants). Results The weighted prevalence of common mental disorders and PTSD symptoms was 27.2% and 4.8%, respectively. The most common diagnoses were alcohol abuse (18.0%) and neurotic disorders (13.5%). There was no health effect of deploying for regular personnel, but an increased risk of PTSD for reservists who deployed to Iraq and other recent deployments compared to reservists who did not deploy. The prevalence of depression, PTSD symptoms and subjective poor health were similar between regular US and UK Iraq combatants. Conclusion The most common mental disorders in the UK military are alcohol abuse and neurotic disorders. The prevalence of PTSD symptoms remains low in the UK military, but reservists are at greater risk of psychiatric injury than regular personnel. PMID:19878538

  7. Screening for posttraumatic stress disorder in civilian substance use disorder patients: Cross-validation of the Jellinek-PTSD screening questionnaire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dam, D.; Ehring, T.; Vedel, E.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to cross-validate earlier findings regarding the diagnostic efficiency of a modified version of the Primary Care Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PC-PTSD) screening questionnaire (A. Prins, P. Ouimette, R. Kimerling, R. P. Cameron, D. S. Hugelshofer, J. Shaw-Hegwer, et al., 2004). The

  8. Response to "Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jongh, A.; ten Broeke, E.

    2014-01-01

    Last November, the European Journal of Psychotraumatology published an interesting paper entitled "Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study". This article

  9. The COMTval158met polymorphism is associated with symptom relief during exposure-based cognitive-behavioral treatment in panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergström Jan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT represents a learning process leading to symptom relief and resulting in long-term changes in behavior. CBT for panic disorder is based on exposure and exposure-based processes can be studied in the laboratory as extinction of experimentally acquired fear responses. We have recently demonstrated that the ability to extinguish learned fear responses is associated with a functional genetic polymorphism (COMTval158met in the COMT gene and this study was aimed at transferring the experimental results on the COMTval158met polymorphism on extinction into a clinical setting. Methods We tested a possible effect of the COMTval158met polymorphism on the efficacy of CBT, in particular exposure-based treatment modules, in a sample of 69 panic disorder patients. Results We present evidence that panic patients with the COMTval158met met/met genotype may profit less from (exposure-based CBT treatment methods as compared to patients carrying at least one val-allele. No association was found with the 5-HTTLPR/rs25531 genotypes which is presented as additional material. Conclusions We were thus able to transfer findings on the effect of the COMTval158met polymorphism from an experimental extinction study obtained using healthy subjects to a clinical setting. Furthermore patients carrying a COMT val-allele tend to report more anxiety and more depression symptoms as compared to those with the met/met genotype. Limitations of the study as well as possible clinical implications are discussed. Trial registration Clinical Trial Registry name: Internet-Versus Group-Administered Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Panic Disorder (IP2. Registration Identification number: NCT00845260, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00845260

  10. The effect of a combined versus a conventional cognitive-behavioral therapy on quality of life for comorbid panic disorder with agoraphobia and generalized anxiety disorder: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primiano, Sandra; Marchand, André; Gosselin, Patrick; Langlois, Frédéric; Bouchard, Stéphane; Bélanger, Claude; Labrecque, Joane; Dugas, Michel; Dupuis, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Concurrent panic disorder with agoraphobia (PDA) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) are the most common diagnostic occurrences among anxiety disorders. This particular comorbidity is associated with significant impairments in quality of life (QOL). The current study sought to investigate the efficacy of a combined cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy that addressed both conditions compared with a conventional psychotherapy, which attends solely to the primary disorder. The hypotheses postulated firstly, that both treatment conditions would lead to improvements in participants' QOL and secondly, that the combined therapy would lead to greater QOL ameliorations. Twenty-five participants with comorbid PDA/GAD diagnoses were evaluated with a number of clinical interviews and self-report questionnaires, and were provided with either conventional or combined cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy, which consisted of 14 one-hour weekly sessions. Participants were once again evaluated in the same fashion 2-weeks after the completion of the psychotherapy. The results revealed that both conditions led to significant improvements in participants' QOL, but that the two groups did not significantly differ in terms of the effect on QOL. The results also reveal that the two conditions did not significantly differ in terms of their effect on PDA and GAD symptomatology or psychiatric comorbidity. The results demonstrate that the combined psychotherapy, which addresses both conditions simultaneously, is similar to the conventional psychotherapy employed for the primary disorder in terms of QOL enhancement, symptom severity, and comorbidity reduction.

  11. Working alliance and competence as predictors of outcome in cognitive behavioral therapy for social anxiety and panic disorder in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Thomas; Nordgreen, Tine; Öst, Lars-Göran; Tangen, Tone; Kvale, Gerd; Hovland, Ole Johan; Heiervang, Einar R; Havik, Odd E

    2016-02-01

    The research on the association between the working alliance and therapist competence/adherence and outcome from cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is limited and characterized by inconclusive findings. This study investigates the working alliance and competence/adherence as predictors of outcome of CBT for social anxiety disorder (SAD) and panic disorder (PD). Eighty-two clinically referred patients (58.5% female; age: M = 33.6 years, SD = 10.3) with PD (n = 31) or SAD (n = 51) were treated with 12 sessions of manualized CBT by 22 clinicians with limited CBT experience in a randomized controlled effectiveness trial. Independent assessors rated the CBT competence/adherence of the therapists using a revised version of the Cognitive Therapy Adherence and Competence Scale, and the patients rated the quality of the working alliance using the Working Alliance Inventory-short form in therapy sessions 3 and 8. The outcome was assessed by independent assessors as well as by patients self-report. A total of 20.7% of the patients (27.5% SAD, 9.7% PD) dropped out during treatment. The association between the alliance, competence/adherence, outcome and dropout was investigated using multiple regression analyses. Higher therapist' competence/adherence early in the therapy was associated with a better outcome among PD patients, lower competence/adherence was associated with dropout among SAD patients. Higher rating of the alliance late in the therapy was associated with a better outcome, whereas lower alliance rating late in the therapy was associated with dropout. The findings indicate that the therapist competence/adherence and the working alliance have independent contributions to the outcome from CBT for anxiety disorders, but in different phases of the treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonorganic insomnia in panic Disorder: comparative sleep laboratory studies with normal controls and placebo-controlled trials with alprazolam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saletu-Zyhlarz, Gerda M; Anderer, Peter; Berger, Peter; Gruber, Georg; Oberndorfer, Stefan; Saletu, Bernd

    2000-06-01

    Objective and subjective sleep and awakening quality was investigated in 11 drug-free patients (4 females, 7 males) aged 30-55 (mean: 44+/-9) years with nonorganic insomnia (F 51.0) related to panic disorder (F 41.0) as compared with 11 age- and sex-matched normal controls aged 30-58 (mean: 44+/-9) years, utilising polysomnography (PSG) and psychometry. PSG demonstrated decreased sleep efficiency (primary target variable), total sleep time (TST) and S2 as well as increased middle and late insomnia, S1, S3+S4, snoring and PLM in patients. There were no intergroup differences in REM variables. Subjective sleep quality deteriorated, as did drive and fine motor activity in the morning, while concentration increased. Blood pressure in the evening and morning and pulse rate in the evening were elevated. These differences as compared with normals were distinct from those observed in other sleep disorders. In a subsequent acute, placebo-controlled cross-over design study, patients received alprazolam 0.5 mg (Xanor((R));) and placebo. As compared with placebo, alprazolam induced an increase in sleep efficiency (primary target variable), TST and S2, a decrease in wakefulness during the total sleep period, S3+S4 and the oxygen desaturation and PLM indices, and improved subjective sleep quality, somatic complaints, drive, affectivity and drowsiness in the morning. There were no changes in REM variables. Thus, alprazolam induced changes that were opposite to the differences observed between patients and controls before treatment, thereby normalizing sleep and awakening quality. As observed in insomnia related to GAD and subsequent benzodiazepine therapy, the present study also points to a key-lock principle in the treatment of insomnia caused by anxiety disorders and neurophysiologically visualizes processes at the receptor level (e.g. benzodiazepine agonists versus inverse agonists). Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Lifestyle Behaviours Add to the Armoury of Treatment Options for Panic Disorder: An Evidence-Based Reasoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rod Lambert

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an evidence-based reasoning, focusing on evidence of an Occupational Therapy input to lifestyle behaviour influences on panic disorder that also provides potentially broader application across other mental health problems (MHP. The article begins from the premise that we are all different. It then follows through a sequence of questions, examining incrementally how MHPs are experienced and classified. It analyses the impact of individual sensitivity at different levels of analysis, from genetic and epigenetic individuality, through neurotransmitter and body system sensitivity. Examples are given demonstrating the evidence base behind the logical sequence of investigation. The paper considers the evidence of how everyday routine lifestyle behaviour impacts on occupational function at all levels, and how these behaviours link to individual sensitivity to influence the level of exposure required to elicit symptomatic responses. Occupational Therapists can help patients by adequately assessing individual sensitivity, and through promoting understanding and a sense of control over their own symptoms. It concludes that present clinical guidelines should be expanded to incorporate knowledge of individual sensitivities to environmental exposures and lifestyle behaviours at an early stage.

  14. The underlying dimensionality of PTSD in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: where are we going?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cherie Armour

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been a substantial body of literature devoted to answering one question: Which latent model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD best represents PTSD's underlying dimensionality? This research summary will, therefore, focus on the literature pertaining to PTSD's latent structure as represented in the fourth (DSM-IV, 1994 to the fifth (DSM-5, 2013 edition of the DSM. This article will begin by providing a clear rationale as to why this is a pertinent research area, then the body of literature pertaining to the DSM-IV and DSM-IV-TR will be summarised, and this will be followed by a summary of the literature pertaining to the recently published DSM-5. To conclude, there will be a discussion with recommendations for future research directions, namely that researchers must investigate the applicability of the new DSM-5 criteria and the newly created DSM-5 symptom sets to trauma survivors. In addition, researchers must continue to endeavour to identify the “correct” constellations of symptoms within symptom sets to ensure that diagnostic algorithms are appropriate and aid in the development of targeted treatment approaches and interventions. In particular, the newly proposed DSM-5 anhedonia model, externalising behaviours model, and hybrid models must be further investigated. It is also important that researchers follow up on the idea that a more parsimonious latent structure of PTSD may exist.

  15. The underlying dimensionality of PTSD in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: where are we going?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie

    2015-01-01

    There has been a substantial body of literature devoted to answering one question: Which latent model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) best represents PTSD's underlying dimensionality? This research summary will, therefore, focus on the literature pertaining to PTSD's latent structure as represented in the fourth (DSM-IV, 1994) to the fifth (DSM-5, 2013) edition of the DSM. This article will begin by providing a clear rationale as to why this is a pertinent research area, then the body of literature pertaining to the DSM-IV and DSM-IV-TR will be summarised, and this will be followed by a summary of the literature pertaining to the recently published DSM-5. To conclude, there will be a discussion with recommendations for future research directions, namely that researchers must investigate the applicability of the new DSM-5 criteria and the newly created DSM-5 symptom sets to trauma survivors. In addition, researchers must continue to endeavour to identify the “correct” constellations of symptoms within symptom sets to ensure that diagnostic algorithms are appropriate and aid in the development of targeted treatment approaches and interventions. In particular, the newly proposed DSM-5 anhedonia model, externalising behaviours model, and hybrid models must be further investigated. It is also important that researchers follow up on the idea that a more parsimonious latent structure of PTSD may exist. PMID:25994027

  16. 艾司西酞普兰治疗惊恐障碍的临床研究%Effect of Escitalopram Angumentation on Panic Disorder: 40 Cases Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐静波; 郑珣; 刘振静

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of Escitalopram on panic disorder. Methods 40 patients were treated with Escitalopram. All patients were evaluated with Hamilton Anxiety Scale, Self-Rating Anxiety Scale and Adverse Drug Reactions Scale. Results All the patients released from panic since the second week after treatment, except one patient dropped because of side-effects. Other side-effects relieved during the course. Conclusion Escitalopram was effective and safe on panic disorder.%目的 探讨艾司西酞普兰治疗惊恐障碍的有效性及安全性.方法 40例惊恐障碍患者给予艾司西酞普兰治疗8周.于第2、4、8周末进行汉密尔顿焦虑量表(HAMA)、焦虑自评量表(SAS)及药物不良反应量表(TESS)评定.结果 因不良反应不能耐受1例患者脱落,艾司西酞普兰治疗惊恐障碍从第2周开始见效;不良反应在治疗期间缓解或减轻,患者耐受性较好.结论 艾司西酞普兰治疗惊恐障碍安全有效.

  17. Content Specificity in Imaginal Exposure: Evaluation of Subjective and Physiological Responding in Patients with Panic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-18

    Association (APA) places greater emphasis on the role ofpanic attacks in the classification and etiology of anxiety disorders (AP~ 1984; APA, 1987...speaking). Although social phobics with avoidant personality disorder reported more subjective anxiety than either pure social phobics or normals, the...Therapy of Anxiety and phobic disorders . Manual oreenleT for Cognitive Therapy, 133 South 36th St., Ph,iJadelphia, PA 19104. Beck, AT., & Rush, A.J

  18. Measuring historical trauma in an American Indian community sample: contributions of substance dependence, affective disorder, conduct disorder and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Cindy L; Gizer, Ian R; Gilder, David A; Ellingson, Jarrod M; Yehuda, Rachel

    2013-11-01

    The American Indian experience of historical trauma is thought of as both a source of intergenerational trauma responses as well as a potential causative factor for long-term distress and substance abuse among communities. The aims of the present study were to evaluate the extent to which the frequency of thoughts of historical loss and associated symptoms are influenced by: current traumatic events, post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), cultural identification, percent Native American Heritage, substance dependence, affective/anxiety disorders, and conduct disorder/antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Participants were American Indians recruited from reservations that were assessed with the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism (SSAGA), The Historical Loss Scale and The Historical Loss Associated Symptoms Scale (to quantify frequency of thoughts and symptoms of historical loss) the Stressful-Life-Events Scale (to assess experiences of trauma) and the Orthogonal Cultural Identification Scale (OCIS). Three hundred and six (306) American Indian adults participated in the study. Over half of them indicated that they thought about historical losses at least occasionally, and that it caused them distress. Logistic regression revealed that significant increases in how often a person thought about historical losses were associated with: not being married, high degrees of Native Heritage, and high cultural identification. Additionally, anxiety/affective disorders and substance dependence were correlated with historical loss associated symptoms. In this American Indian community, thoughts about historical losses and their associated symptomatology are common and the presence of these thoughts are associated with Native American Heritage, cultural identification, and substance dependence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lifetime history of traumatic events in a young adult Mexican American sample: Relation to substance dependence, affective disorder, acculturation stress, and PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Cindy L; Kim, Corinne; Gilder, David A; Stouffer, Gina M; Caetano, Raul; Yehuda, Rachel

    2016-12-01

    Mexican Americans comprise one of the most rapidly growing populations in the United States, and within this population, trauma and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are associated with physical and mental health problems. Therefore, efforts to delineate factors that may uniquely contribute to increased likelihood of trauma, PTSD, and substance use disorders over the lifetime in Mexican Americans are important to address health disparities and to develop treatment and prevention programs. Six hundred fourteen young adults (age 18-30 yrs) of Mexican American heritage, largely second generation, were recruited from the community and assessed with the Semi-Structured Assessment for the Genetics of Alcoholism and an acculturation stress scale. More males (51.2%) reported experiencing traumas than females (41.1%), however, a larger proportion of females received a PTSD diagnosis (15%) than males (8%). Alcohol dependence and affective disorders, but not anxiety disorders, antisocial disorders, nicotine, marijuana, or stimulant dependence, were significantly comorbid with PTSD. Endorsing higher levels of acculturation stress was also significantly associated with both trauma exposure and a diagnosis of PTSD. Logistic regression revealed that female gender, having an affective disorder, alcohol dependence, higher levels of acculturation stress, and lower levels of education were all predictors of PTSD status. Additionally, alcohol dependence generally occurred after the PTSD diagnosis in early adulthood in this high-risk population. These studies suggest that treatment and prevention efforts should particularly focus on young adult second generation Mexican American women with higher levels of acculturation stress, who may be at higher risk for PTSD, affective disorder, and alcohol dependence following trauma exposure.

  20. RGS2 ggenetic variation: association analysis with panic disorder and dimensional as well as intermediate phenotypes of anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohoff, Christa; Weber, Heike; Richter, Jan; Domschke, Katharina; Zwanzger, Peter M; Ohrmann, Patricia; Bauer, Jochen; Suslow, Thomas; Kugel, Harald; Baumann, Christian; Klauke, Benedikt; Jacob, Christian P; Fritze, Jürgen; Bandelow, Borwin; Gloster, Andrew T; Gerlach, Alexander L; Kircher, Tilo; Lang, Thomas; Alpers, Georg W; Ströhle, Andreas; Fehm, Lydia; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Arolt, Volker; Pauli, Paul; Hamm, Alfons; Reif, Andreas; Deckert, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Accumulating evidence from mouse models points to the G protein-coupled receptor RGS2 (regulator of G-protein signaling 2) as a promising candidate gene for anxiety in humans. Recently, RGS2 polymorphisms were found to be associated with various anxiety disorders, e.g., rs4606 with panic disorder (PD), but other findings have been negative or inconsistent concerning the respective risk allele. To further examine the role of RGS2 polymorphisms in the pathogenesis of PD, we genotyped rs4606 and five additional RGS2 tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; rs16834831, rs10801153, rs16829458, rs1342809, rs1890397) in two independent PD samples, comprising 531 matched case/control pairs. The functional SNP rs4606 was nominally associated with PD when both samples were combined. The upstream SNP rs10801153 displayed a Bonferroni-resistant significant association with PD in the second and the combined sample (P = 0.006 and P = 0.017). We furthermore investigated the effect of rs10801153 on dimensional anxiety traits, a behavioral avoidance test (BAT), and an index for emotional processing in the respective subsets of the total sample. In line with categorical results, homozygous risk (G) allele carriers displayed higher scores on the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire (ACQ; P = 0.015) and showed significantly more defensive behavior during fear provoking situations (P = 0.001). Furthermore, significant effects on brain activation in response to angry (P = 0.013), happy (P = 0.042) and neutral faces (P = 0.032) were detected. Taken together, these findings provide further evidence for the potential role of RGS2 as a candidate gene for PD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Biological markers for anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD: A consensus statement. Part II: Neurochemistry, neurophysiology and neurocognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandelow, Borwin; Baldwin, David; Abelli, Marianna; Bolea-Alamanac, Blanca; Bourin, Michel; Chamberlain, Samuel R.; Cinosi, Eduardo; Davies, Simon; Domschke, Katharina; Fineberg, Naomi; Grünblatt, Edna; Jarema, Marek; Kim, Yong-Ku; Maron, Eduard; Masdrakis, Vasileios; Mikova, Olya; Nutt, David; Pallanti, Stefano; Pini, Stefano; Ströhle, Andreas; Thibaut, Florence; Vaghix, Matilde M.; Won, Eunsoo; Wedekind, Dirk; Wichniak, Adam; Woolley, Jade; Zwanzger, Peter; Riederer, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Objective Biomarkers are defined as anatomical, biochemical or physiological traits that are specific to certain disorders or syndromes. The objective of this paper is to summarise the current knowledge of biomarkers for anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Methods Findings in biomarker research were reviewed by a task force of international experts in the field, consisting of members of the World Federation of Societies for Biological Psychiatry Task Force on Biological Markers and of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology Anxiety Disorders Research Network. Results The present article (Part II) summarises findings on potential biomarkers in neurochemistry (neurotransmitters such as serotonin, norepinephrine, dopamine or GABA, neuropeptides such as cholecystokinin, neurokinins, atrial natriuretic peptide, or oxytocin, the HPA axis, neurotrophic factors such as NGF and BDNF, immunology and CO2 hypersensitivity), neurophysiology (EEG, heart rate variability) and neurocognition. The accompanying paper (Part I) focuses on neuroimaging and genetics. Conclusions Although at present, none of the putative biomarkers is sufficient and specific as a diagnostic tool, an abundance of high quality research has accumulated that should improve our understanding of the neurobiological causes of anxiety disorders, OCD and PTSD. PMID:27419272

  2. Early-life risk factors for panic and separation anxiety disorder: insights and outstanding questions arising from human and animal studies of CO2 sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Marco; Ogliari, Anna; D'Amato, Francesca; Kinkead, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Genetically informative studies showed that genetic and environmental risk factors act and interact to influence liability to (a) panic disorder, (b) its childhood precursor separation anxiety disorder, and (c) heightened sensitivity to CO2, an endophenotype common to both disorders. Childhood adversities including parental loss influence both panic disorder and CO2 hypersensitivity. However, childhood parental loss and separation anxiety disorder are weakly correlated in humans, suggesting the presence of alternative pathways of risk. The transferability of tests that assess CO2 sensitivity - an interspecific quantitative trait common to all mammals - to the animal laboratory setting allowed for environmentally controlled studies of early parental separation. Animal findings paralleled those of human studies, in that different forms of early maternal separation in mice and rats evoked heightened CO2 sensitivity; in mice, this could be explained by gene-by-environment interactional mechanisms. While several questions and issues (including obvious divergences between humans and rodents) remain open, parallel investigations by contemporary molecular genetic tools of (1) human longitudinal cohorts and (2) animals in controlled laboratory settings, can help elucidate the mechanisms beyond these phenomena.

  3. Is There Room for Second-Generation Antipsychotics in the Pharmacotherapy of Panic Disorder? A Systematic Review Based on PRISMA Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giampaolo Perna

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A role for second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs in the treatment of panic disorders (PD has been proposed, but the actual usefulness of SGAs in this disorder is unclear. According to the PRISMA guidelines, we undertook an updated systematic review of all of the studies that have examined, in randomized controlled trials, the efficacy and tolerability of SGAs (as either monotherapy or augmentation in the treatment of PD, with or without other comorbid psychiatric disorders. Studies until 31 December 2015 were identified through PubMed, PsycINFO, Embase, Cochrane Library and Clinical trials.gov. Among 210 studies, five were included (two involving patients with a principal diagnosis of PD and three involving patients with bipolar disorder with comorbid PD or generalized anxiety disorder. All were eight-week trials and involved treatments with quetiapine extended release, risperidone and ziprasidone. Overall, a general lack of efficacy of SGAs on panic symptoms was observed. Some preliminary indications of the antipanic effectiveness of risperidone are insufficient to support its use in PD, primarily due to major limitations of the study. However, several methodological limitations may have negatively affected all of these studies, decreasing the validity of the results and making it difficult to draw reliable conclusions. Except for ziprasidone, SGAs were well tolerated in these short-term trials.

  4. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Adult Self Report Child Measures Deployment Measures DSM-5 Measures PTSD Screens Trauma Exposure Measures Assessment Request ... Click here to download "What is PTSD?" (30.5 MB) Close × PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options Right ...

  5. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Kit Logos and Badges Materials for Printing PTSD Awareness About the Website Site Map Content Inventory Accessibility ... Links Linking Policies Small Business POC Subscribe PTSD Awareness PTSD Consultation More Health Care Veterans Health Administration ...

  6. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... PTSD Awareness About the Website Site Map Content Inventory Accessibility Privacy and Security Updating of Web Site Web Site Policies Important Links Linking Policies Small Business POC Subscribe PTSD Awareness PTSD Consultation More Health ...

  7. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... and Coping Treatment Self-Help and Coping PTSD Research Where to Get Help for PTSD Help with ... Articles by Center Staff Clinician’s Trauma Update PTSD Research Quarterly Publications Search Using the PILOTS Database What ...

  8. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Whistleblower Rights & Protections Media Room Inside the Media Room Public ... for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" (30. ...

  9. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas en Espanol ... Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA Providers and ...

  10. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Search How to Obtain Articles Alerts User Guide Purpose and Scope Find Assessment Measures Instrument Authority List ... for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" (30. ...

  11. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Directory Grants Management Services Veterans Service Organizations Whistleblower Rights & Protections Transparency Media Room Inside the Media Room ... for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" (30. ...

  12. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... VA PTSD Care or Benefits Other Common Problems Family and Friends PTSD and Communities Paginas en Espanol ... Cultural Considerations Women Children Older Adults Working with Families PTSD Consultation For Specific Providers VA Providers and ...

  13. Child abuse and neglect in complex dissociative disorder, abuse-related chronic PTSD, and mixed psychiatric samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorahy, Martin J; Middleton, Warwick; Seager, Lenaire; Williams, Mary; Chambers, Ron

    2016-01-01

    Only a select number of studies have examined different forms of child maltreatment in complex dissociative disorders (DDs) in comparison to other groups. Few of these have used child abuse-related chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) and mixed psychiatric (MP) patients with maltreatment as comparison groups. This study examined child sexual, physical, and emotional abuse as well as physical and emotional neglect in DD (n = 39), C-PTSD (n = 13), and MP (n = 21) samples, all with abuse and neglect histories. The predictive capacity of these different forms of maltreatment across the 3 groups was assessed for pathological dissociation, shame, guilt, relationship esteem, relationship anxiety, relationship depression, and fear of relationships. All forms of maltreatment differentiated the DD from the MP group, and sexual abuse differentiated the DD sample from the C-PTSD group. Childhood sexual abuse was the only predictor of pathological dissociation. Emotional abuse predicted shame, guilt, relationship anxiety, and fear of relationships. Emotional neglect predicted relationship anxiety and relationship depression. Physical neglect was associated with less relationship anxiety. Different forms of abuse and neglect are associated with different symptom clusters in psychiatric patients with maltreatment histories.

  14. Does the panic attack activate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis?

    OpenAIRE

    Graeff Frederico G.; Garcia-Leal Cybele; Del-Ben Cristina M; Guimarães Francisco S.

    2005-01-01

    A bibliographic search has been performed in MEDLINE using cortisol and panic as key-words, occurring in the title and/or in the abstract. Human studies were selected, with no time limit. The following publications were excluded: reviewarticles, case reports, panic attacks in disorders other than panic disorder, and studies on changes that occurred in-between panic attacks. The results showed that real-life panic attacks as well as those induced by selective panicogenic agents such as lactate...

  15. Falling out of time: enhanced memory for scenes presented at behaviorally irrelevant points in time in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einat Levy-Gigi

    Full Text Available Spontaneous encoding of the visual environment depends on the behavioral relevance of the task performed simultaneously. If participants identify target letters or auditory tones while viewing a series of briefly presented natural and urban scenes, they demonstrate effective scene recognition only when a target, but not a behaviorally irrelevant distractor, appears together with the scene. Here, we show that individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD, who witnessed the red sludge disaster in Hungary, show the opposite pattern of performance: enhanced recognition of scenes presented together with distractors and deficient recognition of scenes presented with targets. The recognition of trauma-related and neutral scenes was not different in individuals with PTSD. We found a positive correlation between memory for scenes presented with auditory distractors and re-experiencing symptoms (memory intrusions and flashbacks. These results suggest that abnormal encoding of visual scenes at behaviorally irrelevant events might be associated with intrusive experiences by disrupting the flow of time.

  16. Falling out of time: enhanced memory for scenes presented at behaviorally irrelevant points in time in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy-Gigi, Einat; Kéri, Szabolcs

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous encoding of the visual environment depends on the behavioral relevance of the task performed simultaneously. If participants identify target letters or auditory tones while viewing a series of briefly presented natural and urban scenes, they demonstrate effective scene recognition only when a target, but not a behaviorally irrelevant distractor, appears together with the scene. Here, we show that individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), who witnessed the red sludge disaster in Hungary, show the opposite pattern of performance: enhanced recognition of scenes presented together with distractors and deficient recognition of scenes presented with targets. The recognition of trauma-related and neutral scenes was not different in individuals with PTSD. We found a positive correlation between memory for scenes presented with auditory distractors and re-experiencing symptoms (memory intrusions and flashbacks). These results suggest that abnormal encoding of visual scenes at behaviorally irrelevant events might be associated with intrusive experiences by disrupting the flow of time.

  17. Dimensions of trauma associated with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) caseness, severity and functional impairment: a study of Bosnian refugees resettled in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momartin, S; Silove, D; Manicavasagar, V; Steel, Z

    2003-09-01

    Refugee survivors of inter-ethnic warfare vary greatly in the extent and range of their trauma experiences. Discerning which experiences are most salient to generating and perpetuating disorders such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is critical to the mounting rational strategies for targeted psychosocial interventions. In a sample of Bosnian Muslim refugees (n=126) drawn from a community centre and supplemented by a snowball sampling method, PTSD status and associated disability were measured using the clinician-administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) for DSM-IV. A principal components analysis (PCA) based on a pool of trauma items yielded four coherent trauma dimensions: Human Rights Violations, Threat to Life, Traumatic Loss and Dispossession and Eviction. A cluster analysis identified three subgroupings according to extent of trauma exposure. There were no differences in PTSD risk for the group most exposed to human rights violations (internment in concentration camps, torture) compared to the general war-exposed group. Logistic regression analysis using the dimensions derived from the PCA indicated that Threat to Life alone of the four trauma factors predicted PTSD status, a finding that supports the DSM-IV definition of a trauma. Both Threat to Life and Traumatic Loss contributed to symptom severity and disability associated with PTSD. It may be that human rights violations pose a more general threat to the survivor's future psychosocial adaptation in areas of functioning that extend beyond the confines of PTSD.

  18. Development of a guided self-help (GSH) program for the treatment of mild-to-moderate posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Catrin; Roberts, Neil; Vick, Tracey; Bisson, Jonathan I

    2013-11-01

    There is a shortage of suitably qualified therapists able to deliver evidence-based treatment for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), precluding timely access to intervention. This work aimed to develop an optimally effective, feasible, and acceptable guided self-help (GSH) program for treatment of the disorder. The study followed Medical Research Council (MRC) guidance for the development of a complex intervention. A prototype GSH program was developed through an initial modeling phase. Systematic reviews of the literature informed a portfolio of up-to-date information for key stakeholders to consider and discuss in a series of focus groups and semistructured interviews, which included 10 mental health professionals with expertise in the fields of GSH and/or PTSD, and seven former PTSD sufferers. Data were analyzed through a process of Inductive Thematic Analysis and used to inform the content, delivery, and guidance of a GSH program for PTSD. The prototype was piloted with 19 PTSD sufferers in two pilot studies, and refined on the basis of their quantitative results and qualitative feedback. The final version was available online and in hardcopy. It included 11 modules, some being mandatory and others optional, allowing tailoring of the intervention to meet an individual's specific needs. Qualitative and quantitative results of the pilot studies supported its efficacy in terms of reducing traumatic stress symptoms and its acceptability to PTSD sufferers. Delivering psychological treatment in a GSH format shows promise as an effective and acceptable way of treating mild-to-moderate PTSD. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Economic Analysis of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) in the Global War on Terrorism (GWOT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    include treatment costs, the costs of lives lost to suicide , and costs related to lost productivity (including reduced employment and lower earnings...the costs from treatment expenditures, lost productivity, and costs associated with suicide . The increasing trends in the treatment costs of PTSD...order to capture changes across the years. The fiscal-year variables indicate the fiscal year of the PSTD diagnosis date for the PTSD population and

  20. Recurrence of Panic Attacks after Influenza Vaccination: Two Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Han-Joon; Jeon, Sang-Won; Yoon, Ho-Kyoung

    2016-01-01

    Human influenza is a contagious respiratory illness caused by the influenza virus. The influenza vaccination is recommended annually, but several adverse effects related to allergic reactions have been reported. Panic attacks are also known to occur, but no case of a panic attack adverse effect has been reported in South Korea. We present two cases of panic disorder patients whose symptoms were aggravated by the influenza vaccination. We assumed that dysregulation of T-lymphocytes in panic disorder patients could have a role in activating various kinds of cytokines and chemokines, which then can lead to panic attack aggravation. PMID:27776395

  1. The co-occurrence of PTSD and dissociation: differentiating severe PTSD from dissociative-PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Cherie; Karstoft, Karen-Inge; Richardson, J Don

    2014-08-01

    A dissociative-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subtype has been included in the DSM-5. However, it is not yet clear whether certain socio-demographic characteristics or psychological/clinical constructs such as comorbid psychopathology differentiate between severe PTSD and dissociative-PTSD. The current study investigated the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype and explored whether a number of trauma and clinical covariates could differentiate between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The current study utilized a sample of 432 treatment seeking Canadian military veterans. Participants were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and self-report measures of traumatic life events, depression, and anxiety. CAPS severity scores were created reflecting the sum of the frequency and intensity items from each of the 17 PTSD and 3 dissociation items. The CAPS severity scores were used as indicators in a latent profile analysis (LPA) to investigate the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype. Subsequently, several covariates were added to the model to explore differences between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The LPA identified five classes: one of which constituted a severe PTSD group (30.5 %), and one of which constituted a dissociative-PTSD group (13.7 %). None of the included, demographic, trauma, or clinical covariates were significantly predictive of membership in the dissociative-PTSD group compared to the severe PTSD group. In conclusion, a significant proportion of individuals report high levels of dissociation alongside their PTSD, which constitutes a dissociative-PTSD subtype. Further investigation is needed to identify which factors may increase or decrease the likelihood of membership in a dissociative-PTSD subtype group compared to a severe PTSD only group.

  2. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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    Full Text Available ... Accessibility Privacy and Security Updating of Web Site Web Site Policies Important Links Linking Policies Small Business POC Subscribe PTSD Awareness PTSD Consultation More Health ...

  3. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART(®)).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Kevin E; Elk, Carrie A; Sullivan, Kelly L; Kadel, Rajendra; Lengacher, Cecile A; Long, Christopher J; Rosenzweig, Laney; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F; Street, Jennifer D; Girling, Sue Ann; Diamond, David M

    2012-06-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART(®)) that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1-5 one-hour sessions within three weeks). Eighty adults aged 21-60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants' mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5%) completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8%) provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons). No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD.

  4. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin E. Kip

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART® that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1–5 one-hour sessions within three weeks. Eighty adults aged 21–60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants’ mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5% completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8% provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p < 0.0001 for all pre-ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons. No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD.

  5. Brief Treatment of Symptoms of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) by Use of Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, Kevin E.; Elk, Carrie A.; Sullivan, Kelly L.; Kadel, Rajendra; Lengacher, Cecile A.; Long, Christopher J.; Rosenzweig, Laney; Shuman, Amy; Hernandez, Diego F.; Street, Jennifer D.; Girling, Sue Ann; Diamond, David M.

    2012-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is a prevalent, disabling anxiety disorder. This prospective cohort study reports on a new exposure-based therapy known as Accelerated Resolution Therapy (ART®) that incorporates the use of eye movements administered in a brief treatment period (1–5 one-hour sessions within three weeks). Eighty adults aged 21–60 years with symptoms of PTSD were recruited from the Tampa Bay area. The ART-based psychotherapy was designed to minimize anxiety and body sensations associated with recall of traumatic memories and to replace distressing images with favorable ones. Participants’ mean age was 40 years, 77% were female, and 29% were Hispanic. Participants underwent a median of three ART sessions, 66 of 80 (82.5%) completed treatment, and 54 of 66 (81.8%) provided 2-month follow-up data. Mean scores pre- and post-ART and at 2-month follow-up were: PTSD Checklist: 54.5 ± 12.2 vs. 31.2 ± 11.4 vs. 30.0 ± 12.4; Brief Symptom Inventory: 30.8 ± 14.6 vs. 10.1 ± 10.8 vs. 10.1 ± 12.1; Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale: 29.5 ± 10.9 vs. 11.8 ± 11.1 vs. 13.5 ± 12.1; Trauma Related Growth Inventory-Distress scale: 18.9 ± 4.1 vs. 7.4 ± 5.9 vs. 8.2 ± 5.9 (p ART vs. post-ART and 2-month comparisons). No serious adverse events were reported. ART appears to be a brief, safe, and effective treatment for symptoms of PTSD. PMID:25379218

  6. Implementation of an Intensive Treatment Protocol for Adolescents with Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelosante, Aleta G.; Pincus, Donna B.; Whitton, Sarah W.; Cheron, Daniel; Pian, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    New and innovative ways of implementing cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) are required to address the varied needs of youth with anxiety disorders. Brief treatment formats may be useful in assisting teens to return to healthy functioning quickly and can make treatment more accessible for those who may not have local access to providers of CBT.…

  7. An Application of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy in a Case of Anxiety Panic Disorder without Agoraphobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Miguel Angel Lopez; Garcia, Rafael Ferro; Calvillo, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Traditional methods of diagnosis are of little therapeutic use when diagnostic criteria are based upon topographical rather than functional aspects of behavior. Also, this sentence in the original seemed rather awkward and a bit unclear. In contrast to this, several authors have put forward experience avoidance disorders as an alternative which…

  8. Mobilization of Peripheral Blood Stem Cells and Changes in the Concentration of Plasma Factors Influencing their Movement in Patients with Panic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabłoński, Marcin; Mazur, Jolanta Kucharska; Tarnowski, Maciej; Dołęgowska, Barbara; Pędziwiatr, Daniel; Kubiś, Ewa; Budkowska, Marta; Sałata, Daria; Wysiecka, Justyna Pełka; Kazimierczak, Arkadiusz; Reginia, Artur; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Samochowiec, Jerzy

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we examined whether stem cells and factors responsible for their movement may serve as new biological markers of anxiety disorders. The study was carried out on a group of 30 patients diagnosed with panic disorder (examined before and after treatment), compared to 30 healthy individuals forming the control group. We examined the number of circulating HSCs (hematopoetic stem cells) (Lin-/CD45 +/CD34 +) and HSCs (Lin-/CD45 +/AC133 +), the number of circulating VSELs (very small embryonic-like stem cells) (Lin-/CD45-/CD34 +) and VSELs (Lin-/CD45-/AC133 +), as well as the concentration of complement components: C3a, C5a and C5b-9, SDF-1 (stromal derived factor) and S1P (sphingosine-1-phosphate). Significantly lower levels of HSCs (Lin-/CD45 +/AC133 +) have been demonstrated in the patient group compared to the control group both before and after treatment. The level of VSELs (Lin-/CD45-/CD133 +) was significantly lower in the patient group before treatment as compared to the patient group after treatment.The levels of factors responsible for stem cell movement were significantly lower in the patient group compared to the control group before and after treatment. It was concluded that the study of stem cells and factors associated with their movement can be useful in the diagnostics of panic disorder, as well as differentiating between psychotic and anxiety disorders.

  9. Posttraumatic stress disorder: An exploratory study examining rates of trauma and PTSD and its effect on client outcomes in community mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yellowlees Peter

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rates of trauma and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD were examined in order to compare the profile in clients of an Australian Public Mental Health Service with that reported in the international literature for clients with major mental illness and to explore the effect of this on client health outcomes. Potential factors contributing to increased levels of trauma/PTSD in this group of clients and the issue of causality between PTSD and subsequent mental illness was also explored. Methods A convenience sample of 29 clients was screened for trauma and PTSD using the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale™ (PDS and selected outcome measures. Paired and independent samples t-test and ANOVA were applied to the data. Results High levels of undocumented trauma and PTSD were found. Twenty clients, (74% reported exposure to multiple traumatic events; 33.3% (9 met DSM IV diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Significant difference was found for PTSD symptomatology, severity and impairment and for client and clinician-rated scores of Quality of Life (QOL outcomes in the PTSD group. No effect for PTSD symptomatology on the Working Alliance (WA was found. Factors that may influence higher rates of PTSD in this group were identified and included issues associated with the population studied, the predominance of assaultive violence found, and vulnerability and risks factors associated with re-traumatisation within the social and treating environments. Conclusion A similar trauma and PTSD profile to that reported in the international literature, including greater levels of trauma and PTSD and a poorer QOL, was found in this small sample of clients. It is postulated that the increased levels of trauma/PTSD as reported for persons with major mental illness, including those found in the current study, are primarily related to the characteristics of the population that access public mainstream psychiatric services and that these factors have

  10. an fMRI study with agoraphobic patients with and without panic disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Thierfelder, Kolja

    2011-01-01

    In vivo exposure therapy offers an effective way to treat phobic disorders. However, neuronal mechanisms underlying successful fear reduction of this type of therapy are widely unknown. To examine neuronal mechanisms taking effect during exposure therapy, ten patients with DSM-IV diagnosed agoraphobia including the fear of confined spaces were subjected to an examination in the tube of a magnetic resonance tomograph using a therapeutic procedure very similar to a standard exposure therapy....

  11. PTSD Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Force photo by Staff Sgt. Timothy Chacon Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental health condition that can significantly affect a person’s thoughts, feelings, behaviors and relationships. The ...

  12. D-cycloserine does not improve but might slightly speed up the outcome of in-vivo exposure therapy in patients with severe agoraphobia and panic disorder in a randomized double blind clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegmund, Anja; Golfels, Fabian; Finck, Claudia; Halisch, Anna; Räth, Daniela; Plag, Jens; Ströhle, Andreas

    2011-08-01

    D-cycloserine (DCS)-augmented exposure therapy has proven efficacy in the treatment of acrophobia, social phobia, panic disorder and OCD. Here we studied whether DCS can also improve the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in patients with agoraphobia and panic disorder. To this end, 39 patients with the diagnoses of agoraphobia and panic disorder were treated with 11 sessions of CBT including three individual in-vivo exposure sessions (flooding), augmented with either 50mg of DCS (N=20) or placebo (N=19) in a randomized double blind design. Primary outcome was the total score of the panic and agoraphobia scale. Both groups profited considerably from therapy and DCS did not significantly improve this outcome (p=0.475; η(2)p = 0.01). However, there was a statistical trend (p=0.075; η(2)p = 0.17) in the more severely ill patients that DCS accelerated symptom reduction in the primary outcome at post-therapy. No serious adverse effects occurred during the trial. We conclude that in patients with agoraphobia and panic disorder, DCS seems to lack an additional benefit to efficient cbt, probably due to a floor effect. Nonetheless, the acceleration of symptom reduction in severely ill patients might represent a valuable treatment option deserving further investigation.

  13. A brief cognitive-behavioral intervention for treating depression and panic disorder in patients with noncardiac chest pain: a 24-week randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beek, M H C T; Oude Voshaar, R C; Beek, A M; van Zijderveld, G A; Visser, S; Speckens, A E M; Batelaan, N; van Balkom, A J L M

    2013-07-01

    Most patients with noncardiac chest pain experience anxiety and depressive symptoms. Commonly they are reassured and referred back to primary care, leaving them undiagnosed and untreated. Some small studies have suggested efficacy of 12 cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) sessions. Our aim was to examine efficacy of brief CBT in reducing anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with noncardiac chest pain and comorbid panic and/or depressive disorders. In this 24-week randomized controlled trial comparing CBT (n = 60) versus treatment as usual (TAU, n = 53), we included all adults who presented at the cardiac emergency unit of a university hospital with noncardiac chest pain, scored ≥8 on the hospital anxiety and depression scale (HADS) and were diagnosed with a comorbid panic and/or depressive disorder with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. CBT consisted of six individual sessions. Main outcome was disease severity assessed with the clinical global inventory (CGI) by a blinded independent rater. ANCOVA in the intention-to-treat and completer sample showed that CBT was superior to TAU after 24 weeks in reducing disease severity assessed with CGI (P depressive symptoms (Hamilton depression rating scale) were in line with these results except for HADS-depression (P = .10), fear questionnaire (P = .13), and STAI-state (P = .11). Brief CBT significantly reduces anxiety and depressive symptoms in patients with noncardiac chest pain who are diagnosed with panic and/or depressive disorders. Patients presenting with noncardiac chest pain should be screened for psychopathology and if positive, CBT should be considered. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Some notes on a historical perspective of panic disorder Algumas notas sobre uma perspectiva histórica do transtorno de pânico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Egidio Nardi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to describe important points in the history of panic disorder concept, as well as to highlight the importance of its diagnosis for clinical and research developments. Panic disorder has been described in several literary reports and folklore. One of the oldest examples lies in Greek mythology - the god Pan, responsible for the term panic. The first half of the 19th century witnessed the culmination of medical approach. During the second half of the 19th century came the psychological approach of anxiety. The 20th century associated panic disorder to hereditary, organic and psychological factors, dividing anxiety into simple and phobic anxious states. Therapeutic development was also observed in psychopharmacological and psychotherapeutic fields. Official classifications began to include panic disorder as a category since the third edition of the American Classification Manual (1980. Some biological theories dealing with etiology were widely discussed during the last decades of the 20th century. They were based on laboratory studies of physiological, cognitive and biochemical tests, as the false suffocation alarm theory and the fear network. Such theories were important in creating new diagnostic paradigms to modern psychiatry. That suggests the need to consider a wide range of historical variables to understand how particular features for panic disorder diagnosis have been developed and how treatment has emerged.O objetivo deste artigo é descrever alguns pontos importantes na história do desenvolvimento do conceito de transtorno de pânico e ressaltar a importância do diagnóstico para o progresso da pesquisa e da clínica. O transtorno de pânico foi descrito em vários textos literários e folclóricos. Talvez um dos exemplos mais antigos seja o deus Pan da mitologia grega, responsável pelo termo pânico.Aprimeira metade do século XIX presenciou o apogeu do processo de abordagem médica. Durante a segunda metade do s

  15. Helpful and hindering factors for remission in dysthymia and panic disorder at 9-year follow-up: A mixed methods study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lützen Kim

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A better understanding is needed of factors behind the long-term outcome of dysthymic and panic disorders. Combining patients' perceptions of factors that help and hind remission with objective assessments of outcome may give greater insight into mechanisms for maintaining recovery. Methods Twenty-three dysthymic and 15 panic disorder patients participated in a 9-year follow-up investigation of a naturalistic study with psychotherapy and antidepressants. Degree of remission was determined by reassessments with SCID-I & II interviews, self-reported symptoms and life-charting (aided by case records. Qualitative content analysis of in-depth interviews with all 38 patients was done to examine the phenomenon of enduring remission by exploring: 1 perceived helpful and hindering factors, 2 factors common to and specific for the diagnostic groups, 3 convergence between patients' subjective views on remission with objective diagnostic assessments. Results About 50% of the patients were in full or partial remission. Subjective and objective views on degree of remission generally converged, and remission was perceived as receiving 'Tools to handle life'. Common helpful factors were self-understanding, enhanced flexibility of thinking, and antidepressant medication, as well as confidence in the therapist and social support. The perceived main obstacle was difficulty in negotiating treatments. Remitted had overcome the obstacles, whereas many non-remitted had problems expressing their needs. Patients with dysthymia and panic disorder described specific helpful relationships with the therapist: 'As a parent' versus 'As a coach', and specific central areas for change: self-acceptance and resolution of relational problems versus awareness and handling of feelings. Conclusion A general model for recovery from dysthymic and panic disorders is proposed, involving: 1 understanding self and illness mechanisms, 2 enhanced flexibility of thinking

  16. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in anxiety disorders%焦虑障碍的重复经颅磁刺激治疗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐冰清; 王继军; 李春波

    2010-01-01

    @@ 焦虑障碍是一组常见的非精神病性精神障碍,包括广泛性焦虑障碍(generalised anxiety disorder, GAD)、创伤后应激障碍(post-traumatic stress disorder, PTSD)、强迫症(obsessive-compulsive disorder, OCD)、惊恐障碍(panic disorder, PD)及社交焦虑障碍(social anxiety disorder, SAD)等.

  17. Stepped Care Versus Direct Face-to-Face Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder and Panic Disorder: A Randomized Effectiveness Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgreen, Tine; Haug, Thomas; Öst, Lars-Göran; Andersson, Gerhard; Carlbring, Per; Kvale, Gerd; Tangen, Tone; Heiervang, Einar; Havik, Odd E

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) stepped care model (psychoeducation, guided Internet treatment, and face-to-face CBT) compared with direct face-to-face (FtF) CBT. Patients with panic disorder or social anxiety disorder were randomized to either stepped care (n=85) or direct FtF CBT (n=88). Recovery was defined as meeting two of the following three criteria: loss of diagnosis, below cut-off for self-reported symptoms, and functional improvement. No significant differences in intention-to-treat recovery rates were identified between stepped care (40.0%) and direct FtF CBT (43.2%). The majority of the patients who recovered in the stepped care did so at the less therapist-demanding steps (26/34, 76.5%). Moderate to large within-groups effect sizes were identified at posttreatment and 1-year follow-up. The attrition rates were high: 41.2% in the stepped care condition and 27.3% in the direct FtF CBT condition. These findings indicate that the outcome of a stepped care model for anxiety disorders is comparable to that of direct FtF CBT. The rates of improvement at the two less therapist-demanding steps indicate that stepped care models might be useful for increasing patients' access to evidence-based psychological treatments for anxiety disorders. However, attrition in the stepped care condition was high, and research regarding the factors that can improve adherence should be prioritized. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Section: Prescribing for PTSD, Know Your Options . × What is PTSD? Right Click here to download "What is PTSD?" (30.5 MB) Close × PTSD Treatment: Know ... Help page. Date this content was last updated is at the bottom of the page. Share this ...

  19. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... here to download "What is PTSD?" (30.5 MB) Close × PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options Right Click ... download "PTSD Treatment: Know Your Options" (29.5 MB) Close × Cognitive Processing Therapy for PTSD Right Click ...

  20. Treating PTSD in suicidal and self-injuring women with borderline personality disorder: development and preliminary evaluation of a Dialectical Behavior Therapy Prolonged Exposure Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harned, Melanie S; Korslund, Kathryn E; Foa, Edna B; Linehan, Marsha M

    2012-06-01

    This study focused on the development and pilot testing of a protocol based on Prolonged Exposure (PE) that can be added to Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) to treat PTSD in suicidal and self-injuring individuals with borderline personality disorder (BPD). Women with BPD, PTSD, and recent and/or imminent serious intentional self-injury (n = 13) received one year of DBT with the DBT PE Protocol, plus three months of follow-up assessment. The treatment was associated with significant reductions in PTSD, with the majority of patients no longer meeting criteria for PTSD at post-treatment (71.4% of DBT PE Protocol completers, 60.0% of the intent-to-treat sample). A minority of patients (27.3%) engaged in intentional self-injury during the study. Improvements were also found for suicidal ideation, dissociation, trauma-related guilt cognitions, shame, anxiety, depression, and social adjustment. There was no evidence that the DBT PE Protocol led to exacerbations of intentional self-injury urges or behaviors, PTSD, treatment dropout, or crisis service use. Overall, the results indicate that this integrated BPD and PTSD treatment is feasible to implement within one year of treatment, highly acceptable to patients and therapists, safe to administer, and shows promise as an effective intervention for PTSD in this complex and high-risk patient population. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Costs of Mental Health Care in Patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Related to Sexual Abuse One Year Before and After Inpatient DBT-PTSD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priebe, Kathlen; Roth, Mascha; Krüger, Antje; Glöckner-Fink, Kristina; Dyer, Anne; Steil, Regina; Salize, Hans-Joachim; Kleindienst, Nikolaus; Bohus, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Objective In Germany, patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to childhood sexual abuse (CSA) often receive inpatient treatment. However, data on utilization and costs of mental health care as well as on the impact of trauma-focused treatment are missing. Methods Within the context of a randomized controlled trial mental health service utilization was assessed in female patients with PTSD related to CSA. Data on psychiatric-psychotherapeutic inpatient and outpatient treatment and psychotropic medication was obtained for the year before and after inpatient DBT-PTSD. Results The mean total costs of utilization of psychiatric-psychotherapeutic care and use of psychotropics were € 18.100 per patient in the year before and € 7.233 in the year after DBT-PTSD. The significant cost decrease was due to large reductions in inpatient treatment days (on average 57 days before and 14 days after DBT-PTSD), while outpatient treatment and psychotropic medication remained unchanged. Conclusion PTSD related to CSA is associated with high utilization and costs of mental health care. The results suggest that DBT-PTSD might contribute to reducing the mental health care costs. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. The co-occurrence of PTSD and dissociation: differentiating severe PTSD from dissociative-PTSD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armour, C.; Karstoft, K. I.; Richardson, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    A dissociative-posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) subtype has been included in the DSM-5. However, it is not yet clear whether certain socio-demographic characteristics or psychological/clinical constructs such as comorbid psychopathology differentiate between severe PTSD and dissociative......-PTSD. The current study investigated the existence of a dissociative-PTSD subtype and explored whether a number of trauma and clinical covariates could differentiate between severe PTSD alone and dissociative-PTSD. The current study utilized a sample of 432 treatment seeking Canadian military veterans. Participants...... were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale (CAPS) and self-report measures of traumatic life events, depression, and anxiety. CAPS severity scores were created reflecting the sum of the frequency and intensity items from each of the 17 PTSD and 3 dissociation items. The CAPS severity...

  3. O teste das pirâmides coloridas e o transtorno do pânico The colour pyramid test and the panic disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Elisa de Villemor-Amaral

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Esse estudo visa verificar evidências de validade do Teste das Pirâmides Coloridas de Pfister para diagnóstico de transtorno de pânico. Compuseram a amostra desse estudo 15 pacientes diagnosticados pela SCID como tendo um episódio de transtorno dopânico. Seus resultados foram comparados com os obtidos com um grupo de 109 indivíduos não-pacientes que compõem uma amostra normativa.Os dados mais significativos do ponto de vista estatístico, na comparação com o grupo de não-pacientes, foram relativos ao aumento de formações simétricas e da porcentagem do azul. As características atribuídas a esses sinais condizem com os dados encontrados na literatura que descrevem a insegurança, inibição, constrição e rompimento da relação consigo mesmo como aspectos importantes associados ao transtorno do pânico.The aim of this study was to verify the validity of the Pfister’s Colour Pyramid Test in the identification of panic disorder. The sample was composed by 15 patients in psychiatric treatment for having at least one crisis of panic disorder, selected according to the SCID criteria, and 109 non-patients who had never sought for psychological or psychiatric assistance. The results show that the two groups could be distinguished by the using of blue and by the symmetric configurations, both more frequent among the patients, in a significant way. The lack of security, the inhibition and constriction are typical signs and correspond to the panic symptoms described on literature

  4. The underlying dimensionality of PTSD in the diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders: where are we going?

    OpenAIRE

    Armour, Cherie

    2015-01-01

    There has been a substantial body of literature devoted to answering one question: Which latent model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) best represents PTSD’s underlying dimensionality? This research summary will, therefore, focus on the literature pertaining to PTSD’s latent structure as represented in the fourth (DSM-IV, 1994) to the fifth (DSM-5, 2013) edition of the DSM. This article will begin by providing a clear rationale as to why this is a pertinent research area, then the body...

  5. Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Thomaes, Kathleen; Smit, Johannes H; Veltman, Dick J; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Draijer, Nel

    2013-01-01

    In the empirical and clinical literature, complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and personality disorders (PDs) are suggested to be predictive of drop-out or reduced treatment effectiveness in trauma-focused PTSD treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate if personality characteristics would predict treatment compliance and effectiveness in stabilizing complex PTSD treatment. In a randomized controlled trial on a 20-week stabilizing group cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) for child-abuse-related complex PTSD, we included 71 patients of whom 38 were randomized to a psycho-educational and cognitive behavioral stabilizing group treatment. We compared the patients with few PD symptoms (adaptive) (N=14) with the non-adaptive patients (N=24) as revealed by a cluster analysis. We found that non-adaptive patients compared to the adaptive patients showed very low drop-out rates. Both non-adaptive patients, classified with highly different personality profiles "withdrawn" and "aggressive," were equally compliant. With regard to symptom reduction, we found no significant differences between subtypes. Post-hoc, patients with a PD showed lower drop-out rates and higher effect sizes in terms of complex PTSD severity, especially on domains that affect regulation and interpersonal problems. Contrary to our expectations, these preliminary findings indicate that this treatment is well tolerated by patients with a variety of personality pathology. Larger sample sizes are needed to study effectiveness for subgroups of complex PTSD patients.

  6. Treatment compliance and effectiveness in complex PTSD patients with co-morbid personality disorder undergoing stabilizing cognitive behavioral group treatment: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethy Dorrepaal

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the empirical and clinical literature, complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD and personality disorders (PDs are suggested to be predictive of drop-out or reduced treatment effectiveness in trauma-focused PTSD treatment. Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate if personality characteristics would predict treatment compliance and effectiveness in stabilizing complex PTSD treatment. Method: In a randomized controlled trial on a 20-week stabilizing group cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT for child-abuse-related complex PTSD, we included 71 patients of whom 38 were randomized to a psycho-educational and cognitive behavioral stabilizing group treatment. We compared the patients with few PD symptoms (adaptive (N=14 with the non-adaptive patients (N=24 as revealed by a cluster analysis. Results: We found that non-adaptive patients compared to the adaptive patients showed very low drop-out rates. Both non-adaptive patients, classified with highly different personality profiles “withdrawn” and “aggressive,” were equally compliant. With regard to symptom reduction, we found no significant differences between subtypes. Post-hoc, patients with a PD showed lower drop-out rates and higher effect sizes in terms of complex PTSD severity, especially on domains that affect regulation and interpersonal problems. Conclusion: Contrary to our expectations, these preliminary findings indicate that this treatment is well tolerated by patients with a variety of personality pathology. Larger sample sizes are needed to study effectiveness for subgroups of complex PTSD patients.

  7. Different frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD): A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tingting; Xie, Qinglian; Zheng, Zhong; Zou, Ke; Wang, Lijuan

    2017-06-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a psychiatric disorder. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has been found to be effective for treating PTSD, but whether different frequencies have different effects remains controversial. We conducted this systematic review and meta-analysis to address this question. We searched the literature for studies written in English or Chinese in 9 electronic databases from the databases' inception to August 1, 2016. Additional articles were identified from the reference lists of identified studies and from personal reference collections. Eighteen articles were included, and 11 were suitable for the meta-analysis (Combined sample size was 377 (217 in active rTMS groups, 160 in sham-controlled groups)). Low-frequency (LF) rTMS resulted in a significant reduction in the PTSD total score and the depression score (1. PTSD total score: pooled SMD, 0.92; CI, 0.11-1.72; 2. Depression: pooled SMD, 0.54; CI, 0.08-1.00). High-frequency (HF) rTMS showed the following results: 1. PTSD total score: pooled SMD, 3.24; CI, 2.24-4.25; 2. re-experiencing: pooled SMD, -1.77; CI, -2.49-(-1.04); 3. Avoidance: pooled SMD, -1.57; CI, -2.50-(-0.84); 4. hyperarousal: pooled SMD, -1.32; CI, -2.17-(-0.47); 5. depression: pooled SMD, 1.92; CI, 0.80-3.03; and 6. Anxiety: pooled SMD, 2.67; CI, 1.82-3.52. Therefore, both HF and LF rTMS can alleviate PTSD symptoms. Although the evidence is extremely limited, LF rTMS can reduce overall PTSD and depression symptoms. HF rTMS can improve the main and related symptoms of PTSD. However, additional research is needed to substantiate these findings.

  8. Effects of interpersonal violence-related post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) on mother and child diurnal cortisol rhythm and cortisol reactivity to a laboratory stressor involving separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Maria I; Moser, Dominik A; Manini, Aurelia; Suardi, Francesca; Sancho-Rossignol, Ana; Torrisi, Raffaella; Rossier, Michel F; Ansermet, François; Dayer, Alexandre G; Rusconi-Serpa, Sandra; Schechter, Daniel S

    2017-04-01

    Women who have experienced interpersonal violence (IPV) are at a higher risk to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and impaired social behavior. Previously, we had reported impaired maternal sensitivity and increased difficulty in identifying emotions (i.e. alexithymia) among IPV-PTSD mothers. One of the aims of the present study was to examine maternal IPV-PTSD salivary cortisol levels diurnally and reactive to their child's distress in relation to maternal alexithymia. Given that mother-child interaction during infancy and early childhood has important long-term consequences on the stress response system, toddlers' cortisol levels were assessed during the day and in response to a laboratory stressor. Mothers collected their own and their 12-48month-old toddlers' salivary samples at home three times: 30min after waking up, between 2-3pm and at bedtime. Moreover, mother-child dyads participated in a 120-min laboratory session, consisting of 3 phases: baseline, stress situation (involving mother-child separation and exposure to novelty) and a 60-min regulation phase. Compared to non-PTSD controls, IPV-PTSD mothers - but not their toddlers, had lower morning cortisol and higher bedtime cortisol levels. As expected, IPV-PTSD mothers and their children showed blunted cortisol reactivity to the laboratory stressor. Maternal cortisol levels were negatively correlated to difficulty in identifying emotions. Our data highlights PTSD-IPV-related alterations in the HPA system and its relevance to maternal behavior. Toddlers of IPV-PTSD mothers also showed an altered pattern of cortisol reactivity to stress that potentially may predispose them to later psychological disorders. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reducing therapist contact in cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder and agoraphobia in primary care: global measures of outcome in a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D M; Power, K G; Swanson, V

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Panic disorder, with and without agoraphobia, is a prevalent condition presenting in general practice. Psychological treatments are effective but are limited by restricted availability. Interest has grown in methods by which the efficiency and thus availability of psychological treatments can be improved, with particular emphasis on reduced therapist contact formats. AIM: To evaluate the relative efficacy in a primary care setting of a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) delivered at three levels of therapist contact: standard contact, minimum contact, and bibliotherapy. METHOD: A total of 104 patients were randomly allocated to receive standard therapist contact, minimum therapist contact or bibliotherapy, with 91 patients completing treatment. All patients received an identical treatment manual and were seen by the same psychologist therapist. Outcome was reported in terms of brief global ratings of severity of illness, change in symptoms, and levels of social disruption. These brief measures were chosen to be suitable for use in general practice and were used at treatment entry and endpoint. RESULTS: The standard therapist contact group had the strongest and most comprehensive treatment response, showing significant differences from the bibliotherapy group on all, and the minimum therapist contact group on some, endpoint measures. Some reduction in efficacy was therefore found for the reduced therapist contact groups. CONCLUSION: The standard therapist contact group showed the greatest treatment efficacy in the present study. As it was of notably shorter duration than many other current formulations of CBT, it represents a useful and efficient treatment for panic disorder and agoraphobia in primary care. PMID:11224967

  10. Pensamentos negativos automáticos em pacientes com transtorno do pânico (Automatic Negative Thought in Patients with Panic Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Maria Montiel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available RESUMO: O transtorno do pânico (TP é caracterizado por ataques de pânico, os quais surgem acompanhados por uma série de pensamentos inadequados ao contexto. Objetivo: identificar e sistematizar a distorção cognitiva e os tipos de pensamentos negativos automáticos (PNA presentes em pacientes com TP. Participantes: 20 indivíduos na faixa etária de 32 anos e com diagnóstico de TP. Instrumentos: Anamnese e entrevista semi-estruturada, Inventário Beck de Ansiedade e Escala para Pânico e Agorafobia. Resultados: os dados apontaram níveis de ansiedade significativos, corroborando o diagnóstico de transtorno do pânico nos sujeitos. Já os PNA - como «Estou com dor de cabeça. Será que é uma crise?» - e os padrões de distorções cognitivas identificados, incluindo suposição, catastrofização, generalização e subestimação/ superestimação, estão em acordo com a literatura apresentada e são condizentes com a prática clínica. ABSTARCT: Panic disorder (PD is characterized by attacks of panic, which are accompanied by a series of thoughts, inappropriate to the context. Objective: to identify and systematize the cognitive distortion and the types of automatic negative thoughts (ANT present in patients with (PD. Participants: 20 individuals in the age of 32 years and with a diagnosis of PD. Instruments: Anamnesis and semi-structured interview, Beck anxiety inventory and scale of panic and agoraphobia. Results: data showed significant levels of anxiety, corroborating the diagnosis of disorders of panic in the subjects. Already the ANT - as «I have a headache. Is it a crisis?» - and the standards identified cognitive distortions, including assumptions, pessimism, generalization and under-estimation / over-estimation, they are subject to the presented literature and they are suitable for clinical practice.

  11. Description of the case of a female with panic disorder with agoraphobia and elements of social phobia. The effectiveness of an intervention cognitive psychotherapy from the psychological sector of a general hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koinis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anxiety disorders are not a single disease but a group of disorders characterized by persistent highgrade feelings of anxiety and extreme discomfort and tension. Research has shown that cognitive psychotherapy combined with medication are the most entrenched in efficiency and more specific interventions proven to treat anxiety disorders generally and specifically. Aim: The purpose of this study is to show the effectiveness of cognitive psychotherapy in conjunction with medication, in treating anxiety panic disorder with agoraphobia and elements of social phobia. The specifics in applying cognitive psychotherapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders. Case Report: A 32 year old female presented as an emergency at the hospital's Emergency Department with intense panic disorder symptoms. The medical history of the family environment reveals that the patient had a strong sense of fear of "madness." Within the framework of liaison psychiatry the patient was referred by attending physicians for psychological observation and evaluation. The patient followed a course of recognized psychotherapeutic treatment for a duration of 30 sessions, administration of questionnaires at the beginning and end of treatment and adjustment of medication. Comment: This clinical case treated with the medication and cognitive psychotherapy. The differential diagnosis was generalized anxiety disorder and depressive disorder according to the system of mental disorders DSM-IV-TR classification of mental and behavioural disorders. Conclusions: Recognized psychotherapeutic interventions in combination with medication constitute a suitable approach for the treatment of anxiety panic disorder, agoraphobia and social phobia.

  12. Dimensional structure of bodily panic attack symptoms and their specific connections to panic cognitions, anxiety sensitivity and claustrophobic fears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drenckhan, I; Glöckner-Rist, A; Rist, F; Richter, J; Gloster, A T; Fehm, L; Lang, T; Alpers, G W; Hamm, A O; Fydrich, T; Kircher, T; Arolt, V; Deckert, J; Ströhle, A; Wittchen, H-U; Gerlach, A L

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies of the dimensional structure of panic attack symptoms have mostly identified a respiratory and a vestibular/mixed somatic dimension. Evidence for additional dimensions such as a cardiac dimension and the allocation of several of the panic attack symptom criteria is less consistent. Clarifying the dimensional structure of the panic attack symptoms should help to specify the relationship of potential risk factors like anxiety sensitivity and fear of suffocation to the experience of panic attacks and the development of panic disorder. In an outpatient multicentre study 350 panic patients with agoraphobia rated the intensity of each of the ten DSM-IV bodily symptoms during a typical panic attack. The factor structure of these data was investigated with nonlinear confirmatory factor analysis (CFA). The identified bodily symptom dimensions were related to panic cognitions, anxiety sensitivity and fear of suffocation by means of nonlinear structural equation modelling (SEM). CFA indicated a respiratory, a vestibular/mixed somatic and a cardiac dimension of the bodily symptom criteria. These three factors were differentially associated with specific panic cognitions, different anxiety sensitivity facets and suffocation fear. Taking into account the dimensional structure of panic attack symptoms may help to increase the specificity of the associations between the experience of panic attack symptoms and various panic related constructs.

  13. The synchronous neural interactions test as a functional neuromarker for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD): a robust classification method based on the bootstrap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, A. P.; Tan, H.-R. M.; Lewis, S. M.; Leuthold, A. C.; Winskowski, A. M.; Lynch, J. K.; Engdahl, B.

    2010-02-01

    Traumatic experiences can produce post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which is a debilitating condition and for which no biomarker currently exists (Institute of Medicine (US) 2006 Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Diagnosis and Assessment (Washington, DC: National Academies)). Here we show that the synchronous neural interactions (SNI) test which assesses the functional interactions among neural populations derived from magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings (Georgopoulos A P et al 2007 J. Neural Eng. 4 349-55) can successfully differentiate PTSD patients from healthy control subjects. Externally cross-validated, bootstrap-based analyses yielded >90% overall accuracy of classification. In addition, all but one of 18 patients who were not receiving medications for their disease were correctly classified. Altogether, these findings document robust differences in brain function between the PTSD and control groups that can be used for differential diagnosis and which possess the potential for assessing and monitoring disease progression and effects of therapy.

  14. The relationship between forgiveness, spirituality, traumatic guilt and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among people with addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langman, Louise; Chung, Man Cheung

    2013-03-01

    Spirituality and forgiveness have been shown to be associated with psychological well-being, while guilt has been associated with poor health. Little is known, however, about the relationship between forgiveness, spirituality, guilt, posttraumatic stress (PTSD) and psychological co-morbidity among people in recovery from addiction. Eighty-one people (F = 36, M = 45) in recovery from drug and alcohol addiction were recruited from two residential units and two drop-in centres in a city in the United Kingdom. They completed the Posttraumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale (PDS), the General Health Questionnaire-28 (GHQ-28), the Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale (SIBS), the Heartland Forgiveness Scale (HFS), the Traumatic Guilt Inventory (TGI), the Michigan Alcoholism Screening Test (MAST-22) and the Drug Abuse Screening Test (DAST-20). The control group comprised of 83 (F = 34, M = 49) individuals who confirmed that they did not have addiction and completed the PDS & GHQ-28. 54 % of the addiction group met the criteria for full PTSD and reported anxiety, somatic problems and depression. They described themselves as spiritual, had strong feelings of guilt associated with their addiction, and had difficulty in forgiving themselves. Controlling for demographics, number of events and medication management, regression analyses showed that spirituality predicted psychological co-morbidity, whilst feelings of guilt predicted PTSD symptoms and psychological co-morbidity. Unexpectedly, forgiveness did not predict outcomes. This study supports existing literature, which shows that people with drug and alcohol addiction tend to have experienced significant past trauma and PTSD symptoms. Their posttraumatic stress reactions and associated psychological difficulties can be better understood in the light of guilt and spirituality. Meanwhile, their ability to forgive themselves or others did not seem to influence health outcomes.

  15. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  17. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  1. PTSD: National Center for PTSD

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  16. All at once or one at a time? A randomized controlled trial comparing two ways to deliver bibliotherapy for panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlbring, Per; Maurin, Tommy; Sjömark, Josefin; Maurin, Linda; Westling, Bengt E; Ekselius, Lisa; Cuijpers, Pim; Andersson, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    Bibliotherapy is potentially effective in the treatment of panic disorder (PD). A still unanswered question is whether pacing is important. This study was designed to test whether there is a difference between being assigned a full book as therapy and receiving one individual chapter every week (i.e. pacing). A total of 28 participants were randomized to either 10 paced chapters or one book with 10 chapters. To maximize compliance, short weekly telephone calls were added in both conditions (M = 17.8 min, SD = 4.2). Both treatments showed promising results, with effects maintained up to 2 years and with within-group effect sizes (Cohen's d) between 0.95 and 1.11. Pretreatment ratings of credibility were positively correlated with the change scores at both posttest and 2-year follow-up for three panic measures. Pacing of text material in bibliotherapy for PD is not needed, and all material can be provided at once when the treatment is guided by a therapist.

  17. Interoceptive fear conditioning as a learning model of panic disorder: an experimental evaluation using 20% CO(2)-enriched air in a non-clinical sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acheson, Dean T; Forsyth, John P; Prenoveau, Jason M; Bouton, Mark E

    2007-10-01

    Despite the role afforded interoceptive fear conditioning in etiologic accounts of panic disorder, there are no good experimental demonstrations of such learning in humans. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the interoceptive conditioning account using 20% carbon dioxide (CO(2))-enriched air as an interoceptive conditioned stimulus (CS) (i.e., physiologically inert 5-s exposures) and unconditioned stimulus (US) (i.e., physiologically prepotent 15-s exposures). Healthy participants (N=42) were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: a CS-only, contingent CS-US pairings, or unpaired/non-contingent CS and US presentations. Electrodermal and self-report (e.g., distress, fear) served as indices of conditioned emotional responding. Results showed greater magnitude electrodermal and evaluative fear conditioning in the paired relative to the CS-only condition. The explicitly unpaired condition showed even greater electrodermal and evaluative responding during acquisition, and marked resistance to extinction. The latter results are consistent with the possibility that the unpaired procedure constituted a partial reinforcement procedure in which CO(2) onset was paired with more extended CO(2) exposure on 50% of the trials. Overall, the findings are consistent with contemporary learning theory accounts of panic.

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