WorldWideScience

Sample records for ptf software bloom

  1. PTF SN discovery report, April 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, P.; Levitam, D.; Simonian, G.; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Horesh, A.; Bellm, E.; Silverman, J.; Miller, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Filippenko, A. V.; Shivvers, I.; Kasliwal, M.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2012-05-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 19 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  2. PTF SN discovery report, August 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, A.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Horesh, P. Nugent A.; Cao, Y.; Bellm, E.; Fynbo, J.; Wiis, J.; Olesen, J.; Engedal, L.; Larsen, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Pan, Y.-C.; Graham, M.; Parrent, J.; Quimby, R.; PTF Team

    2012-08-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 12 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  3. PTF SN discovery report, September 8, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P.; Walker, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Fox, O.

    2012-09-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 8 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  4. PTF SN discovery report, July 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Arcavi, I.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, Peter; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.

    2012-08-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 14 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  5. PTF SN discovery report, March 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, P.; Levitam, D.; Simonian, G.; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Horesh, A.; Bellm, E.; Silverman, J.; Miller, A.; Cenko, S. B.; Clubb, K. I.; Filippenko, A. V.; Shivvers, I.; Kasliwal, M.; Parrent, J.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2012-05-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 26 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  6. PTF SN discovery report, October 9, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P.; Cao, Y.; Levitan, D.; Hallinan, G.; Kyne, G.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K.; Miller, A.; Fox, O.; Suzuki, N.; Quimby, R.

    2012-10-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 9 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  7. PTF weekly SN discovery report, July 1, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Ben-Ami, S.; Sternberg, A.; Polishuk, D.; Arcavi, I.; Nugent, P.; Silverman, J.; Cenk, S. B.

    2011-06-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 17 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  8. PTF weekly SN discovery report, January 21, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Nugent, Peter; Kasliwal, M.; Walker, E.; Cao, Y.; Levitan, D.

    2012-01-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 13 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  9. PTF weekly SN discovery report, July 28, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.; Sullivan, M.; Howell, A.

    2011-07-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 8 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  10. PTF weekly SN discovery report, August 13, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Xu, Dong; Nugent, Peter; Horesh, Assaf; Cao, Yi; Walker, Emma

    2011-08-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 8 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  11. PTF weekly SN discovery report, March 9, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Nugent, Peter; Levitan, D.; Silverman, J.; Morgan, A.; Nugent, P.; Miller, A.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2012-03-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 11 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  12. PTF weekly SN discovery report, Sep. 2, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Xu, D.; Ben-Ami, S.; Arcavi, I.; Sternberg, A.; Nugent, Peter; Cao, Y.; Konidaris, N.; Levitan, D.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J.; Kandrashoff, T.; Bloom, J. S.; Walker, E.; Groot, P.

    2011-09-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 21 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org).

  13. PTF weekly SN discovery report, July 21, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, A.; Nugen, P.

    2011-07-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 2 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  14. PTF weekly SN discovery report, December 31, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Yaron, O.; Xu, D.; Nugent, P.; Pan, Y.-C.

    2011-12-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 5 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  15. PTF weekly SN discovery report, October 21, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Nugent, Peter; Cao, M.; Kasliwal, Y.; Sesar, Branimir; Sesar; Ptf

    2011-10-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 7 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org).

  16. PTF weekly SN discovery report, August 27, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Xu, D.; Ben-Ami, S.; Arcavi, I.; Sternberg, A.; Nugent, Peter; Cao, Y.; Konidaris, N.; Levitan, D.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J.; Kandrashoff, T.; Bloom, J. S.; Walker, E.; Groot, P.

    2011-09-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 11 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org).

  17. PTF weekly SN discovery report, July 8, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Nugen, P.

    2011-07-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 11 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  18. PTF weekly SN discovery report, February 4, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Arcavi, I.; Nugent, Peter; Levitan, D.; Cao, Y.; Horesh, A.; Bellm, E.; Matheson, T.

    2012-02-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 20 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  19. PTF weekly SN discovery report, November 6, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Nugent, P.; Kasliwal, M.; Cao, Y.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Tandulkar, S.; Groot, P.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, D. Kasen. J.; Kandrashoff, M.; Blanchard, P.; Foley, R.

    2011-11-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 15 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org).

  20. PTF weekly SN discovery report, Sep. 9, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, I.; Polishook, D.; Cao, Y.; Nugen, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 10 new spectroscopically confirmed supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  1. PTF SN discovery report, May-June 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Yaron, O.; Arcavi, I.; Nugent, Peter; Levitan, D.; Perley, D.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Sesar, B.; Cao, Y.; Bellm, E.; Barlow, T.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K.; Miller, A.; Fox, O.; Pan, Y.-C.; Maguire, K.; Sullivan, M.; Walker, E.; Kasliwal, M.; White, C. J.; Graham, M.; Parrent, J.

    2012-07-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 27 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  2. PTF weekly SN discovery report, August 6, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Xu, D.; Nugent, P.; Hsiao, E.; Levitan, D.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C.; Sullivan, M.; Groot, P.

    2011-08-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 10 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  3. PTF weekly SN discovery report, November 18, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Nugent, Peter; Hook, Isobel; Pan, Yen-Chen

    2011-11-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 6 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  4. PTF discovers a young type IIn SN in NGC 151

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrent, J.; Levitan, D.; Howell, A.; Thomas, R. C.; Nugent, P.; Sullivan, M.; Kasliwal, M.; Ofek, E. O.; Quimby, R.; Ben-Ami, S.; Xu, D.; Arcavi, I.; Gal-Yam, A.; Cenko, C. B.; Li, W.; Filippenko, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of a new supernova in NGC 151. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  5. PTF weekly SN discovery report, December 8, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Nugent, P. E.; Groot, P.; Tandulkar, S.; Horesh, E. Bellm. A.; Cao, Y.; Levitan, D.; Sesar, B.; Hook, I.; Pan, Y.-C.; Kandrashoff, M.; Blanchard, P.; Silverman, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Miller, A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Clubb, K. I.

    2011-12-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 25 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org).

  6. PTF weekly SN discovery report, Sep. 23, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Nugent, Peter

    2011-09-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 2 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org).

  7. PTF weekly SN discovery report, July 15, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Nugent, Peter; Hsiao, Eric; Graham, Melissa

    2011-07-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 2 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  8. PTF weekly SN discovery report, October 1, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Xu, Dong; Nugent, Peter; Sesar, Branimir; Pan, Y.-C.; Silverman, J.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A.

    2011-10-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 11 new supernovae. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org).

  9. PTF weekly SN discovery report, May 29, 2012 (part 1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Arcavi, I.; Nugent, P.; Cao, Y.; Perley, D.; Kulkarni, S.; Hook, I.; Pan, Y.-C.; Walker, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K. I.; Miller, A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Parrent, J.; Graham, M.

    2012-05-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 33 new supernovae (in this 2-part telegram). PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  10. PTF weekly SN discovery report, May 29, 2012 (Part 2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Arcavi, I.; Nugent, P.; Cao, Y.; Perley, D.; Kulkarni, S.; Hook, I.; Pan, Y.-C.; Walker, E.; Cenko, S. B.; Silverman, J.; Clubb, K. I.; Miller, A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Parrent, J.; Graham, M.

    2012-05-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964, #3253; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/ ; Law et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1395; Rau et al. 2009, PASP, 121, 1334) reports the discovery of 33 new supernovae in this 2-part telegram. PTF discoveries are made by autonomous PTF software (Bloom et al. 2011, http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011arXiv1106.5491B ), as well as by the Galaxy Zoo Supernova Project (Smith et al. 2011, MNRAS, 412, 1309; http://supernova.galaxyzoo.org ).

  11. PTF discovery of PTF10abyy, a young Type II Supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal-Yam, A.; Yaron, O.; Ben-Ami, S.; Sternberg, A.; Green, Y.; Xu, D.; Arcavi, I.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Nugent, H. Ebeling P.; Howell, D. A.; Sullivan, M.; Bloom, J. S.; Law, N. M.

    2010-12-01

    The PTF (ATEL #1964; http://www.astro.caltech.edu/ptf/) reports the discovery of a new supernova, PTF10abyy. The supernova was discovered by Oarical, an autonomous software framework of the PTF collaboration, on December 8 UT at RA(J2000) = 05:16:40.52 and DEC(J2000) = +06:47:53.8 at a magnitude of 18.7 in R-band (calibrated with respect to the USNOB1 catalog). The supernova was not detected down to mag 21 in previous PTF images taken during Dec.

  12. Dynamic Cognitive Process Application of Blooms Taxonomy for Complex Software Design in the Cognitive Domain

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, NR Shashi; Selvarani, R

    2010-01-01

    Software design in Software Engineering is a critical and dynamic cognitive process. Accurate and flawless system design will lead to fast coding and early completion of a software project. Blooms taxonomy classifies cognitive domain into six dynamic levels such as Knowledge at base level to Comprehension, Application, Analysis, Synthesis and Evaluation at the highest level in the order of increasing complexity. A case study indicated in this paper is a gira system, which is a gprs based Intranet Remote Administration which monitors and controls the intranet from a mobile device. This paper investigates from this case study that the System Design stage in Software Engineering uses all the six levels of Blooms Taxonomy. The application of the highest levels of Blooms Taxonomy such as Synthesis and Evaluation in the design of gira indicates that Software Design in Software Development Life Cycle is a complex and critical cognitive process.

  13. Patient Treatment File (PTF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This database is part of the National Medical Information System (NMIS). The Patient Treatment File (PTF) contains a record for each inpatient care episode provided...

  14. Analysis list: Ptf1a [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Ptf1a Embryo,Pancreas + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ptf1...a.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ptf1a.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc....jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Ptf1a.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ptf1a.Embryo.tsv,htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Ptf1a.Pancreas.tsv http://dbarch

  15. Follow-up photometry of iPTF16geu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.-H.

    2016-10-01

    We report follow-up photometry of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu (ATel #9603, #9626). We observed iPTF16geu on 2016/10/17 with the 2.5-m Isaac Newton Telescope (INT) + WFC at La Palma, under ~0.9" seeing condition.

  16. A Machine-learning Model to Separate Stars and Galaxies in iPTF Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Adam; Kulkarni, Maya; Prince, Thomas A.; Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory

    2016-01-01

    The Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) is a dedicated time-domain survey optimized for the rapid characterization of fast transients. While significant efforts have been devoted to the development of software that quickly and reliably identifies new transients, there are currently no mechanisms to automatically classify these sources. The first component in deriving a classification is understanding whether or not the newly discovered transient is galactic or extragalactic in its origin. Here, we present our development of a new framework for classifying sources in iPTF reference images as either stars or galaxies. The framework utilizes the random forest algorithm and is trained with nearly 3 million sources that have Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) spectra. The final optimized model achieves a cross-validation accuracy of ~96%, which represents a significant improvement over the automated classification provided by the SExtractor algorithm. This accuracy, while slightly worse than that provided by the SDSS photometric classifier, can be extended over the entire iPTF footprint, which covers >5000 deg^2 that have not been imaged by SDSS. Associating transients with galactic or extragalactic origin is the first step in delivering automated classifications of newly discovered transients.

  17. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PTF 12dam & iPTF 13dcc follow-up (Vreeswijk+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Leloudas, G.; Gal-Yam, A.; De Cia, A.; Perley, D. A.; Quimby, R. M.; Waldman, R.; Sullivan, M.; Yan, L.; Ofek, E. O.; Fremling, C.; Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Howell, D. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Cenko, S. B.; Yaron, O.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Ben-Ami, S.; Horesh, A.; Rubin, A.; Lunnan, R.; Nugent, P. E.; Laher, R.; Rebbapragada, U. D.; Wozniak, P.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    Spectroscopic follow-up observations of PTF 12dam were performed with the Kast Spectrograph at the Lick 3m Shane telescope, and the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrograph (LRIS) at the Keck-I 10m telescope (on Mauna Kea, Hawaii) on 2012 May 20, 21, and 22. The full spectroscopic sequence of PTF 12dam will be presented by R. M. Quimby et al. (2016, in preparation). PTF 12dam was imaged with the Palomar Oschin 48 inch (P48) (i)PTF survey telescope in the Mould R filter, the Palomar 60 inch (P60) and CCD camera in Johnson B and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) gri, the Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network (LCOGT) in SDSS r, and LRIS mounted on the 10m Keck-I telescope in Rs. iPTF 13dcc has not had any exposure in the literature yet. It was flagged as a transient source on 2013 August 29. Spectroscopic follow-up observations spanning 2013 Nov 26 to 2014 Jan 16 were performed with the Double Spectrograph (DBSP) at the Palomar 200 inch (P200), LRIS at Keck-I, and the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera & Spectrograph (IMACS) at the Magellan Baade telescope, showing iPTF 13dcc to be an SLSN at z=0.4305. iPTF 13dcc was imaged with the P48 Oschin (i)PTF survey telescope in the Mould R filter, the P60 in SDSS gri, the 4.3m Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT, at Lowell Observatory, Arizona) with the Large Monolithic Imager (LMI) in SDSS ri, and finally with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) Wide-Field Camera using filter F625W (under program GO-13858; P.I. A. De Cia). (3 data files).

  18. Optical Variability of AGNs in the PTF/iPTF Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caplar, Neven; Lilly, Simon J.; Trakhtenbrot, Benny

    2017-01-01

    We characterize the optical variability of quasars in the Palomar Transient Factory and intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (PTF/iPTF) surveys. We re-calibrate the r-band light curves for ∼28,000 luminous, broad-line active galactic nuclei from the SDSS, producing a total of ∼2.4 million photometric data points. We utilize both the structure function (SF) and power spectrum density (PSD) formalisms to search for links between the optical variability and the physical parameters of the accreting supermassive black holes that power the quasars. The excess variance (SF2) of the quasar sample tends to zero at very short time separations, validating our re-calibration of the time-series data. We find that the the amplitude of variability at a given time-interval, or equivalently the timescale of variability to reach a certain amplitude, is most strongly correlated with luminosity with weak or no dependence on black hole mass and redshift. For a variability level of SF(τ) = 0.07 mag, the timescale has a dependency of τ \\propto {L}0.4. This is broadly consistent with the expectation from a simple Keplerian accretion disk model, which provides τ \\propto {L}0.5. The PSD analysis also reveals that many quasar light curves are steeper than a damped random walk. We find a correlation between the steepness of the PSD slopes, specifically the fraction of slopes steeper than 2.5, and black hole mass, although we cannot exclude the possibility that luminosity or Eddington ratio are the drivers of this effect. This effect is also seen in the SF analysis of the (i)PTF data, and in a PSD analysis of quasars in the SDSS Stripe 82.

  19. Low-Cost Planar PTF Sensors for the Identity Verification of Smartcard Holders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henderson, N.J.; Papakostas, T.V.; White, N.M.; Hartel, P.H.

    2002-01-01

    The properties of mechanical flexibility, low-cost and planar geometry make polymer thick film (PTF) sensors attractive for embedded smartcard biometrics. PTF piezoelectric and piezoresistive pressure sensors are investigated for their potential to capture spatial human characteristics. However, it

  20. Optical variability of AGN in the PTF/iPTF survey

    CERN Document Server

    Caplar, Neven; Trakhtenbrot, Benny

    2016-01-01

    We characterize the optical variability of quasars in the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) and Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) surveys. We re-calibrate the $r$-band light curves for $\\sim$28,000 luminous, broad-line AGNs from the SDSS, producing a total of $\\sim$2.4 million photometric data points. We utilize both the structure function (SF) and power spectrum density (PSD) formalisms to search for links between the optical variability and the physical parameters of the accreting supermassive black holes that power the quasars. The excess variance (SF$^{2}$) of the quasar sample tends to zero at very short time separations, validating our re-calibration of the time-series data. We find that the the amplitude of variability at a given time-interval, or equivalently the time-scale of variability to reach a certain amplitude, is most strongly correlated with luminosity with weak or no dependence on black hole mass and redshift. For a variability level of SF($\\tau$)=0.07 mag, the time-scale has a dep...

  1. Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Harleen; Chacon, Anna H; Choudhary, Sonal; McLeod, Michael P; Meshkov, Lauren; Nouri, Keyvan; Izakovic, Jan

    2014-07-01

    Bloom Syndrome (BS, MIM #210900) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the BLM gene, which codes for the DNA repair enzyme RecQL3 helicase. Without proper DNA repair mechanisms, abnormal DNA exchange takes place between sister chromatids and results in genetic instability that may lead to cancer, especially lymphoma and acute myelogenous leukemia, lower and upper gastrointestinal tract neoplasias, cutaneous tumors, and neoplasias in the genitalia and urinary tract. BS patients are usually of Ashkenazi Jewish descent and exhibit narrow facial features, elongated limbs, and several dermatologic complications including photosensitivity, poikiloderma, and telangiectatic erythema. The most concerning manifestation of BS is multiple malignancies, which require frequent screenings and strict vigilance by the physician. Therefore, distinguishing between BS and other dermatologic syndromes of similar presentation such as Rothmund-Thomson Syndrome, Erythropoietic Protoporphyria, and Cockayne Syndrome is paramount to disease management and to prolonging life. BS can be diagnosed through a variety of DNA sequencing methods, and genetic testing is available for high-risk populations. This review consolidates several sources on BS sequelae and aims to suggest the importance of differentiating BS from other dermatologic conditions. This paper also elucidates the recently discovered BRAFT and FANCM protein complexes that link BS and Fanconi anemia.

  2. Harmful algal blooms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Bhat, S.R.; PrabhaDevi; DeSouza, L.; Verlecar, X.N.; Naik, C.G.

    as harmful algal bloom. Bloom formation is a natural process and it enhances biological productivity, but turns worrisome when caused by toxic species, leading to massive fish mortalities and hazards to human health. Incidences of'red tide' are increasing...

  3. PTF12os and iPTF13bvn. Two stripped-envelope supernovae from low-mass progenitors in NGC 5806

    CERN Document Server

    Fremling, C; Taddia, F; Ergon, M; Fraser, M; Karamehmetoglu, E; Valenti, S; Jerkstrand, A; Arcavi, I; Bufano, F; Rosa, N Elias; Filippenko, A V; Fox, D; Gal-Yam, A; Howell, D A; Kotak, R; Mazzali, P; Milisavljevic, D; Nugent, P E; Nyholm, A; Pian, E; Smartt, S

    2016-01-01

    We investigate two stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC 5806 by the (i)PTF. These SNe, designated PTF12os/SN 2012P and iPTF13bvn, exploded at a similar distance from the host-galaxy center. We classify PTF12os as a Type IIb SN based on our spectral sequence; iPTF13bvn has previously been classified as Type Ib having a likely progenitor with zero age main sequence (ZAMS) mass below ~17 solar masses. Our main objective is to constrain the explosion parameters of iPTF12os and iPTF13bvn, and to put constraints on the SN progenitors. We present comprehensive datasets on the SNe, and introduce a new reference-subtraction pipeline (FPipe) currently in use by the iPTF. We perform a detailed study of the light curves (LCs) and spectral evolution of the SNe. The bolometric LCs are modeled using the hydrodynamical code HYDE. We use nebular models and late-time spectra to constrain the ZAMS mass of the progenitors. We perform image registration of ground-based images of PTF12os to archiv...

  4. Discovery of a Luminous Supernova, PTF10vqv

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, R. M.; Kulkarni, S.; Ofek, E.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Ben-Ami, S.; Badenes, C.; Sternberg, A.; Botyanszki, J.; Nugent, P. E.; Howell, D. A.

    2010-10-01

    We report the discovery of an optical transient, PTF10vqv, in R- band images obtained with the 1.2-m Oschin telescope at Palomar Observatory in the course of the Palomar Transient Factory survey (Law et al., 2009; Rau et al., 2009).

  5. Distinct enhancers of ptf1a mediate specification and expansion of ventral pancreas in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashos, Evanthia; Park, Joon Tae; Leach, Steven; Fisher, Shannon

    2013-09-15

    Development of the pancreas and cerebellum require Pancreas-specific transcription factor-1a (Ptf1a), which encodes a subunit of the transcription factor complex PTF1. Ptf1a is required in succession for specification of the pancreas, proper allocation of pancreatic progenitors to endocrine and exocrine fates, and the production of digestive enzymes from the exocrine acini. In several neuronal structures, including the cerebellum, hindbrain, retina and spinal cord, Ptf1a is transiently expressed and promotes inhibitory neuron fates at the expense of excitatory fates. Transcription of Ptf1a in mouse is maintained in part by PTF1 acting on an upstream autoregulatory enhancer. However, the transcription factors and enhancers that initially activate Ptf1a expression in the pancreas and in certain structures of the nervous system have not yet been identified. Here we describe a zebrafish autoregulatory element, conserved among teleosts, with activity similar to that described in mouse. In addition, we performed a comprehensive survey of all non-coding sequences in a 67kb interval encompassing zebrafish ptf1a, and identified several neuronal enhancers, and an enhancer active in the ventral pancreas prior to activation of the autoregulatory enhancer. To test the requirement for autoregulatory control during pancreatic development, we restored ptf1a function through BAC transgenesis in ptf1a morphants, either with an intact BAC or one lacking the autoregulatory enhancer. We find that ptf1a autoregulation is required for development of the exocrine pancreas and full rescue of the ptf1a morphant phenotype. Similarly, we demonstrate that a ptf1a locus lacking the early enhancer region is also capable of rescue, but only supports formation of a hypoplastic exocrine pancreas. Through our dissection of the complex regulatory control of ptf1a, we identified separate cis-regulatory elements that underlie different aspects of its expression and function, and further demonstrated

  6. Discovery of a Super-Luminous Supernova, PTF12dam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, R. M.; Arcavi, I.; Sternberg, A.; Ben-Ami, S.; Yaron, O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Graham, M.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Perley, D.; Cao, Y.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2012-05-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (harvard.edu/abs/2009PASP..121.1395L'>Law et al., 2009; harvard.edu/abs/2009PASP..121.1334R'>Rau et al., 2009) reports the discovery of an optical transient, PTF12dam. The source is located at RA = 14:24:46.20, Dec. = +46:13:48.3 (J2000), which is offset from a r=19.15 mag galaxy detected by the SDSS.

  7. Discovery of a Luminous Supernova, PTF11rks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quimby, R. M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Yaron, O.; Horesh, A.; Mooley, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (harvard.edu/abs/2009PASP..121.1395L'>Law et al., 2009; harvard.edu/abs/2009PASP..121.1334R'>Rau et al., 2009) reports the discovery of an optical transient, PTF11rks. The source is located at RA = 01:39:45.51, Dec. = +29:55:27.0 (J2000), which is offset from a faint (r~20.9 mag) galaxy detected by the SDSS.

  8. The PTF Orion Project: Eclipsing Binaries and Young Stellar Objects

    CERN Document Server

    van Eyken, Julian C; Rebull, Luisa M; Stauffer, John R; Akeson, Rachel L; Beichman, Charles A; Boden, Andrew F; von Braun, Kaspar; Gelino, Dawn M; Hoard, D W; Howell, Steve B; Kane, Stephen R; Plavchan, Peter; Ramírez, Solange V; Bloom, Joshua S; Cenko, S Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Law, Nicholas M; Nugent, Peter E; Ofek, Eran O; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; Grillmair, Carl J; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David; Mattingly, Sean; Surace, Jason A

    2011-01-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project is an experiment within the broader PTF survey, a systematic automated exploration of the sky for optical transients. Taking advantage of the wide field of view available using the PTF camera at the Palomar 48" telescope, 40 nights were dedicated in December 2009-January 2010 to perform continuous high-cadence differential photometry on a single field containing the young (7-10Myr) 25 Ori association. The primary motivation for the project is to search for planets around young stars in this region. The unique data set also provides for much ancillary science. In this first paper we describe the survey and data reduction pipeline, and present initial results from an inspection of the most clearly varying stars relating to two of the ancillary science objectives: detection of eclipsing binaries and young stellar objects. We find 82 new eclipsing binary systems, 9 of which we are candidate 25 Ori- or Orion OB1a-association members. Of these, 2 are potential young...

  9. PTF12os and iPTF13bvn. Two stripped-envelope supernovae from low-mass progenitors in NGC 5806

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.; Fraser, M.; Karamehmetoglu, E.; Valenti, S.; Jerkstrand, A.; Arcavi, I.; Bufano, F.; Elias Rosa, N.; Filippenko, A. V.; Fox, D.; Gal-Yam, A.; Howell, D. A.; Kotak, R.; Mazzali, P.; Milisavljevic, D.; Nugent, P. E.; Nyholm, A.; Pian, E.; Smartt, S.

    2016-09-01

    Context. We investigate two stripped-envelope supernovae (SNe) discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC 5806 by the (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory [(i)PTF]. These SNe, designated PTF12os/SN 2012P and iPTF13bvn, exploded within ~520 days of one another at a similar distance from the host-galaxy center. We classify PTF12os as a Type IIb SN based on our spectral sequence; iPTF13bvn has previously been classified as Type Ib having a likely progenitor with zero age main sequence (ZAMS) mass below ~17 M⊙. Because of the shared and nearby host, we are presented with a unique opportunity to compare these two SNe. Aims: Our main objective is to constrain the explosion parameters of iPTF12os and iPTF13bvn, and to put constraints on the SN progenitors. We also aim to spatially map the metallicity in the host galaxy, and to investigate the presence of hydrogen in early-time spectra of both SNe. Methods: We present comprehensive datasets collected on PTF12os and iPTF13bvn, and introduce a new automatic reference-subtraction photometry pipeline (FPipe) currently in use by the iPTF. We perform a detailed study of the light curves (LCs) and spectral evolution of the SNe. The bolometric LCs are modeled using the hydrodynamical code hyde. We analyze early spectra of both SNe to investigate the presence of hydrogen; for iPTF13bvn we also investigate the regions of the Paschen lines in infrared spectra. We perform spectral line analysis of helium and iron lines to map the ejecta structure of both SNe. We use nebular models and late-time spectroscopy to constrain the ZAMS mass of the progenitors. We also perform image registration of ground-based images of PTF12os to archival HST images of NGC 5806 to identify a potential progenitor candidate. Results: We find that our nebular spectroscopy of iPTF13bvn remains consistent with a low-mass progenitor, likely having a ZAMS mass of ~12M⊙. Our late-time spectroscopy of PTF12os is consistent with a ZAMS mass of ~15M⊙. We

  10. PTF10nvg: An Outbursting Class I Protostar in the Pelican/North American Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Covey, Kevin R; Miller, Adam A; Poznanski, Dovi; Cenko, S Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Bloom, Joshua S; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Fischer, William; Rayner, John; Rebull, Luisa M; Butler, Nathaniel R; Filippenko, Alexei V; Law, Nicholas M; Ofek, Eran O; Agueros, Marcel; Dekany, Richard G; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Quimby, Robert M; Nugent, Peter; Jacobsen, Janet; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Khanh; McKenna, Dan; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Klein, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    During a synoptic survey of the North American Nebula region, the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) detected an optical outburst (dubbed PTF10nvg) associated with the previously unstudied flat or rising spectrum infrared source IRAS 20496+4354. The PTF R-band light curve reveals that PTF10nvg brightened by more than 5 mag during the current outburst, rising to a peak magnitude of R~13.5 in 2010 Sep. Follow-up observations indicate PTF10nvg has undergone a similar ~5 mag brightening in the K band, and possesses a rich emission-line spectrum, including numerous lines commonly assumed to trace mass accretion and outflows. Many of these lines are blueshifted by ~175 km/s from the North American Nebula's rest velocity, suggesting that PTF10nvg is driving an outflow. Optical spectra of PTF10nvg show several TiO/VO bandheads fully in emission, indicating the presence of an unusual amount of dense (> 10^10 cm^-3), warm (1500-4000 K) circumstellar material. Near-infrared spectra of PTF10nvg appear quite similar to a spe...

  11. FIRE Classification of iPTF13bvn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Degenaar, N.; Polishook, D.

    2013-06-01

    We observed iPTF13bvn (ATEL#5137) with the Folded-port InfraRed Echellette (FIRE; Simcoe et al. 2010) spectrograph on the Magellan Baade telescope on UT 2013 Jun 19.04. The spectrum covers 0.8 to 2.5um and shows prominent P Cygni profile of Helium I at 1.083 um at avelocity of 23000 km/s. We note that the 2um Helium I line is relatively weak. Confirming the tentative classification based on the optical spectrum (ATEL#5142), we conclude this is a supernova of Type Ib.

  12. Long-rising Type II supernovae from PTF and CCCP

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Fremling, C; Migotto, K; Gal-Yam, A; Armen, S; Duggan, G; Ergon, M; Filippenko, A V; Fransson, C; Hosseinzadeh, G; Kasliwal, M M; Laher, R R; Leloudas, G; Leonard, D C; Lunnan, R; Masci, F J; Moon, D -S; Silverman, J M; Wozniak, P R

    2016-01-01

    Supernova (SN) 1987A was a peculiar H-rich event with a long-rising (LR) light curve (LC), stemming from a compact blue supergiant star (BSG). Only a few similar events have been presented in the literature. We present new data for a sample of 6 LR Type II SNe (SNe II), 3 of which were discovered and observed by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and 3 observed by the Caltech Core-Collapse Project (CCCP). Our aim is to enlarge the family of LR SNe II, characterizing their properties. Spectra, LCs, and host-galaxies (HG) of these SNe are presented. Comparisons with known SN 1987A-like events are shown, with emphasis on the absolute magnitudes, colors, expansion velocities, and HG metallicities. Bolometric properties are derived from the multiband LC. By modeling the early-time LCs with scaling relations derived from the SuperNova Explosion Code (SNEC) models of MESA progenitor stars, we estimate the progenitor radii of these SNe and other progenitor parameters. We present PTF12kso, a LR SN II with the largest...

  13. Metallicity from Type II Supernovae from the (i)PTF

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Rubin, A; Leloudas, G; Gal-Yam, A; Arcavi, I; Cao, Y; Filippenko, A V; Graham, M L; Mazzali, P A; Nugent, P E; Pan, Y -C; Silverman, J M; Xu, D; Yaron, O

    2016-01-01

    Type IIP supernovae (SNe IIP) have recently been proposed as metallicity ($Z$) probes. The spectral models of Dessart et al. (2014) showed that the pseudo-equivalent width of Fe II $\\lambda$5018 (pEW$_{5018}$) during the plateau phase depends on the primordial $Z$, but there was a paucity of SNe IIP exhibiting pEW$_{5018}$ compatible with $Z < 0.4 {\\rm Z}_{\\odot}$. This lack might be due to some physical property of the SN II population, or to the fact that those SNe were discovered in luminous, metal-rich targeted galaxies. Here we use SN II observations from the untargeted (intermediate) Palomar Transient Factory [(i)PTF] survey, aiming to investigate the pEW$_{5018}$ distribution of this SN population and in particular to look for the presence of SNe II at lower $Z$. We perform pEW$_{5018}$ measurements on the spectra of a sample of 39 (i)PTF SNe II, selected to have well-constrained explosion epochs and light-curve properties (Rubin et al. 2015). Based on the comparison with the pEW$_{5018}$ spectral m...

  14. Allan Bloom's Quarrel with History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind." Concludes that despite cranky comments about bourgeois culture, the focus of Bloom's attack is on historicism, which undercuts his nostalgic vision of a prosperous and just America. Condemns Bloom's exclusion of Blacks, Hispanics, and women from America's cultural heritage.…

  15. Allan Bloom's Quarrel with History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, James

    1988-01-01

    Responds to Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind." Concludes that despite cranky comments about bourgeois culture, the focus of Bloom's attack is on historicism, which undercuts his nostalgic vision of a prosperous and just America. Condemns Bloom's exclusion of Blacks, Hispanics, and women from America's cultural heritage.…

  16. A Turkish newborn infant with cerebellar agenesis/neonatal diabetes mellitus and PTF1A mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutak, E; Satar, M; Yapicioğlu, H; Altintaş, A; Narli, N; Hergüner, O; Bayram, Y

    2009-01-01

    Classical neonatal diabetes mellitus is defined as hyperglycemia that occurs within the first month of life in term infants. It can be either permanent or transient. Cerebellar agenesis and permanent neonatal diabetes has been previously reported as a new autosomal recessive disorder. Pancreas Transcription Factor 1 Alpha (PTF1A) mutations have been related with this constellation of abnormalities. Here we report a new case of cerebellar agenesis and neonatal diabetes mellitus whose parents are PTF1A mutation carriers.

  17. Correlation Study of PtfV1 with Heart-Qi Deficiency Syndrome in Patients with Hypertensive Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨传华; 陆峰

    2002-01-01

    @@ It is generally believed that the change of p-wave terminal force in lead V1 (PtfV1) is associated with the inner diameter of left atrium, left ventricular compliance,and ventricular diastolic function. The increase of negative value of PtfV1 in essential hypertensive (EH) patients with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) indicates the cardiac function may be damaged. In order to explore the relationship between Heart-Qi Deficiency Syndrome (HQDS) of TCM and PtfV1 level in hypertensive LVH patients, correlation analysis of scores of Heart-Qi Deficiency Syndrome and negative value of PtfV1 was made by the authors.

  18. Program Specificity for Ptf1a in Pancreas versus Neural Tube Development Correlates with Distinct Collaborating Cofactors and Chromatin Accessibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, David M.; Borromeo, Mark D.; Deering, Tye G.; Casey, Bradford H.; Savage, Trisha K.; Mayer, Paul R.; Hoang, Chinh; Tung, Kuang-Chi; Kumar, Manonmani; Shen, Chengcheng; Swift, Galvin H.

    2013-01-01

    The lineage-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor Ptf1a is a critical driver for development of both the pancreas and nervous system. How one transcription factor controls diverse programs of gene expression is a fundamental question in developmental biology. To uncover molecular strategies for the program-specific functions of Ptf1a, we identified bound genomic regions in vivo during development of both tissues. Most regions bound by Ptf1a are specific to each tissue, lie near genes needed for proper formation of each tissue, and coincide with regions of open chromatin. The specificity of Ptf1a binding is encoded in the DNA surrounding the Ptf1a-bound sites, because these regions are sufficient to direct tissue-restricted reporter expression in transgenic mice. Fox and Sox factors were identified as potential lineage-specific modifiers of Ptf1a binding, since binding motifs for these factors are enriched in Ptf1a-bound regions in pancreas and neural tube, respectively. Of the Fox factors expressed during pancreatic development, Foxa2 plays a major role. Indeed, Ptf1a and Foxa2 colocalize in embryonic pancreatic chromatin and can act synergistically in cell transfection assays. Together, these findings indicate that lineage-specific chromatin landscapes likely constrain the DNA binding of Ptf1a, and they identify Fox and Sox gene families as part of this process. PMID:23754747

  19. Physiochemical characterization and antimicrobial evaluation of phenylthiourea-formaldehyde polymer (PTF) based polymeric ligand and its polymer metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahamad, Tansir; Alshehri, Saad M.

    2013-05-01

    Phenylthiourea-formaldehyde polymer (PTF) has been synthesized via polycondensation of phenylthiourea and formaldehyde in basic medium and its corresponding metal complexes [PTF-M(II)] were prepared with Mn(II), Co(II), Ni(II), Cu(II) and Zn(II) ions. The synthesized polymers have been characterized by elemental analysis, magnetic susceptibility, UV-visible, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, ESR spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). Elemental analysis, electronic spectra and magnetic moment measurement indicate that PTF-Mn(II), PTF-Co(II) and PTF-Ni(II) show octahedral geometry, while PTF-Cu(II) and PTF-Zn(II) show square planar and tetrahedral geometry, respectively. The results of TGA ascribed that all the PTF-M(II) showed better heat-resistance properties than PTF resin. In vitro antimicrobial activities were performed against several bacteria and fungi using agar well diffusion method. The results of microbial activity were compared with Kanamycin and Miconazole as standard antibiotics for antibacterial and antifungal activities respectively.

  20. Ptf1a triggers GABAergic neuronal cell fates in the retina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parain Karine

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years, considerable knowledge has been gained on the molecular mechanisms underlying retinal cell fate specification. However, hitherto studies focused primarily on the six major retinal cell classes (five types of neurons of one type of glial cell, and paid little attention to the specification of different neuronal subtypes within the same cell class. In particular, the molecular machinery governing the specification of the two most abundant neurotransmitter phenotypes in the retina, GABAergic and glutamatergic, is largely unknown. In the spinal cord and cerebellum, the transcription factor Ptf1a is essential for GABAergic neuron production. In the mouse retina, Ptf1a has been shown to be involved in horizontal and most amacrine neurons differentiation. Results In this study, we examined the distribution of neurotransmitter subtypes following Ptf1a gain and loss of function in the Xenopus retina. We found cell-autonomous dramatic switches between GABAergic and glutamatergic neuron production, concomitant with profound defects in the genesis of amacrine and horizontal cells, which are mainly GABAergic. Therefore, we investigated whether Ptf1a promotes the fate of these two cell types or acts directly as a GABAergic subtype determination factor. In ectodermal explant assays, Ptf1a was found to be a potent inducer of the GABAergic subtype. Moreover, clonal analysis in the retina revealed that Ptf1a overexpression leads to an increased ratio of GABAergic subtypes among the whole amacrine and horizontal cell population, highlighting its instructive capacity to promote this specific subtype of inhibitory neurons. Finally, we also found that within bipolar cells, which are typically glutamatergic interneurons, Ptf1a is able to trigger a GABAergic fate. Conclusion Altogether, our results reveal for the first time in the retina a major player in the GABAergic versus glutamatergic cell specification genetic pathway.

  1. PTF10fqs: A Luminous Red Nova in the Spiral Galaxy Messier 99

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, Mansi M; Quimby, Robert M; Ofek, Eran O; Nugent, Peter; Jacobsen, Janet; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Green, Yoav; Arcavi, Iair; Yaron, Ofer; Howell, Jacob L; Fox, Derek B; Cenko, S Bradley; Kleiser, Io; Bloom, Joshua S; Miller, Adam; Poznanski, Dovi; Li, Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V; Starr, Dan; Law, Nicholas M; Helou, George; Frail, Dale A; Neill, James D; Forster, Karl; Martin, D Christopher; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; Gehrels, Neil; Kennea, Jamie; Sullivan, Mark; Dekany, Richard; Rahmer, Gustavo; Hale, David; Smith, Roger; Zolkower, Jeff; Velur, Viswa; Walters, Richard; Henning, John; Bui, Kahnh; McKenna, Dan; Blake, Cullen

    2010-01-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) is systematically charting the optical transient and variable sky. A primary science driver of PTF is building a complete inventory of transients in the local Universe (distance less than 200 Mpc). Here, we report the discovery of PTF10fqs, a transient in the luminosity "gap" between novae and supernovae. Located in the spiral arm of Messier 99, PTF10fqs is red, slowly evolving and has a spectrum dominated by intermediate width Halpha and Calcium lines. The explosion signature is similar to M85OT2006-1, SN2008S and NGC300-OT. The origin of these events is shrouded in mystery, controversy (and in some cases, in dust). PTF10fqs shows some evidence of a broad feature (around 8600A) that may suggest very large velocities in this explosion (~10000 km/s). Ongoing surveys can be expected to find a few such events per year. Sensitive spectroscopy and statistics (disk versus bulge) will eventually make it possible for astronomers to unravel the nature of these mysterious explosions.

  2. The discovery of the multiply-imaged lensed Type Ia supernova iPTF16geu

    CERN Document Server

    Goobar, A; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Johansson, J; Steidel, C; Law, D; Mortsell, E; Quimby, R; Blagorodnova, N; Brandeker, A; Cao, Y; Cooray, A; Ferretti, R; Fremling, C; Hangard, L; Kasliwal, M; Kupfer, T; Lunnan, R; Masci, F; Miller, A A; Nayyeri, H; Neill, J D; Ofek, E O; Papadogiannakis, S; Petrushevska, T; Ravi, V; Sollerman, J; Sullivan, M; Taddia, F; Walters, R; Wilson, D; Yan, L; Yaron, O

    2016-01-01

    We report the discovery of a gravitationally lensed Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factor (iPTF). The light originating from SNIa iPTF16geu, at redshift $z_{SN}=0.409$, is magnified by an intervening galaxy at $z_{l}=0.216$, acting as a gravitational lens. Using Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics (LGSAO) OSIRIS and NIRC2 observations at the Keck telescope, as well as measurements with the Hubble Space Telescope, we were able to detect the strong bending of the light path, both for iPTF16geu and its host galaxy. We detect four images of the supernova, approximately 0.3" from the center of the lensing galaxy. iPTF16geu is the first \\snia for which multiple images have been observed. From the fits of the multi-color lightcurve we derive a lensing magnification, $\\Delta m = 4.37 \\pm 0.15$ mag, corresponding to a total amplification of the supernova flux by a factor $\\mu \\sim 56$. The discovery of iPTF16geu suggests that lensing by sub-kpc structures may have been greatly underestima...

  3. A DOUBLE NEUTRON STAR MERGER ORIGIN FOR THE COSMOLOGICAL RELATIVISTIC FADING SOURCE PTF11agg?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xue-Feng; Gao, He; Ding, Xuan [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang, Bing [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Dai, Zi-Gao [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wei, Jian-Yan, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China)

    2014-01-20

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) team recently reported the discovery of a rapidly fading optical transient source, PTF11agg. A long-lived scintillating radio counterpart was identified, but the search for a high-energy counterpart showed negative results. The PTF team speculated that PTF11agg may represent a new class of relativistic outbursts. Here we suggest that a neutron star (NS)-NS merger system with a supra-massive magnetar central engine could be a possible source to power such a transient, if our line of sight is not on the jet axis direction of the system. These systems are also top candidates for gravitational wave sources to be detected in the advanced LIGO/Virgo era. We find that the PTF11agg data could be explained well with such a model, suggesting that at least some gravitational wave bursts due to NS-NS mergers may be associated with such a bright electromagnetic counterpart without a γ-ray trigger.

  4. Early Radio and X-Ray Observations of the Youngest nearby Type Ia Supernova PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, Derek B.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, Bradley; de Bruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; van der Horst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; Law, Nicholas M.; Poznanski, Dovi; Shara, Michael

    2012-01-01

    On 2011 August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion

  5. Mathematical model of heat transfer for bloom continuous casting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Liu; Liangzhou Wang; Liqiang Zhang; Liguo Cao; Xiuzhong Ding; Mei Liang; Yongge Qi

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model for heat transfer during solidification in continuous casting of automobile steel, was established on researching under the influence of the solidifying process of bloom quality of CCM in the EAF steelmaking shop, at Shijiazhuang Iron and Steel Co. Ltd. Several steel grades were chosen to research, such as, 40Cr and 42CrMo. According to the results of the high temperature mechanical property tests of blooms, the respective temperature curves for controlling the solidification of differem steels were acquired, and a simulating software was developed. The model was verified using two methods, which were bloom pin-shooting and surface strand temperature measuring experiments. The model provided references for research on the solidifying proc-ess and optimization of a secondary cooling system for automobile steel. Moreover, it was already applied to real production. The calculated temperature distribution and solidification trend of blooms had offered a reliable theory for optimizing the solidifying process of blooms, increasing withdrawal speed, and improving bloom quality. Meanwhile, a new secondary cooling system was designed to optimize a secondary cooling water distribution, including choice and arrangements of nozzles, calculation of cooling water quantity, and so on.

  6. A novel subset of enteric neurons revealed by ptf1a:GFP in the developing zebrafish enteric nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, Rosa A; Gu, Tiffany; Bronner, Marianne E

    2016-03-01

    The enteric nervous system, the largest division of the peripheral nervous system, is derived from vagal neural crest cells that invade and populate the entire length of the gut to form diverse neuronal subtypes. Here, we identify a novel population of neurons within the enteric nervous system of zebrafish larvae that express the transgenic marker ptf1a:GFP within the midgut. Genetic lineage analysis reveals that enteric ptf1a:GFP(+) cells are derived from the neural crest and that most ptf1a:GFP(+) neurons express the neurotransmitter 5HT, demonstrating that they are serotonergic. This transgenic line, Tg(ptf1a:GFP), provides a novel neuronal marker for a subpopulation of neurons within the enteric nervous system, and highlights the possibility that Ptf1a may act as an important transcription factor for enteric neuron development.

  7. Bloom syndrome in two siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Sheikh Javeed; Sultan, Sheikh Tariq

    2010-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (congenital telangiectatic erythema) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by telangiectasias and photosensitivity, growth deficiency of prenatal onset, variable degrees of immunodeficiency, and increased susceptibility to neoplasms of many sites and types. We are reporting Bloom syndrome in two brothers from Kashmir (India), 8 and 6 years of age, who presented with erythematous rashes on the face, photosensitivity, and growth retardation.

  8. A New Bloom: Transforming Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochran, David; Conklin, Jack

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses a new design for the classic Bloom's Taxonomy developed by Anderson, L. W. & Krathwohl, D. (2001), which can be used to evaluate learners' technology-enhanced experience in more powerful and critical ways. The New Bloom's Taxonomy incorporates contemporary research on learning and human cognition into its model. The…

  9. Algal Bloom: Boon or Bane?

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.

    productive regions. Sometimes land run off and other anthropogenic influences trigger intense bloom leading to anoxia that can affect fauna at higher levels When such algal blooms are toxic (ca 6% of 5000sps) they are referred to as HABS (harmful algal...

  10. PTF, a new facility for pulse field testing of large scale superconducting cables and joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Bradford A.; Hale, J. Richard; Zhukovsky, Alex; Michael, Philip C.; Minervini, Joseph V.; Olmstead, Michael M.; Dekow, Gary L.; Rosati, James; Camille, Richard J.; Gung, Chen-yu; Gwinn, David; Silva, Frank; Fairfax, Stephen A.; Shen, Stewart; Knoopers, H.G.; Wessel, S.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Shevchenko, O.A.; Godeke, A.; Kate, ten H.H.J.

    1997-01-01

    A magnetic Pulse Test Facility (PTF), in which samples of CICC electrical joints from each ITER home team will be tested, has been fabricated at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center under an ITER task agreement. Construction of this facility has recently been completed, and an initial test phase on the firs

  11. A Triple-energy-source Model for Superluminous Supernova iPTF13ehe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. Q.; Liu, L. D.; Dai, Z. G.; Wang, L. J.; Wu, X. F.

    2016-09-01

    Almost all superluminous supernovae (SLSNe) whose peak magnitudes are ≲ -21 mag can be explained by the 56Ni-powered model, the magnetar-powered (highly magnetized pulsar) model, or the ejecta-circumstellar medium (CSM) interaction model. Recently, iPTF13ehe challenged these energy-source models, because the spectral analysis shows that ˜ 2.5{M}⊙ of 56Ni have been synthesized, but are inadequate to power the peak bolometric emission of iPTF13ehe, while the rebrightening of the late-time light curve (LC) and the Hα emission lines indicate that the ejecta-CSM interaction must play a key role in powering the late-time LC. Here we propose a triple-energy-source model, in which a magnetar together with some amount (≲ 2.5{M}⊙ ) of 56Ni may power the early LC of iPTF13ehe, while the late-time rebrightening can be quantitatively explained by an ejecta-CSM interaction. Furthermore, we suggest that iPTF13ehe is a genuine core-collapse supernova rather than a pulsational pair-instability supernova candidate. Further studies on similar SLSNe in the future would eventually shed light on their explosion and energy-source mechanisms.

  12. PTF; a new facility for pulse field testing of large scale superconducting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Bradford A.; Hale, J. Richard; Zhukovsky, Alex; Michael, Philip C.; Minervini, Joseph V.; Olmstead, Michael M.; Dekow, Gary L.; Rosati, James; Camille, Richard J.; Gung, Chen-yu; Gwinn, David; Silva, Frank; Fairfax, Stephen A.; Shen, Stewart; Knoopers, H.G.; Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; Chevtchenko, O.A.; Godeke, A.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1997-01-01

    A magnetic Pulse Test Facility (PTF), in which samples of CICC electrical joints from each ITER home team will be tested, has been fabricated at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center under an ITER task agreement. Construction of this facility has recently been completed, and an initial test phase on the

  13. Thermal blooming on laser propagation in an aspirating pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fuyin; Wang, Jihong; Ren, Ge; Tan, Yufeng; Zhu, Nengbing; Ai, Zhiwei

    2016-10-01

    Thermal blooming effect of gas on laser propagation can seriously degrade performance of far-field beam quality and energy distribution. Numerical simulation is carried out to study the influences of thermal blooming on laser propagation in line pipes. A physical model of thermal blooming effect of gas on laser propagation in an aspirating pipe is established. Axial flow and suction in the outlet are used to attenuate the thermal blooming effect. Based on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, stable calculation of flow field is carried out first, then the optical field and the fluent field is coupling calculated by means of user defined function (UDF). The results show that radial flow is enhanced in the aspirating pipe and the index of refraction gradient caused by thermal blooming effect is decreased. It is indicated that the beam quality of the outlet is improved compared with the pipe model without aspirating. The optical path difference (OPD) distribution of the outlet is analyzed and decomposed by Zernike polynomials. It is shown that the defocus item of 4m aspirating pipe is decreased more than an order of magnitude compared with the 4m pipe without aspirating.

  14. iPTF Discovery of the Rapid “Turn-on” of a Luminous Quasar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, S.; Hung, T.; Cenko, S. B.; Blagorodnova, N.; Yan, Lin; Kulkarni, S. R.; Mooley, K.; Kong, A. K. H.; Cantwell, T. M.; Yu, P. C.; Cao, Y.; Fremling, C.; Neill, J. D.; Ngeow, C.-C.; Nugent, P. E.; Wozniak, P.

    2017-02-01

    We present a radio-quiet quasar at z = 0.237 discovered “turning on” by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). The transient, iPTF 16bco, was detected by iPTF in the nucleus of a galaxy with an archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey spectrum with weak narrow-line emission characteristic of a low-ionization nuclear emission-line region (LINER). Our follow-up spectra show the dramatic appearance of broad Balmer lines and a power-law continuum characteristic of a luminous ({L}{bol}≈ {10}45 erg s‑1) type 1 quasar 12 yr later. Our photometric monitoring with PTF from 2009–2012 and serendipitous X-ray observations from the XMM-Newton Slew Survey in 2011 and 2015 constrain the change of state to have occurred less than 500 days before the iPTF detection. An enhanced broad Hα/[O iii] λ5007 line ratio in the type 1 state relative to other changing-look quasars also is suggestive of the most rapid change of state yet observed in a quasar. We argue that the >10 increase in Eddington ratio inferred from the brightening in UV and X-ray continuum flux is more likely due to an intrinsic change in the accretion rate of a preexisting accretion disk than an external mechanism such as variable obscuration, microlensing, or the tidal disruption of a star. However, further monitoring will be helpful in better constraining the mechanism driving this change of state. The rapid “turn-on” of the quasar is much shorter than the viscous infall timescale of an accretion disk and requires a disk instability that can develop around a ∼ {10}8 {M}ȯ black hole on timescales less than 1 yr.

  15. OSU MODIS FLH Bloom Product

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Two bloom products were developed for the Oregon coast based on the observed change between running 8-day composite chlorophyll-a (CHL) and fluorescence line-height...

  16. Further Verification of Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Nancy

    1976-01-01

    Tests a curriculum designed to teach fifth and sixth grade students system dynamics thinking, an orientation that is congruent with the fourth and fifth levels of Bloom's "Taxonomy of Educational Objectives: Cognitive Domain".

  17. Ectopic Ptf1a expression in murine ESCs potentiates endocrine differentiation and models pancreas development in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Gopika G; Vincent, Robert K; Odorico, Jon S

    2014-05-01

    Besides its role in exocrine differentiation, pancreas-specific transcription factor 1a (PTF1a) is required for pancreas specification from the foregut endoderm and ultimately for endocrine cell formation. Examining the early role of PTF1a in pancreas development has been challenging due to limiting amounts of embryonic tissue material for study. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) which can be differentiated in vitro, and without limit to the amount of experimental material, can serve as a model system to study these early developmental events. To this end, we derived and characterized a mouse ESC line with tetracycline-inducible expression of PTF1a (tet-Ptf1a mESCs). We found that transient ectopic expression of PTF1a initiated the pancreatic program in differentiating ESCs causing cells to activate PDX1 expression in bud-like structures resembling pancreatic primordia in vivo. These bud-like structures also expressed progenitor markers characteristic of a developing pancreatic epithelium. The epithelium differentiated to generate a wave of NGN3+ endocrine progenitors, and further formed cells of all three pancreatic lineages. Notably, the insulin+ cells in the cultures were monohormonal, and expressed PDX1 and NKX6.1. PTF1a-induced cultures differentiated into significantly more endocrine and exocrine cells and the ratio of endocrine-to-exocrine cell differentiation could be regulated by retinoic acid (RA) and nicotinamide (Nic) signaling. Moreover, induced cultures treated with RA and Nic exhibited a modest glucose response. Thus, this tet-Ptf1a ESC-based in vitro system is a valuable new tool for interrogating the role of PTF1a in pancreas development and in directing differentiation of ESCs to endocrine cells.

  18. Specification of spatial identities of cerebellar neuron progenitors by ptf1a and atoh1 for proper production of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Mayumi; Seto, Yusuke; Taya, Shinichiro; Owa, Tomoo; Inoue, Yukiko U; Inoue, Takayoshi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiya; Nabeshima, Yo-Ichi; Hoshino, Mikio

    2014-04-01

    In the cerebellum, the bHLH transcription factors Ptf1a and Atoh1 are expressed in distinct neuroepithelial regions, the ventricular zone (VZ) and the rhombic lip (RL), and are required for producing GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively. However, it is unclear whether Ptf1a or Atoh1 is sufficient for specifying GABAergic or glutamatergic neuronal fates. To test this, we generated two novel knock-in mouse lines, Ptf1a(Atoh1) and Atoh1(Ptf1a), that are designed to express Atoh1 and Ptf1a ectopically in the VZ and RL, respectively. In Ptf1a(Atoh1) embryos, ectopically Atoh1-expressing VZ cells produced glutamatergic neurons, including granule cells and deep cerebellar nuclei neurons. Correspondingly, in Atoh1(Ptf1a) animals, ectopically Ptf1a-expressing RL cells produced GABAergic populations, such as Purkinje cells and GABAergic interneurons. Consistent results were also obtained from in utero electroporation of Ptf1a or Atoh1 into embryonic cerebella, suggesting that Ptf1a and Atoh1 are essential and sufficient for GABAergic versus glutamatergic specification in the neuroepithelium. Furthermore, birthdating analyses with BrdU in the knock-in mice or with electroporation studies showed that ectopically produced fate-changed neuronal types were generated at temporal schedules closely simulating those of the wild-type RL and VZ, suggesting that the VZ and RL share common temporal information. Observations of knock-in brains as well as electroporated brains revealed that Ptf1a and Atoh1 mutually negatively regulate their expression, probably contributing to formation of non-overlapping neuroepithelial domains. These findings suggest that Ptf1a and Atoh1 specify spatial identities of cerebellar neuron progenitors in the neuroepithelium, leading to appropriate production of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons, respectively.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Light curves of four transients from PTF & SNLS (Arcavi+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcavi, I.; Wolf, W. M.; Howell, D. A.; Bildsten, L.; Leloudas, G.; Hardin, D.; Prajs, S.; Perley, D. A.; Svirski, G.; Gal-Yam, A.; Katz, B.; McCully, C.; Cenko, S. B.; Lidman, C.; Sullivan, M.; Valenti, S.; Astier, P.; Balland, C.; Carlberg, R. G.; Conley, A.; Fouchez, D.; Guy, J.; Pain, R.; Palanque-Delabrouille, N.; Perrett, K.; Pritchet, C. J.; Regnault, N.; Rich, J.; Ruhlmann-Kleider, V.

    2016-05-01

    PTF10iam was discovered by the Palomar 48 inch Oschin Schmidt telescope (P48) as part of the PTF survey. The three Supernova Legacy Survey (SNLS; Astier et al. 2006A&A...447...31A) events (SNLS04D4ec, SNLS05D2bk and SNLS06D1hc) were discovered by the deep survey of the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey (CFHTLS 2002), using the CFHT 3.6m telescope. The SNLS host-galaxy magnitudes were obtained from the SNLS five-year imaging data set (D. Hardin et al. 2016, in preparation), following the general method described in Kronborg et al. (2010A&A...514A..44K). In short, photometry was performed on deep image stacks in the ugriz CFHT/Megacam filters. (2 data files).

  20. EVLA Observations of an Extremely Young Type Ia Supernova PTF10ygu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, Mansi; Frail, Dale; Nugent, Peter; Howell, Andy; Sullivan, Mark; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Quimby, Robert; Ofek, Eran; Kulkarni, Shri; Yuan, Fang; Akerlof, Carl; McKay, Tim

    2010-10-01

    We triggered our NRAO Target Of Opportunity program "Exploring Transients in the Local Universe" and used the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) to observe PTF10ygu (ATEL#2934), an extremely young Type Ia supernova discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory. The EVLA observations were made on 2010 October 16.68 UT, when this Type Ia supernova was two weeks before maximum light (based on contemporaneous spectroscopy), one of the youngest supernovae to be observed in the radio.

  1. Supernova PTF 09UJ: A Possible Shock Breakout from a Dense Circumstellar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Rabinak, I.; Neill, J. D.; Arcavi, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Waxman, E.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Nugent, P. E.; Bildsten, L.; Bloom, J. S.; Filippenko, A. V.; Forster, K.; Howell, D. A.; Jacobsen, J.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Law, N.; Martin, C.; Poznanski, D.; Quimby, R. M.; Shen, K. J.; Sullivan, M.; Dekany, R.; Rahmer, G.; Hale, D.; Smith, R.; Zolkower, J.; Velur, V.; Walters, R.; Henning, J.; Bui, K.; McKenna, D.

    2010-12-01

    Type-IIn supernovae (SNe IIn), which are characterized by strong interaction of their ejecta with the surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM), provide a unique opportunity to study the mass-loss history of massive stars shortly before their explosive death. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of an SN IIn, PTF 09uj, detected by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Serendipitous observations by Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths detected the rise of the SN light curve prior to the PTF discovery. The UV light curve of the SN rose fast, with a timescale of a few days, to a UV absolute AB magnitude of about -19.5. Modeling our observations, we suggest that the fast rise of the UV light curve is due to the breakout of the SN shock through the dense CSM (n ≈ 1010 cm-3). Furthermore, we find that prior to the explosion the progenitor went through a phase of high mass-loss rate (~0.1 M sun yr-1) that lasted for a few years. The decay rate of this SN was fast relative to that of other SNe IIn.

  2. Supernova PTF 09uj: A possible shock breakout from a dense circumstellar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Neill, J D; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Waxman, E; Kulkarni, S R; Yam, A Gal; Nugent, P E; Bildsten, L; Bloom, J S; Filippenko, A V; Forster, K; Howell, D A; Jacobsen, J; Kasliwal, M M; Law, N; Martin, C; Poznanski, D; Quimby, R M; Shen, K J; Sullivan, M; Dekany, R; Rahmer, G; Hale, D; Smith, R; Zolkower, J; Velur, V; Walters, R; Henning, J; Bui, K; McKenna, D

    2010-01-01

    Type-IIn supernovae (SNe), which are characterized by strong interaction of their ejecta with the surrounding circumstellar matter (CSM), provide a unique opportunity to study the mass-loss history of massive stars shortly before their explosive death. We present the discovery and follow-up observations of a Type IIn SN, PTF 09uj, detected by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Serendipitous observations by GALEX at ultraviolet (UV) wavelengths detected the rise of the SN light curve prior to the PTF discovery. The UV light curve of the SN rose fast, with a time scale of a few days, to a UV absolute AB magnitude of about -19.5. Modeling our observations, we suggest that the fast rise of the UV light curve is due to the breakout of the SN shock through the dense CSM (n~10^10 cm^-3). Furthermore, we find that prior to the explosion the progenitor went through a phase of high mass-loss rate (~0.1 solar mass per year) that lasted for a few years. The decay rate of this SN was fast relative to that of other SNe I...

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Rotation periods of asteroids using iPTF (Chang+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C.-K.; Lin, H.-W.; Ip, W.-H.; Prince, T. A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Levitan, D.; Laher, R.; Surace, J.

    2017-01-01

    To explore the transient and variable sky synoptically, the PTF/iPTF employs the Palomar 48-inch Oschin Schmidt Telescope to create a field of view of ~7.26deg2 and a pixel scale of 1.01". The available filters include the Mould-R band, with which most exposures were taken, Gunn-g', and two different Hα-bands. The exposure time is fixed at 60 seconds, which can reach a median limiting magnitude of R~21mag at the 5σ level. In order to look for large super-fast rotators, we conducted five asteroid rotation-period surveys during 2014 October 29-31 and November 10-13, and 2015 January 18-19, February 20-21 and 25-26. Each survey continuously scanned six consecutive PTF fields over the ecliptic plane in the R-band, with a cadence of 10min. We ended up with a total sky coverage of ~188deg2. (3 data files).

  4. Bloom syndrome with lung involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Girija; Lobo, Ivona; Jayalaksmi, T K; Uppe, Abhay; Jindal, Savita; Chandra, Abhishek; Swami, Shivani

    2009-07-01

    We report a case of a 24-year old male presented with cough and breathlessness with diabetes mellitus and diagnosed as a case of bloom syndrome. He was a product of consanguineous marriage, having short stature, dolicocephaly, polydactyly, prominent nose with telangiectasia face. The respiratory system examination revealed bilateral coarse crepitations and wheezes and the chest X-ray revealed emphysema with right middle zone inhomogenous opacity. Also, CT thorax examination revealed bilateral cystic bronchiectasis with bronchiolitis obliterans. Bloom's syndrome was diagnosed on the basis of clinical features.

  5. Bloom, Neatby, and the Lung Fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, John W.

    1991-01-01

    Discusses Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind" from a Canadian point of view, contending that Bloom's angry, irrational book on failures in U.S. society and higher education does not raise interesting or important ideas. Similarities and differences between Bloom and author Hilda Neatby are noted. (SM)

  6. Mutational analysis of Bloom helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Xu Guang

    2010-01-01

    DNA helicases are biomolecular motors that convert the chemical energy derived from the hydrolysis of nucleotide triphosphate (usually ATP) into mechanical energy to unwind double-stranded DNA. The unwinding of double-stranded DNA is an essential process for DNA replication, repair, recombination, and transcription. Mutations in human RecQ helicases result in inherent human disease including Bloom's syndrome, Werner's syndrome, and Rothmund-Thomson syndrome. Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare human autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a strong predisposition to a wide range of cancers commonly affecting the general population. In order to understand the molecular basis of BS pathology and the mechanism underlying the function of Bloom helicase, we have analyzed BS-causing missense mutations by a combination of structural modeling, site-directed mutagenesis, and biochemical and biophysical approaches. Here, we describe the methods and protocols for measuring ATPase, ATP and DNA binding, DNA strand annealing, and DNA unwinding activities of Bloom protein and its mutant variants. These approaches should be applicable and useful for studying other helicases.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Bloom syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are of Central and Eastern European (Ashkenazi) Jewish background. Related Information What information about a genetic condition can statistics ... Genetic Testing Registry: Bloom syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (2 ... Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests Drug Therapy ...

  8. Service discovery using Bloom filters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goering, P.T.H.; Heijenk, Gerhard J.; Lelieveldt, B.P.F.; Haverkort, Boudewijn R.H.M.; de Laat, C.T.A.M.; Heijnsdijk, J.W.J.

    A protocol to perform service discovery in adhoc networks is introduced in this paper. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to distribute services to nodes in the neighborhood and thus enable local service discovery. The protocol has been implemented in a discrete event simulator to investigate the

  9. iPTF13beo: The Double-Peaked Light Curve of a Type Ibn Supernova Discovered Shortly after Explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Gorbikov, Evgeny; Ofek, Eran O; Vreeswijk, Paul M; Nugent, Peter E; Chotard, Nicolas; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Cao, Yi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer; Tal, David; Arcavi, Iair; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Cenko, S Bradley; Sullivan, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We present optical photometric and spectroscopic observations of the Type Ibn (SN 2006jc-like) supernova iPTF13beo. Detected by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory on 2013 May 19.39, ~3 hours after the estimated explosion time, iPTF13beo is the youngest and the most distant (430 Mpc) Type Ibn event ever observed. Type Ibn events are rare, and their early evolution, both photometric and spectroscopic, has not been studied yet. The iPTF13beo light curve is consistent with light curves of other Type Ibn SNe and with light curves of fast Type Ic events, but with a slightly faster rise-time of two days. In addition, the iPTF13beo light curve exhibits a double-peak structure separated by 9 days, not observed before in any Type Ibn SN. Low-resolution spectra were obtained during the two peaks of the iPTF13beo light curve. The spectrum taken during the rising stage (2.4 days after the estimated explosion time) is featureless and similar to early spectra of SNe Ic-BL. The spectrum obtained during the declining ...

  10. iPTF14yb: The First Discovery of a GRB Afterglow Independent of a High-Energy Trigger

    CERN Document Server

    Cenko, S Bradley; Perley, Daniel A; Horesh, Assaf; Corsi, Alessandra; Fox, Derek B; Cao, Yi; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Lien, Amy; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua S; Butler, Nat R; Cucchiara, Antonino; de Diego, Jose A; Filippenko, Alexei V; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gehrels, Neil; Georgiev, Leonid; Gonzalez, J Jesus; Graham, John F; Greiner, Jochen; Kann, D Alexander; Klein, Christopher R; Knust, Fabian; Kulkarni, S R; Kutyrev, Alexander; Laher, Russ; Lee, William H; Nugent, Peter E; Prochaska, J Xavier; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Richer, Michael G; Rubin, Adam; Urata, Yuji; Varela, Karla; Watson, Alan M; Wozniak, Przemek R

    2015-01-01

    We report here the discovery by the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) of iPTF14yb, a luminous ($M_{r}\\approx-27.8$ mag), cosmological (redshift 1.9733), rapidly fading optical transient. We demonstrate, based on probabilistic arguments and a comparison with the broader population, that iPTF14yb is the optical afterglow of the long-duration gamma-ray burst GRB 140226A. This marks the first unambiguous discovery of a GRB afterglow prior to (and thus entirely independent of) an associated high-energy trigger. We estimate the rate of iPTF14yb-like sources (i.e., cosmologically distant relativistic explosions) based on iPTF observations, inferring an all-sky value of $\\Re_{\\mathrm{rel}}=610$ yr$^{-1}$ (68% confidence interval of 110-2000 yr$^{-1}$). Our derived rate is consistent (within the large uncertainty) with the all-sky rate of on-axis GRBs derived by the Swift satellite. Finally, we briefly discuss the implications of the nondetection to date of bona fide "orphan" afterglows (i.e., those lackin...

  11. PTF10ops - a subluminous, normal-width lightcurve Type Ia supernova in the middle of nowhere

    CERN Document Server

    Maguire, Kate; Thomas, Rollin C; Nugent, Peter E; Howell, D Andrew; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Arcavi, Iair; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Blake, Sarah; Botyanszki, Janos; Buton, Clement; Cooke, Jeffery; Ellis, Richard S; Hook, Isobel M; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Pan, Yen-Chen; Pereira, Rui; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sternberg, Assaf; Suzuki, Nao; Xu, Dong; Yaron, Ofer; Bloom, Joshua S; Cenko, S Bradley; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Law, Nicholas; Ofek, Eran O; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M

    2011-01-01

    PTF10ops is a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia), whose lightcurve and spectral properties place it outside the current SN Ia subtype classifications. Its spectra display the characteristic lines of subluminous SNe Ia, but it has a normal-width lightcurve with a long rise-time, typical of normal luminosity SNe Ia. The early-time optical spectra of PTF10ops were modelled using a spectral fitting code and found to have all the lines typically seen in subluminous SNe Ia, without the need to invoke more uncommon elements. The host galaxy environment of PTF10ops is also unusual with no galaxy detected at the position of the SN down to an absolute limiting magnitude of r \\geq -12.0 mag, but a very massive galaxy is present at a separation of ~148 kpc and at the same redshift as suggested by the SN spectral features. The progenitor of PTF10ops is most likely a very old star, possibly in a low metallicity environment, which affects its explosion mechanism and observational characteristics. PTF10ops does not easily fit into an...

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: PTF obs. of a precursor to SNHunt 275 2015 May event (Ofek+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofek, E. O.; Cenko, S. B.; Shaviv, N. J.; Duggan, G.; Strotjohann, N.-L.; Rubin, A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Sullivan, M.; Cao, Y.; Nugent, P. E.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Sollerman, J.; Fransson, C.; Filippenko, A. V.; Perley, D. A.; Yaron, O.; Laher, R.

    2016-08-01

    The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF and iPTF; Law et al. 2009PASP..121.1395L; Rau et al. 2009PASP..121.1334R), using the 48inch Oschin Schmidt telescope, observed the field of SNHunt 275 starting in 2009 March. On 2013 December 12, PTF detected a new source at the location of the event, and the transient was named PTF 13efv (see Figure 1). Three images obtained between 2014 January 23 and April 25 were used as a reference. The PTF R-band photometry is listed in Table1. Most of the optical spectra were obtained with the Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS) on the Keck I 10m telescope, although a few spectra were also taken with the DEep Imaging Multi-Object Spectrograph (DEIMOS) on the Keck II 10m telescope, the Kast spectrograph on the Shane 3m telescope at Lick Observatory, and the Gemini-North Multiobject Spectrograph (GMOS) on the 8m Gemini-N telescope. The first spectrum was obtained during the 2013 December outburst. We used the Swift/UVOT observations of SNHunt 275, since 2008, to construct the bolometric light curve of the transient. The log of Swift-XRT observations, along with the source and background X-ray counts in the individual observations, is given in Table 5. (3 data files).

  13. Blooming Seas West of Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    For several weeks in May and early June, daily satellite images of the North Atlantic Ocean west of Ireland have captured partial glimpses of luxuriant blooms of microscopic marine plants between patches of clouds. On June 4, 2007, the skies over the ocean cleared, displaying the sea's spring bloom in brilliant color. A bright blue bloom stretches north from the Mouth of the River Shannon and tapers off like a plume of blue smoke north of Clare Island. (In the large image, a second bloom is visible to the north, wrapping around County Donegal, on the island's northwestern tip.) The image was captured by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite. Cold, nutrient-stocked water often wells up to the surface from the deeper ocean along coastal shelves and at the edges of ocean currents. When it does, it delivers a boost of nutrients that fuel large blooms of single-celled plants collectively known as phytoplankton. The plants are the foundation of the marine food web, and their proliferation in this area of the North Atlantic explains why the waters of western Ireland support myriad fisheries and populations of large mammals like seals, whales, and dolphins. Like plants on land, phytoplankton make their food through photosynthesis, harnessing sunlight for energy using chlorophyll and other light-capturing pigments. The pigments change the way light reflects off the surface water, appearing as colorful swirls of turquoise and green against the darker blue of the ocean. Though individually tiny, collectively these plants play a big role in Earth's carbon and climate cycles; worldwide, they remove about as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere during photosynthesis as land plants do. Satellites are the only way to map the occurrence of phytoplankton blooms across the global oceans on a regular basis. That kind of information is important not only to scientists who model carbon and climate, but also to biologists and fisheries

  14. DISCOVERY, PROGENITOR AND EARLY EVOLUTION OF A STRIPPED ENVELOPE SUPERNOVA iPTF13bvn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [The Observatories, Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gorbikov, Evgeny; Ofek, Eran O.; Yaron, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Hancock, Paul [Sydney Institute for Astronomy (SIfA), School of Physics, The University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Valenti, Stefano; Graham, Melissa; Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sand, David [Department of Physics, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Wheeler, J. Craig; Marion, G. H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Walker, Emma S. [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT 06511-8499 (United States); Mazzali, Paolo, E-mail: ycao@astro.caltech.edu [INAF-Padova Astronomical Observatory, Vicolo dell' Osservatorio 5, I-35122 Padova (Italy); and others

    2013-09-20

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory reports our discovery of a young supernova, iPTF13bvn, in the nearby galaxy, NGC 5806 (22.5 Mpc). Our spectral sequence in the optical and infrared suggests a Type Ib classification. We identify a blue progenitor candidate in deep pre-explosion imaging within a 2σ error circle of 80 mas (8.7 pc). The candidate has an M{sub B} luminosity of –5.52 ± 0.39 mag and a B – I color of 0.25 ± 0.25 mag. If confirmed by future observations, this would be the first direct detection for a progenitor of a Type Ib. Fitting a power law to the early light curve, we find an extrapolated explosion date around 0.6 days before our first detection. We see no evidence of shock cooling. The pre-explosion detection limits constrain the radius of the progenitor to be smaller than a few solar radii. iPTF13bvn is also detected in centimeter and millimeter wavelengths. Fitting a synchrotron self-absorption model to our radio data, we find a mass-loading parameter of 1.3×10{sup 12} g cm{sup –1}. Assuming a wind velocity of 10{sup 3} km s{sup –1}, we derive a progenitor mass-loss rate of 3 × 10{sup –5} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}. Our observations, taken as a whole, are consistent with a Wolf-Rayet progenitor of the supernova iPTF13bvn.

  15. Simulation of herbicide degradation in different soils by use of Pedo-transfer functions (PTF) and non-linear kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Götz, N; Richter, O

    1999-03-01

    The degradation behaviour of bentazone in 14 different soils was examined at constant temperature and moisture conditions. Two soils were examined at different temperatures. On the basis of these data the influence of soil properties and temperature on degradation was assessed and modelled. Pedo-transfer functions (PTF) in combination with a linear and a non-linear model were found suitable to describe the bentazone degradation in the laboratory as related to soil properties. The linear PTF can be combined with a rate related to the temperature to account for both soil property and temperature influence at the same time.

  16. iPTF15dtg: a double-peaked Type Ic supernova from a massive progenitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddia, F.; Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Corsi, A.; Gal-Yam, A.; Karamehmetoglu, E.; Lunnan, R.; Bue, B.; Ergon, M.; Kasliwal, M.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Wozniak, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) arise from the core-collapse of H- (and He-) poor stars, which could either be single Wolf-Rayet (WR) stars or lower-mass stars stripped of their envelope by a companion. Their light curves are radioactively powered and usually show a fast rise to peak (~10-15 d), without any early (in the first few days) emission bumps (with the exception of broad-lined SNe Ic) as sometimes seen for other types of stripped-envelope SNe (e.g., Type IIb SN 1993J and Type Ib SN 2008D). Aims: We have studied iPTF15dtg, a spectroscopically normal SN Ic with an early excess in the optical light curves followed by a long (~30 d) rise to the main peak. It is the first spectroscopically-normal double-peaked SN Ic to be observed. Our aim is to determine the properties of this explosion and of its progenitor star. Methods: Optical photometry and spectroscopy of iPTF15dtg was obtained with multiple telescopes. The resulting light curves and spectral sequence are analyzed and modeled with hydrodynamical and analytical models, with particular focus on the early emission. Results: iPTF15dtg is a slow rising SN Ic, similar to SN 2011bm. Hydrodynamical modeling of the bolometric properties reveals a large ejecta mass (~10 M⊙) and strong 56Ni mixing. The luminous early emission can be reproduced if we account for the presence of an extended (≳500 R⊙), low-mass (≳0.045 M⊙) envelope around the progenitor star. Alternative scenarios for the early peak, such as the interaction with a companion, a shock-breakout (SBO) cooling tail from the progenitor surface, or a magnetar-driven SBO are not favored. Conclusions: The large ejecta mass and the presence of H- and He-free extended material around the star suggest that the progenitor of iPTF15dtg was a massive (≳35 M⊙) WR star that experienced strong mass loss.

  17. MERUNUT PEMAHAMAN TAKSONOMI BLOOM: SUATU KONTEMPLASI FILOSOFIS

    OpenAIRE

    Dominikus Tulasi

    2010-01-01

    This article would like to share the use of Bloom's taxonomy as a cognitive framework for teaching-learning process to undertake the way student-centered learning. Related to the curriculum based competence in excellent education, the abstract cognitive in applying Blooms taxonomy is so called scaffolding. We know the taxonomy Bloom is a six-level classification system that uses observed student behavior to infer and absorb the level of cognitive achievement domain. This article surveys think...

  18. Massive phytoplankton blooms under Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrigo, Kevin R; Perovich, Donald K; Pickart, Robert S; Brown, Zachary W; van Dijken, Gert L; Lowry, Kate E; Mills, Matthew M; Palmer, Molly A; Balch, William M; Bahr, Frank; Bates, Nicholas R; Benitez-Nelson, Claudia; Bowler, Bruce; Brownlee, Emily; Ehn, Jens K; Frey, Karen E; Garley, Rebecca; Laney, Samuel R; Lubelczyk, Laura; Mathis, Jeremy; Matsuoka, Atsushi; Mitchell, B Greg; Moore, G W K; Ortega-Retuerta, Eva; Pal, Sharmila; Polashenski, Chris M; Reynolds, Rick A; Schieber, Brian; Sosik, Heidi M; Stephens, Michael; Swift, James H

    2012-06-15

    Phytoplankton blooms over Arctic Ocean continental shelves are thought to be restricted to waters free of sea ice. Here, we document a massive phytoplankton bloom beneath fully consolidated pack ice far from the ice edge in the Chukchi Sea, where light transmission has increased in recent decades because of thinning ice cover and proliferation of melt ponds. The bloom was characterized by high diatom biomass and rates of growth and primary production. Evidence suggests that under-ice phytoplankton blooms may be more widespread over nutrient-rich Arctic continental shelves and that satellite-based estimates of annual primary production in these waters may be underestimated by up to 10-fold.

  19. iPTF15dtg: a double-peaked Type Ic Supernova from a massive progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Taddia, F; Sollerman, J; Corsi, A; Gal-Yam, A; Karamehmetoglu, E; Lunnan, R; Bue, B; Ergon, M; Kasliwal, M; Vreeswijk, P M; Wozniak, P R

    2016-01-01

    Type Ic supernovae (SNe Ic) arise from the core-collapse of H (and He) poor stars, which could be either single WR stars or lower-mass stars stripped of their envelope by a companion. Their light curves are radioactively powered and usually show a fast rise to peak ($\\sim$10-15 d), without any early (first few days) emission bumps (with the exception of broad-lined SNe Ic) as sometimes seen for other types of stripped-envelope SNe (e.g., Type IIb SN 1993J and Type Ib SN 2008D). We have studied iPTF15dtg, a spectroscopically normal SN Ic with an early excess in the optical light curves followed by a long ($\\sim$30 d) rise to the main peak. It is the first spectroscopically-normal double-peaked SN Ic observed. We aim to determine the properties of this explosion and of its progenitor star. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of iPTF15dtg was obtained with multiple telescopes. The resulting light curves and spectral sequence are analyzed and modelled with hydrodynamical and analytical models, with particular foc...

  20. Discovery, Progenitor & Early Evolution of a Stripped Envelope Supernova iPTF13bvn

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Yi; Arcavi, Iair; Horesh, Assaf; Hancock, Paul; Valenti, Stefano; Cenko, S Bradley; Kulkarni, S R; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Gorbikov, Evgeny; Ofek, Eran O; Sand, David; Yaron, Ofer; Graham, Melissa; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Wheeler, J Craig; Marion, G H; Walker, Emma; Mazzali, Paolo; Howell, D Andrew; Bloom, Josh; Nugent, Peter E; Surace, Jason; Masci, Frank; Carpenter, John; Degenaar, Nathalie; Gelino, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory reports our discovery of a young supernova, iPTF13bvn, in the nearby galaxy, NGC5806 (22.5Mpc). Our spectral sequence in the optical and infrared suggests a likely Type Ib classification. We identify a single, blue progenitor candidate in deep pre-explosion imaging within a 2sigma error circle of 80 mas (8.7 pc). The candidate has a MB luminosity of -5.2+/-0.4 mag and a B-I color of 0.1+/-0.3 mag. If confirmed by future observations, this would be the first direct detection for a progenitor of a Type Ib. Fitting a power law to the early light curve, we find an extrapolated explosion date around 1.1 days before our first detection. We see no evidence of shock cooling. The pre-explosion detection limits constrain the radius of the progenitor to be smaller than a few solar radii. iPTF13bvn is also detected in cm and mm-wavelengths. Fitting a synchrotron self-absorption model to our radio data, we ?nd a mass loading parameter of 1.3*10^12 g/cm. Assuming a wind velocity o...

  1. A population of short-period variable quasars from PTF as supermassive black hole binary candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charisi, M.; Bartos, I.; Haiman, Z.; Price-Whelan, A. M.; Graham, M. J.; Bellm, E. C.; Laher, R. R.; Márka, S.

    2016-12-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) at sub-parsec separations should be common in galactic nuclei, as a result of frequent galaxy mergers. Hydrodynamical simulations of circum-binary discs predict strong periodic modulation of the mass accretion rate on time-scales comparable to the orbital period of the binary. As a result, SMBHBs may be recognized by the periodic modulation of their brightness. We conducted a statistical search for periodic variability in a sample of 35 383 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the photometric data base of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We analysed Lomb-Scargle periodograms and assessed the significance of our findings by modelling each individual quasar's variability as a damped random walk (DRW). We identified 50 quasars with significant periodicity beyond the DRW model, typically with short periods of a few hundred days. We find 33 of these to remain significant after a re-analysis of their periodograms including additional optical data from the intermediate-PTF and the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey. Assuming that the observed periods correspond to the redshifted orbital periods of SMBHBs, we conclude that our findings are consistent with a population of unequal-mass SMBHBs, with a typical mass ratio as low as q ≡ M2/M1 ≈ 0.01.

  2. Explaining the Type Ia Supernova PTF 11kx with the Core Degenerate Scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Soker, Noam; Garcia-Berro, Enrique; Torres, Santiago; Camacho, Judit

    2012-01-01

    We argue that the multiple shells of circumstellar material (CSM) and the supernovae (SN) ejecta interaction with the CSM starting 59 days after the explosion of the Type Ia SN (SN Ia) PTF 11kx, are best described by the core-degenerate (CD) scenario for SN Ia. In the CD scenario the super-Chandrasekhar mass white dwarf (WD) is formed at the termination of the common envelope phase from a merger of a WD companion with the hot core of a massive asymptotic giant branch (AGB) star. In most cases the WD is destructed and accreted onto the more massive core. However, in rare cases where mergers take place when the WD is denser than the core, the core will be destructed and accreted onto the cooler WD. In such cases the explosion might occur with no appreciable delay, i.e., months to years after the termination of the common envelope (CE) phase. This, we propose, is the evolutionary route that lead to the explosion of PTF 11kx. The CD scenario can account for the very massive CSM within ~1000 AU of the exploding PT...

  3. Strong near-infrared carbon in the Type Ia supernova iPTF13ebh

    CERN Document Server

    Hsiao, E Y; Contreras, C; Höflich, P; Sand, D; Marion, G H; Phillips, M M; Stritzinger, M; González-Gaitán, S; Mason, R E; Folatelli, G; Parent, E; Gall, C; Amanullah, R; Anupama, G C; Arcavi, I; Banerjee, D P K; Beletsky, Y; Blanc, G A; Bloom, J S; Brown, P J; Campillay, A; Cao, Y; De Cia, A; Diamond, T; Freedman, W L; Gonzalez, C; Goobar, A; Holmbo, S; Howell, D A; Johansson, J; Kasliwal, M M; Kirshner, R P; Krisciunas, K; Kulkarni, S R; Maguire, K; Milne, P A; Morrell, N; Nugent, P E; Ofek, E O; Osip, D; Palunas, P; Perley, D A; Persson, S E; Piro, A L; Rabus, M; Roth, M; Schiefelbein, J M; Srivastav, S; Sullivan, M; Suntzeff, N B; Surace, J; Woźnia, P R; Yaron, O

    2015-01-01

    We present near-infrared (NIR) time-series spectroscopy, as well as complementary ultraviolet (UV), optical, and NIR data, of the Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) iPTF13ebh, which was discovered within two days from the estimated time of explosion. The first NIR spectrum was taken merely 2.3 days after explosion and may be the earliest NIR spectrum yet obtained of a SN Ia. The most striking features in the spectrum are several NIR C I lines, and the C I {\\lambda}1.0693 {\\mu}m line is the strongest ever observed in a SN Ia. Interestingly, no strong optical C II counterparts were found, even though the optical spectroscopic time series began early and is densely-cadenced. Except at the very early epochs, within a few days from the time of explosion, we show that the strong NIR C I compared to the weaker optical C II appears to be general in SNe Ia. iPTF13ebh is a fast decliner with {\\Delta}m15(B) = 1.79 $\\pm$ 0.01, and its absolute magnitude obeys the linear part of the width-luminosity relation. It is therefore categ...

  4. Pulsational Pair-instability Model for Superluminous Supernova PTF12dam: Interaction and Radioactive Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstov, Alexey; Nomoto, Ken’ichi; Blinnikov, Sergei; Sorokina, Elena; Quimby, Robert; Baklanov, Petr

    2017-02-01

    Being a superluminous supernova, PTF12dam can be explained by a 56Ni-powered model, a magnetar-powered model, or an interaction model. We propose that PTF12dam is a pulsational pair-instability supernova, where the outer envelope of a progenitor is ejected during the pulsations. Thus, it is powered by a double energy source: radioactive decay of 56Ni and a radiative shock in a dense circumstellar medium. To describe multicolor light curves and spectra, we use radiation-hydrodynamics calculations of the STELLA code. We found that light curves are well described in the model with 40 M⊙ ejecta and 20–40 M⊙ circumstellar medium. The ejected 56Ni mass is about 6 M⊙, which results from explosive nucleosynthesis with large explosion energy (2–3) × 1052 erg. In comparison with alternative scenarios of pair-instability supernova and magnetar-powered supernova, in the interaction model, all the observed main photometric characteristics are well reproduced: multicolor light curves, color temperatures, and photospheric velocities.

  5. The PTF Orion Project: a Possible Planet Transiting a T-Tauri Star

    CERN Document Server

    van Eyken, Julian C; von Braun, Kaspar; Kane, Stephen R; Plavchan, Peter; Bender, Chad F; Brown, Timothy M; Crepp, Justin; Fulton, Benjamin J; Howard, Andrew W; Howell, Steve B; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Marcy, Geoffrey W; Shporer, Avi; Szkody, Paula; Akeson, Rachel L; Beichman, Charles A; Boden, Andrew F; Gelino, Dawn M; Hoard, D W; Ramírez, Solange V; Rebull, Luisa M; Stauffer, John R; Bloom, Joshua S; Cenko, S Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Law, Nicholas M; Nugent, Peter E; Ofek, Eran O; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; Walters, Richard; Grillmair, Carl J; Laher, Russ; Levitan, David B; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason A

    2012-01-01

    We report observations of a possible young transiting planet orbiting a previously known weak-lined T-Tauri star in the 7-10Myr-old Orion-OB1a/25-Ori region. The candidate was found as part of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) Orion project. It has a photometric transit period of 0.448413 \\pm 0.000040 days, and appears in both 2009 and 2010 PTF data. Follow-up low-precision radial velocity observations and adaptive-optics imaging suggest that the star is not an eclipsing binary, and that it is unlikely that a background source is blended with the target and mimicking the observed transit. Radial-velocity observations with the Hobby-Eberly and Keck telescopes yield a radial velocity that has the same period as the photometric event, but is offset in phase from the transit center by \\approx -0.22 periods. The amplitude (half range) of the radial velocity variations is 2.4 km/s and is comparable with the expected radial velocity amplitude that stellar spots could induce. The radial velocity curve is likely dom...

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Imaging observations of iPTF 13ajg (Vreeswijk+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Savaglio, S.; Gal-Yam, A.; De Cia, A.; Quimby, R. M.; Sullivan, M.; Cenko, S. B.; Perley, D. A.; Filippenko, A. V.; Clubb, K. I.; Taddia, F.; Sollerman, J.; Leloudas, G.; Arcavi, I.; Rubin, A.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Yaron, O.; Tal, D.; Ofek, E. O.; Capone, J.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Toy, V.; Nugent, P. E.; Laher, R.; Surace, J.; Kulkarni, S. R.

    2017-08-01

    iPTF 13ajg was imaged with the Palomar 48 inch (P48) Oschin iPTF survey telescope equipped with a 12kx8k CCD mosaic camera (Rahmer et al. 2008SPIE.7014E..4YR) in the Mould R filter, the Palomar 60 inch and CCD camera (Cenko et al. 2006PASP..118.1396C) in Johnson B and Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) gri, the 2.56 m Nordic Optical Telescope (on La Palma, Canary Islands) with the Andalucia Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera (ALFOSC) in SDSS ugriz, the 4.3 m Discovery Channel Telescope (at Lowell Observatory, Arizona) with the Large Monolithic Imager (LMI) in SDSS r, and with LRIS (Oke et al. 1995PASP..107..375O) and the Multi-Object Spectrometer for Infrared Exploration (MOSFIRE; McLean et al. 2012SPIE.8446E..0JM), both mounted on the 10 m Keck-I telescope (on Mauna Kea, Hawaii), in g and Rs with LRIS and J and Ks with MOSFIRE. (1 data file).

  7. Rbms3, an RNA-binding protein, mediates the expression of Ptf1a by binding to its 3'UTR during mouse pancreas development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chung-Kuang; Lai, Yi-Chyi; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chiang, Ming-Ko

    2012-07-01

    The development of the pancreas is a complicated process that is regulated on several levels. Pancreas transcription factor 1, alpha subunit (Ptf1a), also known as p48, is a pancreas-specific basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is critical for both exocrine pancreas development and maintenance of acinar cell differentiation. Based on a differential screening assay, we identified Rbms3, a gene encoding a glycine-rich RNA-binding protein, to be specifically expressed in the neural tube and the pancreatic rudiment of e10.5 embryos. The presence of Rbms3 in the early developing pancreas suggests that specific post-transcriptional regulation mechanisms play an important role in controlling pancreas development. In this study, we show that Rbms3 binds to the 3'UTR of Ptf1a mRNA, but not the 3'UTR of Pdx1, which is another pancreatic transcription factor. The ectopic expression of Rbms3 stimulates the translation of a reporter gene carrying the Ptf1a 3'UTR. In addition, when Rbms3 expression is suppressed in the AR42J-B13 pancreatic exocrine cell line, the expression of Ptf1a is also down-regulated. These results suggest that binding of Rbms3 to the 3'UTR of Ptf1a regulates the production of the Ptf1a protein and, thereby, indirectly regulates the expression of the Ptf1a downstream target genes.

  8. The bumpy light curve of Type IIn supernova iPTF13z over 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, A.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Fremling, C.; Moriya, T. J.; Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; De Cia, A.; Roy, R.; Kasliwal, M. M.; Cao, Y.; Nugent, P. E.; Masci, F. J.

    2017-08-01

    A core-collapse (CC) supernova (SN) of Type IIn is dominated by the interaction of SN ejecta with the circumstellar medium (CSM). Some SNe IIn (e.g. SN 2006jd) have episodes of re-brightening ("bumps") in their light curves. We present iPTF13z, a Type IIn SN discovered on 2013 February 1 by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). This SN showed at least five bumps in its declining light curve between 130 and 750 days after discovery. We analyse this peculiar behaviour and try to infer the properties of the CSM, of the SN explosion, and the nature of the progenitor star. We obtained multi-band optical photometry for over 1000 days after discovery with the P48 and P60 telescopes at Palomar Observatory. We obtained low-resolution optical spectra during the same period. We did an archival search for progenitor outbursts. We analyse the photometry and the spectra, and compare iPTF13z to other SNe IIn. In particular we derive absolute magnitudes, colours, a pseudo-bolometric light curve, and the velocities of the different components of the spectral lines. A simple analytical model is used to estimate the properties of the CSM. iPTF13z had a light curve peaking at Mr ≲ - 18.3 mag. The five bumps during its decline phase had amplitudes ranging from 0.4 to 0.9 mag and durations between 20 and 120 days. The most prominent bumps appeared in all the different optical bands, when covered. The spectra of this SN showed typical SN IIn characteristics, with emission lines of Hα (with broad component FWHM 103 - 104 km s-1 and narrow component FWHM 102 km s-1) and He i, but also with Fe ii, Ca ii, Na i D and Hβ P Cygni profiles (with velocities of 103km s-1). A pre-explosion outburst was identified lasting ≳ 50 days, with Mr ≈ - 15 mag around 210 days before discovery. Large, variable progenitor mass-loss rates (≳0.01M⊙ yr-1) and CSM densities (≳10-16 g cm-3) are derived. The SN was hosted by a metal-poor dwarf galaxy at redshift z = 0.0328. We suggest that

  9. Algae Bloom in a Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sanabria

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to determine the likelihood of an algae bloom in a particular lake located in upstate New York. The growth of algae in this lake is caused by a high concentration of phosphorous that diffuses to the surface of the lake. Our calculations, based on Fick's Law, are used to create a mathematical model of the driving force of diffusion for phosphorous. Empirical observations are also used to predict whether the concentration of phosphorous will diffuse to the surface of this lake within a specified time and under specified conditions.

  10. Bloom syndrome with lung involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nair Girija

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 24-year old male presented with cough and breathlessness with diabetes mellitus and diagnosed as a case of bloom syndrome. He was a product of consanguineous marriage, having short stature, dolicocephaly, polydactyly, prominent nose with telangiectasia face. The respiratory system examination revealed bilateral coarse crepitations and wheezes and the chest X-ray revealed emphysema with right middle zone inhomogenous opacity. Also, CT thorax examination revealed bilateral cystic bronchiectasis with bronchiolitis obliterans. Bloom′s syndrome was diagnosed on the basis of clinical features.

  11. Adaptive Optics and planned HST follow-up observations of the strongly lensed SNIa iPTF16geu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goobar, Ariel; Amanullah, Rahman; Kulkarni, Shri; Steidel, Charles; Law, David

    2016-10-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) observations of iPTF16geu (ATel #9603) were carried out on October 11 with NACO in Natural Guide Star (NGS) mode on VLT. A bright star 30" SE of the SN position provided for the AO corrections.

  12. Interpreting the Strongly Lensed Supernova iPTF16geu: Time Delay Predictions, Microlensing, and Lensing Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    More, Anupreeta; Suyu, Sherry H.; Oguri, Masamune; More, Surhud; Lee, Chien-Hsiu

    2017-02-01

    We present predictions for time delays between multiple images of the gravitationally lensed supernova, iPTF16geu, which was recently discovered from the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). As the supernova is of Type Ia where the intrinsic luminosity is usually well known, accurately measured time delays of the multiple images could provide tight constraints on the Hubble constant. According to our lens mass models constrained by the Hubble Space Telescope F814W image, we expect the maximum relative time delay to be less than a day, which is consistent with the maximum of 100 hr reported by Goobar et al. but places a stringent upper limit. Furthermore, the fluxes of most of the supernova images depart from expected values suggesting that they are affected by microlensing. The microlensing timescales are small enough that they may pose significant problems to measure the time delays reliably. Our lensing rate calculation indicates that the occurrence of a lensed SN in iPTF is likely. However, the observed total magnification of iPTF16geu is larger than expected, given its redshift. This may be a further indication of ongoing microlensing in this system.

  13. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of the low-luminosity, broad-lined Ic supernova iPTF15dld

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pian, E.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.

    2017-01-01

    Core-collapse stripped-envelope supernova (SN) explosions reflect the diversity of physical parameters and evolutionary paths of their massive star progenitors. We have observed the Type Ic SN iPTF15dld (z = 0.047), reported by the Palomar Transient Factory. Spectra were taken starting 20 rest...

  14. A multi-wavelength investigation of the radio-loud supernova PTF11qcj and its circumstellar environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corsi, A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st St, NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Xu, D. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Frail, D. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kulkarni, S. R.; Horesh, A.; Carpenter, J.; Arcavi, I.; Cao, Y.; Mooley, K.; Sesar, B. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fox, D. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kasliwal, M. M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 685, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sternberg, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astrophysik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Bersier, D., E-mail: corsi@gwu.edu [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-02-10

    We present the discovery, classification, and extensive panchromatic (from radio to X-ray) follow-up observations of PTF11qcj, a supernova (SN) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Our observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array show that this event is radio-loud: PTF11qcj reached a radio peak luminosity comparable to that of the famous gamma-ray-burst-associated SN 1998bw (L {sub 5} {sub GHz} ≈ 10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1} Hz{sup –1}). PTF11qcj is also detected in X-rays with the Chandra Observatory, and in the infrared band with Spitzer. Our multi-wavelength analysis probes the SN interaction with circumstellar material. The radio observations suggest a progenitor mass-loss rate of ∼10{sup –4} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} × (v{sub w} /1000 km s{sup –1}), and a velocity of ≈0.3-0.5 c for the fastest moving ejecta (at ≈10 days after explosion). However, these estimates are derived assuming the simplest model of SN ejecta interacting with a smooth circumstellar wind, and do not account for possible inhomogeneities in the medium and asphericity of the explosion. The radio data show deviations from such a simple model, as well as a late-time re-brightening. The X-ray flux from PTF11qcj is compatible with the high-frequency extrapolation of the radio synchrotron emission (within the large uncertainties). A light echo from pre-existing dust is in agreement with our infrared data. Our pre-explosion data from the PTF suggest that a precursor eruption of absolute magnitude M{sub r} ≈ –13 mag may have occurred ≈2.5 yr prior to the SN explosion. Overall, PTF11qcj fits the expectations from the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star. Precursor eruptions may be a feature characterizing the final pre-explosion evolution of such stars.

  15. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational pro

  16. Bloom syndrome in an Indian child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inamadar, Arun C; Palit, Aparna

    2005-01-01

    A girl presented with severely stunted growth, photosensitivity, and a characteristic facies. Cytogenetic studies were suggestive of Bloom syndrome. This disorder has not been previously documented in the literature in an Indian child. Minor variations in characteristics in this patient have been highlighted. Cytogenetically, she was found to be a low sister chromatid exchange mosaicism of Bloom syndrome.

  17. Summer heatwaves promote blooms of harmful cyanobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joehnk, K.D; Huisman, J.; Sharples, J.; Sommeijer, B.P.; Visser, P.M.; Stroom, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dense surface blooms of toxic cyanobacteria in eutrophic lakes may lead to mass mortalities of fish and birds, and provide a serious health threat for cattle, pets, and humans. It has been argued that global warming may increase the incidence of harmful algal blooms. Here, we report on a lake experi

  18. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational pro

  19. Bloom's Idiosyncratic History of the University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Peter Augustine

    1989-01-01

    Analyzes "The Idiosyncratic History of the University," a chapter in Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind". Focuses on Bloom's history of the university as explained through Socrates' philosophy. Concentrates on the role of philosophers in society past and present. Discusses the Enlightenment, Existentialism,…

  20. PTF 11kx: a type Ia supernova with a symbiotic nova progenitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilday, B; Howell, D A; Cenko, S B; Silverman, J M; Nugent, P E; Sullivan, M; Ben-Ami, S; Bildsten, L; Bolte, M; Endl, M; Filippenko, A V; Gnat, O; Horesh, A; Hsiao, E; Kasliwal, M M; Kirkman, D; Maguire, K; Marcy, G W; Moore, K; Pan, Y; Parrent, J T; Podsiadlowski, P; Quimby, R M; Sternberg, A; Suzuki, N; Tytler, D R; Xu, D; Bloom, J S; Gal-Yam, A; Hook, I M; Kulkarni, S R; Law, N M; Ofek, E O; Polishook, D; Poznanski, D

    2012-08-24

    There is a consensus that type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from the thermonuclear explosion of white dwarf stars that accrete matter from a binary companion. However, direct observation of SN Ia progenitors is lacking, and the precise nature of the binary companion remains uncertain. A temporal series of high-resolution optical spectra of the SN Ia PTF 11kx reveals a complex circumstellar environment that provides an unprecedentedly detailed view of the progenitor system. Multiple shells of circumstellar material are detected, and the SN ejecta are seen to interact with circumstellar material starting 59 days after the explosion. These features are best described by a symbiotic nova progenitor, similar to RS Ophiuchi.

  1. A Population of Short-Period Variable Quasars from PTF as Supermassive Black Hole Binary Candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Charisi, M; Haiman, Z; Price-Whelan, A M; Graham, M J; Bellm, E C; Laher, R R; Marka, S

    2016-01-01

    Supermassive black hole binaries (SMBHBs) at sub-parsec separations should be common in galactic nuclei, as a result of frequent galaxy mergers. Hydrodynamical simulations of circumbinary discs predict strong periodic modulation of the mass accretion rate on time-scales comparable to the orbital period of the binary. As a result, SMBHBs may be recognized by the periodic modulation of their brightness. We conducted a statistical search for periodic variability in a sample of 35,383 spectroscopically confirmed quasars in the photometric database of the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). We analysed Lomb-Scargle periodograms and assessed the significance of our findings by modeling each individual quasar's variability as a damped random walk (DRW). We identified 50 quasars with significant periodicity beyond the DRW model, typically with short periods of a few hundred days. We find 33 of these to remain significant after a re-analysis of their periodograms including additional optical data from the intermediate-PT...

  2. PTF discovers and follows-up nearby, young, Type II supernova

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasliwal, M. M.; Quimby, R. M.; Ofek, E. O.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Green, Y.; Walker, E.; Mazzali, P.; Nugent, P. E.; Poznanski, D.; Howell, D. A.; Dilday, B.; Fox, D. B.

    2010-09-01

    On UT 2010 Sep 15.243, the Palomar Transient Factory discovered an optical transient, PTF10vdl at RA(J2000) = 23:05:49.001 and DEC(J2000)=03:31:20.50 near NGC 7483. We obtained Target Of Opportunity spectra with Gemini-S/GMOS (PI Kasliwal) on Sep 16.29. The spectrum was extremely blue (f_nu proportional to nu^4.5) and nearly featureless. We further obtained a spectrum with the TNG/DOLORES (PI Walker) on Sep 17.40 and P-Cygni profiles of four Balmer lines were clearly visible, consistent with the redshift of NGC 7483, suggesting this is a Type II supernova.

  3. VLA and Swift XRT Observations of PTF12os in NGC 5806

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockdale, C. J.; Immler, S.; Horesh, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Ryder, S. D.; Weiler, K. W.; Van Dyk, S. D.; Panagia, N.; Bauer, F. E.; Marcaide, J. M.; Pooley, D.; Sramek, R. A.; Williams, C. L.

    2012-01-01

    We report the detection of radio emission near the position of the type-IIb supernova PTF2012os (ATEL #3881) with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array radio telescope in the DnC configuration: A flux density of 0.44 ± 0.05 mJy was measured at 5.02 GHz (wavelength 6.0 cm) on 2012 Jan. 22.42 UT. The measured position of the radio emission of R.A. = 14h59m59.s12, Decl. = +01d53m23s.3, equinox 2000.0 is in good agreement with the measured optical position of (ending digits) R.A.

  4. Bloom Filter在重复数据删除技术中应用的研究%Research on Application of Bloom Filter in Data Deduplication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈春玲; 陈琳; 熊晶; 余瀚

    2016-01-01

    In order to alleviate the problem of the frequent access to storage device which caused by the indexes using in data deduplica-tion,data deduplication is deeply studied,making analysis and research on the application of Bloom Filter at the present situation of data deduplication and existing problems of the access of storage system performance and proposing a high-efficiency and optimal model based on Bloom Filter. Aiming at the situation that the probability of false positives is in the nature of Bloom Filters,an additional Bloom Filter is used to reduce false positive rate,achieving the purpose of reducing times of the access for storage system. In view of the situation that the system software errors may bring Bloom Filter false negative,single bit error checking mechanism is introduced to prevent it from happening,at the same time,it can reduce memory overhead. The simulation shows that the proposed method can balance the false posi-tive rate and the access of storage system costs. By introducing a judgment mechanism with complement Bloom Filter and single bit error checking mechanism,it can achieve the effects of the reducing of false positive rate and the access of storage system costs.%为了缓解存储系统中因为重复数据索引而引起的存储设备访问过于频繁的问题,深入研究重复数据删除技术,并针对目前重复数据删除技术中Bloom Filter的运用以及存在的存储设备访问性能问题进行分析和研究,提出一种基于Bloom Filter的高效去重优化模式。针对单一Bloom Filter固有的假阳性的缺陷,增加辅助Bloom Filter,从而减小误判率,达到减少存储设备访问次数的目的;针对因系统软件错误引起的Bloom Filter假阴性错误,引入单校验位的错误校验机制可以实现避免假阴性值存储的同时又能减小内存存储开销。仿真实验结果表明:改进方法能够兼顾Bloom Filter的误判率与存储设备访问开销问题。通过引入一种判断机制配合辅助Bloom

  5. PTF11agg AS THE FIRST EVIDENCE FOR REVERSE SHOCK EMISSION FROM A POST-MERGER MILLISECOND MAGNETAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Lingjun; Dai Zigao, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing (China)

    2013-09-10

    Based on the stiff equations of state of neutron stars (NS) and the discovery of high-mass NSs, it is highly probable that a NS-NS merger will result in a rapidly rotating massive magnetar. The central magnetar will dissipate its rotational energy to the outflow by injecting Poynting flux, which will become lepton-dominated so that a long-lasting reverse shock (RS) develops. We calculate the emission of the RS as well as the emission of forward shock (FS) and find that, in most cases, the RS emission is stronger than FS emission. It is found that the recently discovered transient, PTF11agg, can be neatly accounted for by the RS emission powered by a millisecond magnetar. Other alternative models have been considered and cannot explain the observed light curves well. We therefore suggest that PTF11agg is the first evidence for RS emission from a post-merger millisecond magnetar.

  6. Listening to the sound of flower blooming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN; Wei-fang

    2015-01-01

    The most beautiful thing in our life is the first glance,and the most beautiful point of fireworks is its evanescent bloom.Thing’s beautiful is usually due to its evanescent exist.It might exist shortly but in our mind for a long time.As for me,the most beautiful thing is to listen to the sound of flower blooming.

  7. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational problems in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants due to clogging and poor effluent quality of the pre-treatment system which eventually forced the shutdown of the plant to avoid irreversible fouling...

  8. Algal blooms and Membrane Based Desalination Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Villacorte, L.O.

    2014-01-01

    Seawater desalination is rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity (~80 million m3/day in 2013), plant size and global application. An emerging threat to this technology is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational problems in seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants due to clogging and poor effluent quality of the pre-treatment system which eventually forced the shutdown of the plant to avoid irreversible fouling...

  9. Bloom's taxonomy of cognitive learning objectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Nancy E

    2015-07-01

    Information professionals who train or instruct others can use Bloom's taxonomy to write learning objectives that describe the skills and abilities that they desire their learners to master and demonstrate. Bloom's taxonomy differentiates between cognitive skill levels and calls attention to learning objectives that require higher levels of cognitive skills and, therefore, lead to deeper learning and transfer of knowledge and skills to a greater variety of tasks and contexts.

  10. Bloom's Taxonomy and Training in Programming Style

    OpenAIRE

    Teodosi TEODOSIEV

    2013-01-01

    Report published in the Proceedings of the National Conference on "Education in the Information Society", Plovdiv, May, 2013 The presented work is using Bloom's taxonomy to set the goals of teaching programming. Here are shown the elements of programming style, in which you can teach novices. Elements of programming style are at different levels of Bloom's pyramid. Association for the Development of the Information Society, Institute of Mathematics and Informatics Bulgarian Academ...

  11. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Metallicity from Type II SN from (i)PTF (Taddia+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddia, F.; Moquist, P.; Sollerman, J.; Rubin, A.; Leloudas, G.; Gal-Yam, A.; Arcavi, I.; Cao, Y.; Filippenko, A. V.; Graham, M. L.; Mazzali, P. A.; Nugent, P. E.; Pan, Y.-C.; Silverman, J. M.; Xu, D.; Yaron, O.

    2016-06-01

    We collected the optical spectra of the 57 SNe II presented by R15, as obtained by the (i)PTF collaboration. The selected spectra were obtained with many different telescopes and instruments, as summarized in Table A.1. For each spectrum where FeIIλ5018 was identified, we established the phase, based on the explosion date reported by Rubin et al. (2016ApJ...820...33R). (2 data files).

  12. Rainfall-enhanced blooming in typhoon wakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y.-C.; Oey, L.-Y.

    2016-08-01

    Strong phytoplankton blooming in tropical-cyclone (TC) wakes over the oligotrophic oceans potentially contributes to long-term changes in global biogeochemical cycles. Yet blooming has traditionally been discussed using anecdotal events and its biophysical mechanics remain poorly understood. Here we identify dominant blooming patterns using 16 years of ocean-color data in the wakes of 141 typhoons in western North Pacific. We observe right-side asymmetric blooming shortly after the storms, attributed previously to sub-mesoscale re-stratification, but thereafter a left-side asymmetry which coincides with the left-side preference in rainfall due to the large-scale wind shear. Biophysical model experiments and observations demonstrate that heavier rainfall freshens the near-surface water, leading to stronger stratification, decreased turbulence and enhanced blooming. Our results suggest that rainfall plays a previously unrecognized, critical role in TC-induced blooming, with potentially important implications for global biogeochemical cycles especially in view of the recent and projected increases in TC-intensity that harbingers stronger mixing and heavier rain under the storm.

  13. Interpreting the strongly lensed supernova iPTF16geu: time delay predictions, microlensing, and lensing rates

    CERN Document Server

    More, Anupreeta; Oguri, Masamune; More, Surhud; Lee, Chien-Hsiu

    2016-01-01

    We present predictions for time delays between multiple images of the gravitationally lensed supernova, iPTF16geu, which was recently discovered from the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF). As the supernova is of Type Ia where the intrinsic luminosity is usually well-known, accurately measured time delays of the multiple images could provide tight constraints on the Hubble constant. According to our lens mass models constrained by the {\\it Hubble Space Telescope} F814W image, we expect the maximum relative time delay to be less than a day, which is consistent with the maximum of 100 hours reported by Goobar et al. but places a stringent upper limit. Furthermore, the fluxes of most of the supernova images depart from expected values suggesting that they are affected by microlensing. The microlensing timescales are small enough that they may pose significant problems to measure the time delays reliably. Our lensing rate calculation indicates that the occurrence of a lensed SN in iPTF is likely. Howev...

  14. Early Radio and X-Ray Observations of the Youngest Nearby Type Ia Supernova PTF 11kly (SN 2011fe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, S. R.; Fox, Derek B.; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S. Bradley; deBruyn, A. G.; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; vanderHorst, Alexander J.; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Howell, D. Andrew; Nugent, Peter E.; Gehrels, Neil; Law, Nicolas M.; Poznanski, Dovi; Shara, Michael

    2012-01-01

    On August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of M(raised dot) less than or equal to 10(exp -8) (w /100 kilometers per second ) solar mass yr(exp -1) from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the proximity of PTF11kly and the sensitivity of our prompt observations we would have to wait for a long time (decade or longer) in order to more meaningfully probe the circumstellar matter of Ia supernovae.

  15. The hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova iPTF13ajg and its host galaxy in absorption and emission

    CERN Document Server

    Vreeswijk, Paul M; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Quimby, Robert M; Sullivan, Mark; Cenko, S Bradley; Perley, Daniel A; Filippenko, Alexei V; Clubb, Kelsey I; Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Leloudas, Giorgos; Arcavi, Iair; Rubin, Adam; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Cao, Yi; Yaron, Ofer; Tal, David; Ofek, Eran O; Capone, John; Kutyrev, Alexander S; Toy, Vicki; Nugent, Peter E; Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R

    2014-01-01

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory: iPTF13ajg. At a redshift of z=0.7403, derived from narrow absorption lines, iPTF13ajg peaked at an absolute magnitude M(u,AB)=-22.5, one of the most luminous supernovae to date. The uBgRiz light curves, obtained with the P48, P60, NOT, DCT, and Keck telescopes, and the nine-epoch spectral sequence secured with the Keck and the VLT (covering 3 rest-frame months), are tied together photometrically to provide an estimate of the flux evolution as a function of time and wavelength. The observed bolometric peak luminosity of iPTF13ajg is 3.2x10^44 erg/s, while the estimated total radiated energy is 1.3x10^51 erg. We detect narrow absorption lines of Mg I, Mg II, and Fe II, associated with the cold interstellar medium in the host galaxy, at two different epochs with X-shooter at the VLT. From Voigt-profile fitting, we derive the column densities log N(Mg I)=11.94+-0.06, log ...

  16. PTF1 J071912.13+485834.0: An outbursting AM CVn system discovered by a synoptic survey

    CERN Document Server

    Levitan, David; Groot, Paul J; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Ofek, Eran O; Prince, Thomas A; Shporer, Avi; Bloom, Joshua S; Cenko, S Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Law, Nicholas M; Nugent, Peter E; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; Horesh, Assaf; Sesar, Branimir; Sternberg, Assaf

    2011-01-01

    We present extensive photometric and spectroscopic observations of PTF1 J071912.13+485834.0, an outbursting AM CVn system discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). AM CVn systems are stellar binaries with some of the smallest separations known and orbital periods ranging from 5 to 65 minutes. They are believed to be composed of a white dwarf accretor and a (semi)-degenerate He-rich donor and are considered to be the helium equivalents of Cataclysmic Variables. We have spectroscopically and photometrically identified an orbital period of 26.77 \\pm 0.02 minutes for PTF1 J071912.13+485834.0 and found a super-outburst recurrence time of greater than 65 days along with the presence of "normal" outbursts - rarely seen in AM CVn systems but well known in super-outbursting Cataclysmic Variables. We present a long-term light curve over two super-cycles as well as high cadence photometry of both outburst and quiescent stages, both of which show clear variability. We also compare both the outburst and quiescent...

  17. PTF 13efv - An outburst 500 days prior to the SNHunt 275 explosion and its radiative efficiency

    CERN Document Server

    Ofek, E O; Shaviv, N J; Duggan, G; Strotjohann, N -L; Rubin, A; Kulkarni, S R; Gal-Yam, A; Sullivan, M; Cao, Y; Nugent, P E; Kasliwal, M M; Sollerman, J; Fransson, C; Filippenko, A V; Perley, D A; Yaron, O; Laher, R

    2016-01-01

    The progenitors of some supernovae (SNe) exhibit outbursts with super-Eddington luminosities prior to their final explosions. This behavior is common among Type IIn SNe, but the driving mechanisms of these precursors are not yet well understood. SNHunt 275 was announced as a possible new SN during May 2015. Here we report on pre-explosion observations of the location of this event by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) and report the detection of a precursor about 500 days prior to the 2015 May activity (PTF 13efv). The observed velocities in the 2015 transient and its 2013 precursor absorption spectra are low (1000-2000 km/s), so it is not clear yet if the recent activity indeed marks the final disruption of the progenitor. Regardless of the nature of this event, we use the PTF photometric and spectral observations, as well as Swift-UVOT observations, to constrain the efficiency of the radiated energy relative to the total kinetic energy of the precursor. We find that, using an order-of-magnitude estimate an...

  18. Discovery and redshift of an optical afterglow in 71 square degrees iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, Leo P; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Perley, Daniel A; Ofek, Eran O; Brown, Duncan A; Nugent, Peter E; Kulkarni, S R; Corsi, Alessandra; Frail, Dale A; Bellm, Eric; Mulchaey, John; Arcavi, Iair; Barlow, Tom; Bloom, Joshua S; Cao, Yi; Gehrels, Neil; Horesh, Assaf; Masci, Frank J; McEnery, Julie; Rau, Arne; Surace, Jason A; Yaron, Ofer

    2013-01-01

    We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 square degrees surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the VLA confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200-inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z=0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt gamma-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological...

  19. Biology in Bloom: Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to Enhance Student Learning in Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and…

  20. The hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova iPTF 13ajg and its host galaxy in absorption and emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vreeswijk, Paul M.; Gal-Yam, Avishay; De Cia, Annalisa; Rubin, Adam; Yaron, Ofer; Tal, David; Ofek, Eran O. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 7610001 (Israel); Savaglio, Sandra [Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Quimby, Robert M. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. Bradley; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Clubb, Kelsey I. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Perley, Daniel A.; Cao, Yi [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Taddia, Francesco; Sollerman, Jesper; Leloudas, Giorgos [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Center, Stockholm University, AlbaNova 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Arcavi, Iair [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M., E-mail: paul.vreeswijk@weizmann.ac.il [The Observatories, Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); and others

    2014-12-10

    We present imaging and spectroscopy of a hydrogen-poor superluminous supernova (SLSN) discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF 13ajg. At a redshift of z = 0.7403, derived from narrow absorption lines, iPTF 13ajg peaked at an absolute magnitude of M {sub u,} {sub AB} = –22.5, one of the most luminous supernovae to date. The observed bolometric peak luminosity of iPTF 13ajg is 3.2 × 10{sup 44} erg s{sup –1}, while the estimated total radiated energy is 1.3 × 10{sup 51} erg. We detect narrow absorption lines of Mg I, Mg II, and Fe II, associated with the cold interstellar medium in the host galaxy, at two different epochs with X-shooter at the Very Large Telescope. From Voigt profile fitting, we derive the column densities log N(Mg I) =11.94 ± 0.06, log N(Mg II) =14.7 ± 0.3, and log N(Fe II) =14.25 ± 0.10. These column densities, as well as the Mg I and Mg II equivalent widths of a sample of hydrogen-poor SLSNe taken from the literature, are at the low end of those derived for gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) whose progenitors are also thought to be massive stars. This suggests that the environments of hydrogen-poor SLSNe and GRBs are different. From the nondetection of Fe II fine-structure absorption lines, we derive a lower limit on the distance between the supernova and the narrow-line absorbing gas of 50 pc. The neutral gas responsible for the absorption in iPTF 13ajg exhibits a single narrow component with a low velocity width, ΔV = 76 km s{sup –1}, indicating a low-mass host galaxy. No host galaxy emission lines are detected, leading to an upper limit on the unobscured star formation rate (SFR) of SFR{sub [O} {sub II]}<0.07M{sub ⊙}yr{sup −1}. Late-time imaging shows the iPTF 13ajg host galaxy to be faint, with g {sub AB} ≈ 27.0 and R {sub AB} ≥ 26.0 mag, corresponding to M {sub B,} {sub Vega} ≳ –17.7 mag.

  1. Cyanobacteria blooms produce teratogenic retinoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoqin; Jiang, Jieqiong; Wan, Yi; Giesy, John P; Hu, Jianying

    2012-06-12

    Deformed amphibians have been observed in eutrophic habitats, and some clues point to the retinoic acids (RAs) or RA mimics. However, RAs are generally thought of as vertebrate-specific hormones, and there was no evidence that RAs exist in cyanobacteria or algae blooms. By analyzing RAs and their analogs 4-oxo-RAs in natural cyanobacteria blooms and cultures of cyanobacteria and algae, we showed that cyanobacteria blooms could produce RAs, which were powerful animal teratogens. Intracellular RAs and 4-oxo-RAs with concentrations between 0.4 and 4.2 × 10(2) ng/L were detected in all bloom materials, and extracellular concentrations measured in water from Taihu Lake, China, were as great as 2.0 × 10 ng/L, which might pose a risk to wildlife through chronic exposure. Further examination of 39 cyanobacteria and algae species revealed that 32 species could produce RAs and 4-oxo-RAs (1.6-1.4 × 10(3) ng/g dry weight), and the dominant cyanobacteria species in Taihu Lake, Microcystis flos-aquae and Microcystis aeruginosa, produced high amounts of RAs and 4-oxo-RAs with concentrations of 1.4 × 10(3) and 3.7 × 10(2) ng/g dry weight, respectively. Most genera of cyanobacteria that could produce RAs and 4-oxo-RAs, such as Microcystis, Anabaena, and Aphanizomenon, often occur dominantly in blooms. Production of RAs and 4-oxo-RAs by cyanobacteria was associated with species, origin location, and growth stage. These results represent a conclusive demonstration of endogenous production of RAs in freshwater cyanobacteria blooms. The observation of teratogenic RAs in cyanobacteria is evolutionarily and ecologically significant because RAs are vertebrate-specific hormones, and cyanobacteria form extensive and highly visible blooms in many aquatic ecosystems.

  2. Biomass decay rates and tissue nutrient loss in bloom and non-bloom-forming macroalgal species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Jessie; Green, Lindsay A.; Thornber, Carol S.

    2016-09-01

    Macroalgal blooms occur in shallow, low-wave energy environments and are generally dominated by fast-growing ephemeral macroalgae. When macroalgal mats undergo senescence and decompose they can cause oxygen depletion and release nutrients into the surrounding water. There are relatively few studies that examine macroalgal decomposition rates in areas impacted by macroalgal blooms. Understanding the rate of macroalgal bloom decomposition is essential to understanding the impacts of macroalgal blooms following senescence. Here, we examined the biomass, organic content, nitrogen decay rates and δ15N values for five macroalgal species (the bloom-forming Agardhiella subulata, Gracilaria vermiculophylla, Ulva compressa, and Ulva rigida and the non-bloom-forming Fucus vesiculosus) in Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, U.S.A. using a litterbag design. Bloom-forming macroalgae had similar biomass decay rates (0.34-0.51 k d-1) and decayed significantly faster than non-bloom-forming macroalgae (0.09 k d-1). Biomass decay rates also varied temporally, with a significant positive correlation between biomass decay rate and water temperature for U. rigida. Tissue organic content decreased over time in all species, although A. subulata and G. vermiculophylla displayed significantly higher rates of organic content decay than U. compressa, U. rigida, and F. vesiculosus. Agardhiella subulata had a significantly higher rate of tissue nitrogen decay (0.35 k d-1) than all other species. By contrast, only the δ15N of F. vesiculosus changed significantly over the decay period. Overall, our results indicate that bloom-forming macroalgal species decay more rapidly than non-bloom-forming species.

  3. Phytoplankton Bloom Phenology near Palmer Station Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, L.; Doney, S. C.; Kavanaugh, M.; Ducklow, H. W.; Schofield, O.; Glover, D. M.

    2015-12-01

    West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) phytoplankton bloom phenology is coupled to growing season water column stratification precipitated by seasonal warming and the melting of winter sea-ice. Previous studies document declining bloom magnitude over decadal timescales in conjunction with decreasing sea-ice extent and duration in the Northern WAP, but less work has been to done explain the observed inter-annual variability in this region. Here we use a high-resolution in situ time series collected by the Palmer Station Antarctica Long Term Ecological Research program and satellite ocean color imagery to investigate the underlying mechanisms controlling phytoplankton bloom timing and magnitude near Palmer Station. We pair chlorophyll and CTD measurements collected twice per week during the austral summer, 1992—2003, with satellite ocean color and ice fractional cover data to examine bloom development and within-season trends in mixed layer depth. Initial results suggest a possible shift over time with spring/summer blooms occurring earlier in the growing season reflecting earlier sea-ice free conditions. Net phytoplankton accumulation rates are also computed and compared against growth estimates. Our results can be used to develop and validate models of coastal Antarctic primary production that better represent inter-annual primary production variability.

  4. iPTF Search for an Optical Counterpart to Gravitational Wave Trigger GW150914

    CERN Document Server

    Kasliwal, M M; Singer, L P; Corsi, A; Cao, Y; Barlow, T; Bhalerao, V; Bellm, E; Cook, D; Duggan, G E; Ferretti, R; Frail, D A; Horesh, A; Kendrick, R; Kulkarni, S R; Lunnan, R; Palliyaguru, N; Laher, R; Masci, F; Manulis, I; Miller, A A; Nugent, P E; Perley, D; Prince, T A; Rana, J; Rebbapragada, U; Sesar, B; Singhal, A; Surace, J; Van Sistine, A

    2016-01-01

    The intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) autonomously responded to and promptly tiled the error region of the first gravitational wave event GW150914 to search for an optical counterpart. Only a small fraction of the total localized region was immediately visible in the Northern night sky, due both to sun-angle and elevation constraints. Here, we report on the transient candidates identified and rapid follow-up undertaken to determine the nature of each candidate. Even in the small area imaged of 135 sq. deg., after extensive filtering, 8 candidates were deemed worthy of additional follow-up. Within two hours, all 8 were spectroscopically classified by the Keck II telescope. Curiously, even though such events are rare, one of our candidates was a superluminous supernova. We obtained radio data with the Very Large Array and X-ray follow-up with the Swift satellite for this transient. None of our candidates appear to be associated with the gravitational wave trigger, which is unsurprising given that GW...

  5. Disappearance of the Progenitor of Supernova iPTF13bvn

    CERN Document Server

    Folatelli, Gastón; Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Maeda, Keiichi; Bersten, Melina C; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Pignata, Giuliano; Hamuy, Mario; Quimby, Robert M; Zheng, Weikang; Filippenko, Alexei V; Clubb, Kelsey I; Smith, Nathan; Elias-Rosa, Nancy; Foley, Ryan J; Miller, Adam A

    2016-01-01

    Supernova (SN) iPTF13bvn in NGC 5806 was the first Type Ib SN to have been tentatively associated with a progenitor candidate in pre-explosion images. We performed deep ultraviolet (UV) and optical Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the SN site ~740 days after explosion. We detect an object in the optical bands that is fainter than the pre-explosion object. This dimming is likely not produced by dust absorption in the ejecta; thus, our finding confirms the connection of the progenitor candidate with the SN. The object in our data is likely dominated by the fading SN, which implies that the pre-SN flux is mostly due to the progenitor. We compare our revised pre-SN photometry with previously proposed progenitor models. Although binary progenitors are favored, models need to be refined. In particular, to comply with our deep UV detection limit, any companion star must be less luminous than a late-O star or substantially obscured by newly formed dust. A definitive progenitor characterization will requir...

  6. The Progenitor of Supernova 2011dh/PTF11eon in Messier 51

    CERN Document Server

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D; Cenko, S Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O; Kraus, Adam L; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Arcavi, Iair; Filippenko, Alexei V; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Quimby, Robert M; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Yaron, Ofer; Polishook, David

    2011-01-01

    We have identified the progenitor, or progenitor system, responsible for supernova (SN) 2011dh/PTF11eon, in the nearby, nearly face-on galaxy M51. The available early-time spectra and photometry indicate that it is a stripped-envelope core-collapse SN, of Type IIb or transitional Type II/Ib, possibly similar to the famous SN 1993J in M81. The star was identified in pre-SN archival, multi-band images obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. This identification has been confirmed, to the highest available astrometric precision, using a Keck-II adaptive-optics image. We infer that the extinction to SN 2011dh and its progenitor arises from a low Galactic foreground contribution, and that the SN environment is of solar metallicity. We find that if single, the star is a luminous (absolute V \\approx -7.7 mag) supergiant of effective temperature ~6100 K, bluer than the red supergiants which explode as the more common Type II-Plateau SNe. This requires that the star's hydrogen-rich ...

  7. SN2010jp (PTF10aaxi): A Jet-Driven Type II Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Butler, Nat; Bloom, Joshua S; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Law, Nicholas M; Nugent, Peter E; Ofek, Eran O; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; Sesar, Branimir; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Polishook, David; Xu, Dong; Yaron, Ofer; Frail, Dale A; Sullivan, Mark

    2011-01-01

    We present photometry and spectroscopy of the peculiar TypeII supernova (SN) 2010jp, also named PTF10aaxi. The light curve exhibits a linear decline with a relatively low peak absolute magnitude of only -15.9, and a low radioactive decay luminosity at late times that suggests a nickel mass below 0.003 $M_{\\odot}$. Spectra of SN2010jp display an unprecedented triple-peaked H$\\alpha$ line profile, showing: (1) a narrow (800 km/s) central component that suggests shock interaction with dense CSM; (2) high-velocity blue and red emission features centered at -12600 and +15400 km/s; and (3) broad wings extending from -22000 to +25000 km/s. These features persist during 100 days after explosion. We propose that this line profile indicates a bipolar jet-driven explosion, with the central component produced by normal SN ejecta and CSM interaction at mid latitudes, while the high-velocity bumps and broad line wings arise in a nonrelativistic bipolar jet. Two variations of the jet interpretation seem plausible: (1) A fas...

  8. Recruitment of bloom-forming cyanobacteria and its driving factors

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... Gao (2005) proposed a hypothesis that a series of processes which were .... mainly peaked in a given time of year before blooms onset. In addition .... Nuisance phytoplankton blooms in coastal, estuaries, and inland waters.

  9. AN OVERVIEW ON BLOOM'S REVISED TAKSONOMY

    OpenAIRE

    TUTKUN, Ömer Faruk

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the main purpose is to present the main frame of revised version in 2001 of Bloom's taxonomy that has been accepted extensively in our country since 1956 as well as around the world. In accordance with this purpose, in the study, answers have been searched to these questions: 1- The rise of the original Bloom's taxonomy and what are the key features of? 2- What are the reasons for renewal of original taxonomy? 3- What kind of arrangements has been made in revised taxonomy? 4- W...

  10. Coastal engineering and Harmful Algal Blooms along Alexandria coast, Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany A. Ismael

    2014-01-01

    The phytoplankton composition and its standing crop became totally different during the two periods. The most important bloom was caused by Micromonas pusilla forming a heavy green tide accompanied by a bloom of Peridinium quinquecorne. Although there were no fish or invertebrate mortality, this bloom caused economic losses to internal tourism. In the absence of any Environmental Assessment, the coastal engineering works increased the harmful algal blooms in Alexandria coastal waters, even after corrective steps were taken to mitigate the harmful effects.

  11. Algal blooms: a perspective from the coasts of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSilva, M.S.; Anil, A.C.; Naik, R.K.; DeCosta, P.M.

    Algal blooms have been documented along the west and east coasts of India. A review of bloom occurrences in Indian waters from 1908 to 2009 points out that a total of 101 cases have been reported. A comparison of the bloom cases reported before...

  12. THE DETECTION RATE OF EARLY UV EMISSION FROM SUPERNOVAE: A DEDICATED GALEX/PTF SURVEY AND CALIBRATED THEORETICAL ESTIMATES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganot, Noam; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O.; Sagiv, Ilan; Waxman, Eli; Lapid, Ofer [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ben-Ami, Sagi [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chelouche, Doron; Rafter, Stephen [Physics Department, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Haifa, 31905 Haifa (Israel); Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari [Physics Department, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, 32000 Haifa (Israel); Poznanski, Dovi; Nakar, Ehud; Maoz, Dan [School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Trakhtenbrot, Benny [Institute for Astronomy, ETH Zurich, Wolfgang-Pauli-Strasse 27 Zurich 8093 (Switzerland); Neill, James D.; Barlow, Thomas A.; Martin, Christofer D., E-mail: noam.ganot@gmail.com [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 278-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Collaboration: ULTRASAT Science Team; WTTH consortium; GALEX Science Team; Palomar Transient Factory; and others

    2016-03-20

    The radius and surface composition of an exploding massive star, as well as the explosion energy per unit mass, can be measured using early UV observations of core-collapse supernovae (SNe). We present the first results from a simultaneous GALEX/PTF search for early ultraviolet (UV) emission from SNe. Six SNe II and one Type II superluminous SN (SLSN-II) are clearly detected in the GALEX near-UV (NUV) data. We compare our detection rate with theoretical estimates based on early, shock-cooling UV light curves calculated from models that fit existing Swift and GALEX observations well, combined with volumetric SN rates. We find that our observations are in good agreement with calculated rates assuming that red supergiants (RSGs) explode with fiducial radii of 500 R{sub ⊙}, explosion energies of 10{sup 51} erg, and ejecta masses of 10 M{sub ⊙}. Exploding blue supergiants and Wolf–Rayet stars are poorly constrained. We describe how such observations can be used to derive the progenitor radius, surface composition, and explosion energy per unit mass of such SN events, and we demonstrate why UV observations are critical for such measurements. We use the fiducial RSG parameters to estimate the detection rate of SNe during the shock-cooling phase (<1 day after explosion) for several ground-based surveys (PTF, ZTF, and LSST). We show that the proposed wide-field UV explorer ULTRASAT mission is expected to find >85 SNe per year (∼0.5 SN per deg{sup 2}), independent of host galaxy extinction, down to an NUV detection limit of 21.5 mag AB. Our pilot GALEX/PTF project thus convincingly demonstrates that a dedicated, systematic SN survey at the NUV band is a compelling method to study how massive stars end their life.

  13. MERUNUT PEMAHAMAN TAKSONOMI BLOOM: SUATU KONTEMPLASI FILOSOFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominikus Tulasi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article would like to share the use of Bloom's taxonomy as a cognitive framework for teaching-learning process to undertake the way student-centered learning. Related to the curriculum based competence in excellent education, the abstract cognitive in applying Blooms taxonomy is so called scaffolding. We know the taxonomy Bloom is a six-level classification system that uses observed student behavior to infer and absorb the level of cognitive achievement domain. This article surveys thinking within general education and management education, which uses and draws on Bloom's taxonomy, and then describes suggested uses of the taxonomy. The empirical evaluation of its effect on student achievement follows, as do thoughts about ways colleagues might use this tool to empower and motivate students as self-responsible learners in the classroom. The objective is to promote higher order thinking in college students, we understood an effort to learn how to assess critical-thinking skills in an introductory course. It means, we develop a process by which questions are prepared with both content and critical-thinking skills in mind.

  14. Spring bloom onset in the Nordic Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignot, Alexandre; Ferrari, Raffaele; Mork, Kjell Arne

    2016-06-01

    The North Atlantic spring bloom is a massive annual growth event of marine phytoplankton, tiny free-floating algae that form the base of the ocean's food web and generates a large fraction of the global primary production of organic matter. The conditions that trigger the onset of the spring bloom in the Nordic Seas, at the northern edge of the North Atlantic, are studied using in situ data from six bio-optical floats released north of the Arctic Circle. It is often assumed that spring blooms start as soon as phytoplankton cells daily irradiance is sufficiently abundant that division rates exceed losses. The bio-optical float data instead suggest the tantalizing hypothesis that Nordic Seas blooms start when the photoperiod, the number of daily light hours experienced by phytoplankton, exceeds a critical value, independently of division rates. The photoperiod trigger may have developed at high latitudes where photosynthesis is impossible during polar nights and phytoplankton enters into a dormant stage in winter. While the first accumulation of biomass recorded by the bio-optical floats is consistent with the photoperiod hypothesis, it is possible that some biomass accumulation started before the critical photoperiod but at levels too low to be detected by the fluorometers. More precise observations are needed to test the photoperiod hypothesis.

  15. Harmful cyanobacterial blooms: causes, consequences, and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paerl, Hans W; Otten, Timothy G

    2013-05-01

    Cyanobacteria are the Earth's oldest oxygenic photoautotrophs and have had major impacts on shaping its biosphere. Their long evolutionary history (≈ 3.5 by) has enabled them to adapt to geochemical and climatic changes, and more recently anthropogenic modifications of aquatic environments, including nutrient over-enrichment (eutrophication), water diversions, withdrawals, and salinization. Many cyanobacterial genera exhibit optimal growth rates and bloom potentials at relatively high water temperatures; hence global warming plays a key role in their expansion and persistence. Bloom-forming cyanobacterial taxa can be harmful from environmental, organismal, and human health perspectives by outcompeting beneficial phytoplankton, depleting oxygen upon bloom senescence, and producing a variety of toxic secondary metabolites (e.g., cyanotoxins). How environmental factors impact cyanotoxin production is the subject of ongoing research, but nutrient (N, P and trace metals) supply rates, light, temperature, oxidative stressors, interactions with other biota (bacteria, viruses and animal grazers), and most likely, the combined effects of these factors are all involved. Accordingly, strategies aimed at controlling and mitigating harmful blooms have focused on manipulating these dynamic factors. The applicability and feasibility of various controls and management approaches is discussed for natural waters and drinking water supplies. Strategies based on physical, chemical, and biological manipulations of specific factors show promise; however, a key underlying approach that should be considered in almost all instances is nutrient (both N and P) input reductions; which have been shown to effectively reduce cyanobacterial biomass, and therefore limit health risks and frequencies of hypoxic events.

  16. In the Cells of the 'Bloom Taxonomy'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    The Bloom Taxonomy of Educational Objectives is criticized because its distinctions between cognitive, affective, and psychomotor domains are invalid; its categories are ill-defined and do not denote homogenous types of objectives; its structural base is inconsistent; and it is debatable whether it is a true taxonomy. (IS)

  17. THE PROGENITOR OF SUPERNOVA 2011dh/PTF11eon IN MESSIER 51

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dyk, Schuyler D. [Spitzer Science Center/Caltech, Pasadena CA 91125 (United States); Li, Weidong; Cenko, S. Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Horesh, Assaf; Ofek, Eran O.; Quimby, Robert M.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Astronomy Department, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kraus, Adam L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Arcavi, Iair; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Polishook, David, E-mail: vandyk@ipac.caltech.edu [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel)

    2011-11-10

    We have identified a luminous star at the position of supernova (SN) 2011dh/PTF11eon, in pre-SN archival, multi-band images of the nearby, nearly face-on galaxy Messier 51 (M51) obtained by the Hubble Space Telescope with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. This identification has been confirmed, to the highest available astrometric precision, using a Keck-II adaptive-optics image. The available early-time spectra and photometry indicate that the SN is a stripped-envelope, core-collapse Type IIb, with a more compact progenitor (radius {approx} 10{sup 11} cm) than was the case for the well-studied SN IIb 1993J. We infer that the extinction to SN 2011dh and its progenitor arises from a low Galactic foreground contribution, and that the SN environment is of roughly solar metallicity. The detected object has absolute magnitude M{sup 0}{sub V} Almost-Equal-To -7.7 and effective temperature {approx}6000 K. The star's radius, {approx}10{sup 13} cm, is more extended than what has been inferred for the SN progenitor. We speculate that the detected star is either an unrelated star very near the position of the actual progenitor, or, more likely, the progenitor's companion in a mass-transfer binary system. The position of the detected star in a Hertzsprung-Russell diagram is consistent with an initial mass of 17-19 M{sub Sun }. The light of this star could easily conceal, even in the ultraviolet, the presence of a stripped, compact, very hot ({approx}10{sup 5} K), nitrogen-rich Wolf-Rayet star progenitor.

  18. Biology in Bloom: Implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to Enhance Student Learning in Biology

    OpenAIRE

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and enhance teaching and student learning in a discipline-specific manner in postsecondary education. The BBT was first designed and extensively tested fo...

  19. Subsurface phytoplankton blooms fuel pelagic production in the North Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richardson, Kathrine; Visser, Andre; Pedersen, Flemming

    2000-01-01

    convincingly that energy fixed during the spring bloom is fueling the pelagic production occurring during summer months. We argue here that periodic phytoplankton blooms are occurring during the summer in the North Sea at depths of >25 m and that the accumulated new production [sensu (Dugdale and Goering......, Limnol. Oceanogr., 12, 196-206, 1967)] occurring in these blooms may be greater than that occurring in the spring bloom in the same regions. Thus, such blooms may explain apparent discrepancies in production yields between different temperate marine systems...

  20. Wind-driven marine phytoplank blooms: Satellite observation and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom is defined as a rapid increase or accumulation in biomass in an aquatic system. It not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g.,Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actuallythe traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms.Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing , this study introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; (2)Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. (3)Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. The proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combined "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. These

  1. Optical photometry and spectroscopy of the low-luminosity, broad-lined Ic supernova iPTF15dld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pian, E.; Tomasella, L.; Cappellaro, E.; Benetti, S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Baltay, C.; Branchesi, M.; Brocato, E.; Campana, S.; Copperwheat, C.; Covino, S.; D'Avanzo, P.; Ellman, N.; Grado, A.; Melandri, A.; Palazzi, E.; Piascik, A.; Piranomonte, S.; Rabinowitz, D.; Raimondo, G.; Smartt, S. J.; Steele, I. A.; Stritzinger, M.; Yang, S.; Ascenzi, S.; Della Valle, M.; Gal-Yam, A.; Getman, F.; Greco, G.; Inserra, C.; Kankare, E.; Limatola, L.; Nicastro, L.; Pastorello, A.; Pulone, L.; Stamerra, A.; Stella, L.; Stratta, G.; Tartaglia, L.; Turatto, M.

    2017-04-01

    Core-collapse stripped-envelope supernova (SN) explosions reflect the diversity of physical parameters and evolutionary paths of their massive star progenitors. We have observed the Type Ic SN iPTF15dld (z = 0.047), reported by the Palomar Transient Factory. Spectra were taken starting 20 rest-frame days after maximum luminosity and are affected by a young stellar population background. Broad spectral absorption lines associated with the SN are detected over the continuum, similar to those measured for broad-lined, highly energetic SNe Ic. The light curve and maximum luminosity are instead more similar to those of low luminosity, narrow-lined Ic SNe. This suggests a behaviour whereby certain highly stripped-envelope SNe do not produce a large amount of 56Ni, but the explosion is sufficiently energetic that a large fraction of the ejecta is accelerated to higher than usual velocities. We estimate SN iPTF15dld had a main-sequence progenitor of 20-25 M⊙, produced a 56Ni mass of ∼0.1-0.2 M⊙, had an ejecta mass of [2-10] M⊙, and a kinetic energy of [1-18] × 1051 erg.

  2. PTF10iya: A short-lived, luminous flare from the nuclear region of a star-forming galaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Cenko, S Bradley; Kulkarni, S R; Strubbe, Linda E; Miller, Adam A; Butler, Nathaniel R; Quimby, Robert M; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ofek, Eran O; Quataert, Eliot; Bildsten, Lars; Poznanski, Dovi; Perley, Daniel A; Morgan, Adam N; Filippenko, Alexei V; Arcavi, Iair; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Cucchiara, Antonio; Fassnacht, Christopher D; Green, Yoav; Hook, Isobel M; Howell, D Andrew; Lagattuta, David J; Law, Nicholas M; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Nugent, Peter E; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Sullivan, Mark; Tendulkar, Shriharsh P; Yaron, Ofer

    2011-01-01

    We present the discovery and characterisation of PTF10iya, a short-lived (dt ~ 10 d, with an optical decay rate of ~ 0.3 mag per d), luminous (M_g ~ -21 mag) transient source found by the Palomar Transient Factory. The ultraviolet/optical spectral energy distribution is reasonably well fit by a blackbody with T ~ 1-2 x 10^4 K and peak bolometric luminosity L_BB ~ 10^44 -10^45 erg per s (depending on the details of the extinction correction). A comparable amount of energy is radiated in the X-ray band that appears to result from a distinct physical process. The location of PTF10iya is consistent with the nucleus of a star-forming galaxy (z = 0.22405 +/- 0.00006) to within 350 mas (99.7 per cent confidence radius), or a projected distance of less than 1.2 kpc. At first glance, these properties appear reminiscent of the characteristic "big blue bump" seen in the near-ultraviolet spectra of many active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, emission-line diagnostics of the host galaxy, along with a historical light cur...

  3. Early radio and X-ray observations of the youngest nearby type Ia supernova PTF11kly (SN 2011fe)

    CERN Document Server

    Horesh, Assaf; Fox, Derek B; Carpenter, John; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Ofek, Eran O; Quimby, Robert; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Cenko, S Bradley; de Bruyn, A G; Kamble, Atish; Wijers, Ralph A M J; van der Horst, Alexander J; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Nugent, Peter E; Gehrels, Neil; Law, Nicholas M; Poznanski, Dovi; Shara, Michael

    2011-01-01

    On August 24 (UT) the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) discovered PTF11kly (SN 2011fe), the youngest and most nearby type Ia supernova (SN Ia) in decades. We followed this event up in the radio (centimeter and millimeter bands) and X-ray bands, starting about a day after the estimated explosion time. We present our analysis of the radio and X-ray observations, yielding the tightest constraints yet placed on the pre-explosion mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of this supernova. We find a robust limit of dM/dt<10^-8 (w/100 km/s) [M_solar/yr] from sensitive X-ray non-detections, as well as a similar limit from radio data, which depends, however, on assumptions about microphysical parameters. We discuss our results in the context of single-degenerate models for SNe Ia and find that our observations modestly disfavor symbiotic progenitor models involving a red giant donor, but cannot constrain systems accreting from main-sequence or sub-giant stars, including the popular supersoft channel. In view of the...

  4. PTF11iqb: Cool supergiant mass loss that bridges the gap between Type IIn and normal supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Nathan; Cenko, S Bradley; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Filippenko, Alexei V; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Clubb, Kelsey I; Graham, Melissa L; Leonard, Douglas C; Horst, J Chuck; Williams, G Grant; Andrews, Jennifer E; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Nugent, Peter; Sullivan, Mark; Maguire, Kate; Xu, Dong; Ben-Ami, Sagi

    2015-01-01

    PTF11iqb was initially classified as a TypeIIn event caught very early after explosion. It showed narrow Wolf-Rayet (WR) spectral features on day 2, but the narrow emission weakened quickly and the spectrum morphed to resemble those of Types II-L and II-P. At late times, Halpha emission exhibited a complex, multipeaked profile reminiscent of SN1998S. In terms of spectroscopic evolution, we find that PTF11iqb was a near twin of SN~1998S, although with weaker interaction with circumstellar material (CSM) at early times, and stronger CSM interaction at late times. We interpret the spectral changes as caused by early interaction with asymmetric CSM that is quickly (by day 20) enveloped by the expanding SN ejecta photosphere, but then revealed again after the end of the plateau when the photosphere recedes. The light curve can be matched with a simple model for weak CSM interaction added to the light curve of a normal SN~II-P. This plateau requires that the progenitor had an extended H envelope like a red supergia...

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVRI LCs of type Ib supernova iPTF13bvn (Folatelli+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folatelli, G.; van Dyk, S. D.; Kuncarayakti, H.; Maeda, K.; Bersten, M. C.; Nomoto, K.; Pignata, G.; Hamuy, M.; Quimby, R. M.; Zheng, W.; Filippenko, A. V.; Clubb, K. I.; Smith, N.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Foley, R. J.; Miller, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We obtained deep imaging of the field of iPTF13bvn ~740 days after explosion using HST through Cycle 22 programs GO-13684 and GO-13822. Program GO-13684 was executed between 2015 June 26.37 and 26.60 (UT dates are used herein) with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) UVIS channel. Program GO-13822 comprised observations obtained on 2015 June 30.63 with WFC3/UVIS (F225W filter) and on June 30.90 UT with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS; F814W filter). The supernova (SN) location in the pre- and post-explosion images was found by aligning them relative to a F555W image obtained through program GO-12888 with WFC3/UVIS on 2013 September 2.37 when the SN was still very bright. We also obtained BVRI imaging of iPTF13bvn until ~280 days with the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) and the 1m Nickel telescope at Lick Observatory (see table 3). Apparent magnitudes were first measured in the KAIT4 natural system and then transformed to the standard system using local calibrators and color terms as given in Table 4 of Ganeshalingam et al. (2010, J/ApJS/190/418). (1 data file).

  6. Siderophores: The special ingredient to cyanobacterial blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xue; Creed, Irena; Trick, Charles

    2013-04-01

    Freshwater lakes provide a number of significant ecological services including clean drinking water, habitat for aquatic biota, and economic benefits. The provision of these ecological services, as well as the health of these aquatic systems, is threatened by the excessive growth of algae, specifically, cyanobacteria. Historically, blooms have been linked to eutrophication but recent occurrences indicate that there are less dramatic changes that induce these blooms. Iron is an essential micronutrient required for specific essential metabolic pathways; however, the amount of biologically available iron in naturally occurring lake ranges from saturation to much lower than cell transport affinities. To assist in the modulation of iron availabilities, cyanobacteria in culture produce low molecular weight compounds that function in an iron binding and acquisition system; nevertheless, this has yet to be confirmed in naturally occurring lakes. This project explored the relationship of P, N and in particular, Fe, in the promotion of cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms in 30 natural freshwater lakes located in and around the Elk Island National Park, Alberta. It is hypothesized that cyanobacteria produce and utilize iron chelators called siderophores in low Fe and nitrogen (N) conditions, creating a competitive advantage over other algae in freshwater lakes. Lakes were selected to represent a range of iron availability to explore the nutrient composition of lakes that propagated cyanobacteria harmful algal blooms (cHABs) compared to lakes that did not. Lake water was analyzed for nutrients, microbial composition, siderophore concentration, and toxin concentration. Modifications were made to optimize the Czaky and Arnow tests for hydroxamate- and catecholate-type siderophores, respectively, for field conditions. Preliminary results indicate the presence of iron-binding ligands (0.11-2.34 mg/L) in freshwater lakes characterized by widely ranging Fe regimes (0.04-2.74 mg

  7. Is Bloom's Taxonomy Appropriate for Computer Science?

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Colin G.; Fuller, Ursula

    2007-01-01

    Bloom's taxonomy attempts to provide a set of levels of cognitive engagement with material being learned. It is usually presented as a generic framework. In this paper we outline some studies which examine whether the taxonomy is appropriate for computing, and how its application in computing might differ from its application elsewhere. We place this in the context of ongoing debates concerning graduateness and attempts to benchmark the content of a computing degree.

  8. Software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerville, Ian

    2010-01-01

    The ninth edition of Software Engineering presents a broad perspective of software engineering, focusing on the processes and techniques fundamental to the creation of reliable, software systems. Increased coverage of agile methods and software reuse, along with coverage of 'traditional' plan-driven software engineering, gives readers the most up-to-date view of the field currently available. Practical case studies, a full set of easy-to-access supplements, and extensive web resources make teaching the course easier than ever.

  9. Phytoplankton-Associated Bacterial Community Composition and Succession during Toxic Diatom Bloom and Non-Bloom Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sison-Mangus, Marilou P.; Jiang, Sunny; Kudela, Raphael M.; Mehic, Sanjin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudo-nitzschia blooms often occur in coastal and open ocean environments, sometimes leading to the production of the neurotoxin domoic acid that can cause severe negative impacts to higher trophic levels. Increasing evidence suggests a close relationship between phytoplankton bloom and bacterial assemblages, however, the microbial composition and succession during a bloom process is unknown. Here, we investigate the bacterial assemblages before, during and after toxic and non-toxic Pseudo-nitzschia blooms to determine the patterns of bacterial succession in a natural bloom setting. Opportunistic sampling of bacterial community profiles were determined weekly at Santa Cruz Municipal Wharf by 454 pyrosequencing and analyzed together with domoic acid levels, phytoplankton community and biomass, nutrients and temperature. We asked if the bacterial communities are similar between bloom and non-bloom events and if domoic acid or the presence of toxic algal species acts as a driving force that can significantly structure phytoplankton-associated bacterial communities. We found that bacterial diversity generally increases when Pseudo-nitzschia numbers decline. Furthermore, bacterial diversity is higher when the low-DA producing P. fraudulenta dominates the algal bloom while bacterial diversity is lower when high-DA producing P. australis dominates the algal bloom, suggesting that the presence of algal toxin can structure bacterial community. We also found bloom-related succession patterns among associated bacterial groups; Gamma-proteobacteria, were dominant during low toxic P. fraudulenta blooms comprising mostly of Vibrio spp., which increased in relative abundance (6–65%) as the bloom progresses. On the other hand, Firmicutes bacteria comprising mostly of Planococcus spp. (12–86%) dominate during high toxic P. australis blooms, with the bacterial assemblage showing the same bloom-related successional patterns in three independent bloom events. Other environmental

  10. LRH-1 and PTF1-L coregulate an exocrine pancreas-specific transcriptional network for digestive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmstrom, Sam R; Deering, Tye; Swift, Galvin H; Poelwijk, Frank J; Mangelsdorf, David J; Kliewer, Steven A; MacDonald, Raymond J

    2011-08-15

    We have determined the cistrome and transcriptome for the nuclear receptor liver receptor homolog-1 (LRH-1) in exocrine pancreas. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-seq and RNA-seq analyses reveal that LRH-1 directly induces expression of genes encoding digestive enzymes and secretory and mitochondrial proteins. LRH-1 cooperates with the pancreas transcription factor 1-L complex (PTF1-L) in regulating exocrine pancreas-specific gene expression. Elimination of LRH-1 in adult mice reduced the concentration of several lipases and proteases in pancreatic fluid and impaired pancreatic fluid secretion in response to cholecystokinin. Thus, LRH-1 is a key regulator of the exocrine pancreas-specific transcriptional network required for the production and secretion of pancreatic fluid.

  11. PTF1 J191905.19+481506.2 - A Partially Eclipsing AM CVn System Discovered in the Palomar Transient Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Levitan, David; Groot, Paul J; Margon, Bruce; Prince, Thomas A; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Hallinan, Gregg; Harding, Leon K; Kyne, Gillian; Laher, Russ; Ofek, Eran O; Rutten, René G M; Sesar, Branimir; Surace, Jason

    2014-01-01

    We report on PTF1 J191905.19+481506.2, a newly discovered, partially eclipsing, outbursting AM CVn system found in the Palomar Transient Factory synoptic survey. This is only the second known eclipsing AM CVn system. We use high-speed photometric observations and phase-resolved spectroscopy to establish an orbital period of 22.4559(3) min. We also present a long-term light curve and report on the normal and super-outbursts regularly seen in this system, including a super-outburst recurrence time of 36.8(4) d. We use the presence of the eclipse to place upper and lower limits on the inclination of the system and discuss the number of known eclipsing AM CVn systems versus what would be expected.

  12. SOFTWARE OPEN SOURCE, SOFTWARE GRATIS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Aini Rakhmawati

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false IN X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Berlakunya Undang – undang Hak Atas Kekayaan Intelektual (HAKI, memunculkan suatu alternatif baru untuk menggunakan software open source. Penggunaan software open source menyebar seiring dengan isu global pada Information Communication Technology (ICT saat ini. Beberapa organisasi dan perusahaan mulai menjadikan software open source sebagai pertimbangan. Banyak konsep mengenai software open source ini. Mulai dari software yang gratis sampai software tidak berlisensi. Tidak sepenuhnya isu software open source benar, untuk itu perlu dikenalkan konsep software open source mulai dari sejarah, lisensi dan bagaimana cara memilih lisensi, serta pertimbangan dalam memilih software open source yang ada. Kata kunci :Lisensi, Open Source, HAKI

  13. Biology in bloom: implementing Bloom's Taxonomy to enhance student learning in biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Alison; Dirks, Clarissa; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2008-01-01

    We developed the Blooming Biology Tool (BBT), an assessment tool based on Bloom's Taxonomy, to assist science faculty in better aligning their assessments with their teaching activities and to help students enhance their study skills and metacognition. The work presented here shows how assessment tools, such as the BBT, can be used to guide and enhance teaching and student learning in a discipline-specific manner in postsecondary education. The BBT was first designed and extensively tested for a study in which we ranked almost 600 science questions from college life science exams and standardized tests. The BBT was then implemented in three different collegiate settings. Implementation of the BBT helped us to adjust our teaching to better enhance our students' current mastery of the material, design questions at higher cognitive skills levels, and assist students in studying for college-level exams and in writing study questions at higher levels of Bloom's Taxonomy. From this work we also created a suite of complementary tools that can assist biology faculty in creating classroom materials and exams at the appropriate level of Bloom's Taxonomy and students to successfully develop and answer questions that require higher-order cognitive skills.

  14. The Deletable Bloom filter: A new member of the Bloom family

    CERN Document Server

    Rothenberg, Christian Esteve; Verdi, Fabio L; Magalhaes, Mauricio F

    2010-01-01

    We introduce the Deletable Bloom filter (DlBF) as a new spin on the popular data structure based on compactly encoding the information of where collisions happen when inserting elements. The DlBF design enables false-negative-free deletions at a fraction of the cost in memory consumption, which turns to be appealing for certain probabilistic filter applications.

  15. Software Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Reviews software packages by providing extensive descriptions and discussions of their strengths and weaknesses. Software reviewed include (1) "VISIFROG: Vertebrate Anatomy" (grade seven-adult); (2) "Fraction Bars Computer Program" (grades three to six) and (3) four telecommunications utilities. (JN)

  16. An active learning approach to Bloom's Taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigel, Fred K; Bonica, Mark

    2014-01-01

    As educators strive toward improving student learning outcomes, many find it difficult to instill their students with a deep understanding of the material the instructors share. One challenge lies in how to provide the material with a meaningful and engaging method that maximizes student understanding and synthesis. By following a simple strategy involving Active Learning across the 3 primary domains of Bloom's Taxonomy (cognitive, affective, and psychomotor), instructors can dramatically improve the quality of the lesson and help students retain and understand the information. By applying our strategy, instructors can engage their students at a deeper level and may even find themselves enjoying the process more.

  17. Software reliability

    CERN Document Server

    Bendell, A

    1986-01-01

    Software Reliability reviews some fundamental issues of software reliability as well as the techniques, models, and metrics used to predict the reliability of software. Topics covered include fault avoidance, fault removal, and fault tolerance, along with statistical methods for the objective assessment of predictive accuracy. Development cost models and life-cycle cost models are also discussed. This book is divided into eight sections and begins with a chapter on adaptive modeling used to predict software reliability, followed by a discussion on failure rate in software reliability growth mo

  18. WATER BLOOM OF BLUEGREEN ALGE IN CARP FISHPOUNDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melita Mihaljević

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available The massive development of bluegreen algae (Cyanophyta/Cyanobacteria, the so--called water bloom, is a frequent phenomenon in fishpond ecosystems. This study analyses water bloom development in three carp fishponds owned by a fishbreeding company at Donji Miholjac (Croatia, where one-year-old carps (Cyprinus carpio , were bred in defferent fishstock densities. Analyses of physicallychemical properties of water and phytoplankton biomass were per- formed in fortnight intervals from May till October, 1992. In all there investigated fishponds the water bloom of bluegreen algae developed, but at a different time and showing a different qualitative composition. In the fishpond with fishstock density of 250 kg/ha water bloom consisted of the species Aphanizomenon flos-aquae, and the biggest biomass (131.92 mg/I was found in August. In the fishpond with fishstock density of 437 kg/ha a water bloom consisting of species from the genues Anabaena and species Aphanizomenon flos-aquae developed at the end of July. In the fishpond with the so--called intensive breeding (fishstock density of 750 kg/ha water bloom of the species Microcystis aeruginosa developed as late as September. The beginning of water bloom development was caused by the low value (lower than 7 of the ratio between the quantities of total phosphorus and total nitrogen. However, the qualitative composition of water bloom was influenced by one-year-old carp fingerlings density.

  19. Requirements for forecasting harmful algal blooms in the Benguela

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bernard, S

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Benguela system suffers from the frequent occurence of a variety of harmful algal blooms (HABs).These blooms can have severe negative impacts on local marine ecosystems and communities, in addition to commercial marine concerns such as rock...

  20. The Self According to Allan Bloom and Charles Reich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the works of Charles Reich and Allan Bloom that have helped to shape current social and political debate concerning self theory. Both Reich and Bloom were concerned with the relationship between self and environment. Argues that it is important to insure that its cultural role of self theory is clearly interpreted and applied. (MKA)

  1. The Evolution of Educational Objectives: Bloom's Taxonomy and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Carolyn R.; LaMonaca, Frank H., Jr.

    2009-01-01

    It is crucial for teachers to communicate effectively about educational objectives to students, colleagues, and others in education. In 1956, Bloom developed a cognitive learning taxonomy to enhance communication between college examiners. The Bloom taxonomy consists of 6 hierarchical levels of learning (knowledge, comprehension, application,…

  2. Use of Bloom's Taxonomy in Developing Reading Comprehension Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Stephen; Lorie, James

    2013-01-01

    This article is a brief account of the use of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, & Krathwohl, 1956) by staff of the Law School Admission Council in the 1990 development of redesigned specifications for the Reading Comprehension section of the Law School Admission Test. Summary item statistics for the…

  3. Computer software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, L E

    1986-10-01

    Software is the component in a computer system that permits the hardware to perform the various functions that a computer system is capable of doing. The history of software and its development can be traced to the early nineteenth century. All computer systems are designed to utilize the "stored program concept" as first developed by Charles Babbage in the 1850s. The concept was lost until the mid-1940s, when modern computers made their appearance. Today, because of the complex and myriad tasks that a computer system can perform, there has been a differentiation of types of software. There is software designed to perform specific business applications. There is software that controls the overall operation of a computer system. And there is software that is designed to carry out specialized tasks. Regardless of types, software is the most critical component of any computer system. Without it, all one has is a collection of circuits, transistors, and silicone chips.

  4. Margalef's mandala and phytoplankton bloom strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Margalef's mandala maps phytoplankton species into a phase space defined by turbulence (A) and nutrient concentrations (Ni); these are the hard axes. The permutations of high and low A and high and low Ni divide the space into four domains. Soft axes indicate some ecological dynamics. A main sequence shows the normal course of phytoplankton succession; the r-K axis of MacArthur and Wilson runs parallel to it. An alternative successional sequence leads to the low A-high Ni domain into which many red tide species are mapped. Astronomical and biological time are implicit. A mathematical transformation of the mandala (rotation) links it to the classical bloom models of Sverdrup (time) and Kierstead and Slobodkin (space). Both rarity and the propensity to form red tides are considered to be species characters, meaning that maximum population abundance can be a target of natural selection. Equally, both the unpredictable appearance of bloom species and their short-lived appearances may be species characters. There may be a correlation too between these features and long-lived dormant stages in the life-cycle; then the vegetative planktonic phase is the 'weak link' in the life-cycle. Red tides are thus due to species which have evolved suites of traits which result in specific demographic strategies.

  5. RECOMMENDATION SYSTEM USING BLOOM FILTER IN MAPREDUCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena Pagare

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Many clients like to use the Web to discover product details in the form of online reviews. The reviews are provided by other clients and specialists. Recommender systems provide an important response to the information overload problem as it presents users more practical and personalized information facilities. Collaborative filtering methods are vital component in recommender systems as they generate high-quality recommendations by influencing the likings of society of similar users. The collaborative filtering method has assumption that people having same tastes choose the same items. The conventional collaborative filtering system has drawbacks as sparse data problem & lack of scalability. A new recommender system is required to deal with the sparse data problem & produce high quality recommendations in large scale mobile environment. MapReduce is a programming model which is widely used for large-scale data analysis. The described algorithm of recommendation mechanism for mobile commerce is user based collaborative filtering using MapReduce which reduces scalability problem in conventional CF system. One of the essential operations for the data analysis is join operation. But MapReduce is not very competent to execute the join operation as it always uses all records in the datasets where only small fraction of datasets are applicable for the join operation. This problem can be reduced by applying bloomjoin algorithm. The bloom filters are constructed and used to filter out redundant intermediate records. The proposed algorithm using bloom filter will reduce the number of intermediate results and will improve the join performance.

  6. Phytoplankton Bloom in North Sea off Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The northern and western highlands of Scotland were still winter-brown and even dusted with snow in places, but the waters of the North Sea were blooming with phytoplankton on May 8, 2008, when the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region and captured this image. The tiny, plant-like organisms swirled in the waters off the country's east coast, coloring the shallow coastal waters shades of bright blue and green. Phytoplankton are tiny organisms--many are just a single cell--that use chlorophyll and other pigments to capture light for photosynthesis. Because these pigments absorb sunlight, they change the color of the light reflected from the sea surface back to the satellite. Scientists have used observations of 'ocean color' from satellites for more than 20 years to track worldwide patterns in phytoplankton blooms. Phytoplankton are important to the Earth system for a host of reasons, including their status as the base of the ocean food web. In the North Sea, they are the base of the food web that supports Scotland's commercial fisheries, including monkfish and herring. As photosynthesizers, they also play a crucial role in the carbon cycle, removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Some oceanographers are concerned that rising ocean temperatures will slow phytoplankton growth rates, harming marine ecosystems and causing carbon dioxide to accumulate more rapidly in the atmosphere.

  7. The disappearance of the helium-giant progenitor of the type Ib supernova iPTF13bvn and constraints on its companion

    CERN Document Server

    Eldridge, J J

    2016-01-01

    We report and discuss post-explosion observations of supernova iPTF13bvn. We find that the brightness of the SN at +740 days is below the level of the pre-explosion source and thus confirm that the progenitor star has gone. We estimate that the late-time brightness is still dominated by the supernova, which constrains the magnitude and thus mass of a possible companion star to below approximately 10Msun. In turn this implies that the progenitor's initial mass is constrained to a narrow range of between 10 to 12Msun. The progenitor of iPTF13bvn would have been a helium giant rather than a Wolf-Rayet star. In addition, we suggest that sufficiently deep observations acquired in 2016 would now stand a chance to directly observe the companion star.

  8. DISCOVERY AND REDSHIFT OF AN OPTICAL AFTERGLOW IN 71 deg{sup 2}: iPTF13bxl AND GRB 130702A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, Leo P.; Brown, Duncan A. [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bradley Cenko, S.; Gehrels, Neil; McEnery, Julie [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kasliwal, Mansi M.; Mulchaey, John [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Perley, Daniel A.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Bellm, Eric; Barlow, Tom; Cao, Yi; Horesh, Assaf [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Nugent, Peter E.; Bloom, Joshua S. [Department of Astronomy, University of California Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex 3411, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Corsi, Alessandra [George Washington University, Corcoran Hall, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Frail, Dale A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Masci, Frank J., E-mail: lsinger@caltech.edu [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); and others

    2013-10-20

    We report the discovery of the optical afterglow of the γ-ray burst (GRB) 130702A, identified upon searching 71 deg{sup 2} surrounding the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) localization. Discovered and characterized by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory, iPTF13bxl is the first afterglow discovered solely based on a GBM localization. Real-time image subtraction, machine learning, human vetting, and rapid response multi-wavelength follow-up enabled us to quickly narrow a list of 27,004 optical transient candidates to a single afterglow-like source. Detection of a new, fading X-ray source by Swift and a radio counterpart by CARMA and the Very Large Array confirmed the association between iPTF13bxl and GRB 130702A. Spectroscopy with the Magellan and Palomar 200 inch telescopes showed the afterglow to be at a redshift of z = 0.145, placing GRB 130702A among the lowest redshift GRBs detected to date. The prompt γ-ray energy release and afterglow luminosity are intermediate between typical cosmological GRBs and nearby sub-luminous events such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218. The bright afterglow and emerging supernova offer an opportunity for extensive panchromatic follow-up. Our discovery of iPTF13bxl demonstrates the first observational proof-of-principle for ∼10 Fermi-iPTF localizations annually. Furthermore, it represents an important step toward overcoming the challenges inherent in uncovering faint optical counterparts to comparably localized gravitational wave events in the Advanced LIGO and Virgo era.

  9. PTF11eon/SN2011dh: Discovery of a Type IIb Supernova From a Compact Progenitor in the Nearby Galaxy M51

    CERN Document Server

    Arcavi, Iair; Yaron, Ofer; Sternberg, Assaf; Rabinak, Itay; Waxman, Eli; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Quimby, Robert M; Ofek, Eran O; Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Filippenko, Alexei V; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Cenko, S Bradley; Li, Weidong; Bloom, Joshua S; Sullivan, Mark; Fox, Derek B; Nugent, Peter E; Poznanski, Dovi; Gorbikov, Evgeny; Riou, Amedee; Lamotte-Bailey, Stephane; Griga, Thomas; Cohen, Judith G; Polishook, David; Xu, Dong; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Manulis, Ilan; Walker, Emma S; Mazzali, Paulo A; Pian, Elena; Matheson, Thomas; Maquire, Kate; Pan, Yen-Chen; Bersier, David; James, Philip; Marchant, Jonathan M; Smith, Robert J; Mottram, Chris J; Barnsley, Robert M; Kandrashoff, Michael T; Clubb, Kelsey I

    2011-01-01

    On May 31, 2011 UT a supernova (SN) exploded in the nearby galaxy M51 (the Whirlpool Galaxy). We discovered this event using small telescopes equipped with CCD cameras, as well as by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) survey, and rapidly confirmed it to be a Type II supernova. Our early light curve and spectroscopy indicates that PTF11eon resulted from the explosion of a relatively compact progenitor star as evidenced by the rapid shock-breakout cooling seen in the light curve, the relatively low temperature in early-time spectra and the prompt appearance of low-ionization spectral features. The spectra of PTF11eon are dominated by H lines out to day 10 after explosion, but initial signs of He appear to be present. Assuming that He lines continue to develop in the near future, this SN is likely a member of the cIIb (compact IIb; Chevalier and Soderberg 2010) class, with progenitor radius larger than that of SN 2008ax and smaller than the eIIb (extended IIb) SN 1993J progenitor. Our data imply that the object...

  10. Software piracy

    OpenAIRE

    Kráčmer, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present thesis is to clarify the term of software piracy and to determine responsibility of individual entities as to actual realization of software piracy. First, the thesis focuses on a computer programme, causes, realization and pitfalls of its inclusion under copyright protection. Subsequently, it observes methods of legal usage of a computer programme. This is the point of departure for the following attempt to define software piracy, accompanied with methods of actu...

  11. Harmful Algal Bloom Research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Su Jilan; Zhou Mingjiang

    2001-01-01

    Proliferations of harmful algae in coastal waters, i.e., harmful algal blooms (HABs), popularly known as "red tides," have attracted the concern of governments and scientists worldwide. In recent years, HABs have occurred in China with increasing frequency and scope. These outbreaks have seriously affected the economy along the coast through fish kills, heavy losses in aquaculture, threats to human health, and other effects detrimental to the marine ecosystem. Therefore, it is important to pay special attention to the ecology and oceanography studies related to the outbreak of HABs. Only through the combination of the advancement of such knowledge with the strengthening of the monitoring network can we develop a HAB warning system for the sustainable development of the coastal economy.

  12. Harmful Algal Blooms and Public Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, Lynn M; Holobaugh, Sailor; Morris, J Glenn

    2016-07-01

    The five most commonly recognized Harmful Algal Bloom related illnesses include Ciguatera poisoning, Paralytic Shellfish poisoning, Neurotoxin Shellfish poisoning, Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning and Amnesic Shellfish poisoning. Although they are each the product of different toxins, toxin assemblages or HAB precursors these clinical syndromes have much in common. Exposure occurs through the consumption of fish or shellfish; routine clinical tests are not available for diagnosis; there is no known antidote for exposure; and the risk of these illnesses can negatively impact local fishing and tourism industries. Thus, illness prevention is of paramount importance to minimize human and public health risks. To accomplish this, close communication and collaboration is needed among HAB scientists, public health researchers and local, state and tribal health departments at academic, community outreach, and policy levels.

  13. Harmful Algal Blooms and Public Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, Lynn M.; Holobaugh, Sailor; Morris, J. Glenn

    2015-01-01

    The five most commonly recognized Harmful Algal Bloom related illnesses include Ciguatera poisoning, Paralytic Shellfish poisoning, Neurotoxin Shellfish poisoning, Diarrheic Shellfish Poisoning and Amnesic Shellfish poisoning. Although they are each the product of different toxins, toxin assemblages or HAB precursors these clinical syndromes have much in common. Exposure occurs through the consumption of fish or shellfish; routine clinical tests are not available for diagnosis; there is no known antidote for exposure; and the risk of these illnesses can negatively impact local fishing and tourism industries. Thus, illness prevention is of paramount importance to minimize human and public health risks. To accomplish this, close communication and collaboration is needed among HAB scientists, public health researchers and local, state and tribal health departments at academic, community outreach, and policy levels. PMID:27616971

  14. The Prdm13 histone methyltransferase encoding gene is a Ptf1a-Rbpj downstream target that suppresses glutamatergic and promotes GABAergic neuronal fate in the dorsal neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanotel, Julie; Bessodes, Nathalie; Thélie, Aurore; Hedderich, Marie; Parain, Karine; Van Driessche, Benoit; Brandão, Karina De Oliveira; Kricha, Sadia; Jorgensen, Mette C; Grapin-Botton, Anne; Serup, Palle; Van Lint, Carine; Perron, Muriel; Pieler, Tomas; Henningfeld, Kristine A; Bellefroid, Eric J

    2014-02-15

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional activator Ptf1a determines inhibitory GABAergic over excitatory glutamatergic neuronal cell fate in progenitors of the vertebrate dorsal spinal cord, cerebellum and retina. In an in situ hybridization expression survey of PR domain containing genes encoding putative chromatin-remodeling zinc finger transcription factors in Xenopus embryos, we identified Prdm13 as a histone methyltransferase belonging to the Ptf1a synexpression group. Gain and loss of Ptf1a function analyses in both frog and mice indicates that Prdm13 is positively regulated by Ptf1a and likely constitutes a direct transcriptional target. We also showed that this regulation requires the formation of the Ptf1a-Rbp-j complex. Prdm13 knockdown in Xenopus embryos and in Ptf1a overexpressing ectodermal explants lead to an upregulation of Tlx3/Hox11L2, which specifies a glutamatergic lineage and a reduction of the GABAergic neuronal marker Pax2. It also leads to an upregulation of Prdm13 transcription, suggesting an autonegative regulation. Conversely, in animal caps, Prdm13 blocks the ability of the bHLH factor Neurog2 to activate Tlx3. Additional gain of function experiments in the chick neural tube confirm that Prdm13 suppresses Tlx3(+)/glutamatergic and induces Pax2(+)/GABAergic neuronal fate. Thus, Prdm13 is a novel crucial component of the Ptf1a regulatory pathway that, by modulating the transcriptional activity of bHLH factors such as Neurog2, controls the balance between GABAergic and glutamatergic neuronal fate in the dorsal and caudal part of the vertebrate neural tube.

  15. Physical Hydrography and Algal Bloom Transport in Hong Kong Waters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KUANG Cui-ping; LEE Joseph H.W.

    2005-01-01

    In sub-tropical coastal waters around Hong Kong, algal blooms and red tides are usually first sighted in the Mirs Bay, in the eastern waters of Hong Kong. A calibrated three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the Pearl River Estuary (Delft3D) has been applied to the study of the physical hydrography of Hong Kong waters and its relationship with algal bloom transport patterns in the dry and wet seasons. The general 3D hydrodynamic circulation and salinity structure in the partially-mixed estuary are presented. Extensive numerical surface drogue tracking experiments are performed for algal blooms that are initiated in the Mirs Bay under different seasonal, wind and tidal conditions. The probability of bloom impact on the Victoria Harbour and nearby urban coastal waters is estimated. The computations show that: I) In the wet season (May~August), algal blooms initiated in the Mirs Bay will move in a clockwise direction out of the bay, and be transported away from Hong Kong due to SW monsoon winds which drive the SW to NE coastal current; ii) In the dry season (November~April), algal blooms initiated in the northeast Mirs Bay will move in an anti-clockwise direction and be carried away into southern waters due to the NE to SW coastal current driven by the NE monsoon winds; the bloom typically flows past the east edge of the Victoria Harbour and nearby waters. Finally, the role of hydrodynamic transport in an important episodic event - the spring 1998 massive red tide - is quantitatively examined. It is shown that the strong NE to E wind during late March to early April, coupled with the diurnal tide at the beginning of April, significantly increased the probability of bloom transport into the Port Shelter and East Lamma Channel, resulting in the massive fish kill. The results provide a basis for risk assessment of harmful algal bloom (HAB) impact on urban coastal waters around the Victoria Habour.

  16. The Rise and Fall of the Type Ib Supernova iPTF13bvn Not a Massive Wolf-Rayet Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremling, C.; Sollerman, J.; Taddia, F.; Ergon, M.; Valenti, S.; Arcavi, I.; Ben-Ami, S.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Filippenko, A. V.; Gal-Yam, A.; Howell, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    Context. We investigate iPTF13bvn, a core-collapse (CC) supernova (SN) in the nearby spiral galaxy NGC 5806. This object was discovered by the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF) very close to the estimated explosion date and was classified as a stripped-envelope CC SN, likely of Type Ib. Furthermore, a possible progenitor detection in pre-explosion Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images was reported, making this the only SN Ib with such an identification. Based on the luminosity and color of the progenitor candidate, as well as on early-time spectra and photometry of the SN, it was argued that the progenitor candidate is consistent with a single, massive Wolf-Rayet (WR) star. Aims. We aim to confirm the progenitor detection, to robustly classify the SN using additional spectroscopy, and to investigate if our follow-up photometric and spectroscopic data on iPTF13bvn are consistent with a single-star WR progenitor scenario. Methods. We present a large set of observational data, consisting of multi-band light curves (UBVRI, g'r'i'z') and optical spectra. We perform standard spectral line analysis to track the evolution of the SN ejecta. We also construct a bolometric light curve and perform hydrodynamical calculations to model this light curve to constrain the synthesized radioactive nickel mass and the total ejecta mass of the SN. Late-time photometry is analyzed to constrain the amount of oxygen. Furthermore, image registration of pre- and post-explosion HST images is performed. Results. Our HST astrometry confirms the location of the progenitor candidate of iPTF13bvn, and follow-up spectra securely classify this as a SN Ib. We use our hydrodynamical model to fit the observed bolometric light curve, estimating the total ejecta mass to be 1.9 solar mass and the radioactive nickel mass to be 0.05 solar mass. The model fit requires the nickel synthesized in the explosion to be highly mixed out in the ejecta. We also find that the late-time nebular r

  17. Seasonal phytoplankton blooms in the North Atlantic linked to the overwintering strategies of copepods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin D. Friedland

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The North Atlantic Ocean contains diverse patterns of seasonal phytoplankton blooms with distinct internal dynamics. We analyzed blooms using remotely-sensed chlorophyll a concentration data and change point statistics. The first bloom of the year began during spring at low latitudes and later in summer at higher latitudes. In regions where spring blooms occurred at high frequency (i.e., proportion of years that a bloom was detected, there was a negative correlation between bloom timing and duration, indicating that early blooms last longer. In much of the Northeast Atlantic, bloom development extended over multiple seasons resulting in peak chlorophyll concentrations in summer. Spring bloom start day was found to be positively correlated with a spring phenology index and showed both positive and negative correlations to sea surface temperature and the North Atlantic Oscillation in different regions. Based on the characteristics of spring and summer blooms, the North Atlantic can be classified into two regions: a seasonal bloom region, with a well-defined bloom limited to a single season; and a multi-seasonal bloom region, with blooms extending over multiple seasons. These regions differed in the correlation between bloom start and duration with only the seasonal bloom region showing a significant, negative correlation. We tested the hypothesis that the near-surface springtime distribution of copepods that undergo diapause (Calanus finmarchicus, C. helgolandicus, C. glacialis, and C. hyperboreus may contribute to the contrast in bloom development between the two regions. Peak near-surface spring abundance of the late stages of these Calanoid copepods was generally associated with areas having a well-defined seasonal bloom, implying a link between bloom shape and their abundance. We suggest that either grazing is a factor in shaping the seasonal bloom or bloom shape determines whether a habitat is conducive to diapause, while recognizing

  18. Optical researches for cyanobacteria bloom monitoring in Curonian Lagoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Budylin, Gleb B.; Yakimov, Boris P.; Voloshina, Olga V.; Karabashev, Genrik S.; Evdoshenko, Marina A.; Fadeev, Victor V.

    2016-04-01

    Cyanobacteria bloom is a great ecological problem of Curonian Lagoon and Baltic Sea. The development of novel methods for the on-line control of cyanobacteria concentration and, moreover, for prediction of bloom spreading is of interest for monitoring the state of ecosystem. Here, we report the results of the joint application of hyperspectral measurements and remote sensing of Curonian Lagoon in July 2015 aimed at the assessment of cyanobacteria communities. We show that hyperspectral data allow on-line detection and qualitative estimation of cyanobacteria concentration, while the remote sensing data indicate the possibility of cyanobacteria bloom detection using the spectral features of upwelling irradiation.

  19. Software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sommerville, Ian

    2016-01-01

    For courses in computer science and software engineering The Fundamental Practice of Software Engineering Software Engineering introduces readers to the overwhelmingly important subject of software programming and development. In the past few years, computer systems have come to dominate not just our technological growth, but the foundations of our world's major industries. This text seeks to lay out the fundamental concepts of this huge and continually growing subject area in a clear and comprehensive manner. The Tenth Edition contains new information that highlights various technological updates of recent years, providing readers with highly relevant and current information. Sommerville's experience in system dependability and systems engineering guides the text through a traditional plan-based approach that incorporates some novel agile methods. The text strives to teach the innovators of tomorrow how to create software that will make our world a better, safer, and more advanced place to live.

  20. iPTF13bvn: The first evidence of a binary progenitor for a type Ib supernova

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bersten, Melina C.; Folatelli, Gastón; Nomoto, Ken' ichi; Quimby, Robert [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Benvenuto, Omar G. [Facultad de Ciencias Astronómicas y Geofísicas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Paseo del Bosque S/N, B1900FWA La Plata (Argentina); Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo [Millennium Institute of Astrophysics, Casilla 36-D, Santiago (Chile); Srivastav, Shubham; Anupama, G. C.; Sahu, Devendra K., E-mail: melina.bersten@ipmu.jp [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560034 (India)

    2014-10-01

    The recent detection in archival Hubble Space Telescope images of an object at the location of supernova (SN) iPTF13bvn may represent the first direct evidence of the progenitor of a Type Ib SN. The object's photometry was found to be compatible with a Wolf-Rayet pre-SN star mass of ≈11 M {sub ☉}. However, based on hydrodynamical models, we show that the progenitor had a pre-SN mass of ≈3.5 M {sub ☉} and that it could not be larger than ≈8 M {sub ☉}. We propose an interacting binary system as the SN progenitor and perform evolutionary calculations that are able to self-consistently explain the light curve shape, the absence of hydrogen, and the pre-SN photometry. We further discuss the range of allowed binary systems and predict that the remaining companion is a luminous O-type star of significantly lower flux in the optical than the pre-SN object. A future detection of such a star may be possible and would provide the first robust identification of a progenitor system for a Type Ib SN.

  1. The detection rate of early UV emission from supernovae: A dedicated GALEX/PTF survey and calibrated theoretical estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Ganot, Noam; Ofek, Eran O; Sagiv, Ilan; Waxman, Eli; Lapid, Ofer; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R; Ben-Ami, Sagi; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Chelouche, Doron; Rafter, Stephen; Behar, Ehud; Laor, Ari; Poznanski, Dovi; Nakar, Udi; Maoz, Dan; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Neill, James D; Barlow, Thomas A; Martin, Christofer D; Gezari, Suvi; Arcavi, Iair; Bloom, Joshua s; Nugent, Peter E; Sullivan, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The radius and surface composition of an exploding massive star, as well as the explosion energy per unit mass, can be measured using early UV observations of core collapse supernovae (SNe). We present the first results from a simultaneous GALEX/PTF search for early UV emission from SNe. Six Type II SNe and one Type II superluminous SN (SLSN-II) are clearly detected in the GALEX NUV data. We compare our detection rate with theoretical estimates based on early, shock-cooling UV light curves calculated from models that fit existing Swift and GALEX observations well, combined with volumetric SN rates. We find that our observations are in good agreement with calculated rates assuming that red supergiants (RSGs) explode with fiducial radii of 500 R_solar, explosion energies of 10^51 erg, and ejecta masses of 10 M_solar. Exploding blue supergiants and Wolf-Rayet stars are poorly constrained. We describe how such observations can be used to derive the progenitor radius, surface composition and explosion energy per u...

  2. Ascl1 as a novel player in the Ptf1a transcriptional network for GABAergic cell specification in the retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazurier, Nicolas; Parain, Karine; Parlier, Damien; Pretto, Silvia; Hamdache, Johanna; Vernier, Philippe; Locker, Morgane; Bellefroid, Eric; Perron, Muriel

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with the wealth of data involving bHLH and homeodomain transcription factors in retinal cell type determination, the molecular bases underlying neurotransmitter subtype specification is far less understood. Using both gain and loss of function analyses in Xenopus, we investigated the putative implication of the bHLH factor Ascl1 in this process. We found that in addition to its previously characterized proneural function, Ascl1 also contributes to the specification of the GABAergic phenotype. We showed that it is necessary for retinal GABAergic cell genesis and sufficient in overexpression experiments to bias a subset of retinal precursor cells towards a GABAergic fate. We also analysed the relationships between Ascl1 and a set of other bHLH factors using an in vivo ectopic neurogenic assay. We demonstrated that Ascl1 has unique features as a GABAergic inducer and is epistatic over factors endowed with glutamatergic potentialities such as Neurog2, NeuroD1 or Atoh7. This functional specificity is conferred by the basic DNA binding domain of Ascl1 and involves a specific genetic network, distinct from that underlying its previously demonstrated effects on catecholaminergic differentiation. Our data show that GABAergic inducing activity of Ascl1 requires the direct transcriptional regulation of Ptf1a, providing therefore a new piece of the network governing neurotransmitter subtype specification during retinogenesis.

  3. Constraints on the Progenitor System of the Type Ia Supernova SN 2011fe/PTF11kly

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Weidong; Podsiadlowski, Philipp; Miller, Adam A; Cenko, S Bradley; Jha, Saurabh W; Sullivan, Mark; Howell, D Andrew; Nugent, Peter E; Butler, Nathaniel R; Ofek, Eran O; Kasliwal, Mansi M; Richards, Joseph W; Stockton, Alan; Shih, Hsin-Yi; Bildsten, Lars; Shara, Michael M; Bibby, Joanne; Filippenko, Alexei V; Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Kulkarni, S R; Law, Nicholas M; Poznanski, Dovi; Quimby, Robert M; McCully, Curtis; Patel, Brandon; Maguire, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Type Ia supernovae (SNe) serve as a fundamental pillar of modern cosmology, owing to their large luminosity and a well-defined relationship between light-curve shape and peak brightness. The precision distance measurements enabled by SNe Ia first revealed the accelerating expansion of the universe, now widely believed (though hardly understood) to require the presence of a mysterious "dark" energy. General consensus holds that Type Ia SNe result from thermonuclear explosions of a white dwarf (WD) in a binary system; however, little is known of the precise nature of the companion star and the physical properties of the progenitor system. Here we make use of extensive historical imaging obtained at the location of SN 2011fe/PTF11kly, the closest SN Ia discovered in the digital imaging era, to constrain the visible-light luminosity of the progenitor to be 10-100 times fainter than previous limits on other SN Ia progenitors. This directly rules out luminous red giants and the vast majority of helium stars as the ...

  4. Nebular phase observations of the type-Ib supernova iPTF13bvn favour a binary progenitor

    CERN Document Server

    Kuncarayakti, H; Bersten, M C; Folatelli, G; Morrell, N; Hsiao, E Y; González-Gaitán, S; Anderson, J P; Hamuy, M; de Jaeger, T; Gutiérrez, C P; Kawabata, K S

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We present and analyse late-time observations of the type-Ib supernova with possible pre-supernova progenitor detection, iPTF13bvn, taken at $\\sim$300 days after the explosion, and discuss these in the context of constraints on the supernova's progenitor. Previous studies have proposed two possible natures for the progenitor of the supernova, i.e. a massive Wolf-Rayet star or a lower-mass star in close binary system. Methods. Our observations show that the supernova has entered the nebular phase, with the spectrum dominated by Mg~I]$\\lambda\\lambda$4571, [O~I]$\\lambda\\lambda$6300, 6364, and [Ca~II]$\\lambda\\lambda$7291, 7324 emission lines. We measured the emission line fluxes to estimate the core oxygen mass and compare the [O~I]/[Ca~II] line ratio with other supernovae. Results. The core oxygen mass of the supernova progenitor was estimated to be $\\lesssim$0.7 M$_\\odot$, which implies initial progenitor mass not exceeding $\\sim$15 -- 17 M$_\\odot$. Since the derived mass is too small for a single star to...

  5. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Photometry of SN 2013gh and iPTF13dge (Ferretti+, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferretti, R.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Johansson, J.; Vreeswijk, P.; Butler, R. P.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Doran, G.; Filippenko, A. V.; Freeland, E.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Lundqvist, P.; Mattila, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P. E.; Petrushevska, T.; Valenti, S.; Vogt, S.; Wozniak, P.

    2016-06-01

    Measured photometry of type Ia supernovae 2013gh and iPTF13dge are presented. Furthermore, the effective light-curve-width-corrected phase and the natural magnitude in specified filters have been computed. Thereby, the corresponding Galactic absorption (Ax_MW) and the filter corrections (Kx) to the corresponding rest-frame filter for SN 2011fe as described by Amanullah et al. (2015MNRAS.453.3300A) are presented. The corrected magnitude can be obtained as X-AXMW-KX. All corrections have been calculated after the SN 2011fe template has been reddened with the best-fit Fitzpatrick (1999PASP..111...63F) law, for each SN. Furthermore, the V magnitude and corrections for each phase phase are included. The V magnitude was either measured (M) or calculated (D) using the SNooPy model. The V magnitude is only shown for data points used in the colour analysis, with phases between -10 and +35-days. The corrected colour can be obtained as (X-AXMW-KX)-(V-AVMW-KV) and can be compared with the corresponding colour of SN 2011fe in order to study the reddening laws of the SNe. (3 data files).

  6. iPTF 13bvn: The First Evidence of a Binary Progenitor for a Type Ib Supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Bersten, Melina C; Folatelli, Gaston; Nomoto, Ken'ichi; Kuncarayakti, Hanindyo; Srivastav, Shubham; Anupama, G C; Quimby, Robert; Sahu, Devendra K

    2014-01-01

    The recent detection in archival HST images of an object at the the location of supernova (SN) iPTF~13bvn may represent the first direct evidence of the progenitor of a Type~Ib SN. The object's photometry was found to be compatible with a Wolf-Rayet pre-SN star mass of ~11 Msun. However, based on hydrodynamical models we show that the progenitor had a pre-SN mass of ~3.5 Msun and that it could not be larger than ~8 Msun. We propose an interacting binary system as the SN progenitor and perform evolutionary calculations that are able to self-consistently explain the light-curve shape, the absence of hydrogen, and the pre-SN photometry. We further discuss the range of allowed binary systems and predict that the remaining companion is a luminous O-type star of significantly lower flux in the optical than the pre-SN object. A future detection of such star may be possible and would provide the first robust progenitor identification for a Type-Ib SN.

  7. Ascl1 as a novel player in the Ptf1a transcriptional network for GABAergic cell specification in the retina.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Mazurier

    Full Text Available In contrast with the wealth of data involving bHLH and homeodomain transcription factors in retinal cell type determination, the molecular bases underlying neurotransmitter subtype specification is far less understood. Using both gain and loss of function analyses in Xenopus, we investigated the putative implication of the bHLH factor Ascl1 in this process. We found that in addition to its previously characterized proneural function, Ascl1 also contributes to the specification of the GABAergic phenotype. We showed that it is necessary for retinal GABAergic cell genesis and sufficient in overexpression experiments to bias a subset of retinal precursor cells towards a GABAergic fate. We also analysed the relationships between Ascl1 and a set of other bHLH factors using an in vivo ectopic neurogenic assay. We demonstrated that Ascl1 has unique features as a GABAergic inducer and is epistatic over factors endowed with glutamatergic potentialities such as Neurog2, NeuroD1 or Atoh7. This functional specificity is conferred by the basic DNA binding domain of Ascl1 and involves a specific genetic network, distinct from that underlying its previously demonstrated effects on catecholaminergic differentiation. Our data show that GABAergic inducing activity of Ascl1 requires the direct transcriptional regulation of Ptf1a, providing therefore a new piece of the network governing neurotransmitter subtype specification during retinogenesis.

  8. Functional deficiency of fibroblasts heterozygous for Bloom syndrome as specific manifestation of the primary defect.

    OpenAIRE

    Bartram, C.R.; Rüdiger, H W; Schmidt-Preuss, U; Passarge, E

    1981-01-01

    The effect on the rate of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in Bloom syndrome fibroblasts by cocultivation with Fanconi anemia and xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts and with Bloom syndrome heterozygotes was studied. Cells of Fanconi anemia and xeroderma origin reduced the rate of SCEs in Bloom cells by about 45%-50%, just as control cells do. In contrast, heterozygous Bloom cells reduced the rate of SCEs by only 16%-28%. In absolute figures, Fanconi cells reduced the mean rate of SCE in Bloom...

  9. Software requirements

    CERN Document Server

    Wiegers, Karl E

    2003-01-01

    Without formal, verifiable software requirements-and an effective system for managing them-the programs that developers think they've agreed to build often will not be the same products their customers are expecting. In SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS, Second Edition, requirements engineering authority Karl Wiegers amplifies the best practices presented in his original award-winning text?now a mainstay for anyone participating in the software development process. In this book, you'll discover effective techniques for managing the requirements engineering process all the way through the development cy

  10. Nonstructural carbohydrates and return bloom potential differ among cranberry cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    explain low fruit set and biennial bearing tendencies of cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon). Yet, comparisons of nonstructural carbohydrate concentrations during critical phenological stages across cultivars that differ in biennial bearing tendencies and return bloom potential are lacking, particular...

  11. Algal blooms: an emerging threat to seawater reverse osmosis desalination

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2014-08-04

    Seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination technology has been rapidly growing in terms of installed capacity and global application over the last decade. An emerging threat to SWRO application is the seasonal proliferation of microscopic algae in seawater known as algal blooms. Such blooms have caused operational problems in SWRO plants due to clogging and poor effluent quality of the pre-treatment system which eventually forced the shutdown of various desalination plants to avoid irreversible fouling of downstream SWRO membranes. This article summarizes the current state of SWRO technology and the emerging threat of algal blooms to its application. It also highlights the importance of studying the algal bloom phenomena in the perspective of seawater desalination, so proper mitigation and preventive strategies can be developed in the near future. © 2014 © 2014 Balaban Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  12. Lyngbya majuscula Blooms in an Enclosed Marine Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Soon Lionel Ng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms are a cause of concern because of their potential impacts on the marine environment. In Sentosa Cove, Singapore, Lyngbya majuscula blooms appeared regularly in the highly enclosed boat canals traversing the seafront residential development. This study investigated whether sediments resuspended by physical disturbance liberated nutrients that contribute to the blooms. Sediment resuspension events were mimicked in containers of sediment collected from the canals. Lyngbya majuscula that were incubated in containers with resuspended sediment attained greater biomass than those in filtered seawater only. Levels of iron, phosphates and nitrites in seawater with resuspended sediments were significantly higher than in those without. The results indicate that recurrent L. majuscula blooms in Sentosa Cove could be attributed to nutrient loading from sediment resuspension.

  13. Bloom syndrome: multiple retinopathies in a chromosome breakage disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhisitkul, R B; Rizen, M

    2004-03-01

    To describe multiple retinal abnormalities in a patient with Bloom syndrome, including early macular drusen, diabetic retinopathy, and the onset of leukaemic retinopathy. Clinical data were collected over 1 year of follow up, and ocular abnormalities in Bloom syndrome were reviewed from the literature. A 39 year old man with a rare autosomal recessive "chromosome breakage" syndrome was followed. A variety of ocular findings have been reported in Bloom syndrome; this patient had hard drusen in both maculae, non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy, and haemorrhagic retinopathy as a herald of acute lymphocytic leukaemia. Bloom syndrome is a rare disorder of genomic instability, in which a variety of ocular abnormalities have been found. Described here are multiple retinal manifestations arising from characteristic systemic associations of diabetes mellitus and leukaemia, as well as macular hard drusen.

  14. Spatial analysis of freshwater lake cyanobacteria blooms, 2008-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background/Question/Methods Cyanobacteria and associated harmful algal blooms cause significant social, economic, and environmental impacts. Cyanobacteria synthesize hepatotoxins, neurotoxins, and dermatotoxins, affecting the health of humans and other species. The Cyanobacteria ...

  15. Harmful algal bloom smart device application: using image analysis and machine learning techniques for early classification of harmful algal blooms (SETAC presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of toxic cyanobacterial blooms, also known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABS) have increased drastically in recent years. HABS impact human health from causing mild allergies to liver damage and death. The Ecological Stewardship Institute (ESI) at Northern Kentucky Universi...

  16. Harmful algal bloom smart device application: using image analysis and machine learning techniques for early classification of harmful algal blooms (SETAC presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reports of toxic cyanobacterial blooms, also known as Harmful Algal Blooms (HABS) have increased drastically in recent years. HABS impact human health from causing mild allergies to liver damage and death. The Ecological Stewardship Institute (ESI) at Northern Kentucky Universi...

  17. Algal Bloom in Aquatic Ecosystems-an Overview

    OpenAIRE

    M. Ghorbani; S.A. Mirbagheri; A. H. Hasani; S. M. Monavari; J.Nouri

    2014-01-01

    Algae play an important role in all aquatic ecosystems by providing all living organisms of water bodies with preliminary nutrients and energy required. However, abnormal and excessive algal growth so-called algal bloom would be detrimental as much. Given the importance of algae in aquatic environment as well as their sensitivity to environmental changes, algal measurements are of key components of water quality monitoring programs. The algal blooms could include a variety of adverse impacts...

  18. Fat bloom on chocolate confectionery systems - From core to surface

    OpenAIRE

    Dahlenborg, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Fat bloom on chocolate is a major problem for the confectionery industry since the unappetising appearance and negative sensory effects lead to rejection by customers. The presence of fat bloom on chocolate confectionery systems is usually connected to migration of liquid fat due to the difference in composition between filling triacylglycerols (TAGs) and cocoa butter TAGs. The filling TAGs migrate into the chocolate shell where they can dissolve cocoa butter crystals. Consequ...

  19. Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy

      Innovation is the forgotten key to modern systems development - the element that defines the enterprising engineer, the thriving software firm and the cutting edge software application.  Traditional forms of technical education pay little attention to creativity - often encouraging overly...... rationalistic ways of thinking which stifle the ability to innovate. Professional software developers are often drowned in commercial drudgery and overwhelmed by work pressure and deadlines. The topic that will both ensure success in the market and revitalize their work lives is never addressed. This book sets...... out the new field of software innovation. It organizes the existing scientific research into eight simple heuristics - guiding principles for organizing a system developer's work-life so that it focuses on innovation....

  20. Software Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Classroom Computer Learning, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are three computer software packages including "Martin Luther King, Jr.: Instant Replay of History,""Weeds to Trees," and "The New Print Shop, School Edition." Discussed are hardware requirements, costs, grade levels, availability, emphasis, strengths, and weaknesses. (CW)

  1. Software Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulfson, Stephen, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Reviews seven computer software programs that can be used in science education programs. Describes courseware which deals with muscles and bones, terminology, classifying animals without backbones, molecular structures, drugs, genetics, and shaping the earth's surface. (TW)

  2. Software Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Donna; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed are seven software packages for Apple and IBM computers. Included are: "Toxicology"; "Science Corner: Space Probe"; "Alcohol and Pregnancy"; "Science Tool Kit Plus"; Computer Investigations: Plant Growth"; "Climatrolls"; and "Animal Watch: Whales." (CW)

  3. Reusable Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-01

    overseeing reusable software, the Reusable Software Organization ( RUSO ). This author does not feel at this time that establishment of such a specific...49] have not been accompanied by establishment of RUSO -like activities. There is need, however, for assurance that functions which a RUSO might be...assurance 6. establishment and maintenance of reuse archival facilities and activities. Actual establishment of a RUSO is best dictated by size of the

  4. Software Epistemology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    comprehensive approach for determining software epistemology which significantly advances the state of the art in automated vulnerability discovery...straightforward. First, internet -based repositories of open source software (e.g., FreeBSD ports, GitHub, SourceForge, etc.) are mined Approved for...the fix delta, we attempted to perform the same process to determine if the firmware release present in an Internet -of-Things (IoT) streaming camera

  5. Effects of fertilizers used in agricultural fields on algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Subhendu; Tiwari, P. K.; Sasmal, S. K.; Misra, A. K.; Chattopadhyay, Joydev

    2017-06-01

    The increasing occurrence of algal blooms and their negative ecological impacts have led to intensified monitoring activities. This needs the proper identification of the most responsible factor/factors for the bloom formation. However, in natural systems, algal blooms result from a combination of factors and from observation it is difficult to identify the most important one. In the present paper, using a mathematical model we compare the effects of three human induced factors (fertilizer input in agricultural field, eutrophication due to other sources than fertilizers, and overfishing) on the bloom dynamics and DO level. By applying a sophisticated sensitivity analysis technique, we found that the increasing use of fertilizers in agricultural field causes more rapid algal growth and decreases DO level much faster than eutrophication from other sources and overfishing. We also look at the mechanisms how fertilizer input rate affects the algal bloom dynamics and DO level. The model can be helpful for the policy makers in determining the influential factors responsible for the bloom formation.

  6. Identification of genetically and oceanographically distinct blooms of jellyfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Patricia L M; Dawson, Michael N; Neill, Simon P; Robins, Peter E; Houghton, Jonathan D R; Doyle, Thomas K; Hays, Graeme C

    2013-03-06

    Reports of nuisance jellyfish blooms have increased worldwide during the last half-century, but the possible causes remain unclear. A persistent difficulty lies in identifying whether blooms occur owing to local or regional processes. This issue can be resolved, in part, by establishing the geographical scales of connectivity among locations, which may be addressed using genetic analyses and oceanographic modelling. We used landscape genetics and Lagrangian modelling of oceanographic dispersal to explore patterns of connectivity in the scyphozoan jellyfish Rhizostoma octopus, which occurs en masse at locations in the Irish Sea and northeastern Atlantic. We found significant genetic structure distinguishing three populations, with both consistencies and inconsistencies with prevailing physical oceanographic patterns. Our analyses identify locations where blooms occur in apparently geographically isolated populations, locations where blooms may be the source or result of migrants, and a location where blooms do not occur consistently and jellyfish are mostly immigrant. Our interdisciplinary approach thus provides a means to ascertain the geographical origins of jellyfish in outbreaks, which may have wide utility as increased international efforts investigate jellyfish blooms.

  7. Competing phytoplankton undermines allelopathy of a bloom-forming dinoflagellate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Emily K; Myers, Tracey L; Naar, Jerome; Kubanek, Julia

    2008-12-07

    Biotic interactions in the plankton can be both complex and dynamic. Competition among phytoplankton is often chemically mediated, but no studies have considered whether allelopathic compounds are modified by biotic interactions. Here, we show that compounds exuded during Karenia brevis blooms were allelopathic to the cosmopolitan diatom Skeletonema costatum, but that bloom allelopathy varied dramatically among collections and years. We investigated several possible causes of this variability and found that neither bloom density nor concentrations of water-borne brevetoxins correlated with allelopathic potency. However, when we directly tested whether the presence of competing phytoplankton influenced bloom allelopathy, we found that S. costatum reduced the growth-inhibiting effects of bloom exudates, suggesting that S. costatum has a mechanism for undermining K. brevis allelopathy. Additional laboratory experiments indicated that inducible changes to K. brevis allelopathy were restricted to two diatoms among five sensitive phytoplankton species, whereas five other species were constitutively resistant to K. brevis allelopathy. Our results suggest that competitors differ in their responses to phytoplankton allelopathy, with S. costatum exhibiting a previously undescribed method of resistance that may influence community structure and alter bloom dynamics.

  8. Harmful algal bloom smart device application: using image analysis and machine learning techniques for early classification of harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ecological Stewardship Institute at Northern Kentucky University and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are collaborating to optimize a harmful algal bloom detection algorithm that estimates the presence and count of cyanobacteria in freshwater systems by image analysis...

  9. Harmful algal bloom smart device application: using image analysis and machine learning techniques for early classification of harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ecological Stewardship Institute at Northern Kentucky University and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency are collaborating to optimize a harmful algal bloom detection algorithm that estimates the presence and count of cyanobacteria in freshwater systems by image analysis...

  10. Spring blooms in the Baltic Sea have weakened but lengthened from 2000 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groetsch, Philipp M. M.; Simis, Stefan G. H.; Eleveld, Marieke A.; Peters, Steef W. M.

    2016-09-01

    Phytoplankton spring bloom phenology was derived from a 15-year time series (2000-2014) of ship-of-opportunity chlorophyll a fluorescence observations collected in the Baltic Sea through the Alg@line network. Decadal trends were analysed against inter-annual variability in bloom timing and intensity, and environmental drivers (nutrient concentration, temperature, radiation level, wind speed).Spring blooms developed from the south to the north, with the first blooms peaking mid-March in the Bay of Mecklenburg and the latest bloom peaks occurring mid-April in the Gulf of Finland. Bloom duration was similar between sea areas (43 ± 2 day), except for shorter bloom duration in the Bay of Mecklenburg (36 ± 11 day). Variability in bloom timing increased towards the south. Bloom peak chlorophyll a concentrations were highest (and most variable) in the Gulf of Finland (20.2 ± 5.7 mg m-3) and the Bay of Mecklenburg (12.3 ± 5.2 mg m-3).Bloom peak chlorophyll a concentration showed a negative trend of -0.31 ± 0.10 mg m-3 yr-1. Trend-agnostic distribution-based (Weibull-type) bloom metrics showed a positive trend in bloom duration of 1.04 ± 0.20 day yr-1, which was not found with any of the threshold-based metrics. The Weibull bloom metric results were considered representative in the presence of bloom intensity trends.Bloom intensity was mainly determined by winter nutrient concentration, while bloom timing and duration co-varied with meteorological conditions. Longer blooms corresponded to higher water temperature, more intense solar radiation, and lower wind speed. It is concluded that nutrient reduction efforts led to decreasing bloom intensity, while changes in Baltic Sea environmental conditions associated with global change corresponded to a lengthening spring bloom period.

  11. Monitoring for Harmful Algal Blooms in Influent Waters and Through Treatment on Lake Erie in the 2013 and 2014 Bloom Seasons 

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monitoring of Harmful Algal Blooms in Influent and Through Drinking Water Treatment Facilities Located on Lake Erie in the 2013 and 2014 Bloom SeasonsToby Sanan, Nicholas Dugan, Darren Lytle, Heath MashHarmful algal blooms (HABs) and their associated toxins are emerging as signif...

  12. The Blooming Anatomy Tool (BAT): A Discipline-Specific Rubric for Utilizing Bloom's Taxonomy in the Design and Evaluation of Assessments in the Anatomical Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Andrew R.; O'Loughlin, Valerie D.

    2015-01-01

    Bloom's taxonomy is a resource commonly used to assess the cognitive level associated with course assignments and examination questions. Although widely utilized in educational research, Bloom's taxonomy has received limited attention as an analytical tool in the anatomical sciences. Building on previous research, the Blooming Anatomy Tool (BAT)…

  13. Evaluation of Harmful Algal Bloom Outreach Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Weisman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available With an apparent increase of harmful algal blooms (HABs worldwide,healthcare providers, public health personnel and coastal managers are struggling toprovide scientifically-based appropriately-targeted HAB outreach and education. Since1998, the Florida Poison Information Center-Miami, with its 24 hour/365 day/year freeAquatic Toxins Hotline (1-888-232-8635 available in several languages, has received over 25,000 HAB-related calls. As part of HAB surveillance, all possible cases of HAB-relatedillness among callers are reported to the Florida Health Department. This pilot studyevaluated an automated call processing menu system that allows callers to access bilingualHAB information, and to speak directly with a trained Poison Information Specialist. Themajority (68% of callers reported satisfaction with the information, and many provided specific suggestions for improvement. This pilot study, the first known evaluation of use and satisfaction with HAB educational outreach materials, demonstrated that the automated system provided useful HAB-related information for the majority of callers, and decreased the routine informational call workload for the Poison Information Specialists, allowing them to focus on callers needing immediate assistance and their healthcare providers. These results will lead to improvement of this valuable HAB outreach, education and surveillance tool. Formal evaluation is recommended for future HAB outreach and educational materials.

  14. Technology and Bloom's Taxonomy: Tools to facilitate higher-level learning in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Matthew Earle

    This research project ties together chemistry data acquisition technology, introductory chemistry laboratory experiments. and Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives into a unified learning model. The goal is to provide faculty and introductory chemistry students with the tools and exercises to experience higher levels of learning, as defined by Bloom's taxonomy. The tools developed as part of this project include data acquisition hardware and software, communications software, and computer simulations that enable higher-level learning situations. A series of five experiments using a discovery-based teaching model are developed as part of the learning model. The experiments bring together the hardware tools, software tools, and learning model to place students in situations that require students to use critical thinking skills and experience higher-level learning. Content-related application problems are also included in the experiments. The experiments are divided into three chemistry units of instruction that build on each other, but can also be used independently. Instructor training is an important part of this project. The successful integration of technology into educational situations cannot be accomplished without the support and understanding of faculty, staff, and teaching assistants. This aspect of the project focuses on shifting teaching and learning paradigms to encourage appropriate technology use and allow technology to become a major aspect of the high-level learning environment. Finally, students were surveyed in an attempt to measure the effectiveness of the learning model. Students were evaluated on chemistry concept retention, as well as their perception of learning. They were also asked how well they enjoyed this form of learning. Along with the tools themselves, this project provides templates that can launch future work in this area. The learning model, data acquisition tools, and experiment writing templates are developed here to provide

  15. RNA profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing reveal that PTF1a stabilizes pancreas progenitor identity via the control of MNX1/HLXB9 and a network of other transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Nancy; Gésina, Emilie; Scheinert, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Pancreas development is initiated by the specification and expansion of a small group of endodermal cells. Several transcription factors are crucial for progenitor maintenance and expansion, but their interactions and the downstream targets mediating their activity are poorly understood. Among...... those factors, PTF1a, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor which controls pancreas exocrine cell differentiation, maintenance, and functionality, is also needed for the early specification of pancreas progenitors. We used RNA profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) sequencing...... to identify a set of targets in pancreas progenitors. We demonstrate that Mnx1, a gene that is absolutely required in pancreas progenitors, is a major direct target of PTF1a and is regulated by a distant enhancer element. Pdx1, Nkx6.1, and Onecut1 are also direct PTF1a targets whose expression is promoted...

  16. Chlorophyll Blooms in the Oligotropic Gyres: Ocean oases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.; Maximenko, N.

    2005-12-01

    Ocean color images from the SeaWiFS satellite have revealed that large blooms of chlorophyll sometimes develop in late summer northeast of Hawaii in the oligotrophic Pacific. While these blooms are a recurrent feature, appearing almost every year, their existence was only recently discovered from satellite imagery of ocean color. They have been observed in 11 of 16 years of satellite ocean color data (CZCS, OCTS and SeaWiFS), can last up to 4-5 months, and can get as big as the state of California. Since the blooms have never been purposely sampled, it remains uncertain what species they are composed of, what mechanisms supply nutrients to support the elevated biomass, and what their impacts are on higher trophic levels. However, conventional scenarios of upwelled nutrients or enhanced mixing deepening the mixed layer into the nutricline do not seem to be operable. Instead, research has suggested that the source of new nutrients is biologically mediated, either by nitrogen fixing organisms, or by the vertical migration of diatom mats below the nutricline. Physical dynamics affect the blooms on a basin-wide scale. The blooms only appear in the eastern gyre of the Pacific, a closed anticyclonic gyre that has enhanced convergence relative to the rest of the Pacific, suggesting that blooms develop in part from a large-scale aggregation of the buoyant organisms proposed to be associated with them. While these proposed biological and physical dynamics are speculative, if similar blooms appear in other oceans, analysis of the common features of their physical environments will help to better pinpoint the physical forcings involved. Analysis of the global fields of SeaWiFS satellite chlorophyll shows that while not nearly as common as in the North Pacific, potentially similar blooms occur in the North and South Atlantic, and the North Indian Oceans, but not in the S. Pacific. However, unlike in the N. Pacific, these blooms are not always associated with strong convergence

  17. Improving Bloom Filter Performance on Sequence Data Using k-mer Bloom Filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellow, David; Filippova, Darya; Kingsford, Carl

    2017-06-01

    Using a sequence's k-mer content rather than the full sequence directly has enabled significant performance improvements in several sequencing applications, such as metagenomic species identification, estimation of transcript abundances, and alignment-free comparison of sequencing data. As k-mer sets often reach hundreds of millions of elements, traditional data structures are often impractical for k-mer set storage, and Bloom filters (BFs) and their variants are used instead. BFs reduce the memory footprint required to store millions of k-mers while allowing for fast set containment queries, at the cost of a low false positive rate (FPR). We show that, because k-mers are derived from sequencing reads, the information about k-mer overlap in the original sequence can be used to reduce the FPR up to 30 × with little or no additional memory and with set containment queries that are only 1.3 - 1.6 times slower. Alternatively, we can leverage k-mer overlap information to store k-mer sets in about half the space while maintaining the original FPR. We consider several variants of such k-mer Bloom filters (kBFs), derive theoretical upper bounds for their FPR, and discuss their range of applications and limitations.

  18. MIAWARE Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkowski, Bartlomiej; Pereira, Oscar N. M.; Dias, Paulo

    2008-01-01

    This article presents MIAWARE, a software for Medical Image Analysis With Automated Reporting Engine, which was designed and developed for doctor/radiologist assistance. It allows to analyze an image stack from computed axial tomography scan of lungs (thorax) and, at the same time, to mark all...... pathologies on images and report their characteristics. The reporting process is normalized - radiologists cannot describe pathological changes with their own words, but can only use some terms from a specific vocabulary set provided by the software. Consequently, a normalized radiological report...... is automatically generated. Furthermore, MIAWARE software is accompanied with an intelligent search engine for medical reports, based on the relations between parts of the lungs. A logical structure of the lungs is introduced to the search algorithm through the specially developed ontology. As a result...

  19. Software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Thorin, Marc

    1985-01-01

    Software Engineering describes the conceptual bases as well as the main methods and rules on computer programming. This book presents software engineering as a coherent and logically built synthesis and makes it possible to properly carry out an application of small or medium difficulty that can later be developed and adapted to more complex cases. This text is comprised of six chapters and begins by introducing the reader to the fundamental notions of entities, actions, and programming. The next two chapters elaborate on the concepts of information and consistency domains and show that a proc

  20. Physical and biological data collected along the Texas, Mississippi, and Florida Gulf coasts in the Gulf of Mexico as part of the Harmful Algal BloomS Observing System from 19 Aug 1953 to 11 July 2014 (NODC Accession 0120767)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — HABSOS (Harmful Algal BloomS Observing System) is a data collection and distribution system for harmful algal bloom (HAB) information in the Gulf of Mexico. The goal...

  1. [Software version and medical device software supervision].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Liang; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    The importance of software version in the medical device software supervision does not cause enough attention at present. First of all, the effect of software version in the medical device software supervision is discussed, and then the necessity of software version in the medical device software supervision is analyzed based on the discussion of the misunderstanding of software version. Finally the concrete suggestions on software version naming rules, software version supervision for the software in medical devices, and software version supervision scheme are proposed.

  2. Gemini Observatory Operations and Software for the 2020s

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bryan W.; Stephens, Andrew W.; Nunez, Arturo; Schirmer, Mischa

    2017-01-01

    Gemini Observatory is planning several major software upgrades to improve usability and maintenance and to help prepare Gemini for the LSST, ELT, and JWST era. Gemini is currently a leader in target-of-opportunity (ToO) observing (e.g. SNe and GRB follow-up, solar system objects, eclipses, occultations) due to the dominant queue mode of observing. In the era of large transient surveys (e.g. iPTF, Catalina, Pan-STARRS, and especially LSST) and other transient surveys we expect that the follow-up of faint transient sources will become a very significant, if not dominant, use of Gemini. The next Gemini instrument, Gen4#3, is being designed for transient follow-up. However, much of Gemini's software infrastructure is now more than 15 years old is not sufficiently user-friendly, scalable, or maintainable. Therefore, we are embarking on a series of upgrade projects with the goals of making Gemini easier to use, making the system more scalable and flexible, and ensuring that the system is maintainable for the next 15 years. This poster will describe the ongoing projects and future plans to upgrade the real-time control systems, develop a new Observatory Control System (including a potential rewrite of the Observing Tool and an automated scheduling capability), and integrate into future ToO networks. Feedback on requirements for new user software, in particular, is requested.

  3. Harmful Freshwater Algal Blooms, With an Emphasis on Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans W. Paerl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspended algae, or phytoplankton, are the prime source of organic matter supporting food webs in freshwater ecosystems. Phytoplankton productivity is reliant on adequate nutrient supplies; however, increasing rates of nutrient supply, much of it manmade, fuels accelerating primary production or eutrophication. An obvious and problematic symptom of eutrophication is rapid growth and accumulations of phytoplankton, leading to discoloration of affected waters. These events are termed blooms. Blooms are a prime agent of water quality deterioration, including foul odors and tastes, deoxygenation of bottom waters (hypoxia and anoxia, toxicity, fish kills, and food web alterations. Toxins produced by blooms can adversely affect animal (including human health in waters used for recreational and drinking purposes. Numerous freshwater genera within the diverse phyla comprising the phytoplankton are capable of forming blooms; however, the blue-green algae (or cyanobacteria are the most notorious bloom formers. This is especially true for harmful toxic, surface-dwelling, scum-forming genera (e.g., Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Nodularia, Microcystis and some subsurface bloom-formers (Cylindrospermopsis, Oscillatoria that are adept at exploiting nutrient-enriched conditions. They thrive in highly productive waters by being able to rapidly migrate between radiance-rich surface waters and nutrient-rich bottom waters. Furthermore, many harmful species are tolerant of extreme environmental conditions, including very high light levels, high temperatures, various degrees of desiccation, and periodic nutrient deprivation. Some of the most noxious cyanobacterial bloom genera (e.g., Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, Cylindrospermopsis, Nodularia are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen (N2, enabling them to periodically dominate under nitrogen-limited conditions. Cyanobacteria produce a range of organic compounds, including those that are toxic to higher-ranked consumers, from

  4. Educational Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.

    The third session of IT@EDU98 consisted of five papers on educational software and was chaired by Tran Van Hao (University of Education, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam). "Courseware Engineering" (Nguyen Thanh Son, Ngo Ngoc Bao Tran, Quan Thanh Tho, Nguyen Hong Lam) briefly describes the use of courseware. "Machine Discovery Theorems in Geometry: A…

  5. Software Patents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edmund B.

    1994-01-01

    Outlines basic patent law information that pertains to computer software programs. Topics addressed include protection in other countries; how to obtain patents; kinds of patents; duration; classes of patentable subject matter, including machines and processes; patentability searches; experimental use prior to obtaining a patent; and patent…

  6. Software Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔涛; 周淼

    1996-01-01

    The information used with computers is known as software and includesprograms and data. Programs are sets of instructions telling the computerwhat operations have to be carried out and in what order they should be done. Specialised programs which enable the computer to be used for particularpurposes are called applications programs. A collection of these programs kept

  7. Software Reviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Science and Children, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Reviewed are seven computer software packages for IBM and/or Apple Computers. Included are "Windows on Science: Volume 1--Physical Science"; "Science Probe--Physical Science"; "Wildlife Adventures--Grizzly Bears"; "Science Skills--Development Programs"; "The Clean Machine"; "Rock Doctor"; and "Geology Search." Cost, quality, hardware, and…

  8. Software Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Diane, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Reviewed is a computer software package entitled "Audubon Wildlife Adventures: Grizzly Bears" for Apple II and IBM microcomputers. Included are availability, hardware requirements, cost, and a description of the program. The murder-mystery flavor of the program is stressed in this program that focuses on illegal hunting and game management. (CW)

  9. Optical detection of Prorocentrum donghaiense blooms based on multispectral reflectance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Bangyi; PAN Delu; MAO Zhihua; SHEN Yuzhang; ZHU Qiankun; CHEN Jianyu

    2013-01-01

    Prorocentrum donghaiense is one of the most common red tide causative dinoflagellates in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River Estuary and the adjacent area of the East China Sea. It causes large-scale blooms in late spring and early summer that lead to widespread ecologic and economic damage. A means for distinguish-ing dinoflagellate blooms from diatom (Skeletonema costatum) blooms is desired. On the basis of measure-ments of remote sensing reflectance [Rrs(λ)] and inherent optical parameters, the potential of using a mul-tispectral approach is assessed for discriminating the algal blooms due to P. donghaiense from those due to S. costatum. The behavior of two reflectance ratios [R1 =Rrs(560)/Rrs(532) and R2 =Rrs(708)/Rrs(665)], suggests that differentiation of P. donghaiense blooms from diatom bloom types is possible from the current band setup of ocean color sensors. It is found that there are two reflectance ratio regimes that indicate a bloom is dominated by P. donghaiense: (1) R1 >1.55 and R2 1.75 and R2 ?1.0. Various sensitivity analyses are conducted to investigate the effects of the variation in varying levels of chlorophyll concentration and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) as well as changes in the backscattering ratio (bbp/bp) on the efficacy of this multispectral approach. Results indicate that the intensity and inherent op-tical properties of the algal species explain much of the behavior of the two ratios. Although backscattering influences the amplitude of Rrs(λ), especially in the 530 and 560 nm bands, the discrimination between P. donghaiense and diatoms is not significantly affected by the variation of bbp/bp. Since a CDOM(440) in coastal areas of the ECS is typically lower than 1.0 m−1 in most situations, the presence of CDOM does not interfere with this discrimination, even as SCDOM varies from 0.01 to 0.026 nm−1. Despite all of these effects, the dis-crimination of P. donghaiense blooms from diatom blooms based on multispectral

  10. Climbing Bloom's taxonomy pyramid: Lessons from a graduate histology course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Nikki B; Hwang, Charles; Scott, Sara; Stallard, Stefanie; Purkiss, Joel; Hortsch, Michael

    2017-02-23

    Bloom's taxonomy was adopted to create a subject-specific scoring tool for histology multiple-choice questions (MCQs). This Bloom's Taxonomy Histology Tool (BTHT) was used to analyze teacher- and student-generated quiz and examination questions from a graduate level histology course. Multiple-choice questions using histological images were generally assigned a higher BTHT level than simple text questions. The type of microscopy technique (light or electron microscopy) used for these image-based questions did not result in any significant differences in their Bloom's taxonomy scores. The BTHT levels for teacher-generated MCQs correlated positively with higher discrimination indices and inversely with the percent of students answering these questions correctly (difficulty index), suggesting that higher-level Bloom's taxonomy questions differentiate well between higher- and lower-performing students. When examining BTHT scores for MCQs that were written by students in a Multiple-Choice Item Development Assignment (MCIDA) there was no significant correlation between these scores and the students' ability to answer teacher-generated MCQs. This suggests that the ability to answer histology MCQs relies on a different skill set than the aptitude to construct higher-level Bloom's taxonomy questions. However, students significantly improved their average BTHT scores from the midterm to the final MCIDA task, which indicates that practice, experience and feedback increased their MCQ writing proficiency. Anat Sci Educ. © 2017 American Association of Anatomists.

  11. Toxicity of harmful cyanobacterial blooms to bream and roach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinchet, Isabelle; Cadel-Six, Sabrina; Djediat, Chakib; Marie, Benjamin; Bernard, Cécile; Puiseux-Dao, Simone; Krys, Sophie; Edery, Marc

    2013-09-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are facing increasing environmental pressures, leading to an increasing frequency of cyanobacterial Harmful Algal Blooms (cHABs) that have emerged as a worldwide concern due to their growing frequency and their potential toxicity to the fauna that threatens the functioning of ecosystems. Cyanobacterial blooms raise concerns due to the fact that several strains produce potent bioactive or toxic secondary metabolites, such as the microcystins (MCs), which are hepatotoxic to vertebrates. These strains of cyanobacteria may be potentially toxic to fish via gastrointestinal ingestion and also by direct absorption of the toxin MC from the water. The purpose of our study was to investigate toxic effects observed in fish taken from several lakes in the Ile-de-France region, where MCs-producing blooms occur. This study comprises histological studies and the measurement of MC concentrations in various organs. The histological findings are similar to those obtained following laboratory exposure of medaka fish to MCs: hepatic lesions predominate and include cell lysis and cell detachment. MC concentrations in the organs revealed that accumulation was particularly high in the digestive tract and the liver, which are known to be classical targets of MCs. In contrast concentrations were very low in the muscles. Differences in the accumulation of MC variants produced by blooms indicate that in order to more precisely evaluate the toxic potential of a specific bloom it is necessary not only to consider the concentration of toxins, but also the variants produced.

  12. Language Classification using N-grams Accelerated by FPGA-based Bloom Filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, A; Gokhale, M

    2007-09-13

    N-Gram (n-character sequences in text documents) counting is a well-established technique used in classifying the language of text in a document. In this paper, n-gram processing is accelerated through the use of reconfigurable hardware on the XtremeData XD1000 system. Our design employs parallelism at multiple levels, with parallel Bloom Filters accessing on-chip RAM, parallel language classifiers, and parallel document processing. In contrast to another hardware implementation (HAIL algorithm) that uses off-chip SRAM for lookup, our highly scalable implementation uses only on-chip memory blocks. Our implementation of end-to-end language classification runs at 85x comparable software and 1.45x the competing hardware design.

  13. A secure data outsourcing scheme based on Asmuth-Bloom secret sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris Muhammad, Yusuf; Kaiiali, Mustafa; Habbal, Adib; Wazan, A. S.; Sani Ilyasu, Auwal

    2016-11-01

    Data outsourcing is an emerging paradigm for data management in which a database is provided as a service by third-party service providers. One of the major benefits of offering database as a service is to provide organisations, which are unable to purchase expensive hardware and software to host their databases, with efficient data storage accessible online at a cheap rate. Despite that, several issues of data confidentiality, integrity, availability and efficient indexing of users' queries at the server side have to be addressed in the data outsourcing paradigm. Service providers have to guarantee that their clients' data are secured against internal (insider) and external attacks. This paper briefly analyses the existing indexing schemes in data outsourcing and highlights their advantages and disadvantages. Then, this paper proposes a secure data outsourcing scheme based on Asmuth-Bloom secret sharing which tries to address the issues in data outsourcing such as data confidentiality, availability and order preservation for efficient indexing.

  14. Hydrodynamic control of microphytoplankton bloom in a coastal sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murty, K. Narasimha; Sarma, Nittala S.; Pandi, Sudarsana Rao; Chiranjeevulu, Gundala; Kiran, Rayaprolu; Muralikrishna, R.

    2017-08-01

    The influence of hydrodynamics on phytoplankton bloom occurrence/formation has not been adequately reported. Here, we document diurnal observations in the tropical Bay of Bengal's mid-western shelf region which reveal microphytoplankton cell density maxima in association with neap tide many times more than what could be accounted for by solar insolation and nutrient levels. When in summer, phytoplankton cells were abundant and the cell density of Guinardia delicatula reached critical value by tide caused zonation, aggregation happened to an intense bloom. Mucilaginous exudates from the alga due to heat and silicate stress likely promoted and stable water column and weak winds left undisturbed, the transient bloom. The phytoplankton aggregates have implication as food resource in the benthic region implying higher fishery potential, in carbon dioxide sequestration (carbon burial) and in efforts towards improving remote sensing algorithms for chlorophyll in the coastal region.

  15. Hydrodynamic control of microphytoplankton bloom in a coastal sea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Narasimha Murty; Nittala S Sarma; Sudarsana Rao Pandi; Gundala Chiranjeevulu; Rayaprolu Kiran; R Muralikrishna

    2017-08-01

    The influence of hydrodynamics on phytoplankton bloom occurrence/formation has not been adequately reported. Here, we document diurnal observations in the tropical Bay of Bengal’s mid-western shelf region which reveal microphytoplankton cell density maxima in association with neap tide many times more than what could be accounted for by solar insolation and nutrient levels. When in summer, phytoplankton cells were abundant and the cell density of Guinardia delicatula reached critical value by tide caused zonation, aggregation happened to an intense bloom. Mucilaginous exudates from the alga due to heat and silicate stress likely promoted and stable water column and weak winds left undisturbed, the transient bloom. The phytoplankton aggregates have implication as food resource in the benthic region implying higher fishery potential, in carbon dioxide sequestration (carbon burial) and in efforts towards improving remote sensing algorithms for chlorophyll in the coastal region.

  16. Burkitt lymphoma in a child with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedhila-Ben Ayed, F; Douira-Khomsi, W; Rhayem, S; Jelassi, M; Zribi, H; Chaabouni, M; Khemiri, M; Bellagha, I; Barsaoui, S

    2016-04-01

    Bloom syndrome is a rare disease characterized by chromosomal instability and increased risk of developing lymphoma. We report on a case of Bloom syndrome in a 5-year-old boy with Burkitt lymphoma. The diagnosis was suspected by growth retardation, repeated respiratory infections, facial telangiectasia, and a low immunoglobulin level, then confirmed cytogenetically by sister chromatid exchanges. Chemotherapy was poorly tolerated, which required reducing the doses. Unfortunately, it was not sufficient to control the neoplasm and the patient died 14 months after diagnosis. Cancers in Bloom syndrome are a challenge since the potentially life-threatening side effects of the chemotherapy may require modifications in standard treatment such as dose reduction, which can compromise the tumor prognosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical Follow-Up Observations of PTF10qts, a Luminous Broad-Lined Type Ic Supernova Found by the Palomar Transient Factory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, E. S.; Mazzali, P. A.; Pian, E.; Hurley, K.; Arcavi, I.; Cenko, S. B.; Gal-Yam, A.; Horesh, A.; Kasliwal, M.; Poznanski, D.; Silverman, J. M.; Barthelmy, S.

    2014-01-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SN Ic-BL) PTF10qts, which was discovered as part of the Palomar Transient Factory. The supernova was located in a dwarf galaxy of magnitude r = 21.1 at a redshift z = 0.0907.We find that the R-band light curve is a poor proxy for bolometric data and use photometric and spectroscopic data to construct and constrain the bolometric light curve. The derived bolometric magnitude at maximum light is Mbol = -18.51 +/- 0.2 mag, comparable to that of SN1998bw (Mbol = -18.7 mag) which was associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). PTF10qts is one of the most luminous SN Ic-BL observed without an accompanying GRB. We estimate the physical parameters of the explosion using data from our programme of follow-up observations, finding that it produced a larger mass of radioactive nickel compared to other SNeIc-BL with similar inferred ejecta masses and kinetic energies. The progenitor of the event was likely a approximately 20 solar mass star.

  18. Progenitors of supernova Ibc: a single Wolf-Rayet star as the possible progenitor of the SN Ib iPTF13bvn

    CERN Document Server

    Groh, Jose H; Ekstrom, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Core-collapse supernova (SN) explosions mark the end of the tumultuous life of massive stars. Determining the nature of their progenitors is a crucial step towards understanding the properties of SNe. Until recently, no progenitor has been directly detected for SN of type Ibc, which are believed to come from massive stars that lose their Hydrogen envelope through stellar winds and from binary systems where the companion has stripped the H envelope from the primary. Here we analyze recently-reported observations of iPTF13bvn, which could possibly be the first detection of a SN Ib progenitor based on pre-explosion images. Very interestingly, the recently published Geneva models of single stars can reproduce the observed photometry of the progenitor candidate and its mass-loss rate, confirming the scenario from Cao et al 2013. We find that a single WR star with initial mass in the range 31-35 Msun fits the observed photometry of the progenitor of iPTF13bvn. The progenitor likely has a luminosity of log (L/Lsun)~...

  19. Optical Follow-Up Observations of PTF10qts, a Luminous Broad-Lined Type Ic Supernova Found by the Palomar Transient Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, E S; Pian, E; Hurley, K; Arcavi, I; Cenko, S B; Gal-Yam, A; Horesh, A; Kasliwal, M; Poznanski, D; Silverman, J M; Sullivan, M; Bloom, J S; Filippenko, A V; Kulkarni, S R; Nugent, P E; Ofek, E; Barthelmy, S; Boynton, W; Goldsten, J; Golenetskii, S; Ohno, M; Tashiro, M S; Yamaoka, K; Zhang, X L-

    2014-01-01

    We present optical photometry and spectroscopy of the broad-lined Type Ic supernova (SNIc-BL) PTF10qts, which was discovered as part of the Palomar Transient Factory. The supernova was located in a dwarf galaxy of magnitude $r=21.1$ at a redshift $z=0.0907$. We find that the $R$-band light curve is a poor proxy for bolometric data and use photometric and spectroscopic data to construct and constrain the bolometric light curve. The derived bolometric magnitude at maximum light is $M_{\\rm bol} = -18.51\\pm0.2$ mag, comparable to that of SN 1998bw ($M_{\\rm bol} = -18.7$ mag) which was associated with a gamma-ray burst (GRB). PTF10qts is one of the most luminous SNIc-BL observed without an accompanying GRB. We estimate the physical parameters of the explosion using data from our programme of follow-up observations, finding that it produced a larger mass of radioactive nickel compared to other SNeIc-BL with similar inferred ejecta masses and kinetic energies. The progenitor of the event was likely a $\\sim20$M$_{\\od...

  20. Harmful Algal Bloom in Iligan Bay, Southern Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen J Vicente

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the first occurrence of harmful algal bloom (HAB caused by a non-toxic dinoflagellate, Cochlodinium sp. in Philippine waters, particularly, in Kalangahan Pt.-Manticao Pt., Iligan Bay on March 13-18, 2002. Two patches of Cochlodinium sp. bloom, associated with fish kills in Kalangahan Pt.-Mantacao Pt., Iligan Bay, caused localized water discoloration from the usual ocean blue to rusty brown or reddish brown to blackish. The first patch, located near fish-aggregating device (FAD areas, spanned 2 km wide, while the second patch, located near a fish corral, spanned 500m wide. These patches occupied the water column from surface to 5 m depth, but a thick mat formed at 0.5 m to surface. Patches occupied the water column from surface to 5 m depth, but a thick mat formed at 0.5 m to surface. Patches decreased as the bloom began to decline. The observed dead demersal and pelagic fishes coincided with highest bloom density of 3.1 x 104 to 3.8 x 104 cells ml-1 of Cochlodinium. Dissected gills and stomach contents of fishes killed in HAB-affected areas did not reveal any indication of clogging of gills by Cochlodinium sp. Fishes covered by the “shading effect” of Cochlodinium bloom may have suffered anoxia or asphyxation due to oxygen depletion. No poisoning of people who consumed the dead fishes was reported. Laboratory analyses revealed lower DO values, 2.4 to 0.5 mg L-1from 2400 to 0600Hr; 14N:1P ratio; air-water temperature ranged from 28-29°C; pH 7.89-8.29; and salinity, 33-35°/oo. Favella sp., a tintinnid grazer of dinoflagellate was developing in the area at the termination of the Cochlodinium bloom on March 18.

  1. A novel single-parameter approach for forecasting algal blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xi; He, Junyu; Huang, Haomin; Miller, Todd R; Christakos, George; Reichwaldt, Elke S; Ghadouani, Anas; Lin, Shengpan; Xu, Xinhua; Shi, Jiyan

    2017-01-01

    Harmful algal blooms frequently occur globally, and forecasting could constitute an essential proactive strategy for bloom control. To decrease the cost of aquatic environmental monitoring and increase the accuracy of bloom forecasting, a novel single-parameter approach combining wavelet analysis with artificial neural networks (WNN) was developed and verified based on daily online monitoring datasets of algal density in the Siling Reservoir, China and Lake Winnebago, U.S.A. Firstly, a detailed modeling process was illustrated using the forecasting of cyanobacterial cell density in the Chinese reservoir as an example. Three WNN models occupying various prediction time intervals were optimized through model training using an early stopped training approach. All models performed well in fitting historical data and predicting the dynamics of cyanobacterial cell density, with the best model predicting cyanobacteria density one-day ahead (r = 0.986 and mean absolute error = 0.103 × 10(4) cells mL(-1)). Secondly, the potential of this novel approach was further confirmed by the precise predictions of algal biomass dynamics measured as chl a in both study sites, demonstrating its high performance in forecasting algal blooms, including cyanobacteria as well as other blooming species. Thirdly, the WNN model was compared to current algal forecasting methods (i.e. artificial neural networks, autoregressive integrated moving average model), and was found to be more accurate. In addition, the application of this novel single-parameter approach is cost effective as it requires only a buoy-mounted fluorescent probe, which is merely a fraction (∼15%) of the cost of a typical auto-monitoring system. As such, the newly developed approach presents a promising and cost-effective tool for the future prediction and management of harmful algal blooms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. EPIQR software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flourentzos, F. [Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (Switzerland); Droutsa, K. [National Observatory of Athens, Athens (Greece); Wittchen, K.B. [Danish Building Research Institute, Hoersholm (Denmark)

    1999-11-01

    The support of the EPIQR method is a multimedia computer program. Several modules help the users of the method to treat the data collected during a diagnosis survey, to set up refurbishment scenario and calculate their cost or energy performance, and finally to visualize the results in a comprehensive way and to prepare quality reports. This article presents the structure and the main features of the software. (au)

  3. EPIQR software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flourentzos, F. [Federal Institute of Technology-Lausanne (EPFL), Solar Energy and Building Physics Laboratory (LESO-PB), Lausanne (Switzerland); Droutsa, K. [National Observatory of Athens, Institute of Meteorology and Physics of Atmospheric Environment, Group Energy Conservation, Athens (Greece); Wittchen, K.B. [Danish Building Research Institute, Division of Energy and Indoor Environment, Hoersholm, (Denmark)

    2000-07-01

    The support of the EPIQR method is a multimedia computer program. Several modules help the users of the method to treat the data collected during a diagnosis survey, to set up refurbishment scenarios and calculate their cost or energy performance, and finally to visualize the results in a comprehensive way and to prepare quality reports. This article presents the structure and the main features of the software. (author)

  4. Software preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Vodopivec

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Comtrade Ltd. covers a wide range of activities related to information and communication technologies; its deliverables include web applications, locally installed programs,system software, drivers, embedded software (used e.g. in medical devices, auto parts,communication switchboards. Also the extensive knowledge and practical experience about digital long-term preservation technologies have been acquired. This wide spectrum of activities puts us in the position to discuss the often overlooked aspect of the digital preservation - preservation of software programs. There are many resources dedicated to digital preservation of digital data, documents and multimedia records,but not so many about how to preserve the functionalities and features of computer programs. Exactly these functionalities - dynamic response to inputs - render the computer programs rich compared to documents or linear multimedia. The article opens the questions on the beginning of the way to the permanent digital preservation. The purpose is to find a way in the right direction, where all relevant aspects will be covered in proper balance. The following questions are asked: why at all to preserve computer programs permanently, who should do this and for whom, when we should think about permanent program preservation, what should be persevered (such as source code, screenshots, documentation, and social context of the program - e.g. media response to it ..., where and how? To illustrate the theoretic concepts given the idea of virtual national museum of electronic banking is also presented.

  5. FANCM: A Landing Pad for the Fanconi Anemia and Bloom's Syndrome Complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Vinciguerra, Patrizia; D'Andrea, Alan D.

    2009-01-01

    Here, Deans and West (2009) reveal the molecular basis of the phenotypic similarities between Fanconi Anemia (FA) and Bloom's Syndrome, identifying FANCM as the anchor for both FA and Bloom's complexes at the site of the DNA interstrand crosslink.

  6. Intense blooms of Trichodesmium erythraeum (Cyanophyta) in the open waters along east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jyothibabu, R.; Madhu, N.V.; Murukesh, N.; Haridas, P.; Nair, K.K.C.; Venugopal, P.

    -1) was obtained in these regions, which indicated the enhancement of primary production in the earlier stages of the bloom. Very low NO3-N concentrations, brownish yellow bloom colour, undisturbed patches and high primary production strongly...

  7. Software Engineering to Professionalize Software Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Alonso

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The role, increasingly important, that plays the software in the systems with widespread effects presents new challenges for the formation of Software Engineers. Not only because social dependence software is increasing, but also because the character of software development is also changing and with it the demands for software developers certified. In this paper are propose some challenges and aspirations that guide the learning processes Software Engineering and help to identify the need to train professionals in software development.

  8. Marine harmful algal blooms, human health and wellbeing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berdalet, Elisa; Fleming, Lora E.; Gowen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Microalgal blooms are a natural part of the seasonal cycle of photosynthetic organisms in marine ecosystems. They are key components of the structure and dynamics of the oceans and thus sustain the benefits that humans obtain from these aquatic environments. However, some microalgal blooms can...... maintaining intensive, multidisciplinary and collaborative scientific research, and strengthening the coordination with stakeholders, policymakers and the general public. Here we provide an overview of different aspects of the HABs phenomena, an important element of the intrinsic links between oceans...

  9. [Causes of jellyfish blooms and their influence on marine environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Chang-feng; Song, Jin-ming; Li, Ning

    2014-12-01

    Jellyfish blooms have damaged the normal composition and function of marine ecosystem and ecological environments, which have been one of the new marine ecological disasters. In this study, we summarized the possible inducements of jellyfish blooms, and the influences of jellyfish blooms on biogenic elements, dissolved oxygen, seawater acidity and biological community were discussed emphatically. The results showed that jellyfish blooms had a close contact with its physiological structure and life history, which had favorable characteristics including simple body struc- ture, rapid growth, thriving reproduction and short generation interval to tolerate harsh environment better. Jellyfish abundance increased rapidly when it encountered suitable conditions. The temperature variations of seawater might be the major inducing factor which could result in jellyfish blooms. Jellyfish blooms may benefit from warmer temperature that could increase the food availability of jellyfish and promote jellyfish reproduction, especially for warm temperate jellyfish species. Eutrophication, climate change, overfishing, alien invasions and habitat modification were all possible important contributory factors of jellyfish blooms. Jellyfish could significantly influence the form distribution and biogeochemical cycling of biogenic elements. Jellyfish excreted NH4+ and P04(3-) at a rate of 59.1-91.5 micromol N x kg(-1) x h(-1) and 1.1-1.8 micromol P x kg(-1) x h(-1), which could meet about 8%-10% and 21.6% of the phytoplankton primary production requirement of N and P, respectively. Live jellyfish released dissolved organic carbon (DOC) at a rate of 1.0 micromol C x g(-1) x d(-1). As jellyfish decomposing, the effluxes of total N and total P were 4000 micromol N x kg(-1) x d(-1) and 120 micromol P x kg(-1) x d(-1), respectively, while the efflux of DOC reached 30 micromol C x g(-1) x d(-1). Jellyfish decomposition could cause seawater acidification and lowered level of dissolved oxygen

  10. The cognitive context of examinations in psychiatry using Bloom's taxonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, D A; Sadler, J Z; Mohl, P C; Melchiode, G A

    1991-11-01

    Psychiatric practice involves complex thinking patterns. In addition to commanding a huge number of facts, the student must learn to manipulate factual knowledge to solve diagnostic problems, develop treatment plans, and critically evaluate those plans. This study demonstrates an empirical method for evaluating the level of cognitive processes tested in multiple choice examinations. Use of Bloom's taxonomy in evaluating test items demonstrated the majority of test items on a psychiatry clerkship examination and a resident in-training examination fell into the most basic cognitive level, that of simple recall. The utility of Bloom's taxonomy is discussed along with implications for medical education.

  11. Improving retouched Bloom filter for trading off selected false positives against false negatives

    OpenAIRE

    Donnet, Benoît; Baynat, Bruno; Friedman, Timur

    2010-01-01

    Where distributed agents must share voluminous set membership information, Bloom fil- ters provide a compact, though lossy, way for them to do so. Numerous recent networking papers have examined the trade-offs between the bandwidth consumed by the transmis- sion of Bloom filters, and the error rate, which takes the form of false positives. This paper is about the retouched Bloom filter (RBF). An RBF is an extension that makes the Bloom fil- ter more flexible by permitting the removal of false...

  12. Retouched Bloom Filters: Allowing Networked Applications to Flexibly Trade Off False Positives Against False Negatives

    OpenAIRE

    Donnet, Benoît; Baynat, Bruno; Friedman, Timur

    2006-01-01

    Where distributed agents must share voluminous set mem- bership information, Bloom filters provide a compact, though lossy, way for them to do so. Numerous recent networking papers have examined the trade-offs between the bandwidth consumed by the transmission of Bloom filters, and the er- ror rate, which takes the form of false positives, and which rises the more the filters are compressed. In this paper, we introduce the retouched Bloom filter (RBF), an extension that makes the Bloom filter...

  13. Context discovery using attenuated Bloom filters in ad-hoc networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, F.; Heijenk, Gerhard J.

    2007-01-01

    A novel approach to performing context discovery in ad-hoc networks based on the use of attenuated Bloom filters is proposed in this paper. A Bloom filter is an efficient spacesaving data structure to represent context information. Attenuated Bloom filters are used to advertise the availability of c

  14. Return bloom in 'Stayman' apple with NAA and/or ethephon: 2007 through 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following a season in which apple trees produce a full crop, many cultivars fail to produce enough bloom the next year for an adequate crop. Obtaining good return bloom is a problem for many apple growers. Plant growth regulators (PGRs) are recommended to enhance return bloom in apple. This study...

  15. A Preliminary Bloom's Taxonomy Assessment of End-of-Chapter Problems in Business School Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jennings B.; Carson, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    This article examines textbook problems used in a sampling of some of the most common core courses found in schools of business to ascertain what level of learning, as defined by Bloom's Taxonomy, is required to provide a correct answer. A set of working definitions based on Bloom's Taxonomy (Bloom & Krathwohl, 1956) was developed for the six…

  16. Space Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Xontech, Inc.'s software package, XonVu, simulates the missions of Voyager 1 at Jupiter and Saturn, Voyager 2 at Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, and Giotto in close encounter with Comet Halley. With the program, the user can generate scenes of the planets, moons, stars or Halley's nucleus and tail as seen by Giotto, all graphically reproduced with high accuracy in wireframe representation. Program can be used on a wide range of computers, including PCs. User friendly and interactive, with many options, XonVu can be used by a space novice or a professional astronomer. With a companion user's manual, it sells for $79.

  17. Software architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Vogel, Oliver; Chughtai, Arif

    2011-01-01

    As a software architect you work in a wide-ranging and dynamic environment. You have to understand the needs of your customer, design architectures that satisfy both functional and non-functional requirements, and lead development teams in implementing the architecture. And it is an environment that is constantly changing: trends such as cloud computing, service orientation, and model-driven procedures open up new architectural possibilities. This book will help you to develop a holistic architectural awareness and knowledge base that extends beyond concrete methods, techniques, and technologi

  18. Eutrophic urban ponds suffer from cyanobacterial blooms: Dutch examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waajen, Guido W. A. M.; Faassen, Elisabeth J.; Lurling, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    Ponds play an important role in urban areas. However, cyanobacterial blooms counteract the societal need for a good water quality and pose serious health risks for citizens and pets. To provide insight into the extent and possible causes of cyanobacterial problems in urban ponds, we conducted a surv

  19. Controlling eutrophication by combined bloom precipitation and sediment phosphorus inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Oosterhout, J.F.X.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that the combination of the flocculent polyaluminium chloride (PAC) with the lanthanum-modified bentonite Phoslock® (Flock & Lock) could sink effectively a water bloom of cyanobacteria and could shift a turbid, cyanobacteria infested lake to a clear water lake was tested in a

  20. Developing Learning Objectives for Accounting Ethics Using Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Linda A.; Fisher, Dann G.; Braun, Robert L.; Swanson, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to offer a set of core knowledge learning objectives for accounting ethics education. Using Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives, we develop learning objectives in six content areas: codes of ethical conduct, corporate governance, the accounting profession, moral development, classical ethics theories, and…

  1. A multiprotein nuclear complex connects Fanconi anemia and Bloom syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meetei, AR; Sechi, S; Wallisch, M; Yang, D; Young, MK; Joenje, H.; Hoatlin, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disorder associated with dwarfism, immunodeficiency, reduced fertility, and an elevated risk of cancer. To investigate the mechanism of this disease, we isolated from human HeLa extracts three complexes containing the helicase defective in BS, BLM. Interestingly, one

  2. Mitigating cyanobacterial blooms: how effective are 'effective microorganisms'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Tolman, Y.; Euwe, M.

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effects of 'Effective Microorganisms (EM)' on the growth of cyanobacteria, and their ability to terminate cyanobacterial blooms. The EM was tested in the form of 'mudballs' or 'Bokashi-balls', and as a suspension (EM-A) in laboratory experiments. No growth inhibition was obse

  3. Controlling eutrophication by combined bloom precipitation and sediment phosphorus inactivation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Oosterhout, J.F.X.

    2013-01-01

    The hypothesis that the combination of the flocculent polyaluminium chloride (PAC) with the lanthanum-modified bentonite Phoslock® (Flock & Lock) could sink effectively a water bloom of cyanobacteria and could shift a turbid, cyanobacteria infested lake to a clear water lake was tested in a cont

  4. Allelopathic control of cyanobacterial blooms by periphyton biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghong; Liu, Jiantong; Yang, Linzhang; Chen, Hong; Zhang, Shanqing; Zhao, Huijun; Zhang, Naiming

    2011-03-01

    Periphyton biofilms are natural mixtures comprised of photoautotrophic and heterotrophic complex microorganisms. In this work, the inhibition effects of periphyton biofilms on cyanobacterial blooms were studied in pilot and field trials. Results show that the cyanobacterial species responsible for the blooms had an upper nutrient concentration threshold, below which it could not effectively compete with other organisms in the periphyton. The disappearance of the cyanobacterial blooms was due to the allelopathy between the cyanobacteria and periphyton biofilm. In particular, it was found that the periphyton biofilm could produce water-soluble allelochemicals such as indole and 3-oxo-α-ionone to significantly inhibit the growth of the cyanobacteria. These allelochemicals are able to damage the thylakoid membranes of the cyanobacteria, interrupt the electron transport in photosystem II, decrease effective quantum yields, and eventually lead to the failure of photosynthesis. A comprehensive discussion on the ecological consequences of these findings is also presented. This work demonstrates the potential of periphyton biofilm to be used as an environmentally friendly ecological engineering solution for (i) the control of cyanobacterial blooms and (ii) a transitional means for the construction of beneficial conditions for ecosystem restoration. In addition, this work provides significant insights into the competitive relationships between algae and biofilms.

  5. Then the Wilderness Shall Bloom like a Rosy Bower

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    intertextual connections to the rest of the book. In my article, I have analysed how the Danish poet N.F.S. Grundtvig reworks Isa 35 in his hymn “Then the wilderness shall bloom like a rosy bower”, and how he reinterprets the wild animals as the Enemy (the Devil). In my view, the animals in Isa 35 have...

  6. Fungal parasitism: life cycle, dynamics and impact on cyanobacterial blooms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélanie Gerphagnon

    Full Text Available Many species of phytoplankton are susceptible to parasitism by fungi from the phylum Chytridiomycota (i.e. chytrids. However, few studies have reported the effects of fungal parasites on filamentous cyanobacterial blooms. To investigate the missing components of bloom ecosystems, we examined an entire field bloom of the cyanobacterium Anabaena macrospora for evidence of chytrid infection in a productive freshwater lake, using a high resolution sampling strategy. A. macrospora was infected by two species of the genus Rhizosiphon which have similar life cycles but differed in their infective regimes depending on the cellular niches offered by their host. R. crassum infected both vegetative cells and akinetes while R. akinetum infected only akinetes. A tentative reconstruction of the developmental stages suggested that the life cycle of R. crassum was completed in about 3 days. The infection affected 6% of total cells (and 4% of akinètes, spread over a maximum of 17% of the filaments of cyanobacteria, in which 60% of the cells could be parasitized. Furthermore, chytrids may reduce the length of filaments of Anabaena macrospora significantly by "mechanistic fragmentation" following infection. All these results suggest that chytrid parasitism is one of the driving factors involved in the decline of a cyanobacteria blooms, by direct mortality of parasitized cells and indirectly by the mechanistic fragmentation, which could weaken the resistance of A. macrospora to grazing.

  7. Dynamic Soft Reduction for Continuously Cast Rail Bloom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yong; LI Gui-jun; YANG Su-bo; ZHU Miao-yong

    2007-01-01

    Center porosity and centerline segregation in continuously cast bloom can be minimized by the well-known method of dynamic soft reduction. Metallurgical results of soft reduction previously employed in continuous bloom casting for heavy rail steel in Panzhihua Iron and Steel Group were not fully achieved because of the improper soft reduction process. Therefore, experiments for optimizing the process parameters of soft reduction for bloom were carried out. The results show that the proportion of the center porosity, which is less than 1.0, increases from 28.41% to 99.81%, while the proportion of the centerline segregation class increases from 40.91% to 100%, and the proportion of the central cavity increases from 92.05% to 100%, whereas the center carbon segregation index decreases from 1.17 to 1.05. The internal quality and the mechanical performance of the rails produced from continuously cast blooms meet the requirement of high-speed tracks of 350 km/h.

  8. ENCLOSURE EXPERIMENTS ON AND LACUSTRINE PRACTICE FOR ELIMINATING MICROCYSTIS BLOOM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘建康; 谢平

    2002-01-01

    Microcystis bloom, one of the most objectionable characteristics of eutrophication in tropical and subtropical waters, occurred in Donghu Lake (East Lake) of Wuhan every summer from the 1970s up to 1984, but from 1985 up tonow failed to occur there. The cause of its disappearance remained in obscurityuntil recently. In situ enclosure experiments in the lake for three years showed that the stocking of the filter-feeding silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and big-head carp (Aristichthys nobilis) played a decisive role in eliminating Microcystis bloom from the lake; but that recurrence of the bloom is possibleunder certain conditions. This paper presents the details and the results of enclosure experiments. The authors' analysis of fish biomass data obtained by echo-sounding and the fishery production of the lake over the years, revealed that the recurrence of Microcystis bloom can be prevented so long as the combined biomass of silver carp and big-head carp remains at or exceeds 50 g per cubic meter of lakewater, as was the case in the lake's 1985 fish yield of 1015 t.``

  9. Hirsch, Bloom, and the Proper Ends of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jerry W., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Urges teachers to use E. D. Hirsch's "Cultural Literacy" and Allan Bloom's "The Closing of the American Mind" as tools to explore what to teach and why to teach it. Concludes that in this way, teachers will be socially and morally responsible promoters of democratic literacy. (MM)

  10. A multiprotein nuclear complex connects Fanconi anemia and Bloom syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meetei, AR; Sechi, S; Wallisch, M; Yang, D; Young, MK; Joenje, H.; Hoatlin, M.E.

    2003-01-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is a genetic disorder associated with dwarfism, immunodeficiency, reduced fertility, and an elevated risk of cancer. To investigate the mechanism of this disease, we isolated from human HeLa extracts three complexes containing the helicase defective in BS, BLM. Interestingly, one

  11. Fungal parasitism: life cycle, dynamics and impact on cyanobacterial blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerphagnon, Mélanie; Latour, Delphine; Colombet, Jonathan; Sime-Ngando, Télesphore

    2013-01-01

    Many species of phytoplankton are susceptible to parasitism by fungi from the phylum Chytridiomycota (i.e. chytrids). However, few studies have reported the effects of fungal parasites on filamentous cyanobacterial blooms. To investigate the missing components of bloom ecosystems, we examined an entire field bloom of the cyanobacterium Anabaena macrospora for evidence of chytrid infection in a productive freshwater lake, using a high resolution sampling strategy. A. macrospora was infected by two species of the genus Rhizosiphon which have similar life cycles but differed in their infective regimes depending on the cellular niches offered by their host. R. crassum infected both vegetative cells and akinetes while R. akinetum infected only akinetes. A tentative reconstruction of the developmental stages suggested that the life cycle of R. crassum was completed in about 3 days. The infection affected 6% of total cells (and 4% of akinètes), spread over a maximum of 17% of the filaments of cyanobacteria, in which 60% of the cells could be parasitized. Furthermore, chytrids may reduce the length of filaments of Anabaena macrospora significantly by "mechanistic fragmentation" following infection. All these results suggest that chytrid parasitism is one of the driving factors involved in the decline of a cyanobacteria blooms, by direct mortality of parasitized cells and indirectly by the mechanistic fragmentation, which could weaken the resistance of A. macrospora to grazing.

  12. Using Bloom To Bridge the WAC/WID Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Geoffrey; Wills, Katherine

    A longitudinal study combined Stephen Tsuchdi's Workaday activities with Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives to bridge the WAC/WID (writing across the curriculum/writing in the disciplines) divide. The researchers hoped that by combining concrete activities that can be applied across disciplines with a Bloomian conceptual framework of…

  13. Reconsidering Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Cognitive Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David S.

    1982-01-01

    The hierarchical structure of the cognitive domain presented in Benjamin S. Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives does not reflect the actual nature of the learning process. Attempts to apply the classification levels to student learning in mathematics and other subjects place the taxonomy's usefulness in question. (PP)

  14. Developing Learning Objectives for Accounting Ethics Using Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Linda A.; Fisher, Dann G.; Braun, Robert L.; Swanson, Diane L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of our article is to offer a set of core knowledge learning objectives for accounting ethics education. Using Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives, we develop learning objectives in six content areas: codes of ethical conduct, corporate governance, the accounting profession, moral development, classical ethics theories, and…

  15. The Unfortunate Consequences of Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Case, Roland

    2013-01-01

    The sequenced levels of thinking articulated in Bloom's original taxonomy (or in the multitude of subsequent variations) is the most widely known list in education. In addition to enduring popularity, it is arguably one of the most destructive theories in education. In this article, the author explains what makes it so damaging and how…

  16. Was Bloom's Taxonomy Pointed in the Wrong Direction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wineburg, Sam; Schneider, Jack

    2010-01-01

    Bloom's Taxonomy usually is depicted as a pyramid with knowledge at the lowest level and evaluation at the top. For the history classroom, however, that arrangement might be upside down. In history, evaluation is often necessary before new knowledge can be learned. (Contains 1 figure.)

  17. Using Bloom's Taxonomy to Teach Students about Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosen, Melissa A.

    2008-01-01

    Melissa A. Vosen outlines a unit she has designed to help students comprehend the often unclear boundaries and issues surrounding plagiarism. Using Bloom's taxonomy of the cognitive domain, students complete increasingly complex tasks, learning to construct a works cited page and assess scholarly opinions. They also research the consequences of…

  18. Conception of Learning Outcomes in the Bloom's Taxonomy Affective Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savickiene, Izabela

    2010-01-01

    The article raises a problematic issue regarding an insufficient base of the conception of learning outcomes in the Bloom's taxonomy affective domain. The search for solutions introduces the conception of teaching and learning in the affective domain as well as presents validity criteria of learning outcomes in the affective domain. The…

  19. Global Software Engineering: A Software Process Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ita; Casey, Valentine; Burton, John; McCaffery, Fergal

    Our research has shown that many companies are struggling with the successful implementation of global software engineering, due to temporal, cultural and geographical distance, which causes a range of factors to come into play. For example, cultural, project managementproject management and communication difficulties continually cause problems for software engineers and project managers. While the implementation of efficient software processes can be used to improve the quality of the software product, published software process models do not cater explicitly for the recent growth in global software engineering. Our thesis is that global software engineering factors should be included in software process models to ensure their continued usefulness in global organisations. Based on extensive global software engineering research, we have developed a software process, Global Teaming, which includes specific practices and sub-practices. The purpose is to ensure that requirements for successful global software engineering are stipulated so that organisations can ensure successful implementation of global software engineering.

  20. Tropical cyanobacterial blooms: a review of prevalence, problem taxa, toxins and influencing environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxine A.D. Mowe

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms are a major issue in freshwater systems in many countries. The potentially toxic species and their ecological causes are likely to be different in tropical zones from those in temperate water bodies; however, studies on tropical toxic cyanobacterial blooms are sporadic and currently there is no global synthesis. In this review, we examined published information on tropical cyanobacterial bloom occurrence and toxin production to investigate patterns in their growth and distribution. Microcystis was the most frequently occurring bloom genus throughout tropical Asia, Africa and Central America, while Cylindrospermopsis and Anabaena blooms occurred in various locations in tropical Australia, America and Africa. Microcystis blooms were more prevalent during the wet season while Cylindrospermopsis blooms were more prevalent during the dry period. Microcystin was the most encountered toxin throughout the tropics. A meta-analysis of tropical cyanobacterial blooms showed that Microcystis blooms were more associated with higher total nitrogen concentrations, while Cylindrospermopsis blooms were more associated with higher maximum temperatures. Meta-analysis also showed a positive linear relationship between levels of microcystin and N:P (nitrate:phosphate ratio. Tropical African Microcystis blooms were found to have the lowest microcystin levels in relation to biomass and N:P (nitrate:phosphate compared to tropical Asian, Australian and American blooms. There was also no significant correlation between microcystin concentration and cell concentration for tropical African blooms as opposed to tropical Asian and American blooms. Our review illustrates that some cyanobacteria and toxins are more prevalent in tropical areas. While some tropical countries have considerable information regarding toxic blooms, others have few or no reported studies. 

  1. Using LANDSAT to expand the historical record of phytoplankton blooms in Lake Erie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J. C.; Michalak, A. M.; Stumpf, R. P.; Bridgeman, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    Freshwater harmful algal blooms are occurring with increasing frequency worldwide, intensifying the need for deeper understanding of the processes driving bloom formation. Such understanding is a prerequisite for developing management strategies for limiting bloom occurrence. Unfortunately, however, data for developing robust predictive models of bloom formation are lacking. Even in the well-studied Lake Erie, where diatom and cyanobacteria blooms have occurred for several decades in the Western Basin, previous in-situ and remote-sensing data collection efforts have been hampered by spatial and temporal sampling limitations, resulting in a sparse historical record. Leveraging available data to expand the historical record of algal blooms would thus make it possible to better evaluate hypotheses about factors influencing bloom formation. In this work, remotely-sensed observations of phytoplankton obtained using LANDSAT imagery are presented for 1984-2011. Several phytoplankton detection algorithms based on LANDSAT 5 imagery are evaluated during the period also covered by MERIS (2002-2011), which offers a relatively detailed assessment of bloom occurrence over the last decade. The best algorithm is then applied to historical LANDSAT data, and results are used to obtain new information about historical conditions and assess implications for developing improved models of bloom formation. Estimates of historical bloom occurrence and bloom seasonality shed new light on the widely-held view that phosphorus controls and invasive mussels resulted in substantial bloom reductions in the early 1990s. The new estimated records are not consistent with limited in-situ phytoplankton measurements from that period, and provide additional information on bloom occurrence during years with little to no supporting literature. This work demonstrates the potential to unearth new insights about historical phytoplankton blooms in Lake Erie, as well as in freshwater lakes broadly, and is a

  2. Skill assessment for an operational algal bloom forecast system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Richard P; Tomlinson, Michelle C; Calkins, Julie A; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fisher, Kathleen; Nierenberg, Kate; Currier, Robert; Wynne, Timothy T

    2009-02-20

    An operational forecast system for harmful algal blooms (HABs) in southwest Florida is analyzed for forecasting skill. The HABs, caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, lead to shellfish toxicity and to respiratory irritation. In addition to predicting new blooms and their extent, HAB forecasts are made twice weekly during a bloom event, using a combination of satellite derived image products, wind predictions, and a rule-based model derived from previous observations and research. These forecasts include: identification, intensification, transport, extent, and impact; the latter being the most significant to the public. Identification involves identifying new blooms as HABs and is validated against an operational monitoring program involving water sampling. Intensification forecasts, which are much less frequently made, can only be evaluated with satellite data on mono-specific blooms. Extent and transport forecasts of HABs are also evaluated against the water samples. Due to the resolution of the forecasts and available validation data, skill cannot be resolved at scales finer than 30 km. Initially, respiratory irritation forecasts were analyzed using anecdotal information, the only available data, which had a bias toward major respiratory events leading to a forecast accuracy exceeding 90%. When a systematic program of twice-daily observations from lifeguards was implemented, the forecast could be meaningfully assessed. The results show that the forecasts identify the occurrence of respiratory events at all lifeguard beaches 70% of the time. However, a high rate (80%) of false positive forecasts occurred at any given beach. As the forecasts were made at half to whole county level, the resolution of the validation data was reduced to county level, reducing false positives to 22% (accuracy of 78%). The study indicates the importance of systematic sampling, even when using qualitative descriptors, the use of validation resolution to evaluate forecast

  3. Skill assessment for an operational algal bloom forecast system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Richard P.; Tomlinson, Michelle C.; Calkins, Julie A.; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Fisher, Kathleen; Nierenberg, Kate; Currier, Robert; Wynne, Timothy T.

    2010-01-01

    An operational forecast system for harmful algal blooms (HABs) in southwest Florida is analyzed for forecasting skill. The HABs, caused by the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, lead to shellfish toxicity and to respiratory irritation. In addition to predicting new blooms and their extent, HAB forecasts are made twice weekly during a bloom event, using a combination of satellite derived image products, wind predictions, and a rule-based model derived from previous observations and research. These forecasts include: identification, intensification, transport, extent, and impact; the latter being the most significant to the public. Identification involves identifying new blooms as HABs and is validated against an operational monitoring program involving water sampling. Intensification forecasts, which are much less frequently made, can only be evaluated with satellite data on mono-specific blooms. Extent and transport forecasts of HABs are also evaluated against the water samples. Due to the resolution of the forecasts and available validation data, skill cannot be resolved at scales finer than 30 km. Initially, respiratory irritation forecasts were analyzed using anecdotal information, the only available data, which had a bias toward major respiratory events leading to a forecast accuracy exceeding 90%. When a systematic program of twice-daily observations from lifeguards was implemented, the forecast could be meaningfully assessed. The results show that the forecasts identify the occurrence of respiratory events at all lifeguard beaches 70% of the time. However, a high rate (80%) of false positive forecasts occurred at any given beach. As the forecasts were made at half to whole county level, the resolution of the validation data was reduced to county level, reducing false positives to 22% (accuracy of 78%). The study indicates the importance of systematic sampling, even when using qualitative descriptors, the use of validation resolution to evaluate forecast

  4. SOFTWARE METRICS VALIDATION METHODOLOGIES IN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.P. Srinivasan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the software measurement validations, assessing the validation of software metrics in software engineering is a very difficult task due to lack of theoretical methodology and empirical methodology [41, 44, 45]. During recent years, there have been a number of researchers addressing the issue of validating software metrics. At present, software metrics are validated theoretically using properties of measures. Further, software measurement plays an important role in understanding and controlling software development practices and products. The major requirement in software measurement is that the measures must represent accurately those attributes they purport to quantify and validation is critical to the success of software measurement. Normally, validation is a collection of analysis and testing activities across the full life cycle and complements the efforts of other quality engineering functions and validation is a critical task in any engineering project. Further, validation objective is to discover defects in a system and assess whether or not the system is useful and usable in operational situation. In the case of software engineering, validation is one of the software engineering disciplines that help build quality into software. The major objective of software validation process is to determine that the software performs its intended functions correctly and provides information about its quality and reliability. This paper discusses the validation methodology, techniques and different properties of measures that are used for software metrics validation. In most cases, theoretical and empirical validations are conducted for software metrics validations in software engineering [1-50].

  5. Phytoplankton blooms in estuarine and coastal waters: seasonal patterns and key species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstensen, Jacob; Klais, Riina; Cloern, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Phytoplankton blooms are dynamic phenomena of great importance to the functioning of estuarine and coastal ecosystems. We analysed a unique (large) collection of phytoplankton monitoring data covering 86 coastal sites distributed over eight regions in North America and Europe, with the aim of investigating common patterns in the seasonal timing and species composition of the blooms. The spring bloom was the most common seasonal pattern across all regions, typically occurring early (February–March) at lower latitudes and later (April–May) at higher latitudes. Bloom frequency, defined as the probability of unusually high biomass, ranged from 5 to 35% between sites and followed no consistent patterns across gradients of latitude, temperature, salinity, water depth, stratification, tidal amplitude or nutrient concentrations. Blooms were mostly dominated by a single species, typically diatoms (58% of the blooms) and dinoflagellates (19%). Diatom-dominated spring blooms were a common feature in most systems, although dinoflagellate spring blooms were also observed in the Baltic Sea. Blooms dominated by chlorophytes and cyanobacteria were only common in low salinity waters and occurred mostly at higher temperatures. Key bloom species across the eight regions included the diatoms Cerataulina pelagica and Dactyliosolen fragilissimus and dinoflagellates Heterocapsa triquetra and Prorocentrum cordatum. Other frequent bloom-forming taxa were diatom genera Chaetoceros, Coscinodiscus, Skeletonema, and Thalassiosira. Our meta-analysis shows that these 86 estuarine-coastal sites function as diatom-producing systems, the timing of that production varies widely, and that bloom frequency is not associated with environmental factors measured in monitoring programs. We end with a perspective on the limitations of conclusions derived from meta-analyses of phytoplankton time series, and the grand challenges remaining to understand the wide range of bloom patterns and

  6. In situ observation of harmful dinoflagellate bloom in the eastern coast of Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Hisashi; Murakami, Hirishi; Miyamura, Kazuyoshi; Siawanto, Eko; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ishizaka, Joji

    2014-05-01

    Oita coast, where is in the eastern coast of Kyushu, Japan, is a richly fish aquaculture area. However, sometimes harmful algal blooms occur in this region, especially harmful dinoflagellates blooms, and cultured fish mortality occurs. Ocean color remote sensing is expected as a useful tool to reduce the financial damage of harmful algal blooms. However, ocean color data is low accuracy in the coastal region because colored dissolved organic matter and suspended solid are dominant. More optical data of harmful algal blooms are required because there are few data in harmful algal blooms. The field observation was conducted to understand the inherent optical property of harmful dinoflagellate bloom in the eastern coast of Oita prefecture on April and August 2013. Chlorophyll-a maximum (>24 mg m^-3) was observed in the subsurface layer on April 2013. The dominant phytoplankton species in this chlorophyll-a maximum layer was dinoflagellate Cochlodinium polykrikoides (>300 cells ml^-1) and early stage of the bloom was formed. Peak of the remote sensing reflectance was near 565nm due to strong phytoplankton absorption within 400 ~ 500 nm domain from the subsurface bloom layer. Moreover, high phytoplankton absorption coefficient was observed at the shorter wavelength (bloom was detected by using dinoflagellate bloom detection algorithm, which is a simpler new satellite remote sensing-based harmful algal blooms detection method for JAXA's GCOM-C/SGLI (Siswanto et al., 2013). However, detection of the dinoflagellate Karenia mikimotoi bloom by using the algorithm on August 2013 was difficult as colored dissolved organic matter and detritus absorptions were high. Although the algorithm could detect the early stage of C. polycrikoides bloom, the algorithm improvement to detect the harmful algal blooms in the case II water is thus highly required. This research is part of the combined research between Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and National Research Institute of

  7. Highly Variable Extinction and Accretion in the Jet-driving Class I Type Young Star PTF 10nvg (V2492 Cyg, IRAS 20496+4354)

    CERN Document Server

    Hillenbrand, Lynne A; Covey, Kevin R; Carpenter, John M; Cenko, S Bradley; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Muirhead, Philip; Fischer, William; Crepp, Justin R; Bloom, Joshua S; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2012-01-01

    [abbreviated] We report extensive photometry and spectroscopy of the highly variable young stellar object PTF 10nvg including optical, near-infrared, mid-infrared, and millimeter data. Following the 2010 maximum and subsequent fade, during 2011 and 2012 the source underwent additional episodes of brightening followed by several magnitude dimming events consistent with extinction variations. Further, a ~221 day period is derived; 2010 data taken when the source was near maximum brightness do not phase well to this period, however. Spectral evolution includes changes in slope and correlated changes in the prominence of TiO/VO/CO and atomic emission. These are anticorrelated with changes in forbidden emission which, along with H_2, dominate at faint epochs. Notably, night-to-night variations in several forbidden doublet strengths and ratios are observed. High-dispersion spectra in a variety of photometric states reveal line profiles for atomic species likely formed in an accretion flow and/or impact. The origin ...

  8. PTF1 J191905.19+481506.2—A partially eclipsing AM CVn system discovered in the Palomar transient factory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitan, David; Groot, Paul J.; Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Hallinan, Gregg; Harding, Leon K.; Sesar, Branimir [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kupfer, Thomas [Department of Astrophysics/IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9010, NL-6500 GL Nijmegen (Netherlands); Margon, Bruce [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Kyne, Gillian [Centre for Astronomy, School of Physics, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, MS 314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ofek, Eran O. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Faculty of Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Rutten, René G. M. [GRANTECAN S.A. Cuesta de San José, s/n, E-38712 Breña Baja, La Palma (Spain)

    2014-04-20

    We report on PTF1 J191905.19+481506.2, a newly discovered, partially eclipsing, outbursting AM CVn system found in the Palomar Transient Factory synoptic survey. This is only the second known eclipsing AM CVn system. We use high-speed photometric observations and phase-resolved spectroscopy to establish an orbital period of 22.4559(3) minutes. We also present a long-term light curve and report on the normal and super-outbursts regularly seen in this system, including a super-outburst recurrence time of 36.8(4) days. We use the presence of the eclipse to place upper and lower limits on the inclination of the system and discuss the number of known eclipsing AM CVn systems versus what would be expected.

  9. Sandia software guidelines: Software quality planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-08-01

    This volume is one in a series of Sandia Software Guidelines intended for use in producing quality software within Sandia National Laboratories. In consonance with the IEEE Standard for Software Quality Assurance Plans, this volume identifies procedures to follow in producing a Software Quality Assurance Plan for an organization or a project, and provides an example project SQA plan. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Software engineering architecture-driven software development

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Richard F

    2013-01-01

    Software Engineering: Architecture-driven Software Development is the first comprehensive guide to the underlying skills embodied in the IEEE's Software Engineering Body of Knowledge (SWEBOK) standard. Standards expert Richard Schmidt explains the traditional software engineering practices recognized for developing projects for government or corporate systems. Software engineering education often lacks standardization, with many institutions focusing on implementation rather than design as it impacts product architecture. Many graduates join the workforce with incomplete skil

  11. Software Metrics to Estimate Software Quality using Software Component Reusability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakriti Trivedi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Today most of the applications developed using some existing libraries, codes, open sources etc. As a code is accessed in a program, it is represented as the software component. Such as in java beans and in .net ActiveX controls are the software components. These components are ready to use programming code or controls that excel the code development. A component based software system defines the concept of software reusability. While using these components the main question arise is whether to use such components is beneficial or not. In this proposed work we are trying to present the answer for the same question. In this work we are presenting a set of software matrix that will check the interconnection between the software component and the application. How strong this relation defines the software quality after using this software component. The overall metrics will return the final result in terms of the boundless of the component with application.

  12. The plankton community on Sukkertop and Fylla Banks off West Greenland during a spring bloom and post-bloom period: Hydrography, phytoplankton and protozooplankton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Louise K.; Reuss, N.

    2002-01-01

    The plankton community structure was investigated on Sukkertop and Fylla Banks off West Greenland during the spring bloom in May 2000 and the post-bloom period in June 1999. In May a small change in density, clearly illustrated by the profile of potential energy, was sufficient to support a spring...

  13. Deficiency of Bloom syndrome helicase activity is radiomimetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, David P; Topaloglu, Ozlem; Zhang, Yonggang; Bunz, Fred

    2008-11-01

    Bloom syndrome is caused by homozygous mutations in BLM, which encodes a RecQ DNA helicase. Patient-derived cells deficient in BLM helicase activity exhibit genetic instability--apparent cytogenetically as sister chromatid exchanges--and activated DNA damage signaling. In this report, we show that BLM-knockout colorectal cancer cells exhibited endogenous, ATM-dependent double-strand DNA break responses similar to those recently observed in Bloom syndrome patient-derived cells. Xenograft tumors established from BLM-deficient cancer cells were not radiosensitive, but exhibited growth impairment that was comparable to that of wild type tumors treated with a single, high dose of ionizing radiation. These results suggest that pharmacological inhibitors of BLM would have a radiomimetic effect and that transient inhibition of BLM activity might be a viable strategy for anticancer therapy.

  14. Decision-Directed Correction for Bloom in Optical Recording Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalaswamy, Srinivasan; Kee, Ng See; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.

    2000-02-01

    A threshold adaptation scheme is proposed in a non-Viterbi simple detector for d=2 minimum run-length-constraint coded optical recording schemes, to increase robustness to bloom. The detector has a simple structure comprising of a threshold detector, post processing error correction, and decision directed threshold adaptation. The equalization target is a free symmetric 7-tap target and the detection exploits the d=2 constraint in the input sequence. The detector is evaluated for digital versatile disk (DVD) specifications and compared with other threshold-based detectors as well as Viterbi detectors following targets of length up to 5. Performance improvement of over 1.5 dB is observed with the proposed feature for bloom larger than 15% of the channel bit period.

  15. On the "hidden" phytoplankton blooms on Australia's southern shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämpf, Jochen; Kavi, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    Phytoplankton blooms on Australia's southern shelves are revisited using satellite-derived monthly data of chlorophyll a concentrations for the period 2003-2015. It is known that the region hosts a seasonal coastal upwelling system that develops in austral summer (January-March) with chlorophyll a concentrations of >2 mg/m3. While this summer upwelling is spatially limited to a few hot spots, here we show that widespread phytoplankton blooms of moderate ( 1 mg/m3) chlorophyll a concentrations develop during autumn and early winter on most of Australia's extensive southern shelves—from the vast shelves of the Great Australian Bight (GAB) in the west to Bass Strait in the east. This surprising finding disproves the widespread belief that shelf waters of the GAB are generally oligotrophic and may explain the relatively high abundance of both forage fish (sardines) and upper trophic-level predators (e.g., tuna and whales) in the region.

  16. The Revised Bloom's Taxonomy: implications for educating nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Whei Ming; Osisek, Paul J

    2011-07-01

    One of the essential goals for continuing education in nursing is to enhance nurses' ability to improve patient care outcomes. Toward this goal, learners need to transfer learned knowledge to actual practice. Achieving effective transfer requires knowledge of thinking paradigms in relation to specific subject content. Educators can facilitate knowledge transfer by developing instructional designs that incorporate subject content and cognitive processes related to the use of the subject content. However, it is difficult to develop such instructional designs. The Revised Bloom's Taxonomy provides a framework for meeting this educational need. In this article, the authors establish the relevance of the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy to continuing education and describe how to use the taxonomy to plan an educational session with an emphasis on promoting knowledge transfer.

  17. The software life cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Ince, Darrel

    1990-01-01

    The Software Life Cycle deals with the software lifecycle, that is, what exactly happens when software is developed. Topics covered include aspects of software engineering, structured techniques of software development, and software project management. The use of mathematics to design and develop computer systems is also discussed. This book is comprised of 20 chapters divided into four sections and begins with an overview of software engineering and software development, paying particular attention to the birth of software engineering and the introduction of formal methods of software develop

  18. Effect of Zeolite Treatment on the Blooming Behavior of Paraffin Wax in Natural Rubber Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan B. Pajarito

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The blooming behavior of paraffin wax in natural rubber (NR composites was studied as function of zeolite treatment. Three types of zeolite treatment were treated as factors: acid activation using hydrochloric acid (HCl solution, ion exchange using tetradecyldimethyl amine (TDA chloride salt, and organic modification using glycerol monostearate (GMS. The zeolite was treated according to a 23 full factorial design of experiment. Attenuated total reflectance – Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to characterize the chemical structure of treated zeolite. Treated zeolite was applied as filler to NR composites deliberately compounded with high amount of paraff in wax. The amount of bloomed wax in surface of NR composite sheets was monitored with time at 50oC. Results show the bloom amount to be linear with the square root of time. NR composites reinforced with untreated, acid-activated, and ion-exchanged zeolite fillers indicate reduction in wax blooming as compared to unfilled NR. The bloom rate (slope and initial bloom (y-intercept were determined from the experimental plots. Analysis of variance (ANOVA shows the bloom rate to be signif icantly increased when zeolite fillers are treated with GMS. Meanwhile, initial bloom was significantly enhanced when zeolite fillers are treated with TDA chloride salt and GMS. The significant increase in bloom rate and initial bloom can be attributed to the softening of the NR matrix at high amounts of TDA chloride salt and GMS.

  19. Phytoplankton bloom dynamics in temperate, turbid, stressed estuaries: a model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Swart, Huib E.; Liu, Bo; de Jonge, Victor

    2017-04-01

    To gain insight into mechanisms underlying phytoplankton bloom dynamics in temperature, turbid estuaries, experiments were conducted with an idealised model that couples physical and biological processes. Results show that the model is capable of producing the main features of the observed blooms in the Ems estuary (Northwest Germany), viz. in the lower reach a spring bloom occur, which is followed by a secondary bloom in autumn. The along-estuary distribution of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and the along-estuary distance between the nutrient source and the seaward bound of the turbidity zone control both the along-estuary locations and intensities of the blooms. Results of further sensitivity studies reveal that in a shallow, well-mixed estuary, under temporally-constant suspended sediment conditions, the seasonally-varying water temperature has larger impact on the timing of spring blooms than the seasonally-varying incident light intensity. The occurrence of the secondary bloom is caused by the fact that the growth rate of phytoplankton attains a maximum at an optimum water temperature. Bloom intensities are also modulated by the advective processes related to subtidal current because the latter regulates the seaward transport of nutrient from riverine source. Large-scale deepening of navigation channels leads to later spring blooms due to increased mixing depth. Finally, phytoplankton blooms are unlikely to occur in the upper reach due to the elevated SSC and the landward expansion of turbidity zone related to large-scale deepening.

  20. Distribution and recurrence of phytoplankton blooms around South Georgia, Southern Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Borrione

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available South Georgia phytoplankton blooms are amongst the largest of the Southern Ocean and are associated with a rich ecosystem and strong atmospheric carbon drawdown. Both aspects depend on the intensity of blooms, but also on their regularity. Here we use data from 12 yr of SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor ocean colour imagery and calculate the frequency of bloom occurrence (FBO to re-examine spatial and temporal bloom distributions. We find that upstream of the island and outside the borders of the Georgia Basin, blooms occurred in less than 4 out of the 12 yr (FBO < 4. In contrast, FBO was mostly greater than 8 downstream of the island, i.e., to the north and northwest, and in places equal to 12, indicating that blooms occurred every year. The typical bloom area, defined as the region where blooms occurred in at least 8 out of the 12 yr, covers the entire Georgia Basin and the northern shelf of the island. The time series of surface chlorophyll a (Chl a concentrations averaged over the typical bloom area shows that phytoplankton blooms occurred in every year between September 1997 and September 2010, and that Chl a values followed a clear seasonal cycle, with concentration peaks around December followed in many years by a second peak during late austral summer or early autumn, suggesting a bi-modal bloom pattern. The bloom regularity we describe here is in contrast with results of Park et al. (2010 who used a significantly different study area including regions that almost never exhibit bloom conditions.

  1. Environmental Chemistry and Chemical Ecology of "Green Tide" Seaweed Blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Alstyne, Kathryn L; Nelson, Timothy A; Ridgway, Richard L

    2015-09-01

    Green tides are large growths or accumulations of green seaweeds that have been increasing in magnitude and frequency around the world. Because green tides consist of vast biomasses of algae in a limited area and are often seasonal or episodic, they go through periods of rapid growth in which they take up large amounts of nutrients and dissolved gases and generate bioactive natural products that may be stored in the plants, released into the environment, or broken down during decomposition. As a result of the use and production of inorganic and organic compounds, the algae in these blooms can have detrimental impacts on other organisms. Here, we review some of the effects that green tides have on the chemistry of seawater and the effects of the natural products that they produce. As blooms are developing and expanding, algae in green tides take up inorganic nutrients, such as nitrate and ortho-phosphate, which can limit their availability to other photosynthetic organisms. Their uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon for use in photosynthesis can cause localized spikes in the pH of seawater during the day with concomitant drops in the pH at night when the algae are respiring. Many of the algae that form green-tide blooms produce allelopathic compounds, which are metabolites that affect other species. The best documented allelopathic compounds include dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP), dopamine, and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their breakdown products. DMSP and dopamine are involved in defenses against herbivores. Dopamine and ROS are released into seawater where they can be allelopathic or toxic to other organisms. Thus, these macroalgal blooms can have harmful effects on nearby organisms by altering concentrations of nutrients and dissolved gas in seawater and by producing and releasing allelopathic or toxic compounds.

  2. The Impact of Harmful Algal Blooms on USACE Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    recorded history around the world (Paerl 2008). Freshwater algal blooms commonly consist of many cyanobacterial algal strains, also called “blue-green...competitive edge (Huisman et al. 2005). Microcystis, a hepatotoxin created by the Microcystis algae, is most frequently cited in reports of cyanobacteria ...related poisoning in humans and livestock (Chorus and Bartram 1999) and is the dominant cyanobacteria in North America (Carmichael 2005). It is important

  3. Is global ocean sprawl a cause of jellyfish blooms?

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Carlos M.; Pitt, Kylie A.; Lucas, C.H.; Purcell, Jennifer E.; Uye, Shin-Ichi; Robinson, Kelly L.; Brotz, Lucas; Decker, MaryBeth; Kelly R Sutherland; Malej, Alenka; Madin, Laurence P.; Mianzan, Hermes; Gili, Josep-Maria; Fuentes, Veronica; Atienza, D.

    2013-01-01

    Jellyfish (Cnidaria, Scyphozoa) blooms appear to be increasing in both intensity and frequency in many coastal areas worldwide, due to multiple hypothesized anthropogenic stressors. Here, we propose that the proliferation of artificial structures – associated with (1) the exponential growth in shipping, aquaculture, and other coastal industries, and (2) coastal protection (collectively, “ocean sprawl”) – provides habitat for jellyfish polyps and may be an important driver of the global increa...

  4. Modelling the production of dimethylsulfide during a phytoplankton bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabric, Albert; Murray, Nicholas; Stone, Lewi; Kohl, Manfred

    1993-12-01

    Dimethylsulfide (DMS) is an important sulfur-containing atmospheric trace gas of marine biogenic origin. DMS emitted from the oceans may be a precursor of tropospheric aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), thereby affecting the Earth's radiative balance and possibly constituting a negative feedback to global warming, although this hypothesis is still somewhat controversial. The revised conceptual model of the marine pelagic food web gives a central role to planktonic bacteria. Recent experiments have shown that consumption of dissolved DMS by microbial metabolism may be more important than atmospheric exchange in controlling its concentration in surface waters and hence its ventilation to the atmosphere. In this paper we investigate the effect of the marine food web on cycling of dissolved DMS in surface waters during a phytoplankton bloom episode. A nitrogen-based flow network simulation model has been used to analyze the relative importance of the various biological and chemical processes involved. The model predictions suggest that the concentration of DMS in marine surface waters is indeed governed by bacterial metabolism. Environmental factors that affect the bacterial compartment are thus likely to have a relatively large influence on dissolved DMS concentrations. The ecological succession is particularly sensitive to the ratio of phytoplankton to bacterial nutrient uptake rates as well the interaction between herbivore food chain and the microbial loop. Importantly for the design of field studies, the model predicts that peak DMS concentrations are achieved during the decline of the phytoplankton bloom with a typical time lag between peak DMS and peak phytoplankton biomass of 1 to 2 days. Significantly, the model predicts a relatively high DMS concentration persisting after the phytoplankton bloom due to excretion from large protozoa and zooplankton, which may be an additional explanation for the lack of correlation between DMS and chlorophyll a

  5. A rare Uroglena bloom in Beaver Lake, Arkansas, spring 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, William R.; Hufhines, Brad

    2017-01-01

    A combination of factors triggered a Uroglena volvox bloom and taste and odor event in Beaver Lake, a water-supply reservoir in northwest Arkansas, in late April 2015. Factors contributing to the bloom included increased rainfall and runoff containing increased concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, followed by a stable pool, low nutrient concentrations, and an expansion of lake surface area and littoral zone. This was the first time U. volvox was identified in Beaver Lake and the first time it was recognized as a source of taste and odor. Routine water quality samples happened to be collected by the US Geological Survey and the Beaver Water District throughout the reservoir during the bloom—. Higher than normal rainfall in March 2015 increased the pool elevation in Beaver Lake by 2.3 m (by early April), increased the surface area by 10%, and increased the littoral zone by 1214 ha; these conditions persisted for 38 days, resulting from flood water being retained behind the dam. Monitoring programs that cover a wide range of reservoir features, including dissolved organic carbon, zooplankton, and phytoplankton, are valuable in explaining unusual events such as this Uroglena bloom.

  6. Separation of wind's influence on harmful cyanobacterial blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Zhang, Zhizhang; Liang, Dongfang; du, Hanbei; Pang, Yong; Hu, Kaimin; Wang, Jianjian

    2016-07-01

    Wind is an important physical factor involved in Harmful Cyanobacterial blooms (CyanoHABs). Its integrated influence was separated to three components: (a) Direct Disturbance Impact (DDI) on cyanbacterial proliferation, (b) Indirect Nutrient Impact (INI) by sediment release and (c) Direct Transportation Impact (DTI) by both gentle wind-induced surface drift and wave-generated Stokes drift. By the combination of field investigation, laboratory experiment and numerical simulation their individual contributions to the severe bloom event in May 2007 in Meiliang Bay, Lake Taihu, was explored. Wind synthetically made 10.5 percent promotion to the bloom on May 28, 2007, but the impact varied with locations. DTI was featured with the strongest contribution of wind's impacts on CyanoHABs, while INI stood at the lowest level and DDI played an intermediate role. From the point of whole Meiliang Bay, the influencing weights of DTI, DDI and INI were approximately 48.55%, 32.30% and 19.15% respectively. DTI exerted the higher promotion in the regions of middle-east (ME), southwest (SW) and southeast (SE), and its actual contribution rate on CyanoHABs ranged from 6.41% to 7.46%. Due to the background nutrient load, INI was characterized by a tiny effect with the contribution rate being 2.18% on average. From the south bay to the north, DDI was detected with a decreasing tendency, with the practical contribution rate generally falling from 4.13% to 2.7%.

  7. Petal Thicknesses and Shape Transformations in Blooming Lilies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portet, Thomas; Holmes, Peter N.; Bowden, Mark E.; Stephens, Sean A.; Varga, Tamas; Keller, Sarah L.

    2013-01-29

    During blooming, flower petals undergo significant shape changes. For lilies, various different mechanisms responsible for the change have been suggested [1,2]. One is that cell growth along the edge of a petal, or, more generally, a tepal, drives a transition from a cup shape (within a bud) to a saddle shape (within a bloom). This mechanism has been previously considered for tepals modeled as shallow elliptical shells whose thickness from the center, t, falls off at least as fast as t = t0 (1 - x2/a2 - y2/b2 ) [1]. Here t0 is the maximum thickness of the shell, a and b are the semimajor and semiminoraxes, x and y are the coordinates along the longitudinal and lateral axes. By measuring tepal thicknesses from images collected by x-ray tomography of intact buds and by photography of microtomed buds, we find that this condition is indeed met for both Lilium casablanca and Lilium lancifolium. [1] Liang and Mahadevan. Growth, geometry, and mechanics of a blooming lily.

  8. Volcanic ash fuels anomalous plankton bloom in subarctic northeast Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamme, Roberta C.; Webley, Peter W.; Crawford, William R.; Whitney, Frank A.; DeGrandpre, Michael D.; Emerson, Steven R.; Eriksen, Charles C.; Giesbrecht, Karina E.; Gower, Jim F. R.; Kavanaugh, Maria T.; Peña, M. Angelica; Sabine, Christopher L.; Batten, Sonia D.; Coogan, Laurence A.; Grundle, Damian S.; Lockwood, Deirdre

    2010-10-01

    Using multiple lines of evidence, we demonstrate that volcanic ash deposition in August 2008 initiated one of the largest phytoplankton blooms observed in the subarctic North Pacific. Unusually widespread transport from a volcanic eruption in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska deposited ash over much of the subarctic NE Pacific, followed by large increases in satellite chlorophyll. Surface ocean pCO2, pH, and fluorescence reveal that the bloom started a few days after ashfall. Ship-based measurements showed increased dominance by diatoms. This evidence points toward fertilization of this normally iron-limited region by ash, a relatively new mechanism proposed for iron supply to the ocean. The observations do not support other possible mechanisms. Extrapolation of the pCO2 data to the area of the bloom suggests a modest ˜0.01 Pg carbon export from this event, implying that even large-scale iron fertilization at an optimum time of year is not very efficient at sequestering atmospheric CO2.

  9. Toxin extraction from an Anabaenopsis milleri--dominated bloom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanaras, T; Cook, C M

    1994-03-15

    This paper reports the presence of microcystin type toxins in extracts of a natural bloom of cyanobacteria composed predominantly of Anabaenopsis milleri Woronichin. The toxins have been extracted, purified and compared to microcystin-LR. The LD50 of A. milleri bloom material was 600-1500 mg lyophilized cells/kg body weight. Symptoms and pathological signs of poisoning in mice were characteristic of cyanobacterial hepatotoxins, with enlarged darkened livers with weights of 8-10% of the total body weight. Thin-layer chromatography of the extract resulted in one toxic band, which was separated from pigments and 280-nm absorbing compounds. The toxic fraction was further separated using reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography and one toxic band was recovered. This fraction yielded a single, toxic peak with a retention time of 11.3 min after high performance liquid chromatography. The absorption spectrum of the purified toxin had a maximum at 238-240 nm and was characteristic of cyanobacterial hepatotoxic peptides. Comparison of the chromatographic behaviour of the purified toxin with microcystin-LR on reversed phase and on internal surface reversed phase, high performance liquid chromatography indicated that an A. milleri bloom material toxin was a microcystin type toxin and it is highly likely that the purified toxin is microcystin-LR.

  10. Connecting Florida Bay algal blooms to freshwater nutrient sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakey, T.; Melesse, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    In this study, monthly water quality data collected in the Everglades by the Southeast Environmental Research Center (SERC) and the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) from 1991 to 2008 at 28 sampling stations distributed across Florida Bay was analyzed within the context of local geomorphology and seasonal wind and current regimes in order to evaluate the feasibility of the various purported nutrient sources for reoccurring algal blooms. The in situ chlorophyll-a (chl-a) measurements from the SERC dataset were evaluated as the indicator of algal biomass. Significant differences in average monthly chl-a concentrations at stations indicated a seasonality of algal blooms in the north central and west areas that is not evidenced in stations exhibiting low levels of chl-a throughout the typical year. Tukey's pairwise comparisons of monthly chl-a indicated, at the 95% confidence level, peak algal biomass occurs in October and November at the end of the wet season with minimums occurring between February and August depending on the location of the station. By month comparison of chl-a levels across stations suggest seasonal trends in the geographic focus and extent of blooms. Significant differences from Tukey's pairwise comparisons at the 95% confidence level showed stations to the west as having higher levels of chl-a in March through May with north central stations dominating from June to January. The month of February shows no significant difference in chl-a levels across this area. The results support hypotheses centering on a western source of nutrients that are delivered to the bay over the course of the rainy season. Mapping water quality sampling station locations on top of the bathymetry of Florida Bay illustrates the importance of considering coastal morphology in explaining trends in estuarine algal blooms. Coastal geomorphology along with seasonal changes in the direction of winds and magnitude of rains are demonstrated to be the predominant

  11. Peculiarities of the Woody Plants Re-Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Opalko Olga Anatolievna

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The data of literary sources concerning the bloom of angiosperm plants and deviation in the development of a flower and inflorescence, in particular untimely flowering, was generalized; our observation results of some peculiarities of re-bloom of woody plants in the National Dendrological Park “Sofiyivka” of NAS of Ukraine (NDP “Sofiyivka” were discussed. The flowering process was formed during a long-term evolution of a propagation system of angiosperm plants as a basis of fertilization and further fruit and seed development. As a result of vernalization and photoperiodism reactions, flowering (under regular conditions occurs in the most favorable period for pollination and fertilization of every plant. However, various deviations, in particular, the untimely (most frequently double, sometimes three- and four-fold flowering occurs in this perfect process of generative organ formation of angiosperm plants. An increased number of reports about re-bloom (at the end of summer – at the beginning of fall of the representatives of various woody plant species whose flowers usually blossom in May-June prompts the analysis of the available information concerning the mechanisms of flowering and the causes which lead to deviation of flowering processes. Flowering of the woody plant representatives of the collection fund of the NDP “Sofiyivka” was studied; statistics about re-bloom in different cities of Ukraine were monitored. The classification of re-bloom facts was carried out according to V.L. Vitkovskiy (1984. Although this classification has mostly a stated nature, it was good enough when being formulated and, with certain conditions, it can be applied nowadays. Accordingly, using this classification, abnormal cases can include facts of early summer-fall flowering and early winter flowering. A late spring flowering can be adaptive response of damaged plants to exogenous stresses, due to which the probability of sexual propagation remains

  12. Photoadaptation of carboxylating enzymes and photosynthesis during a spring bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, John Clegg; Platt, Trevor; Harrison, William G.

    Properties of the light saturation curve of photosynthesis and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RuBPC) activity are shown to change qualitatively in a natural population of marine phytoplankton during a spring bloom. Evidence is presented to show that these changes constitute photoadapative responses to increasing irradiance. As irradiance increased during the bloom, both the level of light-saturated photosynthesis ( Pm) and the initial slope of the light saturation curve ( α = photosynthetic efficiency) increased whether those parameters were normalized to chlorophyll a concentration ( Pmb, αb) or to cell numbers ( Pmc, αc). The magnitudes of these changes were such that Ik (= Pm/ α, the photoadaptation parameter) did not change, but Im, the light intensity at which photosynthesis becomes saturated, increased. RuBPC activity, both chlorophyll a (RuBPC b) and cell number normalized (RuBPC c), also increased during the bloom. We suggest that these adaptations were achieved by simultaneously increasing the number of photosynthetic units, proportionately decreasing the photosynthetic unit size, and increasing both the concentrations of the enzymes of the dark reactions and possibly also of photosynthetic electron transport components. We also observed diminished levels of photoinhibition in the high light adapted cells late in the bloom and have suggested that this was a consequence of the same suite of physiological changes. In situ carbon fixation per cell increased during the bloom whereas no change occurred in this parameter when normalized to chlorophyll a concentration. Although these photoadaptive responses thus permitted carbon to be fixed in situ more rapidly per cell, at a constant efficiency with respect to investment of energy in the photosynthetic apparatus, they did not result in a change in growth rate. Based on consideratios of the role of time scale in physiological adaptation, however, it is suggested that the observed alterations in

  13. Amalgamation of Personal Software Process in Software ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    evolutionary series of personal software engineering techniques that an engineer learns and ... Article History: Received : 30-04- ... began to realize that software process, plans and methodologies for ..... Executive Strategy. Addison-Wesley ...

  14. Analysis of algal bloom risk with uncertainties in lakes by integrating self-organizing map and fuzzy information theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiuwen, E-mail: qchen@rcees.ac.cn [RCEES, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 10085 (China); China Three Gorges University, Daxuelu 8, Yichang 443002 (China); CEER, Nanjing Hydraulics Research Institute, Guangzhoulu 223, Nanjing 210029 (China); Rui, Han; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yanhui [RCEES, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shuangqinglu 18, Beijing 10085 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Algal blooms are a serious problem in waters, which damage aquatic ecosystems and threaten drinking water safety. However, the outbreak mechanism of algal blooms is very complex with great uncertainty, especially for large water bodies where environmental conditions have obvious variation in both space and time. This study developed an innovative method which integrated a self-organizing map (SOM) and fuzzy information diffusion theory to comprehensively analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. The Lake Taihu was taken as study case and the long-term (2004–2010) on-site monitoring data were used. The results showed that algal blooms in Taihu Lake were classified into four categories and exhibited obvious spatial–temporal patterns. The lake was mainly characterized by moderate bloom but had high uncertainty, whereas severe blooms with low uncertainty were observed in the northwest part of the lake. The study gives insight on the spatial–temporal dynamics of algal blooms, and should help government and decision-makers outline policies and practices on bloom monitoring and prevention. The developed method provides a promising approach to estimate algal bloom risks under uncertainties. - Highlights: • An innovative method is developed to analyze algal bloom risks with uncertainties. • The algal blooms in Taihu Lake showed obvious spatial and temporal patterns. • The lake is mainly characterized as moderate bloom but with high uncertainty. • Severe bloom with low uncertainty appeared occasionally in the northwest part. • The results provide important information to bloom monitoring and management.

  15. Software attribute visualization for high integrity software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, G.M.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents a prototype tool developed to investigate the use of visualization and virtual reality technologies for improving software surety confidence. The tool is utilized within the execution phase of the software life cycle. It provides a capability to monitor an executing program against prespecified requirements constraints provided in a program written in the requirements specification language SAGE. The resulting Software Attribute Visual Analysis Tool (SAVAnT) also provides a technique to assess the completeness of a software specification.

  16. Hardware-based high-performance string lookup with value retrieval using extended Bloom filter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qi-yue; QU Yu-gui; ZHAO Bao-hua

    2008-01-01

    In network packet processing, high-performance string lookup systems are very important. In this article, an extended Bloom filter data structure is introduced to support value retrieval string lookup, and to improve its performance, a weighted extended Bloom filter (WEBF) structure is generalized. The optimal configuration of the WEBF is then derived, and it is shown that it outperforms the traditional Bloom filter. Finally, an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC)-based technique using WEBF is outlined.

  17. Critical Examination of a Revision of Bloom's Taxonomy for the Development of Art Education Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    中村, 和世; 大和, 浩子; 中島, 敦夫; 吉川, 和生

    2011-01-01

    This paper is aimed at developing Art Education Taxonomy Table through critically examining a revision of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives contrived by Anderson and Krathwohl. First, the overview of the history of Bloom's Taxonomy is provided in relation to art education. Second, the influence of Bloom's theory of educational evaluation and Taxonomy on the classroom practice of art education in Japan is discussed. Third, aiming at using for the development of art education curriculu...

  18. Ontologies for software engineering and software technology

    CERN Document Server

    Calero, Coral; Piattini, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Covers two applications of ontologies in software engineering and software technology: sharing knowledge of the problem domain and using a common terminology among all stakeholders; and filtering the knowledge when defining models and metamodels. This book is of benefit to software engineering researchers in both academia and industry.

  19. Controls of primary production in two phytoplankton blooms in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, C. J. M.; Klaas, C.; Ossebaar, S.; Soppa, M. A.; Cheah, W.; Laglera, L. M.; Santos-Echeandia, J.; Rost, B.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Bracher, A.; Hoppema, M.; Strass, V.; Trimborn, S.

    2017-04-01

    The Antarctic Circumpolar Current has a high potential for primary production and carbon sequestration through the biological pump. In the current study, two large-scale blooms observed in 2012 during a cruise with R.V. Polarstern were investigated with respect to phytoplankton standing stocks, primary productivity and nutrient budgets. While net primary productivity was similar in both blooms, chlorophyll a -specific photosynthesis was more efficient in the bloom closer to the island of South Georgia (39 °W, 50 °S) compared to the open ocean bloom further east (12 °W, 51 °S). We did not find evidence for light being the driver of bloom dynamics as chlorophyll standing stocks up to 165 mg m-2 developed despite mixed layers as deep as 90 m. Since the two bloom regions differ in their distance to shelf areas, potential sources of iron vary. Nutrient (nitrate, phosphate, silicate) deficits were similar in both areas despite different bloom ages, but their ratios indicated more pronounced iron limitation at 12 °W compared to 39 °W. While primarily the supply of iron and not the availability of light seemed to control onset and duration of the blooms, higher grazing pressure could have exerted a stronger control toward the declining phase of the blooms.

  20. Succession and fate of the spring diatom bloom in Disko Bay, western Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dünweber, Michael; Swalethorp, Rasmus; Kjellerup, Sanne;

    2010-01-01

    from the initiation of the bloom but only had a small grazing impact on the phytoplankton. Consequently, there was a close coupling between the spring phytoplankton bloom and sedimentation of particulate organic carbon (POC). Out of 1836 ± 180 mg C m–2 d–1 leaving the upper 50 m, 60% was phytoplankton...... based carbon (PPC). The composition and quality of the sedimenting material changed throughout the bloom succession from PPC dominance in the initial phase with a POC/PON ratio close to 6.6 to a dominance of amorphous detritus with a higher POC/PON ratio (>10) in the post-bloom phase. The succession...

  1. Remote sensing of algal blooms by aircraft and satellite in Lake Erie and Utah Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, A. E.

    1974-01-01

    During late summer, when the surface waters of Lake Erie reach their maximum temperature, an algal bloom is likely to develop. Such phenomena, which characterize eutrophic conditions, have been noticed on other shallow lakes using the Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS-1). The concentration of the algae into long streamers provides additional information on surface circulations. To augment the ERTS Multispectral Scanner Subsystem data of Lake Erie, an aircraft was used to obtain correlative thermal-IR and additional multiband photographs. A large bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae observed in Utah Lake together with recent bloom history in Lake Erie is used to verify the Great Lakes bloom.

  2. The distribution and impacts of harmful algal bloom species in eastern boundary upwelling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trainer, V. L.; Pitcher, G. C.; Reguera, B.; Smayda, T. J.

    2010-04-01

    Comparison of harmful algal bloom (HAB) species in eastern boundary upwelling systems, specifically species composition, bloom densities, toxin concentrations and impacts are likely to contribute to understanding these phenomena. We identify and describe HABs in the California, Canary, Benguela and Humboldt Current systems, including those that can cause the poisoning syndromes in humans called paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP), diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP), and amnesic shellfish poisoning (ASP), as well as yessotoxins, ichthyotoxins, and high-biomass blooms resulting in hypoxia and anoxia. Such comparisons will allow identification of parameters, some unique to upwelling systems and others not, that contribute to the development of these harmful blooms.

  3. The 2008 Emiliania huxleyi bloom along the Patagonian Shelf: Ecology, biogeochemistry, and cellular calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Alex J.; Painter, Stuart C.; Young, Jeremy R.; Bates, Nicholas R.; Bowler, Bruce; Drapeau, Dave; Lyczsckowski, Emily; Balch, William M.

    2013-12-01

    blooms are significant contributors to the global production and export of calcium carbonate (calcite). The Patagonian Shelf is a site of intense annual coccolithophore blooms during austral summer. During December 2008, we made intensive measurements of the ecology, biogeochemistry, and physiology of a coccolithophore bloom. High numbers of Emiliania huxleyi cells and detached coccoliths (>1 × 103 mL-1 and >10 × 103 mL-1, respectively), high particulate inorganic carbon concentrations (>10 mmol C m-2), and high calcite production (up to 7.3 mmol C m-2 d-1) all characterized bloom waters. The bloom was dominated by the low-calcite-containing B/C morphotype of Emiliania huxleyi, although a small (30%, similar to estimates for E. huxleyi and indicative of a significant role for this diatom in bloom biogeochemistry. Cell-normalized calcification rates, when corrected for a high number of nonactive cells, were relatively high and when normalized to estimates of coccolith calcite indicate excessive coccolith production in the declining phase of the bloom. We find that low measures of calcite and calcite production relative to other blooms in the global ocean indicate that the dominance of the B/C morphotype may lead to overall lower calcite production. Globally, this suggests that morphotype composition influences regional bloom inventories of carbonate production and export and that climate-induced changes in morphotype biogeography could affect the carbon cycle.

  4. Health risk assessment standards of cyanobacteria bloom occurrence in bathing sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Stankiewicz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Threat for human health appears during a massive cyanobacteria bloom in potable water used for human consumption or in basins used for recreational purposes. General health risk assessment standards and preventive measures to be taken by sanitation service were presented in scope of: – evaluation of cyanobacteria bloom occurrence in bathing sites / water bodies, – procedures in case of cyanobacteria bloom, including health risk assessment and decision making process to protect users’ health at bathing sites, – preventive measures, to be taken in case of cyanobacteria bloom occurrence in bathing sites and basins, where bathing sites are located.

  5. Cellular defects caused by hypomorphic variants of the Bloom syndrome helicase gene BLM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, Vivek M; Schmidt, Kristina H

    2016-01-01

    Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extraordinary cancer incidence early in life and an average life expectancy of ~27 years. Premature stop codons in BLM, which encodes a DNA helicase that functions in DNA double-strand-break repair, make up the vast majority of Bloom syndrome mutations, with only 13 single amino acid changes identified in the syndrome. Sequencing projects have identified nearly one hundred single nucleotide variants in BLM that cause amino acid changes of uncertain significance. Here, in addition to identifying five BLM variants incapable of complementing certain defects of Bloom syndrome cells, making them candidates for new Bloom syndrome causing mutations, we characterize a new class of BLM variants that cause some, but not all, cellular defects of Bloom syndrome. We find elevated sister-chromatid exchanges, a delayed DNA damage response and inefficient DNA repair. Conversely, hydroxyurea sensitivity and quadriradial chromosome accumulation, both characteristic of Bloom syndrome cells, are absent. These intermediate variants affect sites in BLM that function in ATP hydrolysis and in contacting double-stranded DNA. Allele frequency and cellular defects suggest candidates for new Bloom syndrome causing mutations, and intermediate BLM variants that are hypomorphic which, instead of causing Bloom syndrome, may increase a person's risk for cancer or possibly other Bloom-syndrome-associated disorders, such as type-2 diabetes.

  6. Role for Atlantic inflows and sea ice loss on shifting phytoplankton blooms in the Barents Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oziel, L.; Neukermans, G.; Ardyna, M.; Lancelot, C.; Tison, J.-L.; Wassmann, P.; Sirven, J.; Ruiz-Pino, D.; Gascard, J.-C.

    2017-06-01

    Phytoplankton blooms in the Barents Sea are highly sensitive to seasonal and interannual changes in sea ice extent, water mass distribution, and oceanic fronts. With the ongoing increase of Atlantic Water inflows, we expect an impact on these blooms. Here, we use a state-of-the-art collection of in situ hydrogeochemical data for the period 1998-2014, which includes ocean color satellite-derived proxies for the biomass of calcifying and noncalcifying phytoplankton. Over the last 17 years, sea ice extent anomalies were evidenced having direct consequences for the spatial extent of spring blooms in the Barents Sea. In years of minimal sea ice extent, two spatially distinct blooms were clearly observed: one along the ice edge and another in ice-free water. These blooms are thought to be triggered by different stratification mechanisms: heating of the surface layers in ice-free waters and melting of the sea ice along the ice edge. In years of maximal sea ice extent, no such spatial delimitation was observed. The spring bloom generally ended in June when nutrients in the surface layer were depleted. This was followed by a stratified and oligotrophic summer period. A coccolithophore bloom generally developed in August, but was confined only to Atlantic Waters. In these same waters, a late summer bloom of noncalcifying algae was observed in September, triggered by enhanced mixing, which replenishes surface waters with nutrients. Altogether, the 17 year time-series revealed a northward and eastward shift of the spring and summer phytoplankton blooms.

  7. Controlling Software Piracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Albert S.

    1992-01-01

    Explains what software manufacturers are doing to combat software piracy, recommends how managers should deal with this problem, and provides a role-playing exercise to help students understand the issues in software piracy. (SR)

  8. Space Flight Software Development Software for Intelligent System Health Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Luis C.; Crumbley, Tim

    2004-01-01

    The slide presentation examines the Marshall Space Flight Center Flight Software Branch, including software development projects, mission critical space flight software development, software technical insight, advanced software development technologies, and continuous improvement in the software development processes and methods.

  9. Software Engineering Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John; Wenneson, Greg

    1993-01-01

    The Software Engineering Guidebook describes SEPG (Software Engineering Process Group) supported processes and techniques for engineering quality software in NASA environments. Three process models are supported: structured, object-oriented, and evolutionary rapid-prototyping. The guidebook covers software life-cycles, engineering, assurance, and configuration management. The guidebook is written for managers and engineers who manage, develop, enhance, and/or maintain software under the Computer Software Services Contract.

  10. Software and systems traceability

    CERN Document Server

    Cleland-Huang, Jane; Zisman, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    ""Software and Systems Traceability"" provides a comprehensive description of the practices and theories of software traceability across all phases of the software development lifecycle. The term software traceability is derived from the concept of requirements traceability. Requirements traceability is the ability to track a requirement all the way from its origins to the downstream work products that implement that requirement in a software system. Software traceability is defined as the ability to relate the various types of software artefacts created during the development of software syst

  11. Maximizing ROI on software development

    CERN Document Server

    Sikka, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    A brief review of software development history. Software complexity crisis. Software development ROI. The case for global software development and testing. Software quality and test ROI. How do you implement global software development and testing. Case studies.

  12. Phenology of the McMurdo Sound Spring Bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, K. L.; Kim, S.; Broadbent, H.; Saenz, B.; Ainley, D. G.; Ballard, G.; Pitman, R.; DiTullio, G. R.

    2016-02-01

    The phenology of spring blooms in most cases has important consequences for the food web that supports upper trophic level predators. An investigation during spring/summer of 2012/13 and 2014/15 of the McMurdo Sound ecosystem, at the southern end of the Ross Sea, revealed that maximum concentrations of fast ice algae occurred during November, with higher concentrations on the eastern side of the Sound near Ross Island and lower concentrations on the western side in the cold water outflow from under the Ross Ice Shelf. In early to mid-December, warming surface water ablated the undersurface of the fast ice and ice algae likely sank rapidly out of the water column to provide food for the benthos. Also in early to mid-December, the McMurdo system transitioned to a phytoplankton bloom at the fast ice edge and under the ice, which co-occurred with the timing of Adelie penguin reproduction (chick hatching) at Cape Royds and the arrival of minke whales and fish-eating killer whales at the fast ice edge. The phytoplankton bloom was initially advected from the Ross Sea into the eastern side of McMurdo Sound and then spread across the Sound to the western side. The phytoplankton community, which was dominated by diatoms and Phaeocystis, was not grazed down by zooplankton and appeared to sink out of the water column. Results support recent findings that a wasp-waist food web structure exists in the Ross Sea, whereby upper trophic levels are not closely coupled to phytoplankton dynamics.

  13. Proton beam therapy for malignancy in Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizumoto, M; Hashii, H; Senarita, M; Sakai, S; Wada, T; Okumura, T; Tsuboi, K; Sakurai, H

    2013-04-01

    Bloom syndrome is a DNA repair disorder that is hypersensitive to radiotherapy. We describe the first case in which proton beam therapy (PBT) was used in a patient with Bloom syndrome to treat oropharyngeal cancer. The patient was a 32-year-old woman with Bloom syndrome who was diagnosed with oropharyngeal cancer staged as T2N2bM0 poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma. The primary tumor was located on the right tongue base and extended to the right lateral pharyngeal wall. Several right upper region lymph nodes were positive for metastases. We selected PBT in anticipation of dose reduction to normal tissue. The clinical target volume was defined as the area of the primary tumor and lymph node metastases plus an 8-mm margin. After treatment with 36 GyE (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions (4-5 fractions per week), dietary intake was decreased by mucositis and intravenous hyperalimentation was started. Termination of treatment for 2.5 weeks was required to relieve mucositis. Administration of 59.4 GyE in 33 fractions markedly reduced the size of the primary tumor, but also caused moderate mucositis that required termination of PBT. One month later, lung metastases and breast cancer developed and the patient died 9 months after PBT. At this time the reduction in size of the primary tumor was maintained without severe late toxicity. We obtained almost complete response for a radiosensitive patient with a deficiency of DNA repair, indicating the excellent dose concentration of proton beam therapy.

  14. Macroalgal blooms alter community structure and primary productivity in marine ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Devin A; Arvanitidis, Christos; Blight, Andrew J; Chatzinikolaou, Eva; Guy-Haim, Tamar; Kotta, Jonne; Orav-Kotta, Helen; Queirós, Ana M; Rilov, Gil; Somerfield, Paul J; Crowe, Tasman P

    2014-09-01

    Eutrophication, coupled with loss of herbivory due to habitat degradation and overharvesting, has increased the frequency and severity of macroalgal blooms worldwide. Macroalgal blooms interfere with human activities in coastal areas, and sometimes necessitate costly algal removal programmes. They also have many detrimental effects on marine and estuarine ecosystems, including induction of hypoxia, release of toxic hydrogen sulphide into the sediments and atmosphere, and the loss of ecologically and economically important species. However, macroalgal blooms can also increase habitat complexity, provide organisms with food and shelter, and reduce other problems associated with eutrophication. These contrasting effects make their overall ecological impacts unclear. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the overall effects of macroalgal blooms on several key measures of ecosystem structure and functioning in marine ecosystems. We also evaluated some of the ecological and methodological factors that might explain the highly variable effects observed in different studies. Averaged across all studies, macroalgal blooms had negative effects on the abundance and species richness of marine organisms, but blooms by different algal taxa had different consequences, ranging from strong negative to strong positive effects. Blooms' effects on species richness also depended on the habitat where they occurred, with the strongest negative effects seen in sandy or muddy subtidal habitats and in the rocky intertidal. Invertebrate communities also appeared to be particularly sensitive to blooms, suffering reductions in their abundance, species richness, and diversity. The total net primary productivity, gross primary productivity, and respiration of benthic ecosystems were higher during macroalgal blooms, but blooms had negative effects on the productivity and respiration of other organisms. These results suggest that, in addition to their direct social and

  15. Oxylipin production during a mesocosm bloom of Skeletonema marinoi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerecht, Andrea; Carotenuto, Ylenia; Ianora, Adrianna

    2013-01-01

    Numerous biological activities such as grazer defense and intraspecific signaling have been described for diatom oxylipins, fatty acid derived secondary metabolites produced by some diatom species. As the function and importance of these compounds are still controversial, the production of a subc......Numerous biological activities such as grazer defense and intraspecific signaling have been described for diatom oxylipins, fatty acid derived secondary metabolites produced by some diatom species. As the function and importance of these compounds are still controversial, the production...... clone of S. marinoi. These results highlight the necessity of quantitatively measuring oxylipin concentrations during diatom blooms at sea to be able to correctly evaluate their ecological significance....

  16. Surveillance and treatment of malignancy in Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, E R A; Shanley, S; Walker, L; Eeles, R

    2008-06-01

    We report a patient with Bloom syndrome, a rare autosomal recessive condition characterised by chromosomal instability leading to a high risk of cancer at an early age. The diagnosis should be considered in patients with any cancer of significantly early onset, short stature and a photosensitive lupus-like rash on the face. Diagnostic confirmation is obtained from chromosome studies that show significantly increased numbers of sister chromatid exchanges. There are important management implications, including minimising the use of ionising radiation in surveillance and treatment.

  17. Phenolic Compounds Characterization and Biological Activities of Citrus aurantium Bloom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armin Oskoueian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus plants are known to possess beneficial biological activities for human health. In addition, ethnopharmacological application of plants is a good tool to explore their bioactivities and active compounds. This research was carried out to evaluate the phenolic and flavonoid analysis, antioxidant properties, anti inflammatory and anti cancer activity of Citrus aurantium bloom. The total phenolics and flavonoids results revealed that methanolic extract contained high total phenolics and flavonoids compared to ethanolic and boiling water extracts. The obtained total phenolics value for methanolic Citrus aurantium bloom extract was 4.55 ± 0.05 mg gallic acid equivalent (GAE/g dry weight (DW, and for total flavonoids it was 3.83 ± 0.05 mg rutin equivalent/g DW. In addition, the RP-HPLC analyses of phenolics and flavonoids indicated the presence of gallic acid, pyrogallol, syringic acid, caffeic acid, rutin, quercetin and naringin as bioactive compounds. The antioxidant activity of Citrus aurantium bloom were examined by the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH assay and the ferric reducing/antioxidant potential (FRAP. The free radical scavenging and ferric reducing power activities were higher for the methanolic extract of Citrus aurantium bloom at a concentration of 300 μg/mL, with values of 55.3% and 51.7%, respectively, as compared to the corresponding boiling water and ethanolic extracts, but the activities were lower than those of antioxidant standards such as BHT and α-tocopherol. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory result of methanolic extract showed appreciable reduction in nitric oxide production of stimulated RAW 264.7 cells at the presence of plant extract. Apart from that, the anticancer activity of the methanolic extract was investigated in vitro against human cancer cell lines (MCF-7; MDA-MB-231, human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29 and Chang cell as a normal human hepatocyte. The obtained result demonstrated the moderate to

  18. Bloom: A Relationship Visualization Tool for Complex Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Horsfall

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Faced with an ever-increasing capacity to collect and store data, organizations must find a way to make sense of it to their advantage. Methods are required to simplify the data so that it can inform strategic decisions and help solve problems. Visualization tools are becoming increasingly popular since they can display complex relationships in a simple, visual format. This article describes Bloom, a project at Carleton University to develop an open source visualization tool for complex networks and business ecosystems. It provides an overview of the visualization technology used in the project and demonstrates its potential impact through a case study using real-world data.

  19. Effects of fertilizers used in agricultural fields on algal blooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Subhendu; Tiwari, P. K.; Sasmal, S. K.

    2017-01-01

    ) on the bloom dynamics and DO level. By applying a sophisticated sensitivity analysis technique, we found that the increasing use of fertilizers in agricultural field causes more rapid algal growth and decreases DO level much faster than eutrophication from other sources and overfishing. We also look...... of factors and from observation it is difficult to identify the most important one. In the present paper, using a mathematical model we compare the effects of three human induced factors (fertilizer input in agricultural field, eutrophication due to other sources than fertilizers, and overfishing...

  20. The extended Kalman filter for forecast of algal bloom dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J Q; Lee, Joseph H W; Choi, K W

    2009-09-01

    A deterministic ecosystem model is combined with an extended Kalman filter (EKF) to produce short term forecasts of algal bloom and dissolved oxygen dynamics in a marine fish culture zone (FCZ). The weakly flushed FCZ is modelled as a well-mixed system; the tidal exchange with the outer bay is lumped into a flushing rate that is numerically determined from a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model. The ecosystem model incorporates phytoplankton growth kinetics, nutrient uptake, photosynthetic production, nutrient sources from organic fish farm loads, and nutrient exchange with a sediment bed layer. High frequency field observations of chlorophyll, dissolved oxygen (DO) and hydro-meteorological parameters (sampling interval Deltat=1 day, 2h, 1h, respectively) and bi-weekly nutrient data are assimilated into the model to produce the combined state estimate accounting for the uncertainties. In addition to the water quality state variables, the EKF incorporates dynamic estimation of algal growth rate and settling velocity. The effectiveness of the EKF data assimilation is studied for a wide range of sampling intervals and prediction lead-times. The chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen estimated by the EKF are compared with field data of seven algal bloom events observed at Lamma Island, Hong Kong. The results show that the EKF estimate well captures the nonlinear error evolution in time; the chlorophyll level can be satisfactorily predicted by the filtered model estimate with a mean absolute error of around 1-2 microg/L. Predictions with 1-2 day lead-time are highly correlated with the observations (r=0.7-0.9); the correlation stays at a high level for a lead-time of 3 days (r=0.6-0.7). Estimated algal growth and settling rates are in accord with field observations; the more frequent DO data can compensate for less frequent algal biomass measurements. The present study is the first time the EKF is successfully applied to forecast an entire algal bloom cycle, suggesting the

  1. The Bloom-Gilman duality and leading logarithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, C.E. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States); Mukhopadhyay, N.C. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    1994-04-01

    The existing inclusive electroproduction data base allows the authors a look at the issue of the relative behaviors of background and resonance excitations, a part of the Bloom-Gilman duality. These data lack accuracy at high Q{sup 2} but establish PQCD scaling in the resonance region and even allow the authors a glimpse at the leading logarithmic corrections due to the gluon radiation and its possible quenching at large W and x. These should inspire better quality experimental tests at facilities like CEBAF II.

  2. Control of toxic marine dinoflagellate blooms by serial parasitic killers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambouvet, Aurelie; Morin, Pascal; Marie, Dominique; Guillou, Laure

    2008-11-21

    The marine dinoflagellates commonly responsible for toxic red tides are parasitized by other dinoflagellate species. Using culture-independent environmental ribosomal RNA sequences and fluorescence markers, we identified host-specific infections among several species. Each parasitoid produces 60 to 400 offspring, leading to extraordinarily rapid control of the host's population. During 3 consecutive years of observation in a natural estuary, all dinoflagellates observed were chronically infected, and a given host species was infected by a single genetically distinct parasite year after year. Our observations in natural ecosystems suggest that although bloom-forming dinoflagellates may escape control by grazing organisms, they eventually succumb to parasite attack.

  3. Unusual Bloom of Tetraselmis sp. in the Valparaiso Bay, Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    base , in accordance with reference (a). , It is the opinion of the author that the subject paper (is __ ) (is not __ ,~><) classified, in...S data base , in ~c,cordelnce with reference (a). It Is the opinion of the author that the subject paper (Is __ ) (is not c/assiHed, in accordance...extinción de la luz, con el fin de describir las condiciones ambientales que se presentaron durante el bloom de enero de 2006. Los datos de radiación

  4. Evaluating a case study using Bloom's Taxonomy of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Brenda G; Burton, Karen J

    2008-09-01

    The joint commission recognizes effective communication among caregivers as an important factor for ensuring patient safety, especially at times when the patient's care is handed off from one caregiver or service to another. This case study reviews the course of treatment for one patient throughout the perioperative continuum, including the postoperative unit where a pre-arrest situation developed. A workshop using Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives enabled staff members to more clearly understand the patient's situation. It also allowed the participants to gain an increased understanding of significant data and has been strategic in preventing patient complications.

  5. Temporal and spatial characteristics of harmful algal blooms in Qingdao Waters, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongquan; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Cao, Xihua

    2017-03-01

    Qingdao waters, including both the semi-enclosed Jiaozhou Bay (JB) and the adjacent water out of JB (OJB), have been the areas that are most frequently affected by harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the western Yellow Sea (west of 124°E). In this research, HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters from 1990 to 2009 were investigated using spatial tools in geographic information system (GIS) and are discussed in terms of their connection to temporal variation. Additionally, the effects of each HAB occurrence were further evaluated using a simple model. The calculated results were then visualized using a GIS software to indicate the effects of HABs in Qingdao waters during the entire period. As a result, the OJB was proven to be responsible for the frequent HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters after 2000, although JB was traditionally believed to be the principle source of HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters. In addition, increasing nitrogen and N/P structure imbalance were essential for increasing HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters throughout the entire period, especially for the recent HAB occurrences in the OJB. The results of this research would improve the current understanding on HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters, which would benefit HAB monitoring and the implementation of a control strategy in China as well.

  6. Temporal and spatial characteristics of harmful algal blooms in Qingdao Waters, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongquan; Yu, Zhiming; Song, Xiuxian; Cao, Xihua

    2016-05-01

    Qingdao waters, including both the semi-enclosed Jiaozhou Bay (JB) and the adjacent water out of JB (OJB), have been the areas that are most frequently aff ected by harmful algal blooms (HABs) in the western Yellow Sea (west of 124°E). In this research, HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters from 1990 to 2009 were investigated using spatial tools in geographic information system (GIS) and are discussed in terms of their connection to temporal variation. Additionally, the eff ects of each HAB occurrence were further evaluated using a simple model. The calculated results were then visualized using a GIS software to indicate the eff ects of HABs in Qingdao waters during the entire period. As a result, the OJB was proven to be responsible for the frequent HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters after 2000, although JB was traditionally believed to be the principle source of HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters. In addition, increasing nitrogen and N/P structure imbalance were essential for increasing HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters throughout the entire period, especially for the recent HAB occurrences in the OJB. The results of this research would improve the current understanding on HAB occurrences in Qingdao waters, which would benefit HAB monitoring and the implementation of a control strategy in China as well.

  7. Improving Software Developer's Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Pekka; Kautz, Karlheinz; Sieppi, Heikki

    2002-01-01

    Emerging agile software development methods are people oriented development approaches to be used by the software industry. The personal software process (PSP) is an accepted method for improving the capabilities of a single software engineer. Five original hypotheses regarding the impact...

  8. Ensuring Software IP Cleanliness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahshad Koohgoli

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available At many points in the life of a software enterprise, determination of intellectual property (IP cleanliness becomes critical. The value of an enterprise that develops and sells software may depend on how clean the software is from the IP perspective. This article examines various methods of ensuring software IP cleanliness and discusses some of the benefits and shortcomings of current solutions.

  9. Improving Software Developer's Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Pekka; Kautz, Karlheinz; Sieppi, Heikki

    2002-01-01

    Emerging agile software development methods are people oriented development approaches to be used by the software industry. The personal software process (PSP) is an accepted method for improving the capabilities of a single software engineer. Five original hypotheses regarding the impact...

  10. Agile Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  11. Software distribution using xnetlib

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dongarra, J.J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US). Dept. of Computer Science]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Rowan, T.H. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (US); Wade, R.C. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (US). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-06-01

    Xnetlib is a new tool for software distribution. Whereas its predecessor netlib uses e-mail as the user interface to its large collection of public-domain mathematical software, xnetlib uses an X Window interface and socket-based communication. Xnetlib makes it easy to search through a large distributed collection of software and to retrieve requested software in seconds.

  12. Image Processing Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosio, M. A.

    1990-11-01

    ABSTRACT: A brief description of astronomical image software is presented. This software was developed in a Digital Micro Vax II Computer System. : St presenta una somera descripci6n del software para procesamiento de imagenes. Este software fue desarrollado en un equipo Digital Micro Vax II. : DATA ANALYSIS - IMAGE PROCESSING

  13. Agile Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, Soly Mathew

    2008-01-01

    Many software development firms are now adopting the agile software development method. This method involves the customer at every level of software development, thus reducing the impact of change in the requirement at a later stage. In this article, the principles of the agile method for software development are explored and there is a focus on…

  14. Software productivity improvement through software engineering technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgarry, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    It has been estimated that NASA expends anywhere from 6 to 10 percent of its annual budget on the acquisition, implementation and maintenance of computer software. Although researchers have produced numerous software engineering approaches over the past 5-10 years; each claiming to be more effective than the other, there is very limited quantitative information verifying the measurable impact htat any of these technologies may have in a production environment. At NASA/GSFC, an extended research effort aimed at identifying and measuring software techniques that favorably impact productivity of software development, has been active over the past 8 years. Specific, measurable, software development technologies have been applied and measured in a production environment. Resulting software development approaches have been shown to be effective in both improving quality as well as productivity in this one environment.

  15. Blooms of phytoplankton along the west coast of India associated with nutrient enrichment and the response of zooplankton

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, S.R.S.; Devassy, V.P.; Madhupratap, M.

    and dinoflagellates are also common Spectacular bloom formations of Trichodesmium is a regular phenomenon during the later part of the NE monsoon season At times, these blooms cover hundreds of kilometres Very often successions of phyto- and zooplankton communities...

  16. .A method for examining temporal changes in cyanobacterial harmful algal bloom spatial extent using satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanobacterial harmful algal blooms (CyanoHAB) are thought to be increasing globally over the past few decades, but relatively little quantitative information is available about the spatial extent of blooms. Satellite remote sensing provides a potential technology for identifying...

  17. Great software debates

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, A

    2004-01-01

    The industry’s most outspoken and insightful critic explains how the software industry REALLY works. In Great Software Debates, Al Davis, shares what he has learned about the difference between the theory and the realities of business and encourages you to question and think about software engineering in ways that will help you succeed where others fail. In short, provocative essays, Davis fearlessly reveals the truth about process improvement, productivity, software quality, metrics, agile development, requirements documentation, modeling, software marketing and sales, empiricism, start-up financing, software research, requirements triage, software estimation, and entrepreneurship.

  18. Phytoplankton bloom and subpolar gyre induced dynamics in the North Atlantic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Hátún, Hjálmar; Counillion, Francois;

    represents the integrated oceanic dynamics over the Northern North Atlantic, while the timing of the spring bloom is more governed by direct atmospheric forcing during the pre-bloom weeks. We, therefore, further investigate which published theories (Sverdrup [1953], Siegel et al [2002], Huisman et al [2002...

  19. The Internationalization of Bloom's Learning for Mastery: A 25-Year Retrospective-Prospective View.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hymel, Glenn M.; Dyck, Walter E.

    Twenty-five years have elapsed since the publication of Benjamin S. Bloom's article titled "Learning for Mastery." With approximately 2,000 master learning/testing citations in the ERIC data base alone, Bloom's 1968 piece is indeed one of the most generative works to appear in the educational psychology literature in decades. At this…

  20. The effect of environmental parameters and cyanobacterial blooms on phytoplankton dynamics of a Portuguese temperate lake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Figueiredo, Daniela R.; P. S. Reboleira, Ana Sofia; Antunes, Sara C.

    2006-01-01

    of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae occurred early in May 2001 and was preceded by the lowest nitrogen levels measured in the water during all the study period. At the time of this bloom senescence, dissolved oxygen was severely depleted and a massive death of ichthyofauna was recorded. A Microcystis aeruginosa bloom...

  1. Lupus-like histopathology in bloom syndrome: reexamining the clinical and histologic implications of photosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Joseph; Maize, John; Cook, Joel

    2009-12-01

    Bloom syndrome is a rare genodermatosis of autosomal recessive inheritance. Although lupus-like skin lesions characterize this disorder, mechanisms of photosensitivity are poorly understood. In this case presentation, the authors report a patient with Bloom syndrome whose lupus-like facial rash revealed striking histopathologic similarities to cutaneous lupus erythematosus.

  2. Byatt versus Bloom; or Poetic Influence – a Case of Anxiety or Desire?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børch, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Antonia Byatt's Possession; a Romance (1990) implicitly critiques Harold Bloom's theory of poetic influence as laid out in the influential Anxiety of Influence; her narrative suggests that a better metaphor than Bloom's Oedipal patricide would be that of love, an emotion that opens up for external...

  3. Effect of monsoonal perturbations on the occurrence of phytoplankton blooms in a tropical bay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Patil, J.S.; Anil, A.C.

    dominated by nano- and picophytoplankton, and the intervening blooms by microphytoplankton. All blooms coincided with flood tide or high tide under optimal salinity (>15) and light (depth of light penetration: >50 cm; solar radiation: 30-70 mW cm-2

  4. Impact of water level fluctuations on cyanobacterial blooms: Options for management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, E.S.; Hilt, S.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change can promote harmful cyanobacteria blooms in eutrophic waters through increased droughts or flooding. In this paper, we explore how water-level fluctuations affect the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms, and based on the observations from case studies, we discuss the options and pitfa

  5. Importance of deep mixing for initiating the North Atlantic spring bloom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Karen; Paulsen, Maria Lund; Thingstad, T. Frede;

    The phytoplankton spring bloom is one of the most important recurrent events in the sup-polar part of the Atlantic Ocean. The classical idea is that the bloom is controlled by nutrients and light, but recent observations challenge this hypothesis. During repeated visits to stations in the deep...

  6. Timing of migratory baleen whales at the Azores in relation to the North Atlantic spring bloom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, F.; Hartman, K.L.; Pierce, G.J.; Valavanis, V.D.; Huisman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Each year, a phytoplankton spring bloom starts just north of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, and then expands northwards across the entire North Atlantic. Here, we investigate whether the timing of the spring migration of baleen whales is related to the timing of the phytoplankton spring bloom,

  7. Random Access for Machine-Type Communication based on Bloom Filtering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pratas, Nuno; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Madueño, Germán Corrales

    2016-01-01

    We present a random access method inspired on Bloom filters that is suited for Machine-Type Communications (MTC). Each accessing device sends a signature during the contention process. A signature is constructed using the Bloom filtering method and contains information on the device identity...

  8. LYSIS-INDUCED DECLINE OF A PHAEOCYSTIS SPRING BLOOM AND COUPLING WITH THE MICROBIAL FOODWEB

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANBOEKEL, WHM; HANSEN, FC; RIEGMAN, R; BAK, RPM

    1992-01-01

    We studied the development and decline of the 1990 phytoplankton spring bloom in the Marsdiep area of the North Sea (The Netherlands) with emphasis on the cause of the decline of the Phaeocystis bloom, the role of microbial organisms and the utilization of organic material produced by the algae. At

  9. The phytoplankton spring bloom in Dutch coaqtal waters of the North Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gieskes, W.W.C.; Kraay, G.W.

    1975-01-01

    In the eastern part of the Southern Bight of the North Sea several sub areas could be distinguished, each with a characteristic spring bloom and species succession pattern. Regional differences in spring bloom timing were in accord with theoretical considerations in which (on the assumption of a ver

  10. The costs of respiratory illnesses arising from Florida gulf coast Karenia brevis blooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, Porter; Jin, Di; Polansky, Lara Y; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Kirkpatrick, Gary; Fleming, Lora E; Reich, Andrew; Watkins, Sharon M; Ullmann, Steven G; Backer, Lorraine C

    2009-08-01

    Algal blooms of Karenia brevis, a harmful marine algae, occur almost annually off the west coast of Florida. At high concentrations, K. brevis blooms can cause harm through the release of potent toxins, known as brevetoxins, to the atmosphere. Epidemiologic studies suggest that aerosolized brevetoxins are linked to respiratory illnesses in humans. We hypothesized a relationship between K. brevis blooms and respiratory illness visits to hospital emergency departments (EDs) while controlling for environmental factors, disease, and tourism. We sought to use this relationship to estimate the costs of illness associated with aerosolized brevetoxins. We developed a statistical exposure-response model to express hypotheses about the relationship between respiratory illnesses and bloom events. We estimated the model with data on ED visits, K. brevis cell densities, and measures of pollen, pollutants, respiratory disease, and intra-annual population changes. We found that lagged K. brevis cell counts, low air temperatures, influenza outbreaks, high pollen counts, and tourist visits helped explain the number of respiratory-specific ED diagnoses. The capitalized estimated marginal costs of illness for ED respiratory illnesses associated with K. brevis blooms in Sarasota County, Florida, alone ranged from $0.5 to $4 million, depending on bloom severity. Blooms of K. brevis lead to significant economic impacts. The costs of illness of ED visits are a conservative estimate of the total economic impacts. It will become increasingly necessary to understand the scale of the economic losses associated with K. brevis blooms to make rational choices about appropriate mitigation.

  11. Nuisance foam events and Phaeocystis globosa blooms in Dutch coastal waters analyzed with fuzzy logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blauw, A.N.; Los, F.J.; Huisman, J.; Peperzak, L.

    2010-01-01

    Phaeocystis globosa is a nuisance algal species because it can cause foam on beaches which are associated with coastal blooms. Models of Phaeocystis have considered its bloom dynamics, but not the foam formation. The process of foam formation is poorly understood which limits the suitability of trad

  12. Climbing Bloom's Taxonomy Pyramid: Lessons from a Graduate Histology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Nikki B.; Hwang, Charles; Scott, Sara; Stallard, Stefanie; Purkiss, Joel; Hortsch, Michael

    Bloom's taxonomy was adopted to create a subject-specific scoring tool for histology multiple-choice questions (MCQs). This Bloom's Taxonomy Histology Tool (BTHT) was used to analyze teacher- and student-generated quiz and examination questions from a graduate level histology course. Multiple-choice questions using histological images were…

  13. Allan Bloom, Mike Rose, and Paul Goodman: In Search of a Lost Pedagogical Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeff

    1993-01-01

    Discusses and compares two recent books on American higher education: "The Closing of the American Mind" by Allan Bloom, and "Lives on the Boundary" by Mike Rose. Develops a view which synthesizes those of Bloom and Rose. Considers this view as comparable to that of Paul Goodman. (HB)

  14. [Bloom syndrome. Clinical manifestations and cromosomal study in a Mexican child].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Solis, Gloria María; Martínez-Longoria, César Adrián; Guerrero-González, Guillermo Antonio; Ocampo-Garza, Jorge; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge

    Bloom syndrome is an extremely rare inherited disorder. We present a case of Bloom syndrome with a chromosomal study in a Mexican five-year-old patient who presented growth retardation, narrow facies with poikiloderma, café-au-lait, macules and photosensitivity.

  15. Timing of migratory baleen whales at the Azores in relation to the North Atlantic spring bloom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, F.; Hartman, K.L.; Pierce, G.J.; Valavanis, V.D.; Huisman, J.

    2011-01-01

    Each year, a phytoplankton spring bloom starts just north of the North Atlantic Subtropical Gyre, and then expands northwards across the entire North Atlantic. Here, we investigate whether the timing of the spring migration of baleen whales is related to the timing of the phytoplankton spring bloom,

  16. Satellite-based detection and monitoring of phytoplankton blooms along the Oregon coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKibben, S. M.; Strutton, P. G.; Foley, D. G.; Peterson, T. D.; White, A. E.

    2012-12-01

    We have applied a normalized difference algorithm to 8 day composite chlorophyll-a (CHL) and fluorescence line height (FLH) imagery obtained from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer aboard the Aqua spacecraft in order to detect and monitor phytoplankton blooms in the Oregon coastal region. The resulting bloom products, termed CHLrel and FLHrel, respectively, describe the onset and advection of algal blooms as a function of the percent relative change observed in standard 8 day CHL or FLH imagery over time. Bloom product performance was optimized to consider local time scales of biological variability (days) and cloud cover. Comparison of CHLrel and FLHrelretrievals to in situ mooring data collected off the central Oregon coast from summer 2009 through winter 2010 shows that the products are a robust means to detect bloom events during the summer upwelling season. Evaluation of winter performance was inconclusive due to persistent cloud cover and limited in situ chl-a records. Pairing the products with coincident in situ physical proxies provides a tool to elucidate the conditions that induce bloom onset and identify the physical mechanisms that affect bloom advection, persistence, and decay. These products offer an excellent foundation for remote bloom detection and monitoring in this region, and the methods developed herein are applicable to any region with sufficient CHL and FLH coverage.

  17. Use of remote sensing in monitoring and forecasting of harmful algal blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Richard P.; Tomlinson, Michelle C.

    2005-08-01

    Harmful algal blooms (HABs) have impacts on coastal economies, public health, and various endangered species. HABs are caused by a variety of organisms, most commonly dinoflagellates, diatoms, and cyanobacteria. In the late 1970's, optical remote sensing was found to have a potential for detecting the presence of blooms of Karenia brevis on the US Florida coast. Due to the nearly annual frequency of these blooms and the ability to note them with ocean color imagery, K. brevis blooms have strongly influenced the field of HAB remote sensing. However, with the variability between phytoplankton blooms, heir environment and their relatively narrow range of pigment types, particularly between toxic and non-toxic dinoflagellates and diatoms, techniques beyond optical detection are required for detecting and monitoring HABs. While satellite chlorophyll has some value, ecological or environmental characteristics are required to use chlorophyll. For example, identification of new blooms can be an effective means of identifying HABs that are quie intense, also blooms occurring after specific rainfall or wind events can be indicated as HABs. Several HAB species do not bloom in the traditional sense, in that they do not dominate the biomass. In these cases, remote sensing of SST or chlorophyll can be coupled with linkages to seasonal succession, changes in circulation or currents, and wind-induced transport--including upwelling and downwelling, to indicate the potential for a HAB to occur. An effective monitoring and forecasting system for HABs will require the coupling of remote sensing with an environmental and ecological understanding of the organism.

  18. Application of Multispectral and Hyperspectral Remote Sensing For Detection of Freshwater Harmful Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudela, R. M.; Accorsi, E.; Austerberry, D.; Palacios, S. L.

    2013-12-01

    Freshwater Cyanobacterial Harmful algal blooms (CHABs) represent a pressing and apparently increasing threat to both human and environmental health. In California, toxin producing blooms of several species, including Aphanizomenon, Microcystis, Lyngbya, and Anabaena are common; toxins from these blooms have been linked to impaired drinking water, domestic and wild animal deaths, and increasing evidence for toxin transfer to coastal marine environments, including the death of several California sea otters, a threatened marine species. California scientists and managers are under increasing pressure to identify and mitigate these potentially toxic blooms, but point-source measurements and grab samples have been less than effective. There is increasing awareness that these toxic events are both spatially widespread and ephememeral, leading to the need for better monitoring methods applicable to large spatial and temporal scales. Based on monitoring in several California water bodies, it appears that Aphanizomenon blooms frequently precede dangerous levels of toxins from Microcystis. We are exploring new detection methods for identifying CHABs and potentially distinguishing between blooms of the harmful cyanobacteria Aphanizomenon and Microcystis using remote sensing reflectance from a variety of airborne and satellite sensors. We suggest that Aphanizomenon blooms could potentially be used as an early warning of more highly toxic subsequent blooms, and that these methods, combined with better toxin monitoring, can lead to improved understanding and prediction of CHABs by pinpointing problematic watersheds.

  19. Retrieved bacteria from Noctiluca miliaris (green) bloom of the northeastern Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Basu, S.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Furtado, I.

    a wide range of salinities (0 percent to 25 percent w/v NaCl), pH levels (5-8.5), and organic nutrient strengths, in comparison to non-bloom waters. MPN indices of bacteria in surface waters of bloom stations DWK and PRB, corresponded to (3...

  20. Use of Bloom's Taxonomy in Developing Reading Comprehension Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, Stephen; Lorie, James

    2013-01-01

    This article is a brief account of the use of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (Bloom, Engelhart, Furst, Hill, & Krathwohl, 1956) by staff of the Law School Admission Council in the 1990 development of redesigned specifications for the Reading Comprehension section of the Law School Admission Test. Summary item statistics for…

  1. Critical Thinking in the Management Classroom: Bloom's Taxonomy as a Learning Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiou, Nicholas; McNett, Jeanne M.; Harvey, Carol

    2003-01-01

    Using Bloom's taxonomy as a scaffolding device moves students toward self-management of learning. Analysis of journals and assignments completed by 42 students in business courses showed that repeated emphasis of Bloom's concepts improved higher-level conceptual thinking. (Contains 35 references.) (SK)

  2. Self-Awareness and Personal Growth: Theory and Application of Bloom's Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, Hasan; Constantinescu, Petru-Madalin; Stevens, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Problem Statement: In this article, we summarize a group-based, self-development curriculum based on humanistic principles, framed by contemporary self-determination theory (SDT), and designed in accordance with Bloom's Taxonomy. The processes of awareness and integration are common to SDT and Bloom's Taxonomy, and to our knowledge, have not been…

  3. Calibrating the Difficulty of an Assessment Tool: The Blooming of a Statistics Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Bruce; Yapa, Gaitri; Yu, Eugenia

    2015-01-01

    Bloom's taxonomy is proposed as a tool by which to assess the level of complexity of assessment tasks in statistics. Guidelines are provided for how to locate tasks at each level of the taxonomy, along with descriptions and examples of suggested test questions. Through the "Blooming" of an examination--that is, locating its constituent…

  4. An Evaluative Calculus Project: Applying Bloom's Taxonomy to the Calculus Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaali, Gizem

    2011-01-01

    In education theory, Bloom's taxonomy is a well-known paradigm to describe domains of learning and levels of competency. In this article I propose a calculus capstone project that is meant to utilize the sixth and arguably the highest level in the cognitive domain, according to Bloom et al.: evaluation. Although one may assume that mathematics is…

  5. A Roof without Walls: Benjamin Bloom's Taxonomy and the Misdirection of American Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Plato wrote that higher order thinking could not start until the student had mastered conventional wisdom. The American educational establishment has turned Plato on his head with the help of a dubious approach to teaching developed by one Benjamin Bloom. Bloom's taxonomy was intended for higher education, but its misappropriation has resulted in…

  6. Evaluating Course-Objective Writing Effectiveness: Applying the Comprehensive Bloom Verb List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Russell; Almerico, Gina M.; Thornton, Barry

    2008-01-01

    This study is a comparative analysis of the objective writing skills of pre-service teachers to determine the efficacy of utilizing a master verb list based on Bloom's Taxonomy. Students enrolled in a mid-size university were asked to create a set of objectives to measure Bloom's Taxonomy learning outcomes. One group received a master list of…

  7. Software Engineering for Practiced Software Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Yadav

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Software development scenario particularly in IT industries is very competitive and demands for development with minimum resources. Software development started and prevailed up to an extent in industry without the use of software engineering practices, which was perceived as an overhead. This approach causes over use of resources, such as money, man-hours, hardware components. This paper attempts to present the causes of inefficiencies in an almost exhaustive way. Further, an attempt has been made to elaborate the software engineering methods as remedies against the listed causes of inefficiencies of development.

  8. Natural and anthropogenic nitrogen uptake by bloom-forming macroalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornber, Carol S. [Department of Biological Sciences, 100 Flagg Road, University of Rhode Island, Kingston, RI 02881 (United States)], E-mail: thornber@uri.edu; DiMilla, Peter; Nixon, Scott W. [Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island, South Ferry Road, Narragansett, RI 02881 (United States); McKinney, Richard A. [US Environmental Protection Agency, Atlantic Ecology Division, 27 Tarzwell Drive, Narragansett, RI 02882 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    The frequency and duration of macroalgal blooms have increased in many coastal waters over the past several decades. We used field surveys and laboratory culturing experiments to examine the nitrogen content and {delta}{sup 15}N values of Ulva and Gracilaria, two bloom-forming algal genera in Narragansett Bay, RI (USA). The northern end of this bay is densely populated with large sewage treatment plant nitrogen inputs; the southern end is more lightly populated and opens to the Atlantic Ocean. Field-collected Ulva varied in {delta}{sup 15}N among sites, but with two exceptions had {delta}{sup 15}N above 10 per mille , reflecting a significant component of heavy anthropogenic N. This variation was not correlated with a north-south gradient. Both Ulva and Gracilaria cultured in water from across Narragansett Bay also had high signals ({delta}{sup 15}N = {approx}14-17 per mille and 8-12 per mille , respectively). These results indicate that inputs of anthropogenic N can have far-reaching impacts throughout estuaries.

  9. Seawater reverse osmosis desalination and (harmful) algal blooms

    KAUST Repository

    Villacorte, Loreen O.

    2015-03-01

    This article reviews the occurrence of HABs in seawater, their effects on the operation of seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) plants, the indicators for quantifying/predicting these effects, and the pretreatment strategies for mitigating operational issues during algal blooms. The potential issues in SWRO plants during HABs are particulate/organic fouling of pretreatment systems and biological fouling of RO membranes, mainly due to accumulation of algal organic matter (AOM). The presence of HAB toxins in desalinated water is also a potential concern but only at very low concentrations. Monitoring algal cell density, AOM concentrations and membrane fouling indices is a promising approach to assess the quality of SWRO feedwater and performance of the pretreatment system. When geological condition is favourable, subsurface intake can be a robust pretreatment for SWRO during HABs. Existing SWRO plants with open intake and are fitted with granular media filtration can improve performance in terms of capacity and product water quality, if preceded by dissolved air flotation or sedimentation. However, the application of advanced pretreatment using ultrafiltration membrane with in-line coagulation is often a better option as it is capable of maintaining stable operation and better RO feed water quality during algal bloom periods with significantly lower chemical consumption.

  10. Monthly Ensembles in Algal Bloom Predictions on the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roiha, Petra; Westerlund, Antti; Stipa, Tapani

    2010-05-01

    In this work we explore the statistical features of monthly ensembles and their capability to predict biogeochemical conditions in the Baltic Sea. Operational marine environmental modelling has been considered hard, and consequently there are very few operational ecological models. Operational modelling of harmful algal blooms is harder still, since it is difficult to separate the algal species in models, and in general, very little is known of HAB properties. We present results of an ensemble approach to HAB forecasting in the Baltic, and discuss the applicability of the forecasting method to biochemical modelling. It turns out that HABs are indeed possible to forecast with useful accuracy. For modelling the algal blooms in Baltic Sea we used FMI operational 3-dimensional biogeochemical model to produce seasonal ensemble forecasts for different physical, chemical and biological variables. The modelled variables were temperature, salinity, velocity, silicate, phosphate, nitrate, diatoms, flagellates and two species of potentially toxic filamentous cyanobacteria nodularia spumigena and aphanizomenon flos-aquae. In this work we concentrate to the latter two. Ensembles were produced by running the biogeochemical model several times and forcing it on every run with different set of seasonal weather parameters from ECMWF's mathematically perturbed ensemble prediction forecasts. The ensembles were then analysed by statistical methods and the median, quartiles, minimum and maximum values were calculated for estimating the probable amounts of algae. Validation for the forecast method was made by comparing the final results against available and valid in-situ HAB data.

  11. Critical interaction domains between bloom syndrome protein and RAD51.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Krystal L; Murphy, Eileen L; Brown, Lily W; Almeida, Karen H

    2011-01-01

    The American Cancer Society's 2009 statistics estimate that 1 out of every 4 deaths is cancer related. Genomic instability is a common feature of cancerous states, and an increase in genomic instability is the diagnostic feature of Bloom Syndrome. Bloom Syndrome, a rare disorder characterized by a predisposition to cancer, is caused by mutations of the BLM gene. This study focuses on the partnerships of BLM protein to RAD51, a Homologous Recombination repair protein essential for survival. A systematic set of BLM deletion fragments were generated to refine the protein binding domains of BLM to RAD51 and determine interacting regions of BLM and ssDNA. Results show that RAD51 and ssDNA interact in overlapping regions; BLM₁₀₀₋₂₁₄ and BLM₁₃₁₇₋₁₃₆₇. The overlapping nature of these regions suggests a preferential binding for one partner that could function to regulate homologous recombination and therefore helps to clarify the role of BLM in maintaining genomic stability.

  12. Bacterial and protist community changes during a phytoplankton bloom

    KAUST Repository

    Pearman, John K.

    2015-10-01

    The present study aims to characterize the change in the composition and structure of the bacterial and microzooplankton planktonic communities in relation to the phytoplankton community composition during a bloom. High-throughput amplicon sequencing of regions of the 16S and 18S rRNA gene was undertaken on samples collected during a 20 day (d) mesocosm experiment incorporating two different nutrient addition treatments [Nitrate and Phosphate (NPc) and Nitrate, Phosphate and Silicate (NPSc)] as well as a control. This approach allowed us to discriminate the changes in species composition across a broad range of phylogenetic groups using a common taxonomic level. Diatoms dominated the bloom in the NPSc treatment while dinoflagellates were the dominant phytoplankton in the control and NPc treatment. Network correlations highlighted significant interactions between OTUs within each treatment including changes in the composition of Paraphysomonas OTUs when the dominant Chaetoceros OTU switched. The microzooplankton community composition responded to changes in the phytoplankton composition while the prokaryotic community responded more to changes in ammonia concentration.

  13. Weather variability, sunspots, and the blooms of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenbiao; Connell, Des; Mengersen, Kerrie; Tong, Shilu

    2009-03-01

    The roles of weather variability and sunspots in the occurrence of cyanobacteria blooms, were investigated using cyanobacteria cell data collected from the Fred Haigh Dam, Queensland, Australia. Time series generalized linear model and classification and regression tree (CART) model were used in the analysis. Data on notified cell numbers of cyanobacteria and weather variables over the periods 2001 and 2005 were provided by the Australian Department of Natural Resources and Water, and Australian Bureau of Meteorology, respectively. The results indicate that monthly minimum temperature (relative risk [RR]: 1.13, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.02-1.25) and rainfall (RR: 1.11; 95% CI: 1.03-1.20) had a positive association, but relative humidity (RR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.91-0.98) and wind speed (RR: 0.90; 95% CI: 0.82-0.98) were negatively associated with the cyanobacterial numbers, after adjustment for seasonality and auto-correlation. The CART model showed that the cyanobacteria numbers were best described by an interaction between minimum temperature, relative humidity, and sunspot numbers. When minimum temperature exceeded 18 degrees C and relative humidity was under 66%, the number of cyanobacterial cells rose by 2.15-fold. We conclude that weather variability and sunspot activity may affect cyanobacteria blooms in dams.

  14. Lake level fluctuations boost toxic cyanobacterial "oligotrophic blooms".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiana Callieri

    Full Text Available Global warming has been shown to strongly influence inland water systems, producing noticeable increases in water temperatures. Rising temperatures, especially when combined with widespread nutrient pollution, directly favour the growth of toxic cyanobacteria. Climate changes have also altered natural water level fluctuations increasing the probability of extreme events as dry periods followed by heavy rains. The massive appearance of Dolichospermum lemmermannii ( = planktonic Anabaena, a toxic species absent from the pelagic zone of the subalpine oligotrophic Lake Maggiore before 2005, could be a consequence of the unusual fluctuations of lake level in recent years. We hypothesized that these fluctuations may favour the cyanobacterium as result of nutrient pulses from the biofilms formed in the littoral zone when the lake level is high. To help verify this, we exposed artificial substrates in the lake, and evaluated their nutrient enrichment and release after desiccation, together with measurements of fluctuations in lake level, precipitation and D. lemmermannii population. The highest percentage of P release and the lowest C:P molar ratio of released nutrients coincided with the summer appearance of the D. lemmermannii bloom. The P pulse indicates that fluctuations in level counteract nutrient limitation in this lake and it is suggested that this may apply more widely to other oligotrophic lakes. In view of the predicted increase in water level fluctuations due to climate change, it is important to try to minimize such fluctuations in order to mitigate the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms.

  15. Effects of nutrients on Microcystis growth more easily forming bloom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OU Ming-ming; ZHOU Bao-xue; XIE Wei-jie; JIANG Ju-hui; CAI Wei-min

    2004-01-01

    Different nutrient media experimentally were N, P and Fe-limited conditions and a serial of diluted BG11 media. The cell change of morphology and life history, cell number, cell color and cell area of Microcystis were analyzed quantitatively. First, the effects of nitrogen, phosphorus and iron depletion were distinctively different. Phosphorus and iron depletion caused more special division cells, slowly growth increasing, the easier change of bigger cell area. Second, the nitrogen and iron depletion could make the color of alga from green to brown. Finally, according to the resource competition and Monod equation, Microcystis kinetics of phosphorus and iron were also examined. Ks and μmax of phosphorus absorption were 0.0352 μmol/L, 0.493 d-1 respectively; iron absorption: 0.00323 μmol/L, 0.483 d-1. In a word, some evidences of the Microcystis bloom privilege in certain nutrient conditions were indicated in the experiments. The privileges were determined as the reviving under the adverse circumstances through the special division, the various nitrogen resources, and the lower kinetics of phosphorus and iron than that of most of other algae. The conclusions provided the scientific basis for preventing and managing Microcystis bloom in freshwater.

  16. Is iron a limiting factor of Nodularia spumigena blooms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Paczuska

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that a deficiency of iron, a trace element essential to every living organism, limits the growth of algae and cyanobacteria. Nodularia spumigena Mertens is a blue-green algae species inhabiting the Baltic region that often forms toxic blooms.     The aim of the study was to assess the growth of the toxic cyanobacteria with respect to iron bioavailability. The measured growth parameters were the numbers of cells (optical density, chlorophyll a and pheopigment a concentrations. The iron concentrations used ranged from 10-7 to 10-4 mol dm-3. Under iron stress conditions (<5 × 10-7 mol dm-3, growth inhibition, gradual pigment decay and cell mortality were observed. However, enriching the medium with complexing factors like citric acid and EDTA significantly stimulated the growth rate and chlorophyll a production. The citric acid - EDTA - Fe (5 × 10-7 mol dm-3 complex was demonstrably effective in stimulating the rate of cell division. Starting with 10-6 mol dm-3, the higher the iron(III concentration used in the media, the more intensive the growth of the cyanobacteria populations. This was most rapid in the presence of high iron concentrations (10-4 mol dm-3, regardless of the presence of complexing agents.     It appears that the growth of toxic cyanobacteria N. spumigena, and thus also its ability to form blooms, may well depend on iron availability in the environment.

  17. An epizootic of Florida manatees associated with a dinoflagellate bloom

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, T.J.; Rathbun, G.B.; Bonde, R.K.; Buergelt, C.D.; Odell, D.K.

    1991-01-01

    Over a 10-wk period in early 1982, 39 Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) were found dead in the lower Caloosahatchee River and nearby waters of southwestern Florida. Two were killed by boats. The remainder showed no evidence of trauma. Lesions indicative of infectious agents were not identified, and bacteriological and contaminant residue findings were unremarkable. Nonspecific lesions of congestion and hemorrhage were identified in brain tissue. Numerous reports were also received of manatee morbidity. Some distressed manatees showed no biochemical lesions in clinical analyses of blood samples and recovered quickly. Timing of manatee illnesses coincided with fish and double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) mortality and morbidity. A widespread bloom of the dinoflagellate red tide organism (Gymnodinium breve) also coincided with these incidents. G. breve produces potent neurotoxins (brevetoxins). Circumstantial evidence links these events, and possible routes of exposure may include ingestion of filter-feeding ascidians. Ecological conditions that magnified the extent of the epizootic included an early dispersal of manatees into the area from a nearby winter aggregation site and unusually high salinities that facilitated the inshore spread of the red tide bloom. Management responses to future episodes of red tide in manatee areas are suggested.

  18. Revisiting Bloom's taxonomy for ethics and other educational domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Russell D; Schick, Ida Critelli

    2003-01-01

    In the process of developing competency-based health services administration education, the Ethics Faculty Forum Co-Chairs from the Association of University Programs in Health Administration (AUPHA) were asked not only to identify their domains and competencies, but also to review six other faculty fora research outcomes. This article was written by the Ethics Faculty Forum Co-Chairs in response to the AUPHA request. Reviewing the work of the original six faculty fora using Bloom's taxonomy, we found that the fora focused mainly on the cognitive objectives and generally did not consider the affective objectives. The intent of this paper is to help those who teach healthcare ethics refine their current courses to include both cognitive and affective objectives. The paper pursues five objectives: 1. review of Bloom's taxonomy as a framework for creating course objectives in both the cognitive and affective domains; 2. present fora research and their domain outcomes; 3. present an overview of healthcare ethics literature; 4. provide a demonstration of healthcare ethics competencies in both the cognitive and affective domains; and 5. present possible directions for healthcare ethics and other educational domain research.

  19. A classification of the ISIS program using Bloom's cognitive taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clevenstine, Richard F.

    This article focuses on the practical use of Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives. The current status of analyzing and classifying test items and behavioral objectives was examined in this study. Specifically, the purpose of this study was to analyze and classify the ISIS minicourse performance objectives and criterion-referenced test items according to Bloom's cognitive Taxonomy in order to determine what levels of cognition the ISIS instructional materials are directed. The performance objectives and test items of thirty-three ISIS minicourses and criterion-referenced tests were collected and classified. Four research questions were posed in the study. The findings indicate that ISIS minicourse test items and performance objectives are written primarily at the Knowledge and Comprehension levels. The ISIS instructional materials reflect low percentages of upper cognitive level test items and performance objectives. Based upon the use of a chi-square analysis, twenty-four of the ISIS minicourses and tests demonstrate a positive congruence between their performance objectives and criterion-referenced test items. Nine ISIS minicourses were found to demonstrate a negative relationship between their performance objectives and test items. Implications and Recommendations based on the findings of the studies are provided.

  20. Spectropolarimetry of the Type Ib Supernova iPTF 13bvn: Revealing the complex explosion geometry of a stripped-envelope core-collapse supernova

    CERN Document Server

    Reilly, Emma; Baade, Dietrich; Wheeler, J Craig; Silverman, Jeffrey M; Clocchiatti, Alejandro; Patat, Ferdinando; Höflich, Peter; Spyromilio, Jason; Wang, Lifan; Zelaya, Paula

    2015-01-01

    We present six epochs of spectropolarimetric observations and one epoch of spectroscopy of the Type Ib SN iPTF 13bvn. The epochs of these observations correspond to $-$10 to $+$61 days with respect to the {\\it r}-band light curve maximum. The continuum is intrinsically polarised to the $0.2-0.4\\%$ level throughout the observations, implying asphericities of $\\sim10\\%$ in the shape of the photosphere. We observe significant line polarisation associated with the spectral features of Ca II IR3, He I/Na I D, He I {\\lambda}{\\lambda}6678, 7065, Fe II {\\lambda}4924 and O I {\\lambda}7774. We propose that an absorption feature at $\\sim 6200\\mathrm{\\AA}$, usually identified as Si II $\\lambda 6355$, is most likely to be high velocity $\\mathrm{H\\alpha}$ at $-16,400$ $\\mathrm{km \\; s^{-1}}$. Two distinctly polarised components, separated in velocity, are detected for both He I/Na I D and Ca II IR3, indicating the presence of two discrete line forming regions in the ejecta in both radial velocity space and in the plane of ...

  1. Software Metrics for Identifying Software Size in Software Development Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.S.P Vidanapathirana

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Measurements are fundamental any engineering discipline. They indicate the amount, extent, dimension or capacity of an attribute or a product, in a quantitative manner. The analyzed results of the measured data can be given as the basic idea of metrics. It is a quantitative representation of the measurements of the degree to which a system, component, or process possesses a given attribute. When it comes to software, the metrics are a wide scope of measurements of computer programming. The size oriented metrics takes a main role in it since they can be used as the key for better estimations, to improve trust and confidence, and to have a better control over the software products. Software professionals traditionally have been measuring the size of software applications by using several methods. In this paper the researchers discuss about the software size metrics for identifying software size and it is mainly focused on the software development projects in today’s Information Technology (IT industry.

  2. Software Cost Estimation Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ongere, Alphonce

    2013-01-01

    Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort, the time and the cost re-quired to complete software project successfully. It involves size measurement of the soft-ware project to be produced, estimating and allocating the effort, drawing the project schedules, and finally, estimating overall cost of the project. Accurate estimation of software project cost is an important factor for business and the welfare of software organization in general. If cost and effort estimat...

  3. Software Partitioning Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-29

    1 Software Partitioning Technologies Tim Skutt Smiths Aerospace 3290 Patterson Ave. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512-1991 (616) 241-8645 skutt_timothy...Limitation of Abstract UU Number of Pages 12 2 Agenda n Software Partitioning Overview n Smiths Software Partitioning Technology n Software Partitioning...Partition Level OS Core Module Level OS Timers MMU I/O API Layer Partitioning Services 6 Smiths Software Partitioning Technology n Smiths has developed

  4. 基于Bloom Filter的网络爬虫URL消重算法研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王春梅

    2011-01-01

    针对网络大量重复页面,本文研究基于Bloom Filter的网络爬虫URL地址消重算法.首先,本文对Bloom Filter算法进行了分析研究;其次,本文应用Bloom Filter算法设计并实现了网络爬虫的URL消重;最后,论文采用URL消重率争爬虫爬取某类网站所用时间等性能指标,对基于遍历法和基于MD5算法的URL消重性能与基于Bloom Filter的消重性能做了对比.实验证明,基于Bloom Filter的网络爬虫URL地址消重算法效率较高.

  5. Extensive Chaetoceros curvisetus bloom in relation to water quality in Port Blair Bay, Andaman Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begum, Mehmuna; Sahu, Biraja Kumar; Das, Apurba Kumar; Vinithkumar, Nambali Valsalan; Kirubagaran, Ramalingam

    2015-05-01

    Blooming of diatom species Chaetoceros curvisetus (Cleve, 1889) was observed in Junglighat Bay and Haddo Harbour of Port Blair Bay of Andaman and Nicobar Islands during June 2010. Physico-chemical parameters, nutrient concentrations and phytoplankton composition data collected from five stations during 2010 were classified as bloom area (BA) and non-bloom area (NBA) and compared. Elevated values of dissolved oxygen were recorded in the BA, and it significantly varied (p NBA. Among the nutrient parameters studied, nitrate concentration indicated significant variation in BA and NBA (p NBA, indicating its utilization. In Junglighat Bay, the C. curvisetus species constituted 93.4 and 69.2% composition of total phytoplankton population during day 1 and day 2, respectively. The bloom forming stations separated out from the non-bloom forming station in non-parametric multidimensional scaling (nMDS) ordinations; cluster analysis powered by SIMPROF test also grouped the stations as BA and NBA.

  6. Accumulated chilling hours during endodormancy impact blooming and fruit shape developmentin peach (Prunus persicaL.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yong; FANG Wei-chao; ZHU Geng-rui; CAO Ke; CHEN Chang-wen; WANG Xin-wei; WANG Li-rong

    2016-01-01

    Winter chil is essential for the growth and development of deciduous species. To understand the relationship between accumulated chiling hours during endodormancy and blooming and fruit shape development, we controled chiling hours and investigated their effects on blooming date and fruit shape of peaches. The results showed that the number of days to full bloom date and the heat requirement for blooming were negatively correlated with accumulated chilling hours. Accumulated chiling hours were signiifcantly negatively correlated with fruit shape index and fruit tip lengths, suggesting that the number of chiling hours affect the fruit shape development. Fewer accumulated chiling hours may be the major reason for longer fruit shape and protruding fruit tips. In conclusion, our results indicate speciifcaly that decreased winter chiling hours can delay the bloom date and may lead to aberrant fruit shape development in peaches. Our study provides preliminary insights into the response of temperate fruit species to global climate change.

  7. Free polyamine content during algal bloom succession in the East China Sea in spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Zhao, Weihong; Li, Caiyan; Miao, Hui

    2017-01-01

    We measured the concentrations and distribution of major polyamines (spermine, putrescine and spermidine) in seawater during successive spring algal blooms in an area of frequent harmful blooms in the East China Sea. Spermine, putrescine, and spermidine concentrations were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography and ranged from 1-64, 7-81, and 0-19 nmol/L. Spermine was present at the highest concentrations, followed by putrescine and spermidine. In late April, when a diatom bloom dominated by Skeletonema costatum dispersed, polyamine concentrations increased, presumably as a result of diatom decomposition. In early May, when a dinoflagellate bloom dominated by Prorocentrum donghaiense occurred, the polyamine concentration decreased from the level seen in late April. The abundant polyamines that decomposed and were released during the diatom bloom in late April may have promoted the growth of P. donghaiense, resulting in its dominance.

  8. Is Occurrence of Harmful Algal Blooms in the Exclusive Economic Zone of India on the Rise?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Padmakumar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Occurrence, increase in frequency, intensity and spatial coverage of harmful algal blooms during the past decade in the EEZ of India are documented here. Eighty algal blooms were recorded during the period 1998–2010. Of the eighty algal blooms, 31 blooms were formed by dinoflagellates, 27 by cyanobacteria, and 18 by diatoms. Three raphidophyte and one haptophyte blooms were also observed. Potentially toxic microalgae recorded from the Indian waters were Alexandrium spp., Gymnodinium spp. Dinophysis spp., Coolia monotis, Prorocentrum lima, and Pseudo-nitzschia spp. Examination of available data from the literature during the last hundred years and in situ observations during 1998–2010 indicates clear-cut increase in the occurrence of HABs in the Indian EEZ.

  9. Contributions of meteorology to the phenology of cyanobacterial blooms: implications for future climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Duan, Hongtao; Shi, Xiaoli; Yu, Yang; Kong, Fanxiang

    2012-02-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms are often a result of eutrophication. Recently, however, their expansion has also been found to be associated with changes in climate. To elucidate the effects of climatic variables on the expansion of cyanobacterial blooms in Taihu, China, we analyzed the relationships between climatic variables and bloom events which were retrieved by satellite images. We then assessed the contribution of each climate variable to the phenology of blooms using multiple regression models. Our study demonstrates that retrieving ecological information from satellite images is meritorious for large-scale and long-term ecological research in freshwater ecosystems. Our results show that the phenological changes of blooms at an inter-annual scale are strongly linked to climate in Taihu during the past 23 yr. Cyanobacterial blooms occur earlier and last longer with the increase of temperature, sunshine hours, and global radiation and the decrease of wind speed. Furthermore, the duration increases when the daily averages of maximum, mean, and minimum temperature each exceed 20.3 °C, 16.7 °C, and 13.7 °C, respectively. Among these factors, sunshine hours and wind speed are the primary contributors to the onset of the blooms, explaining 84.6% of their variability over the past 23 yr. These factors are also good predictors of the variability in the duration of annual blooms and determined 58.9% of the variability in this parameter. Our results indicate that when nutrients are in sufficiently high quantities to sustain the formation of cyanobacterial blooms, climatic variables become crucial in predicting cyanobacterial bloom events. Climate changes should be considered when we evaluate how much the amount of nutrients should be reduced in Taihu for lake management.

  10. The bloom of the dinoflagellate (Noctiluca miliaris) in the North Eastern Arabian Sea: Ship and Satellite study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Matondkar, S.G.P.; Basu, S.; Parab, S.G.; Pednekar, S.; Dwivedi, R.M.; Raman, M.; Goes, J.I.; Gomes, H.

    The bloom of Noctiluca miliaris (a dinoflagellate) which appears in the form of a green tide was studied from 2003-2011. This bloom covered a large area of the Arabian Sea from the west coast of India to the coast of Oman. The bloom was easily...

  11. Software Engineering Program: Software Process Improvement Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide experience-based guidance in implementing a software process improvement program in any NASA software development or maintenance community. This guidebook details how to define, operate, and implement a working software process improvement program. It describes the concept of the software process improvement program and its basic organizational components. It then describes the structure, organization, and operation of the software process improvement program, illustrating all these concepts with specific NASA examples. The information presented in the document is derived from the experiences of several NASA software organizations, including the SEL, the SEAL, and the SORCE. Their experiences reflect many of the elements of software process improvement within NASA. This guidebook presents lessons learned in a form usable by anyone considering establishing a software process improvement program within his or her own environment. This guidebook attempts to balance general and detailed information. It provides material general enough to be usable by NASA organizations whose characteristics do not directly match those of the sources of the information and models presented herein. It also keeps the ideas sufficiently close to the sources of the practical experiences that have generated the models and information.

  12. Payload software technology: Software technology development plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    Programmatic requirements for the advancement of software technology are identified for meeting the space flight requirements in the 1980 to 1990 time period. The development items are described, and software technology item derivation worksheets are presented along with the cost/time/priority assessments.

  13. Theoretical analysis for scaling law of thermal blooming based on optical phase deference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yunqiang; Huang, Zhilong; Ren, Zebin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Guo, Longde; Xi, Fengjie

    2016-10-01

    In order to explore the laser propagation influence of thermal blooming effect of pipe flow and to analysis the influencing factors, scaling law theoretical analysis of the thermal blooming effects in pipe flow are carry out in detail based on the optical path difference caused by thermal blooming effects in pipe flow. Firstly, by solving the energy coupling equation of laser beam propagation, the temperature of the flow is obtained, and then the optical path difference caused by the thermal blooming is deduced. Through the analysis of the influence of pipe size, flow field and laser parameters on the optical path difference, energy scaling parameters Ne=nTαLPR2/(ρɛCpπR02) and geometric scaling parameters Nc=νR2/(ɛL) of thermal blooming for the pipe flow are derived. Secondly, for the direct solution method, the energy coupled equations have analytic solutions only for the straight tube with Gauss beam. Considering the limitation of directly solving the coupled equations, the dimensionless analysis method is adopted, the analysis is also based on the change of optical path difference, same scaling parameters for the pipe flow thermal blooming are derived, which makes energy scaling parameters Ne and geometric scaling parameters Nc have good universality. The research results indicate that when the laser power and the laser beam diameter are changed, thermal blooming effects of the pipeline axial flow caused by optical path difference will not change, as long as you keep energy scaling parameters constant. When diameter or length of the pipe changes, just keep the geometric scaling parameters constant, the pipeline axial flow gas thermal blooming effects caused by optical path difference distribution will not change. That is to say, when the pipe size and laser parameters change, if keeping two scaling parameters with constant, the pipeline axial flow thermal blooming effects caused by the optical path difference will not change. Therefore, the energy scaling

  14. Pragmatic Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan; Jensen, Rikke Hagensby

    2014-01-01

    We understand software innovation as concerned with introducing innovation into the development of software intensive systems, i.e. systems in which software development and/or integration are dominant considerations. Innovation is key in almost any strategy for competitiveness in existing markets......, for creating new markets, or for curbing rising public expenses, and software intensive systems are core elements in most such strategies. Software innovation therefore is vital for about every sector of the economy. Changes in software technologies over the last decades have opened up for experimentation...

  15. Three new BLM gene mutations associated with Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor-Guéret, Mounira; Dubois-d'Enghien, Catherine; Laugé, Anthony; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Barakat, Abdelhamid; Chadli, Elbekkay; Bousfiha, Ahmed Aziz; Benjelloun, Meriem; Flori, Elisabeth; Doray, Bérénice; Laugel, Vincent; Lourenço, Maria Teresa; Gonçalves, Rui; Sousa, Silvia; Couturier, Jérôme; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique

    2008-06-01

    Bloom's syndrome (BS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease predisposing patients to all types of cancers affecting the general population. BS cells display a high level of genetic instability, including a 10-fold increase in the rate of sister chromatid exchanges, currently the only objective criterion for BS diagnosis. We have developed a method for screening the BLM gene for mutations based on direct genomic DNA sequencing. A questionnaire based on clinical information, cytogenetic features, and family history was addressed to physicians prescribing BS genetic screening, with the aim of confirming or guiding diagnosis. We report here four BLM gene mutations, three of which have not been described before. Three of the mutations are frameshift mutations, and the fourth is a nonsense mutation. All these mutations introduce a stop codon, and may therefore be considered to have deleterious biological effect. This approach should make it possible to identify new mutations and to correlate them with clinical information.

  16. Bloom syndrome and maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodage, T.; Prasad, M.; Trent, R.J.; Smith, A. (Children' s Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (New Zealand)); Dixon, J.W.; Romain, D.R.; Columbano-Green, L.M.; Selby, R.E. (Wellington Hospital (New Zealand)); Graham, D. (Waikato Hospital, Hamilton (New Zealand)); Rogan, P.K. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Hershey, PA (United States)) (and others)

    1994-07-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by increases in the frequency of sister-chromatid exchange and in the incidence of malignancy. Chromosome-transfer studies have shown the BS locus to map to chromosome 15q. This report describes a subject with features of both BS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Molecular analysis showed maternal uniparental disomy for chromosome 15. Meiotic recombination between the two disomic chromosomes 15 has resulted in heterodisomy for proximal 15q and isodisomy for distal 15q. In this individual BS is probably due to homozygosity for a gene that is telomeric to D15S95 (15q25), rather than to genetic imprinting, the mechanism responsible for the development of PWS. This report represents the first application of disomy analysis to the regional localization of a disease gene. This strategy promises to be useful in the genetic mapping of other uncommon autosomal recessive conditions. 37 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Discussion about mechanism of harmful algal blooms breakout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BU Xianwei; XU Weiyi; ZHU Dedi; CHEN Gengxin

    2005-01-01

    HAB (harmful algal bloom) is a serious marine ecological disaster. Up to now there is no definite conclusion about its mechanism of occurrence.The observation results show that the HAB breakout in the Xiangshan Bay was mainly caused by physical convergence ca pacity,and the breakout process had no direct relation to eutrophication. As a new idea it is thought that the process of the HAB break out is mainly a physical convergence or accumulation process in some areas. A hypothesis about dynamic mechanism of the HAB ap pearing in the area off the Changjiang Estuary is put forward according to hydrology and topography and the past work, and a breakthrough is expected to be made for doing further research.

  18. Factors determining the diurnal dynamics of blooming of chosen plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Denisow

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to synthesize the determinants which may influence the diurnal rhythm of blooming. Additionally, I tried to explore and bring together topics that concern blooming and have always been considered separately because of their origin in different disciplines. The following species were included: Hydrangea arborescens L. subsp. discolor (Raf., H. paniculata Sieb., Viburnum opulus L., Chaenomeles japonica Lindl., Knautia arvensis L., Adonis vernalis L., Aster saggitifolius Willd., Taraxacum officinale L. Chelidonium majus L. The taxons were observed in Lublin (51008' - 51018' N and 21027' - 21041' E in the years 2001-2007. The blooming of species was determined at least for two vegetation seasons. During observations all flowers developed in one-hour intervals were counted. The diurnal dynamics of blooming differs among species and is modified by different endogenous and exogenous factors. The endogenous determinants of diurnal dynamics of blooming are morphological diversity of flowers (fertility or sterility within species or heterostyly. The different pattern of blooming succour different mechanisms which prevent self-pollination (Chaenomeles japonica Lindl., Knautia arvensis L.. The abiotic factors, such as day length and temperature during the vegetation season, influence the change in the process of diurnal dynamics of blooming (e. g. Taraxacum officinale, Chelidonium majus.

  19. Physical control of interannual variations of the winter chlorophyll bloom in the northern Arabian Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. G. Keerthi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The northern Arabian Sea hosts a winter chlorophyll bloom, triggered by convective overturning in response to cold and dry northeasterly monsoon winds. Previous studies of interannual variations of this bloom only relied on a couple of years of data and reached no consensus on the associated processes. The current study aims at identifying these processes using both  ∼  10 years of observations (including remotely sensed chlorophyll data and physical parameters derived from Argo data and a 20-year-long coupled biophysical ocean model simulation. Despite discrepancies in the estimated bloom amplitude, the six different remotely sensed chlorophyll products analysed in this study display a good phase agreement at seasonal and interannual timescales. The model and observations both indicate that the interannual winter bloom fluctuations are strongly tied to interannual mixed layer depth anomalies ( ∼  0.6 to 0.7 correlation, which are themselves controlled by the net heat flux at the air–sea interface. Our modelling results suggest that the mixed layer depth control of the bloom amplitude ensues from the modulation of nutrient entrainment into the euphotic layer. In contrast, the model and observations both display insignificant correlations between the bloom amplitude and thermocline depth, which precludes a control of the bloom amplitude by daily dilution down to the thermocline depth, as suggested in a previous study.

  20. Clinical features of Bloom syndrome and function of the causative gene, BLM helicase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Hideo; Kondo, Naomi

    2004-05-01

    Bloom syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder characterized by growth deficiency, unusual facies, sun-sensitive telangiectatic erythema, immunodeficiency and predisposition to cancer. The causative gene for Bloom syndrome is BLM, which encodes the BLM RecQ helicase homolog protein. The first part of this review describes a long-term follow-up study of two Bloom syndrome siblings. Subsequently, the focus is placed on the functional domains of BLM. Laboratory diagnosis of Bloom syndrome by detecting mutations in BLM is laborious and impractical, unless there are common mutations in a population. Immunoblot and immunohistochemical analyses for the detection of the BLM protein using a polyclonal BLM antibody, which are useful approaches for clinical diagnosis of Bloom syndrome, are also described. In addition, a useful adjunct for the diagnosis of Bloom syndrome in terms of the BLM function is investigated, since disease cells must have the defective BLM helicase function. This review also discusses the nuclear localization signal of BLM, the proteins that interact with BLM and tumors originating from Bloom syndrome.

  1. The bloom of nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in the northern Baltic Proper stimulates summer production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedén, Jennie B.; Walve, Jakob; Larsson, Ulf; Elmgren, Ragnar

    2016-11-01

    In the northern Baltic Sea Proper, total nitrogen (TN) increases during the summer bloom of filamentous heterocystous cyanobacteria. To follow the fate of the nitrogen they fix, we studied several N fractions during the bloom. We measured cyanobacterial biomass, TN, particulate organic N (PON, two size fractions), dissolved organic N (DON), and PON sedimentation in two areas in 2011. TN increased mainly due to increasing PON, but also to DON. Cyanobacteria contributed about 20% of the PON increase and ~ 10% of the TN increase. About half the PON changes (increase, then decrease) could be explained by the sum of cyanobacteria, other autotrophs (> 2 μm) and zooplankton, indicating that the bloom stimulates primary and secondary production. TN decreased after the bloom mainly due to declining PON > 10 μm, but sedimentation rates did not increase and could explain little of the post-bloom N-loss. There was little settling of undecomposed cyanobacteria. The seasonal development of Aphanizomenon sp. and N pools was similar among stations and areas. For Nodularia spumigena between-station variability increased once patchy surface accumulations developed. A brief Dolichospermum spp. bloom indicated that sampling frequency may be more important than spatial resolution for capturing dynamics of this bloom.

  2. Sea-ice retreat controls timing of summer plankton blooms in the Eastern Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janout, Markus A.; Hölemann, Jens; Waite, Anya M.; Krumpen, Thomas; Appen, Wilken-Jon; Martynov, Fedor

    2016-12-01

    Two full-year mooring records of sea-ice, physical, and bio-optical parameters illuminate tight temporal coupling between the retreating seasonal ice edge and the summer phytoplankton bloom on the Laptev Sea shelf. Our records showed no sign of pelagic under-ice blooms despite available nutrients and thinning sea ice in early summer, presumably because stratification had not yet developed. Chlorophyll blooms were detected immediately after the ice retreated in late May 2014 and late July 2015. Despite radically different timing, the blooms were similar in both magnitude and length, interpreted as community-level nutrient limitation. Acoustic backscatter records suggest the delayed 2015 bloom resulted in lower zooplankton abundance, perhaps due to a timing mismatch between ice algal and pelagic blooms and unfavorable thermal conditions. Our observations provide classical examples of ice-edge blooms and further emphasize the complexity of high-latitude shelves and the need to understand vertical mixing processes important for stratification and nutrient fluxes.

  3. Cyanotoxin mixtures and taste-and-odor compounds in cyanobacterial blooms from the midwestern united states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, J.L.; Loftin, K.A.; Meyer, M.T.; Ziegler, A.C.

    2010-01-01

    The mixtures of toxins and taste-and-odor compounds present during cyanobacterial blooms are not well characterized and of particular concern when evaluating potential human health risks. Cyanobacterial blooms were sampled in twenty-three Midwestern United States lakes and analyzed for community composition, thirteen cyanotoxins by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and immunoassay, and two taste-and-odor compounds by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Aphanizomenon, Cylindrospermopsis and/or Microcystis were dominant in most (96%) blooms, but community composition was not strongly correlated with toxin and taste-and-odor occurrence. Microcystins occurred in all blooms. Total microcystin concentrations measured by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry and immunoassay were linearly related (rs = 0.76, p Geosmin (87%), 2-methylisoborneol (39%), anatoxin-a (30%), saxitoxins (17%), cylindrospermopsins (9%), and nodularin-R (9%) also were present in these blooms. Multiple classes of cyanotoxins occurred in 48% of blooms and 95% had multiple microcystin variants. Toxins and taste-and-odor compounds frequently co-occurred (91% of blooms), indicating odor may serve as a warning that cyanotoxins likely are present. However, toxins occurred more frequently than taste-and-odor compounds, so odor alone does not provide sufficient warning to ensure human-health protection. ?? This article not subject to U.S. Copyright. Published 2010 by the American Chemical Society.

  4. Species identification of mixed algal bloom in the Northern Arabian Sea using remote sensing techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, R; Rafeeq, M; Smitha, B R; Padmakumar, K B; Thomas, Lathika Cicily; Sanjeevan, V N; Prakash, Prince; Raman, Mini

    2015-02-01

    Oceanic waters of the Northern Arabian Sea experience massive algal blooms during winter-spring (mid Feb-end Mar), which prevail for at least for 3 months covering the entire northern half of the basin from east to west. Ship cruises were conducted during winter-spring of 2001-2012 covering different stages of the bloom to study the biogeochemistry of the region. Phytoplankton analysis indicated the presence of green tides of dinoflagellate, Noctiluca scintillans (=N. miliaris), in the oceanic waters. Our observations indicated that diatoms are coupled and often co-exist with N. scintillans, making it a mixed-species ecosystem. In this paper, we describe an approach for detection of bloom-forming algae N. scintillans and its discrimination from diatoms using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua data in a mixed-species environment. In situ remote sensing reflectance spectra were generated using Satlantic™ hyperspectral radiometer for the bloom and non-bloom waters. Spectral shapes of the reflectance spectra for different water types were distinct, and the same were used for species identification. Scatter of points representing different phytoplankton classes on a derivative plot revealed four diverse clusters, viz. N. scintillans, diatoms, non-bloom oceanic, and non-bloom coastal waters. The criteria developed for species discrimination were implemented on MODIS data and validated using inputs from a recent ship cruise conducted in March 2013.

  5. Comparative Metagenomics of Toxic Freshwater Cyanobacteria Bloom Communities on Two Continents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steffen, Morgan M [ORNL; Li, Zhou [ORNL; Effler, Chad [Department of Microbiology, University of Tennessee; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Boyer, Gergory [College of Environmental Science and Forestry, State University of New York, Syracuse; Wilhelm, Steven W [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloomassociated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised .90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloomassociated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  6. Intravascular optical coherence tomography light scattering artifacts: merry-go-rounding, blooming, and ghost struts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancuso, J. Jacob; Halaney, David L.; Elahi, Sahar; Ho, Derek; Wang, Tianyi; Ouyang, Yongjian; Dijkstra, Jouke; Milner, Thomas E.; Feldman, Marc D.

    2014-12-01

    We sought to elucidate the mechanisms underlying two common intravascular optical coherence tomography (IV-OCT) artifacts that occur when imaging metallic stents: "merry-go-rounding" (MGR), which is an increase in strut arc length (SAL), and "blooming," which is an increase in the strut reflection thickness (blooming thickness). Due to uncontrollable variables that occur in vivo, we performed an in vitro assessment of MGR and blooming in stented vessel phantoms. Using Xience V and Driver stents, we examined the effects of catheter offset, intimal strut coverage, and residual blood on SAL and blooming thickness in IV-OCT images. Catheter offset and strut coverage both caused minor MGR, while the greatest MGR effect resulted from light scattering by residual blood in the vessel lumen, with 1% hematocrit (Hct) causing a more than fourfold increase in SAL compared with saline (pResidual blood also resulted in blooming, with blooming thickness more than doubling when imaged in 0.5% Hct compared with saline (presidual blood in the imaging field, is the predominant cause of MGR. Light scattering also results in blooming, and a newly described artifact, three-dimensional-MGR, which results in "ghost struts" in B-scans.

  7. Pragmatic Software Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aaen, Ivan; Jensen, Rikke Hagensby

    2014-01-01

    We understand software innovation as concerned with introducing innovation into the development of software intensive systems, i.e. systems in which software development and/or integration are dominant considerations. Innovation is key in almost any strategy for competitiveness in existing markets......, for creating new markets, or for curbing rising public expenses, and software intensive systems are core elements in most such strategies. Software innovation therefore is vital for about every sector of the economy. Changes in software technologies over the last decades have opened up for experimentation......, learning, and flexibility in ongoing software projects, but how can this change be used to facilitate software innovation? How can a team systematically identify and pursue opportunities to create added value in ongoing projects? In this paper, we describe Deweyan pragmatism as the philosophical foundation...

  8. Software Engineering Improvement Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    In performance of this task order, bd Systems personnel provided support to the Flight Software Branch and the Software Working Group through multiple tasks related to software engineering improvement and to activities of the independent Technical Authority (iTA) Discipline Technical Warrant Holder (DTWH) for software engineering. To ensure that the products, comments, and recommendations complied with customer requirements and the statement of work, bd Systems personnel maintained close coordination with the customer. These personnel performed work in areas such as update of agency requirements and directives database, software effort estimation, software problem reports, a web-based process asset library, miscellaneous documentation review, software system requirements, issue tracking software survey, systems engineering NPR, and project-related reviews. This report contains a summary of the work performed and the accomplishments in each of these areas.

  9. Paladin Software Support Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Paladin Software Support Environment (SSE) occupies 2,241 square-feet. It contains the hardware and software tools required to support the Paladin Automatic Fire...

  10. ATLAS software packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Rybkin, G

    2012-01-01

    Software packaging is indispensable part of build and prerequisite for deployment processes. Full ATLAS software stack consists of TDAQ, HLT, and Offline software. These software groups depend on some 80 external software packages. We present tools, package PackDist, developed and used to package all this software except for TDAQ project. PackDist is based on and driven by CMT, ATLAS software configuration and build tool, and consists of shell and Python scripts. The packaging unit used is CMT project. Each CMT project is packaged as several packages - platform dependent (one per platform available), source code excluding header files, other platform independent files, documentation, and debug information packages (the last two being built optionally). Packaging can be done recursively to package all the dependencies. The whole set of packages for one software release, distribution kit, also includes configuration packages and contains some 120 packages for one platform. Also packaged are physics analysis pro...

  11. Commercial Data Mining Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyu; Segall, Richard S.

    This chapter discusses selected commercial software for data mining, supercomputing data mining, text mining, and web mining. The selected software are compared with their features and also applied to available data sets. The software for data mining are SAS Enterprise Miner, Megaputer PolyAnalyst 5.0, PASW (formerly SPSS Clementine), IBM Intelligent Miner, and BioDiscovery GeneSight. The software for supercomputing are Avizo by Visualization Science Group and JMP Genomics from SAS Institute. The software for text mining are SAS Text Miner and Megaputer PolyAnalyst 5.0. The software for web mining are Megaputer PolyAnalyst and SPSS Clementine . Background on related literature and software are presented. Screen shots of each of the selected software are presented, as are conclusions and future directions.

  12. Loss of Bloom syndrome protein destabilizes human gene cluster architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, Michael W; Stults, Dawn M; Adachi, Noritaka; Hanakahi, Les; Pierce, Andrew J

    2009-09-15

    Bloom syndrome confers strong predisposition to malignancy in multiple tissue types. The Bloom syndrome patient (BLM) protein defective in the disease biochemically functions as a Holliday junction dissolvase and human cells lacking functional BLM show 10-fold elevated rates of sister chromatid exchange. Collectively, these phenomena suggest that dysregulated mitotic recombination drives the genomic instability underpinning the development of cancer in these individuals. Here we use physical analysis of the highly repeated, highly self-similar human ribosomal RNA gene clusters as sentinel biomarkers for dysregulated homologous recombination to demonstrate that loss of BLM protein function causes a striking increase in spontaneous molecular level genomic restructuring. Analysis of single-cell derived sub-clonal populations from wild-type human cell lines shows that gene cluster architecture is ordinarily very faithfully preserved under mitosis, but is so unstable in cell lines derived from BLMs as to make gene cluster architecture in different sub-clonal populations essentially unrecognizable one from another. Human cells defective in a different RecQ helicase, the WRN protein involved in the premature aging Werner syndrome, do not exhibit the gene cluster instability (GCI) phenotype, indicating that the BLM protein specifically, rather than RecQ helicases generally, holds back this recombination-mediated genomic instability. An ataxia-telangiectasia defective cell line also shows elevated rDNA GCI, although not to the extent of BLM defective cells. Genomic restructuring mediated by dysregulated recombination between the abundant low-copy repeats in the human genome may prove to be an important additional mechanism of genomic instability driving the initiation and progression of human cancer.

  13. The Role of Cyanobacteria Blooms in Cholera Epidemic in Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagir Ahmed, Md.; Raknuzzaman, Md.; Akther, Hafeza; Ahmed, Sumaiya

    A study was conducted on association of Vibrio cholerae with plankton specially emphasis on cyanobacteria in relation to some physico-chemical parameters in the River Buriganga, Dhaka, from January to December 2002. Monthly abundance of phytoplankton and zooplankton varied from 457 to 14166 and from 169 to 1055 individual L-1, respectively. Monthly average of faecal coliform in water, zooplankton and phytoplankton samples were 3.99x109, 4.54x103 and 4.28x102 (CFU L-1), respectively. During epidemics, toxigenic V. cholerae 01 and 0139 were isolated from the patients as well as from the surface water. V. cholerae 01 and 0139 were also isolated from plankton samples. More over, it was observed that ctx (cholera toxic) positive in water and phytoplankton samples of the river. A bloom of Oscillatoria sp. (1.6x104 individual L-1) occurred in the upper reaches of the River Buriganga in May 2002. Methanol-water extract of bloom sample was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography with UV detection and Mass Spectrum (MS) detected microcystin-RR. Cyanobacteria are abundant in the aquatic environment of Bangladesh and it was established that V. cholerae maintain a symbiotic relationship with these algae particularly mucilaginous cyanobacteria. During epidemics, patients symptoms included diarrhea, vomiting and hemorrhagic enteritis and in severe cases hemorrhagic diarrhea. So, question has arisen that which is responsible, microcystins or cholera for death of cholera/diarrhea patients in Bangladesh. Future research should be directed to isolate microcystins and cholera toxins from the epidemic areas to clarify the fact.

  14. Biogeochemical implications of decomposing jellyfish blooms in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelsky, Ariella; Pitt, Kylie A.; Welsh, David T.

    2015-03-01

    Jellyfish often exhibit 'boom and bust' population dynamics whereby they proliferate rapidly and then die en masse and decompose. The few studies that have investigated post-bloom processes have not studied how changing ocean conditions will alter rates of decomposition. Climate change will result in warmer and more acidic waters, and studies therefore need to consider these factors in concert to determine their combined effect on decomposition processes. To quantify the effect, we measured oxygen consumption and nutrient regeneration rates during decomposition of Catostylus mosaicus in mesocosms at current average summer pH and temperature (pH 8.0 and 27 °C) as well as conditions projected for year 2100 (pH 7.8 and 30 °C) and compared these fluxes to control mesocosms without jellyfish over 12 days. We hypothesised that rates of jellyfish decomposition, as measured by oxygen demand and nutrient regeneration, would be accelerated in the end-of-century treatments, compared to present day treatments. Overall decomposition rates were only slightly elevated under end-of-century conditions, and the difference was only significant for ammonium fluxes from 19 h until 43 h after the experiment commenced. The difference between treatments was much smaller than would be expected due to the temperature increase, based on theoretical modelling of jellyfish decomposition which predicts a Q10 of 4.28, or a 1.5 fold increase in decomposition rates. This highlights the importance of investigating net effects on decomposition rates, as simultaneous shifts in temperature and pH may not follow patterns predicted due to one stressor alone. Ultimately, these results suggest that rates of oxygen consumption and nutrient regeneration resulting from collapsed jellyfish blooms may not change drastically over the next 100 years.

  15. Software Testing Requires Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2003-01-01

    Software variability is the ability of a software system or artefact to be changed, customized or configured for use in a particular context. Variability in software systems is important from a number of perspectives. Some perspectives rightly receive much attention due to their direct economic...... impact in software production. As is also apparent from the call for papers these perspectives focus on qualities such as reuse, adaptability, and maintainability....

  16. Software engineer's pocket book

    CERN Document Server

    Tooley, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Software Engineer's Pocket Book provides a concise discussion on various aspects of software engineering. The book is comprised of six chapters that tackle various areas of concerns in software engineering. Chapter 1 discusses software development, and Chapter 2 covers programming languages. Chapter 3 deals with operating systems. The book also tackles discrete mathematics and numerical computation. Data structures and algorithms are also explained. The text will be of great use to individuals involved in the specification, design, development, implementation, testing, maintenance, and qualit

  17. Software Testing Requires Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2003-01-01

    Software variability is the ability of a software system or artefact to be changed, customized or configured for use in a particular context. Variability in software systems is important from a number of perspectives. Some perspectives rightly receive much attention due to their direct economic...... impact in software production. As is also apparent from the call for papers these perspectives focus on qualities such as reuse, adaptability, and maintainability....

  18. Software engineering measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Munson, PhD, John C

    2003-01-01

    By demonstrating how to develop simple experiments for the empirical validation of theoretical research and showing how to convert measurement data into meaningful and valuable information, this text fosters more precise use of software measurement in the computer science and software engineering literature. Software Engineering Measurement shows you how to convert your measurement data to valuable information that can be used immediately for software process improvement.

  19. Challenges in modelling spatiotemporally varying phytoplankton blooms in the Northwestern Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sedigh Marvasti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We examine interannual variability of phytoplankton blooms in northwestern Arabian Sea and Gulf of Oman. Satellite data (SeaWIFS ocean color shows two climatological blooms in this region, a wintertime bloom peaking in February and a summertime bloom peaking in September. A pronounced anti-correlation between the AVISO sea surface height anomaly (SSHA and chlorophyll is found during the wintertime bloom. On a regional scale, interannual variability of the wintertime bloom is thus dominated by cyclonic eddies which vary in location from one year to another. These results were compared against the outputs from three different 3-D Earth System models. We show that two coarse (1° models with the relatively complex biogeochemistry (TOPAZ capture the annual cycle but neither eddies nor the interannual variability. An eddy-resolving model (GFDL CM2.6 with a simpler biogeochemistry (miniBLING displays larger interannual variability, but overestimates the wintertime bloom and captures eddy-bloom coupling in the south but not in the north. The southern part of the domain is a region with a much sharper thermocline and nutricline relatively close to the surface, in which eddies modulate diffusive nutrient supply to the surface (a mechanism not previously emphasized in the literature. We suggest that for the model to simulate the observed wintertime blooms within cyclones, it will be necessary to represent this relatively unusual nutrient structure as well as the cyclonic eddies. This is a challenge in the Northern Arabian Sea as it requires capturing the details of the outflow from the Persian Gulf.

  20. Comparative metagenomics of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria bloom communities on two continents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Morgan M; Li, Zhou; Effler, T Chad; Hauser, Loren J; Boyer, Gregory L; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloom-associated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America), Lake Tai (Taihu, China), and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA) using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised >90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloom-associated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  1. Comparative metagenomics of toxic freshwater cyanobacteria bloom communities on two continents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan M Steffen

    Full Text Available Toxic cyanobacterial blooms have persisted in freshwater systems around the world for centuries and appear to be globally increasing in frequency and severity. Toxins produced by bloom-associated cyanobacteria can have drastic impacts on the ecosystem and surrounding communities, and bloom biomass can disrupt aquatic food webs and act as a driver for hypoxia. Little is currently known regarding the genomic content of the Microcystis strains that form blooms or the companion heterotrophic community associated with bloom events. To address these issues, we examined the bloom-associated microbial communities in single samples from Lake Erie (North America, Lake Tai (Taihu, China, and Grand Lakes St. Marys (OH, USA using comparative metagenomics. Together the Cyanobacteria and Proteobacteria comprised >90% of each bloom bacterial community sample, although the dominant phylum varied between systems. Relative to the existing Microcystis aeruginosa NIES 843 genome, sequences from Lake Erie and Taihu revealed a number of metagenomic islands that were absent in the environmental samples. Moreover, despite variation in the phylogenetic assignments of bloom-associated organisms, the functional potential of bloom members remained relatively constant between systems. This pattern was particularly noticeable in the genomic contribution of nitrogen assimilation genes. In Taihu, the genetic elements associated with the assimilation and metabolism of nitrogen were predominantly associated with Proteobacteria, while these functions in the North American lakes were primarily contributed to by the Cyanobacteria. Our observations build on an emerging body of metagenomic surveys describing the functional potential of microbial communities as more highly conserved than that of their phylogenetic makeup within natural systems.

  2. Software variability management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, J; Nord, RL

    2004-01-01

    During recent years, the amount of variability that has to be supported by a software artefact is growing considerably and its management is evolving into a major challenge during development, usage, and evolution of software artefacts. Successful management of variability in software leads to

  3. Software Language Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermolen, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    Software plays a critical role in our daily life. Vast amounts of money are spent on more and more complex systems. All software, regardless if it controls a plane or the game on your phone is never finished. Software changes when it contains bugs or when new functionality is added. This process of

  4. Software Architecture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  5. Java for flight software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benowitz, E.; Niessner, A.

    2003-01-01

    This work involves developing representative mission-critical spacecraft software using the Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ). This work currently leverages actual flight software used in the design of actual flight software in the NASA's Deep Space 1 (DSI), which flew in 1998.

  6. Software Language Evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermolen, S.D.

    2012-01-01

    Software plays a critical role in our daily life. Vast amounts of money are spent on more and more complex systems. All software, regardless if it controls a plane or the game on your phone is never finished. Software changes when it contains bugs or when new functionality is added. This process of

  7. Software Engineering for Portability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanchev, Ivan

    1990-01-01

    Discussion of the portability of educational software focuses on the software design and development process. Topics discussed include levels of portability; the user-computer dialog; software engineering principles; design techniques for student performance records; techniques of courseware programing; and suggestions for further research and…

  8. Software Architecture Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Many software systems eventually undergo changes to their basic architectural structure. Such changes may be prompted by new feature requests, new quality attribute requirements, changing technology, or other reasons. Whatever the causes, architecture evolution is commonplace in real-world software projects. Today's software architects, however,…

  9. Economic Cost of an Algae Bloom Cleanup in China's 2008 Olympic Sailing Venue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. H.; Li, L.; Bao, X.; Zhao, L. D.

    2009-07-01

    In the summer of 2008, an algae bloom struck the coast of Qingdao, China, where the 2008 Olympic sailing events were to be held. The bloom was caused by the drift and proliferation of the green algae Enteromorpha (see http://precedings.nature.com/documents/2352/version/1). It lasted for more than 1 month and covered nearly the entire sailing venue. The Enteromorpha bloom was so intense that national and local governments invested a tremendous amount of labor and resources in a cleanup effort in order to achieve Olympic Games standards [Hu and He, 2008].

  10. The X chromosome: does it have a role in Bloom syndrome, a genomic instability disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Deniz

    2014-01-01

    The Bloom syndrome, caused by mutations in a single gene [BLM (15q26.1)], is a rare genomic instability syndrome. Despite its autosomal recessive transmission, it shows a male dominance, suggesting the possibility of a subgroup with X-linked recessive inheritance. In view of the latest molecular developments achieved in the other genomic instability syndromes, the potential functions of the X chromosome in maintaining genomic stability, and particularly, the first clues of Bloom syndrome development by mechanisms other than the BLM, we suggest herein that the X chromosome should be investigated in Bloom syndrome.

  11. A case of Bloom syndrome with uncommon clinical manifestations confirmed on genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian-Bing, Wu; Cheng-Rang, Li; Yi-Ping, Ma; Nan, Sheng; Hui, Li; Lin, Lin

    2016-02-01

    Bloom syndrome, a rare autosomal-recessive disorder, characteristically presents with photosensitivity, telangiectatic facial erythema, and growth deficiency. We present a case of Bloom syndrome with uncommon clinical manifestations including alopecia areata, eyebrow hair loss, flat nose, reticular pigmentation, and short sharpened distal phalanges with fingernails that were wider than they were long. We detected the Bloom syndrome gene, BLM, which is one of the members of the RecQ family of DNA helicases, and found changes in 2 heterozygous nucleotide sites in the patient as well as her father and mother.

  12. Bloom syndrome complicated by colonic cancer in a young Tunisian woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjazia, Elhem; Turki, Hajer; Atig, Amira; Khalifa, Mabrouk; Letaief, Amel; Bahri, Fethi; Braham, Ahlem

    2011-10-01

    Bloom syndrome (BS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by chromosomal instability leading to a high risk of cancer at an early age. The diagnosis should be considered in patients with short stature, photosensitivity, variable degrees of immunodeficiency, and hypogonadism. We report a 19-year-old woman, with history of dysmorphic features and recurrent infections. The diagnosis of bloom syndrome was made and confirmed cytogenetically at the age of 14 years. She developed a colon cancer revealed by venous thrombosis and anemia. She died after 15 days of the cancer diagnosis. This is the first registrated case of confirmed Bloom syndrome in Tunisian population.

  13. Remote Sensing Marine Ecology: Wind-driven algal blooms in the open oceans and their ecological impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, DanLing

    2016-07-01

    Algal bloom not only can increase the primary production but also could result in negative ecological consequence, e.g., Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs). According to the classic theory for the formation of algal blooms "critical depth" and "eutrophication", oligotrophic sea area is usually difficult to form a large area of algal blooms, and actually the traditional observation is only sporadic capture to the existence of algal blooms. Taking full advantage of multiple data of satellite remote sensing, this study: 1), introduces "Wind-driven algal blooms in open oceans: observation and mechanisms" It explained except classic coastal Ekman transport, the wind through a variety of mechanisms affecting the formation of algal blooms. Proposed a conceptual model of "Strong wind -upwelling-nutrient-phytoplankton blooms" in Western South China Sea (SCS) to assess role of wind-induced advection transport in phytoplankton bloom formation. It illustrates the nutrient resources that support long-term offshore phytoplankton blooms in the western SCS; 2), Proposal of the theory that "typhoons cause vertical mixing, induce phytoplankton blooms", and quantify their important contribution to marine primary production; Proposal a new ecological index for typhoon. Proposed remote sensing inversion models. 3), Finding of the spatial and temporaldistributions pattern of harmful algal bloom (HAB)and species variations of HAB in the South Yellow Sea and East China Sea, and in the Pearl River estuary, and their oceanic dynamic mechanisms related with monsoon; The project developed new techniques and generated new knowledge, which significantly improved understanding of the formation mechanisms of algal blooms. 1), It proposed "wind-pump" mechanism integrates theoretical system combing "ocean dynamics, development of algal blooms, and impact on primary production", which will benefit fisheries management. 2), A new interdisciplinary subject "Remote Sensing Marine Ecology"(RSME) has been

  14. Software Maintenance Success Recipes

    CERN Document Server

    Reifer, Donald J

    2011-01-01

    Dispelling much of the folklore surrounding software maintenance, Software Maintenance Success Recipes identifies actionable formulas for success based on in-depth analysis of more than 200 real-world maintenance projects. It details the set of factors that are usually present when effective software maintenance teams do their work and instructs on the methods required to achieve success. Donald J. Reifer--an award winner for his contributions to the field of software engineering and whose experience includes managing the DoD Software Initiatives Office--provides step-by-step guidance on how t

  15. Funding Research Software Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momcheva, Ivelina G.

    2017-01-01

    Astronomical software is used by each and every member of our scientific community. Purpose-build software is becoming ever more critical as we enter the regime of large datasets and simulations of increasing complexity. However, financial investments in building, maintaining and renovating the software infrastructure have been uneven. In this talk I will summarize past and current funding sources for astronomical software development, discuss other models of funding and introduce a new initiative for supporting community software at STScI. The purpose of this talk is to prompt discussion about how we allocate resources to this vital infrastructure.

  16. A Bloom Filter-Powered Technique Supporting Scalable Semantic Discovery in Data Service Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Shi, R.; Bao, Q.; Lee, T. J.; Ramachandran, R.

    2016-12-01

    More and more Earth data analytics software products are published onto the Internet as a service, in the format of either heavyweight WSDL service or lightweight RESTful API. Such reusable data analytics services form a data service network, which allows Earth scientists to compose (mashup) services into value-added ones. Therefore, it is important to have a technique that is capable of helping Earth scientists quickly identify appropriate candidate datasets and services in the global data service network. Most existing services discovery techniques, however, mainly rely on syntax or semantics-based service matchmaking between service requests and available services. Since the scale of the data service network is increasing rapidly, the run-time computational cost will soon become a bottleneck. To address this issue, this project presents a way of applying network routing mechanism to facilitate data service discovery in a service network, featuring scalability and performance. Earth data services are automatically annotated in Web Ontology Language for Services (OWL-S) based on their metadata, semantic information, and usage history. Deterministic Annealing (DA) technique is applied to dynamically organize annotated data services into a hierarchical network, where virtual routers are created to represent semantic local network featuring leading terms. Afterwards Bloom Filters are generated over virtual routers. A data service search request is transformed into a network routing problem in order to quickly locate candidate services through network hierarchy. A neural network-powered technique is applied to assure network address encoding and routing performance. A series of empirical study has been conducted to evaluate the applicability and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  17. Impact of harmful algal blooms on several Lake Erie drinking water treatment facilities; methodology considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    The propagation of cyanbacterial cells and their toxins were investigated at seven drinking water treatment plants (DWTPs) on Lake Erie were investigated with regards to harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxin concentrations, water quality variations in treatment plant influents, and pr...

  18. Exploring the erodibility of sediments and harmful algal blooms in the Gulf of Maine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butman, Bradford; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Keafer, Bruce A.

    2012-01-01

    Investigators at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) are cooperating with scientists at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI) to investigate harmful algal blooms along the New England coast in the Gulf of Maine. These blooms are caused by cysts of the dinoflagellate Alexandrium fundyense that overwinter in the bottom sediments and germinate in spring. Depending on conditions such as temperature, light, nutrient levels, and currents, these single-celled organismscan create a bloom along the coast, called ‘red tides.’Shellfish that have ingested these cells in sufficient concentration can become toxic to humans and require that the shellfisheries be closed. After the spring bloom, the organisms form cysts that sink to the sea floor and are sequestered in the bottom sediments over the winter.

  19. Bloom Filter-Based Secure Data Forwarding in Large-Scale Cyber-Physical Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siyu Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyber-physical systems (CPSs connect with the physical world via communication networks, which significantly increases security risks of CPSs. To secure the sensitive data, secure forwarding is an essential component of CPSs. However, CPSs require high dimensional multiattribute and multilevel security requirements due to the significantly increased system scale and diversity, and hence impose high demand on the secure forwarding information query and storage. To tackle these challenges, we propose a practical secure data forwarding scheme for CPSs. Considering the limited storage capability and computational power of entities, we adopt bloom filter to store the secure forwarding information for each entity, which can achieve well balance between the storage consumption and query delay. Furthermore, a novel link-based bloom filter construction method is designed to reduce false positive rate during bloom filter construction. Finally, the effects of false positive rate on the performance of bloom filter-based secure forwarding with different routing policies are discussed.

  20. Multispecies mass mortality of marine fauna linked to a toxic dinoflagellate bloom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michel Starr; Stéphane Lair; Sonia Michaud; Michael Scarratt; Michael Quilliam; Denis Lefaivre; Michel Robert; Andrew Wotherspoon; Robert Michaud; Nadia Ménard; Gilbert Sauvé; Sylvie Lessard; Pierre Béland; Lena Measures

    2017-01-01

    Following heavy precipitation, we observed an intense algal bloom in the St. Lawrence Estuary (SLE) that coincided with an unusually high mortality of several species of marine fish, birds and mammals, including species designated at risk...

  1. Selective grazing of Temora longicornis in different stages of a Phaeocystis globosa bloom - a mesocosm study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koski, Marja; Dutz, Jörg; Breteler, W.C.M.K.

    2005-01-01

    Selective grazing of a calanoid copepod Temora longicornis was measured during different stages of a Phaeocystis globosa bloom, in order to reveal (1) if T longicornis feeds on single cells and/or colonies of P. globosa in the presence of alternative food sources, (2) if copepod food selection...... of alternative food sources. In contrast, feeding on single cells was never significant, and the total contribution of P globosa to carbon ingestion of T longicornis was minor. T longicornis fed most actively on the decaying colonies, whereas during the peak of the bloom copepods selected against P globosa...... with highest proportional ingestion of heterotrophic organisms, but was not seriously reduced even during the peak of the bloom. We conclude that P globosa blooms should not threaten survival of copepod populations, but the population recruitment may depend on the type (and concentration) of the dominant...

  2. Pyrimidine pool imbalance induced by BLM helicase deficiency contributes to genetic instability in Bloom syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabosseau, Pauline; Buhagiar-Labarchède, Géraldine; Onclercq-Delic, Rosine; Lambert, Sarah; Debatisse, Michelle; Brison, Olivier; Amor-Guéret, Mounira

    2011-06-28

    Defects in DNA replication are associated with genetic instability and cancer development, as illustrated in Bloom syndrome. Features of this syndrome include a slowdown in replication speed, defective fork reactivation and high rates of sister chromatid exchange, with a general predisposition to cancer. Bloom syndrome is caused by mutations in the BLM gene encoding a RecQ helicase. Here we report that BLM deficiency is associated with a strong cytidine deaminase defect, leading to pyrimidine pool disequilibrium. In BLM-deficient cells, pyrimidine pool normalization leads to reduction of sister chromatid exchange frequency and is sufficient for full restoration of replication fork velocity but not the fork restart defect, thus identifying the part of the Bloom syndrome phenotype because of pyrimidine pool imbalance. This study provides new insights into the molecular basis of control of replication speed and the genetic instability associated with Bloom syndrome. Nucleotide pool disequilibrium could be a general phenomenon in a large spectrum of precancerous and cancer cells.

  3. Harmful algal blooms discovered during the Mote Monthly transect cruises, 1998 and 1999 (NODC Accession 0000532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Harmful algal blooms of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, have caused massive fish kills in the Gulf of Mexico since the 1500's, with most occurrences on the...

  4. Nitrogen deposition fuels harmful algal blooms in the East China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, K. R.; Kavanaugh, M.; Chien, C. T.; Chen, Y.; Glover, D. M.; Paytan, A.

    2015-12-01

    Chinese marginal seas support vast fisheries and vital economies, but their productivity is threatened by eutrophication and increasing harmful algal blooms (HABs). Here we provide direct experimental evidence that aerosol enrichment shifts seawater chemistry by increasing the ratio of N to phosphorus (N:P) and supports the growth of bloom-forming phytoplankton in the East China Sea. We use a combination of field-based aerosol addition incubation experiments, along with ocean color data on blooms dominated by different taxa to show that HAB forming dinoflagellates are particularly responsive to aerosol inputs. Moreover, we show that the effect of N deposition is strongest in offshore waters further from the Yangtze River outflow, consistent with the large anthropogenic flux of N from this source. This study shows the potential for aerosols to control N:P ratios in offshore waters and to shape the phytoplankton community, contributing to the success of bloom-forming organisms.

  5. Status, Alert System, and Prediction of Cyanobacterial Bloom in South Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankita Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bloom-forming freshwater cyanobacterial genera pose a major ecological problem due to their ability to produce toxins and other bioactive compounds, which can have important implications in illnesses of humans and livestock. Cyanobacteria such as Microcystis, Anabaena, Oscillatoria, Phormidium, and Aphanizomenon species producing microcystins and anatoxin-a have been predominantly documented from most South Korean lakes and reservoirs. With the increase in frequency of such blooms, various monitoring approaches, treatment processes, and prediction models have been developed in due course. In this paper we review the field studies and current knowledge on toxin producing cyanobacterial species and ecological variables that regulate toxin production and bloom formation in major rivers (Han, Geum, Nakdong, and Yeongsan and reservoirs in South Korea. In addition, development of new, fast, and high-throughput techniques for effective monitoring is also discussed with cyanobacterial bloom advisory practices, current management strategies, and their implications in South Korean freshwater bodies.

  6. West Coast DA Event data - West Coast Toxic Pseudo-nitzschia bloom

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Beginning in the spring of 2015 the US West Coast began to experience the most wide-spread toxic Pseudo-nitzschia bloom to date, after approximately eight years...

  7. EPA, NASA, NOAA and USGS Creating Early Warning System to Detect Harmful Algal Blooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    WASHINGTON- The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced today that it is developing an early warning indicator system using historical and current satellite data to detect algal blooms. EPA researchers will develop a mobile app to inform water

  8. Study of Under-ice Blooms In the Chukchi Ecosystem (SUBICE) (HLY1401, EM122)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The primary objectives of SUBICE were to determine the spatial distribution of large under-ice phytoplankton blooms on the Chukchi Shelf and the physical mechanisms...

  9. Algal-bloom control by allelopathy of aquatic macrophytes——A review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongying HU; Yu HONG

    2008-01-01

    Algal-bloom control is an important issue for water environment protection as it induces several nega-tive impacts on the lives of aquatic organisms, aquacul-ture, landscaping, and human health. The development of an environment-friendly, cost-effective, and convenient alternative for controlling algal bloom has gained much concern. Using the allelopathy of aquatic macrophytes as a novel and safe method for algal-bloom control is a promising alternative. This paper reviews the develop-ment and potential application about allelopathy of aquatic plants on algae, including the allelopathic research history, the potential research problems, the research methodology, and the reported aquatic macro-phytes and their inhibitory allelochemicals. Potential modes of inhibition action of allelochemicals on algae, possible ways for application, and future development directions of research on algal-bloom control by aquatic macrophytes were also presented.

  10. Telomere-binding Protein TRF2 Binds to and Stimulates the Werner and Bloom Syndrome Helicases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patricia L. Opresko; Cayetano von Kobbe; Jean-Philippe Laine; Jeanine Harrigan; Ian D. Hickson; Vilhelm A. Bohr

    2002-01-01

    .... This interaction is mediated by the RecQ conserved C-terminal region of WRN. In vitro , TRF2 demonstrates high affinity for WRN and for another RecQ family member, the Bloom syndrome protein (BLM...

  11. Oceanic and atmospheric influences on the variability of phytoplankton bloom in the southwestern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raj, R.P.; Peter, B.N.; Pushpadas, D.

    Data Assimilation (SODA) and NOAA blended sea surface winds are the other reanalysis and model dataset used in this study. 3. Results and discussion This section focuses on the interannual variability of the phytoplankton bloom and the major...

  12. A Model for Adapting. Bloom's Taxonomy to a Preschool Curriculum for the Gifted

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Donald B.; Leonard, Judith

    1977-01-01

    Presented is a rationale for the use of B. Bloom's taxonomy of educational objectives in the development of preschool curriculum units for the gifted and talented which translates taxonomical objectives into activities. (BB)

  13. Software Maintenance and Evolution: The Implication for Software ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. O. E. OSUAGWU

    2013-06-01

    Jun 1, 2013 ... ... the test of time. Keywords: Software, software maintenance, software evolution, reverse engineering, ... area of human endeavour be it automobile, software, etc. at .... greater efficiency and productivity in the maintenance ...

  14. NASA software documentation standard software engineering program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Software Documentation Standard (hereinafter referred to as Standard) can be applied to the documentation of all NASA software. This Standard is limited to documentation format and content requirements. It does not mandate specific management, engineering, or assurance standards or techniques. This Standard defines the format and content of documentation for software acquisition, development, and sustaining engineering. Format requirements address where information shall be recorded and content requirements address what information shall be recorded. This Standard provides a framework to allow consistency of documentation across NASA and visibility into the completeness of project documentation. This basic framework consists of four major sections (or volumes). The Management Plan contains all planning and business aspects of a software project, including engineering and assurance planning. The Product Specification contains all technical engineering information, including software requirements and design. The Assurance and Test Procedures contains all technical assurance information, including Test, Quality Assurance (QA), and Verification and Validation (V&V). The Management, Engineering, and Assurance Reports is the library and/or listing of all project reports.

  15. Cellular defects caused by hypomorphic variants of the Bloom syndrome helicase gene BLM

    OpenAIRE

    Shastri, Vivek M.; Schmidt, Kristina H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Bloom syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by extraordinary cancer incidence early in life and an average life expectancy of ~27 years. Premature stop codons in BLM , which encodes a DNA helicase that functions in DNA double‐strand‐break repair, make up the vast majority of Bloom syndrome mutations, with only 13 single amino acid changes identified in the syndrome. Sequencing projects have identified nearly one hundred single nucleotide variants in BLM...

  16. Basin-wide seasonal evolution of the Indian Ocean's phytoplankton blooms

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Levy, M.; Shankar, D.; Andre, J.M.; Shenoi, S.S.C.; Durand, F.; DeBoyer Montegut, C.

    , like, for example, with the onset of a strong upwelling. On the55 other hand, the peak of the bloom marks the time when phytoplankton growth (through56 photosynthesis) and sinks (through mortality or grazing) equilibrate; hence, the peak is57 less... is triggered by the convective supply of nutrients. At higher latitudes, the mixed-219 layer deepening severely limits photosynthesis because the mean irradiance experienced220 by the cells is too low; the bloom can only occur in spring, when the mixed...

  17. Hepatotoxicity of Microcystis aeruginosa Strains Growing as Blooms in Certain Eutrophic Ponds

    OpenAIRE

    Jha, Prabhat N.; Kumar, Anil; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Dhananjay P.; Sinha, Rajeshwar P.; Tyagi, Madhu B.

    2006-01-01

    Critical assessment of five eutrophicated ponds of Varanasi city (India) revealed the presence of heavy blooms of cyanobacteria consisting mainly of Microcystis aeruginosa. Crude aqueous extracts of blooms as well as laboratory grown M. aeruginosa isolated from three ponds, namely Lakshmikund, Durgakund and Adityanagar showed toxicity in mouse bioassay test. Crude aqueous extracts from these samples caused death of test mice within 1h of administration (i.p.) with a LD50 of 60 mg/kg body weig...

  18. The human health effects of Florida red tide (FRT) blooms: an expanded analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoagland, Porter; Jin, Di; Beet, Andrew; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Reich, Andrew; Ullmann, Steve; Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Gary

    2014-07-01

    Human respiratory and digestive illnesses can be caused by exposures to brevetoxins from blooms of the marine alga Karenia brevis, also known as Florida red tide (FRT). K. brevis requires macro-nutrients to grow; although the sources of these nutrients have not been resolved completely, they are thought to originate both naturally and anthropogenically. The latter sources comprise atmospheric depositions, industrial effluents, land runoffs, or submerged groundwater discharges. To date, there has been only limited research on the extent of human health risks and economic impacts due to FRT. We hypothesized that FRT blooms were associated with increases in the numbers of emergency room visits and hospital inpatient admissions for both respiratory and digestive illnesses. We sought to estimate these relationships and to calculate the costs of associated adverse health impacts. We developed environmental exposure-response models to test the effects of FRT blooms on human health, using data from diverse sources. We estimated the FRT bloom-associated illness costs, using extant data and parameters from the literature. When controlling for resident population, a proxy for tourism, and seasonal and annual effects, we found that increases in respiratory and digestive illnesses can be explained by FRT blooms. Specifically, FRT blooms were associated with human health and economic effects in older cohorts (≥55 years of age) in six southwest Florida counties. Annual costs of illness ranged from $60,000 to $700,000 annually, but these costs could exceed $1.0 million per year for severe, long-lasting FRT blooms, such as the one that occurred during 2005. Assuming that the average annual illness costs of FRT blooms persist into the future, using a discount rate of 3%, the capitalized costs of future illnesses would range between $2 and 24 million. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Applying the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy to a medical-surgical nursing lesson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Whei Ming; Osisek, Paul J; Starnes, Beth

    2004-01-01

    The Revised Bloom's Taxonomy provides a 2-dimensional framework for classifying cognitive learning. Classifying learning objectives by knowledge type in relation to cognitive process helps educators obtain a better understanding about intended learning, and enables them to design appropriate instruction and assessment methods. The authors demonstrate use of the Revised Bloom's Taxonomy to achieve congruence among intended learning, instructional activities, and assessment methods while teaching diagnostic reasoning for clients with myocardial infarction.

  20. Controlling eutrophication by combined bloom precipitation and sediment phosphorus inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lürling, Miquel; van Oosterhout, Frank

    2013-11-01

    The hypothesis that the combination of the flocculent polyaluminium chloride (PAC) with the lanthanum-modified bentonite Phoslock(®) (Flock & Lock) could sink effectively a water bloom of cyanobacteria and could shift a turbid, cyanobacteria infested lake to a clear water lake was tested in a controlled laboratory experiment and a whole lake experiment. In the laboratory, a relatively low dose of the flocculent PAC (2.2 and 4.4 mg Al l(-1)) was insufficient to sediment positively buoyant cyanobacteria (Microcystis aeruginosa). Similarly, the lanthanum modified clay (dosed at 390 mg l(-1)) was insufficient to sediment the positively buoyant cyanobacteria. However, the combination of PAC and Phoslock(®) effectively sedimented cyanobacteria flocks. Likewise, a combined treatment of 2 tons PAC and 18 tons Phoslock(®) in Lake Rauwbraken in April 2008 effectively sedimented a developing cyanobacteria bloom of Aphanizomenon flos-aquae. The average chlorophyll-a concentration in the two years prior to this Flock & Lock treatment was 19.5 (±36.5) μg l(-1), while it was as low as 3.7 (±4.5) μg l(-1) in the years following the treatment. The combined treatment effectively reduced the amount of total phosphorus (TP) in the water column from on average 169 (±126) μg P l(-1) before the application to 14 (±15) μg P l(-1) after the treatment. Based on mean summer chlorophyll-a and TP concentrations, the lake was shifted from a eutrophic/hypertrophic state to an oligo/mesotrophic state. From directly after treatment in April 2008 until and including 2013, Lake Rauwbraken remained in an oligo-mesotrophic clear water state with TP reduced to less than 10% of the pre-treatment. This result shows that eutrophication in relatively small, isolated, stratifying lakes can be restored by targeting both water column and sediment P using a combination of flocculent and solid phase P-sorbent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.