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Sample records for pterygopalatine ganglion ppg

  1. Anatomical and clinical appraisal of the pterygopalatine ganglion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomen, K.P.Q.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomy of the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) and its branches is related to pain syndromes Cluster headache (CH) and Sluder’s neuralgia (SN). In order to gain more insight in these syndromes, we conducted an anatomical and clinical study of the PPG. A search for new neural structures in the PPF

  2. The pterygopalatine ganglion and its role in various pain syndromes: from anatomy to clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piagkou, Maria; Demesticha, Theano; Troupis, Theodore; Vlasis, Konstantinos; Skandalakis, Panayiotis; Makri, Aggeliki; Mazarakis, Antonios; Lappas, Dimitrios; Piagkos, Giannoulis; Johnson, Elizabeth O

    2012-06-01

    The postsynaptic fibers of the pterygopalatine or sphenopalatine ganglion (PPG or SPG) supply the lacrimal and nasal glands. The PPG appears to play an important role in various pain syndromes including headaches, trigeminal and sphenopalatine neuralgia, atypical facial pain, muscle pain, vasomotor rhinitis, eye disorders, and herpes infection. Clinical trials have shown that these pain disorders can be managed effectively with sphenopalatine ganglion blockade (SPGB). In addition, regional anesthesia of the distribution area of the SPG sensory fibers for nasal and dental surgery can be provided by SPGB via a transnasal, transoral, or lateral infratemporal approach. To arouse the interest of the modern-day clinicians in the use of the SPGB, the advantages, disadvantages, and modifications of the available methods for blockade are discussed.▪

  3. Stereology of the pterygopalatine ganglion of the rat.

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    Costa, W S; Morais, R; Mandarim-De-Lacerda, C A

    1992-01-01

    The right pterygopalatine ganglia (PG) of 9 male Wistar-strain rats were dissected, embedded in Epon (3 specimens) or paraffin (6 specimens), and prepared for stereological examination under light microscopy. The perikarya were quantitatively characterized, and the ganglionic volume was determined. Stereology is an efficient method for the quantitative evaluation of the perikarya of the PG. The results(expressed as mean +/- standard deviation) were: a) areal fraction occupied by the perikarya = 53.8 +/- 7.4%; b) the perikaryal surface area per volume = 0.101 +/- 0.013 microns-1; c) the number of perikarya per volume x 10(-5) = 5.26 +/- 0.99 microns-3; d) the mean profile area of the perikarya (apk) = 505.93 +/- 78.29 microns 2; e) the mean perikaryal volume (vpk) = 9,179.33 +/- 1,533.52 microns 3; and f) the ganglionic volume = 0.210 +/- 0.127 mm3. The low coefficient of variation the apk and vpk values suggests the presence of only one population of neurons in the PG of the rat. The number of perikarya in the PG is about 11,046 per ganglion. As compared to analogous data in the otic ganglion of the rat, the PG did not show statistically significant stereological differences, but the relatively higher number of neurons found in the PG is probably associated with the higher functional activity of this ganglion.

  4. Morphology, topography and cytoarchitectonics of the pterygopalatine ganglion in Egyptian spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus, Desmarest).

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    Szczurkowski, Aleksander; Kuder, Tadeusz; Nowak, Elzbieta; Kuchinka, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    Using the thiocholine method of Koelle and Friedenwald and histological techniques the pterygopalatine ganglion in Egyptian spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus, Desmarest) was studied. The ganglion was found to be a single irregular cluster of neurocytes, situated on the medial surface of the maxillary nerve. The ganglion is composed of oval, elliptical and sometimes fusiform ganglionic neurones in compact arrangement without a thick connective-tissue capsule.

  5. Nitrergic nerves derived from the pterygopalatine ganglion innervate arteries irrigating the cerebrum but not the cerebellum and brain stem in monkeys.

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    Ayajiki, Kazuhide; Kobuchi, Shuhei; Tawa, Masashi; Okamura, Tomio

    2012-01-01

    The functional roles of the nitrergic nerves innervating the monkey cerebral artery were evaluated in a tension-response study examining isolated arteries in vitro and cerebral angiography in vivo. Nicotine produced relaxation of arteries by stimulation of nerve terminals innervating isolated monkey arteries irrigating the cerebrum, cerebellum and brain stem. Relaxation of arteries induced by nicotine was abolished by treatment with N(G)-nitro-L-arginine, a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, and was restored by addition of L-arginine. Cerebral angiography showed that electrical stimulation of the unilateral greater petrosal nerve, which connects to the pterygopalatine ganglion via the parasympathetic ganglion synapse, produced vasodilatation of the anterior, middle and posterior cerebral arteries in the stimulated side. However, stimulation failed to produce vasodilatation of the superior and anterior-inferior cerebellar arteries and the basilar artery in anesthetized monkeys. Therefore, nitrergic nerves derived from the pterygopalatine ganglion appear to regulate cerebral vasomotor function. In contrast, circulation in the cerebellum and brain stem might be regulated by nitrergic nerves originating not from the pterygopalatine ganglion, but rather from an unknown ganglion (or ganglia).

  6. Pterygopalatine Fossa: Not a Mystery!

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    Derinkuyu, Betul Emine; Boyunaga, Oznur; Oztunali, Cigdem; Alimli, Ayse Gul; Ucar, Murat

    2017-05-01

    The pterygopalatine fossa is an important anatomic crossroads that is connected with numerous intra- and extracranial spaces via foramina and fissures. Although this fossa is small, its central location in the skull base and its communications provide clinical, radiological, and anatomical significance. In this pictorial review, we aimed to describe the radiologic anatomy of the pterygopalatine fossa, as well as to give some pathologic examples to better understand this major conduit. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultrasound-Guided Pulsed Radiofrequency Application via the Pterygopalatine Fossa: A Practical Approach to Treat Refractory Trigeminal Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nader, Antoun; Bendok, Bernard R; Prine, Jeremy J; Kendall, Mark C

    2015-01-01

    Although pharmacological therapy is the primary treatment modality for trigeminal neuralgia associated pain, ineffective analgesia and dose limiting side effects often prompt patients to seek alternative pharmacological solutions such as interventional nerve blockade. Blockade of the Gasserian ganglion or its branches is an effective analgesic procedure for trigeminal neuralgia, traditionally performed using fluoroscopy or CT imaging. Ultrasonography allows point of care and real time visualization of needle placement within the surrounding anatomical structures. The use of ultrasonography with pulsed radiofrequency therapy for trigeminal neuralgia has not been reported. Our case is a 66-year-old male suffering from trigeminal neuralgia for 4 years that was refractory to pharmacologic therapy. Neurological examination was normal with no sensory deficit. Imaging showed no vascular compression or mass involving the trigeminal nerve. A diagnostic ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa with 4 mL of bupivacaine 0.25% and 4 mg dexamethasone provided immediate pain relief (100%) with sustained analgesia >50% at 2 weeks. Pain relief was not sustained at one month, with return to pretreatment symptoms. A series of injections were performed with similar intermittent analgesic effectiveness. The decision was made that the patient was a suitable candidate for pulsed radiofrequency application in the pterygopalatine fossa. We successfully used an alternative approach through the pterygopalatine fossa to treat trigeminal neuralgia using ultrasound guidance in an office setting. Our case demonstrates the utility of ultrasound-guidance pulsed radiofrequency treatment in the pterygopalatine fossa as a potential alternative to other percutaneous techniques for patients with medical refractory trigeminal neuralgia.

  8. RBC aggregation based system for long-term photoplethysmography (PPG): new prospects for PPG applications

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    Shvartsman, Leonid D.; Tverskoy, Boris

    2015-03-01

    We present system for long-term continuous PPG monitoring, and physical model for PPG analysis. The system is based on ideology of light scattering modulated by the process of RBC aggregation. OXIRATE's system works in reflection geometry. The sensor is tiny, completely mobile phone compatible, it can be placed nearly everywhere on the body surface. These technical features allow all-night comfortable PPG monitoring that was performed and analyzed. We can define various sleep stages on the basis of different reproducible time-behavior of PPG signal. Our system of PPG monitoring was used also for reflection pulse oximetry and for extreme PPG studies, such as diving.

  9. Transpterygoid Approach to a Dermoid Cyst in Pterygopalatine Fossa

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    Ordones, Alexandre Beraldo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe a case of dermoid cyst arising from the pterygopalatine fossa and review the literature. Methods We report a case of a 23-year-old man who suffered a car accident 2 years before otolaryngologic attendance. He had one episode of generalized tonic-clonic seizure and developed a reduction of visual acuity of the left side after the accident. Neurologic investigation was performed and magnetic resonance imaging revealed an incidental finding of a heterogeneous ovoid lesion in the pterygopalatine fossa, hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. Results Endoscopic sinus surgery with transpterygoid approach was performed. The ovoid lesion was noted in the pterygopalatine fossa. Puncture for intraoperative evaluation showed a transparent thick fluid. Surprisingly, hair and sebaceous glands were found inside the cyst capsule. The cyst was excised completely. Histologic examination revealed a dermoid cyst. The patient currently has no evidence of recurrence at 1 year postoperatively. Conclusion This unique case is a rare report of a dermoid cyst incidentally diagnosed. An endoscopic transnasal transpterygoid approach may be performed to treat successfully this kind of lesion. Although rare, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of expansive lesions in the pterygopalatine fossa, including schwannoma, angiofibroma, esthesioneuroblastoma, osteochondroma, cholesterol granuloma, hemangioma, lymphoma, and osteoma.

  10. 3D printing the pterygopalatine fossa: a negative space model of a complex structure.

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    Bannon, Ross; Parihar, Shivani; Skarparis, Yiannis; Varsou, Ourania; Cezayirli, Enis

    2017-08-30

    The pterygopalatine fossa is one of the most complex anatomical regions to understand. It is poorly visualized in cadaveric dissection and most textbooks rely on schematic depictions. We describe our approach to creating a low-cost, 3D model of the pterygopalatine fossa, including its associated canals and foramina, using an affordable "desktop" 3D printer. We used open source software to create a volume render of the pterygopalatine fossa from axial slices of a head computerised tomography scan. These data were then exported to a 3D printer to produce an anatomically accurate model. The resulting 'negative space' model of the pterygopalatine fossa provides a useful and innovative aid for understanding the complex anatomical relationships of the pterygopalatine fossa. This model was designed primarily for medical students; however, it will also be of interest to postgraduates in ENT, ophthalmology, neurosurgery, and radiology. The technical process described may be replicated by other departments wishing to develop their own anatomical models whilst incurring minimal costs.

  11. PPG: online generation of protein pictures and animations.

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    Binisti, Cédric; Salim, Ahmed Ali; Tufféry, Pierre

    2005-07-01

    The protein picture generator (PPG) is an online service to generate pictures of a protein structure. Its design was conceived as an answer to the need expressed by a part of the community to have some means to produce simply complex pictures to insert in publications or in presentations. PPG can produce static or animated pictures. It can be accessed at http://bioserv.rpbs.jussieu.fr/cgi-bin/PPG.

  12. Removal of a Maxillary Third Molar Displaced into Pterygopalatine Fossa via Intraoral Approach

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    Nedim Özer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of impacted maxillary third molars is one of the most common procedures performed in oral and maxillofacial surgery units with low rates of complications and morbidity. A few cases of accidental displacement of third molars into adjacent anatomical spaces, such as the infratemporal fossa, the pterygomandibular space, the maxillary sinus, buccal space, or the lateral pharyngeal space, during surgical interventions have been reported. In this paper, a case of a maxillary third molar accidentally displaced into the pterygopalatine fossa is presented, and the removal of the tooth via intraoral approach is described.

  13. Morphology and conduction properties of graphite-filled immiscible PVDF/PPgMA blends

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Zhidong; Saracco, Guido; FINA, Alberto; Gross, U; Mainil, M.

    2012-01-01

    Graphite was dispersed in immiscible polyvinylidene "uoride/maleated polypropylene (PVDF/PPgMA) blends to improve electrical and thermal conductive properties by building a double-percolation structure. The morphology of PVDF/PPgMA blends was !rst investigated for several compositions by selective solvent extraction, scanning electron microscopy, and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. Blends of PVDF and PPgMA were prepared in different relative fractions, and a PVDF/PPgMA ratio of 7/3 showe...

  14. Ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa: an effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia and atypical facial pain.

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    Nader, Antoun; Kendall, Mark C; De Oliveria, Gildasio S; Chen, Jeffry Q; Vanderby, Brooke; Rosenow, Joshua M; Bendok, Bernard R

    2013-01-01

    Patients presenting with facial pain often have ineffective pain relief with medical therapy. Cases refractory to medical management are frequently treated with surgical or minimally invasive procedures with variable success rates. We report on the use of ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block via the pterygopalatine fossa in patients following refractory medical and surgical treatment. To present the immediate and long-term efficacy of ultrasound-guided injections of local anesthetic and steroids in the pterygopalatine fossa in patients with unilateral facial pain that failed pharmacological and surgical interventions. Academic pain management center. Prospective case series. Fifteen patients were treated with ultrasound-guided trigeminal nerve block with local anesthetic and steroids placed into the pterygopalatine fossa. All patients achieved complete sensory analgesia to pin prick in the distribution of the V2 branch of the trigeminal nerve and 80% (12 out of 15) achieved complete sensory analgesia in V1, V2, V3 distribution within 15 minutes of the injection. All patients reported pain relief within 5 minutes of the injection. The majority of patients maintained pain relief throughout the 15 month study period. No patients experienced symptoms of local anesthetic toxicity or onset of new neurological sequelae. Prospective case series. We conclude that the use of ultrasound guidance for injectate delivery in the pterygopalatine fossa is a simple, free of radiation or magnetization, safe, and effective percutaneous procedure that provides sustained pain relief in trigeminal neuralgia or atypical facial pain patients who have failed previous medical interventions.

  15. A Pulse Rate Estimation Algorithm Using PPG and Smartphone Camera.

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    Siddiqui, Sarah Ali; Zhang, Yuan; Feng, Zhiquan; Kos, Anton

    2016-05-01

    The ubiquitous use and advancement in built-in smartphone sensors and the development in big data processing have been beneficial in several fields including healthcare. Among the basic vitals monitoring, pulse rate monitoring is the most important healthcare necessity. A multimedia video stream data acquired by built-in smartphone camera can be used to estimate it. In this paper, an algorithm that uses only smartphone camera as a sensor to estimate pulse rate using PhotoPlethysmograph (PPG) signals is proposed. The results obtained by the proposed algorithm are compared with the actual pulse rate and the maximum error found is 3 beats per minute. The standard deviation in percentage error and percentage accuracy is found to be 0.68 % whereas the average percentage error and percentage accuracy is found to be 1.98 % and 98.02 % respectively.

  16. 成人翼腭管CBCT测量研究%Examination the Pterygopalatine Canal of Adult with CBCT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于天平; 侯敏

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究成人翼腭管的解剖形态,为经翼腭管行上颌神经阻滞麻醉提供指导.方法:利用锥体束CT(CBCT)观测200个正常国人翼腭管的解剖形态.结果:矢状面上翼腭管的走行有四类:1)斜线形,向前下方走行,此类型最为多见,所占比例为89.25%;2)突向前方的弧形,此类型所占比例为5.25%,占第二位;3)折线形,占3.25%.4)突向后方的弧形,此类型最为少见,占2.25%.翼腭管的形态有3类:1)上窄下宽的喇叭口状,此形态最为多见,占88%;2)上下径较一致管状,此形态较为少见,比例占10%;3)不规则形,约占2%.翼腭管的长度平均为(15.76±2.32) mm,翼腭管与颌平面的夹角平均为(55.77±3.37)°.结论:通过CBCT可明确观测翼腭管的形态,对临床有定位指导作用.%Objective:To provide guidance for maxillary nerve block anesthesia through pterygopalatine canal.Methods:We examined the anatomy of the pterygopalatine canal using data obtained from CBCT scans of 200 normal Chinese.Results:In the sagittal plane,four pathways were observed:1) Diagonal form,the pterygopalatine canal travels in an anterior-inferior direction,the most common pathway,it occurred in 89.25 % ;2) Arc,Convex to the front,this pathway occurred in 5.25 %;3)Fold line shape,this pathway occurred in 3.25 %;4)Arc,Convex to the behind,this pathway occurred in 2.25%.There are three shapes of the pterygopalatine canal:1) bellbottom shape,the most common shapes,the top diameter are less than the below,(88%) ;2) tubular,the top diameter are same to the below,(10%) ;3)irregular shape,(2%).The average length of the pterygopalatine canal was (15.76±2.32)mm.The mean angle between the pterygopalatine and the occlusion plane were (55.77±3.37)°.Conclusion:Using CBCT,we are able to observe the exact shape of the pterygopalatine canal.It will play an important role to guide the clinical operation in the future.

  17. Preliminary results on a study to locate the pterygopalatine fossa using mathematical formulae.

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    du Plessis, M; Navsa, N; Bosman, M C

    2010-11-01

    Blocking the contents of the pterygopalatine fossa (PPF) has been shown to be effective in treating most orofacial pain including that associated with trigeminal neuralgia. However, the technique is not widely used, and we propose it to be due to the vague descriptions of the techniques in the literature. The aim of this study was therefore to achieve an alternative method of locating the PPF. One hundred and sixty skulls from the department of Anatomy, University of Pretoria, were used. Distinct landmarks (both anthropometric and clinical) accompanied by existing and new anthropometric measurements were used to define the location of the PPF. Regression analysis was used to measure the reliability of predicting the location of the PPF. From the results, two mathematical formulae were devised (one for each side). These formulae were tested on 47 cadavers by inserting a needle at the calculated points after which the areas where dissected to determine whether or not the needle had entered the PPF. Our results showed an accuracy of 65.2% on the right and 54.4% on the left. In conclusion, improvement in the accuracy of the technique could aid in the management of various pain disorders as well as pain management during surgery.

  18. Gyroscope vs. accelerometer measurements of motion from wrist PPG during physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander J. Casson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Many wearable devices include PPG (photoplethysmography sensors for non-invasive heart rate monitoring. However, PPG signals are heavily corrupted by motion interference, and rely on simultaneous motion measurements to remove the interference. Accelerometers are used commonly, but cannot differentiate between acceleration due to movement and acceleration due to gravity. This paper compares measurements of motion using accelerometers and gyroscopes to give a more complete estimate of wrist motion. Results show the two sensor signals are very different, with low correlations present. When used in a wrist PPG heart rate algorithm gyroscope motion estimates obtain better performance in half of the cases.

  19. PPG neurons of the lower brain stem and their role in brain GLP-1 receptor activation.

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    Trapp, Stefan; Cork, Simon C

    2015-10-15

    Within the brain, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) affects central autonomic neurons, including those controlling the cardiovascular system, thermogenesis, and energy balance. Additionally, GLP-1 influences the mesolimbic reward system to modulate the rewarding properties of palatable food. GLP-1 is produced in the gut and by hindbrain preproglucagon (PPG) neurons, located mainly in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and medullary intermediate reticular nucleus. Transgenic mice expressing glucagon promoter-driven yellow fluorescent protein revealed that PPG neurons not only project to central autonomic control regions and mesolimbic reward centers, but also strongly innervate spinal autonomic neurons. Therefore, these brain stem PPG neurons could directly modulate sympathetic outflow through their spinal inputs to sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Electrical recordings from PPG neurons in vitro have revealed that they receive synaptic inputs from vagal afferents entering via the solitary tract. Vagal afferents convey satiation to the brain from signals like postprandial gastric distention or activation of peripheral GLP-1 receptors. CCK and leptin, short- and long-term satiety peptides, respectively, increased the electrical activity of PPG neurons, while ghrelin, an orexigenic peptide, had no effect. These findings indicate that satiation is a main driver of PPG neuronal activation. They also show that PPG neurons are in a prime position to respond to both immediate and long-term indicators of energy and feeding status, enabling regulation of both energy balance and general autonomic homeostasis. This review discusses the question of whether PPG neurons, rather than gut-derived GLP-1, are providing the physiological substrate for the effects elicited by central nervous system GLP-1 receptor activation.

  20. Adaptive comb filtering for motion artifact reduction from PPG with a structure of adaptive lattice IIR notch filter.

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    Lee, Boreom; Kee, Youngwook; Han, Jonghee; Yi, Won Jin

    2011-01-01

    Photoplethysmographic (PPG) signal can provide important information about cardiovascular and respiratory conditions of individuals in a hospital or daily life. However, PPG can be distorted by motion artifacts significantly. Therefore, the reduction of the effects of motion artifacts is very important procedure for monitoring cardio-respiratory system by PPG. There have been many adaptive techniques to reduce motion artifacts from PPG signal including normalized least mean squares (NLMS) method, recursive least squares (RLS) filter, and Kalman filter. In the present study, we propose the adaptive comb filter (ACF) for reducing the effects of motion artifacts from PPG signal. ACF with adaptive lattice infinite impulse response (IIR) notch filter (ALNF) successfully reduced the motion artifacts from the quasi-periodic PPG signal.

  1. Heart Rate Tracking using Wrist-Type Photoplethysmographic (PPG) Signals during Physical Exercise with Simultaneous Accelerometry

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    Boloursaz Mashhadi, Mahdi; Asadi, Ehsan; Eskandari, Mohsen; Kiani, Shahrzad; Marvasti, Farokh

    2016-02-01

    This paper considers the problem of casual heart rate tracking during intensive physical exercise using simultaneous 2 channel photoplethysmographic (PPG) and 3 dimensional (3D) acceleration signals recorded from wrist. This is a challenging problem because the PPG signals recorded from wrist during exercise are contaminated by strong Motion Artifacts (MAs). In this work, a novel algorithm is proposed which consists of two main steps of MA Cancellation and Spectral Analysis. The MA cancellation step cleanses the MA-contaminated PPG signals utilizing the acceleration data and the spectral analysis step estimates a higher resolution spectrum of the signal and selects the spectral peaks corresponding to HR. Experimental results on datasets recorded from 12 subjects during fast running at the peak speed of 15 km/hour showed that the proposed algorithm achieves an average absolute error of 1.25 beat per minute (BPM). These experimental results also confirm that the proposed algorithm keeps high estimation accuracies even in strong MA conditions.

  2. A novel feature ranking algorithm for biometric recognition with PPG signals.

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    Reşit Kavsaoğlu, A; Polat, Kemal; Recep Bozkurt, M

    2014-06-01

    This study is intended for describing the application of the Photoplethysmography (PPG) signal and the time domain features acquired from its first and second derivatives for biometric identification. For this purpose, a sum of 40 features has been extracted and a feature-ranking algorithm is proposed. This proposed algorithm calculates the contribution of each feature to biometric recognition and collocates the features, the contribution of which is from great to small. While identifying the contribution of the features, the Euclidean distance and absolute distance formulas are used. The efficiency of the proposed algorithms is demonstrated by the results of the k-NN (k-nearest neighbor) classifier applications of the features. During application, each 15-period-PPG signal belonging to two different durations from each of the thirty healthy subjects were used with a PPG data acquisition card. The first PPG signals recorded from the subjects were evaluated as the 1st configuration; the PPG signals recorded later at a different time as the 2nd configuration and the combination of both were evaluated as the 3rd configuration. When the results were evaluated for the k-NN classifier model created along with the proposed algorithm, an identification of 90.44% for the 1st configuration, 94.44% for the 2nd configuration, and 87.22% for the 3rd configuration has successfully been attained. The obtained results showed that both the proposed algorithm and the biometric identification model based on this developed PPG signal are very promising for contactless recognizing the people with the proposed method.

  3. 77 FR 66843 - The PPG Architectural Finishes, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment

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    2012-11-07

    ... PPG Architectural Finishes, Inc.; Analysis of Proposed Consent Order To Aid Public Comment AGENCY... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section below. Write ``PPG Architectural, File No. 112 3160'' on your comment and file... approval, by the Commission, has been placed on the public record for a period of thirty (30) days. The...

  4. The assessment of sympathetic activity using iPPG based inter-limb coherence measurements

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    Tsoy, Maria O.; Rogatina, Kristina V.; Stiukhina, Elena S.; Postnov, Dmitry E.

    2017-04-01

    Photoplethysmography is an optical technique that can be used to detect blood volume changes and to measure important physiological parameters. This is low cost and non-invasive technique. However, one has to apply sensor directly to the skin. In this regard, the development on remote mothods receives the growing attention, such as imaging photoplethysmography (iPPG). Note, most of public-available iPPG systems are based on smartphone-embedded cameras, and thus have a sample frequency about 30-60 frames per second, which is enough for heart rate measurements, but may be too low for some more advanced usages of this technique. In our work, we describe the attempt to use smartphone-based iPPG technique aimed to measure the tiny mismatch in RR interval data series recorded from left and right arms. We use the transmission mode iPPG, in which the light transmitted through the medium of finger is detected by a web-camera opposite the LED source. The computational scheme by processing and analysis of the received signal was implemented using MATLAB language (MathWork Inc. in the United States). We believe that further development of our approach may lead to fast and low cost method to access the state of the sympathetic nervous system.

  5. Highly conductive and electrochemically stable plasticized blend polymer electrolytes based on PVdF-HFP and triblock copolymer PPG-PEG-PPG diamine for Li-ion batteries

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    Saikia, Diganta; Wu, Hao-Yiang; Pan, Yu-Chi; Lin, Chi-Pin; Huang, Kai-Pin; Chen, Kan-Nan; Fey, George T. K.; Kao, Hsien-Ming

    2011-03-01

    A new plasticized poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene (PVdF-HFP)/PPG-PEG-PPG diamine/organosilane blend-based polymer electrolyte system has been synthesized and characterized. The structural and electrochemical properties of the electrolytes thus obtained were systematically investigated by a variety of techniques including differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), tensile test, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), 13C and 29Si solid-state NMR, AC impedance, linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and charge-discharge measurements. The FTIR and NMR results provided the information about the interaction among the constituents in the blend polymer membrane. The present blend polymer electrolyte exhibits several advantageous electrochemical properties such as ionic conductivity up to 1.3 × 10-2 S cm-1 at room temperature, high value of Li+ transference number (t+ = 0.82), electrochemical stability up to 6.4 V vs. Li/Li+ with the platinum electrode, and stable charge-discharge cycles for lithium-ion batteries.

  6. PROGRAM PPG UNTUK MEMBANGUN KOMPETENSI GURU GEOGRAFI (STUDI KASUS DI UNIVERSITAS NEGERI MALANG

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    Mega Prani Ningsih

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of rhe research to explain PPG SM3T Program designs for building the grogrphy teacher competences, the graduates of  SM3T’s Program. The design implementation of PPG SM3T includes curriculum development process till the evaluation of geography teacher competences. Competence referred to are competence pedagogical, competence personality, social competence, and professional competency. The research is a case study researchs in Malang State University. Technique the data collection was done through in-depth interviews and documentation. Data analysis use the interactive model Miles and Huberman. This research result indicates that an implementation program PPG includes several stage are: (1 the developmental syllabus stages by the appropriate policy regarding university, (2 the pre the condition stages as the combined with plenary 1, (3 the learning system stages are consist of several stage and learning activities, thy are: (a workshop SSP stages consist of the stage activity: plenary 2 namely the deepening of material curriculum 2013; pre-test; focus group discussion are the subject matter of geography and pedagogical that have not understood, yet; independent working group is composing device learning, combined the stage of plenary 3, revision and approval lesson plans that is peer teaching, formative tests , KKL and doing incidental activity such as writing journals and scientific paper; (b the stage of PPL consist of procession submission the PPL students to school, KMD trainings by the PPG, doing some teaching and non teaching activities, PTK researchs, and a test of the performance by lesson study; (c the competency test stages which are consist of intensification of the subtansial geography materials, also the local and national examination test. The implementation directed in developing geography teacher competences which are consist of pedagogik, personality, social and professional competences. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk

  7. DistancePPG: Robust non-contact vital signs monitoring using a camera.

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    Kumar, Mayank; Veeraraghavan, Ashok; Sabharwal, Ashutosh

    2015-05-01

    Vital signs such as pulse rate and breathing rate are currently measured using contact probes. But, non-contact methods for measuring vital signs are desirable both in hospital settings (e.g. in NICU) and for ubiquitous in-situ health tracking (e.g. on mobile phone and computers with webcams). Recently, camera-based non-contact vital sign monitoring have been shown to be feasible. However, camera-based vital sign monitoring is challenging for people with darker skin tone, under low lighting conditions, and/or during movement of an individual in front of the camera. In this paper, we propose distancePPG, a new camera-based vital sign estimation algorithm which addresses these challenges. DistancePPG proposes a new method of combining skin-color change signals from different tracked regions of the face using a weighted average, where the weights depend on the blood perfusion and incident light intensity in the region, to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of camera-based estimate. One of our key contributions is a new automatic method for determining the weights based only on the video recording of the subject. The gains in SNR of camera-based PPG estimated using distancePPG translate into reduction of the error in vital sign estimation, and thus expand the scope of camera-based vital sign monitoring to potentially challenging scenarios. Further, a dataset will be released, comprising of synchronized video recordings of face and pulse oximeter based ground truth recordings from the earlobe for people with different skin tones, under different lighting conditions and for various motion scenarios.

  8. Non-constrained blood pressure monitoring using ECG and PPG for personal healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Youngzoon; Cho, Jung H; Yoon, Gilwon

    2009-08-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is one of the important vital signs that need to be monitored for personal healthcare. Arterial blood pressure (BP) was estimated from pulse transit time (PTT) and PPG waveform. PTT is a time interval between an R-wave of electrocardiography (ECG) and a photoplethysmography (PPG) signal. This method does not require an aircuff and only a minimal inconvenience of attaching electrodes and LED/photo detector sensors on a subject. PTT computed between the ECG R-wave and the maximum first derivative PPG was strongly correlated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) (R = -0.712) compared with other PTT values, and the diastolic time proved to be appropriate for estimation diastolic blood pressure (DBP) (R = -0.764). The percent errors of SBP using the individual regression line (4-11%) were lower than those using the regression line obtained from all five subjects (9-14%). On the other hand, the DBP estimation did not show much difference between the individual regression (4-10%) and total regression line (6-10%). Our developed device had a total size of 7 x 13.5 cm and was operated by single 3-V battery. Biosignals can be measured for 72 h continuously without external interruptions. Through a serial network communication, an external personal computer can monitor measured waveforms in real time. Our proposed method can be used for non-constrained, thus continuous BP monitoring for the purpose of personal healthcare.

  9. A novel approach for chewing detection based on a wearable PPG sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papapanagiotou, Vasileios; Diou, Christos; Lingchuan Zhou; van den Boer, Janet; Mars, Monica; Delopoulos, Anastasios

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring of human eating behaviour has been attracting interest over the last few years, as a means to a healthy lifestyle, but also due to its association with serious health conditions, such as eating disorders and obesity. Use of self-reports and other non-automated means of monitoring have been found to be unreliable, compared to the use of wearable sensors. Various modalities have been reported, such as acoustic signal from ear-worn microphones, or signal from wearable strain sensors. In this work, we introduce a new sensor for the task of chewing detection, based on a novel photoplethysmography (PPG) sensor placed on the outer earlobe to perform the task. We also present a processing pipeline that includes two chewing detection algorithms from literature and one new algorithm, to process the captured PPG signal, and present their effectiveness. Experiments are performed on an annotated dataset recorded from 21 individuals, including more than 10 hours of eating and non-eating activities. Results show that the PPG sensor can be successfully used to support dietary monitoring.

  10. Heart Rate monitoring during physical exercise using wrist-type photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Amirhosein Khas; Moradi, Parsa; Malihi, Mahan; Karimi, Sajjad; Shamsollahi, Mohammad B

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate monitoring using wrist-type using photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals during subjects' intensive exercises is a challenging problem, since signals are strongly affected by motion artifacts caused by unexpected movements. This paper presents a method that uses both time and frequency characteristics of signals; using sparse signal reconstruction for high-resolution spectrum estimation. Experimental results on type data sets recorded from 12 subjects during fast running at peak speed of 15 km/hour. The results have a performance with the average absolute error being 1.80 beat per minute.

  11. Investigation of blood pulse PPG signal regulation on toe effect of body posture and lower limb height

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIN Shang-zhi; HU Sijung; CRABTREE Vincent P.; ZHENG Jia

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To study the regulation of blood pulse volume via photoplethysmography (PPG) signal detected from toe, while the lower limb is passively raised in different height positions. Methods: Use a modified non-invasive PPG technique to detect the blood pulse signal on toe with infrared (IR) photo sensor. A protocol consisting of two postures, i.e., supine and 45° reclining, was designed to conduct laboratory trial in this study. During the period of performing the protocol of these postures, the lower limb was passively raised from the heights of 10 cm to 60 cm randomly and individually with sponge blocks underneath the foot. Results: In the supine posture, the higher the foot was passively raised, the more the blood PPG signal decreased. In the 45° reclining posture, the blood PPG signal increased at the beginning and then decreased in the foot height position from 10 cm to 60 cm. In both postures the normalized AC signal changes significantly while the normalized DC signal changes little. Conclusion:The toe PPG signals can obviously indicate the regulated blood volume change with the designated postural procedures due to the heart level position.

  12. Sticker-type ECG/PPG concurrent monitoring system hybrid integration of CMOS SoC and organic sensor device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yongsu; Lee, Hyeonwoo; Yoo, Seunghyup; Yoo, Hoi-Jun; Yongsu Lee; Hyeonwoo Lee; Seunghyup Yoo; Hoi-Jun Yoo; Yoo, Seunghyup; Lee, Yongsu; Yoo, Hoi-Jun; Lee, Hyeonwoo

    2016-08-01

    The sticker-type sensor system is proposed targeting ECG/PPG concurrent monitoring for cardiovascular diseases. The stickers are composed of two types: Hub and Sensor-node (SN) sticker. Low-power CMOS SoC for measuring ECG and PPG signal is hybrid integrated with organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photo detector (OPD). The sticker has only 2g weight and only consumes 141μW. The optical calibration loop is adopted for maintaining SNR of PPG signal higher than 30dB. The pulse arrival time (PAT) and SpO2 value can be extracted from various body parts and verified comparing with the reference device from 20 people in-vivo experiments.

  13. Motion artifact cancellation and outlier rejection for clip-type ppg-based heart rate sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Takunori; Hara, Shinsuke; Okuhata, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Hajime; Kawabata, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Heart rate sensing can be used to not only understand exercise intensity but also detect life-critical condition during sports activities. To reduce stress during exercise and attach heart rate sensor easily, we developed a clip-type photoplethysmography (PPG)-based heart rate sensor. The sensor can be attached just by hanging it to the waist part of undershorts, and furthermore, it employs the motion artifact (MA) cancellation technique. However, due to its low contact pressure, sudden jumps and drops, which are called "outliers," are often observed in the sensed heart rate, so we also developed a simple outlier rejection technique. By an experiment using five male subjects (4 sets per subject), we confirmed the MA cancellation and outlier rejection capabilities.

  14. Mechanical Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Polyurethane Nanocomposites via PPG Dispersion with MWCNTs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dae Won; Kim, Jong Seok [Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    In order to improve the dispersity of nanofiller, polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites were manufactured via poly(propylene gylcol) (PPG) dispersion with MWCNTs prepared by using a ball mill shaker. MWCNTs could be functionalized by treating with the hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Tensile strengths and elongations at break of PU/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treated MWCNTs nanocomposites were enhanced compared to those of the PU/pristine MWCNTs nanocomposites. The good dispersion of MWCNTs shown in SEM images was obtained by the functionalization of MWCNTs surface. PU/carbon black (CB) composites showed no significant change in the tensile properties. The tensile properties of PU nanocomposites containing pristine MWCNTs or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treated MWCNTs were enhanced with increasing dispersion time. As a result, it was certified that the enhanced dispersity of nanofiller brought the improvement of the tensile properties of the MWCNTs based PU nanocomposites.

  15. Foaming of E-Glass (Report for G Plus Project for PPG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong-Sang; Hrma, Pavel R.; Pilon, Laurent; Dutton, Bryan C.

    2004-04-19

    The behavior of foams generated in the crucible melts was investigated to study the effect of furnace atmosphere on E-glass foaming, specifically focused on its water content to understand the effect of oxy-firing. A quartz-crucible furnace equipped with video recording was used to observe the behavior and to evaluate stability of foams generated from the PPG E-glass under various atmospheres. The present study preliminarily concluded that the higher foaming in oxy-fired furnace compared to air-fired is caused by the effect of water on early sulfate decomposition, promoting more efficient refining gas generation from sulfate (known as ''dilution effect''), not by the effect of humidity on foam lamella stability. A plausible explanation for the difference between soda-lime glass and E-glass in the end result of the dilution effect on glass refining and foaming is presented. A preliminary experiment on the effect of heating rate also suggests that thermal history of glass melting can be a major factor in the rate of E-glass foaming. Approaches to develop the methods to reduce foaming in oxy-fired furnace are recommended.

  16. A Novel Classification Technique of Arteriovenous Fistula Stenosis Evaluation Using Bilateral PPG Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Du

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The most common treatment for end-stage renal disease (ESRD patients is the hemodialysis (HD. For this kind of treatment, the functional vascular access that called arteriovenous fistula (AVF is done by surgery to connect the vein and artery. Stenosis is considered the major cause of dysfunction of AVF. In this study, a noninvasive approach based on asynchronous analysis of bilateral photoplethysmography (PPG with error correcting output coding support vector machine one versus rest (ESVM-OVR for the degree of stenosis (DOS evaluation is proposed. An artificial neural network (ANN classifier is also applied to compare the performance with the proposed system. The testing data has been collected from 22 patients at the right and left thumb of the hand. The experimental results indicated that the proposed system could provide positive predictive value (PPV reaching 91.67% and had higher noise tolerance. The system has the potential for providing diagnostic assistance in a wearable device for evaluation of AVF stenosis.

  17. Sphenopalatine ganglion neuromodulation in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Sabrina; Schoenen, Jean; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    autonomic symptoms. CONCLUSION: We propose two possible mechanisms of action: 1) interrupting the post-ganglionic parasympathetic outflow to inhibit the pain and cephalic autonomic symptoms, and 2) modulating the sensory processing in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis. To further explore SPG stimulation...

  18. Radio-anatomical Study of the Greater Palatine Canal and the Pterygopalatine Fossa in a Lebanese Population: A Consideration for Maxillary Nerve Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Aoun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the morphology of the component, greater palatine canal-pterygopalatine fossa (GPC-PPF, in a Lebanese population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT technology. Materials and Methods: CBCT images of 79 Lebanese adult patients (38 females and 41 males were included in this study, and a total of 158 cases were evaluated bilaterally. The length and path of the GPCs-PPFs were determined, and the data obtained analyzed statistically. Results: In the sagittal plane, of all the GPCs-PPFs assessed, the average length was 35.02 mm on the right and 35.01 mm on the left. The most common anatomic path consisted in the presence of a curvature resulting in an internal narrowing whose average diameter was 2.4 mm on the right and 2.45 mm on the left. The mean diameter of the upper opening was 5.85 mm on the right and 5.82 mm on the left. As for the lower opening corresponding to the greater palatine foramen, the right and left average diameters were 6.39 mm and 6.42 mm, respectively. Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, we concluded that throughout the Lebanese population, the GPC-PPF path is variable with a predominance of curved one (77.21% [122/158] in both the right and left sides; however, the GPC-PPF length does not significantly vary according to gender and side.

  19. A Comparative Analysis of Ultrasound Velocity in Binary Liquid Systems of PPG by Mathematical and Experimental Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, A.; Venugopal, T.; Venkatramanan, K.

    The estimation of the speed of ultrasound is the fundamental requirement for investigating the transport properties of liquid and solid systems. Ultrasonic velocities of liquid mixtures containing polar and non-polar groups are of considerable importance in understanding inter-molecular interaction between component molecules and they find applications in several industrial and technological processes. There are many standard mathematical methods available to measure the ultrasonic velocity. In the present study, interferometric technique is planned for experimental measurement of ultrasound velocity. In this paper, the speed of ultrasound waves in Polypropylene Glycol (PPG 400, PPG 4000) in toluene has been estimated for different concentrations (2%, 4%, 6%, 8% & 10%) at 303K and these experimental values compared with theoretical values obtained by using various mathematical methods like Nomotto's Relation, Vandeal Vangeal Relation, Impedance Relation, and Rao's specific sound velocity. The most reliable method that matches with experimental method is identified using Average Percentage Error (APE) and analysed in the light of molecular interactions occurring in the binary liquid systems. Comparison of evaluated theoretical velocities with experimental values will reveal the nature of interaction between component molecules in the mixtures. Such theoretical study is useful in defining a comprehensive theoretical model for a specific liquid mixture. Also, various molecular interaction parameters like free volume, internal pressure, viscous relaxation time, inter atomic free length, etc are calculated and discussed in terms of polymer-solvent interactions.

  20. MICROST: A mixed approach for heart rate monitoring during intensive physical exercise using wrist-type PPG Signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shilin; Tan, Ke; Zhang, Xinyu; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The performance of heart rate (HR) monitoring using wrist-type photoplethysmographic (PPG) signals is strongly influenced by motion artifacts (MAs), since the intensive physical exercises are common in real world. Few works focus on this study so far because of unsatisfying quality of corrupted PPG signals. In this paper, we propose an accurate and efficient strategy, named MICROST, which estimates heart rate based on a mixed approach. The MICROST framework is designed as a MIxed algorithm which consists of acceleration Classification (AC), fiRst-frame prOcessing and heuriStic Tracking. Experimental results using recordings from 12 subjects during fast running and intensive movement showed the average absolute error of heart rate estimation was 2.58 beat per minute (BPM), and the Pearson correlation between the estimates and the ground-truth of heart rate was 0.988. We discuss our approach in real time to face the applications of wearable devices such as smart-watches in reality.

  1. FT-IR spectroscopic investigation of ionic interactions in PPG 4000: AgCF3SO3 polymer electrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthanthiraraj, S Austin; Kumar, R; Paul, B Joseph

    2009-01-01

    The effect of salt concentration on the ubiquitous ionic interactions observed in the case of the silver ion conducting polymer electrolyte system poly(propylene glycol) (PPG)-silver triflate has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy as a probe for the characterization of the local environment of the triflate ion in PPG-based polymer electrolytes. The maximum free anion concentrations of symmetric and asymmetric SO(3) stretching modes in the case of poly(propylene glycol) complexed with silver triflate (AgCF(3)SO(3)) corresponding to the ether oxygen metal cation ratios from 2:1 to 6:1 have been investigated in detail. The present Fourier transform infrared spectral studies of the C-O-C stretching mode have shown reduction in the intensity, due to the decrease of salt concentration. The splitting of vibrational modes has been analyzed in terms of free ions, ion pairs and aggregates. The bands of SO(3) symmetric stretching mode appearing at 1032 and 1038 cm(-1) in the chosen polymer electrolyte material have been assigned to free ions and ion pairs respectively.

  2. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gary; E.PICKARD; Patricia; J.SOLLARS

    2010-01-01

    A new mammalian photoreceptor was recently discovered to reside in the ganglion cell layer of the inner retina.These intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells(ipRGCs) express a photopigment,melanopsin,that confers upon them the ability to respond to light in the absence of all rod and cone photoreceptor input.Although relatively few in number,ipRGCs extend their dendrites across large expanses of the retina making them ideally suited to function as irradiance detectors to assess changes in ambient light levels.Phototransduction in ipRGCs appears to be mediated by transient receptor potential channels more closely resembling the phototransduction cascade of invertebrate rather than vertebrate photoreceptors.ipRGCs convey irradiance information centrally via the optic nerve to influence several functions.ipRGCs are the primary retinal input to the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus(SCN),a circadian oscillator and biological clock,and this input entrains the SCN to the day/night cycle.ipRGCs contribute irradiance signals that regulate pupil size and they also provide signals that interface with the autonomic nervous system to regulate rhythmic gene activity in major organs of the body.ipRGCs also provide excitatory drive to dopaminergic amacrine cells in the retina,providing a novel basis for the restructuring of retinal circuits by light.Here we review the ground-breaking discoveries,current progress and directions for future investigation.

  3. Sectional and applied anatomy of pterygopalatine fossa far operative approach%翼腭窝手术入路的断层与应用解剖学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑海宁; 吴樾; 吕杨波; 于涌; 刘庚辰; 王平; 李云生; 翟丽东

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To supply the evidence of applied anatomy of new operative route of pterygopalatine fossa with improved ceUoidin embedding techniques. Methods: Take the anterior bases of 30 specimens of dead adult heads first. Then,after series of processes like decalcification and dehydration we make three-dimensional continued thin sections of 0.25 mm. At the same time we measure 80 sides of cardaveric heads. Results: The appearance of pterygopalatine fossa is multiplex,except for triangle,there are arc-shape、transverse"S"-shape,chock-shape ,"L"shape,dumbbell-shape,cosh-shapc,assurgent narrow strip shape. The thickness of medial wall ofpterygopalatiue fessa in middle nasal meatus is (1.95±0.66) mm (left),(1.97±0.74) mm(right).The distance from posterior edge of the aperture of maxillary sinus to pterygopalatine fossa is (11.25±1.95) mm(left) (11.22±1.96) mm (right). Conchision: The now approach of the operation doesn't pass maxillary sinus,the instruments can be used to go in the middle nasal meatus until the medial wall of pterygopalatine fossa,then open the thin piece ofboue,enter the pterygopalatine fossa directly.%目的:用改进火棉胶包埋技术,为翼腭窝新型手术入路提供应用解剖学依据.方法:固定成人尸头标本30例,取其前颅底.标本经脱钙、脱水等系列处理,分别行三维连续薄切片,厚度0.25 mm.同时对80侧干燥骨进行测量.结果:翼腭窝形态多样,除有三角形外,还有弧形、横置"S"形、楔形、"L"形、哑铃形、短棒状或斜向外上的窄长条形.翼腭窝在中鼻道处内侧壁厚度为(1.95±0.66)mmm(左),(1.97±0.74)mm(右).在中鼻道处上颌窦口后缘至翼腭窝距离(11.25±1.95)mm(左),(11.22±1.96)mm(右).结论:新型手术入路不经过上颌窦,运用器械从中鼻道深入至翼腭窝的内侧壁深度,打开薄骨板,直接进入翼腭窝,由此处入路手术创伤小、出血少、安全、术后并发症少.

  4. Nonvisual ganglion cells, circuits and nonvisual pigments

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Akbar Kashani; WANG Huai-zhou; WANG Ning-li

    2009-01-01

    @@ To the editor: WANG and his colleagues provided the evidence that "both melanopsin-containing and superior collicular retinal ganglion cells were damaged by chronic ocular hypertension, indicating that glaucomatous neural degeneration involves the non-image-forming visual pathway".

  5. Ectopic ganglion in cauda equina: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Andrew K; Fung, Kar-Ming; Peterson, Jo Elle G; Glenn, Chad A; Martin, Michael D

    2016-06-01

    Macroscopic ectopic or heterotopic ganglionic tissue within the cauda equina is a very rare pathological finding and is usually associated with spinal dysraphism. However, it may mimic genuine neoplasms of the cauda equina. The authors describe a 29-year-old woman with a history of back pain, right leg pain, and urinary incontinence in whom imaging demonstrated an enhancing mass located in the cauda equina at the L1-2 interspace. The patient subsequently underwent biopsy and was found to have a focus of ectopic ganglionic tissue that was 1.3 cm in greatest dimension. To the authors' knowledge, ectopic or heterotopic ganglionic tissue within the cauda equina in a patient without evidence of spinal dysraphism has never been reported. This patient presented with imaging and clinical findings suggestive of a neoplasm, and an open biopsy proved the lesion to be ectopic ganglionic tissue. The authors suggest that ectopic ganglionic tissue be added to the list of differential diagnoses of a space-occupying lesion arising from the cauda equina.

  6. Preparation and characterization of PEG-PPG-PEG copolymer/pregelatinized starch blends for use as resorbable bone hemostatic wax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwanprateeb, J; Suvannapruk, W; Thammarakcharoen, F; Chokevivat, W; Rukskul, P

    2013-12-01

    In this study, polymer blends between PEG-PPG-PEG copolymer mixtures and pregelatinized starch at various compositions ranging from 0 to 3 % by weight were prepared and evaluated for potential use as novel resorbable bone hemostatic wax. It was found that the prepared samples had sufficient smearability for use as a bone wax. An addition of pregelatinized starch increased the hardness, smoothness and consistency of the texture while decreasing the adherence to glove. Thermal analysis indicated that the heat of fusion slightly decreased with increasing pregelatinized starch content. Compressive stiffness tended to decrease with increasing starch content for concentrations lower than 20 %, but re-increased at higher starch levels. In contrast, adherence deformation increased initially, but then decreased with increasing starch content. This behavior was related to the dependence of softening or reinforcing effect on the level of starch concentration in the samples. Adherence load and energy decreased with the addition of pregelatinized starch implying the decrease in adhesiveness of the samples. Furthermore, increasing the pregelatized starch amount also increased the liquid sealing duration of the samples at both 23 and 37 °C. Cytotoxicity tests against osteoblasts using a MTT assay revealed that the all the prepared samples and their raw materials did not show any cytotoxic potential. Formulations containing pregelatinized starch content between 20 and 30 % were found to show optimized performance.

  7. Ganglion cell like cells, diagnostic dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anand Shankar Ammanagi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of cutaneous swelling found on the left anterior axillary fold of a 41-year-old man. Gross examination of specimen excised from the dermis showed a well-circumscribed nodule histologically composed of spindle cells with interspersed ganglion cell like cells. On hematoxylin and eosine (H and E staining it was diagnosed as ganglioneuroma. Ganglioneuromas are rare, benign, fully differentiated tumors that contain mature schwann cells, ganglion cells, fibrous tissue, and nerve fibers. They are commonly found along the paravertebral sympathetic ganglia and sometimes in the adrenal medulla. However primary cutaneous ganglioneuroma is an extremely rare tumor. Immunohistochemical workup revealed a fibroblastic origin and hence the case was diagnosed as fibromatosis with ganglion cell like fibroblasts. This case report suggests that the features considered diagnostic of ganglioneuromas can occur in other cutaneous lesions and, therefore, this diagnosis cannot be offered only on the basis of H and E.

  8. Melanopsin expressing human retinal ganglion cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hannibal, Jens; Christensen, Anders Tolstrup; Heegaard, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin belong to a heterogenic population of RGCs which regulate the circadian clock, masking behavior, melatonin suppression, the pupillary light reflex and sleep/wake cycles. The different functions seem...

  9. Two Case Report on Wrist Ganglion Treated with Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Seop Shin

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Object : This study was to investigate the clinical effect of Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture on two patients suffering from Wrist Ganglion. Methods : We treated two patients suffering from Wrist Ganglion with both acupuncture and injection of Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture. Then we measured the sizes of Wrist Ganglion and Visual Analogue Scale(VAS. Results and Conclusions : We found that the sizes of Wrist Ganglion of the two patients were significantly reduced. Moreover, the pain and discomfort of the wrists of the patients were reported to be reduced. So, we concluded that Scolopendrid Pharmacopuncture has an excellent effect on Wrist Ganglion. However, further studies are needed to investigate its exact effects.

  10. Internal carotid false aneurysm after thermocoagulation of the gasserian ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmerber, Sébastien; Vasdev, Ashok; Chahine, Karim; Tournaire, Romain; Bing, Fabrice

    2008-08-01

    To identify petrous internal carotid bleeding aneurysm as a complication of gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation. A single case presenting with epistaxis and otorrhagia 1 month after gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation in the treatment of refractory trigeminal neuralgia. Gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation, computed tomographic scan, and angiocomputed tomographic scan revealing petrous internal carotid ruptured aneurysm and internal carotid embolization. Radiologic diagnosis of the vascular injury after gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation. Radiologic identification of ruptured internal carotid artery as the cause of simultaneous epistaxis and otorrhagia. Gasserian ganglion thermocoagulation may cause aneurysm and rupture of the petrous portion of the internal carotid artery.

  11. Retinal ganglion cell topography in elasmobranchs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzano, A; Collin, S P

    2000-04-01

    Retinal wholemounts are used to examine the topographic distribution of retinal cells within the ganglion cell layer in a range of elasmobranchs from different depths. The retina is examined for regional specializations for acute vision in six species of selachians, Galeocerdo cuvieri, Hemiscyllium ocellatum, Scyliorhinus canicula, Galeus melastomus, Etmopterus spinax, Isistius brasiliensis, one species of batoid, Raja bigelowi and one species of chimaera, Hydrolagus mirabilis. These species represent a range of lifestyles including pelagic, mesopelagic and benthic habitats, living from shallow water to the sea bottom at a depth of more than 3000 m. The topography of cells within the ganglion cell layer is non-uniform and changes markedly across the retina. Most species possess an increased density of cells across the horizontal (dorsal) meridian or visual streak, with a density range of 500 to 2,500 cells per mm(2) with one or more regional increases in density lying within this specialized horizontal area. It is proposed that the higher spatial resolving power provided by the horizontal streak in these species mediates panoramic vision in the lower frontal visual field. Only I. brasiliensis possesses a concentric arrangement of retinal iso-density contours in temporal retina or an area centralis, thereby increasing spatial resolving power in a more specialized part of the visual field, an adaptation for its unusual feeding behavior. In Nissl-stained material, amacrine and ganglion cell populations could be distinguished on the criteria of soma size, soma shape and nuclear staining. Quantitative analyses show that the proportion of amacrine cells lying within the ganglion cell layer is non-uniform and ranges between 0.4 and 12.3% in specialized retinal areas and between 8.2 and 48.1% in the peripheral non-specialized regions. Analyses of soma area of the total population of cells in the ganglion cell layer also show that the pelagic species possess significantly

  12. Evidence for a blood-ganglion barrier in the superior cervical ganglion of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depace, D M

    1982-12-01

    The permeability of the blood vessels in the superior cervical ganglion of the rat was tested by intravenous injection of horseradish peroxidase (HRP). By light microscopy, peroxidase activity was found in three locations: in the capsule of the ganglion, in the lumina of the blood vessels, and within macrophages. Electron microscopy revealed that virtually all ganglionic blood vessels contained HRP 5 minutes following its administration. The intensity of peroxidase activity declined over the period of 15 minutes. The enzyme was localized on the luminal surface of the endothelial cells, attaching to the glycocalyx. Endothelial microvilli, projecting into the vessel lumen, were also covered with peroxidase. Micropinocytotic vesicles on the luminal surface of the endothelium contained reaction product. Some of these vesicles were free within the cytoplasm of the endothelium but none was observed on the abluminal surface. Peroxidase activity was not detected in the extracellular space even after 15 minutes. The majority of blood vessels in the superior cervical ganglion possess a continuous endothelium with tight junctions; features associated with the blood-brain barrier of the central nervous system and peripheral nerves. It is proposed that these vessels perform a barrier function between the capillary circulation and the superior cervical ganglion.

  13. Endoscopic sphenopalatine ganglion block for pain relief

    OpenAIRE

    Murty, P. S. N.; Prasanna, Atma

    1998-01-01

    The anaesthetic effect of the sphenopalatine (SPG) block has been well utilized for intranasal topical anaesthesia but the analgesic efficacy of (SPG) block, though well documented in literature, has not been put into practice. The methods available for SPG block till date were blind as they do not visualize the foramen. Nasal endoscopies have been used to visualize the foramen for an effective block. The authors present their experience with the endoscopic sphenopalatine ganglion block for p...

  14. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  15. Treatment of temporomandibular joint ganglion cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao-I; Liu, Ka-Wai; Hsu, Yung-Chang; Chiang, I-Ping; Chang, Sophia Chia-Ning

    2011-09-01

    Ganglion cysts of the temporomandibular joint are very rare and always misdiagnosed as synovial cyst, parotid gland tumor, or other cystic lesions. They present with pain, swelling, or dysfunction. Image studies could facilitate to identify the tumor mass from the adjacent soft tissue, but a definitive diagnosis could be made from the pathologic report.A 59-year-old woman presented to the clinics with a chief complaint of a painless swelling mass in the right preauricular region of 3-month duration. Computed tomography was performed, which showed a small radiolucent lesion adjacent to the right condyle. Local excision was performed, and the specimen was sent for histologic examination.Microscopic examination showed a cystic space walled by dense fibrous connective tissue without epithelial or endothelial lining. Immunohistochemical staining of these lining cells showed positivity for vimentin and negativity for cytokeratin. These findings were consistent with the diagnosis of ganglion cyst.Ganglion cysts present as unilobulate or multilobulate cysts that arise from the collagenous tissue and is filled with highly viscous fluid. It does not communicate with the joint cavity. In contrast, synovial cyst is a true cyst lined by cuboidal or flattened cells from the synoviocytes and is filled with gelatinous fluid. It may or may not communicate with the joint cavity. Excision is the treatment of choice of symptomatic cystic lesions. Incomplete excision of these lesions may cause further recurrence or infection. Thus, injection of hydrocortisone or aspiration may be considered as an alternative management.

  16. Thalamic pain alleviated by stellate ganglion block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chenlong; Yang, Min; Liu, Pengfei; Zhong, Wenxiang; Zhang, Wenchuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Thalamic pain is a distressing and treatment-resistant type of central post-stroke pain. Although stellate ganglion block is an established intervention used in pain management, its use in the treatment of thalamic pain has never been reported. Patient concerns: A 66-year-old woman presented with a 3-year history of severe intermittent lancinating pain on the right side of the face and the right hand. The pain started from the ulnar side of the right forearm after a mild ischemic stroke in bilateral basal ganglia and left thalamus. Weeks later, the pain extended to the dorsum of the finger tips and the whole palmar surface, becoming more severe. Meanwhile, there was also pain with similar characteristics emerging on her right face, resembling atypical trigeminal neuralgia. Diagnoses: Thalamic pain was diagnosed. Interventions: After refusing the further invasive treatment, she was suggested to try stellate ganglion block. Outcomes: After a 3-day period of pain free (numerical rating scale: 0) postoperatively, she reported moderate to good pain relief with a numerical rating scale of about 3 to 4 lasting 1 month after the first injection. Pain as well as the quality of life was markedly improved with less dose of analgesic agents. Lessons: Stellate ganglion block may be an optional treatment for thalamic pain. PMID:28151918

  17. O programa piloto para proteção das florestas tropicais do Brasil (PPG-7 e a globalização da Amazônia Pilot program for tropical forest protection in Brazil (PPG-7 and the globalization of the Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio De Antoni

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available O PPG-7 desenvolvido desde 1994 até 2009 adquire um significado especial pelo fato de marcar a passagem da ideologia conservacionista à introdução da economia de mercado na região amazônica. A própria oferta do G-7 e a aceitação do governo brasileiro da época visavam a integrar a iniciativa dentro do novo cenário internacional, dando início ao processo de mercantilização atual da Amazônia.The PPG-7, developed from 1994 to 2009, acquires a special significance by making the transition of a conservationist ideology to the introduction of market economy in the Amazon region. The proposal of G-7 and the acceptance of the Brazilian government at that time sought to integrate the initiative within the new international scenario, initiating the current mercantile process of the Amazon.

  18. Strategies to preserve or regenerate spiral ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehm, Pamela C; Hansen, Marlan R

    2005-10-01

    Degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons following hair cell loss carries critical implications for efforts to rehabilitate severe cases of hearing loss with cochlear implants or hair cell regeneration. This review considers recently identified neurotrophic factors and therapeutic strategies which promote spiral ganglion neuron survival and neurite growth. Replacement of these factors may help preserve or regenerate the auditory nerve in patients with extensive hair cell loss. Spiral ganglion neurons depend on neurotrophic factors supplied by hair cells and other targets for their development and continued survival. Loss of this trophic support leads to spiral ganglion neuron death via apoptosis. Hair cells support spiral ganglion neuron survival by producing several peptide neurotrophic factors such as neurotrophin-3 and glial derived neurotrophic factor. In addition, neurotransmitter release from the hair cells drives membrane electrical activity in spiral ganglion neurons which also supports their survival. In animal models, replacement of peptide neurotrophic factors or electrical stimulation with an implanted electrode attenuates spiral ganglion neuron degeneration following deafferentation. Cell death inhibitors can also preserve spiral ganglion neuron populations. Preliminary studies show that transfer of stem cells or neurons from other ganglia are two potential strategies to replace lost spiral ganglion neurons. Inducing the regrowth of spiral ganglion neuron peripheral processes to approximate or contact cochlear implant electrodes may help optimize signaling from a diminished population of neurons. Recent studies of spiral ganglion neuron development and survival have identified several trophic and neuritogenic factors which protect these specialized cells from degeneration following hair cell loss. While still preliminary, such strategies show promise for future clinical applications.

  19. Trends in Surgery and Diagnosis of Benign and Malignant Tumors of the pterygopalatine Fossa%翼腭窝及翼腭窝邻近结构中良、恶性肿瘤的诊断与外科处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翦新春

    2012-01-01

    翼腭窝区域的手术因为位置深在、解剖结构复杂,使得发生在该区域的肿瘤切除具有臣大的挑战性.当翼腭窝的肿瘤累及上颌骨、进入上颌窦,腮腺深叶的肿瘤扩展进入翼腭窝时,广泛的切除通常是必要的.随着影像学、病理诊断学、外科技术、手术器械和重建技术的进步,颅底外科已成为多学科外科医师关注的热点.本文就翼腭窝及翼腭窝邻近结构中良、恶性肿瘤的诊断与外科处理进行系统的论述.%Surgical management in the pterygopalatine fossa region presents anatomic and surgical problems related to the difficulty of access. When a tumor in the pterygopalaline fossa involves the maxilla and extends into the maxillary sinus, and a tumor in the deep lobe of the parotid gland extends into the pterygopalatine fossa, extensive resection is often necessary. With the advancements in imageology, diagnostic technology, diagnostic pathology, surgical technology and instrumentation, reconstructive techniques, the surgery of the lateral cranial base or the middle cranial base is now receiving significant attention progress, and interest. The objective of the paper was to provide an overview of contemporary strategies for the management of tumors in the pterygopalatine fossa and adjacent structures.

  20. Intraosseous ganglion in the first metacarpal bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, H.; Itoh, Tatsuo; Katoh, Y.; Munakata, Y. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Tokyo Women' s Medical Univ. (Japan)

    2001-10-01

    Intraosseous ganglia occur most frequently in the long bones of the lower limbs, particularly in the medial malleolus of the tibia. They usually appear as radiographically well circumscribed juxta-articular cystic lesions, containing myxoid fibrous tissue histologically. Intraosseous ganglia in the hand are very rare. Most reported cases have involved the carpal bones, in particular the lunate and scaphoid. To our knowledge, the present case is the third report of an intraosseous ganglion appearing in the first metacarpal bone; it arose in a patient who had been on dialysis for 25 years, mimicking amyloidosis of bone. (orig.)

  1. Symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cyst of the patellar tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Jean; O'Donnell, Kevin; Lesniak, Bryson

    2011-01-01

    Ganglion cysts have been previously described throughout the body, most commonly about the wrist, hand, knee, ankle, and feet. When symptomatic, they may interfere with joint mechanics, resulting in snapping, catching, and locking. Intratendinous ganglion cysts lack a synovial epithelial lining and are thought to develop from the mucoid degeneration of connective tissue caused by chronic irritation, chronic repetitive injury, and chronic ischemia. On magnetic resonance imaging, ganglion cysts originating from tendons, ligaments, tendon sheaths, menisci, or joint capsules appear as well-defined lobulated masses that follow simple or complex fluid signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with enhancing walls and internal septations on post-contrast images. There may be appreciable degeneration and partial tearing of the structure of origin, particularly if associated with tendons. On ultrasonography, they present as hypoechoic masses, with internal septations and lobulations of varying sizes, without significant vascularity on power or color Doppler sampling. A thin fluid neck extending from the structure of origin (tail sign), when present, is a reliable sign of a ganglion cyst. This article describes a sonographically guided technique to treat symptomatic ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon. Complete evacuation of the ganglion cyst, with disappearance of the tail sign, is considered the determining factor for a successful procedure. A similar technique can be used for the treatment of other symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts elsewhere in the body. To our knowledge, symptomatic intratendinous ganglion cysts within the patellar tendon and their treatment have not been previously reported. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  2. An Optimized Culture Method of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYin; CHENJing-Hong; GONGZe-Hui

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish a primary culture technique of acutely isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and provide a simple & useful in vitro model for study of analgesia. Methods: Acutely isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were planted and cultured; the configuration and growth characters of DRG neurons were observed through inverted microscope.

  3. Anterior cruciate ligament ganglion: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Pedrinelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A ganglion is a cystic formation close to joints or tendinous sheaths, frequently found in the wrist, foot or knee. Intra-articular ganglia of the knee are rare, and most of them are located in the anterior cruciate ligament. The clinical picture for these ganglia comprises pain and movement restrictions in the knee, causing significant impairment to the patient. Symptoms are non-specific, and anterior cruciate ligament ganglia are usually diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging or arthroscopy. Not all ganglia diagnosed through magnetic resonance imaging need to undergo surgical treatment: only those that cause clinical signs and symptoms do. Surgical results are considered good or excellent in the vast majority of cases. CASE REPORT: A 29-year-old male presented with pain in the left knee during a marathon race. Physical examination revealed limitation in the maximum range of knee extension and pain in the posterior aspect of the left knee. Radiographs of the left knee were normal, but magnetic resonance imaging revealed a multi-lobed cystic structure adjacent to the anterior cruciate ligament, which resembled a ganglion cyst. The mass was removed through arthroscopy, and pathological examination revealed a synovial cyst. Patient recovery was excellent, and he resumed his usual training routine five months later.

  4. Ganglion cyst associated with triangular fibrocartilage complex tear that caused ulnar nerve compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingol, Ugur Anil; Cinar, Can; Tasdelen, Neslihan

    2015-03-01

    Ganglions are the most frequently seen soft-tissue tumors in the hand. Nerve compression due to ganglion cysts at the wrist is rare. We report 2 ganglion cysts arising from triangular fibrocartilage complex, one of which caused ulnar nerve compression proximal to the Guyon's canal, leading to ulnar neuropathy. Ganglion cysts seem unimportant, and many surgeons refrain from performing a general hand examination.

  5. Stellate ganglion blockade for analgesia following upper limb surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, J G

    2012-01-31

    We report the successful use of a stellate ganglion block as part of a multi-modal postoperative analgesic regimen. Four patients scheduled for orthopaedic surgery following upper limb trauma underwent blockade of the stellate ganglion pre-operatively under ultrasound guidance. Patients reported excellent postoperative analgesia, with postoperative VAS pain scores between 0 and 2, and consumption of morphine in the first 24 h ranging from 0 to 14 mg. While these are preliminary findings, and must be confirmed in a clinical trial, they highlight the potential for stellate ganglion blockade to provide analgesia following major upper limb surgery.

  6. Ionic channel changes in glaucomatous retinal ganglion cells: multicompartment modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Matias I; Turpin, Andrew; McKendrick, Allison M; Kameneva, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    This research takes a step towards discovering underlying ionic channel changes in the glaucomatous ganglion cells. Glaucoma is characterized by a gradual death of retinal ganglion cells. In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that the ionic channel concentrations change during the progression of glaucoma. We use computer simulation of a multi-compartment morphologically correct model of a mouse retinal ganglion cell to verify our hypothesis. Using published experimental data, we alter the morphology of healthy ganglion cells to replicate glaucomatous cells. Our results suggest that in glaucomatous cell, the sodium channel concentration decreases in the soma by 30% and by 60% in the dendrites, calcium channel concentration decreases by 10% in all compartments, and leak channel concentration increases by 40% in the soma and by 100% in the dendrites.

  7. THE MODULATORY ROLE OF TAURINE IN RETINAL GANGLION CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zheng; Bulley, Simon; Guzzone, Joseph; Ripps, Harris; Shen, Wen

    2017-01-01

    Taurine (2-aminoethylsuphonic acid) is present in nearly all animal tissues, and is the most abundant free amino acid in muscle, heart, CNS and retina. Although it is known to be a major cytoprotectant and essential for normal retinal development, its role in retinal neurotransmission and modulation is not well understood. We investigated the response of taurine in retinal ganglion cells, and its effect on synaptic transmission between ganglion cells and their pre-synaptic neurons. We find that taurine-elicited currents in ganglion cells could be fully blocked by both strychnine and SR95531, glycine and GABAA receptor antagonists, respectively. This suggests that taurine-activated receptors might share the antagonists with GABA and glycine receptors. The effect of taurine at micromolar concentrations can effectively suppress spontaneous vesicle release from the pre-synaptic neurons, but had limited effects on light-evoked synaptic signals in ganglion cells. We also describe a metabotropic effect of taurine in the suppression of light-evoked response in ganglion cells. Clearly, taurine acts in multiple ways to modulate synaptic signals in retinal output neurons, ganglion cells. PMID:23392924

  8. Ultrastructure of the ganglion on human internal laryngeal nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, S; Shankar, S K; Manjunath, K Y; Devanathan, P H; Nityaseelan, N

    1994-01-01

    There is now definite evidence for the presence of a macroscopic ganglion on the human internal laryngeal nerve, with the distribution of its post-ganglionic fibres to the glands in the saccule and to the glands at the root of epiglottis in the vicinity of the opening of the saccule. This ganglion could be identified as early as 14 weeks in human foetal larynx, which contains immature neurons. Seven ganglia, dissected from human laryngectomy specimens and resected for carcinoma larynx, were studied by electron microscopy. Ultrastructurally, the neurons and the synaptic terminals had both small, round, luscent vesicles and dense core vesicles. Symmetrical, asymmetrical and electrical synaptic complexes were noted. A few neurons revealed degenerative changes suggestive of axotomy. The location of the ganglion on the internal laryngeal nerve, a branch of nervus vagus, and ultrastructural demonstration of large and small dense core vesicles and small luscent vesicles in the neurons of this ganglion, lead us to believe that the ganglion is parasympathetic in nature.

  9. Genetic Networks in Mouse Retinal Ganglion Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix L Struebing

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs are the output neuron of the eye, transmitting visual information from the retina through the optic nerve to the brain. The importance of RGCs for vision is demonstrated in blinding diseases where RGCs are lost, such as in glaucoma or after optic nerve injury. In the present study, we hypothesize that normal RGC function is transcriptionally regulated. To test our hypothesis, we examine large retinal expression microarray datasets from recombinant inbred mouse strains in GeneNetwork and define transcriptional networks of RGCs and their subtypes. Two major and functionally distinct transcriptional networks centering around Thy1 and Tubb3 (Class III beta-tubulin were identified. Each network is independently regulated and modulated by unique genomic loci. Meta-analysis of publically available data confirms that RGC subtypes are differentially susceptible to death, with alpha-RGCs and intrinsically photosensitive RGCs (ipRGCs being less sensitive to cell death than other RGC subtypes in a mouse model of glaucoma.

  10. The Grueneberg ganglion: a novel sensory system in the nose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Joerg; Breer, Heinz

    2010-07-01

    Within the nasal epithelium of mammals, there are several compartments which are populated with neuronal cells. One of them - the so-called Grueneberg ganglion - is composed of ciliated neurons residing in the anterior region of the nose. Although cells of the Grueneberg ganglion lack direct contact with the lumen of the nasal cavity, they are endowed with features indicative of olfactory sensory neurons, such as the olfactory marker protein and distinct olfactory receptors, as well as projection of axonal processes to the olfactory bulb of the brain. These findings have led to the notion that the Grueneberg ganglion might be a novel olfactory subsystem; a concept which was lately supported by the observation that chemical cues activate Grueneberg ganglion neurons. Unexpectedly, it was recently found that these cells also respond to cool ambient temperatures, presumably via a signaling pathway mediated by second messengers. Thus, the Grueneberg ganglion may operate as a dual sensory organ involved in the detection of both chemical and thermal stimuli.

  11. Effects of haloperidol and phentolamine on the crustacean cardiac ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlind, A

    2001-09-01

    Haloperidol (a dopamine D2 blocker in vertebrates) and phentolamine (an alpha-adrenergic blocker) alter the pattern of bursting by the isolated cardiac ganglion of the lobster when perfused at concentrations of 10(-6)-10(-5) mol/l. Both drugs decrease the frequency of bursting and increase burst duration. They are most effective in slowing the ganglion when applied selectively to the anterior ganglionic trunk, the same region of the ganglion where dopamine (DA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT) are most effective in speeding up bursting. When exogenous monoamine transmitters are applied in the presence of 3x10(-6) mol/l haloperidol, the effect of 5HT, but not of DA, is significantly reduced. At the same concentration, phentolamine does not suppress the actions of DA, 5HT or noradrenaline (NA). Both haloperidol and phentolamine significantly alter the properties of endogenous burst-organizing potentials (driver potentials) generated by motorneurons in the ganglion. It is possible that the effects of these drugs on bursting reflect alteration of endogenous electrical properties of the constituent neurons, rather than receptor antagonism.

  12. Ganglion cell death in glaucoma: from mice to men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickells, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    Glaucoma results from the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and their axons. Over the last 20 years several important advancements have been made in our understanding of the molecular pathology of this disease, particularly through the development of rat models of experimental glaucoma and the characterization of a spontaneous secondary form of glaucoma in DBA/2 substrains of inbred mice. One of these advances is the observation that ganglion cells die by apoptosis, an intrinsic molecular pathway of programmed cell death. An important aspect of this cell death process is the concept that these cells actually undergo compartmentalized self-destruction. Importantly, genetic evidence now suggests that axons die independently of the apoptotic program that executes the cell body or soma. This review briefly summarizes some of the most significant developments in glaucoma research, with respect to the process of ganglion cell degeneration.

  13. Imaging demonstration of fistulous gas communication between joint and ganglion of medial malleolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulier, B. [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Namur (Belgium); Devyver, B. [Orthopedic Surgery, Namur (Belgium); Hamels, J. [Institute of Pathology and Genetics, Gerpinnes (Belgium)

    2002-01-01

    We report an unusual demonstration of a fistulous gas communication between the ankle joint and ganglion of the medial malleolus. The imaging findings support the mechanical hypothesis for the genesis of intraosseous ganglion cysts. (orig.)

  14. Morphology, topography and cytoarchitectonics of the otic ganglion in Egyptian spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus, Desmarest).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczurkowski, A; Kuder, T; Nowak, E; Kuchinka, J

    2001-01-01

    Using the thiocholine method of Koelle and Friedenwald and histological techniques, the otic ganglion in Egyptian spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus, Desmarest) was studied. The ganglion was found to be a single oval cluster of neurocytes, situated at the medial and posterior surface of the mandibular nerve just above the maxillary artery. The ganglion is composed of typical ganglionic neurons in compact arrangement without a thick connective-tissue capsule.

  15. Ganglion Cyst Associated with Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear That Caused Ulnar Nerve Compression

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Summary: Ganglions are the most frequently seen soft-tissue tumors in the hand. Nerve compression due to ganglion cysts at the wrist is rare. We report 2 ganglion cysts arising from triangular fibrocartilage complex, one of which caused ulnar nerve compression proximal to the Guyon's canal, leading to ulnar neuropathy. Ganglion cysts seem unimportant, and many surgeons refrain from performing a general hand examination.

  16. Ganglion Cyst Associated with Triangular Fibrocartilage Complex Tear That Caused Ulnar Nerve Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Anil Bingol, MD

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ganglions are the most frequently seen soft-tissue tumors in the hand. Nerve compression due to ganglion cysts at the wrist is rare. We report 2 ganglion cysts arising from triangular fibrocartilage complex, one of which caused ulnar nerve compression proximal to the Guyonʼs canal, leading to ulnar neuropathy. Ganglion cysts seem unimportant, and many surgeons refrain from performing a general hand examination.

  17. Repeatability of Perimacular Ganglion Cell Complex Analysis with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Dorothy S. K.; Preeti Gupta; Yih Chung Tham; Chye Fong Peck; Tien Yin Wong; Mohammad Kamran Ikram; Cheung, Carol Y.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the repeatability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to measure macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses and compare retinal ganglion cell parameters between algorithms. Methods. Ninety-two nonglaucomatous eyes from 92 participants underwent macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thickness measurement using OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm and these measurements were repeated for 34 subjects. All subjects also had macular ganglion cell-in...

  18. A rare case of intraosseous ganglion of the triquetrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luben Stokov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Carpal intraosseous ganglia are one of the rarely seenpathologic conditions in the hand. In this report we presenta rare case of an intraosseous ganglion cyst in a16-year-old girl located in the triquetrum bone as an uncommoncause of wrist pain. Radiographic and magneticresonance imaging demonstrated the cystic lesion intothe triquetrum. The patient was successfully treated byexcision of the ganglion cyst and curettage of the bone.Clinical aspects, radiological findings and treatment modalitiesof this condition were briefly reviewed. J Clin ExpInvest 2012; 3(1: 111-112

  19. Compressive neuropathies related to ganglions of the wrist and hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakumar, Prakash; Jayaram, Vijay; Nairn, David S

    2014-01-01

    Ganglions of the wrist and hand causing compressive neuropathies are rare clinical entities. Compression of the ulnar and median nerves in their respective fibro-osseous tunnels lead to characteristic patterns of motor and/or sensory deficits, which are directly related to the location of the lesion. We present a unique case of a "dumbbell" shaped ganglion invading both Guyon's canal and the carpal tunnel causing a dual compressive neuropathy of the ulnar and median nerve. We discuss the patho-anatomy, clinical assessment, investigation and surgical treatment of this condition.

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  1. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Superior_Cervical_Ganglion [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

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  3. A Rare Cause of Compression Neuropathy of Upper Limbs – Ganglionic Cysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Yin Mak

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a 51-year-old Chinese male with a ganglion in the Guyon canal causing ulnar nerve palsy and a 54-year-old Chinese male with a ganglion in the elbow causing posterior interosseous nerve (PIN palsy. Exploration and excision of the ganglions were performed. Both patients made a good recovery.

  4. Repeatability of Perimacular Ganglion Cell Complex Analysis with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothy S. K. Ng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To assess the repeatability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to measure macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses and compare retinal ganglion cell parameters between algorithms. Methods. Ninety-two nonglaucomatous eyes from 92 participants underwent macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thickness measurement using OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm and these measurements were repeated for 34 subjects. All subjects also had macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness measured by Cirrus HD-OCT Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm. Intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson’s correlation analyses were performed. Results. Subfields of both macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses had high intraclass correlation coefficient values between 0.979 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.958–0.989 and 0.981 (95% CI: 0.963, 0.991 and between 0.70 (95% CI: 0.481–0.838 and 0.987 (95% CI: 0.956–0.989, respectively. The overall average ganglion cell complex and macular average ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thicknesses were strongly correlated (r=0.83, P<0.001.  Conclusions. The assessment of macular and perimacular retinal ganglion cell parameters by OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm is highly repeatable, and strongly correlates to retinal ganglion cell parameters assessed by Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm. A comprehensive evaluation of retinal ganglion cells may be possible with OCT-HS100.

  5. Ganglion cyst of the cruciate ligament with atlantoaxial subluxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ching-Yi; Lai, Hung-Yi; Lee, Shih-Tseng

    2013-10-01

    Ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligament are rare and sometimes asymptomatic. The authors present three cases of ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligament with atlantoaxial subluxation, which has rarely been reported previously. Generally, ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligament are reported as case reports. Several theories regarding the process of cyst formation and the development of treatment options have been described. However, trans-oral decompression with total removal of the cyst may be one of the options for treatment of this kind of disease. A retrospective review of three patients, two female and one male patient, with a mean age of 68 years was conducted. The operation performed was a trans-oral decompression with cyst removal for all patients. Clinical outcomes were evaluated after the operation. All patients underwent trans-oral decompression with total removal of the cyst, followed by posterior fusion and pathologic examination of the cyst, revealing myxoid stroma with an absence of synovial linings. The ganglion cysts and synovial cysts of the cruciate ligament are two different diseases with different presentation, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, and pathologic findings.

  6. Arthroscopic Treatment of Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of the Lunate Bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerlier, Alexandre; Gay, André-Mathieu; Levadoux, Michel

    2015-10-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cysts are rare causes of wrist pain. Surgical treatment of this pathologic condition yields good results and a low recurrence rate. The main complications are joint stiffness and vascular disturbances of the lunate bone. Wrist arthroscopy is a surgical technique that reduces the intra-articular operative area and therefore minimizes postoperative stiffness. This article describes an arthroscopic technique used for lunate intraosseous cyst resection associated with an autologous bone graft in a series of cases to prevent joint stiffness while respecting the scapholunate ligament. This study was based on a series of 4 patients, all of whom had wrist pain because of intraosseous ganglion cysts. Arthrosynovial cyst resection, ganglion curettage, and bone grafting were performed arthroscopically. Pain had totally disappeared within 2 months after the operation in 100% of patients. The average hand grip strength was estimated at 100% compared with the opposite side, and articular ranges of motion were the same on both sides in 100% of cases. No complications were reported after surgery. On the basis of these results, arthroscopic treatment of intraosseous synovial ganglion cysts seems to be more efficient and helpful in overcoming the limitations of classic open surgery in terms of complications.

  7. Vascular malformation (so-called hemangioma) of Scarpa's ganglion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardeschi, D; Dunnebier, EA; Sauvaget, E; Herman, P; Wassef, M; Huy, PTB

    2004-01-01

    Vascular malformations of the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA) arising from the capillary plexus surrounding Scarpa's ganglion are rare tumors. We report a case of so-called "hemangioma" of the CPA which was operated on via a trans-labyrinthine approach based on a preoperative diagnosis of vestibular s

  8. Bilateral ganglion cyst of the common peroneal nerve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrazzini, Massimo; Cusmano, Ferdinando; Armaroli, Sara; Pavone, Paolo [Institute of Radiology, University of Parma, Viale Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy); Pogliacomi, Francesco; Rinaldi, Elio [Institute of Clinical Orthopedics and Traumatology, University of Parma, Viale Gramsci 14, 43100 Parma (Italy)

    2002-11-01

    Ganglion cysts of the common peroneal nerve are rarely described in the literature and a bilateral lesion has not been previously reported. We present a case of a 41-year-old man with a bilateral cyst of the common peroneal nerve diagnosed with ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  9. Metrizamide demonstration of the subarachnoid space surrounding the Gasserian ganglion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christmann, D.; Babin, E.

    1980-05-01

    The chance opacification of the subarachnoid space surrounding the Gasserian ganglion, observed during metrizamide basal cisternography, is reported. This is compared to similar demonstrations of the optic subarachnoid space. Such infrequently observed images should be known because they may be related to the occurrence of trigeminal neuralgia.

  10. Vascular malformation (so-called hemangioma) of Scarpa's ganglion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernardeschi, D; Dunnebier, EA; Sauvaget, E; Herman, P; Wassef, M; Huy, PTB

    2004-01-01

    Vascular malformations of the cerebello-pontine angle (CPA) arising from the capillary plexus surrounding Scarpa's ganglion are rare tumors. We report a case of so-called "hemangioma" of the CPA which was operated on via a trans-labyrinthine approach based on a preoperative diagnosis of vestibular

  11. Processing of natural temporal stimuli by macaque retinal ganglion cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Rüttiger, L.; Lee, B.B.

    2002-01-01

    This study quantifies the performance of primate retinal ganglion cells in response to natural stimuli. Stimuli were confined to the temporal and chromatic domains and were derived from two contrasting environments, one typically northern European and the other a flower show. The performance of the

  12. Processing of natural temporal stimuli by macaque retinal ganglion cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hateren, J.H. van; Rüttiger, L.; Lee, B.B.

    2002-01-01

    This study quantifies the performance of primate retinal ganglion cells in response to natural stimuli. Stimuli were confined to the temporal and chromatic domains and were derived from two contrasting environments, one typically northern European and the other a flower show. The performance of the

  13. Neuropathy of motor branch of median or ulnar nerve induced by midpalm ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, N; Koshino, T; Nakazawa, A; Saito, T

    2001-05-01

    Two cases of neuropathy of a motor branch caused by a midpalmal ganglion are presented. In the first case the ganglion originated from the midcarpal joint, protruded into the thenar muscle, and compressed the motor branch of the median nerve. In the second case the ganglion, distal to the fibrous arch of the hypothenar muscles, originated from the third carpometacarpal joint and compressed the motor branch of the ulnar nerve. In both cases muscle weakness and finger deformity recovered well after resection of the ganglion. This clinical condition is rare compared with carpal tunnel syndrome and Guyon's tunnel syndrome, which are caused by a ganglion in the wrist.

  14. Retinal ganglion cell adaptation to small luminance fluctuations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel K; Graña, Gilberto; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2010-08-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells.

  15. Repeatability of Perimacular Ganglion Cell Complex Analysis with Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Dorothy S K; Gupta, Preeti; Tham, Yih Chung; Peck, Chye Fong; Wong, Tien Yin; Ikram, Mohammad Kamran; Cheung, Carol Y

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To assess the repeatability of spectral-domain optical coherence tomography to measure macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses and compare retinal ganglion cell parameters between algorithms. Methods. Ninety-two nonglaucomatous eyes from 92 participants underwent macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thickness measurement using OCT-HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm and these measurements were repeated for 34 subjects. All subjects also had macular ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thickness measured by Cirrus HD-OCT Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm. Intraclass correlation coefficient and Pearson's correlation analyses were performed. Results. Subfields of both macular and perimacular ganglion cell complex thicknesses had high intraclass correlation coefficient values between 0.979 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.958-0.989) and 0.981 (95% CI: 0.963, 0.991) and between 0.70 (95% CI: 0.481-0.838) and 0.987 (95% CI: 0.956-0.989), respectively. The overall average ganglion cell complex and macular average ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer thicknesses were strongly correlated (r = 0.83,  P HS100 Glaucoma 3D algorithm is highly repeatable, and strongly correlates to retinal ganglion cell parameters assessed by Ganglion Cell Analysis algorithm. A comprehensive evaluation of retinal ganglion cells may be possible with OCT-HS100.

  16. Regulation of molecular components of the synapse in the developing and adult rat superior cervical ganglion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, K.; Black, I.B.

    1987-12-01

    Rat superior cervical sympathetic ganglion was used to begin studying the regulation of molecular components of the synapse. Ganglionic postsynaptic densities (PSDs) exhibited a thin, disc-shaped profile electron microscopically, comparable to that described for brain. Moreover, the presumptive ganglionic PSD protein (PSDp) was phosphorylated in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/ and calmodulin, bound /sup 125/I-labeled calmodulin, and exhibited a M/sub r/ of 51,000 all characteristic of the major PSD protein of brain. These initial studies indicated that ganglionic PSDp and the major PSD protein of brain are comparable, allowing the study synaptic regulation in the well-defined superior cervical sympathetic ganglion. To obtain enough quantities of ganglionic PSDp, the authors used synaptic membrane fractions. During postnatal development, calmodulin binding to the ganglionic PSDp increased 411-fold per ganglion from birth to 60 days, whereas synaptic membrane protein increased only 4.5-fold. Consequently, different synaptic components apparently develop differently. Moreover, denervation of the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion in adult rats caused an 85% decrease in ganglionic PSDp-calmodulin binding, but denervation caused no change in synaptic membrane protein 2 weeks postoperatively. The observations suggest that presynaptic innervation selectively regulates specific molecular components of the postsynaptic membrane structure.

  17. Incomplete segregation of endorgan-specific vestibular ganglion cells in mice and rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maklad, A.; Fritzsch, B.

    1999-01-01

    The endorgan-specific distribution of vestibular ganglion cells was studied in neonatal and postnatal rats and mice using indocarbocyanine dye (DiI) and dextran amines for retrograde and anterograde labeling. Retrograde DiI tracing from the anterior vertical canal labeled neurons scattered throughout the whole superior vestibular ganglion, with denser labeling at the dorsal and central regions. Horizontal canal neurons were scattered along the dorsoventral axis with more clustering toward the dorsal and ventral poles of this axis. Utricular ganglion cells occupied predominantly the central region of the superior vestibular ganglion. This utricular population overlapped with both the anterior vertical and horizontal canals' ganglion cells. Posterior vertical canal neurons were clustered in the posterior part of the inferior vestibular ganglion. The saccular neurons were distributed in the two parts of the vestibular ganglion, the superior and inferior ganglia. Within the inferior ganglion, the saccular neurons were clustered in the anterior part. In the superior ganglion, the saccular neurons were widely scattered throughout the whole ganglion with more numerous neurons at the posterior half. Small and large neurons were labeled from all endorgans. Examination of the fiber trajectory within the superior division of the vestibular nerve showed no clear lamination of the fibers innervating the different endorgans. These results demonstrate an overlapping pattern between the different populations within the superior ganglion, while in the inferior ganglion, the posterior canal and saccular neurons show tighter clustering but incomplete segregation. This distribution implies that the ganglion cells are assigned for their target during development in a stochastic rather than topographical fashion.

  18. Taurine prevents ultraviolet B induced apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayang, Wu; Dongbo, Pang

    2017-06-07

    Compatible osmolytes accumulation is an active resistance response in retina under ultraviolet radiation and hypertonicity conditions. The purpose of this research is to investigate the protective role of taurine on retina under ultraviolet B radiation. Osmolytes transporters was measured by quantitative realtime PCR. Osmolytes uptake was estimated by radioimmunoassay. Cell viability was caculated by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry analysis. Hypertonicity accelerated osmolytes uptake into retinal ganglion cells including taurine, betaine and myoinositol. Ultraviolet B radiation increased osmolytes transporter expression and osmolytes uptake. In addition, osmolyte taurine remarkably prevented ultraviolet B radiation induced cell apoptosis in retinal ganglion cells. The effect of compatible osmolyte taurine on cell survival rate may play an important role in cell resistance and adaption to UVB exposure.

  19. High speed coding for velocity by archerfish retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kretschmer Viola

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Archerfish show very short behavioural latencies in response to falling prey. This raises the question, which response parameters of retinal ganglion cells to moving stimuli are best suited for fast coding of stimulus speed and direction. Results We compared stimulus reconstruction quality based on the ganglion cell response parameters latency, first interspike interval, and rate. For stimulus reconstruction of moving stimuli using latency was superior to using the other stimulus parameters. This was true for absolute latency, with respect to stimulus onset, as well as for relative latency, with respect to population response onset. Iteratively increasing the number of cells used for reconstruction decreased the calculated error close to zero. Conclusions Latency is the fastest response parameter available to the brain. Therefore, latency coding is best suited for high speed coding of moving objects. The quantitative data of this study are in good accordance with previously published behavioural response latencies.

  20. The functional diversity of retinal ganglion cells in the mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Tom; Berens, Philipp; Franke, Katrin; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Bethge, Matthias; Euler, Thomas

    2016-01-21

    In the vertebrate visual system, all output of the retina is carried by retinal ganglion cells. Each type encodes distinct visual features in parallel for transmission to the brain. How many such 'output channels' exist and what each encodes are areas of intense debate. In the mouse, anatomical estimates range from 15 to 20 channels, and only a handful are functionally understood. By combining two-photon calcium imaging to obtain dense retinal recordings and unsupervised clustering of the resulting sample of more than 11,000 cells, here we show that the mouse retina harbours substantially more than 30 functional output channels. These include all known and several new ganglion cell types, as verified by genetic and anatomical criteria. Therefore, information channels from the mouse eye to the mouse brain are considerably more diverse than shown thus far by anatomical studies, suggesting an encoding strategy resembling that used in state-of-the-art artificial vision systems.

  1. Retinal Ganglion Cell Loss in Diabetes Associated with Elevated Homocysteine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth S. Shindler

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available A number of studies have suggested that homocysteine may be a contributing factor to development of retinopathy in diabetic patients based on observed correlations between elevated homocysteine levels and the presence of retinopathy. The significance of such a correlation remains to be determined, and potential mechanisms by which homocysteine might induce retinopathy have not been well characterized. Ganapathy and colleagues1 used mutant mice that have endogenously elevated homocysteine levels due to heterozygous deletion of the cystathionine-β-synthase gene to examine changes in retinal pathology following induction of diabetes. Their finding that elevated homocysteine levels hastens loss of cells in the retinal ganglion cell layer suggests that toxicity to ganglion cells may warrant further investigation as a potential mechanism of homocysteine enhanced susceptibility to diabetic retinopathy.

  2. Intraosseous ganglion cyst of the lunate: A case report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohamed Ali Sbai; Sofien Benzarti; Monia Boussen; Hichem Msek; Riadh Maalla

    2016-01-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cyst of the carpal bones represents a rare cause of wrist pain.We report a case of a 42 year-old,right-handed female,who presented with pain of the right wrist following a fall on the palm of the hand.Clinical study revealed a moderate swelling over the mid-section of the palmar face and pain through extreme ranges of motion of the wrist.Plain radiographs and CT-scan of the wrist have revealed an intraosseous ganglion cyst of the lunate bone.Curetting-filling by Kuhlman's vascularized radial bone graft allowed a good functional recovery.The clinical,radiological and therapeutic aspects are discussed.

  3. Retrograde degeneration of retinal ganglion cells in homonymous hemianopsia

    OpenAIRE

    Herro AM; Lam BL

    2015-01-01

    Angela M Herro, Byron L Lam Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Background: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between topographic reduction in macular ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness as detected with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and visual field defects caused by ischemic occipital cortical injury.Methods: This study was a retrospective review of all pat...

  4. Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell function in relation to age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbst, Kristina; Sander, Birgit; Lund-Andersen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The activity of melanopsin containing intrinsically photosensitive ganglion retinal cells (ipRGC) can be assessed by a means of pupil responses to bright blue (appr.480 nm) light. Due to age related factors in the eye, particularly, structural changes of the lens, less light reaches retina. The aim...... of this study was to examine how age and in vivo measured lens transmission of blue light might affect pupil light responses, in particular, mediated by the ipRGC....

  5. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Froger; Lucia Cadetti; Henri Lorach; Joao Martins; Alexis-Pierre Bemelmans; Elisabeth Dubus; Julie Degardin; Dorothée Pain; Valérie Forster; Laurent Chicaud; Ivana Ivkovic; Manuel Simonutti; Stéphane Fouquet; Firas Jammoul; Thierry Léveillard

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was inc...

  6. Neurogenic inflammation: a study of rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kim Anker; Edvinsson, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is linked to neurogenic inflammation and to migraine. Activation of the trigeminovascular system plays a prominent role during migraine attacks with the release of CGRP. The trigeminal ganglion (TG) contains three main cell types: neurons, satellite glial...... inhibitor SP600125. This method may be of value to examine local TG inflammation, putatively involved in the pathophysiology of some forms of primary headaches....

  7. Ganglionic cysts related to the scapula: MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ae Kyeong; Kim, Sung Moon; Kim, Kyung Sook; Shin, Myung Jin; Chun, Jae Myeung [Ulsan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Joong Mo [Sungkyunkwan Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-07-01

    To evaluate the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging characteristics of ganglionic cysts related to the scapula. We retrospectively reviewed 15 ganglionic cysts diagnosed by MR imaging in 14 patients who subsequently underwent surgical excision (n=8) or needle aspiration (n=1). Five other patients whose lesion-related symptoms were not too severe to manage underwent conservative treatment. We analyzed MR findings with regard to the size, shape and presence of internal septa, the location and signal intensity of the lesion, and associated findings such as change of rotator cuff muscle, labral tear and bone erosion. We also evaluated the presence of tear of rotator cuff tendon, tendinosis, and subacromial enthesophyte. The diameter of ganglionic cysts was 0.5-5.5 (mean, 2.8)cm, and they were round (n=2), ovoid (n=6), or elongated (n=7). Where internal septa were present (n=13), cysts were lobulated. Lesions were located in both scapular and spinoglenoid notches (n=9), only in the scapular notch (n=2), only in the spinoglenoid notch (n=2) or within the bone (n=2). In eleven cases they were very close to the superoposterior aspect of the glenoid labrum (n=11). On T1-weighted images, all lesions were seen to be iso- or hypointense to muscle, while on T2-weighted images, they were hyperintense, resembling joint fluid (n=14), except in one patient with hemorrhage. Associated findings were edema of the infraspinatus muscle (n=4), pressure erosion of the scapular neck (n=1), and labral tear (n=1). A torn supraspinatus tendon (n=2), supraspinatus tendinosis (n=3), and subacromial enthesophyte (n=2) were also present. MR imaging was helpful in diagnosing ganglionic cysts and detecting associated lesions.

  8. Cultured Vestibular Ganglion Neurons Demonstrate Latent HSV1 Reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehm, Pamela C.; Camarena, Vladimir; Nayak, Shruti; Gardner, James B.; Wilson, Angus; Mohr, Ian; Chao, Moses V.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives/Hypothesis Vestibular neuritis is a common cause of both acute and chronic vestibular dysfunction. Multiple pathologies have been hypothesized to be the causative agent of vestibular neuritis; however, whether herpes simplex type I (HSV1) reactivation occurs within the vestibular ganglion has not been demonstrated previously by experimental evidence. We developed an in vitro system to study HSV1 infection of vestibular ganglion neurons (VGNs) using a cell culture model system. Study design basic science study. Results Lytic infection of cultured rat VGNs was observed following low viral multiplicity of infection (MOI). Inclusion of acyclovir suppressed lytic replication and allowed latency to be established. Upon removal of acyclovir, latent infection was confirmed with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction and by RNA fluorescent in situ hybridization for the latency-associated transcript (LAT). 29% cells in latently infected cultures were LAT positive. The lytic IPC27 transcript was not detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Reactivation of HSV1 occurred at a high frequency in latently infected cultures following treatment with trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deactylase inhibitor. Conclusions VGNs can be both lytically and latently infected with HSV1. Furthermore, latently infected VGNs can be induced to reactivate using TSA. This demonstrates that reactivation of latent HSV1 infection in the vestibular ganglion can occur in a cell culture model, and suggests that reactivation of HSV1 infection a plausible etiologic mechanism of vestibular neuritis. PMID:21898423

  9. Veratridine increases the survival of retinal ganglion cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.F. Pereira

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is an important phenomenon involving many biochemical pathways. This degenerative event has been studied to understand how the cells activate the mechanisms that lead to self-destruction. Target cells and afferent cells play a relevant role in the regulation of natural cell death. We studied the effect of veratridine (1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 µM on the survival of neonatal rat retinal ganglion cells in vitro. Veratridine (3.0 µM, a well-known depolarizing agent that opens the Na+ channel, promoted a two-fold increase in the survival of retinal ganglion cells kept in culture for 48 h. This effect was dose-dependent and was blocked by 1.0 µM tetrodotoxin (a classical voltage-dependent Na+ channel blocker and 30.0 µM flunarizine (a Na+ and Ca2+ channel blocker. These results indicate that electrical activity is also important for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell survival in vitro

  10. An unusual meniscal ganglion cyst that triggered recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Itokazu, Mansho; Ito, Yoshiki; Fukuta, Masashi; Simizu, Katsuji

    2006-04-01

    A 58-year-old woman suffered spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis of the knee. In the clinical course, pigmented villonodular synovitis was mostly suspected, but in arthroscopic surgery the lateral meniscus appeared to be upturned and stuck into the lateral pouch with the meniscal ganglion cyst. It was suggested that meniscal tear with meniscal ganglion cyst was related with recurrent hemarthrosis. Generally, both the meniscal ganglion cysts and spontaneous recurrent hemarthrosis are highly rare conditions. In this case, we speculated that a negligible power could induce the meniscal tear with recurrent hemarthrosis in the particular situation in which the meniscal ganglion cyst existed. In other words, the meniscal ganglion cyst might basically and physically relate with hemorrhagic condition. Arthroscopically, the meniscal ganglion cyst was removed together with the anterior segment of the lateral meniscus. Recurrent hemarthrosis was treated successfully by resection of the meniscus.

  11. Agmatine protects retinal ganglion cells from hypoxia-induced apoptosis in transformed rat retinal ganglion cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Chan

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Agmatine is an endogenous polyamine formed by the decarboxylation of L-arginine. We investigated the protective effects of agmatine against hypoxia-induced apoptosis of immortalized rat retinal ganglion cells (RGC-5. RGC-5 cells were cultured in a closed hypoxic chamber (5% O2 with or without agmatine. Cell viability was determined by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH assay and apoptosis was examined by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Expression and phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs; JNK, ERK p44/42, and p38 and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB were investigated by Western immunoblot analysis. The effects of agmatine were compared to those of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a well-known protective neurotrophin for retinal ganglion cells. Results After 48 hours of hypoxic culture, the LDH assay showed 52.3% cell loss, which was reduced to 25.6% and 30.1% when agmatine and BDNF were administered, respectively. This observed cell loss was due to apoptotic cell death, as established by annexin V and caspase-3 assays. Although total expression of MAPKs and NF-κB was not influenced by hypoxic injury, phosphorylation of these two proteins was increased. Agmatine reduced phosphorylation of JNK and NF-κB, while BDNF suppressed phosphorylation of ERK and p38. Conclusion Our results show that agmatine has neuroprotective effects against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage in RGC-5 cells and that its effects may act through the JNK and NF-κB signaling pathways. Our data suggest that agmatine may lead to a novel therapeutic strategy to reduce retinal ganglion cell injury related to hypoxia.

  12. Inhibition of BDNF-AS Provides Neuroprotection for Retinal Ganglion Cells against Ischemic Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Lifang; Zhang, Ziyin; Xie, Tianhua; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Dai, Tu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protects retinal ganglion cells against ischemia in ocular degenerative diseases. We aimed to determine the effect of BDNF-AS on the ischemic injury of retinal ganglion cells. Methods: The levels of BDNF and BDNF-AS were measured in retinal ganglion cells subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation. The lentiviral vectors were constructed to either overexpress or knock out BDNF-AS. The luciferase reporter gene assay was used to determine wh...

  13. The morphology, topography and cytoarchitectonics of the ciliary ganglion in the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo domesticus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radzimirska, Małgorzata

    2003-11-01

    The ciliary ganglion of the domestic turkey (Meleagris gallopavo domesticus) is located between the posterior wall of the eyeball and the optic nerve. It is closely connected with the oculomotor nerve; in particular with its inferior branch. The ganglion has a cask-like shape and is adjacent to the inferior branch of the oculomotor nerve. From this ganglion postganglionic fibres emerge which are arranged in two fasciculi. These are termed the long ciliary nerves and the short ciliary nerves. A cross-section of the ciliary ganglion revealed two populations of cells: small ones - choroid cells and large ones - ciliary cells.

  14. Large Ganglion Cyst with Unusual Location on the Back-A Case Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoellhammer, Liv; Nielsen, Thomas Wagner; Berg, Jais Oliver

    2016-01-01

    A ganglion cyst is a soft tissue tumor-like lesion filled with colloid material commonly located on the hand and wrist. We report a case of a large ganglion cyst with an unusual location on the back. The patient presented with a mass growing over 2 months measuring 11.2 × 4.7 × 7.2 cm on magnetic...... resonance imaging. Ultrasound and puncture was attempted twice without achieving drainage. After surgical removal, histologic examination diagnosed the tumor as a ganglion cyst. We conclude that when evaluating a subcutaneous soft tissue mass, regardless of localization, a ganglion cyst may...

  15. Retrograde degeneration of retinal ganglion cells in homonymous hemianopsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herro AM

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Angela M Herro, Byron L Lam Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA Background: The aim of this study was to demonstrate the relationship between topographic reduction in macular ganglion cell complex (GCC thickness as detected with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography and visual field defects caused by ischemic occipital cortical injury.Methods: This study was a retrospective review of all patients who presented to our eye institution between January 2012 and July 2014 with visual field defects secondary to ischemic cortical injury. The visual field defect pattern and mean deviation were analyzed. Retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and macular GCC were both assessed with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography. Patients with any ocular pathology that could affect these measurements were excluded. The topographic relationship of visual field defect to reduction in GCC was specifically analyzed. Results: Nine patients met the inclusion criteria. Their average age was 65 (57–73 years; eight were men and six had right hemianopsias. The laterality of the visual field defect was used to assign an affected and unaffected side of analysis for RNFL and GCC layer thickness. A right hemianopsia meant that the nasal fibers of the right eye and temporal fibers of the left eye were assigned as the “affected side”, and the temporal fibers of the right eye and nasal fibers of the left eye were assigned as “unaffected”. There was no statistically significant difference between affected and unaffected RNFL. However, there was a significant difference in GCC layer reduction between the affected and unaffected sides (P=0.029.Conclusion: There is evidence of retrograde trans-synaptic retinal ganglion cell loss in patients with homonymous hemianopsias from cortical visual impairment. This relationship is reflected in thinning of the GCC and maintains the topographic

  16. Cluster headache attack remission with sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barloese, Mads C J; Jürgens, Tim P; May, Arne

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cluster headache (CH) is a debilitating headache disorder with severe consequences for patient quality of life. On-demand neuromodulation targeting the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is effective in treating the acute pain and a subgroup of patients experience a decreased frequency of CH......, range 699-847) after insertion of an SPG microstimulator. Remission periods (attack-free periods exceeding one month, per the ICHD 3 (beta) definition) occurring during the 24-month study period were characterized. Attack frequency, acute effectiveness, medication usage, and questionnaire data were...

  17. Cystic Eccrine Spiradenoma of the Finger Mimicking a Ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid F. Jaber, MBChB

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We report a rare case of cystic eccrine spiradenoma in the finger. A 46-year-old man presented with a cystic mass in his left index finger. Clinical assessment along with the investigation pointed toward a diagnosis of a ganglion. However, excisional biopsy of the mass revealed histopathological findings of cystic eccrine spiradenoma. Very few cases of eccrine spiradenoma have been reported in the hand and none of them were cystic in consistency. We believe that this case will draw the surgeon’s attention to the possibility of unusual differential diagnoses in the evaluation and treatment of cystic lumps in the hand.

  18. Neurotoxicity of Quinolinic Acid to Spiral Ganglion Cells in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖红俊; 杨琛; 何圆圆; 郑娜

    2010-01-01

    Our study investigated the neurotoxicity of quinolinic acid(QA) to spiral ganglion cells(SGCs),observed the protective effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate(NMDA) receptor antagonist MK-801 and magnesium ions on the QA-induced injury to SGCs,and analyzed the role of QA in otitis media with effusion(OME)-induced sensorineural hearing loss(SNHL).After culture in vitro for 72 h,SGCs were exposed to different media and divided into 4 groups:the blank control group,the QA injury group,the MK-801 treatment group,and th...

  19. Ganglionic adrenergic action modulates ovarian steroids and nitric oxide in prepubertal rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Silvia Marcela; Casais, Marilina; Sosa, Zulema; Rastrilla, Ana María

    2006-08-01

    Both peripheral innervation and nitric oxide (NO) participate in ovarian steroidogenesis. The purpose of this work was to analyse the ganglionic adrenergic influence on the ovarian release of steroids and NO and the possible steroids/NO relationship. The experiments were carried out in the ex vivo coeliac ganglion-superior ovarian nerve (SON)-ovary system of prepubertal rats. The coeliac ganglion-SON-ovary system was incubated in Krebs Ringer-bicarbonate buffer in presence of adrenergic agents in the ganglionic compartment. The accumulation of progesterone, androstenedione, oestradiol and NO in the ovarian incubation liquid was measured. Norepinephrine in coeliac ganglion inhibited the liberation of progesterone and increased androstenedione, oestradiol and NO in ovary. The addition of alpha and beta adrenergic antagonists also showed different responses in the liberation of the substances mentioned before, which, from a physiological point of view, reveals the presence of adrenergic receptors in coeliac ganglion. In relation to propranolol, it does not revert the effect of noradrenaline on the liberation of progesterone, which leads us to think that it might also have a "per se" effect on the ganglion, responsible for the ovarian response observed for progesterone. Finally, we can conclude that the ganglionic adrenergic action via SON participates on the regulation of the prepubertal ovary in one of two ways: either increasing the NO, a gaseous neurotransmitter with cytostatic characteristics, to favour the immature follicles to remain dormant or increasing the liberation of androstenedione and oestradiol, the steroids necessary for the beginning of the near first estral cycle.

  20. Intra-tendinous ganglion in the long head of the biceps humeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Kenta; Akisue, Toshihiro; Fujimoto, Takuya; Kawamoto, Teruya; Hara, Hitomi; Kurosaka, Masahiro [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kobe (Japan); Hitora, Toshiaki; Yamamoto, Tetuji [Kagawa University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kita-gun, Kagawa (Japan)

    2008-03-15

    We present details of a case of intra-tendinous ganglion arising from the long head of the biceps at an unusual location. MRI scans have important implications for surgical planning and treatment. After excision of the ganglion, the tendon remaining could be repaired. Five months after surgery, there was no sign of recurrence. (orig.)

  1. Spiral Ganglion Stem Cells Can Be Propagated and Differentiated Into Neurons and Glia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, Veronika; Wagenblast, Jens; Arnhold, Stefan; Edge, Albert S. B.; Stöver, Timo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The spiral ganglion is an essential functional component of the peripheral auditory system. Most types of hearing loss are associated with spiral ganglion cell degeneration which is irreversible due to the inner ear's lack of regenerative capacity. Recent studies revealed the existence of stem cells in the postnatal spiral ganglion, which gives rise to the hope that these cells might be useful for regenerative inner ear therapies. Here, we provide an in-depth analysis of sphere-forming stem cells isolated from the spiral ganglion of postnatal mice. We show that spiral ganglion spheres have characteristics similar to neurospheres isolated from the brain. Importantly, spiral ganglion sphere cells maintain their major stem cell characteristics after repeated propagation, which enables the culture of spheres for an extended period of time. In this work, we also demonstrate that differentiated sphere-derived cell populations not only adopt the immunophenotype of mature spiral ganglion cells but also develop distinct ultrastructural features of neurons and glial cells. Thus, our work provides further evidence that self-renewing spiral ganglion stem cells might serve as a promising source for the regeneration of lost auditory neurons. PMID:24940560

  2. Functional profiles of SCN9A variants in dorsal root ganglion neurons and superior cervical ganglion neurons correlate with autonomic symptoms in small fibre neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chongyang; Hoeijmakers, Janneke G J; Liu, Shujun; Gerrits, Monique M; te Morsche, Rene H M; Lauria, Giuseppe; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Drenth, Joost P H; Faber, Catharina G; Merkies, Ingemar S J; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-09-01

    Patients with small fibre neuropathy typically manifest pain in distal extremities and severe autonomic dysfunction. However, occasionally patients present with minimal autonomic symptoms. The basis for this phenotypic difference is not understood. Sodium channel Na(v)1.7, encoded by the SCN9A gene, is preferentially expressed in the peripheral nervous system within sensory dorsal root ganglion and sympathetic ganglion neurons and their small diameter peripheral axons. We recently reported missense substitutions in SCN9A that encode functional Na(v)1.7 variants in 28% of patients with biopsy-confirmed small fibre neuropathy. Two patients with biopsy-confirmed small fibre neuropathy manifested minimal autonomic dysfunction unlike the other six patients in this series, and both of these patients carry the Na(v)1.7/R185H variant, presenting the opportunity to compare variants associated with extreme ends of a spectrum from minimal to severe autonomic dysfunction. Herein, we show by voltage-clamp that R185H variant channels enhance resurgent currents within dorsal root ganglion neurons and show by current-clamp that R185H renders dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable. We also show that in contrast, R185H variant channels do not produce detectable changes when studied by voltage-clamp within sympathetic neurons of the superior cervical ganglion, and have no effect on the excitability of these cells. As a comparator, we studied the Na(v)1.7 variant I739V, identified in three patients with small fibre neuropathy characterized by severe autonomic dysfunction as well as neuropathic pain, and show that this variant impairs channel slow inactivation within both dorsal root ganglion and superior cervical ganglion neurons, and renders dorsal root ganglion neurons hyperexcitable and superior cervical ganglion neurons hypoexcitable. Thus, we show that R185H, from patients with minimal autonomic dysfunction, does not produce detectable changes in the properties of

  3. Research of PES/PPG Compound Soft Polyurethane Emulsion and Coating%硅改性高固含量水性聚氨酯分散体的制备及性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫晓利; 张发兴

    2014-01-01

    以含硅的多元醇(PES)和聚醚二醇(PPG)为软链段,甲苯二异氰酸酯(TDI)和复合亲水扩链剂1,2-二羟基-3-丙磺酸钠( DHPS)和二羟甲基丙酸( DMPA)为硬链段,以γ-氨丙基三甲氧基硅烷(KH-540)作为封端剂,采用自乳化法制备了一系列高固含量有机硅/聚氨酯复合分散体(Si/PU)。分析了PES和PPG质量比和KH-540含量对分散体性能的影响。结果表明,所得分散体的粒径呈多元分布,乳胶粒子呈核壳结构。随着PES/PPG质量比和KH-540含量的增大,乳胶粒平均粒径增大,粒度分布变宽,固体质量分数基本能达到50%以上,粘度均小于400 mPa·s,当PES/PGG值为1∶3,KH-540质量分数为1%时,固体质量分数高达55�8%;另外,胶膜具有较好的表面性能。%A series high-solid-content polyurethane-silicone compound dispersions were prepared by self-emul-sification, which were modified with γ-aminopropyl methyldimethyoxysilane ( KH-540 ) as a blocking agent, the self-made silicon polyether (PES) and propylene oxide glycol(PPG)as soft segments, toluene diisocyanate(TDI) as hard segment, 1,2-dihydroxy-3-propanesulfonic acid salt(DHPS) and dimethylol propionic acid (DMPA)as hy-drophilic chain-extending agents. Influences of KH-540 content and weight ratio of PES and PPG on properties of polyurethane dispersions were analyzed. Results showed that the dispersions possessed characteristic of multivariate distribution and core-shell structure in particle size. With increasing of PES/PPG weight ratio and KH-540 content, polyurethane dispersions possessed higher average particles diameter, wider particle size distribution, solid content 50% and viscosity 400 mPa·s. When the weight ratio of PES and PPG was 1∶3 and KH-540 content was 1%, the solid content of dispersions was up to 55�8%. The film had good surface properties.

  4. Parasites in the thoracic ganglion of Pachygrapsus marmoratus (Brachyura: Grapsidae from the coast of Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuris A.M.

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined 149 marbled shore crabs, Pachygrapsus marmoratus, from the coast of Portugal for parasites. In particular, we focused our effort on the crab thoracic ganglion. The thoracic ganglion is the largest concentration of nervous tissue in a crab and thus, parasites associated with this organ are well situated to influence host behavior. We found metacercariae of two microphallid trematode species in the thoracic ganglion. We also found a microsporan and an apicomplexan associated with the thoracic ganglion. Other parasites not associated with the thoracic ganglion included gregarine trophozoites which were present in the digestive diverticulae in some of the crabs and the entoniscid isopod, Grapsion cavolini.Metacercariae of one of the trematodes (probably Microphallus pachygrapsi (Deblock and Prevot, may influence the mortality of its host.

  5. The circadian response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Zele

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC signal environmental light level to the central circadian clock and contribute to the pupil light reflex. It is unknown if ipRGC activity is subject to extrinsic (central or intrinsic (retinal network-mediated circadian modulation during light entrainment and phase shifting. Eleven younger persons (18-30 years with no ophthalmological, medical or sleep disorders participated. The activity of the inner (ipRGC and outer retina (cone photoreceptors was assessed hourly using the pupil light reflex during a 24 h period of constant environmental illumination (10 lux. Exogenous circadian cues of activity, sleep, posture, caffeine, ambient temperature, caloric intake and ambient illumination were controlled. Dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO was determined from salivary melatonin assay at hourly intervals, and participant melatonin onset values were set to 14 h to adjust clock time to circadian time. Here we demonstrate in humans that the ipRGC controlled post-illumination pupil response has a circadian rhythm independent of external light cues. This circadian variation precedes melatonin onset and the minimum ipRGC driven pupil response occurs post melatonin onset. Outer retinal photoreceptor contributions to the inner retinal ipRGC driven post-illumination pupil response also show circadian variation whereas direct outer retinal cone inputs to the pupil light reflex do not, indicating that intrinsically photosensitive (melanopsin retinal ganglion cells mediate this circadian variation.

  6. Intraneural ganglion cyst: a 200-year-old mystery solved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinner, Robert J; Vincent, Jean-François; Wolanskyj, Alexandra P; Scheithauer, Bernd W

    2008-10-01

    We describe the first reported case of an intraneural ganglion cyst, an ulnar ("cubital") intraneural cyst, which, on literature review, dated to 1810. For over 80 years, its original brief description by Beauchêne was wrongly attributed to Duchenne, effectively making the reference and specimen inaccessible to scrutiny. Fortunately, the intact cyst had been safely housed in the Musée Dupuytren, Paris, France, thus permitting its examination. Although originally described as a "serous" cyst, our present understanding of the anatomy of the ulnar nerve and of peripheral nerve pathology allowed us to reinterpret it as a mucin-filled, elbow-level, ulnar intraneural ganglion cyst. In addition to its description as a fusiform cystic enlargement of the nerve, we documented similar enlargement of a lumen-bearing branch, the articular branch at the level of the elbow. Based on our assessment of the specimen and with a modern perspective, we concluded that the origin of the cyst was from the postero-medial aspect of the elbow joint and that its fluid content, having dissected through a capsular defect, followed the path of the articular branch into the parent ulnar nerve. The purpose of this report is to clarify historical misconceptions regarding the pathogenesis of this controversial entity.

  7. The spiral ganglion and Rosenthal's canal in beluga whales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensor, Jennifer D; Suydam, Robert; George, John C; Liberman, M C; Lovano, Denise; Rhaganti, Mary Ann; Usip, Sharon; Vinyard, Christopher J; Thewissen, J G M

    2015-12-01

    With the increase of human activity and corresponding increase in anthropogenic sounds in marine waters of the Arctic, it is necessary to understand its effect on the hearing of marine wildlife. We have conducted a baseline study on the spiral ganglion and Rosenthal's canal of the cochlea in beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) as an initial assessment of auditory anatomy and health. We present morphometric data on the length of the cochlea, number of whorls, neuron densities along its length, Rosenthal's canal length, and cross-sectional area, and show some histological results. In belugas, Rosenthal's canal is not a cylinder of equal cross-sectional area, but its cross-section is greatest near the apex of the basal whorl. We found systematic variation in the numbers of neurons along the length of the spiral ganglion, indicating that neurons are not dispersed evenly in Rosenthal's canal. These results provide data on functionally important structural parameters of the beluga ear. We observed no signs of acoustic trauma in our sample of beluga whales. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Modeling the variability of firing rate of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, M W

    1992-12-01

    Impulse trains simulating the maintained discharges of retinal ganglion cells were generated by digital realizations of the integrate-and-fire model. If the mean rate were set by a "bias" level added to "noise," the variability of firing would be related to the mean firing rate as an inverse square root law; the maintained discharges of retinal ganglion cells deviate systematically from such a relationship. A more realistic relationship can be obtained if the integrate-and-fire mechanism is "leaky"; with this refinement, the integrate-and-fire model captures the essential features of the data. However, the model shows that the distribution of intervals is insensitive to that of the underlying variability. The leakage time constant, threshold, and distribution of the noise are confounded, rendering the model unspecifiable. Another aspect of variability is presented by the variance of responses to repeated discrete stimuli. The variance of response rate increases with the mean response amplitude; the nature of that relationship depends on the duration of the periods in which the response is sampled. These results have defied explanation. But if it is assumed that variability depends on mean rate in the way observed for maintained discharges, the variability of responses to abrupt changes in lighting can be predicted from the observed mean responses. The parameters that provide the best fits for the variability of responses also provide a reasonable fit to the variability of maintained discharges.

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  17. Association Between Regular Cannabis Use and Ganglion Cell Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitzer, Thomas; Schwan, Raymund; Albuisson, Eliane; Giersch, Anne; Lalanne, Laurence; Angioi-Duprez, Karine; Laprevote, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Because cannabis use is a major public health concern and cannabis is known to act on central neurotransmission, studying the retinal ganglion cells in individuals who regularly use cannabis is of interest. To determine whether the regular use of cannabis could alter the function of retinal ganglion cells in humans. For this case-control study, individuals who regularly use cannabis, as well as healthy controls, were recruited, and data were collected from February 11 to October 28, 2014. Retinal function was used as a direct marker of brain neurotransmission abnormalities in complex mental phenomena. Amplitude and implicit time of the N95 wave on results of pattern electroretinography. Twenty-eight of the 52 participants were regular cannabis users (24 men and 4 women; median age, 22 years [95% CI, 21-24 years]), and the remaining 24 were controls (20 men and 4 women; median age, 24 years [95% CI, 23-27 years]). There was no difference between groups in terms of age (P = .13) or sex (P = .81). After adjustment for the number of years of education and alcohol use, there was a significant increase for cannabis users of the N95 implicit time on results of pattern electroretinography (median, 98.6 milliseconds [95% CI, 93.4-99.5]) compared with controls (median, 88.4 milliseconds [95% CI, 85.0-91.1]), with 8.4 milliseconds as the median of the differences (95% CI, 4.9-11.5; P cannabis users and controls in their corresponding group. The positive predictive value was 78.6% (95% CI, 60.5%-89.8%), and the negative predictive value was 75.0% (95% CI, 55.1%-88.0%). Our results demonstrate a delay in transmission of action potentials by the ganglion cells in regular cannabis users, which could support alterations in vision. Our findings may be important from a public health perspective since they could highlight the neurotoxic effects of cannabis use on the central nervous system as a result of how it affects retinal processing.

  18. Temporomandibular Joint Ganglion Cyst: A Unique Case of Complete Resolution Following Subtotal Excision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levarek, Rachel E; Nolan, Patrick J

    2016-09-01

    Ganglion cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are a rare entity. Most often, ganglions present in anatomic regions, such as the hand, wrist, knee, foot, or ankle. Ganglion cysts are pseudocysts characterized by a fibrous connective tissue lining that lacks synovial cells and contains a thick gelatinous material. The etiology remains unclear, but might involve myxoid degeneration or softening of the collagen and connective tissue after long-term irritation and trauma. Ganglion cysts of the TMJ most commonly present as a swelling in the preauricular region, produce limited or no pain, and often have no effect on mouth opening. Because of the infrequent involvement of ganglion cysts with the TMJ and the nonspecific clinical presentation, the diagnosis is challenging. Diagnostic imaging tools, such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, have aided in diagnosis; however, only histopathologic examination will lead to a definitive diagnosis. The precise management of ganglion cysts of the TMJ remains uncertain owing to the uncommon appearance of these lesions. Treatment has focused on surgical excision without regard for lesion size or symptoms. This seems to be due to the decreased rate of recurrence after complete excision and microscopic examination providing the best method for a definitive diagnosis. This report describes a unique case of an 88-year-old woman with a large multilocular ganglion cyst of the right TMJ that completely resolved approximately 1.5 years after subtotal cystectomy. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Ganglion cell tumours in the sella turcica in close morphological connection with pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyja, Ewa; Maksymowicz, Maria; Grajkowska, Wiesława; Zieliński, Grzegorz; Kunicki, Jacek; Bonicki, Wiesław; Witek, Przemysław; Naganska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    Ganglion cell tumours in the sellar region are uncommon. They are usually associated with pituitary adenomas, while isolated ganglion cell neoplasms are extremely rare. We report the clinicopathological studies of five cases diagnosed as ganglion cell tumours located in the intrasellar region: four mixed/collision tumours composed of gangliocytoma and pituitary adenoma, and one isolated ganglioglioma unrelated to adenoma. Clinically, two patients presented with acromegaly, while three others were initially diagnosed as non-functioning adenomas. In four cases, the histopathological examination of surgical specimens revealed intermixed lesions composed of pituitary adenoma and ganglion cell elements. The adenomas appeared to secrete growth hormone. Electron microscopy enabled identification of the sparsely granulated somatotroph cells. Neoplastic neuronal lesions were composed of mature ganglion cells, including binucleate or multinucleate cells. In all cases, boundaries between adenomatous and gangliocytic components were not clearly demarcated, and numerous gangliocytic cells were closely intermingled with adenomatous tissue. One case lacked endocrine symptoms, and no pituitary adenoma was identified in the surgically excised material; it was finally diagnosed as low-grade ganglioglioma. The etiopathogenesis of ganglion cell neoplasms in the sellar region is not clearly defined. Our study revealed that if ganglion cell neoplasms were combined with adenoma, both neoplastic components were closely related to each other, and numerous neuronal elements were strictly intermingled with adenoma cells. Such a tissue pattern indicates that these neoplastic changes, including their common respective etiopathogeneses, are closely related. The identification of both components in sellar regions may have some nosological implications.

  20. Contrast Adaptation Decreases Complexity in Retinal Ganglion Cell Spike Train

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Guang-Li; HUANG Shi-Yong; ZHANG Ying-Ying; LIANG Pei-Ji

    2007-01-01

    @@ The difference in temporal structures of retinal ganglion cell spike trains between spontaneous activity and firing activity after contrast adaptation is investigated. The Lempel-Ziv complexity analysis reveals that the complexity of the neural spike train decreases after contrast adaptation. This implies that the behaviour of the neuron becomes ordered, which may carry relevant information about the external stimulus. Thus, during the neuron activity after contrast adaptation, external information could be encoded in forms of some certain patterns in the temporal structure of spike train that is significantly different, compared to that of the spike train during spontaneous activity, although the firing rates in spontaneous activity and firing activity after contrast adaptation are sometime similar.

  1. Stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion in intractable cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgens, Tim P; Schoenen, Jean; Rostgaard, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OVERVIEW: Chronic cluster headache (CCH) is a debilitating headache disorder with a significant impairment of the patients' lives. Within the past decade, various invasive neuromodulatory approaches have been proposed for the treatment of CCH refractory to standard preventive drug......, but only very few randomized controlled studies exist in the field of neuromodulation for the treatment of drug-refractory headaches. Based on the prominent role of the cranial parasympathetic system in acute cluster headache attacks, high-frequency sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) stimulation has been shown...... patients and the first commercially available CE-marked SPG neurostimulator system has been introduced for cluster headache, patient selection and care should be standardized to ensure maximal efficacy and safety. As only limited data have been published on SPG stimulation, standards of care based...

  2. Imaging of compound palmar ganglion with pathologic correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sourav Talukder

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Compound palmar ganglion, or chronic flexor tenosynovitis, most commonly of tuberculousorigin, is a rare extrapulmonary manifestation of tuberculosis (TB. The flexor synovialsheath is not a common site for TB but, once involved, causes rapid involvement of all flexortendons. We discuss the case of a 70-year-old farmer who presented to us with pain and progressive swelling of the palmar aspect of the wrist. On clinical examination, swelling both above and below the proximal wrist crease was found, with positive cross-fluctuation. Onultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, features suggestive of compound palmarganglion were present. The patient underwent surgical resection (extensive tenosynovectomyand chemotherapy. Post-operative histopatholgical findings correlated with the radiological features.

  3. Morphology, dendritic field size, somal size, density, and coverage of M and P retinal ganglion cells of dichromatic Cebus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, E S; Silveira, L C; Perry, V H

    1996-01-01

    Male Cebus monkeys are all dichromats, but about two thirds of the females are trichromats. M and P retinal ganglion cells were studied in the male Cebus monkey to investigate the relationship of their morphology to retinal eccentricity. Retinal ganglion cells were retrogradely labeled after optic nerve deposits of biocytin to reveal their entire dendritic tree. Cebus M and P ganglion cell morphology revealed by biocytin retrograde filling is similar to that described for macaque and human M and P ganglion cells obtained by in vitro intracellular injection of HRP and neurobiotin. We measured 264 and 441 M and P ganglion cells, respectively. M ganglion cells have larger dendritic field and cell body size than P ganglion cells at any comparable temporal or nasal eccentricity. Dendritic trees of both M and P ganglion cells are smaller in the nasal than in the temporal region at eccentricities greater than 5 mm and 2 mm for M and P ganglion cells, respectively. The depth of terminal dendrites allows identification of both inner and outer subclasses of M and P ganglion cells. The difference in dendritic tree size between inner and outer cells is small or absent. Comparison between Cebus and Macaca shows that M and P ganglion cells have similar sizes in the central retinal region. The results support the view that M and P pathways are similarly organized in diurnal dichromat and trichromat primates.

  4. Dynamic Range of Vertebrate Retina Ganglion Cells: Importance of Active Dendrites and Coupling by Electrical Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publio, Rodrigo; Ceballos, Cesar Celis; Roque, Antonio C.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate retina has a very high dynamic range. This is due to the concerted action of its diverse cell types. Ganglion cells, which are the output cells of the retina, have to preserve this high dynamic range to convey it to higher brain areas. Experimental evidence shows that the firing response of ganglion cells is strongly correlated with their total dendritic area and only weakly correlated with their dendritic branching complexity. On the other hand, theoretical studies with simple neuron models claim that active and large dendritic trees enhance the dynamic range of single neurons. Theoretical models also claim that electrical coupling between ganglion cells via gap junctions enhances their collective dynamic range. In this work we use morphologically reconstructed multi-compartmental ganglion cell models to perform two studies. In the first study we investigate the relationship between single ganglion cell dynamic range and number of dendritic branches/total dendritic area for both active and passive dendrites. Our results support the claim that large and active dendrites enhance the dynamic range of a single ganglion cell and show that total dendritic area has stronger correlation with dynamic range than with number of dendritic branches. In the second study we investigate the dynamic range of a square array of ganglion cells with passive or active dendritic trees coupled with each other via dendrodendritic gap junctions. Our results suggest that electrical coupling between active dendritic trees enhances the dynamic range of the ganglion cell array in comparison with both the uncoupled case and the coupled case with cells with passive dendrites. The results from our detailed computational modeling studies suggest that the key properties of the ganglion cells that endow them with a large dynamic range are large and active dendritic trees and electrical coupling via gap junctions. PMID:23144767

  5. Dynamic range of vertebrate retina ganglion cells: importance of active dendrites and coupling by electrical synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Publio, Rodrigo; Ceballos, Cesar Celis; Roque, Antonio C

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate retina has a very high dynamic range. This is due to the concerted action of its diverse cell types. Ganglion cells, which are the output cells of the retina, have to preserve this high dynamic range to convey it to higher brain areas. Experimental evidence shows that the firing response of ganglion cells is strongly correlated with their total dendritic area and only weakly correlated with their dendritic branching complexity. On the other hand, theoretical studies with simple neuron models claim that active and large dendritic trees enhance the dynamic range of single neurons. Theoretical models also claim that electrical coupling between ganglion cells via gap junctions enhances their collective dynamic range. In this work we use morphologically reconstructed multi-compartmental ganglion cell models to perform two studies. In the first study we investigate the relationship between single ganglion cell dynamic range and number of dendritic branches/total dendritic area for both active and passive dendrites. Our results support the claim that large and active dendrites enhance the dynamic range of a single ganglion cell and show that total dendritic area has stronger correlation with dynamic range than with number of dendritic branches. In the second study we investigate the dynamic range of a square array of ganglion cells with passive or active dendritic trees coupled with each other via dendrodendritic gap junctions. Our results suggest that electrical coupling between active dendritic trees enhances the dynamic range of the ganglion cell array in comparison with both the uncoupled case and the coupled case with cells with passive dendrites. The results from our detailed computational modeling studies suggest that the key properties of the ganglion cells that endow them with a large dynamic range are large and active dendritic trees and electrical coupling via gap junctions.

  6. FTY720 protects retinal ganglion cells in experimental glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Li, Jonathan C; Al-Adawy, Nadia; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2014-04-17

    To investigate the neuroprotective effects of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) analogue fingolimod (FTY720) in experimental glaucoma in rats. A unilateral chronic ocular hypertensive model was established by injections of microbeads into the anterior eye chamber of adult Sprague-Dawley rats. Fingolimod was administered to one group of rats intraperitoneally every week for 3 months. The scotopic threshold response (STR) was recorded to assess the function of the inner retina. Changes in cell density in the ganglion cell layer (GCL) were evaluated by hematoxylin and eosin staining on retinal sections and axonal count of the optic nerve was performed using Bielschowsky's silver staining. Effects of drug treatment on activation of Akt and Erk1/2 were evaluated using Western blotting by assessing phosphorylation levels of these proteins. The expression of S1P receptors in the optic nerve head region was also evaluated using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Administration of FTY720 reduced the loss of STR amplitude in glaucomatous eyes (P < 0.05). Counting and plotting the cell numbers/axonal density showed significant neural preservation in the GCL and the optic nerve (P < 0.05). An increased phosphorylation level of Akt and Erk1/2 following FTY720 administration was observed. Both S1P1 and S1P5 receptors were found to be expressed in the retina and the expression of S1P1R was upregulated in experimentally-induced glaucoma. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that FTY720 could act as a neuroprotective agent to protect retinal ganglion cells in experimental glaucoma. Administration of this drug significantly reduces the structural and functional loss of the inner retina elicited indicating that it may potentially be used to attenuate neuronal loss and optic nerve damage in glaucomatous patients. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  7. Inhibitory masking controls the threshold sensitivity of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Feng; Toychiev, Abduqodir; Zhang, Yi; Atlasz, Tamas; Ramakrishnan, Hariharasubramanian; Roy, Kaushambi; Völgyi, Béla; Akopian, Abram; Bloomfield, Stewart A

    2016-11-15

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in dark-adapted retinas show a range of threshold sensitivities spanning ∼3 log units of illuminance. Here, we show that the different threshold sensitivities of RGCs reflect an inhibitory mechanism that masks inputs from certain rod pathways. The masking inhibition is subserved by GABAC receptors, probably on bipolar cell axon terminals. The GABAergic masking inhibition appears independent of dopaminergic circuitry that has been shown also to affect RGC sensitivity. The results indicate a novel mechanism whereby inhibition controls the sensitivity of different cohorts of RGCs. This can limit and thereby ensure that appropriate signals are carried centrally in scotopic conditions when sensitivity rather than acuity is crucial. The responses of rod photoreceptors, which subserve dim light vision, are carried through the retina by three independent pathways. These pathways carry signals with largely different sensitivities. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), the output neurons of the retina, show a wide range of sensitivities in the same dark-adapted conditions, suggesting a divergence of the rod pathways. However, this organization is not supported by the known synaptic morphology of the retina. Here, we tested an alternative idea that the rod pathways converge onto single RGCs, but inhibitory circuits selectively mask signals so that one pathway predominates. Indeed, we found that application of GABA receptor blockers increased the sensitivity of most RGCs by unmasking rod signals, which were suppressed. Our results indicate that inhibition controls the threshold responses of RGCs under dim ambient light. This mechanism can ensure that appropriate signals cross the bottleneck of the optic nerve in changing stimulus conditions. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  8. Hypoxia-ischemia and retinal ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charanjit Kaur

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Charanjit Kaur1, Wallace S Foulds2, Eng-Ang Ling11Department of Anatomy, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Singapore Eye Research Institute, SingaporeAbstract: Retinal hypoxia is the potentially blinding mechanism underlying a number of sight-threatening disorders including central retinal artery occlusion, ischemic central retinal vein thrombosis, complications of diabetic eye disease and some types of glaucoma. Hypoxia is implicated in loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs occurring in such conditions. RGC death occurs by apoptosis or necrosis. Hypoxia-ischemia induces the expression of hypoxia inducible factor-1α and its target genes such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF and nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Increased production of VEGF results in disruption of the blood retinal barrier leading to retinal edema. Enhanced expression of NOS results in increased production of nitric oxide which may be toxic to the cells resulting in their death. Excess glutamate release in hypoxic-ischemic conditions causes excitotoxic damage to the RGCs through activation of ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors. Activation of glutamate receptors is thought to initiate damage in the retina by a cascade of biochemical effects such as neuronal NOS activation and increase in intracellular Ca2+ which has been described as a major contributing factor to RGC loss. Excess production of proinflammatory cytokines also mediates cell damage. Besides the above, free-radicals generated in hypoxic-ischemic conditions result in RGC loss because of an imbalance between antioxidant- and oxidant-generating systems. Although many advances have been made in understanding the mediators and mechanisms of injury, strategies to improve the damage are lacking. Measures to prevent neuronal injury have to be developed.Keywords: retinal hypoxia, retinal ganglion cells, glutamate receptors, neuronal injury, retina

  9. Yoga induced acute ulnar nerve compression by a ganglion cyst in Guyon's canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horner, Liana; Edelsohn, Lanny; Gakhal, Mandip

    2013-12-01

    Acute ulnar neuropathy at the wrist can be difficult to diagnose, as it is an uncommon neuropathy with variable clinical presentations and numerous etiologies. We present a case of acute ulnar neuropathy of the deep motor branch caused by a ganglion cyst in Guyon's canal. Interestingly, this case of acute loss of motor function occurred after the patient participated in yoga (specifically the downward dog position), and resolved spontaneously over time after stopping yoga, without surgical excision of the ganglion, suggesting exacerbation or protrusion of an occult ganglion cyst due to increased activity and compression of the hypothenar eminence.

  10. Prevalencia de sífilis en mujeres gestantes atendidas por el Programa de Protección a la Gestante (PPG y reporte de aborto en el Estado de Sergipe, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Saab

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: La sífilis ha representado un importante reto para la salud pública en Brasil, tanto por su alta prevalencia como por las graves secuelas neonatales. Objetivo: Determinar la prevalencia de infección por sífilis y la aparición de abortos involuntarios en mujeres embarazadas, por edad y distribución espacial en el estado de Sergipe en Brasil. Metodología: Estudio transversal descriptivo-retrospectivo, en el que se analizaron 39.807 registros de usuarias del Programa de Protección a la Gestante (PPG ofrecido en 73 municipios en el estado de Sergipe, en un período aproximado de dos años. Resultados: Fueron seleccionadas 39.807 gestantes, de las cuales 7.538 (18,9% reportaron haber abortado, 544 (1,37% fueron halladas con sífilis positiva y 192 (0,48% presentaron sífilis positiva y reporte de aborto. La proporción aumentó de 25,7% de mujeres que abortaron y tuvieron cualquier tipo de alteración (HIV, HTLV, Chagas, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Clamidia, Toxoplasmosis, Rubéola, Citomegalovirus, Hipotiroidismo congénito e Fenilcetonuria materna a 35,3% en mujeres que abortaron y presentaron confirmación de sífilis positiva, representando un aumento de 1,37 veces de los casos. El Municipio de Carmópolis tuvo el mayor porcentaje de casos con 2,19%, seguido de Malhador con un 1.30%, Malhada dos Bois con 1.16%, Estância con 1.15%, Barra dos Coqueiros con 1.14%, Santa Luzia do Itanhy con 1,04% y Pedrinhas con un 1,00%. Conclusión: Se verificó que en la mayoría de los municipios fue elevado el número de registros de abortos involuntarios en mujeres gestantes. La prevalencia gestacional de sífilis fue superior a la aceptada por la Organización Mundial de la Salud (OMS. Por medio del PPG se verificó que la sífilis continúa siendo un importante problema de salud durante la gestación, y que las mujeres con sífilis presentan una mayor frecuencia de abortos.

  11. The antibiotic neomycin abolishes directional selectivity in rabbit retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, R J

    1996-12-01

    1. Extracellular recordings from ON/OFF directionally selective ganglion cells in superfused rabbit retinas were made to study the effect of the aminoglycoside antibiotic, neomycin, on the responses of these cells to a moving light stimulus. 2. Neomycin, at 480-800 microM, reversibly abolished the directional selectivity in these ganglion cells by bringing out a response to movement in one ("null") direction that was similar in magnitude to the response to movement in the reverse ("preferred") direction. 3. Gentamicin, streptomycin, and tobramycin were also able to abolish directional selectivity in these ganglion cells but only at concentrations greater than 1000 microM. 4. It is proposed that neomycin abolishes directional selectivity in rabbit retinal ganglion cells by blocking omega-conotoxin MVIIC-sensitive Ca2+ channels in the retina.

  12. Population activity changes during a trial-to-trial adaptation of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wei; Xiao, Lei; Jing, Wei; Zhang, Pu-Ming; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2014-07-09

    A 'trial-to-trial adaptation' of bullfrog retinal ganglion cells in response to a repetitive light stimulus was investigated in the present study. Using the multielectrode recording technique, we studied the trial-to-trial adaptive properties of ganglion cells and explored the activity of population neurons during this adaptation process. It was found that the ganglion cells adapted with different degrees: their firing rates were decreased in different extents from early-adaptation to late-adaptation stage, and this was accompanied by a decrease in cross-correlation strength. In addition, adaptation behavior was different for ON-response and OFF-response, which implied that the mechanism of the trial-to-trial adaptation might involve bipolar cells and/or their synapses with other neurons and the stronger adaptation in the ganglion cells' OFF-responses might reflect the requirement to avoid possible saturation in the OFF circuit.

  13. A Guyon's canal ganglion presenting as occupational overuse syndrome: A case report.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chan, Jeffrey C Y

    2008-01-01

    Occupational overuse syndrome (OOS) can present as Guyon\\'s canal syndrome in computer keyboard users. We report a case of Guyon\\'s canal syndrome caused by a ganglion in a computer user that was misdiagnosed as OOS.

  14. Intraosseous Ganglion Cyst of Scaphoid: An Uncommon Cause of Radial Wrist Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salunke, Abhijeet Ashok; Singh, Saranjeet; Kanani, Himanshu; Chokshi, Jimmy; Nambi, G I; Raval, Pradyumna; Vala, Pathik; Jain, Shantanu; Chaudhari, Sanjay; Patel, Amit; Panchal, Ramesh

    2016-02-01

    Intraosseous ganglion cyst is a rare bone tumor and the lesion could often be missed. The diagnosis could be delayed so proper radiologic investigation and index of suspicion is necessary .Differential diagnoses of painful cystic radiolucent carpal lesion are osteoid osteoma, osteoblastoma and intraosseous ganglion. Curettage of the scaphoid lesion and filling of void with bone graft provides good functional outcomes. The cyst contains mucoid viscous material without epithelial or synovial lining. We present a case of 30 years old male with intraosseous ganglion cyst of scaphoid which was treated with curettage and bone grafting. Rarely ganglion cyst is found in small bones of hand and should be considered as differential diagnosis of chronic radial wrist pain.

  15. Retinal ganglion cells of high cytochrome oxidase activity in the rat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JENLS; CHAURMW

    1990-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells in the rat were studied using the heavy metal intensified cytochrome oxidase and horseradish peroxidase histochemical methods.The results show that a population of large retinal ganglion cells was consistently observed with the cytochrome oxidase staining method in retinas of normal rats or rats which received unilateral thalamotomy at birth.These cytochrome oxidase rich ganglion cells appeared to have large somata,3-6 primary dendrites and extensive dendritic arbors,and are comparable to ganglion cells labeled by the wheat germ agglutinin conjugated to horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP).However,the morphological details of some of the cells revealed by the cytochrome oxidase staining method are frequently better than those shown by the HRP histochemical method.These results suggest that the mitochondrial enzyme cytochrome oxidase can be used as a simple but reliable marker for identifying and studying a population of retinal genglion cells with high metabolic rate in the rat.

  16. Effects of ganglion blocking agents on nicotine extensor convulsions and lethality in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aceto, M. D.; Bentley, H. C.; Dembinski, J. R.

    1969-01-01

    1. The ganglion blocking agents, chlorisondamine, pentamethonium, mecamylamine, decamethonium and hexamethonium all block nicotine extensor convulsions when administered intraventricularly in mice. Tetraethylammonium was inactive. 2. For the intraventricular route, there is a relationship between ganglionic blocking potency and blocking of nicotine extensor convulsions. Indirect evidence suggests that the site(s) of action of nicotine extensor convulsions and lethality is central in origin and associated with brain areas near the ventricles. 3. When ganglion blocking agents are given orally, subcutaneously or intravenously varying degrees of protection can be observed probably depending on factors such as whether or not the drugs cross the blood-brain barrier, absorption, etc., and the effectiveness in protecting mice from nicotine is not related to ganglionic blocking potency. 4. Atropine and morphine given intraventricularly or subcutaneously did not protect mice from the LD95 of nicotine. Chlorpromazine gave very erratic results and phenobarbitone was effective subcutaneously and to a lesser extent intraventricularly. PMID:4390479

  17. Intraneural ganglion cyst of the ulnar nerve in an unusual location: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öztürk, Ufuk; Salduz, Ahmet; Demirel, Mehmet; Pehlivanoğlu, Tuna; Sivacioğlu, Sevan

    2017-01-01

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are benign, mucinous, non-neoplastic lesions of the peripheral nerves. While the most common location of intraneural ganglion cysts is the ulnar nerve and its branches, intraneural ganglion cyst involving the superficial branch of the ulnar nerve has not yet been reported. A-25-year-old woman presented with pain and a palpable mass in the hypothenar region of the volar side of her right hand. Her neuromuscular examination was normal. The pain was unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. After confirming with imaging modalities, the initial diagnosis was considered as an intraneural ganglion cyst arising from superficial ulnar nerve. Excision of the ganglion and exploration of the articular branch (if seen in operation) decision was undertaken by the senior author. Whether MRI or intraoperative exploration, not identified an articular branch. Intraneural ganglion cysts of peripheral nerves may be seen in miscellaneous locations in the body. However, to our knowledge, an intraneural ganglion cyst involving the superficial branch of the ulnar nerve is unique. While a variety of theories have been proposed to enlighten the etiopathogenesis of intraneural ganglia, the latest and most affirmed is the unifying articular (synovial) theory. Intraneural ganglion cysts may be seen on the hypothenar side of the palm. The etiology and treatment of choice are closely associated with each other in this rare disorder. It is important to realize a related articular branch, otherwise the origin of cyst formation remains, and this may cause other para-articular cysts. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. Cell type-specific bipolar cell input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, S; Hüser, L; Ondreka, K; Auler, N; Haverkamp, S

    2016-03-01

    Many distinct ganglion cell types, which are the output elements of the retina, were found to encode for specific features of a visual scene such as contrast, color information or movement. The detailed composition of retinal circuits leading to this tuning of retinal ganglion cells, however, is apart from some prominent examples, largely unknown. Here we aimed to investigate if ganglion cell types in the mouse retina receive selective input from specific bipolar cell types or if they sample their synaptic input non-selectively from all bipolar cell types stratifying within their dendritic tree. To address this question we took an anatomical approach and immunolabeled retinae of two transgenic mouse lines (GFP-O and JAM-B) with markers for ribbon synapses and type 2 bipolar cells. We morphologically identified all green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ganglion cell types, which co-stratified with type 2 bipolar cells and assessed the total number of bipolar input synapses and the proportion of synapses deriving from type 2 bipolar cells. Only JAM-B ganglion cells received synaptic input preferentially from bipolar cell types other than type 2 bipolar cells whereas the other analyzed ganglion cell types sampled their bipolar input most likely from all bipolar cell terminals within their dendritic arbor.

  19. Caspase-dependent retinal ganglion cell apoptosis in the rat model of acute diabetes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Background Neural apoptosis is generally believed to be mediated by two distinct pathways, caspase-dependant and caspase-independent pathways. This study investigated the apoptotic pathways involved in retinal ganglion ceils in acute diabetes in rats. Methods Diabetes was induced in male Wistar rats by a peritoneal injection of streptozotocin (STZ). Expression and localization of caspase-3 and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) proteins in the retina of diabetic rats was examined by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analyses. Terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and immunofluorescent staining specific for caspase-3 and AIF were applied to analyze for apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells. In addition, a caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-CHO was injected intravitreally to further determine the apoptotic pathways of retinal ganglion cells triggered in acute diabetes. Results Two weeks after induction of diabetes, a significant increase in caspase-3 protein expression and localization occurred in the nerve fiber layer, ganglion cell layer, and inner plexiform layer of the retina. Four weeks after the onset of diabetes, the increase in caspase-3 expression was profound eight weeks postinduction of diabetes (P<0.05). Meanwhile, no AIF protein expression was detected in this study. In addition, intravitreal administration of the caspase-3 inhibitor DEVD-CHO reduced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells by its direct inhibitory action on caspase-3. Conclusion Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathways may be the main stimulant of STZ-induced retinal ganglion cell apoptosis in acute diabetes.

  20. Characteristics of sodium currents in rat geniculate ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Shiro; Bradley, Robert M

    2011-12-01

    Geniculate ganglion (GG) cell bodies of chorda tympani (CT), greater superficial petrosal (GSP), and posterior auricular (PA) nerves transmit orofacial sensory information to the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract. We have used whole cell recording to investigate the characteristics of the Na(+) channels in isolated Fluorogold-labeled GG neurons that innervate different peripheral receptive fields. GG neurons expressed two classes of Na(+) channels, TTX sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX resistant (TTX-R). The majority of GG neurons expressed TTX-R currents of different amplitudes. TTX-R currents were relatively small in 60% of the neurons but were large in 12% of the sampled population. In a further 28% of the neurons, TTX completely abolished all Na(+) currents. Application of TTX completely inhibited action potential generation in all CT and PA neurons but had little effect on the generation of action potentials in 40% of GSP neurons. Most CT, GSP, and PA neurons stained positively with IB(4), and 27% of the GSP neurons were capsaicin sensitive. The majority of IB(4)-positive GSP neurons with large TTX-R Na(+) currents responded to capsaicin, whereas IB(4)-positive GSP neurons with small TTX-R Na(+) currents were capsaicin insensitive. These data demonstrate the heterogeneity of GG neurons and indicate the existence of a subset of GSP neurons sensitive to capsaicin, usually associated with nociceptors. Since there are no reports of nociceptors in the GSP receptive field, the role of these capsaicin-sensitive neurons is not clear.

  1. A filter based encoding model for mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Q; Roychowdhury, V; Boykin, P; Jacobs, A; Nirenberg, S

    2005-01-01

    We adopt a system theoretic approach and explore the model of retinal ganglion cells as linear filters followed by a maximum-likelihood Bayesian predictor. We evaluate the model by using cross-validation, i.e., first the model parameters are estimated using a training set, and then the prediction error is computed (by comparing the stochastic rate predicted by the model with the rate code of the response) for a test set. As in system identification theory, we present spatially uniform stimuli to the retina, whose temporal intensity is drawn independently from a Gaussian distribution, and we simultaneously record the spike trains from multiple neurons. The optimal linear filter for each cell is obtained by maximizing the mutual information between the filtered stimulus values and the output of the cell (as measured in terms of a stochastic rate code). Our results show that the model presented in this paper performs well on the test set, and it outperforms the identity Bayesian model and the traditional linear model. Moreover, in order to reduce the number of optimal filters needed for prediction, we cluster the cells based on the filters' shapes, and use the cluster consensus filters to predict the firing rates of all neurons in the same class. We obtain almost the same performance with these cluster filters. These results provide hope that filter-based retinal prosthetics might be an effective and feasible idea.

  2. Citicoline and Retinal Ganglion Cells: Effects on Morphology and Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, Vincenzo; Oddone, Francesco; Ziccardi, Lucia; Roberti, Gloria; Coppola, Gianluca; Manni, Gianluca

    2017-07-03

    Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) are the nervous retinal elements that connect the visual receptors to the brain forming the nervous visual system. Functional and/or morphological involvement of RGCs occurs in several ocular and neurological disorders and therefore these cells are targeted in neuroprotective strategies. Cytidine 5-diphosphocholine or Citicoline is an endogenous compound that acts in the biosynthesis of phospholipids of cell membranes and increases neurotransmitters' levels in the Central Nervous System. Experimental studies suggested the neuromodulator effect and the protective role of Citicoline on RGCs. In particular, in rodent retinal cultures and animal models Citicoline induces antiapoptotic effects, increases the dopamine retinal level and counteracts retinal nerve fibers layer thinning. Human studies in neurodegenerative visual pathologies such as glaucoma or non-arteritic ischemic neuropathy showed a reduction of the RGCs impairment after Citicoline administration. By reducing the RGCs' dysfunction, a better neural conduction along the post-retinal visual pathways with an improvement of the visual field defects was observed. Therefore, actually Citicoline, with a solid history of experimental and clinical studies, may be considered a very promising molecule for neuroprotective strategies. In this review, we will present the current evidences on the effects of Citicoline in experimental or human models of neurodegenerative disorders involving the RGCs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Percutaneous trigeminal ganglion balloon compression : experience in 40 patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natarajan M

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Forty patients of trigeminal neuralgia were treated with percutaneous trigeminal ganglion balloon compression. Symptoms had been present since six months to twenty years. The age ranged between 23 years and 73 years. All the patients had immediate relief from pain. Two had already undergone trigeminal cistern rhizolysis. One patient had foramen ovale stenosis. After the procedure, all the patients had mild to moderate degree of ipsilateral facial sensory loss which included buccal mucosa and anterior 2/3rd of the tongue. Facial dysaesthesia (anaesthesia dolorosa was seen in only one case, who had mild involvement lasting one week. Thirty patients had altered taste sensation, probably due to general somatic sensory loss. Five patients had herpes perioralis. In this study group, two patients had already undergone microvascular decompression. All the patients were followed for a period ranging from one to eighteen months. Balloon compression technique seems to be better than injection of alcohol, glycerol or radio frequency lesion. Recurrence of pain was noted in 3 patients after one year.

  4. Enriched retinal ganglion cells derived from human embryonic stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Katherine P.; Hung, Sandy S. C.; Sharov, Alexei; Lo, Camden Y.; Needham, Karina; Lidgerwood, Grace E.; Jackson, Stacey; Crombie, Duncan E.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Pébay, Alice; Wong, Raymond C. B.

    2016-01-01

    Optic neuropathies are characterised by a loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) that lead to vision impairment. Development of cell therapy requires a better understanding of the signals that direct stem cells into RGCs. Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an unlimited cellular source for generation of human RGCs in vitro. In this study, we present a 45-day protocol that utilises magnetic activated cell sorting to generate enriched population of RGCs via stepwise retinal differentiation using hESCs. We performed an extensive characterization of these stem cell-derived RGCs by examining the gene and protein expressions of a panel of neural/RGC markers. Furthermore, whole transcriptome analysis demonstrated similarity of the hESC-derived RGCs to human adult RGCs. The enriched hESC-RGCs possess long axons, functional electrophysiological profiles and axonal transport of mitochondria, suggestive of maturity. In summary, this RGC differentiation protocol can generate an enriched population of functional RGCs from hESCs, allowing future studies on disease modeling of optic neuropathies and development of cell therapies. PMID:27506453

  5. Developmental patterning of glutamatergic synapses onto retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schubert Timm

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurons receive excitatory synaptic inputs that are distributed across their dendritic arbors at densities and with spatial patterns that influence their output. How specific synaptic distributions are attained during development is not well understood. The distribution of glutamatergic inputs across the dendritic arbors of mammalian retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has long been correlated to the spatial receptive field profiles of these neurons. Thus, determining how glutamatergic inputs are patterned onto RGC dendritic arbors during development could provide insight into the cellular mechanisms that shape their functional receptive fields. Results We transfected developing and mature mouse RGCs with plasmids encoding fluorescent proteins that label their dendrites and glutamatergic postsynaptic sites. We found that as dendritic density (dendritic length per unit area of dendritic field decreases with maturation, the density of synapses along the dendrites increases. These changes appear coordinated such that RGCs attain the mature average density of postsynaptic sites per unit area (areal density by the time synaptic function emerges. Furthermore, stereotypic centro-peripheral gradients in the areal density of synapses across the arbor of RGCs are established at an early developmental stage. Conclusion The spatial pattern of glutamatergic inputs onto RGCs arises early in synaptogenesis despite ensuing reorganization of dendritic structure. We raise the possibility that these early patterns of synaptic distributions may arise from constraints placed on the number of contacts presynaptic neurons are able to make with the RGCs.

  6. Enteric Ganglionitis in Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orandle, Marlene S.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2007-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) disease is a debilitating feature of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that can occur in the absence of histopathological abnormalities or identifiable enteropathogens. However, the mechanisms of GI dysfunction are poorly understood. The present study was undertaken to characterize changes in resident and inflammatory cells in the enteric nervous system (ENS) of macaques during the acute stage of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection to gain insight into potential pathogenic mechanisms of GI disease. Ganglia from duodenum, ileum, and colon were examined in healthy and acutely infected macaques by using a combination of routine histology, double-label immunofluorescence and in situ hybridization. Evaluation of tissues from infected macaques showed progressive infiltration of myenteric ganglia by CD3+ T cells and IBA1+ macrophages beginning as early as 8 days postinfection. Quantitative image analysis revealed that the severity of myenteric ganglionitis increased with time after SIV infection and, in general, was more severe in ganglia from the small intestine than in ganglia from the colon. Despite an abundance of inflammatory cells in myenteric ganglia during acute infection, the ENS was not a target for virus infection. This study provides evidence that the ENS may be playing a role in the pathogenesis of GI disease and enteropathy in HIV-infected people. PMID:17392357

  7. Comparison between neurotropin and mepivacaine for stellate ganglion injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Tomoki; Matsukawa, Takashi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2006-01-01

    Neurotropin, a nonproteinaceous extract from the inflamed skin of rabbits inoculated with vaccinia virus, is reported to decrease pain effectively when used for stellate ganglion (SG) injection. We compared the effects of neurotropin SG injection with those of mepivacaine on pain relief, as well as comparing the side effects. One hundred and eighty-eight SG injections in 15 patients (5 with postherpetic neuralgia and 10 with sudden deafness) were performed either with 1% mepivacaine 6 ml or with neurotropin 3 ml combined with saline 3 ml in turn. Fifteen min before and after the injection, the pain score, according to a visual analog scale (VAS; only in patients with postherpetic neuralgia); blood pressure; and heart rate were checked, and the number of procedures with Horner's sign was determined. VAS scores decreased significantly with both injections. Horner's sign was observed on the block side in all procedures with the mepivacaine injection, but it was seen in only 48 procedures with the neurotropin injection. Blood pressure and heart rate did not change. In conclusion, the SG injection of neurotropin decreased the VAS score in postherpetic neuralgia to the same extent as mepivacaine. The incidence of Horner's sign was significantly lower with neurotropin than with mepivacaine.

  8. CT-guided injection for ganglion impar blockade: a radiological approach to the management of coccydynia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Datir, A., E-mail: apdatir@gmail.co [Jackson Memorial Hospital, Miami, FL (United States); Connell, D. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-15

    Aim: To evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in needle placement for ganglion impar blocks, and to determine the efficacy of CT-guided ganglion impar blocks in the management of coccydynia. Materials and methods: The results of ganglion impar blockade in eight patients with coccydynia secondary to trauma or unknown cause were reviewed. The diagnosis of coccydynia was based on clinical history, location of pain, and response to previous diagnostic and therapeutic procedures. The eight patients were treated with CT-guided ganglion impar blocks to manage their coccyx pain after conservative procedures, including oral medication and cushions, failed to provide relief. All patients were subjected to ganglion impar blocks under a thin-section CT-guided technique for needle placement, using a mixture of bupivacaine and triamcinolone. The patients were followed-up for a period of 6-months. Results: Eight patients were treated in this study with a total of 11 injections. A technical success of 100% was achieved in all cases with accurate needle placement without any complications and all the patients tolerated the procedure well. Out of eight, three patients (37%) had complete relief of pain on the follow-up intervals up to 6 months. Three out of eight patients (37%), had partial relief of symptoms and a second repeat injection was given at the 3 month interval of the follow-up period. At the end of the 6-month follow-up period, six out of eight patients (75%) experienced symptomatic relief (four complete relief and two partial relief) without any additional resort to conventional pain management. Twenty-five percent (two out of eight) did not have any symptomatic improvement. The mean visual analogue score (VAS) pre-procedure was 8 (range 6-10) and had decreased to 2 (range 0-5) in six out of eight patients. Conclusion: CT can be used as an imaging method to identify the ganglion and guide the needle in ganglion impar blockade. The advantages of CT

  9. Intratendinous ganglion of the long head of the biceps tendon: US and MRI features (2010: 9b)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutten, Matthieu J.C.M.; Jong, Mathijn D.F. de; Jager, Gerrit J. [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Radiology, ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands); Loon, Ton van [Jeroen Bosch Hospital, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, ' s-Hertogenbosch (Netherlands)

    2010-12-15

    We present a case report and literature review of the ultrasound (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features of an intratendinous ganglion originating from the long head of the biceps tendon. Intratendinous ganglia are very rare entities and intratendinous ganglion of the long head of the biceps tendon has only been described once. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report presenting the sonographic features of an intratendinous ganglion originating from the long head of the biceps tendon. (orig.)

  10. Periarticular Cysts of the Temporomandibular Joint Are More Frequently Synovial Than Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Justin C; Cipriani, Nicole; Faquin, William C; Chuang, Sung K; Keith, David A; Lahey, Edward Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Differentiating between ganglion and synovial cysts by standard histology is difficult, leading to inaccurate statements on frequency for each of these periarticular lesions. The purpose of this study was to use immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis to 1) calculate the accuracy of the histologic diagnoses, 2) determine the frequency of ganglion and synovial cysts of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), and 3) compare the frequency of these lesions in the TMJ compared with the extracranial skeleton in patients treated at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH). This is a retrospective cohort study of all patients undergoing treatment of TMJ cysts at MGH from 2001 through 2013. IHC analysis of tissue samples for each patient was completed and compared with the original histologic diagnoses. Categorical variables, including age, gender, and sidedness, were recorded. A natural language search of the MGH Department of Pathology database determined the frequency of extracranial periarticular cysts during the same period. Thirteen patients met the inclusion criteria. Eleven cysts were synovial and 2 were ganglion based on histology. IHC analysis identified 2 false-positive synovial cyst diagnoses, resulting in 100% sensitivity and 50% specificity for the original histologic assessment and a percentage error of 22%. Of the periarticular TMJ lesions, 69% were synovial cysts and 31% were ganglion cysts. The frequency of TMJ versus extracranial ganglion cysts was 0.24%, and the frequency of TMJ versus extracranial synovial cysts was 0.60% based on 3,176 extracranial cysts (1,506 synovial; 1,670 ganglion). This study represents the largest single-institution experience with periarticular cysts of the TMJ, and contrary to previous reports, TMJ cysts appear to be more frequently synovial than ganglion. IHC can be used to overcome the relatively poor specificity of histologic diagnosis of synovial cysts. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published

  11. Retinal ganglion cell distribution and spatial resolving power in deep-sea lanternfishes (Myctophidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Busserolles, Fanny; Marshall, N Justin; Collin, Shaun P

    2014-01-01

    Topographic analyses of retinal ganglion cell density are very useful in providing information about the visual ecology of a species by identifying areas of acute vision within the visual field (i.e. areas of high cell density). In this study, we investigated the neural cell distribution in the ganglion cell layer of a range of lanternfish species belonging to 10 genera. Analyses were performed on wholemounted retinas using stereology. Topographic maps were constructed of the distribution of all neurons and both ganglion and amacrine cell populations in 5 different species from Nissl-stained retinas using cytological criteria. Amacrine cell distribution was also examined immunohistochemically in 2 of the 5 species using anti-parvalbumin antibody. The distributions of both the total neuron and the amacrine cell populations were aligned in all of the species examined, showing a general increase in cell density toward the retinal periphery. However, when the ganglion cell population was topographically isolated from the amacrine cell population, which comprised up to 80% of the total neurons within the ganglion cell layer, a different distribution was revealed. Topographic maps of the true ganglion cell distribution in 18 species of lanternfishes revealed well-defined specializations in different regions of the retina. Different species possessed distinct areas of high ganglion cell density with respect to both peak density and the location and/or shape of the specialized acute zone (i.e. elongated areae ventro-temporales, areae temporales and large areae centrales). The spatial resolving power was calculated to be relatively low (varying from 1.6 to 4.4 cycles per degree), indicating that myctophids may constitute one of the less visually acute groups of deep-sea teleosts. The diversity in retinal specializations and spatial resolving power within the family is assessed in terms of possible ecological functions and evolutionary history. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Retinal Ganglion Cell Distribution and Spatial Resolving Power in Deep-Sea Lanternfishes (Myctophidae)

    KAUST Repository

    De Busserolles, Fanny

    2014-01-01

    Topographic analyses of retinal ganglion cell density are very useful in providing information about the visual ecology of a species by identifying areas of acute vision within the visual field (i.e. areas of high cell density). In this study, we investigated the neural cell distribution in the ganglion cell layer of a range of lanternfish species belonging to 10 genera. Analyses were performed on wholemounted retinas using stereology. Topographic maps were constructed of the distribution of all neurons and both ganglion and amacrine cell populations in 5 different species from Nissl-stained retinas using cytological criteria. Amacrine cell distribution was also examined immunohistochemically in 2 of the 5 species using anti-parvalbumin antibody. The distributions of both the total neuron and the amacrine cell populations were aligned in all of the species examined, showing a general increase in cell density toward the retinal periphery. However, when the ganglion cell population was topographically isolated from the amacrine cell population, which comprised up to 80% of the total neurons within the ganglion cell layer, a different distribution was revealed. Topographic maps of the true ganglion cell distribution in 18 species of lanternfishes revealed well-defined specializations in different regions of the retina. Different species possessed distinct areas of high ganglion cell density with respect to both peak density and the location and/or shape of the specialized acute zone (i.e. elongated areae ventro-temporales, areae temporales and large areae centrales). The spatial resolving power was calculated to be relatively low (varying from 1.6 to 4.4 cycles per degree), indicating that myctophids may constitute one of the less visually acute groups of deep-sea teleosts. The diversity in retinal specializations and spatial resolving power within the family is assessed in terms of possible ecological functions and evolutionary history.

  13. Spatial distribution of excitatory synapses on the dendrites of ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin-Peng; Chiao, Chuan-Chin

    2014-01-01

    Excitatory glutamatergic inputs from bipolar cells affect the physiological properties of ganglion cells in the mammalian retina. The spatial distribution of these excitatory synapses on the dendrites of retinal ganglion cells thus may shape their distinct functions. To visualize the spatial pattern of excitatory glutamatergic input into the ganglion cells in the mouse retina, particle-mediated gene transfer of plasmids expressing postsynaptic density 95-green fluorescent fusion protein (PSD95-GFP) was used to label the excitatory synapses. Despite wide variation in the size and morphology of the retinal ganglion cells, the expression of PSD95 puncta was found to follow two general rules. Firstly, the PSD95 puncta are regularly spaced, at 1-2 µm intervals, along the dendrites, whereby the presence of an excitatory synapse creates an exclusion zone that rules out the presence of other glutamatergic synaptic inputs. Secondly, the spatial distribution of PSD95 puncta on the dendrites of diverse retinal ganglion cells are similar in that the number of excitatory synapses appears to be less on primary dendrites and to increase to a plateau on higher branch order dendrites. These observations suggest that synaptogenesis is spatially regulated along the dendritic segments and that the number of synaptic contacts is relatively constant beyond the primary dendrites. Interestingly, we also found that the linear puncta density is slightly higher in large cells than in small cells. This may suggest that retinal ganglion cells with a large dendritic field tend to show an increased connectivity of excitatory synapses that makes up for their reduced dendrite density. Mapping the spatial distribution pattern of the excitatory synapses on retinal ganglion cells thus provides explicit structural information that is essential for our understanding of how excitatory glutamatergic inputs shape neuronal responses.

  14. MR-guided perineural injection of the ganglion impar: technical considerations and feasibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marker, David R.; Carrino, John A.; Fritz, Jan [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Musculoskeletal Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); U-Thainual, Paweena [Queen' s University, Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Kingston, ON (Canada); Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor [Queen' s University, School of Computing, Kingston, ON (Canada); Flammang, Aaron J. [Siemens Corporate Research, Center for Applied Medical Imaging, Baltimore, MD (United States); Iordachita, Iulian I. [Johns Hopkins University, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Computational Sensing and Robotics, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2016-05-15

    Perineural ganglion impar injections are used in the management of pelvic pain syndromes; however, there is no consensus regarding the optimal image guidance. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high soft tissue contrast and the potential to directly visualize and target the ganglion. The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of MR-guided percutaneous perineural ganglion impar injections. Six MR-guided ganglion impar injections were performed in six human cadavers. Procedures were performed with a clinical 1.5-Tesla MRI system through a far lateral transgluteus approach. Ganglion impar visibility, distance from the sacrococcygeal joint, number of intermittent MRI control steps required to place the needle, target error between the intended and final needle tip location, inadvertent punctures of non-targeted vulnerable structures, injectant distribution, and procedure time were determined. The ganglion impar was seen on MRI in 4/6 (66 %) of cases and located 0.8 mm cephalad to 16.3 mm caudad (average 1.2 mm caudad) to the midpoint of the sacrococcygeal joint. Needle placement required an average of three MRI control steps (range, 2-6). The average target error was 2.2 ± 2.1 mm. In 6/6 cases (100 %), there was appropriate periganglionic distribution and filling of the presacrococcygeal space. No punctures of non-targeted structures occurred. The median procedure time was 20 min (range, 12-29 min). Interventional MRI can visualize and directly target the ganglion impar for accurate needle placement and successful periganglionic injection with the additional benefit of no ionizing radiation exposure to patient and staff. Our results support clinical evaluation. (orig.)

  15. Expression of EFR3A in the mouse cochlea during degeneration of spiral ganglion following hair cell loss.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Nie

    Full Text Available Retrograde degeneration of spiral ganglion cells in the cochlea following hair cell loss is similar to dying back in pathology. The EFR3A gene has recently been discovered to be involved in the pathogenesis of dying back. The relationship of EFR3A and spiral ganglion degeneration, however, was rarely investigated. In this study, we destroyed the hair cells of the mouse cochlea by co-administration of kanamycin and furosemide and then investigated the EFR3A expression during the induced spiral ganglion cell degeneration. Our results revealed that co-administration of kanamycin and furosemide quickly induced hair cell loss in the C57BL/6J mice and then resulted in progressive degeneration of the spiral ganglion beginning at day 5 following drug administration. The number of the spiral ganglion cells began to decrease at day 15. The expression of EFR3A increased remarkably in the spiral ganglion at day 5 and then decreased to near normal level within the next 10 days. Our study suggested that the change of EFR3A expression in the spiral ganglion was coincident with the time of the spiral ganglion degeneration, which implied that high expression of EFR3A may be important to prompt initiation of spiral ganglion degeneration following hair cell loss.

  16. The celiac ganglion modulates LH-induced inhibition of androstenedione release in late pregnant rat ovaries

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    Rastrilla Ana M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the control of ovarian production of steroid hormones is mainly of endocrine nature, there is increasing evidence that the nervous system also influences ovarian steroidogenic output. The purpose of this work was to study whether the celiac ganglion modulates, via the superior ovarian nerve, the anti-steroidogenic effect of LH in the rat ovary. Using mid- and late-pregnant rats, we set up to study: 1 the influence of the noradrenergic stimulation of the celiac ganglion on the ovarian production of the luteotropic hormone androstenedione; 2 the modulatory effect of noradrenaline at the celiac ganglion on the anti-steroidogenic effect of LH in the ovary; and 3 the involvement of catecholaminergic neurotransmitters released in the ovary upon the combination of noradrenergic stimulation of the celiac ganglion and LH treatment of the ovary. Methods The ex vivo celiac ganglion-superior ovarian nerve-ovary integrated system was used. This model allows studying in vitro how direct neural connections from the celiac ganglion regulate ovarian steroidogenic output. The system was incubated in buffer solution with the ganglion and the ovary located in different compartments and linked by the superior ovarian nerve. Three experiments were designed with the addition of: 1 noradrenaline in the ganglion compartment; 2 LH in the ovarian compartment; and 3 noradrenaline and LH in the ganglion and ovarian compartments, respectively. Rats of 15, 19, 20 and 21 days of pregnancy were used, and, as an end point, the concentration of the luteotropic hormone androstenedione was measured in the ovarian compartment by RIA at various times of incubation. For some of the experimental paradigms the concentration of various catecholamines (dihydroxyphenylalanine, dopamine, noradrenaline and adrenaline was also measured in the ovarian compartment by HPLC. Results The most relevant result concerning the action of noradrenaline in the celiac ganglion

  17. Taurine Provides Neuroprotection against Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases. PMID:23115615

  18. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cell loss in Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross‐Cisneros, Fred N.; Koronyo, Yosef; Hannibal, Jens; Gallassi, Roberto; Cantalupo, Gaetano; Sambati, Luisa; Pan, Billy X.; Tozer, Kevin R.; Barboni, Piero; Provini, Federica; Avanzini, Pietro; Carbonelli, Michele; Pelosi, Annalisa; Chui, Helena; Liguori, Rocco; Baruzzi, Agostino; Koronyo‐Hamaoui, Maya; Sadun, Alfredo A.; Carelli, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    Objective Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) are photoreceptors driving circadian photoentrainment, and circadian dysfunction characterizes Alzheimer disease (AD). We investigated mRGCs in AD, hypothesizing that they contribute to circadian dysfunction. Methods We assessed retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness by optical coherence tomography (OCT) in 21 mild‐moderate AD patients, and in a subgroup of 16 we evaluated rest–activity circadian rhythm by actigraphy. We studied postmortem mRGCs by immunohistochemistry in retinas, and axons in optic nerve cross‐sections of 14 neuropathologically confirmed AD patients. We coimmunostained for retinal amyloid β (Aβ) deposition and melanopsin to locate mRGCs. All AD cohorts were compared with age‐matched controls. Results We demonstrated an age‐related optic neuropathy in AD by OCT, with a significant reduction of RNFL thickness (p = 0.038), more evident in the superior quadrant (p = 0.006). Axonal loss was confirmed in postmortem AD optic nerves. Abnormal circadian function characterized only a subgroup of AD patients. Sleep efficiency was significantly reduced in AD patients (p = 0.001). We also found a significant loss of mRGCs in postmortem AD retinal specimens (p = 0.003) across all ages and abnormal mRGC dendritic morphology and size (p = 0.003). In flat‐mounted AD retinas, Aβ accumulation was remarkably evident inside and around mRGCs. Interpretation We show variable degrees of rest–activity circadian dysfunction in AD patients. We also demonstrate age‐related loss of optic nerve axons and specifically mRGC loss and pathology in postmortem AD retinal specimens, associated with Aβ deposition. These results all support the concept that mRGC degeneration is a contributor to circadian rhythm dysfunction in AD. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:90–109 PMID:26505992

  19. Cannabinoids modulate spontaneous synaptic activity in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, T P; Protti, D A

    2011-09-01

    The endocannabinoid (ECB) system has been found throughout the central nervous system and modulates cell excitability in various forms of short-term plasticity. ECBs and their receptors have also been localized to all retinal cells, and cannabinoid receptor activation has been shown to alter voltage-dependent conductances in several different retinal cell types, suggesting a possible role for cannabinoids in retinal processing. Their effects on synaptic transmission in the mammalian retina, however, have not been previously investigated. Here, we show that exogenous cannabinoids alter spontaneous synaptic transmission onto retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Using whole-cell voltage-clamp recordings in whole-mount retinas, we measured spontaneous postsynaptic currents (SPSCs) in RGCs in adult and young (P14-P21) mice. We found that the addition of an exogenous cannabinoid agonist, WIN55212-2 (5 μM), caused a significant reversible reduction in the frequency of SPSCs. This change, however, did not alter the kinetics of the SPSCs, indicating a presynaptic locus of action. Using blockers to isolate inhibitory or excitatory currents, we found that cannabinoids significantly reduced the release probability of both GABA and glutamate, respectively. While the addition of cannabinoids reduced the frequency of both GABAergic and glutamatergic SPSCs in both young and adult mice, we found that the largest effect was on GABA-mediated currents in young mice. These results suggest that the ECB system may potentially be involved in the modulation of signal transmission in the retina. Furthermore, they suggest that it might play a role in the developmental maturation of synaptic circuits, and that exogenous cannabinoids are likely able to disrupt retinal processing and consequently alter vision.

  20. Ganglion Cells Are Frequently Present in Pediatric Mucosal Colorectal Biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Alexandra E; Pacheco, M Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Hirschsprung disease (HD) rarely presents as chronic constipation after the newborn period. At our institution, calretinin immunohistochemistry (CAL) is frequently requested by clinicians on rectal mucosal biopsies (RMBs) taken during colonoscopy in older children in whom suspicion for HD is low. We hypothesized that review of these biopsies would frequently reveal ganglion cells (GCs). We reviewed features of mucosal biopsies (November 2013 to September 2015) from children ≥1 year of age on which clinicians had requested CAL on at least one specimen. A total of 93 biopsies with paired CAL from 83 patients were suitable for study (ages 1-18 years, M:F 1.2). Submitted clinical indication was constipation in 62 patients (75%). GCs were found within or subjacent to muscularis mucosa in 63 biopsies (68%), 12 (19%) of which were designated from a specific anatomic site, eg, 2 or 3 cm. In 25 of 63 (40%) cases, GCs were identified on one of the first 3 sections (median 5th, range 1st-54th). Forty-six cases (73%) contained no or 1 mm of SM, and 21 (70%) had no SM. CAL was positive in 28 (93%) and equivocal/weak in 2 (7%); no additional work-up for HD was pursued. The data suggest that H&E sections of RMBs can exclude HD at a specified site in many cases and provide the basis for a future study examining the utility of CAL in RMBs without SM as a means for excluding HD.

  1. Sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation for the treatment of cluster headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Láinez, Miguel J A; Puche, Miguel; Garcia, Ana; Gascón, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    Cluster headache is a severe, debilitating disorder with pain that ranks among the most severe known to humans. Patients with cluster headaches have few therapeutic options and further, 10-20% develop drug-resistant attacks. The often brief duration of cluster attacks makes abortive therapy a challenge, and preventive medications are almost always provided to patients, but the side effects of these preventive medications can be significant. The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is believed to play a role in headache pain and cranial autonomic symptoms associated with cluster headache, which is a result of activation of the trigeminal-autonomic reflex. For over 100 years, the SPG has been a clinical target to treat primary headache disorders using pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic methods. Radiofrequency lesioning and nerve-resection therapies, while initially beneficial, are irreversible procedures, and the use of neurostimulation provides one method of interfacing with the neural pathways without causing permanent damage to neural tissue. SPG neurostimulation is both reversible and adjustable, and has recently been tested in both proof-of-concept work and in a randomized, sham-controlled trial for the treatment of cluster headache. A randomized, sham-controlled study of 32 patients was performed to evaluate further the use of SPG stimulation for the acute treatment of chronic cluster headache. Of the 32 patients, 28 completed the randomized experimental period. Overall, 68% of patients experienced an acute response, a frequency response, or both. In this study the majority of adverse events were related to the implantation procedure, which typically resolved or remained mild in nature at 3 months following the implant procedure. This and other studies highlight the promise of using SPG stimulation to treat the pain-associated cluster headache. SPG stimulation could be a safe and effective option for chronic cluster headache.

  2. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Froger

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats. After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%, whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases.

  3. Taurine provides neuroprotection against retinal ganglion cell degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froger, Nicolas; Cadetti, Lucia; Lorach, Henri; Martins, Joao; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre; Dubus, Elisabeth; Degardin, Julie; Pain, Dorothée; Forster, Valérie; Chicaud, Laurent; Ivkovic, Ivana; Simonutti, Manuel; Fouquet, Stéphane; Jammoul, Firas; Léveillard, Thierry; Benosman, Ryad; Sahel, José-Alain; Picaud, Serge

    2012-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration occurs in numerous retinal diseases leading to blindness, either as a primary process like in glaucoma, or secondary to photoreceptor loss. However, no commercial drug is yet directly targeting RGCs for their neuroprotection. In the 70s, taurine, a small sulfonic acid provided by nutrition, was found to be essential for the survival of photoreceptors, but this dependence was not related to any retinal disease. More recently, taurine deprivation was incriminated in the retinal toxicity of an antiepileptic drug. We demonstrate here that taurine can improve RGC survival in culture or in different animal models of RGC degeneration. Taurine effect on RGC survival was assessed in vitro on primary pure RCG cultures under serum-deprivation conditions, and on NMDA-treated retinal explants from adult rats. In vivo, taurine was administered through the drinking water in two glaucomatous animal models (DBA/2J mice and rats with vein occlusion) and in a model of Retinitis pigmentosa with secondary RGC degeneration (P23H rats). After a 6-day incubation, 1 mM taurine significantly enhanced RGCs survival (+68%), whereas control RGCs were cultured in a taurine-free medium, containing all natural amino-acids. This effect was found to rely on taurine-uptake by RGCs. Furthermore taurine (1 mM) partly prevented NMDA-induced RGC excitotoxicity. Finally, taurine supplementation increased RGC densities both in DBA/2J mice, in rats with vein occlusion and in P23H rats by contrast to controls drinking taurine-free water. This study indicates that enriched taurine nutrition can directly promote RGC survival through RGC intracellular pathways. It provides evidence that taurine can positively interfere with retinal degenerative diseases.

  4. Adenovector GAD65 gene delivery into the rat trigeminal ganglion produces orofacial analgesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vit, Jean-Philippe; Ohara, Peter T; Sundberg, Christopher; Rubi, Blanca; Maechler, Pierre; Liu, Chunyan; Puntel, Mariana; Lowenstein, Pedro; Castro, Maria; Jasmin, Luc

    2009-01-01

    Background Our goal is to use gene therapy to alleviate pain by targeting glial cells. In an animal model of facial pain we tested the effect of transfecting the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) gene into satellite glial cells (SGCs) of the trigeminal ganglion by using a serotype 5 adenovector with high tropisms for glial cells. We postulated that GABA produced from the expression of GAD would reduce pain behavior by acting on GABA receptors on neurons within the ganglion. Results Injection of adenoviral vectors (AdGAD65) directly into the trigeminal ganglion leads to sustained expression of the GAD65 isoform over the 4 weeks observation period. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that adenovirus-mediated GAD65 expression and GABA synthesis were mainly in SGCs. GABAA and GABAB receptors were both seen in sensory neurons, yet only GABAA receptors decorated the neuronal surface. GABA receptors were not found on SGCs. Six days after injection of AdGAD65 into the trigeminal ganglion, there was a statistically significant decrease of pain behavior in the orofacial formalin test, a model of inflammatory pain. Rats injected with control virus (AdGFP or AdLacZ) had no reduction in their pain behavior. AdGAD65-dependent analgesia was blocked by bicuculline, a selective GABAA receptor antagonist, but not by CGP46381, a selective GABAB receptor antagonist. Conclusion Transfection of glial cells in the trigeminal ganglion with the GAD gene blocks pain behavior by acting on GABAA receptors on neuronal perikarya. PMID:19656360

  5. Spiral ganglion outgrowth and hearing development in p75-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Mlynski, Robert; Volkenstein, Stefan; Aletsee, Christoph; Sendtner, Michael; Ryan, Allen F; Dazert, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    To explore the role of nerve growth factor receptor p75(NTR) during the terminal neuronal development of the mammalian cochlea the onset of hearing and the in vitro response of spiral ganglion neurites to neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), which is known to play a critical role during neonatal inner ear development, were investigated in p75(NTR)-deficient mice (p75(NTR)-/-). Auditory-evoked brain stem response recordings from p75(NTR)-/- and wild-type (WT) littermates were measured from postnatal days (PD) 8 to 23. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from p75(NTR)-/- and WT animals were dissected and cultured in an organotypic tissue culture system. In both groups, spiral ganglion neurite outgrowth was analyzed with and without NT-3 supplementation. No significant differences in the onset of hearing of mutant mice compared to the WT mice were detected, and both groups showed a similar development of hearing until PD 23. After stimulation with NT-3, neurite outgrowth was enhanced in both p75(NTR)-/- and WT mice. However, neurites from p75(NTR)-/- spiral ganglion explants were longer in both culture conditions. Moreover, NT-3 did not significantly enhance neurite number in p75(NTR)-/-, as it did in WT mice. P75(NTR) has a remarkable influence on spiral ganglion neurite growth behavior. However, p75(NTR) does not seem to be essential for the development of basic hearing function in the first 3 postnatal weeks.

  6. Morphologic study of the blood vessels of the superior cervical ganglion of the albino rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DePace, D M

    1981-01-01

    Blood vessels of the rat superior cervical ganglion were examined by both light and electron microscopy. Direct blood supply to the superior cervical ganglion was derived from a capsular plexus of vessels. Intraganglionic vessels were for the most part capillaries. Some of these capillaries appeared dilated and sinusoidal. Although the ganglion did not seem to be densely vascularized, there was sufficient distribution to accommodate the nerve cell bodies of the ganglion. Individual capillaries served groups of neurons. Occasionally, capillary loops could be observed to surround single neuron perikarya. Ultrastructural studies revealed the presence of two types of capillaries. The majority of the capillaries of the rat superior cervical ganglion demonstrated a continuous, non-fenestrated endothelium. Typical junctional complexes were found on abutting endothelial surfaces. Endothelial flaps and microvilli were also observed on the luminal surface of some of the vessels. Numerous micropinocytotic vesicles were observed on both the luminal and abluminal surfaces of the endothelium. A small number of capillaries demonstrated a fenestrated endothelium. In both types of capillaries there was a basement membrane and an extracellular space containing collagen. Perikaryal cytoplasm was separated from the extracellular space by a thick layer of satellite cell cytoplasm.

  7. Ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments. MR findings with clinical correlation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, G.S.; Hsueh, C.-J.; Juan, C.J.; Chen, C.Y. [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiology; Lee, C.H. [Tri-Service General Hospital and National Defense Medical Center, Taipei (China). Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery; Chan, W.P. [Taipei Medical Univ., Wan Fang Hospital, Taipei (China). Dept. of Radiology; Taylor, J.A.M. [New York Chiropractic College, Seneca Falls, NY (United States). Dept. of Diagnosis; Yu, J.S. [Ohio State Univ. Medical Center, Columbus, OH (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    2002-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the MR findings of ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments in correlation with clinical findings. Material and Methods:We reviewed 12 patients with ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments obtained from a medical record of 4153 consecutive patients referred for knee MR examinations. All patients presented with chronic knee pain and 4 had restriction of knee motion. The MR imaging findings of the cysts were evaluated and correlated with clinical manifestations. Results:Seven ganglion cysts were found in the posterior cruciate ligaments and 5 in the anterior cruciate ligaments. All cysts were lobulated (n=7) or fusiform (n=5) in shape, 1.8-4.5 cm in size, along the posterior surface in the proximal or distal end of the ligaments. Ten patients had arthroscopic resection or aspiration of their cysts, became symptom free and had no recurrence on follow-up MR examinations. Two cysts reduced in size spontaneously by conservative treatment. Conclusion:MR imaging can offer useful information in detection and diagnosis of patients with chronic knee pain due to ganglion cysts of the cruciate ligaments. The size and location of the ganglion cysts can attribute to the clinical manifestations.

  8. [Growth behavior of spiral ganglion explants on cochlear implant electrodes and their materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, S; Mlynski, R; Volkenstein, S; Stark, T; Schwaab, M; Dazert, S; Brors, D

    2009-04-01

    With the increasing use of cochlear implants (CIs), the insertion of alloplastic material into the inner ear is nowadays an established treatment for severe to profound hearing loss in children and adults. Beyond its widespread use, the biocompatibility of the CI electrode and its interaction with the neural structures of the cochlea is not yet established. To investigate the survival and growth behavior of spiral ganglion neurons on different CI materials, spiral ganglion explants from newborn rats were cultured on silicone and platinum, on a surface combination of silicone and platinum, and, finally, on a CI electrode. The results of this study indicate that the growth of spiral ganglion neurons in vitro is strongly influenced by the different materials and their arrangement, with platinum exhibiting the highest degree of biocompatibility with respect to neurite extension. Level differences in the surface structure between silicone and platinum lead to inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, the culturing of spiral ganglion explants on a CI electrode leads to neurite sprouting toward the electrodes made of platinum. The biocompatibility of CI materials with spiral ganglion neurons was shown in this study, but it differs with different CI materials. Besides the material itself, the arrangement of the materials can affect the neurite extension.

  9. Exploration on the underlying mechanism of female predominance in spasmodic dysphonia: an anatomical study of nodose ganglion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zengrui; Li, Ge; Feng, Xin

    2014-01-01

    To study the gender differences of amount of neurons in the nodose ganglions of rats. Fourteen Sprague-Dawley rats (7 males and 7 females) were selected. Bilateral nodose ganglions were dissected and serial sections of nodose ganglion were cut in a cryostat, followed by Cresyl-violet staining for neurons. Eight to ten consecutive sections from mid-portion of each nodose ganglion sample, which represent the most neuron number per section, were counted and averaged. Gender difference in the amount of neurons in the nodose ganglions was compared. No gender difference of neuron numbers was found in either side of nodose ganglion (p > 0.05). However, average neuron number of nodose ganglions on the left side of male (654 ± 60) and female (616 ± 37) were significantly more than that on the right side of male (470 ± 22) and female (453 ± 40) respectively (p < 0.05). There is no gender difference in total neuron number of nodose ganglions between male and female rat. However, the neuron number in the left nodose ganglion is greater than that in the right one. The difference may be due to the fact that left and right nodose ganglion is receiving different visceral sensory impulses separately, which is associated with different physiological functions. Further work should be carried out with retrograde tracing on neurons of nodose ganglions in an animal model, which are directly related to laryngeal sensory transmission, in order to determine the gender difference in the neuron number and morphology related to laryngeal functions.

  10. [Histoenzymologic features of adrenal medulla ganglionic cells 60 days after exposure to detergents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devecerski, V; Marjanov, M; Milićević, S

    1993-01-01

    We investigated histochemical reactions in adrenal medulla sympathic ganglionic cells in the animals who after a 30-day stay in a detergent manufactory department survived 60 days in laboratory conditions. The obtained data show a strong isocytrate dehydrogenase activity in the experimental animals; the reaction to the lactate dehydrogenase activity reflects a decrease of the ganglionic cell volume and a slight decrease of the reaction intensity. The activity of isoenzyme F is mildly increased; similarly was found for isoenzyme S. There was a significant decrease of the succinate dehydrogenase activity--all this was detected in the animals exposed to detergents. Sympathic ganglionic cells within the adrenal medulla are rather sensitive to the influence of detergents. The recovery after the exposure to their toxic effects takes more than 2 months.

  11. A rare cause of ulnar-side wrist pain: Ganglion cyst of the triquetrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihsan Senturk

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing chronic wrist pain may sometimes be challenging and the differential diagnoses include many conditions (traumatic, rheumatoid, neoplasms, etc.. This report describes a case of chronic wrist pain due to intraosseous ganglion cyst of triquetrum. The wrist pain had lasted for 6 months and was not relieved by conservative treatment. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intraosseous ganglion cyst. The triquetrum was tender on palpation. After curettage and grafting of the cyst, and 6 months of follow-up, the patient was free of complaints with full range of motion of the wrist. Although mostly asymptomatic, intraosseous ganglion cysts should be kept in mind when assessing wrist pain. [Hand Microsurg 2017; 6(2.000: 87-89

  12. Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells are resistant to neurodegeneration in mitochondrial optic neuropathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    La Morgia, C; Ross-Cisneros, F.N.; Sadun, A.A.

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial optic neuropathies, that is, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy and dominant optic atrophy, selectively affect retinal ganglion cells, causing visual loss with relatively preserved pupillary light reflex. The mammalian eye contains a light detection system based on a subset of retinal...... for the preservation of pupillary light reaction despite profound visual loss in patients with mitochondrial optic neuropathy, revealing the robustness of melanopsin retinal ganglion cells to a metabolic insult and opening the question of mechanisms that might protect these cells....... ganglion cells containing the photopigment melanopsin. These cells give origin to the retinohypothalamic tract and support the non-image-forming visual functions of the eye, which include the photoentrainment of circadian rhythms, light-induced suppression of melatonin secretion and pupillary light reflex...

  13. Tibial nerve intraneural ganglion cyst in a 10-year-old boy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Squires, Judy H. [University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Emery, Kathleen H.; Johnson, Neil [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Sorger, Joel [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Orthopedics, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Intraneural ganglion cysts are uncommon cystic lesions of peripheral nerves that are typically encountered in adults. In the lower extremity, the peroneal nerve is most frequently affected with involvement of the tibial nerve much less common. This article describes a tibial intraneural ganglion cyst in a 10-year-old boy. Although extremely rare, intraneural ganglion cysts of the tibial nerve should be considered when a nonenhancing cystic structure with intra-articular extension is identified along the course of the nerve. This report also details the unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous treatment with US-guided cyst aspiration and steroid injection, an option recently reported as a viable alternative to open surgical resection. (orig.)

  14. Degeneration and regeneration in the superior cervical sympathetic ganglion after Latrodectus venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, S E

    1989-06-01

    The effects of the venom of the spider Latrodectus mactans hasselti on the superior cervical ganglion were studied in the guinea pig. Under anaesthesia the ganglion was bathed in venom solution for 15 min. Shortly afterwards animals salivated profusely and later developed unilateral ptosis and enophthalmos. Postoperative survival times ranged from 15 min to 10 weeks. Electron microscopy showed acute swelling of preganglionic cholinergic nerve terminals, followed by degeneration with separation of synapses. Other ganglionic elements appeared to be undamaged, although after detachment of synapses the dendritic postsynaptic specializations were reduced in number. Recovery was very rapid; axon growth cones were identifiable at 18 h and synapse reformation was well established by 2 weeks. With longer survival times there was progressive restoration of normal morphology such that by 8 weeks regeneration appeared complete. These experiments indicate that the preganglionic cholinergic nerve terminals are selectively affected by Latrodectus venom and have a considerable capacity for appropriate regeneration.

  15. Pseudotumoral ganglion cyst of a finger with unexpected remote origin: multimodality imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouilleau, Loic; Malghem, Jacques; Omoumi, Patrick; Simoni, Paolo; Vande Berg, Bruno C.; Lecouvet, Frederic E. [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Radiology, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium); Barbier, Olivier [Universite Catholique de Louvain, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Brussels (Belgium)

    2010-04-15

    The case of a ganglion cyst in the pulp of a fifth finger in an elderly woman initially mimicking a soft tissue tumor is described. Most typical sites of ganglion cysts are well documented at the wrist and in the vicinity of inter-phalangeal and metacarpo-phalangeal joints. In this case, ultrasonography (US) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated a cystic lesion within the pulp of the fifth finger and indicated carpal osteoarthritis as the distant - and unexpected - origin of the lesion. The suggested diagnosis of ganglion cyst was confirmed by computed tomography arthrography (CT arthrography) of the wrist, which showed opacification of the cyst on delayed acquisitions after intra-articular injection into the mid-carpal joint, through the fifth flexor digitorum tendon sheath. The communications between the degenerative carpal joint, the radio-ulnar bursa, the fifth flexor digitorum tendon sheath and the pedicle of the cyst were well demonstrated. (orig.)

  16. Dominant inheritance of retinal ganglion cell resistance to optic nerve crush in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlamp Cassandra L

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several neurodegenerative diseases are influenced by complex genetics that affect an individual's susceptibility, disease severity, and rate of progression. One such disease is glaucoma, a chronic neurodegenerative condition of the eye that targets and stimulates apoptosis of CNS neurons called retinal ganglion cells. Since ganglion cell death is intrinsic, it is reasonable that the genes that control this process may contribute to the complex genetics that affect ganglion cell susceptibility to disease. To determine if genetic background influences susceptibility to optic nerve damage, leading to ganglion cell death, we performed optic nerve crush on 15 different inbred lines of mice and measured ganglion cell loss. Resistant and susceptible strains were used in a reciprocal breeding strategy to examine the inheritance pattern of the resistance phenotype. Because earlier studies had implicated Bax as a susceptibility allele for ganglion cell death in the chronic neurodegenerative disease glaucoma, we conducted allelic segregation analysis and mRNA quantification to assess this gene as a candidate for the cell death phenotype. Results Inbred lines showed varying levels of susceptibility to optic nerve crush. DBA/2J mice were most resistant and BALB/cByJ mice were most susceptible. F1 mice from these lines inherited the DBA/2J phenotype, while N2 backcross mice exhibited the BALB/cByJ phenotype. F2 mice exhibited an intermediate phenotype. A Wright Formula calculation suggested as few as 2 dominant loci were linked to the resistance phenotype, which was corroborated by a Punnett Square analysis of the distribution of the mean phenotype in each cross. The levels of latent Bax mRNA were the same in both lines, and Bax alleles did not segregate with phenotype in N2 and F2 mice. Conclusion Inbred mice show different levels of resistance to optic nerve crush. The resistance phenotype is heritable in a dominant fashion involving

  17. Growth and morphogenesis of an autonomic ganglion. I. Matching neurons with target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heathcote, R D; Sargent, P B

    1987-08-01

    Regulation of the number and size of neurons presumably plays a role in the matching of a group of neurons to their target. In this paper the relationship of the cardiac ganglion neurons of the frog to their target is examined. Neurons in this ganglion first appear in the embryo and continue to accumulate for several months, even after the animal has completed metamorphosis, and eventually reach a fixed number of cells in the adult. This prolonged period of neuron production has provided an opportunity to manipulate development and test various mechanisms of neuronal regulation. Manipulation of animal culture conditions and hormone levels has shown that the addition of neurons to the ganglion continues up to the characteristic adult number and depends upon neither the chronological age nor the developmental stage of the animal. The size of neurons also changes markedly during development. The average cell body size initially decreases due to the addition of many smaller cells to the ganglion. After metamorphosis neuron size increases dramatically. The changes in size and number complement one another such that the total volume of neuronal cell bodies increases in proportion with the size of both the target and the entire body. The relationship holds for changes in animal size that extend over 4 orders of magnitude and follows a power function of the form y = bxm. Regulation of cardiac ganglion size can be divided into 3 overlapping phases: (1) the arrival of neurons and precursors from the neural crest, (2) an increase in neuron number, (3) and an increase in neuron size. A common denominator for all phases is that the size of the ganglion is, in a coherent way, precisely matched to the size of its target.

  18. Connectivity between the OFF bipolar type DB3a and six types of ganglion cell in the marmoset retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masri, Rania A; Percival, Kumiko A; Koizumi, Amane; Martin, Paul R; Grünert, Ulrike

    2016-06-15

    Parallel visual pathways originate at the first synapse in the retina, where cones make connections with cone bipolar cells that in turn contact ganglion cells. There are more ganglion cell types than bipolar types, suggesting that there must be divergence from bipolar to ganglion cells. Here we analyze the contacts between an OFF bipolar type (DB3a) and six ganglion cell types in the retina of the marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus). Ganglion cells were transfected via particle-mediated gene transfer of an expression plasmid for the postsynaptic density 95-green fluorescent protein (PSD95-GFP), and DB3a cells were labeled via immunohistochemistry. Ganglion cell types that fully or partially costratified with DB3a cells included OFF parasol, OFF midget, broad thorny, recursive bistratified, small bistratified, and large bistratified cells. On average, the number of DB3a contacts to parasol cells (18 contacts per axon terminal) is higher than that to other ganglion cell types (between four and seven contacts). We estimate that the DB3a output to OFF parasol cells accounts for at least 30% of the total DB3a output. Furthermore, we found that OFF parasol cells receive approximately 20% of their total bipolar input from DB3a cells, suggesting that other diffuse bipolar types also provide input to OFF parasol cells. We conclude that DB3a cells preferentially contact OFF parasol cells but also provide input to other ganglion cell types.

  19. Immunorecognition of estrogen and androgen receptors in the brain and thoracic ganglion mass of mud crab, Scylla paramamosain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haihui Ye; Huiyang Huang; Shaojing Li; Guizhong Wang

    2008-01-01

    The brain and the thoracic ganglion of a crustacean can synthesize and secrete gonad-stimulating hormone (GSH) which stimulates the maturation of gonad. In the previous experiments, sex steroid hormones (estradiol, testosterone, progesterone, etc.) have been detected from the crustacean. However, the feedback regulation of sex steroid hormones on the brain and the thoracic ganglion of the crustacean has not been reported so far. In the present experiment, monoclonal antibodies were applied to investigate the immunorecognition of estrogen receptor (ER) and androgen receptor (AR) in the brain and the thoracic ganglion mass of Scylla paramamosain. The results showed that the distribution of the immunopositive substances of ER and AR was extremely similar. They distributed in the protocerebrum, deutocerebrum and tritocerebrum of the brain, and mainly in protocerebrum. In the thoracic ganglion mass, immunopositive substances distributed in the subesophageal ganglion, thoracic ganglion and abdominal ganglion, and mostly in subesophageal ganglion. Immunopositive substances of ER and AR mostly existed in the cytoplasm of neurons. The present study will provide morphological evidence for the origin and the evolution of ER and AR. In addition, the immunoreactivities of ER and AR suggested that the estrogen and androgen may be involved in the feedback regulation of crustacean neuroendocrine.

  20. Neuroprotective Effect of Melatonin on Retinal Ganglion Cells in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Qiongyan; HU Yizhen; CAO Yang

    2006-01-01

    To investigate the neuroprotective effect of melatonin (MT) on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in rats with ischemia reperfusion injury (RIR), 24 healthy SD rats were randomly divided into two groups:group A and group B. RIR model was induced in the left eyes by increasing the pressure of the anterior chamber. Group A was treated with 10 % alcohol- normal saline (1 mL/kg/d, ip), while group B was treated with 0.5 % MT (1 mL/kg/d, ip). On the basis of the time interval between the left eyes RIR and the sacrifice, rats in both group A and group B were further divided into 3 subgroups: groups A1 and B1 (days 7), groups A2 and B2 (days 14), groups A3 and B3 (days 30), with4 rats in each subgroup. 7 day before the sacrifice, 3 % fluorogold was bilaterally injected into superior colliculi and geniculate body. The eyes were enucleated after being sacrificed, and mounting of the retina from both eyes was performed on a slide and observed under a fluorescence microscope. Four photos were taken from each of the four quadrants of the retina.The labeled-RGCs were counted by using a computerized image analyzer. The rate of the labeledRGCs was used for statistical analysis. Our results showed that, in group A, the rate of the labeled-RGCs was (77. 16±6.35) %, (65.53±7.01) %, (53.85±4.38) % on day 7, 14 and 30.In group B, the rate of the labeled-RGCs was (81.33±9.27) %, (79.80±8.36) %, (80.34±11.05) % on day 7, 14 and 30. In group B, which was treated with MT after RIR, the rate of labeled-RGCs was significantly higher than that of group A on day 14 and day 30 (P<0.05). It is concluded that, in the RIR rats, MT therapy could increase the survival rate of the RGCs and could rescue and restore the injured RGCs.

  1. Tetrandrine protects mouse retinal ganglion cells from ischemic injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li WY

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Weiyi Li,1,2 Chen Yang,2 Jing Lu,2 Ping Huang,1 Colin J Barnstable,2 Chun Zhang,1 Samuel S Zhang2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Peking University Third Hospital, Peking University Eye Center, Beijing, People's Republic of China; 2Department of Neural and Behavioral Sciences, Penn State University, Hershey, PA, USA; 3Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore Abstract: This study aimed to determine the protective effects of tetrandrine (Tet on murine ischemia-injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. For this, we used serum deprivation cell model, glutamate and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced RGC-5 cell death models, and staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 in vitro. We also investigated cell survival of purified primary-cultured RGCs treated with Tet. An in vivo retinal ischemia/reperfusion model was used to examine RGC survival after Tet administration 1 day before ischemia. We found that Tet affected RGC-5 survival in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Compared to dimethyl sulfoxide treatment, Tet increased the numbers of RGC-5 cells by 30% at 72 hours. After 48 hours, Tet protected staurosporine-induced RGC-5 cells from serum deprivation-induced cell death and significantly increased the relative number of cells cultured with 1 mM H2O2 (P<0.01. Several concentrations of Tet significantly prevented 25-mM-glutamate-induced cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Tet also increased primary RGC survival after 72 and 96 hours. Tet administration (10 µM, 2 µL 1 day before retinal ischemia showed RGC layer loss (greater survival, which was less than those in groups with phosphate-buffered saline intravitreal injection plus ischemia in the central (P=0.005, n=6, middle (P=0.018, n=6, and peripheral (P=0.017, n=6 parts of the retina. Thus, Tet conferred protective effects on serum deprivation models of staurosporine-differentiated neuron-like RGC-5 cells and primary cultured murine RGCs. Furthermore, Tet showed

  2. Ganglion block. When and how?; Ganglienblockade. Wann und wie?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bale, R. [Medizinische Universitaet Innsbruck, Sektion fuer Mikroinvasive Therapie Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiologie, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2015-10-15

    Increasing understanding of the anatomy and physiology of neural structures has led to the development of surgical and percutaneous neurodestructive methods in order to target and destroy various components of afferent nociceptive pathways. The dorsal root ganglia and in particular the ganglia of the autonomous nervous system are targets for radiological interventions. The autonomous nervous system is responsible for the regulation of organ functions, sweating, visceral and blood vessel-associated pain. Ganglia of the sympathetic chain and non-myelinized autonomous nerves can be irreversibly destroyed by chemical and thermal ablation. Computed tomography (CT)-guided sympathetic nerve blocks are well established interventional radiological procedures which lead to vasodilatation, reduction of sweating and reduction of pain associated with the autonomous nervous system. Sympathetic blocks are applied for the treatment of various vascular diseases including critical limb ischemia. Other indications for thoracic and lumbar sympathectomy include complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS), chronic tumor associated pain and hyperhidrosis. Neurolysis of the celiac plexus is an effective palliative pain treatment particularly in patients suffering from pancreatic cancer. Percutaneous dorsal root ganglion rhizotomy can be performed in selected patients with radicular pain that is resistant to conventional pharmacological and interventional treatment. (orig.) [German] Anatomische und physiologische Kenntnisse ueber die Funktion von Schmerzbahnen fuehrten zur Entwicklung chirurgischer und perkutaner destruktiver Verfahren, um einzelne Komponenten afferenter Schmerzbahnen anzusteuern bzw. auszuschalten. Neben anderen nervalen Strukturen gelten Hinterstrangganglien und insbesondere die Ganglien des autonomen Nervensystems als Ziele fuer radiologische Interventionen. Das vegetative Nervensystem ist fuer die Organfunktion durch Regulation des Gefaesstonus und fuer die Leitung

  3. MR imaging findings of neurosarcoidosis of the gasserian ganglion: an unusual presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Mercedes; Iglesias, Alfonso; Vila, Oscar; Brasa, Jose [Unidad de Resonancia Magnetica (MEDTEC), Hospital Xeral-Cies, 36204 Vigo (Spain); Conde, Cesareo [Servicio de Neurocirugia, Hospital Xeral-Cies, 36204 Vigo (Spain)

    2002-11-01

    We report the MR imaging findings of an unusual case of neurosarcoidosis of the gasserian ganglion associated with trigeminal neuralgia. No other neurological or extraneurological localization was found. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a mass in the Meckel's diverticulum that was isointense on T1-weighted images and hypointense on T2-weighted images. Gadolinium-enhanced MR imaging showed heterogeneous enhancement. Although rare, sarcoid infiltration of the gasserian ganglion must be considered in the differential diagnosis of an isolated mass in this localization in patients with trigeminal neuralgia. (orig.)

  4. Chicken retinal ganglion cells response characteristics: multi-channel electrode recording study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Aihua; (陈爱华); ZHOU; Yi(周; 艺); GONG; Haiqing; (龚海庆); LIANG; Peiji; (梁培基)

    2003-01-01

    The first stage of visual processing occurs in the retina, the function of which is to process the raw information obtained from the outside world. In the present study, the electrical activities of a group of retinal ganglion cells were recorded from a small functioning piece of retina, using multi-electrode array (MEA), and the action potentials were detected by applying nonlinear algorithm. By analyzing the ensemble retinal ganglion output characteristics, it is revealed that both firing rates and correlated activity between adjacent neurons in the retina contribute to visual information encoding.

  5. Effects of Lead on Temporal Response Properties of Retinal Ganglion Cells in Developing Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮迪云; 汤立新; 赵晨; 郭宇静

    1994-01-01

    Neonatal rats have taken in lead, during the period from their parturition to their weaning, from the milk of dams fed with water containing 0.2% lead acetate solutions. The alterations in the temporal response properties of retinal ganglion cells in adult rats (90 days) following the lead exposure at their developing stage have been studied. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the lead exposure in neonatal rats causes decreases in the optimal temporal frequency, bandwidth at half amplitude, temporal resolution and response phase of the retinal ganglion cells in adult rats. Compared with the sustained cells, the transient cells have a much greater alteration in temporal response properties.

  6. Effects of xenon irradiation of the stellate ganglion region on fibromyalgia

    OpenAIRE

    Nakajima, Fukami; Komoda, Akihiro; Aratani, Satoko; Fujita, Hidetoshi; Kawate, Mariko; Nakatani, Kou; Akiyama, Masako; Makita, Koshi; Nakajima, Toshihiro

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the study was to determine the effect of xenon irradiation of the stellate ganglion region on fibromyalgia. [Subjects] The study included 5 men and 22 women (age, 56.4 ± 16.3 years [range, 25–84 years]) who were diagnosed with fibromyalgia according to the modified 2010 criteria of the American College of Rheumatology between July and August 2013. [Methods] Bilateral xenon light irradiation (0.38–1.1 μm) around the stellate ganglion was performed in the supine position by...

  7. One is the loneliest number: a review of the ganglion impar and its relation to pelvic pain syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Andrew; Muhleman, Mitchel; Osiro, Stephen; Bubb, Kathleen; Snosek, Michael; Shoja, Mohammadali M; Tubbs, R Shane; Loukas, Marios

    2013-10-01

    The ganglion impar is often overlooked as a component of the sympathetic nervous system. Despite its obscurity, this ganglion provides a pathway for neurons by accommodating postganglionic sympathetics, visceral afferents, and somatic fibers traveling to and from the pelvis. Its classic anatomic location as described in the 1720's held up until recently, with the current literature now revealing a great deal of anatomical variability. This variation becomes important when the ganglion impar is used as a treatment target for patients with chronic pelvic pain - its primary clinical implication. The aim of this review was to provide a better understanding of the anatomy of ganglion impar, accounting for variation in size, shape, and location. In addition, the clinical importance and treatment modalities associated with the ganglion impar are outlined.

  8. Wearable PPG Sensor Matrix for Cardiovascular Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Mečņika, V; Kviesis-Kipge, E; Krieviņš, I; Marcikevics, Z; Schwarz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Wearable biomonitoring systems and smart textiles for healthcare are gaining more importance and significance in the R&D sphere due to their potentials in healthcare and sports. Such biomonitoring systems offer a number of advantages in comparison to the conventional equipment proving mobility of the wearer during a long-term monitoring of vital parameters. There are different options to set up the physiological monitoring using wireless and wearable technologies. One of ...

  9. Assessment of the tolerability profile of an ophthalmic solution of 5% glycyrrhizin and copolymer PEG/PPG on healthy volunteers and evaluation of its efficacy in the treatment of moderate to severe blepharitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mencucci R

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Rita Mencucci, Eleonora Favuzza, Ugo MenchiniDepartment of Surgery and Translational Medicine – Eye Clinic, University of Florence, Florence, ItalyPurpose: To evaluate the tolerability on healthy volunteers and the efficacy on subjects affected by chronic moderate/severe blepharitis of a 5% glycyrrhizin and copolymer poly(ethylene glycol/poly(propylene glycol(PEG/PPG ophthalmic solution.Methods: The study was a randomized, controlled, open label, intra-patient monocentric study. It consisted of two different phases, the assessment of tolerability phase on 20 healthy volunteers, and the evaluation of the efficacy on 21 subjects affected by chronic moderate/severe blepharitis; the treatment period was 2 weeks, followed by 1-week of follow-up. In the efficacy phase, in both eyes, eyelid hygiene was also performed. At day 0, 3, 7, 14, and 21 a complete ophthalmological examination was performed. In the tolerability phase, signs of clinical toxicity were recorded and subject-reported symptoms were collected using a questionnaire. In the efficacy phase, global signs and symptoms of blepharitis scores were collected using standardized photographic scales and questionnaire. The statistical analysis was performed using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: No ocular signs of drug toxicity were reported. During the treatment period for tolerability phase, there were statistically significant higher scores of tearing and ocular discomfort in the tolerability study group versus the tolerability control group. In the efficacy phase, differences between global scores of the two groups were statistically significant at day 0 (score of the efficacy study group was higher than the efficacy control group; P = 0.005 and at day 21 (score of the efficacy study group was lower than the efficacy control group (P ≤ 0.001.The difference of global scores at day 3, 7, 14, and 21 versus day 0 was statistically significant in both groups. No serious adverse events

  10. Intraneural ganglion cyst of the ulnar nerve in an unusual location: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ufuk Öztürk

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Intraneural ganglion cysts may be seen on the hypothenar side of the palm. The etiology and treatment of choice are closely associated with each other in this rare disorder. It is important to realize a related articular branch, otherwise the origin of cyst formation remains, and this may cause other para-articular cysts.

  11. Neuroprotective Effect of Tauroursodeoxycholic Acid on N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced Retinal Ganglion Cell Degeneration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Gómez-Vicente

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cell degeneration underlies the pathophysiology of diseases affecting the retina and optic nerve. Several studies have previously evidenced the anti-apoptotic properties of the bile constituent, tauroursodeoxycholic acid, in diverse models of photoreceptor degeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-induced damage in the rat retina using a functional and morphological approach. Tauroursodeoxycholic acid was administered intraperitoneally before and after intravitreal injection of NMDA. Three days after insult, full-field electroretinograms showed reductions in the amplitudes of the positive and negative-scotopic threshold responses, scotopic a- and b-waves and oscillatory potentials. Quantitative morphological evaluation of whole-mount retinas demonstrated a reduction in the density of retinal ganglion cells. Systemic administration of tauroursodeoxycholic acid attenuated the functional impairment induced by NMDA, which correlated with a higher retinal ganglion cell density. Our findings sustain the efficacy of tauroursodeoxycholic acid administration in vivo, suggesting it would be a good candidate for the pharmacological treatment of degenerative diseases coursing with retinal ganglion cell loss.

  12. Changes in ganglion cell physiology during retinal degeneration influence excitability by prosthetic electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Alice; Ratliff, Charles; Sampath, Alapakkam; Weiland, James

    2016-01-01

    Objective Here we investigate ganglion cell physiology in healthy and degenerating retina to test its influence on threshold to electrical stimulation. Approach Age-related Macular Degeneration and Retinitis Pigmentosa cause blindness via outer retinal degeneration. Inner retinal pathways that transmit visual information to the central brain remain intact, so direct electrical stimulation from prosthetic devices offers the possibility for visual restoration. Since inner retinal physiology changes during degeneration, we characterize physiological properties and responses to electrical stimulation in retinal ganglion cells of both wild type mice and the rd10 mouse model of retinal degeneration. Main results Our aggregate results support previous observations that elevated thresholds characterize diseased retinas. However, a physiology-driven classification scheme reveals distinct sub-populations of ganglion cells with thresholds either normal or strongly elevated compared to wild-type. When these populations are combined, only a weakly elevated threshold with large variance is observed. The cells with normal threshold are more depolarized at rest and exhibit periodic oscillations. Significance During degeneration, physiological changes in retinal ganglion cells affect the threshold stimulation currents required to evoke action potentials. PMID:26905177

  13. Visual Field Defects and Retinal Ganglion Cell Losses in Human Glaucoma Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwerth, Ronald S.; Quigley, Harry A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The depth of visual field defects are correlated with retinal ganglion cell densities in experimental glaucoma. This study was to determine whether a similar structure-function relationship holds for human glaucoma. Methods The study was based on retinal ganglion cell densities and visual thresholds of patients with documented glaucoma (Kerrigan-Baumrind, et al.) The data were analyzed by a model that predicted ganglion cell densities from standard clinical perimetry, which were then compared to histologic cell counts. Results The model, without free parameters, produced accurate and relatively precise quantification of ganglion cell densities associated with visual field defects. For 437 sets of data, the unity correlation for predicted vs. measured cell densities had a coefficient of determination of 0.39. The mean absolute deviation of the predicted vs. measured values was 2.59 dB, the mean and SD of the distribution of residual errors of prediction was -0.26 ± 3.22 dB. Conclusions Visual field defects by standard clinical perimetry are proportional to neural losses caused by glaucoma. Clinical Relevance The evidence for quantitative structure-function relationships provides a scientific basis of interpreting glaucomatous neuropathy from visual thresholds and supports the application of standard perimetry to establish the stage of the disease. PMID:16769839

  14. DIFFERENT EFFECTS OF MUSCARINIC AGONISTS IN RAT SUPERIOR CERVICAL-GANGLION AND HIPPOCAMPAL SLICES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BODDEKE, HWGM

    1991-01-01

    In this study the effects of muscarinic antagonists and agonists on M1 muscarinic receptors in the isolated rat superior cervical ganglion and the rat hippocampal slice were investigated. Oxotremorine and APE but not pilocarpine, McN-A-343 or 4-Cl-McN-A-343 induced small M2 muscarinic

  15. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Kietzell, M; Richter, H; Bruderer, T; Goldenberger, D; Emonet, S; Strahm, C

    2016-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed.

  16. Meningitis and Bacteremia Due to Neisseria cinerea following a Percutaneous Rhizotomy of the Trigeminal Ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    von Kietzell, M.; Richter, H.; Bruderer, T.; Goldenberger, D.; Emonet, S; Strahm, C.

    2015-01-01

    Neisseria cinerea is a human commensal. The first known case of meningitis and bacteremia due to Neisseria cinerea following percutaneous glycerol instillation of the trigeminal ganglion is reported. Conventional phenotypic methods and complete 16S RNA gene sequencing accurately identified the pathogen. Difficulties in differentiation from pathogenic neisseriae are discussed.

  17. Anatomical and histological data on the ciliary ganglion in the Egyptian spiny mouse (Acomys cahirinus Desmarest).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Elzbieta; Kuder, Tadeusz; Szczurkowski, Aleksander; Kuchinka, Jacek

    2004-08-01

    The morphology and topography of the ciliary ganglion in the Egyptian spiny mouse were studied with use of histochemical and histological techniques. The ciliary ganglion of the Egyptian spiny mouse consisted of between 3 and 4 agglomerations of nerve cells. The largest was situated at the point where the ventral branch of the oculomotor nerve divides into two branches. The next two smaller aggregations were located on the superior and lateral surfaces of the optic nerve where it crossed the oculomotor nerve. From the main agglomerations of neurocytes arose between 3 and 4 intensively stained postganglionic cholinergic fibres. These followed the optic nerve to the eyeball. On the cross-sections of these bundles small agglomerations of neurocytes were observed. These decreased in size to only 2 or 3 cells towards the sclera. The ganglionic neurocytes in the largest ganglion varied from 15 to 30 microm in diameter. They were distributed uniformly over the whole surface of the sections. All the ganglia had connective capsules.

  18. Ganglion cell distribution and retinal resolution in the Florida manatee, Trichechus manatus latirostris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mass, Alla M; Ketten, Darlene R; Odell, Daniel K; Supin, Alexander Ya

    2012-01-01

    The topographic organization of retinal ganglion cells was examined in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) to assess ganglion cell size and distribution and to estimate retinal resolution. The ganglion cell layer of the manatee's retina was comprised primarily of large neurons with broad intercellular spaces. Cell sizes varied from 10 to 60 μm in diameter (mean 24.3 μm). The retinal wholemounts from adult animals measured 446-501 mm(2) in area with total ganglion cell counts of 62,000-81,800 (mean 70,200). The cell density changed across the retina, with the maximum in the area below the optic disc and decreasing toward the retinal edges and in the immediate vicinity of the optic disc. The maximum cell density ranged from 235 to 337 cells per millimeter square in the adult retinae. Two wholemounts obtained from juvenile animals were 271 and 282 mm(2) in area with total cell numbers of 70,900 and 68,700, respectively (mean 69,800), that is, nearly equivalent to those of adults, but juvenile retinae consequently had maximum cell densities that were higher than those of adults: 478 and 491 cells per millimeter square. Calculations indicate a retinal resolution of ∼19' (1.6 cycles per degree) in both adult and juvenile retinae.

  19. Long-lasting analgesic effect of radiofrequency treatment of the lumbosacral dorsal root ganglion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, JWM; Wynne, HJ; van Wijk, R.

    2001-01-01

    Object. The authors conducted a study to establish the benefit of radiofrequency (RF) treatment of the lumbosacral dorsal root ganglion (DRG) as a therapy to reduce symptomatic pain in patients with chronic spinal pain radiating to the leg. Methods. Two hundred seventy-nine patients were evaluated a

  20. Stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) for cluster headache treatment. Pathway CH-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoenen, Jean; Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Lantéri-Minet, Michel

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundThe pain and autonomic symptoms of cluster headache (CH) result from activation of the trigeminal parasympathetic reflex, mediated through the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG). We investigated the safety and efficacy of on-demand SPG stimulation for chronic CH (CCH).MethodsA multicenter...

  1. Long-term effectiveness of sphenopalatine ganglion stimulation for cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jürgens, Tim P; Barloese, Mads; May, Arne

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) plays a pivotal role in cluster headache (CH) pathophysiology as the major efferent parasympathetic relay. We evaluated the long-term effectiveness of SPG stimulation in medically refractory, chronic CH patients. METHODS: Thirty-three patients were...

  2. Rac1 selective activation improves retina ganglion cell survival and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzetto, E.; Ettorre, M.; Pontelli, V.; Bolomini-Vittori, M.; Bolognin, S.; Zorzan, S.; Laudanna, C.; Buffelli, M.

    2013-01-01

    In adult mammals, after optic nerve injury, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) do not regenerate their axons and most of them die by apoptosis within a few days. Recently, several strategies that activate neuronal intracellular pathways were proposed to prevent such degenerative processes. The rho-relate

  3. Rac1 selective activation improves retina ganglion cell survival and regeneration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzetto, E.; Ettorre, M.; Pontelli, V.; Bolomini-Vittori, M.; Bolognin, S.; Zorzan, S.; Laudanna, C.; Buffelli, M.

    2013-01-01

    In adult mammals, after optic nerve injury, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) do not regenerate their axons and most of them die by apoptosis within a few days. Recently, several strategies that activate neuronal intracellular pathways were proposed to prevent such degenerative processes. The

  4. The clinico-anatomic explanation for tibial intraneural ganglion cysts arising from the superior tibiofibular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spinner, Robert J. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Neurologic Surgery, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mayo Clinic, Department of Anatomy, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mokhtarzadeh, Ali; Schiefer, Terry K. [Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Krishnan, Kartik G. [Carl Gustav Carus University Hospital, Department of Neurological Surgery, Dresden (Germany); Kliot, Michel [University of Washington, Department of Neurosurgery, Seattle, Washington (United States); Amrami, Kimberly K. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2007-04-15

    To demonstrate that tibial intraneural ganglia in the popliteal fossa are derived from the posterior portion of the superior tibiofibular joint, in a mechanism similar to that of peroneal intraneural ganglia, which have recently been shown to arise from the anterior portion of the same joint. Retrospective clinical study and prospective anatomic study. The clinical records and MRI findings of three patients with tibial intraneural ganglion cysts were analyzed and compared with those of one patient with a tibial extraneural ganglion cyst and one volunteer. Seven cadaveric limbs were dissected to define the articular anatomy of the posterior aspect of the superior tibiofibular joint. The condition of the three patients with intraneural ganglia recurred because their joint connections were not identified initially. In two patients there was no cyst recurrence when the joint connection was treated at revision surgery; the third patient did not wish to undergo additional surgery. The one patient with an extraneural ganglion had the joint connection identified at initial assessment and had successful surgery addressing the cyst and the joint connection. Retrospective evaluation of the tibial intraneural ganglion cysts revealed stereotypic features, which allowed their accurate diagnosis and distinction from extraneural cases. The intraneural cysts had tubular (rather than globular) appearances. They derived from the postero-inferior portion of the superior tibiofibular joint and followed the expected course of the articular branch on the posterior surface of the popliteus muscle. The cysts then extended intra-epineurially into the parent tibial nerves, where they contained displaced nerve fascicles. The extraneural cyst extrinsically compressed the tibial nerve but did not directly involve it. All cadaveric specimens demonstrated a small single articular branch, which derived from the tibial nerve to the popliteus. The branch coursed obliquely across the posterior

  5. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyan Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure signals may modulate ChBF, we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler flowmetry to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40-80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (i.e. vasodilation and choroidal blood velocity (presumed orbital vessel dilation. Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure. We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA, thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the blood pressure-dependent regulation of ChBF.

  6. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  7. [Relations between the accessory nerve and the distal ganglion of the vagus nerve in sheep during the prenatal period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pospieszny, N

    1984-01-01

    This contribution presents the results of morphological studies regarding the nervus accessorius and the ganglion distale nervi vagi of the sheep during the prenatal period. Special attention was paid to the roots of the brain and spinal medulla, which are implicated in the formation of the nervus accessorius, and the region of the spinal medulla in embryos at different stages of development. We investigated the relationship between the above nerve and the ganglion distale nervi vagi. The morphology of this ganglion was also investigated, and its external structure is described.

  8. Ganglion cell size and distribution in the retina of the two-toed sloth (Choloepus didactylus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade-da-Costa, B L; Pessoa, V F; Bousfield, J D; Clarke, R J

    1989-01-01

    The distribution of ganglion cell densities and sizes was studied in Nissl-stained flat-mount retinae of the two-toed sloth. The area centralis, a weak specialization with low ganglion cell density, is located in the temporal retina close to the center of the eye. The presence of a visual streak was noted. The distribution of different ganglion cell sizes was approximately equal throughout the retina. Although the retinal organization differs from that of the closely related three-toed sloth, the presumed function of retinal specializations in both species is to guide limb movements by permitting visualization of the branch along which the animal is climbing.

  9. Three dimensional-magnetic resonance imaging of dorsal root. Ganglion in lumbosacral disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taira, Gaku [Tokyo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is commonly used for the diagnosis of lumbosacral disease. However, there are certain pitfalls in the use of this imaging technique. In particular, MRI is inadequate for accurate diagnosis of lateral spinal root lesions. Furthermore, it is also difficult to show the root ganglion of both sides on a plane by classical 2D-MRI. Moreover 2D-coronal views do not show several roots in one image because each lumbosacral nerve root is on a different plane. We have developed a new method of three-dimensional MRI (3D-MRI) which enables a stereoscopic view of the spinal cord and both sides of spinal nerve roots in one image. We evaluated three techniques of 3D-MRI, including rapid imaging spin echo (RISE), small tip angle gradient echo (STAGE) and short TI inversion recovery (STIR), in 30 patients with lumbar disc herniation. In a separate anatomical study lumbosacral nerve roots and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were investigated by 3D-MRI in 20 normal subjects. In a pathophysiological study the use of 3D-MRI defects the signal changes following damage to the spinal nerve roots or ganglion in 70 patients. Our results indicated that the STIR method is the best for identifying abnormalities of the spinal cord, roots and intervertebral disc. It was possible to image the lateral part of damaged nerve roots. The S1 angulations and length were significantly smaller than those of others (p<0.05). The S1 DRG was oval and was the largest. With regard to signal changes in damaged root ganglion, a good correlation between root compression and root edema was detected by basic experiments. We are currently examining the relationship between the damaged root ganglion, pain and sensory disturbance. This study showed that the dorsal root ganglion plays an important role in sensory control of radiculopathy. In conclusion, our new data show a close relationship between sensory loss, pain and DRG finding on 3D-MRI. (author)

  10. Resección guiada por ecografía de gangliones dorsales de muñeca. [Ultrasound-Guided resection of dorsal wrist ganglion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damián G. Bustos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In­tro­duc­ción: el objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar prospectivamente los resultados del drenaje de gangliones dorsales de muñeca y la ruptura de su pedículo guiada por ecografía, y determinar su tasa de recidiva, las complicaciones y los resultados subjetivos. Materiales ­y ­Métodos: se evaluaron prospectivamente 32 pacientes con gangliones dorsales sintomáticos de muñeca tratados mediante punción guiada por ecografía, aspiración del contenido y ruptura del pedículo con un trocar, entre enero de 2010 y junio de 2011. La edad de los pacientes promedió 31 años. Todos realizaban tareas administrativas, y retornaron a sus tareas habituales al día siguiente del procedimiento. El puntaje DASH previo al procedimiento fue, en promedio, de 2,90. El dolor previo al procedimiento promedió 7,75 puntos. Se separó a los pacientes en dos grupos, gangliones primarios (grupo 1: 19 pacientes y gangliones recurrentes con cirugía previa (grupo 2: 13 pacientes. Resultados: once pacientes tuvieron recidivas (34,3% al año de seguimiento: 5 del grupo 1 (26,31% y 6 del grupo 2 (46,1%. El puntaje DASH a los 6 meses promedió 1,91 (rango 1,02-3,98. El dolor a los 6 meses promedió 1,53 puntos (rango 0-4. Ningún paciente presentó complicaciones neurológicas o tendinosas, infección o hematomas (seguimiento promedio 6 meses. Conclusión:­ la técnica bajo control ecográfico es mínimamente invasiva con una tasa de recurrencia aceptable (26% en pacientes sin antecedente quirúrgico, considerando que plantea menores riesgos que los procedimientos quirúrgicos al igual que un menor costo y bajo costo laboral.

  11. Large infrapatellar ganglionic cyst of the knee fat pad: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilias Apostolos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Large ganglionic cystic formations arising from the infrapatellar fat pad are quite uncommon and only a few are mentioned in the literature. An open excision in these cases is mandatory. Case presentation We report the case of a large infrapatellar fat pad ganglion in a 37-year-old Greek man with chronic knee discomfort. The ganglionic cyst originated from the infrapatellar fat pad and had no intrasynovial extension. The final diagnosis was determined with magnetic resonance imaging of the knee, and the lesion was treated with surgery. Conclusions These lesions are asymptomatic in most cases but often are misdiagnosed as meniscal or ligamentous lesions of the knee joint. Nowadays, the therapeutic trend for such lesions is arthroscopic excision, but when there is a large ganglion, as in this case report, the treatment should be an open and thorough resection. This report is intended mostly but not exclusively for clinical physicians and radiologists.

  12. Percutaneous radio-frequency thermocoagulation of the Gasserian ganglion guided by high-speed real-time CT fluoroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koizuka, Shiro [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Maebashi (Japan); Gunma University Hospital, Department of Anesthesiology, Maebashi (Japan); Saito, Shigeru; Sekimoto, Kenichi; Tobe, Masaru; Obata, Hideaki [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Maebashi (Japan); Koyama, Yoshinori [Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Maebashi (Japan)

    2009-09-15

    Although Gasserian ganglion block is an established treatment for trigeminal neuralgia, the foramen ovale cannot always be clearly visualized by classical X-ray radiography. We present a new method for percutaneous radio-frequency thermocoagulation of the Gasserian ganglion, in which computed tomography (CT) fluoroscopy is used to guide needle placement. In the present study, 15 patients with trigeminal neuralgia underwent percutaneous radio-frequency thermocoagulation of the Gasserian ganglion guided by high-speed real-time CT fluoroscopy. Trigeminal neuralgia was improved in all patients after treatment without any severe complications. Moderate dysesthesia occurred in only one case. CT fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous radio-frequency thermocoagulation of the Gasserian ganglion was safe, quick, and effective for patients with intractable idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia. (orig.)

  13. Enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion mimicking a metastatic lymph node in the retropharyngeal space: A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae Min; Kim, Jin Na; Kim, Se Hoon; Choi, Eun Chang [Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The superior cervical sympathetic ganglion, the largest and most cranial of the three cervical sympathetic ganglia, transfers sympathetic signals to specific targets on the head and neck. This ganglion is located just lateral to the retropharyngeal space along the medial margin of the carotid sheath. Located thus, an enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion can mimic a metastatic lymph node in the retropharyngeal space of the suprahyoid neck in head and neck cancer patients. However, this is often disregarded by radiologists due to lack of interest in its anatomic location. We present a case of an enlarged superior cervical sympathetic ganglion mimicking a retropharyngeal metastatic lymph node in a 42-year-old man with oral tongue cancer.

  14. Transplantation of human adipose tissue-derived stem cells for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons in deaf guinea pigs

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    Sujeong Jang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excessive noise, ototoxic drugs, infections, autoimmune diseases, and aging can cause loss of spiral ganglion neurons, leading to permanent sensorineural hearing loss in mammals. Stem cells have been confirmed to be able to differentiate into spiral ganglion neurons. Little has been reported on adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs for repair of injured spiral ganglion neurons. In this study, we hypothesized that transplantation of neural induced-human ADSCs (NI-hADSCs can repair the injured spiral ganglion neurons in guinea pigs with neomycin-induced sensorineural hearing loss. NI-hADSCs were induced with culture medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor and forskolin and then injected to the injured cochleae. Guinea pigs that received injection of Hanks′ balanced salt solution into the cochleae were used as controls. Hematoxylin-eosin staining showed that at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the number of surviving spiral ganglion neurons in the cell transplantation group was significantly increased than that in the control group. Also at 8 weeks after cell transplantation, immunohistochemical staining showed that a greater number of NI-hADSCs in the spiral ganglions were detected in the cell transplantation group than in the control group, and these NI-hADSCs expressed neuronal markers neurofilament protein and microtubule-associated protein 2. Within 8 weeks after cell transplantation, the guinea pigs in the cell transplantation group had a gradually decreased auditory brainstem response threshold, while those in the control group had almost no response to 80 dB of clicks or pure tone burst. These findings suggest that a large amount of NI-hADSCs migrated to the spiral ganglions, survived for a period of time, repaired the injured spiral ganglion cells, and thereby contributed to the recovery of sensorineural hearing loss in guinea pigs.

  15. Axonal transmission in the retina introduces a small dispersion of relative timing in the ganglion cell population response.

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    Günther Zeck

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Visual stimuli elicit action potentials in tens of different retinal ganglion cells. Each ganglion cell type responds with a different latency to a given stimulus, thus transforming the high-dimensional input into a temporal neural code. The timing of the first spikes between different retinal projection neurons cells may further change along axonal transmission. The purpose of this study is to investigate if intraretinal conduction velocity leads to a synchronization or dispersion of the population signal leaving the eye. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We 'imaged' the initiation and transmission of light-evoked action potentials along individual axons in the rabbit retina at micron-scale resolution using a high-density multi-transistor array. We measured unimodal conduction velocity distributions (1.3±0.3 m/sec, mean ± SD for axonal populations at all retinal eccentricities with the exception of the central part that contains myelinated axons. The velocity variance within each piece of retina is caused by ganglion cell types that show narrower and slightly different average velocity tuning. Ganglion cells of the same type respond with similar latency to spatially homogenous stimuli and conduct with similar velocity. For ganglion cells of different type intraretinal conduction velocity and response latency to flashed stimuli are negatively correlated, indicating that differences in first spike timing increase (up to 10 msec. Similarly, the analysis of pair-wise correlated activity in response to white-noise stimuli reveals that conduction velocity and response latency are negatively correlated. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Intraretinal conduction does not change the relative spike timing between ganglion cells of the same type but increases spike timing differences among ganglion cells of different type. The fastest retinal ganglion cells therefore act as indicators of new stimuli for postsynaptic neurons. The intraretinal dispersion

  16. Nitric oxide in prepubertal rat ovary contribution of the ganglionic nitric oxide synthase system via superior ovarian nerve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casais, Marilina; Delgado, Silvia Marcela; Vallcaneras, Sandra; Sosa, Zulema; Rastrilla, Ana María

    2007-02-01

    Both peripheral innervation and nitric oxide (NO) participate in ovarian steroidogenesis. Considering the existence of the nitric oxide/ nitric oxide synthase system in the peripheral neural system and in the ovary, the aim of this work was to analyze if the liberation of NO in the ovarian compartment of prepubertal rats is of ovarian and/or ganglionic origin. The analysis is carried out from a physiological point of view using the experimental coeliac ganglion--Superior Ovarian Nerve--ovary model with and without ganglionic cholinergic stimulus Acetylcholine (Ach) 10(-6) M. Non selective and selective inhibitors of the synthase nitric oxide enzyme were added to the ovarian and ganglionic compartment, and the liberation of nitrites (soluble metabolite of the nitric oxide) in the ovarian incubation liquid was measured. We found that the non-selective inhibitor L-nitro-arginina methyl ester (L-NAME) in the ovarian compartment decreased the liberation of nitrites, and that Aminoguanidine (AG) in two concentrations in a non-dose dependent form provoked the same effect. The addition of Ach in ganglion magnified the effect of the inhibitors of the NOS enzyme. The most relevant results after the addition of inhibitors in ganglion were obtained with AG 400 and 800 microM. The inhibition was made evident with and without the joint action of Ach in ganglion. These data suggest that the greatest production of NO in the ovarian compartment comes from the ovary, mainly the iNOS isoform, though the coeliac ganglion also contributes through the superior ovarian nerve but with less quantity.

  17. [Nitric oxide production by normal and injured neurons of Nodose ganglion and Nucleus dorsalis of Vagus nerve].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motavkin, P A; Shumatova, T A; Andreeva, N A; Tikhanskiĭ, S N

    2000-01-01

    Nodosum ganglion and nucleus dorsalis contain from 19.2 to 22.65% of NO-positive neurons. Their amount increases up to almost 77.4 and 68.8% in the ganglion and the nucleus dorsalis, respectively, in the damaged nervus vagus due to i-NOS transcription. It has been shown that NO participates in desorganization and recovery of the traumatic neuron, as auto- and paracrine regulator.

  18. Loss of Responses to Visual But Not Electrical Stimulation in Ganglion Cells of Rats With Severe Photoreceptor Degeneration

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Retinal implants are intended to help patients with degenerative conditions by electrically stimulating surviving cells to produce artificial vision. However, little is known about how individual retinal ganglion cells respond to direct electrical stimulation in degenerating retina. Here we used a transgenic rat model to characterize ganglion cell responses to light and electrical stimulation during photoreceptor degeneration. Retinas from pigmented P23H-1 rats were compared with wild-type re...

  19. Intratympanic steroid prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.

    2010-01-01

    for 3 days. Hearing loss and cochlear damage were assessed by distortion product otoacoustic emissions, auditory brainstem response at 16 kHz, and spiral ganglion neuron density. Results: Fifty-six days after infection, auditory brainstem response showed no significant differences between groups......, and distortion product otoacoustic emissions showed significant hearing loss at the low frequencies in animals treated with intratympanic steroid compared with animals treated with systemic saline (p neurons...... treatment prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. This finding is clinically relevant in relation to postmeningitic hearing rehabilitation by cochlear implantation. However, the drug instillation in the middle ear induced local fibrosis and a concurrent low...

  20. The same dorsal root ganglion neurons innervate uterus and colon in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaban, Victor; Christensen, Amy; Wakamatsu, Micah; McDonald, Michelle; Rapkin, Andrea; McDonald, John; Micevych, Paul

    2007-02-12

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether primary sensory neurons that innervate the uterus receive convergent input from the colon. To test this, in the rat, cell bodies of colonic and uterine dorsal root ganglia were retrogradely labeled with fluorescent tracer dyes microinjected into the colon/rectum and bilaterally into the uterine horns. Ganglia were harvested, cryoprotected and cut into 20 microm slices to identify positively stained cells for fluorescent microscopy. Up to 5% of neurons were colon-specific or uterus-specific, and 10-15% of labeled ganglion neurons innervate both viscera in the L1, L2, L6 and S1-S3 levels. These results suggest a novel form of visceral sensory integration in the dorsal root ganglion that may underlie comorbidity of many functional pain syndromes.

  1. [Control of blood flow in nasal mucosa by electro-stimulation of sphenopalatine ganglion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, C; Wang, Z

    1997-06-01

    The effects of control of blood flow on cat nasal mucosa by stimulating sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) were studied using laser Doppler flowmetry in order to investigate the role of SPG. The study showed that the stimulation on one side of SPG could induce vasodilation, with increased blood flow, as well as protective reflexes on both sides. The reactivity depended on the stimulation intensity, frequency and duration. The stimulation on one side of postganglionic parasympathetic nerves, in which the stellate ganglion was resected, caused vasodilation only ipsilaterally. The results indicated that the vasodilation induced by stimulating SPG might be mediated via central reflex arc. The "reverse blood regulation" phenomenon was observed during stimulation of SPG as well. The mechanisms of "reverse blood regulation" induced by stimulating SPG need further investigation.

  2. Sphenopalatine ganglion treatment with radiofrequency in a Sluder syndrome young patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmelo Costa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sluder's neuralgia or sphenopalatine ganglion neuralgia is a pain syndrome first described by Sluder in 1908. The clinical picture is characterised by pain starting around the eye and the route of nose. Typically the pain is accompanied by parasympathetic disautonomic signs such as lacrimation and/or rhinorrhea. However, many official headache classifications do not mention the Sluder's neuralgia at all, which is instead classified as a cluster headache (CH. In case of resistance to pharmacological management pain the physician could recur to sphenopalatine ganglion (GSP neurolytic block with continuous radiofrequency (CRF or its no ablative alternative with pulsed radiofrequency (PRF. We are presenting a case of a 16-year-old woman who suffered from a typical Sluder's neuralgia successfully treated with GSP PRF.

  3. Intratympanic steroid prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worsøe, Lise Lotte; Brandt, C.T.; Lund, S.P.;

    2010-01-01

    , and distortion product otoacoustic emissions showed significant hearing loss at the low frequencies in animals treated with intratympanic steroid compared with animals treated with systemic saline (p test). However, intratympanic steroid significantly increased the number of viable neurons...... in the spiral ganglion compared with both intratympanic and systemic saline (p = 0.0082 and p = 0.0089; Mann-Whitney test). Histology revealed fibrosis of the tympanic membrane and cavity in steroid-treated animals, which plausibly caused the low-frequency hearing loss. Conclusion: Intratympanic betamethasone...... treatment prevents long-term spiral ganglion neuron loss in experimental pneumococcal meningitis. This finding is clinically relevant in relation to postmeningitic hearing rehabilitation by cochlear implantation. However, the drug instillation in the middle ear induced local fibrosis and a concurrent low...

  4. Direction selectivity is computed by active dendritic integration in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivyer, Benjamin; Williams, Stephen R

    2013-12-01

    Active dendritic integration is thought to enrich the computational power of central neurons. However, a direct role of active dendritic processing in the execution of defined neuronal computations in intact neural networks has not been established. Here we used multi-site electrophysiological recording techniques to demonstrate that active dendritic integration underlies the computation of direction selectivity in rabbit retinal ganglion cells. Direction-selective retinal ganglion cells fire action potentials in response to visual image movement in a preferred direction. Dendritic recordings revealed that preferred-direction moving-light stimuli led to dendritic spike generation in terminal dendrites, which were further integrated and amplified as they spread through the dendritic arbor to the axon to drive action potential output. In contrast, when light bars moved in a null direction, synaptic inhibition vetoed neuronal output by directly inhibiting terminal dendritic spike initiation. Active dendritic integration therefore underlies a physiologically engaged circuit-based computation in the retina.

  5. Lethal effect of the serotonin-xylocaineR association in ganglion-blocked rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, L B; Oliveira-Filho, R M; Armonia, P L; Saraceni, G; Nassif, M; De Lucia, R

    1976-12-01

    In rats anestetized with urethane and under ganglionic blockade by hexamethonium (20 mg/kg, i.v.), the i.v. injection of serotonin (60 mug/kg) determined apnea, ECG alterations and a brief hypotensive response which is similar to that as elicited when 5-HT is given to intact rats. During the hypertension which follows that initial response, apnea is still present along with more severe ECG changes. After that, blood pressure falls into a prolonged hypotension, which is invariably accompanied by death. Neither norepinephrine, nor respiratory analeptics (CoramineR, RemeflinF) were able to prevent the fatal outcome. Only artificial respiration was found to be useful in some instances. It was concluded that the association serotonin plus lidocaine becomes lethal when given to ganglion-blocked rate, and this toxic effect can be ascribed mainly to the respiratory depressor activity of the drugs.

  6. Effects of low level laser treatment on the survival of axotomized retinal ganglion cells in adult Hamsters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwok-Fai So; Mason Chin Pang Leung; Qi Cui

    2014-01-01

    Injury to axons close to the neuronal bodies in the mammalian central nervous system causes a large proportion of parenting neurons to degenerate. It is known that optic nerve transection close to the eye in rodents leads to a loss of about half of retinal ganglion cells in 1 week and about 90% in 2 weeks. Using low level laser treatment in the present study, we demonstrated that treatment with helium-neon (660 nm) laser with 15 mW power could delay retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve axotomy in adult hamsters. The effect was most apparent in the ifrst week with a short period of treatment time (5 minutes) in which 65–66% of retinal ganglion cells survived the optic nerve axotomy whereas 45–47% of retinal ganglion cells did so in optic nerve axotomy controls. We also found that single dose and early commencement of laser irradiation were important in protecting retinal ganglion cells following optic nerve axotomy. These ifndings thus convincingly show that appropriate laser treatment may be neuroprotective to retinal gan-glion cells.

  7. Specific projection of displaced retinal ganglion cells upon the accessory optic system in the pigeon (Columbia livia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karten, J H; Fite, K V; Brecha, N

    1977-04-01

    In the pigeon, the nucleus of the basal optic root, a component of the accessory optic system, projects directly upon the vestibulo-cerebellum. This nucleus receives a prominent projection composed of large-diameter retinal axons, known as the basal optic root. The cells of origin of this tract were identified using horseradish peroxidase (donor:hydrogen-peroxide oxidoreductase, EC 1.11.1.7) as a retrograde marker. Injections of horseradish peroxidase confined primarily to the basal optic root nucleus labeled displaced ganglion cells of the contralateral retina. Cell sizes were 18-30 micronm and the dendrites of these cells were confined to the first stratum of the inner plexiform layer. Approximately 3700 displaced ganglion cells were labeled after injections of horseradish peroxidase into basal optic root. In contrast, no displaced ganglion cells were labeled after injections of horseradish peroxidase into the optic tectum, which labeled only cells in the ganglion cell layer proper. These findings indicate that displaced ganglion cells constitute a unique population of retinal neurons that give rise to a bisynaptic pathway directed to the cerebellum via the nucleus of the basal optic root. These displaced ganglion cells may play a major role inoculomotor reflexes.

  8. Is the capacity for optic nerve regeneration related to continued retinal ganglion cell production in the frog?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, J S; Jack, J L; Easter, S S

    1989-01-01

    In the central nervous system of fish and frogs, some, but not all, axons can regenerate. Retinal ganglion cells are among those that can. The retinae of fish and frogs produce new retinal neurons, including ganglion cells, for months or years after hatching. We have evaluated the hypothesis that retinal axonal regeneration is obligatorily linked to continued production of new ganglion cells. We used bromodeoxyuridine immunocytochemistry to assess retinal neurogenesis in juvenile, yearling, and 10 year old Xenopus laevis. Retinal ganglion cell genesis was vigorous in the marginal retina of the juveniles, but in the yearlings and the 10 year olds, no new ganglion cells were produced there. Cellular proliferation in the central retina was evident at all three ages, but none of the cells produced centrally were in the ganglion cell layer. Regeneration was examined in vivo by cutting one optic nerve and then, weeks later, injecting the eye with tritiated proline. Autoradiographs of brain sections showed that the optic nerves of all three ages regenerated. Regeneration in vitro was assessed using retinal explants from frogs of all three ages. In all cases, the cultures produced neurites, with some age-specific differences in the patterns of outgrowth. We conclude that retinal axonal regeneration is not linked obligatorily to maintained neurogenesis.

  9. THE NEURONAL DISTRIBUTION OF CANNABINOID RECEPTOR TYPE 1 IN THE TRIGEMINAL GANGLION OF THE RAT

    OpenAIRE

    2003-01-01

    Cannabinoid compounds have been shown to produce antinociception and antihyperalgesia by acting upon cannabinoid receptors located in both the CNS and the periphery. A potential mechanism by which cannabinoids could inhibit nociception in the periphery is the activation of cannabinoid receptors located on one or more classes of primary nociceptive neurons. To address this hypothesis, we evaluated the neuronal distribution of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) of...

  10. Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor 8 in neurite outgrowth from spiral ganglion neurons in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    García-Hernández, Sofía; Potashner, Steven J.; Morest, D. Kent

    2013-01-01

    Many neurons degenerate after injuries resulting from overstimulation, drugs, genetic mutations, and aging. Although several growth factors and neurotrophins delay degeneration and promote regrowth of neural processes, the role of fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) in mammalian spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) neurite outgrowth has not been examined. This study develops and uses SGN cell cultures suitable for experimental analysis, it investigates whether FGF8a and FGF8b isoforms affect the neuri...

  11. Compression of the radial nerve at the elbow by a ganglion: two case reports

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    Jou I-Ming

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Radial nerve compression by a ganglion in the radial tunnel is not common. Compressive neuropathies of the radial nerve in the radial tunnel can occur anywhere along the course of the nerve and may lead to various clinical manifestations, depending on which branch is involved. We present two unusual cases of ganglions located in the radial tunnel and requiring surgical excision. Case presentation A 31-year-old woman complained of difficulty in fully extending her fingers at the metacarpophalangeal joint for 2 weeks. Before her first visit, she had noticed a swelling and pain in her right elbow over the anterolateral forearm. The extension muscle power of the metacarpophalangeal joints at the fingers and the interphalangeal joint at the thumb had decreased. Sonography and magnetic resonance imaging of the elbow revealed a cystic lesion located at the area of the arcade of Frohse. A thin-walled ovoid cyst was found against the posterior interosseous nerve during surgical excision. Pathological examination was compatible with a ganglion cyst. The second case involved a 36-year-old woman complaining of numbness over the radial aspect of her hand and wrist, but without swelling or tumor in this area. The patient had slightly decreased sensitivity in the distribution of the sensory branch of the radial nerve. There was no muscle weakness on extension of the fingers and wrist. Surgical exposure defined a ganglion cyst in the shoulder of the division of the radial nerve into its superficial sensory and posterior interosseous components. There has been no disease recurrence after following both patients for 2 years. Conclusion Compression of nerves by extraneural soft tissue tumors of the extremities should be considered when a patient presents with progressive weakness or sensory changes in an extremity. Surgical excision should be promptly performed to ensure optimal recovery from the nerve palsy.

  12. Sphenopalatine ganglion pulsed radiofrequency treatment in patients suffering from chronic face and head pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert Akbas

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: There are various facial pain syndromes including trigeminal neuralgia, trigeminal neuropathic pain and atypical facial pain syndromes. Effectiveness of the pulsed radiofrequency in managing various pain syndromes has been clearly demonstrated. There are a limited number of studies on the pulsed radiofrequency treatment for sphenopalatine ganglion in patients suffering from face and head pain. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the satisfaction of pulsed radiofrequency treatment at our patients retrospectively. METHODS: Infrazygomatic approach was used for the pulsed radiofrequency of the sphenopalatine ganglion under fluoroscopic guidance. After the tip of the needle reached the target point, 0.25-0.5 ms pulse width was applied for sensory stimulation at frequencies from 50 Hz to 1 V. Paraesthesias were exposed at the roof of the nose at 0.5-0.7 V. To rule out trigeminal contact that led to rhythmic mandibular contraction, motor stimulation at a frequency of 2 Hz was applied. Then, four cycles of pulsed radiofrequency lesioning were performed for 120 s at a temperature of 42 °C. RESULTS: Pain relief could not be achieved in 23% of the patients (unacceptable, whereas pain was completely relieved in 35% of the patients (excellent and mild to moderate pain relief could be achieved in 42% of the patients (good through sphenopalatine ganglion-pulsed radiofrequency treatment. CONCLUSION: Pulsed radiofrequency of the sphenopalatine ganglion is effective in treating the patients suffering from intractable chronic facial and head pain as shown by our findings. There is a need for prospective, randomized, controlled trials in order to confirm the efficacy and safety of this new treatment modality in chronic head and face pain.

  13. Genetic Study of Axon Regeneration with Cultured Adult Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Saijilafu,; Zhou, Feng-Quan

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that mature neurons in the central nervous system (CNS) cannot regenerate their axons after injuries due to diminished intrinsic ability to support axon growth and a hostile environment in the mature CNS1,2. In contrast, mature neurons in the peripheral nervous system (PNS) regenerate readily after injuries3. Adult dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons are well known to regenerate robustly after peripheral nerve injuries. Each DRG neuron grows one axon from the cell soma, which ...

  14. Retinal ganglion cell density of the black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis): calculating visual resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettigrew, John D; Manger, Paul R

    2008-01-01

    A single right retina from a black rhinoceros was whole mounted, stained and analyzed to determine the visual resolution of the rhinoceros, an animal with reputedly poor eyesight. A range of small (15-microm diameter) to large (100-microm diameter) ganglion cell types was seen across the retina. We observed two regions of high density of retinal ganglion cells at either end of a long, but thin, horizontal streak. The temporal specialization, which receives light from the anterior visual field, exhibited a ganglion cell density of approximately 2000/mm2, while the nasal specialization exhibited a density of approximately 1500/mm2. The retina exhibited a ganglion cell density bias toward the upper half, especially so, the upper temporal quadrant, indicating that the rhinoceros would be processing visual information from the visual field below the anterior horizon for the most part. Our calculations indicate that the rhinoceros has a visual resolution of 6 cycles/degree. While this resolution is one-tenth that of humans (60 cycles/deg) and less than that of the domestic cat (9 cycles/deg), it is comparable to that of the rabbit (6 cycles/deg), and exceeds that seen in a variety of other mammals including seals, dolphins, microbats, and rats. Thus, the reputation of the rhinoceros as a myopic, weakly visual animal is not supported by our observations of the retina. We calculate that the black rhinoceros could readily distinguish a 30 cm wide human at a distance of around 200 m given the appropriate visual background.

  15. Seasonally Changing Cryptochrome 1b Expression in the Retinal Ganglion Cells of a Migrating Passerine Bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Nießner

    Full Text Available Cryptochromes, blue-light absorbing proteins involved in the circadian clock, have been proposed to be the receptor molecules of the avian magnetic compass. In birds, several cryptochromes occur: Cryptochrome 2, Cryptochrome 4 and two splice products of Cryptochrome 1, Cry1a and Cry1b. With an antibody not distinguishing between the two splice products, Cryptochrome 1 had been detected in the retinal ganglion cells of garden warblers during migration. A recent study located Cry1a in the outer segments of UV/V-cones in the retina of domestic chickens and European robins, another migratory species. Here we report the presence of cryptochrome 1b (eCry1b in retinal ganglion cells and displaced ganglion cells of European Robins, Erithacus rubecula. Immuno-histochemistry at the light microscopic and electron microscopic level showed eCry1b in the cell plasma, free in the cytosol as well as bound to membranes. This is supported by immuno-blotting. However, this applies only to robins in the migratory state. After the end of the migratory phase, the amount of eCry1b was markedly reduced and hardly detectable. In robins, the amount of eCry1b in the retinal ganglion cells varies with season: it appears to be strongly expressed only during the migratory period when the birds show nocturnal migratory restlessness. Since the avian magnetic compass does not seem to be restricted to the migratory phase, this seasonal variation makes a role of eCry1b in magnetoreception rather unlikely. Rather, it could be involved in physiological processes controlling migratory restlessness and thus enabling birds to perform their nocturnal flights.

  16. The Formation of a Pretibial Ganglion Cyst After the Reconstruction of an Anterior Cruciate Ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seok Jin; Park, Ji Seon; Yoon, Kyung Ho; Park, Yong Goo; Ryu, Kyung Nam [Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, So Young; Jin, Wook [Kyung Hee University East-West NEO Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    The formation of a pretibial ganglion cyst after the reconstruction of an anterior cruciate ligament is an uncommon complication which may be a result of the degradation of the biodegradable screw or a variety of other reasons. The authors report a case of a significantly large pretibial cyst, which probably occurred as a result of no treatment over a long period, along with a description of the clinical manifestations and radiologic findings

  17. Loss of COUP-TFI alters the balance between caudal ganglionic eminence- and medial ganglionic eminence-derived cortical interneurons and results in resistance to epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, Simona; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; De Leonibus, Elvira; Uzcategui, Yoryani G; Andolfi, Gennaro; Armentano, Maria; Touzot, Audrey; Gaztelu, Jose M; Arlotta, Paola; Menendez de la Prida, Liset; Studer, Michèle

    2011-03-23

    In rodents, cortical interneurons originate from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) according to precise temporal schedules. The mechanisms controlling the specification of CGE-derived interneurons and their role in cortical circuitry are still unknown. Here, we show that COUP-TFI expression becomes restricted to the dorsal MGE and CGE at embryonic day 13.5 in the basal telencephalon. Conditional loss of function of COUP-TFI in subventricular precursors and postmitotic cells leads to a decrease of late-born, CGE-derived, VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide)- and CR (calretinin)-expressing bipolar cortical neurons, compensated by the concurrent increase of early-born MGE-derived, PV (parvalbumin)-expressing interneurons. Strikingly, COUP-TFI mutants are more resistant to pharmacologically induced seizures, a phenotype that is dependent on GABAergic signaling. Together, our data indicate that COUP-TFI controls the delicate balance between MGE- and CGE-derived cortical interneurons by regulating intermediate progenitor divisions and ultimately affecting the activity of the cortical inhibitory circuitry.

  18. The Role of Cyclooxygenase in Multiplication and Reactivation of HSV-1 in Vestibular Ganglion Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng; Wang, Zhengmin

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1) and nerve inflammation have been shown to be involved in vertigo-related vestibular pathogenesis. Treatments of such diseases have been less than perfect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been reported to suppress reactivation of HSV-1 in trigeminal ganglions. However, whether this drug can affect reactivation of HSV-1 in vestibular ganglions is unclear. Due to the difficulties of constructing in vivo animal models, in this study, we developed a vestibular ganglion culture system, in which vestibular neurons were latently or lytically infected with HSV-1. Indomethacin and celecoxib were selected to measure their effects on HSV-1. Trichostatin A was used to reactivate HSV-1 in latently infected neurons. Cycloxygenase-2, which is the target of NSAIDs, was induced by HSV-1 in the lytically infected cultures, with an increase of 14-fold. Although it appeared that indomethacin and celecoxib showed limited but concentration-dependent inhibition effects on viral production under our condition, indomethacin decreased reactivation rate of HSV-1 by about 20%. Though more in vitro or in vivo studies are needed to confirm the effects of the drugs, our study may provide a potential way to investigate the mechanism of HSV-related vestibular pathogenesis as well as new treatments of vertigo-related diseases. PMID:24688447

  19. Intraosseous ganglion and report of five cases from orthopedic ward in Imam Khomeini Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzan M

    1996-07-01

    Full Text Available Cysts in bone are seen occasionally at or near its end and are filled with mucoid, glaird fluid. Typically, they have a thick fibrous wall similar to that of a "ganglion" of tendon sheath, are associated with no significant degenerative changes in the nearly near by joint, and seem appropriately considered to be collections in synovial spaces in unusual locations. Although they are rare and usually an incidental radiographic finding, intraosseous ganglions are being increasingly recognized as a source of wrist pain. Surgical treatment is best delayed, however, until all other possible etiologic factors for the patient's discomfort have been excluded. When indicated, curettage and bone grafting will adequately treat the condition. A careful exploration of the joint at the time of surgery helps rule out other undiagnosed causes for the patient's symptoms. Communications between the joint cavity and the intraosseous cyst are inconsistently demonstrated. The histologic features of intraosseous ganglions are identical to their soft tissue counterparts

  20. Adult human nasal mesenchymal-like stem cells restore cochlear spiral ganglion neurons after experimental lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, Esperanza; Van De Water, Thomas R; Lumbreras, Vicente; Rajguru, Suhrud; Goss, Garrett; Hare, Joshua M; Goldstein, Bradley J

    2014-03-01

    A loss of sensory hair cells or spiral ganglion neurons from the inner ear causes deafness, affecting millions of people. Currently, there is no effective therapy to repair the inner ear sensory structures in humans. Cochlear implantation can restore input, but only if auditory neurons remain intact. Efforts to develop stem cell-based treatments for deafness have demonstrated progress, most notably utilizing embryonic-derived cells. In an effort to bypass limitations of embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells that may impede the translation to clinical applications, we sought to utilize an alternative cell source. Here, we show that adult human mesenchymal-like stem cells (MSCs) obtained from nasal tissue can repair spiral ganglion loss in experimentally lesioned cochlear cultures from neonatal rats. Stem cells engraft into gentamicin-lesioned organotypic cultures and orchestrate the restoration of the spiral ganglion neuronal population, involving both direct neuronal differentiation and secondary effects on endogenous cells. As a physiologic assay, nasal MSC-derived cells engrafted into lesioned spiral ganglia demonstrate responses to infrared laser stimulus that are consistent with those typical of excitable cells. The addition of a pharmacologic activator of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway concurrent with stem cell treatment promoted robust neuronal differentiation. The availability of an effective adult autologous cell source for inner ear tissue repair should contribute to efforts to translate cell-based strategies to the clinic.

  1. A Guyon's canal ganglion presenting as occupational overuse syndrome: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hennessy Michael J

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Occupational overuse syndrome (OOS can present as Guyon's canal syndrome in computer keyboard users. We report a case of Guyon's canal syndrome caused by a ganglion in a computer user that was misdiagnosed as OOS. Case presentation A 54-year-old female secretary was referred with a six-month history of right little finger weakness and difficulty with adduction. Prior to her referral, she was diagnosed by her general practitioner and physiotherapist with a right ulnar nerve neuropraxia at the level of the Guyon's canal. This was thought to be secondary to computer keyboard use and direct pressure exerted on a wrist support. There was obvious atrophy of the hypothenar eminence and the first dorsal interosseous muscle. Both Froment's and Wartenberg's signs were positive. A nerve conduction study revealed that both the abductor digiti minimi and the first dorsal interosseus muscles showed prolonged motor latency. Ulnar conduction across the right elbow was normal. Ulnar sensory amplitude across the right wrist to the fifth digit was reduced while the dorsal cutaneous nerve response was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging of the right wrist showed a ganglion in Guyon's canal. Decompression of the Guyon's canal was performed and histological examination confirmed a ganglion. The patient's symptoms and signs resolved completely at four-month follow-up. Conclusion Clinical history, occupational history and examination alone could potentially lead to misdiagnosis of OOS when a computer user presents with these symptoms and we recommend that nerve conduction or imaging studies be performed.

  2. Role of calcium conductance in firing behavior of retinal ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dan Wang; Qingli Qiao; Nan Xie

    2011-01-01

    Fohlmeister-Coleman-Miller model of retinal ganglion cells consists of five ion channels; these are sodium channels, calcium channels, and 3 types of potassium channels. An increasing number of studies have investigated sodium channels, voltage-gated potassium channels, and delayed rectifier potassium channels. However, little is known about calcium channels, and in particular the dynamics and computational models of calcium ions. Retinal prostheses have been designed to assist with sight recovery for the blind, and in the present study, the effects of calcium ions in retinal ganglion cell models were analyzed with regard to calcium channel potential and calcium-activated potassium potential. Using MATLAB software, calcium conductance and calcium current from the Fohlmeister-Coleman-Miller model, under clamped voltages, were numerically computed using backward Euler methods. Subsequently, the Fohlmeister-Coleman-Miller model was simulated with the absence of calcium-current (lc,) or calcium-activated potassium current (IK, ca). The model was also analyzed according to the phase plane method.The relationship curve between peak calcium current and clamped potentials revealed an inverted bell shape, and the calcium-activated potassium current increased the frequency of firing and the peak of membrane potential. Results suggested that calcium ion concentrations play an important role in controlling the peak and the magnitude of peak membrane voltage in retinal ganglion cells.

  3. Dorsal root ganglion neurons promote proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pei-xun Zhang; Xiao-rui Jiang; Lei Wang; Fang-min Chen; Lin Xu; Fei Huang

    2015-01-01

    Preliminary animal experiments have conifrmed that sensory nerve ifbers promote osteoblast differentiation, but motor nerve ifbers have no promotion effect. Whether sensory neurons pro-mote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells remains unclear. No results at the cellular level have been reported. In this study, dorsal root ganglion neurons (sensory neurons) from Sprague-Dawley fetal rats were co-cultured with bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells transfected with green lfuorescent protein 3 weeks after osteo-genic differentiationin vitro, while osteoblasts derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells served as the control group. The rat dorsal root ganglion neurons promoted the prolifera-tion of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell-derived osteoblasts at 3 and 5 days of co-culture, as observed by lfuorescence microscopy. The levels of mRNAs for osteogenic differentiation-re-lated factors (including alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, osteopontin and bone morphogenetic protein 2) in the co-culture group were higher than those in the control group, as detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Our ifndings indicate that dorsal root ganglion neurons promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, which pro-vides a theoretical basis forin vitro experiments aimed at constructing tissue-engineered bone.

  4. Hyperpolarization-activated current (I(h in ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Van Hook

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs express the photopigment melanopsin and serve as the primary retinal drivers of non-image-forming visual functions such as circadian photoentrainment, the pupillary light reflex, and suppression of melatonin production in the pineal. Past electrophysiological studies of these cells have focused on their intrinsic photosensitivity and synaptic inputs. Much less is known about their voltage-gated channels and how these might shape their output to non-image-forming visual centers. Here, we show that rat ipRGCs retrolabeled from the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN express a hyperpolarization-activated inwardly-rectifying current (I(h. This current is blocked by the known I(h blockers ZD7288 and extracellular cesium. As in other systems, including other retinal ganglion cells, I(h in ipRGCs is characterized by slow kinetics and a slightly greater permeability for K(+ than for Na(+. Unlike in other systems, however, I(h in ipRGCs apparently does not actively contribute to resting membrane potential. We also explore non-specific effects of the common I(h blocker ZD7288 on rebound depolarization and evoked spiking and discuss possible functional roles of I(h in non-image-forming vision. This study is the first to characterize I(h in a well-defined population of retinal ganglion cells, namely SCN-projecting ipRGCs.

  5. Suppression of pain in trigeminal neuropathy by electric stimulation of the gasserian ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyerson, B A; Håkanson, S

    1986-01-01

    Lesions of the peripheral part of the trigeminal nerve may cause trigeminal neuropathy associated with severe pain. Such pain usually does not respond to carbamazepine and analgesics, and it is continuous and lacks the characteristic paroxysmal character of tic douloureux. These patients often present with complex changes of facial sensibility in the form of dysesthesia, hyperalgesia, and allodynia. The pain sometimes responds favorably to transcutaneous nerve stimulation, but direct stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion and rootlets via an implanted electrode provides a greater likelihood of pain relief. Fourteen patients diagnosed as having painful trigeminal neuropathy received implants of a gasserian ganglion-stimulating electrode. The mean follow-up period is 4 years (range, 1 to 7 years). Eleven of the patients have retained the pain-relieving effect, and 1 had pain disappear without further stimulation. Eight of the patients estimated their pain relief to be complete or very good. There were no serious complications, but in several of the patients the electrode had to be exchanged because the insulation of the lead wires broke. For the selection of patients for permanent electrode implantation, a method has been developed for trial stimulation via a percutaneous electrode introduced into the trigeminal cistern. Temporary trial stimulation can be performed for several days. It is concluded that stimulation of the trigeminal ganglion and rootlets with the aid of an implanted electrode may effectively relieve certain forms of trigeminal pain that are otherwise extremely difficult to manage.

  6. The Role of Cyclooxygenase in Multiplication and Reactivation of HSV-1 in Vestibular Ganglion Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehong Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reactivation of latent herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 and nerve inflammation have been shown to be involved in vertigo-related vestibular pathogenesis. Treatments of such diseases have been less than perfect. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have been reported to suppress reactivation of HSV-1 in trigeminal ganglions. However, whether this drug can affect reactivation of HSV-1 in vestibular ganglions is unclear. Due to the difficulties of constructing in vivo animal models, in this study, we developed a vestibular ganglion culture system, in which vestibular neurons were latently or lytically infected with HSV-1. Indomethacin and celecoxib were selected to measure their effects on HSV-1. Trichostatin A was used to reactivate HSV-1 in latently infected neurons. Cycloxygenase-2, which is the target of NSAIDs, was induced by HSV-1 in the lytically infected cultures, with an increase of 14-fold. Although it appeared that indomethacin and celecoxib showed limited but concentration-dependent inhibition effects on viral production under our condition, indomethacin decreased reactivation rate of HSV-1 by about 20%. Though more in vitro or in vivo studies are needed to confirm the effects of the drugs, our study may provide a potential way to investigate the mechanism of HSV-related vestibular pathogenesis as well as new treatments of vertigo-related diseases.

  7. Carbenoxolone blocks the light-evoked rise in intracellular calcium in isolated melanopsin ganglion cell photoreceptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayne R Bramley

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Retinal ganglion cells expressing the photopigment melanopsin are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs. These ganglion cell photoreceptors send axons to several central targets involved in a variety of functions. Within the retina ipRGCs provide excitatory drive to dopaminergic amacrine cells via glutamatergic signals and ipRGCs are coupled to wide-field GABAergic amacrine cells via gap junctions. However, the extent to which ipRGCs are coupled to other retinal neurons in the ganglion cell layer via gap junctions is unclear. Carbenoxolone, a widely employed gap junction inhibitor, greatly reduces the number of retinal neurons exhibiting non-rod, non-cone mediated light-evoked Ca(2+ signals suggesting extensive intercellular coupling between ipRGCs and non-ipRGCs in the ganglion cell layer. However, carbenoxolone may directly inhibit light-evoked Ca(2+ signals in ipRGCs independent of gap junction blockade. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test the possibility that carbenoxolone directly inhibits light-evoked Ca(2+ responses in ipRGCs, the light-evoked rise in intracellular Ca(2+ ([Ca(2+](i was examined using fura-2 imaging in isolated rat ipRGCs maintained in short-term culture in the absence and presence of carbenoxolone. Carbenoxolone at 50 and 100 µM concentrations completely abolished the light-evoked rise in [Ca(2+](i in isolated ipRGCs. Recovery from carbenoxolone inhibition was variable. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrate that the light-evoked rise in [Ca(2+](i in isolated mammalian ganglion cell photoreceptors is inhibited by carbenoxolone. Since the light-evoked increase in [Ca(2+](i in isolated ipRGCs is almost entirely due to Ca(2+ entry via L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and carbenoxolone does not inhibit light-evoked action potential firing in ipRGCs in situ, carbenoxolone may block the light-evoked increase in [Ca(2+](i in ipRGCs by blocking L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels. The ability of

  8. Strychnine, but not PMBA, inhibits neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors expressed by rabbit retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, J M; Strang, C E; Amthor, F R; Keyser, K T

    2007-01-01

    Strychnine is considered a selective competitive antagonist of glycine gated Cl- channels (Saitoh et al., 1994) and studies have used strychnine at low micromolar concentrations to study the role of glycine in rabbit retina (Linn, 1998; Protti et al., 2005). However, other studies have shown that strychnine, in the concentrations commonly used, is also a potent competitive antagonist of alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs; Matsubayashi et al., 1998). We tested the effects of low micromolar concentrations of strychnine and 3-[2'-phosphonomethyl[1,1'-biphenyl]-3-yl] alanine (PMBA), a specific glycine receptor blocker (Saitoh et al., 1994; Hosie et al., 1999) on the activation of both alpha7 nAChRs on retinal ganglion cells and on ganglion cell responses to a light flash. Extracellular recordings were obtained from ganglion cells in an isolated retina/choroid preparation and 500 microM choline was used as an alpha7 agonist (Alkondon et al., 1997). We recorded from brisk sustained and brisk transient OFF cells, many of which have been previously shown to have alpha7 receptors (Strang et al., 2005). Further, we tested the effect of strychnine, PMBA and alpha-bungarotoxin on the binding of tetramethylrhodamine alpha-bungarotoxin in the inner plexiform layer. Our data indicates that strychnine, at doses as low as 1.0 microM, can inhibit the alpha7 nAChR-mediated response to choline, but PMBA at concentrations as high as 0.4 microM does not. Binding studies show strychnine and alpha-bungarotoxin inhibit binding of labeled alpha-bungarotoxin in the IPL. Thus, the effects of strychnine application may be to inhibit glycine receptors expressed by ganglion cell or to inhibit amacrine cell alpha7 nAChRs, both of which would result in an increase in the ganglion cell responses. Further research will be required to disentangle the effects of strychnine previously believed to be caused by a single mechanism of glycine receptor inhibition.

  9. Loose-fit polypseudorotaxanes constructed from γ-CDs and PHEMA-PPG-PEG-PPG-PHEMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Kong

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A pentablock copolymer was prepared via the atom transfer radical polymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA initiated by 2-bromoisobutyryl end-capped PPO-PEO-PPO as a macroinitiator in DMF. Attaching PHEMA blocks altered the self-assembly process of the pentablock copolymer with γ-CDs in aqueous solution. Before attaching the PHEMA, the macroinitiator was preferentially bent to pass through the inner cavity of γ-CDs to give rise to tight-fit double-chain stranded polypseudorotaxanes (PPRs. After attaching the PHEMA, the resulting pentablock copolymer was single-chain stranded into the interior of γ-CDs to form more stable, loose-fit PPRs. The results of 1H NMR, WXRD, DSC, TGA, 13C CP/MAS NMR and FTIR analyses indicated that γ-CDs can accommodate and slip over PHEMA blocks to randomly distribute along the entire pentablock copolymer chain. This results in unique, single-chain stranded PPRs showing no characteristic channel-type crystal structure.

  10. Rgcs1, a dominant QTL that affects retinal ganglion cell death after optic nerve crush in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schlamp Cassandra L

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intrinsic apoptosis of neuronal somas is one aspect of neurodegenerative diseases that can be influenced by genetic background. Genes that affect this process may act as susceptibility alleles that contribute to the complex genetic nature of these diseases. Retinal ganglion cell death is a defining feature of the chronic and genetically complex neurodegenerative disease glaucoma. Previous studies using an optic nerve crush procedure in inbred mice, showed that ganglion cell resistance to crush was affected by the Mendelian-dominant inheritance of 1–2 predicted loci. To assess this further, we bred and phenotyped a large population of F2 mice derived from a resistant inbred strain (DBA/2J and a susceptible strain (BALB/cByJ. Results Genome wide mapping of the F2 mice using microsatellite markers, detected a single highly significant quantitative trait locus in a 25 cM (58 Mb interval on chromosome 5 (Chr5.loc34-59 cM. No interacting loci were detected at the resolution of this screen. We have designated this locus as Retinal ganglion cell susceptible 1, Rgcs1. In silico analysis of this region revealed the presence of 578 genes or expressed sequence tags, 4 of which are highly expressed in the ganglion cell layer of the mammalian retina, and 2 of which are suspected susceptibility alleles in chronic neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, 25 genes contain 36 known single nucleotide polymorphisms that create nonsynonymous amino acid changes between the two parental strains. Collectively, this analysis has identified 7 potential candidate genes that may affect ganglion cell death. Conclusion The process of ganglion cell death is likely one of the many facets of glaucoma susceptibility. A novel dominant locus has been identified that affects sensitivity of ganglion cells to optic nerve crush. The allele responsible for this sensitivity may also be a susceptibility allele for glaucoma.

  11. KYNA analogue SZR72 modifies CFA-induced dural inflammation- regarding expression of pERK1/2 and IL-1β in the rat trigeminal ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukács, M; Warfvinge, K; Kruse, L S

    2016-01-01

    modify the neurogenic inflammatory response in the trigeminal ganglion. METHODS: Inflammation in the trigeminal ganglion was induced by local dural application of Complete Freunds Adjuvant (CFA). Levels of phosphorylated MAP kinase pERK1/2 and IL-1β expression in V1 region of the trigeminal ganglion were...... investigated using immunohistochemistry and Western blot. FINDINGS: Pretreatment with one dose of SZR72 abolished the CFA-induced pERK1/2 and IL-1β activation in the trigeminal ganglion. No significant change was noted in case of repeated treatment with SZR72 as compared to a single dose. CONCLUSIONS...

  12. Morphometry of synaptophysin immunoreactive ganglion cells in Auerbach plexus in patients with colorectal cancer. Is this a new prognostic factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobaniec-Lotowska, Maria E; Ciołkiewicz, Mariusz; Pogumirski, Józef; Sulkowski, Stanisław; Sobczak, Andrzej

    2004-01-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate morphometric parameters of synaptophysin (Syn-38) immunoreactive ganglion cells in colorectal cancer (within and at various distances from neoplastic infiltration) in postoperative material from 60 patients. We analysed the intensity of Syn-38 expression in Auerbach ganglion neurones, mean number of these cells in the ganglion, and their longitudinal and transverse diameters. The results showed a statistically significant reduction in the number of neurones in intramural ganglia of the large intestine located in neoplastic infiltration and in its close proximity. The size of ganglion cells was directly proportional to the distance from cancer infiltration and inversely proportional to Syn-38 content, which may be explained by degenerative changes and dysfunction of these cells. This correlation was significant in the case of cells with the cytoplasmatic Syn-38 immunoreactivity pattern, but did not refer to the cells with perimembranous pattern, which seemed to be undamaged. Morphometric analysis of synaptophysin immunoreactive ganglion cells in Auerbach plexus in colorectal cancer may be a new useful marker for the description of changes in the intestinal nervous system as well as a prognostic factor for colorectal cancer.

  13. [Atypical facial pains--sluder's neuralgia--local treatment of the sphenopalatine ganglion with phenol--case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olszewska-Ziaber, Agnieszka; Ziaber, Jacek; Rysz, Jacek

    2007-01-01

    Chronic reccuring head and facial pain can be very difficult for successful treatment. Such a pain can be in some rare cases Sluder's sphenopalatine ganglion neuralgia. The aim of the study was to obtain the pain relief by local treatment in patients with Sluder's sphenopalatine ganglion neuralgia. We described three cases of Sluder's neuralgia among all the seventeen patients with reccuring head and face pain that were seen in our department. In all these cases 4% Xylocaine was applied intranasally, into the region of shenopalatine ganglion, behind the posterior tip of the middle turbinate four times for ten minutes. According to Kern, the diagnosis of Sluder's neuralgia was confirmed only in cases where local anesthetic block of the sphenopaltine ganglion was successful. It means the patients were pain-free for at least an hour after application of Xylocaine, so they were qualified for phenolization and 88% phenol was applied on the cotton carriers (number of the applications depended on the patient). The total relief of pain of different duration was obtained in all the presented cases. The relief of pain obtained by intranasal phenolization of sphenopalatine ganglion in three patients shows it could be the effective treatment of Sluder's neuralgia. The patients were totally free from the pain and accompanying symptoms like nasal obstruction, rhinorrhea, epiphora or conjunctivitis. The relief period was different but the patients were satisfied with the effectiveness and simplicity of the treatment. They did not need to take the additional medications for months and were able to continue work.

  14. Successful Management of Refractory Headache and Facial Pain due to Cavernous Sinus Meningioma with Sphenopalatine Ganglion Radiofrequency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foad Elahi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Headaches and facial pain can be extremely difficult to manage for the patient and the clinician. In the medical literature, it has been suggested that the autonomic reflex plays an important role in the pathophysiology of facial neuralgia. The sphenopalatine ganglion is the largest parasympathetic ganglion outside the cranium. It is an easy accessible target for pain management. The application of radiofrequency nerve ablation was described in the medical literature. In this case report, we describe a 54-year-old female. She was diagnosed with a cavernous sinus meningioma. She underwent surgical resection and gamma knife radiosurgery. She was suffering from an intractable hemifacial pain for many years. Her pain started shortly after surgery and continued throughout many years. Sphenopalatine ganglion block in multiple occasions was able to provide temporary relief. The patient’s intractable hemicranial headaches and hemifacial pain responded to the sphenopalatine ganglion radiofrequency nerve ablation. The pain response remained unchanged for 12 months after procedure. This case report increased our current knowledge about the sphenopalatine ganglion role in the headache and facial intractable pain management. The failure of available antalgic medications to adequately control pain in similar patients underscores the need to develop an algorithm for therapies.

  15. Density, proportion, and dendritic coverage of retinal ganglion cells of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus jacchus

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    F.L. Gomes

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We performed a quantitative analysis of M and P cell mosaics of the common-marmoset retina. Ganglion cells were labeled retrogradely from optic nerve deposits of Biocytin. The labeling was visualized using horseradish peroxidase (HRP histochemistry and 3-3'diaminobenzidine as chromogen. M and P cells were morphologically similar to those found in Old- and New-World primates. Measurements were performed on well-stained cells from 4 retinas of different animals. We analyzed separate mosaics for inner and outer M and P cells at increasing distances from the fovea (2.5-9 mm of eccentricity to estimate cell density, proportion, and dendritic coverage. M cell density decreased towards the retinal periphery in all quadrants. M cell density was higher in the nasal quadrant than in other retinal regions at similar eccentricities, reaching about 740 cells/mm² at 2.5 mm of temporal eccentricity, and representing 8-14% of all ganglion cells. P cell density increased from peripheral to more central regions, reaching about 5540 cells/mm² at 2.5 mm of temporal eccentricity. P cells represented a smaller proportion of all ganglion cells in the nasal quadrant than in other quadrants, and their numbers increased towards central retinal regions. The M cell coverage factor ranged from 5 to 12 and the P cell coverage factor ranged from 1 to 3 in the nasal quadrant and from 5 to 12 in the other quadrants. These results show that central and peripheral retinal regions differ in terms of cell class proportions and dendritic coverage, and their properties do not result from simply scaling down cell density. Therefore, differences in functional properties between central and peripheral vision should take these distinct regional retinal characteristics into account.

  16. MRI diagnosis of intraosseous ganglion%骨内腱鞘囊肿的MRI诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩长年

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the MRI features and diagnostic value of the intraosseous ganglion. Materials and Methods:Clinical data and imaging features of 10 cases surgically conifrmed of intraosseous ganglion were respectively analyzed. Among these cases, 3 knees, 2 hips and 5 ankles were included. Results: MRI manifestations of lesions showed long T1, T2 signal, round or oval shape with low signal sclerotic rim, 1 case was found low signal interval, 1 case communicated to the joint cavity. Conclusions:Intraosseous ganglion showed characteristic image ifndings in MRI, MRI can display the characteristic signal and the adjacent involved cartilage lesions and joint relations, it has important clinical value.%目的:探讨骨内腱鞘囊肿的MRI表现及其诊断价值。材料与方法回顾性分析经手术证实的10例骨内腱鞘囊肿的临床及影像学资料。其中膝关节3例,髋关节2例,踝关节5例。结果 MRI表现病灶呈圆形或者椭圆形的长T1、T2信号,病灶周围可见低信号硬化边,1例病灶内见低信号间隔,1例病灶与关节腔相通。结论骨内腱鞘囊肿在MRI具有特征性的影像学表现,MRI可以显示病灶的信号特征、邻近软骨有无受累及与关节关系,有重要的临床价值。

  17. Internalization and synaptogenic effect of GH in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Thomas; Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Mora, Janeth; Aizouki, Miray; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    In the chicken embryo, GH gene expression occurs in the neural retina and retinal GH promotes cell survival and induces axonal growth of retinal ganglion cells. Neuroretinal GH is therefore of functional importance before the appearance of somatotrophs and the onset of pituitary GH secretion to the peripheral plasma (at ED15-17). Endocrine actions of pituitary GH in the development and function of the chicken embryo eye are, however, unknown. This possibility has therefore been investigated in ED15 embryos and using the quail neuroretinal derived cell line (QNR/D). During this research, we studied for the first time, the coexistence of exogenous (endocrine) and local GH (autocrine/paracrine) in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). In ovo systemic injections of Cy3-labeled GH demonstrated that GH in the embryo bloodstream was translocated into the neural retina and internalized into RGC's. Pituitary GH may therefore be functionally involved in retinal development during late embryogenesis. Cy3-labelled GH was similarly internalized into QNR/D cells after its addition into incubation media. The uptake of exogenous GH was by a receptor-mediated mechanism and maximal after 30-60min. The exogenous (endocrine) GH induced STAT5 phosphorylation and increased growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and SNAP-25 immunoreactivity. Ex ovo intravitreal injections of Cy3-GH in ED12 embryos resulted in GH internalization and STAT5 activation. Interestingly, the CY3-labeled GH accumulated in perinuclear regions of the QNR/D cells, but was not found in the cytoplasm of neurite outgrowths, in which endogenous retinal GH is located. This suggests that exogenous (endocrine) and local (autocrine/paracrine) GH are both involved in retinal function in late embryogenesis but they co-exist in separate intracellular compartments within retinal ganglion cells.

  18. Treatment of patients with painful blind eye using stellate ganglion block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Vaz Horta Xavier

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: management of pain in painful blind eyes is still a challenge. Corticosteroids and hypotensive agents, as well as evisceration and enucleation, are some of the strategies employed so far that are not always effective and, depending on the strategy, cause a deep emotional shock to the patient. Given these issues, the aim of this case report is to demonstrate a new and viable option for the management of such pain by treating the painful blind eye with the stellate ganglion block technique, a procedure that has never been described in the literature for this purpose. CASE REPORT: six patients with painful blind eye, all caused by glaucoma, were treated; in these patients, VAS (visual analogue scale for pain assessment, in which 0 is the absence of pain and 10 is the worst pain ever experienced ranged from 7 to 10. We opted for weekly sessions of stellate ganglion block with 4 mL of bupivacaine (0.5% without vasoconstrictor and clonidine 1 mcg/kg. Four patients had excellent results at VAS, ranging between 0 and 3, and two remained asymptomatic (VAS = 0, without the need for additional medication. The other two used gabapentin 300 mg every 12 h. CONCLUSION: currently, there are several therapeutic options for the treatment of painful blind eye, among which stand out the retrobulbar blocks with chlorpromazine, alcohol and phenol. However, an effective strategy with low rate of serious complications, which is non-mutilating and improves the quality of life of the patient, is essential. Then, stellate ganglion block arises as a demonstrably viable and promising option to meet this demand.

  19. Ultrasonic interventional analgesia in pancreatic carcinoma with chemical destruction of celiac ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tao Wang; Fu-Zhou Tian; Zhong-Hong Cai; Xu Li; Tao Cheng; Li Shi; Qi Cheng

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect the therapeutic effects of chemical destruction of celiac ganglion in patients with pancreatic carcinoma with intractable pain.METHODS: Ninety-seven cases with advanced pancreatic carcinoma received chemical destruction of celiac ganglion-5 mL pure alcohol injection around celiac artery under ultrasonic guidance. The changes of visual analogue scale (VAS), serum substance P (Sub P),β-endopeptide (β-EP) and T-lymphocyte subtypes level were compared between pre- and post-therapy.RESULTS: Successful rate of puncture was 98.7%, with one failure. No serious complications such as traumatic pancreatitis, pancreatic fistula, abdominal cavity hemorrhage or peritoneal infection occurred. VAS, serum Sub P and β-EP level significantly changed after treatment (8.0 ± 2.3 vs 4.6 ± 2.1, 254.1 ± 96.7 vs 182.4 ± 77.6,3.2 ± 0.8 vs 8.8 ± 2.1, P < 0.01, P < 0.05, P < 0.01)with complete relief rate 54.2%, partial relief rate 21.9%, ineffective rate 12.5% and recurrent rate 10.7%.The T-lymphocyte subtypes level remarkably increased when compared with that of pre-therapy (46.7 ± 3.7 vs 62.5 ± 5.5, P < 0.01).CONCLUSION: Our study suggests that chemical destruction of celiac ganglion under ultrasonic guidance is highly safe, and can evidently relieve cancer pain and improve the cellular immunity in patients with advanced pancreatic carcinoma.

  20. Activation of Neuropeptide Y Receptors Modulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Physiology and Exerts Neuroprotective Actions In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, João; Elvas, Filipe; Brudzewsky, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is expressed in mammalian retina but the location and potential modulatory effects of NPY receptor activation remain largely unknown. Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death is a hallmark of several retinal degenerative diseases, particularly glaucoma. Using purified RGCs and ex vivo...... receptor activation, at the level of inner or outer plexiform layers, leads to modulation of RGC receptive field properties. Using in vitro cultures of rat retinal explants exposed to NMDA, we found that NPY pretreatment prevented NMDA-induced cell death. However, in an animal model of retinal ischemia...... actions detected in retinal explants can be translated into animal models of retinal degenerative diseases....

  1. Inhibition of calcium currents in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurones by (-)-baclofen.

    OpenAIRE

    Dolphin, A C; Scott, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Voltage-dependent inward calcium currents (ICa) activated in cultured rat dorsal root ganglion neurones were reversibly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by (-)-baclofen (10 microM to 100 microM). Baclofen (100 microM) reduced the calcium-dependent slow outward potassium current (IK(Ca)). This current was abolished in calcium-free medium and by 300 microM cadmium chloride. The action of baclofen on IK(Ca) was reduced when the calcium concentration in the medium was increased from 5 mM to 30 ...

  2. Phenotypic differentiation of neonatal rat cochlear spiral ganglion neurons following trypsin dissociation and culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dingjun Zha; Li Qiao; Lianjun Lu; Xue Gao; Tao Xue; Wenjuan Mi; Shunli Liu; Jianhua Qiu

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Under laboratory conditions, cochlear spiral ganglion neurons are commonly isolated and cultured by mechanical dissociation. However, these neurons are extremely fragile and survive for only a short time.OBJECTIVE: To establish a trypsin dissociation and culture method for studying neonatal rat cochlear spiral ganglion neurons. DESIGN: A single sample study. SETTING: Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA.MATERIALS: This study was performed at the central laboratory for Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Xijing Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA from February to May 2006. A total of 40 neonatal Sprague Dawley rats of either gender, aged 2-5 days, were provided by the Laboratory Animal Center of the Fourth Military Medical University of Chinese PLA. Trypsin and neuronal-specific nuclear protein (NeuN) monoclonal antibodies were purchased from Sigma Company, USA. Culture medium was synthesized using Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM)/F12 (Gibco Company, USA) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (Sigma Company, USA), 100 000 U/L penicillin, and 1 mol/L NaOH. The following protocol was performed in accordance with ethical guidelines for the use and care of animals.METHODS: After anesthesia, rats were sacrificed by neck dislocation. A complete cochlear axis with spiral ganglion tissue was removed. The cochlear axis was rinsed three times in a culture dish with a diameter of 35 mm using Hank's balanced solution. After washings, the tissue was cut into pieces, digested with 0.25% trypsin for about 20 minutes, and incubated in a 37 ℃ water bath. The tissue was centrifuged, then mixed with serum-containing culture medium. Using a transfer pipette, the cell suspension was transferred to polylysine (0.1%)-treated culture dishes with a diameter of 35 mm. The culture dish was incubated at 37 ℃, with a 5% CO2-air environment. Once

  3. Modulation of inflammatory mediators in the trigeminal ganglion by botulinum neurotoxin type A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, Jacob; Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Onabotulinumtoxin type A (BoNT-A) has been found to reduce pain in chronic migraine. The aim of the present study was to ask if BoNT-A can interact directly on sensory mechanisms in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) using an organ culture method. METHODS: To induce inflammation, rat TGs were...... that treatment with corticosteroids will reduce the symptoms of chronic migraine; however this remedy is associated with long-term side effects. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the expressional alterations may suggest novel ways to modify the changes and indicate novel therapeutics. The results...

  4. Detecting Determinism in Firing Activities of Retinal Ganglion Cells during Response to Complex Stimuli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Chao-Feng; ZHANG Ying-Ying; LIU Xue; LIANG Pei-Ji; ZHANG Pu-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Complex stimuli are used to probe the response properties of the chicken's retinal ganglion cells (GCs). Thecorrelation dimension method and the nonlinear forecasting method are applied to detect the determinism in the firing activities of the retinal GCs during response to complex stimuli.The inter-spike interval (ISI) series and the first difference of the ISI (DISI) series are analysed.Two conclusions are drawn.Firstly,the first difference operation of the ISI series makes it comparatively easier for determinism detection in the firing activities of retinal GCs.Secondly,the nonlinear forecasting method is more efficient and reliable than the correlation dimension method for determinism detection.

  5. An intra-articular ganglion cyst in a patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Donna Y; Yee, Keolamau; Burkhalter, William; Okimoto, Kelley Chinen; Kon, Kevin; Kurahara, David K

    2014-01-01

    We report an intra-articular ganglion cyst (IAGC) presenting as knee pain and a mass in a patient with longstanding Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA). We could not find a similar case of an IAGC occurring in the knee of JIA patients in the literature. IAGC may need to be included as a possibility in patients with inflammatory arthritis with new-onset knee pain, especially in those with a palpable mass. MRI was useful in distinguishing IAGC from more worrisome causes of a knee mass. Orthopedic input was helpful in diagnosis and treatment. In addition, methotrexate therapy was effective in bringing about a long-lasting remission.

  6. Optical coherence tomography segmentation reveals ganglion cell layer pathology after optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syc, Stephanie B; Saidha, Shiv; Newsome, Scott D; Ratchford, John N; Levy, Michael; Ford, E'tona; Crainiceanu, Ciprian M; Durbin, Mary K; Oakley, Jonathan D; Meyer, Scott A; Frohman, Elliot M; Calabresi, Peter A

    2012-02-01

    Post-mortem ganglion cell dropout has been observed in multiple sclerosis; however, longitudinal in vivo assessment of retinal neuronal layers following acute optic neuritis remains largely unexplored. Peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer thickness, measured by optical coherence tomography, has been proposed as an outcome measure in studies of neuroprotective agents in multiple sclerosis, yet potential swelling during the acute stages of optic neuritis may confound baseline measurements. The objective of this study was to ascertain whether patients with multiple sclerosis or neuromyelitis optica develop retinal neuronal layer pathology following acute optic neuritis, and to systematically characterize such changes in vivo over time. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography imaging, including automated retinal layer segmentation, was performed serially in 20 participants during the acute phase of optic neuritis, and again 3 and 6 months later. Imaging was performed cross-sectionally in 98 multiple sclerosis participants, 22 neuromyelitis optica participants and 72 healthy controls. Neuronal thinning was observed in the ganglion cell layer of eyes affected by acute optic neuritis 3 and 6 months after onset (P optica, with and without a history of optic neuritis, when compared with healthy controls (P optica and a history of optic neuritis exhibited the greatest reduction in ganglion cell layer thickness. Results from our in vivo longitudinal study demonstrate retinal neuronal layer thinning following acute optic neuritis, corroborating the hypothesis that axonal injury may cause neuronal pathology in multiple sclerosis. Further, these data provide evidence of subclinical disease activity, in both participants with multiple sclerosis and with neuromyelitis optica without a history of optic neuritis, a disease in which subclinical disease activity has not been widely appreciated. No pathology was seen in the inner or outer nuclear layers of eyes with optic

  7. Alpha B-crystallin improved survival of retinal ganglion cells in a rat model of acute ocular hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhihong Wu; Layi Wang; Shike Hou

    2012-01-01

    Increased endogenous αB-crystallin protein levels have been shown to reduce cell apoptosis,although the effects of exogenous αB-crystallin protein remain poorly understood.The present study established an acute ocular hypertension model in the right eye of Sprague-Dawley rats.Fluorogold retrograde tracing and immunofluorescence methods showed that the number of retinal ganglion cells decreased in the right eyes and caspase-3 expression increased following acute ocular hypertension.Intravitreal injection of αB-crystallin in the right eye increased the number of retinal ganglion cells and reduced caspase-3 expression.Results demonstrated that exogenous αB-crystallin protein inhibited caspase-3 expression and improved retinal ganglion cell survival following acute ocular hypertension.

  8. Ultrasound-guided aspiration and steroid injection of a posterior cruciate ligament ganglion cyst: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilella, Giuseppe Maria; Guerrisi, Pietro; Lucignani, Giulia; Pasquali, Gaia; Drudi, Francesco Maria

    2015-09-01

    Ganglion cysts are benign masses that originate from mucinous degeneration of the connective tissues and are quite rare when arising from the knee joint. Symptoms are often represented by pain, joint tenderness, effusion and occasional swelling with a palpable mass in the popliteal region of the knee. Percutaneous aspiration followed by a corticosteroid injection of a ganglion cyst has either a diagnostic or therapeutic meaning and its guidance through ultrasound allows the operator to make more accurate the procedure, ensuring the correct placement of the needle inside the lesion. We report our experience in the treatment of a voluminous ganglion cyst of the posterior cruciate ligament performed through the ultrasound guidance in a symptomatic young patient.

  9. Retinal vessel diameters decrease with macular ganglion cell layer thickness in autosomal dominant optic atrophy and in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rönnbäck, Cecilia; Grønskov, Karen; Larsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate retinal trunk vessel diameters in subjects with autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) and mutation-free healthy relatives. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 52 ADOA patients with the optic atrophy 1 (OPA1) exon 28 (c.2826_2836delinsGGATGCTCCA) mutation (age 8...... ganglion cell-inner plexiform layer (GC-IPL) thickness (p = 0.0017 and p = 0.0057, respectively). CONCLUSION: Narrow retinal arteries and veins were associated not only with the severity of ADOA but with ganglion cell volume in patients with ADOA and in healthy subjects. This suggests that narrow vessels...

  10. Horseradish peroxidase dye tracing and embryonic statoacoustic ganglion cell transplantation in the rat auditory nerve trunk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmgren, Björn; Jin, Zhe; Jiao, Yu; Kostyszyn, Beata; Olivius, Petri

    2011-03-04

    At present severe damage to hair cells and sensory neurons in the inner ear results in non-treatable auditory disorders. Cell implantation is a potential treatment for various neurological disorders and has already been used in clinical practice. In the inner ear, delivery of therapeutic substances including neurotrophic factors and stem cells provide strategies that in the future may ameliorate or restore hearing impairment. In order to describe a surgical auditory nerve trunk approach, in the present paper we injected the neuronal tracer horseradish peroxidase (HRP) into the central part of the nerve by an intra cranial approach. We further evaluated the applicability of the present approach by implanting statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) cells into the same location of the auditory nerve in normal hearing rats or animals deafened by application of β-bungarotoxin to the round window niche. The HRP results illustrate labeling in the cochlear nucleus in the brain stem as well as peripherally in the spiral ganglion neurons in the cochlea. The transplanted SAGs were observed within the auditory nerve trunk but no more peripheral than the CNS-PNS transitional zone. Interestingly, the auditory nerve injection did not impair auditory function, as evidenced by the auditory brainstem response. The present findings illustrate that an auditory nerve trunk approach may well access the entire auditory nerve and does not compromise auditory function. We suggest that such an approach might compose a suitable route for cell transplantation into this sensory cranial nerve. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A Novel Retinal Ganglion Cell Promoter for Utility in AAV Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Killian S. Hanlon

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Significant advances in gene therapy have enabled exploration of therapies for inherited retinal disorders, many of which are in preclinical development or clinical evaluation. Gene therapy for retinal conditions has led the way in this growing field. The loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs is a hallmark of a number of retinal disorders. As the field matures innovations that aid in refining therapies and optimizing efficacy are in demand. Gene therapies under development for RGC-related disorders, when delivered with recombinant adeno associated vectors (AAV, have typically been expressed from ubiquitous promoter sequences. Here we describe how a novel promoter from the murine Nefh gene was selected to drive transgene expression in RGCs. The Nefh promoter, in an AAV2/2 vector, was shown to drive preferential EGFP expression in murine RGCs in vivo following intravitreal injection. In contrast, EGFP expression from a CMV promoter was observed not only in RGCs, but throughout the inner nuclear layer and in amacrine cells located within the ganglion cell layer (GCL. Of note, the Nefh promoter sequence is sufficiently compact to be readily accommodated in AAV vectors, where transgene size represents a significant constraint. Moreover, this promoter should in principle provide a more targeted and potentially safer alternative for RGC-directed gene therapies.

  12. Autophagy in retinal ganglion cells in a rhesus monkey chronic hypertensive glaucoma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuifeng Deng

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by physiological intraocular hypertension that causes damage to the retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. In the past, RGC damage in POAG was suggested to have been attributed to RGC apoptosis. However, in the present study, we applied a model closer to human POAG through the use of a chronic hypertensive glaucoma model in rhesus monkeys to investigate whether another mode of progressive cell death, autophagy, was activated in the glaucomatous retinas. First, in the glaucomatous retinas, the levels of LC3B-II, LC3B-II/LC3B-I and Beclin 1 increased as demonstrated by Western blot analyses, whereas early or initial autophagic vacuoles (AVi and late or degraded autophagic vacuoles (AVd accumulated in the ganglion cell layer (GCL and in the inner plexiform layer (IPL as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis. Second, lysosome activity and autophagosome-lysosomal fusion increased in the RGCs of the glaucomatous retinas, as demonstrated by Western blotting against lysosome associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP1 and double labeling against LC3B and LAMP1. Third, apoptosis was activated in the glaucomatous eyes with increased levels of caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-3 and an increased number of TUNEL-positive RGCs. Our results suggested that autophagy was activated in RGCs in the chronic hypertensive glaucoma model of rhesus monkeys and that autophagy may have potential as a new target for intervention in glaucoma treatment.

  13. Electrical storm: Role of stellate ganglion blockade and anesthetic implications of left cardiac sympathetic denervation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas Gadhinglajkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrical storm is usually associated with catecholaminergic surge following myocardial ischaemia and manifest as recurrent ventricular arrhythmias, requiring frequent DC shocks. Delivering repeated DC shocks induces myocardial damage and further worsens the arrhythmias, which are resistant to the antiarrhythmic drugs. Cardiac sympathetic blockade abates the excessive catecholaminergic drive and help pacifying the malignant ventricular arrhythmias. We treated the electrical storm in a 52-year-old male with ultrasound-guided left sympathetic ganglion block followed by surgical left cardiac sympathetic denervation. The patient remained symptom-free without any incident of ventricular arrhythmias for 8 months after the surgery. The ultrasonography during blockade of the stellate ganglion enhances the success rate of the technique, reduces the quantity of local anaesthetic required to produce desired effects and prevents technical complications. Supraclavicular surgical access to the upper thoracic sympathetic chain obviates the necessity for one lung ventilation and lateral decubitus during surgery, when the patient is in hemodynamically unstable condition. Sympathectomy can be performed under general anaesthesia taking cautions to avoid sympathetic stimulation in intraoperative period.

  14. Dorsal root ganglion compression as an animal model of sciatica and low back pain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Yu Lin; Jing Yang; Hui-Ming Li; San-Jue Hu; Jun-Ling Xing

    2012-01-01

    As sciatica and low back pain are among the most common medical complaints,many studies have duplicated these conditions in animals.Chronic compression of the dorsal root ganglion (CCD) is one of these models.The surgery is simple:after exposing the L4/L5 intervertebral foramina,stainless steel rods are implanted unilaterally,one rod for each vertebra,to chronically compress the lumbar dorsal root ganglion (DRG).Then,CCD can be used to simulate the clinical conditions caused by stenosis,such as a laterally herniated disc or foraminal stenosis.As the intraforaminal implantation of a rod results in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous action potentials associated with hyperalgesia,spontaneous pain,and mechanical allodynia,CCD provides an animal model that mimics radicular pain in humans.This review concerns the mechanisms of neuronal hyperexcitability,focusing on various patterns of spontaneous discharge including one possible pain signal for mechanical allodynia-evoked bursting.Also,new data regarding its significant property of maintaining peripheral input are also discussed.Investigations using this animal model will enhance our understanding of the neural mechanisms for low back pain and sciatica.Furthermore,the peripheral location of the DRG facilitates its use as a locus for controlling pain with minimal central effects,in the hope of ultimately uncovering analgesics that block neuropathic pain without influencing physiological pain.

  15. [Subdural, extra-arachnoid block as a complication of stellate ganglion block: documentation with ultrasound].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapral, S; Krafft, P; Gosch, M; Fridrich, P; Weinstabl, C

    1997-10-01

    We present a patient who developed a high central neural block after stellate-ganglion-blockade. The underlying pathophysiology was assessed via sonographic imaging. Stellate ganglion block was performed in a 19-year old patient according to the standard technique. Multiple aspiration tests were negative and a test dose of 3 ml bupivacaine 0.25% was injected. After a 3 min interval another 5 ml were injected. Two minutes after the local anaesthetic administration the patient reported nausea and sensations in the upper extremity. Spontaneous respiration efforts stopped, and the patient became unconscious. Tracheal intubation was performed, and the patient was ventilated in a controlled mode for two hours. Heart rate as well as blood pressure remained within the normal range. Neurologic recovery occurred rapidly and extubation was performed about two and a half hours after the event. Our sonographic studies demonstrated a local anaesthetic depot directly at the root of C 6, with a mean diameter of 10 mm and a length of 5 to 6 cm (about a third smaller than expected). Sonographic studies and clinical symptoms of our patient are most likely to occur with a subdural extra-arachnoidal block. Ultrasonographic guided puncture enhances the patient's safety by the opportunity to directly visualise transverse process, nerval root as well as local anaesthetic depot. In case of depot formation directly at the nerval root, injection may be stopped and the needle repositioned. Furthermore, direct visualisation of the great vessels (A. vertebralis) prevents intravascular injection and haematoma formation.

  16. Increased expression of nestin in the major pelvic ganglion following cavernous nerve injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutlu, O; Ross, AE; Schaeffer, EM; Gratzke, C; Stief, CG; Strong, TD; Burnett, AL; Hedlund, P; Bivalacqua, TJ

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to identify neuronal repair mechanisms of the major pelvic ganglion (MPG), we evaluated changes in the expression of nestin, an intermediate filament protein and neural stem cell marker following cavernous nerve crush injury (CNI). We utilized two groups of Sprague Dawley rats: (i) sham and (ii) bilateral CNI. Erectile responses to cavernous nerve stimulation (CNS) were determined at 48 h in a subset of rats. The MPG was isolated and removed at 48 h after CNI, and nestin immunolocalization, protein levels and RNA expression were evaluated. At 48 h, erectile responses to CNS in CNI rats were substantially reduced (P<0.05; ~70% decrease in intracavernous pressure/mean arterial pressure) compared with sham surgery controls. This coincided with a dramatic 10-fold increase (P<0.05) in nestin messenger RNA expression and protein levels in the MPG of rats with CNI. Immunoflourescence microscopy demonstrated that nestin upregulation after CNI occurred within the ganglion cell bodies and nerve fibers of the MPG. In conclusion, CNI induces nestin in the MPG. These data suggest that nestin may be involved in the regenerative process of the cavernous nerve following crush injury. PMID:21993267

  17. Evaluation of ultraviolet light toxicity on cultured retinal pigment epithelial and retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankarathi Balaiya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sankarathi Balaiya, Ravi K Murthy, Vikram S Brar, Kakarla V ChalamDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville, FL, USAPurpose: Our study is aimed at evaluating the role of UVB light in inducing cytotoxicity in an in vitro model.Methods: RGC-5 and ARPE-19 cells were exposed to different time periods of UVB light: 0, 15, 30, and 45 min. They were subsequently examined for changes in cell morphology, cell viability (neutral red uptake assay, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, expression of bax, bcl-2 and cytochome C by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and western blot, respectively.Results: Dose-dependent reduction in cell viability to UVB light was demonstrated with parallel increase in ROS. Increased duration of exposure (>15 minutes, was associated with increased expression of bax and cytochrome C, and absence of bcl-2 expression.Conclusion: UVB light exposure results in cell cytotoxicity. The concomitant generation of ROS and expression of apoptotic markers suggests the role of oxidative stress in UVB-mediated apoptosis in an in vitro model of retinal ganglion and pigment epithelial cells.Keywords: ultraviolet light, retinal pigment epithelium, retinal ganglion cell, reactive oxygen species, cytochrome C

  18. Eye muscle nerves and the ciliary ganglion of Malpolon monspessulana (Colubridae, Ophidia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amel R. Omar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In Malpolon monspessulana, the nervus oculomotorius arises from the ventral side of the pars peduncularis mesencephali of the midbrain by a single root. It runs closely applied to both the nervus abducens and the ramus nasalis of the nervus trigeminus. These nerves together with the nervus trochlearis leave the cranial cavity through the foramen orbitale magnum. Within this foramen the nervus oculomotorius divides into two rami: superior and inferior. The two rami innervate the rectus superior, rectus inferior, rectus medialis and the obliquus inferior muscles. The nervus trochlearis arises from the lateral side of the mesencephalon by a single root and passes to innervate the obliquus superior muscle. The nervus abducens arises from the ventral side of the medulla oblongata by a single root and passes for a distance through the vidian canal excavated in the parachordal cartilage. It innervates the rectus lateralis muscle. The eye muscle nerves carry special somatic motor fibres. The ciliary ganglion receives the preganglionic parasympathetic fibres from the ramus inferior of the nervus oculomotorius via the radix ciliaris brevis. Both the radix ciliaris longa and sympathetic root are absent. The ciliary ganglion is a well defined mass located in the postorbital region, irregular in shape formed of one type of neuron and gives off only one ciliary nerve.

  19. Optical Imaging of Neurons in the Crab Stomatogastric Ganglion with Voltage-sensitive Dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Wolfgang; Städele, Carola; Andras, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of neurons is a key methodology for the understanding of how neuronal networks are organised and how the simultaneous activity of participating neurons leads to the emergence of the integral functionality of the network. Here we present the methodology of application of this technique to identified pattern generating neurons in the crab stomatogastric ganglion. We demonstrate the loading of these neurons with the fluorescent voltage-sensitive dye Di-8-ANEPPQ and we show how to image the activity of dye loaded neurons using the MiCAM02 high speed and high resolution CCD camera imaging system. We demonstrate the analysis of the recorded imaging data using the BVAna imaging software associated with the MiCAM02 imaging system. The simultaneous voltage-sensitive dye imaging of the detailed activity of multiple neurons in the crab stomatogastric ganglion applied together with traditional electrophysiology techniques (intracellular and extracellular recordings) opens radically new opportunities for the understanding of how central pattern generator neural networks work. PMID:21490564

  20. Implementing dynamic clamp with synaptic and artificial conductances in mouse retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jin Y; Stiefel, Klaus M; Protti, Dario A

    2013-05-16

    Ganglion cells are the output neurons of the retina and their activity reflects the integration of multiple synaptic inputs arising from specific neural circuits. Patch clamp techniques, in voltage clamp and current clamp configurations, are commonly used to study the physiological properties of neurons and to characterize their synaptic inputs. Although the application of these techniques is highly informative, they pose various limitations. For example, it is difficult to quantify how the precise interactions of excitatory and inhibitory inputs determine response output. To address this issue, we used a modified current clamp technique, dynamic clamp, also called conductance clamp (1, 2, 3) and examined the impact of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs on neuronal excitability. This technique requires the injection of current into the cell and is dependent on the real-time feedback of its membrane potential at that time. The injected current is calculated from predetermined excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances, their reversal potentials and the cell's instantaneous membrane potential. Details on the experimental procedures, patch clamping cells to achieve a whole-cell configuration and employment of the dynamic clamp technique are illustrated in this video article. Here, we show the responses of mouse retinal ganglion cells to various conductance waveforms obtained from physiological experiments in control conditions or in the presence of drugs. Furthermore, we show the use of artificial excitatory and inhibitory conductances generated using alpha functions to investigate the responses of the cells.

  1. Spiral Ganglion Neuron Explant Culture and Electrophysiology on Multi Electrode Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnewald, Stefan; Roccio, Marta; Tscherter, Anne; Streit, Jürg; Ambett, Ranjeeta; Senn, Pascal

    2016-10-19

    Spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) participate in the physiological process of hearing by relaying signals from sensory hair cells to the cochlear nucleus in the brain stem. Loss of hair cells is a major cause of sensory hearing loss. Prosthetic devices such as cochlear implants function by bypassing lost hair cells and directly stimulating SGNs electrically, allowing for restoration of hearing in deaf patients. The performance of these devices depends on the functionality of SGNs, the implantation procedure and on the distance between the electrodes and the auditory neurons. We hypothesized, that reducing the distance between the SGNs and the electrode array of the implant would allow for improved stimulation and frequency resolution, with the best results in a gapless position. Currently we lack in vitro culture systems to study, modify and optimize the interaction between auditory neurons and electrode arrays and characterize their electrophysiological response. To address these issues, we developed an in vitro bioassay using SGN cultures on a planar multi electrode array (MEA). With this method we were able to perform extracellular recording of the basal and electrically induced activity of a population of spiral ganglion neurons. We were also able to optimize stimulation protocols and analyze the response to electrical stimuli as a function of the electrode distance. This platform could also be used to optimize electrode features such as surface coatings.

  2. Spatial relationship of organized rotational and focal sources in human atrial fibrillation to autonomic ganglionated plexi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykaner, Tina; Zografos, Theodoros A; Zaman, Junaid A B; Pantos, Ioannis; Alhusseini, Mahmood; Navara, Rachita; Krummen, David E; Narayan, Sanjiv M; Katritsis, Demosthenes G

    2017-08-01

    One approach to improve ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is to focus on physiological targets including focal or rotational sources or ganglionic plexi (GP). However, the spatial relationship between these potential mechanisms has never been studied. We tested the hypothesis that rotors and focal sources for AF may co-localize with ganglionated plexi (GP). We prospectively identified locations of AF rotors and focal sources, and correlated these to GP sites in 97 consecutive patients (age 59.9±11.4, 73% persistent AF). AF was recorded with 64-pole catheters with activation/phase mapping, and related to anatomic GP sites on electroanatomic maps. AF sources arose in 96/97 (99%) patients for 2.6±1.4 sources per patient (left atrium: 1.7±0.9 right atrium: 1.1±0.8), each with an area of 2-3cm(2). On area analyses, the probability of an AF source randomly overlapping a GP area was 26%. Left atrial sources were seen in 94 (97%) patients, in whom ≥1 source co-localized with GP in 75 patients (80%; psources were more likely to colocalize with left vs right GPs (p65, diabetes; psources in the left atrium often colocalize with regions of autonomic innervation. Studies should define if the role of AF sources differs by their anatomical location. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Case report: intra-tendinous ganglion of the anterior cruciate ligament in a young footballer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Thomas P

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A 20-year-old male medical student and keen rugby player presented with a 12-month history of progressively worsening right knee pain and stiffness with no history of trauma. Clinical examination revealed effusion and posterior knee pain exacerbated by end range movement and an extension lag of 15 degrees. Physiotherapy to improve the range of motion proved unsuccessful. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the ACL was grossly thickened and displaced by material reported as mucoid in nature. There were also areas of focally high signal in relation to its tibial attachment and intra osseous small cysts. Arthroscopic examination revealed a ganglion related to the tibial attachment of the ACL and gross thickening and discoloration of the ACL. Biopsies were taken showing foci of mucoid degeneration in the ACL. A large intra-ACL mass of brownish coloured tissue was excised arthroscopically. Already at 2 weeks follow up the patient had greatly improved range of movement and was pain free. However, upon returning to rugby, joint instability was noticed and a tear of the ACL was confirmed. This rare clinical condition can be diagnosed with MRI and arthroscopic debridement effectively relieves symptoms. This case report illustrates that augmentation or reconstruction may end up being the definitive treatment for athletes. It may also offer some support to the argument that mucoid degeneration and ganglion cyst formation share a similar pathogenesis to intra-osseous cyst formation.

  4. Calpain Inhibition Attenuates Apoptosis of Retinal Ganglion Cells in Acute Optic Neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amena W.; Das, Arabinda; Guyton, M. Kelly; Ray, Swapan K.; Rohrer, Baerbel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Optic neuritis (ON), inflammation of the optic nerve, is strongly associated with the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and is initiated by the attack of autoreactive T cells against self-myelin antigens, resulting in demyelination, degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), and cumulative visual impairment. Methods. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) was induced in Lewis rats on day 0, and animals received daily intraperitoneal injections of calpain inhibitor (calpeptin) or vehicle from day 1 until killed. Retinal cell death was analyzed by DNA fragmentation, and surviving ganglion cells were quantified after double labeling of retinal tissue with TUNEL and Brn3a. The expression of apoptotic and inflammatory proteins was determined by Western blotting. Results. It was demonstrated that calpain inhibition downregulates expression of proapoptotic proteins and the proinflammatory molecule nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) in the retina of Lewis rats with acute EAE. Immunofluorescent labeling revealed that apoptotic cells in the RGC layer of vehicle-treated EAE animals were Brn3a positive, and a moderate dose of calpeptin dramatically reduced the frequency of apoptotic RGCs. Conclusions. These results suggest that calpain inhibition might be a useful supplement to immunomodulatory therapies such as corticosteroids in ON, due to its neuroprotective effect on RGCs. PMID:21613375

  5. Cellular Origin of Spontaneous Ganglion Cell Spike Activity in Animal Models of Retinitis Pigmentosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Margolis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we review evidence that loss of photoreceptors due to degenerative retinal disease causes an increase in the rate of spontaneous ganglion spike discharge. Information about persistent spike activity is important since it is expected to add noise to the communication between the eye and the brain and thus impact the design and effective use of retinal prosthetics for restoring visual function in patients blinded by disease. Patch-clamp recordings from identified types of ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells in the adult (36–210 d old rd1 mouse show that the ongoing oscillatory spike activity in both cell types is driven by strong rhythmic synaptic input from presynaptic neurons that is blocked by CNQX. The recurrent synaptic activity may arise in a negative feedback loop between a bipolar cell and an amacrine cell that exhibits resonant behavior and oscillations in membrane potential when the normal balance between excitation and inhibition is disrupted by the absence of photoreceptor input.

  6. Allogeneic Transplantation of Müller-Derived Retinal Ganglion Cells Improves Retinal Function in a Feline Model of Ganglion Cell Depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Silke; Eastlake, Karen; Jayaram, Hari; Jones, Megan F; Brown, Robert A; McLellan, Gillian J; Charteris, David G; Khaw, Peng T; Limb, G Astrid

    2016-02-01

    Human Müller glia with stem cell characteristics (hMGSCs) have been shown to improve retinal function upon transplantation into rat models of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) depletion. However, their translational potential may depend upon successful engraftment and improvement of retinal function in experimental models with anatomical and functional features resembling those of the human eye. We investigated the effect of allogeneic transplantation of feline Müller glia with the ability to differentiate into cells expressing RGC markers, following ablation of RGCs by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA). Unlike previous observations in the rat, transplantation of hMGSC-derived RGCs into the feline vitreous formed aggregates and elicited a severe inflammatory response without improving visual function. In contrast, allogeneic transplantation of feline MGSC (fMGSC)-derived RGCs into the vitrectomized eye improved the scotopic threshold response (STR) of the electroretinogram (ERG). Despite causing functional improvement, the cells did not attach onto the retina and formed aggregates on peripheral vitreous remnants, suggesting that vitreous may constitute a barrier for cell attachment onto the retina. This was confirmed by observations that cellular scaffolds of compressed collagen and enriched preparations of fMGSC-derived RGCs facilitated cell attachment. Although cells did not migrate into the RGC layer or the optic nerve, they significantly improved the STR and the photopic negative response of the ERG, indicative of increased RGC function. These results suggest that MGSCs have a neuroprotective ability that promotes partial recovery of impaired RGC function and indicate that cell attachment onto the retina may be necessary for transplanted cells to confer neuroprotection to the retina. Significance: Müller glia with stem cell characteristics are present in the adult human retina, but they do not have regenerative ability. These cells, however, have potential for

  7. Ganglion Cysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ... Gardening Safety Turkey Carving Removing a Ring Español Artritis de la base del pulgar Dedo en gatillo ...

  8. Ganglion Cyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Where do you hurt? Interactive Foot Diagram Going Barefoot? Beware! Tips for a safer barefoot summer. Millions of Americans will go barefoot this summer, and thousands will suffer injuries, such ...

  9. Effect of type-2 astrocytes on the viability of dorsal root ganglion neurons and length of neuronal processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chunling Fan; Hui Wang; Dan Chen; Xiaoxin Cheng; Kun Xiong; Xuegang Luo; Qilin Cao

    2014-01-01

    The role of type-2 astrocytes in the repair of central nervous system injury remains poorly un-derstood. In this study, using a relatively simple culture condition in vitro, type-2 astrocytes, differentiated from oligodendrocyte precursor cells by induction with bone morphogenetic pro-tein-4, were co-cultured with dorsal root ganglion neurons. We examined the effects of type-2 astrocytes differentiated from oligodendrocyte precursor cells on the survival and growth of dorsal root ganglion neurons. Results demonstrated that the number of dorsal root ganglion neurons was higher following co-culture of oligodendrocyte precursor cells and type-2 astrocytes than when cultured alone, but lower than that of neurons co-cultured with type-1 astrocytes. The length of the longest process and the length of all processes of a single neuron were shortest in neurons cultured alone, followed by neurons co-cultured with type-2 astrocytes, then neurons co-cultured with oligodendrocyte precursor cells, and longest in neurons co-cultured with type-1 astrocytes. These results indicate that co-culture with type-2 astrocytes can increase neuronal survival rate and process length. However, compared with type-1 astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursor cells, the promotion effects of type-2 astrocytes on the growth of dorsal root ganglion neurons were weaker.

  10. Use of fluorescently labelled calmodulins as tools to measure subcellular calmodulin activation in living dorsal root ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milikan, J M; Bolsover, S R

    2000-01-01

    We have used fluorescently labelled calmodulins to probe the activity of calmodulin in living dorsal root ganglion cells. Calmodulin labelled with the fluorophore 5-([4,6 dichlorotriazin-2yl]amino)-fluorescein (FL-CaM) does not change its fluorescence when it binds calcium, while calmodulin labelled at lysine 75 with 2-chloro-(6-(4-N,N-diethylamino-phenyl)-1,4,5-triazin-4-yl (TA-CaM), an environment-sensitive probe, increases its fluorescence when it binds calcium. We micro-injected FL-CaM or TA-CaM into rat dorsal root ganglion cells and found that both probes localise to the cell nucleus. In contrast, endogenous cellular calmodulin, in dorsal root ganglion cells as in hippocampal neurones, is predominantly cytosolic unless the neurones are depolarised, then it moves to the nucleus. FL-CaM and TA-CaM, introduced into dorsal root ganglion cells via a patch pipette, also immediately move to the nucleus, indicating that the nuclear localisation is a property of the labelled calmodulins. Although the subcellular distribution of FL-CaM and TA-CaM does not necessarily match that of endogenous calmodulin, we show that FL-CaM can be used as a control for TA-CaM when studying calmodulin activation in different cellular compartments.

  11. Electrophysiological characterization of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in cat petrosal ganglion neurons in culture: effects of cytisine and its bromo derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varas, Rodrigo; Valdés, Viviana; Iturriaga-Vásquez, Patricio; Cassels, Bruce K; Iturriaga, Rodrigo; Alcayaga, Julio

    2006-02-09

    Petrosal ganglion neurons are depolarized and fire action potentials in response to acetylcholine and nicotine. However, little is known about the subtype(s) of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors involved, although alpha4 and alpha7 subunits have been identified in petrosal ganglion neurons. Cytisine, an alkaloid unrelated to nicotine, and its bromo derivatives are agonists exhibiting different affinities, potencies and efficacies at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors containing alpha4 or alpha7 subunits. To characterize the receptors involved, we studied the effects of these agonists and the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonists hexamethonium and alpha-bungarotoxin in isolated petrosal ganglion neurons. Petrosal ganglia were excised from anesthetized cats and cultured for up to 16 days. Using patch-clamp technique, we recorded whole-cell currents evoked by 5-10 s applications of acetylcholine, cytisine or its bromo derivatives. Agonists and antagonists were applied by gravity from a pipette near the neuron surface. Neurons responded to acetylcholine, cytisine, 3-bromocytisine and 5-bromocytisine with fast inward currents that desensitized during application of the stimuli and were reversibly blocked by 1 microM hexamethonium or 10 nM alpha-bungarotoxin. The order of potency of the agonists was 3-bromocytisine > acetylcholine approximately = cytisine > 5-bromocytisine, suggesting that homomeric alpha7 neuronal nicotinic receptors predominate in cat petrosal ganglion neurons in culture.

  12. Influence of the sodium channel band on retinal ganglion cell excitation during electric stimulation--a modeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werginz, P; Fried, S I; Rattay, F

    2014-04-25

    Electric stimulation using retinal implants allows blind people to re-experience a rudimentary kind of vision. The elicited percepts or so called 'phosphenes' are highly inconstant and therefore do not restore vision properly. The better knowledge of how retinal neurons, especially retinal ganglion cells, respond to electric stimulation will help to develop more sophisticated stimulation strategies. Special anatomic and physiologic properties like a band of highly dense sodium channels in retinal ganglion cells may help to achieve a focal activation of target cells and as a result better restoration of vision. A portion of retinal ganglion cell axons, about 40μm from the soma and between 25 and 40μm in length, shows a specific biophysical property. Electrode locations close to a band of highly dense sodium channels which were identified immunochemically show lowest thresholds during electric stimulation. The (modeled) thresholds for this kind of structure result in lowest thresholds as well. The influence on the location where action potentials are generated within the axon is far reaching. When a stimulating electrode is positioned far outside the actual band region the site of spike initiation still remains within the sodium channel band. These findings suggest to further examine the key mechanisms of activation for retinal ganglion cells because focal activation without influencing passing axons of neurons located far away can improve the outcome of electric stimulation and therefore the development of retinal implants. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Concomitant Lipoma and Ganglion Causing Ulnar Nerve Compression at the Wrist: A Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Lee Ping; Tan, Jacqueline Siau Woon

    2016-04-01

    We present a rare case of ulnar nerve compression caused by concurrent lumps-a lipoma and a ganglion at the wrist, with no prior report cited in the English literature. This case illustrates the possibility of dual concurrent pathologies causing ulnar neuropathy and the importance of not missing one.

  14. One-day high-fat diet induces inflammation in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waise, T M Zaved; Toshinai, Koji; Naznin, Farhana; NamKoong, Cherl; Md Moin, Abu Saleh; Sakoda, Hideyuki; Nakazato, Masamitsu

    2015-09-04

    A high-fat diet (HFD) induces inflammation in systemic organs including the hypothalamus, resulting in obesity and diabetes. The vagus nerve connects the visceral organs and central nervous system, and the gastric-derived orexigenic peptide ghrelin transmits its starvation signals to the hypothalamus via the vagal afferent nerve. Here we investigated the inflammatory response in vagal afferent neurons and the hypothalamus in mice following one day of HFD feeding. This treatment increased the number of macrophages/microglia in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus. Furthermore, one-day HFD induced expression of Toll-like receptor 4 in the goblet cells of the colon and upregulated mRNA expressions of the proinflammatory biomarkers Emr1, Iba1, Il6, and Tnfα in the nodose ganglion and hypothalamus. Both subcutaneous administration of ghrelin and celiac vagotomy reduced HFD-induced inflammation in these tissues. HFD intake triggered inflammatory responses in the gut, nodose ganglion, and subsequently in the hypothalamus within 24 h. These findings suggest that the vagal afferent nerve may transfer gut-derived inflammatory signals to the hypothalamus via the nodose ganglion, and that ghrelin may protect against HFD-induced inflammation. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Utility of Stellate Ganglion Block in Atypical Facial Pain: A Case Report and Consideration of Its Possible Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsha Shanthanna

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present this report of a young patient with chronic severe atypical facial pain who was successfully controlled with stellate ganglion block under ultrasound guidance. The patient had a history of severe disabling, unilateral, facial neuropathic pain with minimal response to analgesic medications. Upon assessment the patient had features suggestive of trigeminal neuralgia, although postherpetic neuralgia could not be ruled out. As a diagnostic test intervention, stellate ganglion block was tried under ultrasound guidance. The patient showed significant improvement in pain control and functional disability lasting beyond 10 weeks. Subsequent blocks reinforced the analgesia. Atypical facial pain has several differential diagnoses. The involvement of sympathetic system in its causation or sustenance is uncertain. Stellate ganglion block achieves sympathetic block of cervicofacial structures, and its blockade has been shown to affect chronic pain conditions. Although its mechanism is not clear, one has to consider its possible role in conditions of stress apart from directly controlling the sympathetic activity. There is certainly a role in exploring the potential benefits of stellate ganglion block in such clinical conditions. The technique of stellate block under ultrasound is also described, as it influences the safety and precision of the block.

  16. Selective degeneration of the parvocellular-projecting retinal ganglion cells in a New World monkey, Saimiri sciureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, J J; Eskin, T A; Merigan, W H

    1989-10-16

    Selective degeneration of retinal ganglion cells projecting to parvocellular layers of the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) was observed in squirrel monkeys (Saimiri sciureus) exposed to a range of doses of acrylamide monomer. Similar acrylamide-induced neuronal loss has previously been reported in parvocellular-projecting ganglion cells of macaques, but no such selective degeneration has been found in acrylamide-dosed rats, squirrels, rabbits or cats. The extent of ganglion cell loss observed in the present study suggests that in the squirrel monkey, as in the macaque, a majority of ganglion cells project to parvocellular layers of the LGN. The locus of optic tract degeneration suggests that the squirrel monkey parvocellular pathway passes in dorsolateral optic tract, as does that of the macaque. Patterns of decreases in cytochrome oxidase activity confirm that, in both of these primates, geniculocortical pathways driven by these vulnerable neurons project to cortical layers 4A and 4C beta. These results suggest close parallels in the neuroanatomical projections and toxic vulnerability of the parvocellular-projecting pathway in New and Old World monkeys. They indicate that acrylamide intoxication can be used to selectively damage this pathway in order to study the functional roles of parallel visual pathways in both New and Old World monkeys.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of ClC-3 chloride channel in glutamate-induced retinal ganglion cell RGC-5 apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yu; Ning Han; Ligang Jiang; Yajuan Zheng; Lifeng Liu

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor β plays a role in regulation of apoptosis in ClC-3 and the Smads signaling pathway, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The present study determined possible signal transduction mechanisms based on CIC-3 expression, which accordingly affected apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in a glutamate-induced retinal ganglion cell RGC-5 apoptosis model. Results revealed significantly increased cell survival rate and significantly decreased apoptosis rate following apoptosis of ClC-3 cDNA-transfected glutamate-induced retinal ganglion cells. Following inhibition of the ClC-3 chloride channel using RNAi technology, cell survival and apoptosis rates were reversed. In addition, expression of transforming growth factor β2, Smads2, Smads3, Smads4, and Smads7 increased to varying degrees. These results suggest that ClC-3 chloride channel plays a protective role in glutamate-induced apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells, and transforming growth factor β/Smads signal transduction pathways are involved in this process.

  18. Pulsed Radiofrequency to the Dorsal Root Ganglion in Acute Herpes Zoster and Postherpetic Neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Koohyun; Jo, Daehyun; Kim, EungDon

    2017-03-01

    Latent varicella zoster virus reactivates mainly in sensory ganglia such as the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) or trigeminal ganglion. The DRG contains many receptor channels and is an important region for pain signal transduction. Sustained abnormal electrical activity to the spinal cord via the DRG in acute herpes zoster can result in neuropathic conditions such as postherpetic neuralgia (PHN). Although the efficacy of pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the DRG in various pain conditions has been previously reported, the application of PRF to the DRG in patients with herpes zoster has not yet been studied. The aim of the present study was to compare the clinical effects of PRF to the DRG in patients with herpes zoster to those of PRF to the DRG in patients with PHN. Retrospective comparative study. University hospital pain center in Korea. The medical records of 58 patients who underwent PRF to the DRG due to zoster related pain (herpes zoster or PHN) were retrospectively analyzed. Patients were divided into 2 groups according to the timing of PRF after zoster onset: an early PRF group (within 90 days) and a PHN PRF group (more than 90 days). The efficacy of PRF was assessed by a numeric rating scale (NRS) and by recording patient medication doses before PRF and at one week, 4 weeks, 8 weeks, and 12 weeks after PRF. Pain intensity was decreased after PRF in all participants. However, the degree of pain reduction was significantly higher in the early PRF group. Moreover, more patients discontinued their medication in the early PRF group, and the PRF success rate was also higher in the early PRF group. The relatively small sample size from a single center, short duration of review of medical records, and the retrospective nature of the study. PRF to the DRG is a useful treatment for treatment-resistant cases of herpes zoster and PHN. Particularly in herpes zoster patients with intractable pain, application of PRF to the DRG should be considered for pain control

  19. Effect of alpha lipoic acid on retinal ganglion cell survival in an optic nerve crush model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruixing; Wang, Yanling; Pu, Mingliang

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study was conducted to determine whether alpha lipoic acid (ALA) promotes the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in a rat model of optic nerve crush (ONC) injury and to investigate the neuroprotective mechanisms of ALA in the retina in this ONC injury model. Methods Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (180–220 g) were subjected to ONC injury surgery. ALA (63 mg/kg) was injected intravenously 1 day before or after the ONC injury. Animals were euthanized after 10 days, and the number of ganglion cells positive for RNA-binding protein with multiple splicing (Rbpms), which is an RGC marker, were counted on the whole mount retinas. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoblotting were performed to examine the localization and levels of erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT4/5) in the retinas in all experimental groups. To determine whether the EPO/EPOR signaling pathway was involved in the ALA antioxidant pathway, the rats were subjected to ruxolitinib (INCB018424, 0.25 mg/kg, bid, intraperitoneal, i.p.) treatment after the animals were injected intravenously with ALA 1 day before ONC injury. Results The average number of Rbpms-positive cells/mm2 in the control group (sham-operated group), the ONC group, the ALA-ONC group, and the ONC-ALA group retinas was 2219±28, 418±8, 848±22, and 613±18/mm2, respectively. The ALA-ONC and ONC-ALA groups showed a statistically significantly increased RGC survival rate compared to the ONC group. There were statistical differences in the RGC survival rates between the ALA-ONC (39%) and ONC-ALA groups (28%; p<0.05). Immunofluorescent labeling showed that EPOR and NT4/5 expression was significant in the retinal ganglion cell layer (GCL). At the same time, western blot analysis revealed that ALA induced upregulation of EPOR protein and NT4/5 protein expression in the retina after ONC injury. However, INCB018424 reversed the protective effects of ALA on the ONC retinas. Conclusions ALA has

  20. Using perimetric data to estimate ganglion cell loss for detecting progression of glaucoma: a comparison of models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Derek A; Swanson, William H; Horner, Douglas G

    2017-07-01

    Models relating perimetric sensitivities to ganglion cell numbers have been proposed for combining structural and functional measures from patients with glaucoma. Here we compared seven models for ability to differentiate progressing and stable patients, testing the hypothesis that the model incorporating local spatial scale would have the best performance. The models were compared for the United Kingdom Glaucoma Treatment Study (UKGTS) data for the right eyes of 489 patients recently diagnosed with glaucoma. The SITA 24-2 program was utilised for perimetry and Stratus OCT fast scanning protocol for thickness of circumpapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL). The first analysis defined progression in terms of decline in RNFL thickness. The highest and lowest quintiles (22 subjects per group) were identified for change in thickness of inferior temporal (IT), superior temporal (ST), and global RNFL (μm year(-1) ); a two-way anova was used to look for differences between the models in ability to discriminate the two quintiles. The second analysis defined a 'progression group' as those who were flagged by the UKGTS criteria as having progressive loss in perimetric sensitivity, and a 'no progression' group as those with rate of change in Mean Deviation (MD) closest to 0 dB year(-1) (87 subjects per group). The third analysis characterised variability of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) models for the two groups in the second analysis, using the standard deviation of residuals from linear regression of ganglion cell number over time to compute Coefficient of Variation (CoV). The first analysis produced a negative result because the three anovas found no effect of model or interaction of model and group (F6,294 0.08). There was an effect of group only for the anova with the ST sector (F6,294 = 12.2, p models. The third analysis found that even when variability in MD was low, the CoV was so large that test-retest variation could include 100% loss of ganglion cells. Two very

  1. Estimate of size and total number of neurons in superior cervical ganglion of rat, capybara and horse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Antonio Augusto Coppi Maciel; Davis, Christine; Gabella, Giorgio

    2004-08-01

    The superior (cranial) cervical ganglion was investigated by light microscopy in adult rats, capybaras (Hydrochaeris hydrochaeris) and horses. The ganglia were vascularly perfused, embedded in resin and cut into semi-thin sections. An unbiased stereological procedure (disector method) was used to estimate ganglion neuron size, total number of ganglion neurons, neuronal density. The volume of the ganglion was 0.5 mm3 in rats, 226 mm3 in capybaras and 412 mm3 in horses. The total number of neurons per ganglion was 18,800, 1,520,000 and 3,390,000 and the number of neurons per cubic millimetre was 36,700, 7,000 and 8,250 in rats, capybaras and horses, respectively. The average neuronal size (area of the largest sectional profile of a neuron) was 358, 982 and 800 microm2, and the percentage of volume occupied by neurons was 33, 21 and 17% in rats, capybaras and horses, respectively. When comparing the three species (average body weight: 200 g, 40 kg and 200 kg), most of the neuronal quantitative parameters change in line with the variation of body weight. However, the average neuronal size in the capybara deviates from this pattern in being larger than that of in the horse. The rat presented great interindividual variability in all the neuronal parameters. From the data in the literature and our new findings in the capybara and horse, we conclude that some correlations exist between average size of neurons and body size and between total number of neurons and body size. However, these correlations are only approximate and are based on averaged parameters for large populations of neurons: they are less likely to be valid if one considers a single quantitative parameter. Several quantitative features of the nervous tissue have to be taken into account together, rather than individually, when evolutionary trends related to size are considered.

  2. The trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cells is mediated by IL-1β and TNF-α

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salles von-Held-Ventura, Juliana; Mázala-de-Oliveira, Thalita; Cândida da Rocha Oliveira, Amanda; Granja, Marcelo Gomes [Departamento de Neurobiologia, Programa de Neurociências, Outeiro de São João Batista s/n CEP: 24020-150, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil); Gonçalves-de-Albuquerque, Cassiano Felippe; Castro-Faria-Neto, Hugo Caire [Fundação Oswaldo Cruz, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, Departamento de Fisiologia e Farmacodinâmica, Av., no 4365, Manguinhos, 21045-900, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth, E-mail: egiestal@vm.uff.br [Departamento de Neurobiologia, Programa de Neurociências, Outeiro de São João Batista s/n CEP: 24020-150, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-09-09

    Ouabain is a steroid hormone that binds to the enzyme Na{sup +}, K{sup +} – ATPase and stimulates different intracellular pathways controlling growth, proliferation and cell survival. IL-1β and TNF-α are pleiotropic molecules, conventionally regarded as pro-inflammatory cytokines with well-known effects in the immune system. In addition, IL-1β and TNF-α also play important roles in the nervous system including neuroprotective effects. Previous data from our group showed that ouabain treatment is able to induce an increase in retinal ganglion cell survival kept in mixed retinal cell cultures. The aim of this work was to investigate if IL-1β and TNF-α could be mediating the trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cells. Our results show that the trophic effect of ouabain on retinal ganglion cell was inhibited by either anti-IL-1β or anti-TNF-α antibodies. In agreement, IL-1β or TNF-α increased the retinal ganglion cells survival in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, ouabain treatment induces a temporal release of TNF-α and IL-1β from retinal cell cultures. Interestingly, TNF-α and IL-1β regulate each other intracellular levels. Our results suggest that ouabain treatment triggers the activation of TNF-α and IL-1β signaling pathways leading to an increase in retinal ganglion cell survival. - Highlights: • Pro-inflammatory cytokines regulates the ouabain effect on RGC survival. • Ouabain treatment modulates the intracellular levels of TNF-α and IL-1β. • Ouabain induces the release of TNF-α and IL-1β in retinal cell cultures.

  3. Evaluation of effectiveness of stellate ganglion block (SGB) treatment of sudden hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takinami, Yoshikazu

    2012-01-01

    A stellate ganglion block (SGB) based on the goal of improving internal ear circulatory disturbance appears to be beneficial for the treatment of sudden hearing loss. To evaluate the effectiveness of SGB for sudden hearing loss. This retrospective study reviewed the medical records of 49 patients who received SGBs and 496 patients who received only conservative therapy, primarily with systemic steroids, for treatment of sudden hearing loss. Propensity scores were used in pairwise matching of these patients to avoid selection biases between the two treatment modalities. Propensity score matching yielded 48 pairs. The mean therapeutic effect of the SGB was calculated to be 0.40 ± 0.20 (mean ± standard error, p = 0.051).

  4. G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-fei GAO; Hai-lin ZHANG; Zhen-dong YOU; Chang-lin LU; Cheng HE

    2007-01-01

    Aim: G protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium channels (GIRK) are important for neuronal signaling and membrane excitability. In the present study, we intend to find whether GIRK channels express functionally in adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. Methods: We used RT-PCR to detect mRNA for4 subunits of GIRK in the adult DRG. The whole-cell patch clamp recording was used to confirm GIRK channels functionally expressed. Results: The mRNA for the 4 subunits of GIRK were detected in the adult DRG. GTPγS enhanced inwardly rectifying potassium (K+) currents of the DRG neurons, while Ba2+inhibited such currents. Furthermore, the GIRK channels were shown to be coupled to the GABAB receptor, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family, as baclofen increased the inwardly rectifying K+ currents. Conclusion: GIRK channels are expressed and functionally coupled with GABAB receptors in adult rat DRG neurons.

  5. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells protect against retinal ganglion cell loss in aged rats with glaucoma

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    Hu Y

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ying Hu,1,2 Hai Bo Tan,1 Xin Mei Wang,3 Hua Rong,1 Hong Ping Cui,1 Hao Cui2 Departments of Ophthalmology, 1Shanghai East Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, 2First Affiliated Hospital, 3Fourth Affiliated Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin, People's Republic of China Abstract: Glaucoma is a common eye disease in the aged population and has severe consequences. The present study examined the therapeutic effects of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (BMSC transplantation in preventing loss of visual function in aged rats with glaucoma caused by laser-induced ocular hypertension. We found that BMSCs promoted survival of retinal ganglion cells in the transplanted eye as compared with the control eye. Further, in swimming tests guided by visual cues, the rats with a BMSC transplant performed significantly better. We believe that BMSC transplantation therapy is effective in treating aged rats with glaucoma. Keywords: glaucoma, stem cell, transplantation, cell therapy, aging

  6. Optic neuropathies: characteristic features and mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yuyi; Gupta, Vivek K; Li, Jonathan C; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L

    2013-01-01

    Optic neuropathy refers to dysfunction and/or degeneration of axons of the optic nerve with subsequent optic nerve atrophy. A common feature of different optic neuropathies is retinal ganglion cell (RGC) apoptosis and axonal damage. Glaucoma and optic neuritis are the two major degenerative causes of optic nerve damage. Here, we review the anatomy and pathology of the optic nerve, and etiological categories of optic neuropathies, and discuss rodent models that can mimic these conditions. Electrophysiology can reveal signature features of RGC damage using the pattern electroretinogram (PERG), scotopic threshold response (STR) and photopic negative response (PhNR). The amplitude of the visual evoked potential (VEP) also reflects RGC axonal damage. The neurotrophin-mediated survival pathways, as well as the extrinsic and intrinsic cell apoptotic pathways, play a critical role in the pathogenesis of RGC loss. Finally, promising neuroprotective approaches based on the molecular signaling are analyzed for the treatment of optic neuropathies.

  7. Pressure monitoring inside Meckel's cave during percutaneous microcompression of gasserian ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanusso, M; Curri, D; Landi, A; Colombo, F; Volpin, L; Cervellini, P

    1991-01-01

    During percutaneous microcompression of the gasserian ganglion for the relief of trigeminal neuralgia, a computerized technique for monitoring the pressure inside Meckel's cave was employed in 22 patients. A dedicated transducer connected to a computer records the balloon inflation pressure. Its variations are discernible within tenths of a bar and are plotted in relation to time. The intraoperative pressure inside Meckel's cave is from 0.9 to 2.4 bars. When pressure was low, there was recurrence of pain. The highest values of pressure (1.9-2.4 bars) were observed in most of the patients suffering from untoward side effects. The clinical results seem to be influenced by the level of the intraoperative intracavitary pressure.

  8. Retrograde Labeling of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells with the Flurogold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Huang; Yannian Hui; Miaoli Zhang

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To study the densities and distribution of retinal ganglion cells(RGC) in adult rat retinae with flurogold(FG) labeling retogradely.Methods: FG was injected to the superior colliculi(SC) and dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei (dLGN) in adult rats and the retinae were examined by fluorescence microscopy at various periods of time.Results: FG-labelled RGC were observed in the retina as early as 3 days after application of FG. The labelled cells gradually increased in density, reached 95% of the maximal number on days 7 and the maximal number on days 30. The density of labelled cells was higher in the posterior pole than in the peripheral area. The fluorescence intensity in labelled cells maintained up to 60 days.Conclusion: The FG retrograde labeling method is reliable and effective for quantity of RGC. Eye Science 2000; 16:29 ~ 33.

  9. Retrograde Labeling of Adult Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells with the Flurogold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WeiHuang; YannianHui; 等

    2002-01-01

    Purpose:To study the densities and distribution of retinal ganglion cells(RGC) in adult rat retinae with flurogold(FG) labeling retogradely.Methods:FG was injected to the superior colliculid(SC) and dorsal lateral geniculate nuclei(dLGN) in adult rats and the retinae were examined by fluorescence microscopy at various periods of time.Results:FG-labelled RGC were observed in the retina as early as 3 days after application of FG.The labeled cells gradually increased in density,reached 95% of the maximal number on days 7 and the maximal nuber on days 30.The density of labeled cells was higher in the posterior pole than in the peripheral area.The fluorescence intensity in labeled cells maintained up to 60 days.Conclusion:The FG retrograde labeling method is reliable and effective for quantity of RGC.Eye Science 2000;46:29-33.

  10. Role of fibroblast growth factor 8 in neurite outgrowth from spiral ganglion neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Hernández, Sofía; Potashner, Steven J; Morest, D Kent

    2013-09-05

    Many neurons degenerate after injuries resulting from overstimulation, drugs, genetic mutations, and aging. Although several growth factors and neurotrophins delay degeneration and promote regrowth of neural processes, the role of fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8) in mammalian spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) neurite outgrowth has not been examined. This study develops and uses SGN cell cultures suitable for experimental analysis, it investigates whether FGF8a and FGF8b isoforms affect the neurite outgrowth from SGN cultured in vitro. We found that both FGF8a and FGF8b promoted the outgrowth of neurites from cultured SGN. This response is mediated by FGF receptors and involves the activation of IκBα-mediated NFκB signaling pathway. These findings suggest that, besides its morphogenetic role during development, FGF8 may have trophic functions in the adult which are relevant to regeneration.

  11. Experimental activation of the sphenopalatine ganglion provokes cluster-like attacks in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schytz, Henrik W; Barløse, Mads; Guo, Song

    2013-01-01

    BackgroundHigh frequency (HF) stimulation of the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) is an emerging abortive treatment for cluster headache (CH) attacks. HF SPG stimulation is thought to exert its effect by physiologically blocking parasympathetic outflow. We hypothesized that low frequency (LF) SPG...... separate days. We recorded headache characteristics and autonomic symptoms during and after stimulation.ResultsSix patients completed the study. Three out of six patients (50%) reported ipsilateral cluster-like attacks during or within 30 min of LF SPG stimulation. These cluster-like attacks were all...... stimulation may activate the SPG, causing increased parasympathetic outflow and thereby provoking cluster attacks in CH patients.MethodsIn a double-blind randomized cross-over study, seven CH patients implanted with an SPG neurostimulator were randomly allocated to receive HF or LF stimulation for 3 min on 2...

  12. Decoupling kinematics and mechanics reveals coding properties of trigeminal ganglion neurons in the rat vibrissal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Nicholas E; Schroeder, Christopher L; Hobbs, Jennifer A; Yang, Anne Et; Huet, Lucie A; Solla, Sara A; Hartmann, Mitra Jz

    2016-06-27

    Tactile information available to the rat vibrissal system begins as external forces that cause whisker deformations, which in turn excite mechanoreceptors in the follicle. Despite the fundamental mechanical origin of tactile information, primary sensory neurons in the trigeminal ganglion (Vg) have often been described as encoding the kinematics (geometry) of object contact. Here we aimed to determine the extent to which Vg neurons encode the kinematics vs. mechanics of contact. We used models of whisker bending to quantify mechanical signals (forces and moments) at the whisker base while simultaneously monitoring whisker kinematics and recording single Vg units in both anesthetized rats and awake, body restrained rats. We employed a novel manual stimulation technique to deflect whiskers in a way that decouples kinematics from mechanics, and used Generalized Linear Models (GLMs) to show that Vg neurons more directly encode mechanical signals when the whisker is deflected in this decoupled stimulus space.

  13. Oral traumatic neuroma with mature ganglion cells: A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopes Marcio

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic neuromas are characterized by the presence of pain, burning, or paresthesia, associated with a history of trauma, normally surgery, in the same site. In the oral cavity, the most commonly affected sites are the lip, tongue, and mental nerve area. Pressure on the suspected area usually provokes pain. They microscopically consist of a proliferation of nerve fascicles embedded in a background of collagen. We present a case of a 42-year-old Latin American female patient complaining of a painful solitary nodule erupting on the lingual surface of the mandibular body. Histopathological analysis showed a traumatic neuroma associated with mature ganglion cells, which is an extremely unusual finding. After complete removal of the lesion the symptoms disappeared. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a unique lesion with unusual clinical and histopathological features reported in the English language literature.

  14. Properties of mouse retinal ganglion cell dendritic growth during postnatal development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The property of dendritic growth dynamics during development is a subject of intense interest.Here,we investigated the dendritic motility of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during different developmental stages,using ex vivo mouse retina explant culture,Semliki Forest Virus transfection and time-lapse observations.The results illustrated that during development,the dendritic motility underwent a change from rapid growth to a relatively stable state,i.e.,at P0 (day of birth),RGC dendrites were in a highly active state,whereas at postnatal 13 (P13) they were more stable,and at P3 and P8,the RGCs were in an intermediate state.At any given developmental stage,RGCs of different types displayed the same dendritic growth rate and extent.Since the mouse is the most popular mammalian model for genetic manipulation,this study provided a methodological foundation for further exploring the regulatory mechanisms of dendritic development.

  15. Role of endoplasmic reticulum stress in the loss of retinal ganglion cells in diabetic retinopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Yang; Lemeng Wu; Dongmei Wang; Ying Li; Hongliang Dou; Mark OMTso; Zhizhong Ma

    2013-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum stress is closely involved in the early stage of diabetic retinopathy. In the present study, a streptozotocin-induced diabetic animal model was given an intraperitoneal injection of tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Results from immunofluorescent co-localization experiments showed that both caspase-12 protein and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 phosphorylation levels significantly in-creased, which was associated with retinal ganglion celldeath in diabetic retinas. The C/ERB ho-mologous protein pathway directly contributed to glial reactivity, and was subsequently responsible for neuronal loss and vascular abnormalities in diabetic retinopathy. Our experimental findings in-dicate that endoplasmic reticulum stress plays an important role in diabetes-induced retinal neu-ronal loss and vascular abnormalities, and that inhibiting the activation of the endoplasmic reticulum stress pathway provides effective protection against diabetic retinopathy.

  16. Single-cell RNA sequencing identifies distinct mouse medial ganglionic eminence cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Jiun J.; Friedman, Brad A.; Ha, Connie; Durinck, Steffen; Liu, Jinfeng; Rubenstein, John L.; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Modrusan, Zora

    2017-01-01

    Many subtypes of cortical interneurons (CINs) are found in adult mouse cortices, but the mechanism generating their diversity remains elusive. We performed single-cell RNA sequencing on the mouse embryonic medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), the major birthplace for CINs, and on MGE-like cells differentiated from embryonic stem cells. Two distinct cell types were identified as proliferating neural progenitors and immature neurons, both of which comprised sub-populations. Although lineage development of MGE progenitors was reconstructed and immature neurons were characterized as GABAergic, cells that might correspond to precursors of different CINs were not identified. A few non-neuronal cell types were detected, including microglia. In vitro MGE-like cells resembled bona fide MGE cells but expressed lower levels of Foxg1 and Epha4. Together, our data provide detailed understanding of the embryonic MGE developmental program and suggest how CINs are specified. PMID:28361918

  17. Large Intra-Articular Anterior Cruciate Ligament Ganglion Cyst, Presenting with Inability to Flex the Knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake Sloane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old female presented with a 3-month history of gradually worsening anterior knee pain, swelling and inability to flex the knee. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI revealed a large intra-articular cystic swelling anterior to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL, extending into the Hoffa's infrapatellar fat pad. Following manipulation under anaesthesia and arthroscopic debridement of the cyst, the patient's symptoms were relieved with restoration of normal knee motion. ACL ganglion cysts are uncommon intra-articular pathological entities, which are usually asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally by MRI. This is the first reported case of an ACL cyst being so large as to cause a mechanical block to knee flexion.

  18. Effect of eye NGF administration on two animal models of retinal ganglion cells degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Colafrancesco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF administration on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in experimentally induced glaucoma (GL and diabetic retinopathy (DR. GL was induced in adult rats by injection of hypertonic saline into the episcleral vein of the eye and diabetes (DT was induced by administration of streptozoticin. Control and experimental rats were treated daily with either ocular application of NGF or vehicle solution. We found that both animal models present a progressive degeneration of RGCs and changing NGF and VEGF levels in the retina and optic nerve. We then proved that NGF eye drop administration exerts a protective effect on these models of retinal degeneration. In brief, our findings indicate that NGF can play a protective role against RGC degeneration occurring in GL and DR and suggest that ocular NGF administration might be an effective pharmacological approach.

  19. Endothelin B receptors contribute to retinal ganglion cell loss in a rat model of glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alena Z Minton

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is an optic neuropathy, commonly associated with elevated intraocular pressure (IOP characterized by optic nerve degeneration, cupping of the optic disc, and loss of retinal ganglion cells which could lead to loss of vision. Endothelin-1 (ET-1 is a 21-amino acid vasoactive peptide that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of glaucoma; however, the receptors mediating these effects have not been defined. In the current study, endothelin B (ET(B receptor expression was assessed in vivo, in the Morrison's ocular hypertension model of glaucoma in rats. Elevation of IOP in Brown Norway rats produced increased expression of ET(B receptors in the retina, mainly in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, nerve fiber layer (NFL, and also in the inner plexiform layer (IPL and inner nuclear layer (INL. To determine the role of ET(B receptors in neurodegeneration, Wistar-Kyoto wild type (WT and ET(B receptor-deficient (KO rats were subjected to retrograde labeling with Fluoro-Gold (FG, following which IOP was elevated in one eye while the contralateral eye served as control. IOP elevation for 4 weeks in WT rats caused an appreciable loss of RGCs, which was significantly attenuated in KO rats. In addition, degenerative changes in the optic nerve were greatly reduced in KO rats compared to those in WT rats. Taken together, elevated intraocular pressure mediated increase in ET(B receptor expression and its activation may contribute to a decrease in RGC survival as seen in glaucoma. These findings raise the possibility of using endothelin receptor antagonists as neuroprotective agents for the treatment of glaucoma.

  20. Effects of gentamicin on guinea pig vestibular ganglion function and on substance P and neuropeptide Y.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chi-Te; Young, Yi-Ho; Cheng, Po-Wen; Lue, June-Horng

    2010-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that following intratympanic gentamicin application in the guinea pigs, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) were absent regardless of stimulation mode using either air-conducted sound (ACS) stimuli or galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS). Ultrastructurally, both type I hair cells and their calyx terminals were distorted in the saccular macula. However, little is known about the toxic effects of gentamicin on the vestibular ganglion (VG). In this study, absent ACS- and GVS-VEMPs were noted in all the gentamicin-treated ears (100%), which were confirmed by the substantial loss of sensory hair cells in the saccular macula. Moreover, dramatic up-regulation of growth associated protein-43 (GAP-43) expression was detected in the ipsilateral VG neurons. The mean percentage of substance P-like immunoreactive (SP-LI) neurons in the treated VG (81.8±1.9%) was significantly higher than that in the control VG (68.6±3.3%). Conversely, the mean percentage of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive (NPY-LI) neurons in the treated VG (13.7±3.8%) was dramatically lower than that in the control VG (49.0±3.8%). Double labeling results shown 82% of SP-LI and 16% of NPY-LI neurons coexpressed with GAP-43, suggested that SP accumulating coincided with NPY decreasing in regenerating VG neurons after gentamicin treatment. Overall, the changes in SP and NPY expression in VG neurons after gentamicin treatment were like to those in the superior cervical ganglion following sympathectomy.

  1. Presence of Functional Neurotrophin TrkB Receptors in the Rat Superior Cervical Ganglion

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    Pablo Valle-Leija

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Sympathetic neurons express the neurotrophin receptors TrkA, p75NTR, and a non-functional truncated TrkB isoform (TrkB-Tc, but are not thought to express a functional full-length TrkB receptor (TrkB-Fl. We, and others, have demonstrated that nerve growth factor (NGF and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF modulate synaptic transmission and synaptic plasticity in neurons of the superior cervical ganglion (SCG of the rat. To clarify whether TrkB is expressed in sympathetic ganglia and contributes to the effects of BDNF upon sympathetic function, we characterized the presence and activity of the neurotrophin receptors expressed in the adult SCG compared with their presence in neonatal and cultured sympathetic neurons. Here, we expand our previous study regarding the immunodetection of neurotrophin receptors. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that 19% of adult ganglionic neurons expressed TrkB-Fl immunoreactivity (IR, 82% expressed TrkA-IR, and 51% expressed p75NTR-IR; TrkB-Tc would be expressed in 36% of neurons. In addition, using Western-blotting and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR analyses, we confirmed the expression of TrkB-Fl and TrkB-Tc protein and mRNA transcripts in adult SCG. Neonatal neurons expressed significantly more TrkA-IR and TrkB-Fl-IR than p75NTR-IR. Finally, the application of neurotrophin, and high frequency stimulation, induced the activation of Trk receptors and the downstream PI3-kinase (phosphatidyl inositol-3-kinase signaling pathway, thus evoking the phosphorylation of Trk and Akt. These results demonstrate that SCG neurons express functional TrkA and TrkB-Fl receptors, which may contribute to the differential modulation of synaptic transmission and long-term synaptic plasticity.

  2. Topographic prominence discriminator for the detection of short-latency spikes of retinal ganglion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Ahn, Jungryul; Park, Dae Jin; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Kwangsoo; Cho, Dong-il Dan; Senok, Solomon S.; Koo, Kyo-in; Goo, Yong Sook

    2017-02-01

    Objective. Direct stimulation of retinal ganglion cells in degenerate retinas by implanting epi-retinal prostheses is a recognized strategy for restoration of visual perception in patients with retinitis pigmentosa or age-related macular degeneration. Elucidating the best stimulus-response paradigms in the laboratory using multielectrode arrays (MEA) is complicated by the fact that the short-latency spikes (within 10 ms) elicited by direct retinal ganglion cell (RGC) stimulation are obscured by the stimulus artifact which is generated by the electrical stimulator. Approach. We developed an artifact subtraction algorithm based on topographic prominence discrimination, wherein the duration of prominences within the stimulus artifact is used as a strategy for identifying the artifact for subtraction and clarifying the obfuscated spikes which are then quantified using standard thresholding. Main results. We found that the prominence discrimination based filters perform creditably in simulation conditions by successfully isolating randomly inserted spikes in the presence of simple and even complex residual artifacts. We also show that the algorithm successfully isolated short-latency spikes in an MEA-based recording from degenerate mouse retinas, where the amplitude and frequency characteristics of the stimulus artifact vary according to the distance of the recording electrode from the stimulating electrode. By ROC analysis of false positive and false negative first spike detection rates in a dataset of one hundred and eight RGCs from four retinal patches, we found that the performance of our algorithm is comparable to that of a generally-used artifact subtraction filter algorithm which uses a strategy of local polynomial approximation (SALPA). Significance. We conclude that the application of topographic prominence discrimination is a valid and useful method for subtraction of stimulation artifacts with variable amplitudes and shapes. We propose that our algorithm

  3. Spiral Ganglion Cells and Macrophages Initiate Neuro-inflammation and Scarring Following Cochlear Implantation

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    Esperanza eBas

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Conservation of a patient’s residual hearing and prevention of fibrous tissue/new bone formation around an electrode array are some of the major challenges in cochlear implant (CI surgery. Although it is well known that fibrotic tissue formation around the electrode array can interfere with hearing performance in implanted patients, and that associated intracochlear inflammation can initiate loss of residual hearing, little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms that promote this response in the cochlea. In vitro studies in neonatal rats and in vivo studies in adult mice were performed to gain insight into the pro-inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling phases of pathological wound healing that occur in the cochlea following an electrode analogue insertion. Resident Schwann cells, macrophages/microglia, and fibroblasts had a prominent role in the inflammatory process in the cochlea. Leukocytes were recruited to the cochlea following insertion of a nylon filament in adult mice, where contributed to the inflammatory response. The reparative stages in wound healing are characterized by persistent neuro-inflammation of spiral ganglion neurons and expression of regenerative macrophages in the cochlea. Accordingly, genes involved in extracellular matrix deposition and remodeling were up-regulated in implanted cochleae.Maturation of scar tissue occurs in the remodeling phase of wound healing in the cochlea. Similar to other damaged peripheral nerves, M2 macrophages and de-differentiated Schwann cells were observed in damaged cochleae and may play a role in cell survival and axonal regeneration. In conclusion, the insertion of an electrode analogue into the cochlea is associated with robust early and chronic inflammatory responses characterized by recruitment of leukocytes and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines that promote intracochlear fibrosis and loss of auditory hair cells and spiral ganglion neurons important for hearing

  4. Novel Methodology for Creating Macaque Retinas with Sortable Photoreceptors and Ganglion Cells

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    Shreyasi Choudhury

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The ability to generate macaque retinas with sortable cell populations would be of great benefit to both basic and translational studies of the primate retina. The purpose of our study was therefore to develop methods to achieve this goal by selectively labeling, in life, photoreceptors (PRs and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs with separate fluorescent markers. Methods: Labeling of macaque (Macaca fascicularis PRs and RGCs was accomplished by subretinal delivery of AAV5-hGRK1-GFP, and retrograde transport of micro-ruby™ from the lateral geniculate nucleus, respectively. Retinas were anatomically separated into different regions. Dissociation conditions were optimized, and cells from each region underwent fluorescent activated cell sorting (FACS. Expression of retinal cell type- specific genes was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR to characterize isolated cell populations. Results: We show that macaque PRs and RGCs can be simultaneously labeled in-life and enriched populations isolated by FACS. Recovery from different retinal regions indicated efficient isolation/enrichment for PRs and RGCs, with the macula being particularly amendable to this technique. Conclusions: The methods and materials presented here allow for the identification of novel reagents designed to target retinal ganglion cells and/or photoreceptors in a species that is phylogenetically and anatomically similar to human. These techniques will enable screening of intravitreally- delivered AAV capsid libraries for variants with increased tropism for PRs and/or RGCs and the evaluation of vector tropism and/or cellular promoter activity of gene therapy vectors in a clinically relevant species.

  5. Type I vs type II spiral ganglion neurons exhibit differential survival and neuritogenesis during cochlear development

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    Housley Gary D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms that consolidate neural circuitry are a major focus of neuroscience. In the mammalian cochlea, the refinement of spiral ganglion neuron (SGN innervation to the inner hair cells (by type I SGNs and the outer hair cells (by type II SGNs is accompanied by a 25% loss of SGNs. Results We investigated the segregation of neuronal loss in the mouse cochlea using β-tubulin and peripherin antisera to immunolabel all SGNs and selectively type II SGNs, respectively, and discovered that it is the type II SGN population that is predominately lost within the first postnatal week. Developmental neuronal loss has been attributed to the decline in neurotrophin expression by the target hair cells during this period, so we next examined survival of SGN sub-populations using tissue culture of the mid apex-mid turn region of neonatal mouse cochleae. In organotypic culture for 48 hours from postnatal day 1, endogenous trophic support from the organ of Corti proved sufficient to maintain all type II SGNs; however, a large proportion of type I SGNs were lost. Culture of the spiral ganglion as an explant, with removal of the organ of Corti, led to loss of the majority of both SGN sub-types. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF added as a supplement to the media rescued a significant proportion of the SGNs, particularly the type II SGNs, which also showed increased neuritogenesis. The known decline in BDNF production by the rodent sensory epithelium after birth is therefore a likely mediator of type II neuron apoptosis. Conclusion Our study thus indicates that BDNF supply from the organ of Corti supports consolidation of type II innervation in the neonatal mouse cochlea. In contrast, type I SGNs likely rely on additional sources for trophic support.

  6. [Diagnosis and treatment of the ganglion cysts and synovial cysts arising from the temporomandibular joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Juan-hong; Guo, Chuan-bin; Ma, Xu-chen

    2014-02-18

    To give a reference for the early diagnosis and treatment of the cysts arising from the temporomandibular joint. Nine patients finally diagnosed as temporomandibular joint cysts at the Peking University Hospital of Stomatology from May 1998 to August 2013 were selected and reviewed. Their clinical manifestations, imaging features, diagnoses and differential diagnoses, treatments and follow-ups were summarized and discussed. In the 9 patients, 3 were males and 6 females. Their ages ranged from 33 to 62 years with a median age of 39 years; the course of the disease ranged from 2 weeks to 3 years with a median of 4 months. The image examinations were performed with conventional X-ray examinations in 7 cases, CT scans in 8 cases, MRI in 6 cases and ultrasound in one case. Of the 9 cases, 7 were finally diagnosed as ganglion cyst and 2 as synovial cyst. Ganglion cysts mainly presented as the mass of preauricular area or joint area, with no obvious symptoms or only local discomfort, occasionally with pain. The synovial cysts manifested as the painful swelling of preauricular area and limited mouth-opening, accompanying with occlusal disorders. The treatments included surgical resection in 8 cases, repeated arthrocenteses and lavages in one case. The follow-ups were from 3 months to 9 years, one case with recurrence, and the remaining eight cases without recurrence. MRI examinations are very helpful in the early diagnosis and treatment planning of temporomandibular joint cysts. Surgical resection can have good results. Repeated arthrocenteses and lavages also have a good result, which may be an alternative choice for synovial cyst, but more accumulation of clinical experience is further needed.

  7. Specific inhibition of TRPV4 enhances retinal ganglion cell survival in adult porcine retinal explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Linnéa; Arnér, Karin; Ghosh, Fredrik

    2017-01-01

    Signaling through the polymodal cation channel Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) has been implicated in retinal neuronal degeneration. To further outline the involvement of this channel in this process, we here explore modulation of Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) activity on neuronal health and glial activation in an in vitro model of retinal degeneration. For this purpose, adult porcine retinal explants were cultured using a previously established standard protocol for up to 5 days with specific TRPV4 agonist GSK1016790A (GSK), or specific antagonist RN-1734, or culture medium only. Glial and neuronal cell health were evaluated by a battery of immunohistochemical markers, as well as morphological staining. Specific inhibition of TRPV4 by RN-1734 significantly enhanced ganglion cell survival, improved the maintenance of the retinal laminar architecture, reduced apoptotic cell death and attenuated the gliotic response as well as preserved the expression of TRPV4 in the plexiform layers and ganglion cells. In contrast, culture controls, as well as specimens treated with GSK, displayed rapid remodeling and neurodegeneration as well as a downregulation of TRPV4 and the Müller cell homeostatic mediator glutamine synthetase. Our results indicate that TRPV4 signaling is an important contributor to the retinal degeneration in this model, affecting neuronal cell health and glial homeostasis. The finding that pharmacological inhibition of the receptor significantly attenuates neuronal degeneration and gliosis in vitro, suggests that TRPV4 signaling may be an interesting pharmaceutical target to explore for treatment of retinal degenerative disease.

  8. Dorsal Root Ganglionic Field Stimulation Relieves Spontaneous and Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bin; Yu, Hongwei; Fischer, Gregory J; Kramer, Jeffery M; Hogan, Quinn H

    2016-12-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) electrical stimulation (ganglionic field stimulation [GFS]) is effective in relieving clinical pain, but its mechanism is unknown. We therefore developed a rat model for GFS to test analgesic effects in the context of neuropathic pain. GFS was applied with a bipolar electrode at L4, using parameters replicating clinical use (20 Hz, 150-μs pulse width, current at 80% of motor threshold). Neuropathic pain was generated by tibial nerve injury (TNI). Pain behavior was monitored by determining the threshold for withdrawal from punctate mechanical stimuli, by identifying hyperalgesic responses to noxious mechanical stimuli, and by hypersensitivity to cold. The affective dimension of pain was measured using conditioned place preference. We found that electrode insertion caused no behavioral evidence of pain and produced no histological evidence of DRG damage. GFS reversed TNI-induced hypersensitivity to cold and mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia. Allodynia remained diminished 15 minutes after GFS. Conditioned place preference showed that GFS was not rewarding in uninjured control animals but was rewarding in animals subjected to TNI, which reveals analgesic efficacy of GFS for spontaneous pain. We conclude that GFS relieves neuropathic pain in rats. This model may provide a platform for identifying mechanisms and novel applications of GFS. We show that electrical stimulation of the DRG in rats reverses neuropathic pain behavior and provides a rewarding effect to animals with spontaneous neuropathic pain. This confirms analgesic efficacy of DRG stimulation in an animal model, and provides a platform for preclinical exploration. Copyright © 2016 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Neuroarchitecture of aminergic systems in the larval ventral ganglion of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vömel, Matthias; Wegener, Christian

    2008-03-26

    Biogenic amines are important signaling molecules in the central nervous system of both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, biogenic amines take part in the regulation of various vital physiological processes such as feeding, learning/memory, locomotion, sexual behavior, and sleep/arousal. Consequently, several morphological studies have analyzed the distribution of aminergic neurons in the CNS. Previous descriptions, however, did not determine the exact spatial location of aminergic neurite arborizations within the neuropil. The release sites and pre-/postsynaptic compartments of aminergic neurons also remained largely unidentified. We here used gal4-driven marker gene expression and immunocytochemistry to map presumed serotonergic (5-HT), dopaminergic, and tyraminergic/octopaminergic neurons in the thoracic and abdominal neuromeres of the Drosophila larval ventral ganglion relying on Fasciclin2-immunoreactive tracts as three-dimensional landmarks. With tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH) or tyrosine decarboxylase 2 (TDC2)-specific gal4-drivers, we also analyzed the distribution of ectopically expressed neuronal compartment markers in presumptive dopaminergic TH and tyraminergic/octopaminergic TDC2 neurons, respectively. Our results suggest that thoracic and abdominal 5-HT and TH neurons are exclusively interneurons whereas most TDC2 neurons are efferent. 5-HT and TH neurons are ideally positioned to integrate sensory information and to modulate neuronal transmission within the ventral ganglion, while most TDC2 neurons appear to act peripherally. In contrast to 5-HT neurons, TH and TDC2 neurons each comprise morphologically different neuron subsets with separated in- and output compartments in specific neuropil regions. The three-dimensional mapping of aminergic neurons now facilitates the identification of neuronal network contacts and co-localized signaling molecules, as exemplified for DOPA decarboxylase-synthesizing neurons that co

  10. The influence of ileitis on the neurochemistry of the caudal mesenteric ganglion in the pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidsudko, Z; Wasowicz, K; Kaleczyc, J; Klimczuk, M; Bossowska, A; Majewski, M; Adriaensen, D; Timmermans, J-P

    2011-06-01

    Some literature data suggest that there is a regulatory neuronal circuit between the small and the large bowel. To verify this hypothesis the present study investigated: (i) the distribution, chemical coding and routing of caudal mesenteric ganglion (CaMG) neurons participating in an intestinointestinal reflex pathway involving ileal descending neurons and viscerofugal colonic neurons and (ii) possible changes in the neuroarchitecture of this pathway evoked by chemically induced ileitis in juvenile pigs (n=16). Combined retrograde tract tracing and transections of the intermesenteric or caudal colonic nerves were applied. In addition, double immunostainings was used to investigate the chemical coding of retrogradely labeled CaMG neurons and intraganglionic nerve terminals apposed to them, under normal and inflammatory conditions. The majority of the ileum-projecting neurons were found in the caudal part of CaMG. Disruption of particular nerve pathways resulted in diminished number of retrogradely labeled neurons, ipsilateral to the side of manipulation. In normal pigs, ileum-projecting CaMG neurons stained for tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-β-hydroxylase, neuropeptide Y (NPY), somatostatin and galanin (GAL). The number and chemical coding of the neurons in the inflamed animals were similar to those observed in the normal pigs. However, in the inflamed pigs, the number of NPY-, GAL- or substance P-positive nerve terminals supplying retrogradely labeled neurons was increased. The present results suggest that inflammatory processes of the porcine ileum are able to induce changes in the intraganglionic architecture of a sympathetic ganglion located at discrete distance from the affected bowel segment. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  11. Regenerative Responses and Axon Pathfinding of Retinal Ganglion Cells in Chronically Injured Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yungher, Benjamin J.; Ribeiro, Márcio; Park, Kevin K.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Enhanced regeneration of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) axons can be achieved by modification of numerous neuronal-intrinsic factors. However, axon growth initiation and the pathfinding behavior of these axons after traumatic injury remain poorly understood outside of acute injury paradigms, despite the clinical relevance of more chronic settings. We therefore examined RGC axon regeneration following therapeutic delivery that is postponed until 2 months after optic nerve crush injury. Methods Optic nerve regeneration was induced by virally mediated (adeno-associated virus) ciliary neurotrophic factor (AAV-CNTF) administered either immediately or 56 days after optic nerve crush in wild-type or Bax knockout (KO) mice. Retinal ganglion nerve axon regeneration was assessed 21 and 56 days after viral injection. Immunohistochemical analysis of RGC injury signals and extrinsic factors in the optic nerve were also examined at 5 and 56 days post crush. Results In addition to sustained expression of injury response proteins in surviving RGCs, we observe axon regrowth in wild-type and apoptosis-deficient Bax KO mice following AAV-CNTF treatment. Fewer instances of aberrant axon growth are seen, at least in the area near the lesion site, in animals given treatment 56 days after crush injury compared to the animals given treatment immediately after injury. We also find evidence of long distance growth into a visual target in Bax KO mice despite postponed initiation of this regenerative program. Conclusions These studies provide evidence against an intrinsic critical period for RGC axon regeneration or degradation of injury signals. Regeneration results from Bax KO mice imply highly sustained regenerative capacity in RGCs, highlighting the importance of long-lasting neuroprotective strategies as well as of RGC axon guidance research in chronically injured animals. PMID:28324115

  12. The homeodomain transcription factor Phox2 in the stellate ganglion of the squid Loligo pealei

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    J. Peter H. Burbach

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Homeodomain transcription factors regulate development of embryos and cellular physiology in adult systems. Paired-type homeodomain genes constitute a subclass that has been particularly implicated in establishment of neuronal identity in the mammalian nervous system. We isolated fragments of eight homeodomain genes of this subclass expressed in the stellate ganglion of the North Atlantic long finned squid Loligo pealei (lp [Note: Loligo pealei has been officially renamed Doryteuthis pealei. For reasons of uniformity and clarity Loligo pealei (lp is used here]. Of the most abundant ones, we cloned a full length cDNA which encoded the squid ortholog of the paired-type homeodomain proteins Phox2a/b. The homology of lpPhox2 to invertebrate and mammalian Phox2 was limited to the homeodomain. In contrast to mouse Phox2b, lpPhox2 was unable to transactivate the dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH promoter in a heterologous mammalian transfection system. In vivo, lpPhox2 was expressed in the developing stellate ganglion of stage 27 squid embryos and continued to be expressed in the adult stellate neurons where expression was confined to the giant fiber lobe containing the neurons that form the giant axons. The expression of lpPhox was similarly timed and distributed as the Fmrf gene. Furthermore, the Fmrf upstream region contained putative Phox2a/b binding sites. These results suggest a role of lpPhox2 in the developmental specification of neuronal identity and regulation of neurons of the squid giant axon.

  13. Dendritic thickness: a morphometric parameter to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells

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    L.D. Loopuijt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the dendritic morphology of retinal ganglion cells in wild-type mice we intracellularly injected these cells with Lucifer yellow in an in vitro preparation of the retina. Subsequently, quantified values of dendritic thickness, number of branching points and level of stratification of 73 Lucifer yellow-filled ganglion cells were analyzed by statistical methods, resulting in a classification into 9 groups. The variables dendritic thickness, number of branching points per cell and level of stratification were independent of each other. Number of branching points and level of stratification were independent of eccentricity, whereas dendritic thickness was positively dependent (r = 0.37 on it. The frequency distribution of dendritic thickness tended to be multimodal, indicating the presence of at least two cell populations composed of neurons with dendritic diameters either smaller or larger than 1.8 µm ("thin" or "thick" dendrites, respectively. Three cells (4.5% were bistratified, having thick dendrites, and the others (95.5% were monostratified. Using k-means cluster analysis, monostratified cells with either thin or thick dendrites were further subdivided according to level of stratification and number of branching points: cells with thin dendrites were divided into 2 groups with outer stratification (0-40% and 2 groups with inner (50-100% stratification, whereas cells with thick dendrites were divided into one group with outer and 3 groups with inner stratification. We postulate, that one group of cells with thin dendrites resembles cat ß-cells, whereas one group of cells with thick dendrites includes cells that resemble cat a-cells.

  14. Rescuing axons from degeneration does not affect retinal ganglion cell death

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    S. de Lima

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available After a traumatic injury to the central nervous system, the distal stumps of axons undergo Wallerian degeneration (WD, an event that comprises cytoskeleton and myelin breakdown, astrocytic gliosis, and overexpression of proteins that inhibit axonal regrowth. By contrast, injured neuronal cell bodies show features characteristic of attempts to initiate the regenerative process of elongating their axons. The main molecular event that leads to WD is an increase in the intracellular calcium concentration, which activates calpains, calcium-dependent proteases that degrade cytoskeleton proteins. The aim of our study was to investigate whether preventing axonal degeneration would impact the survival of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs after crushing the optic nerve. We observed that male Wistar rats (weighing 200-400 g; n=18 treated with an exogenous calpain inhibitor (20 mM administered via direct application of the inhibitor embedded within the copolymer resin Evlax immediately following optic nerve crush showed a delay in the onset of WD. This delayed onset was characterized by a decrease in the number of degenerated fibers (P<0.05 and an increase in the number of preserved fibers (P<0.05 4 days after injury. Additionally, most preserved fibers showed a normal G-ratio. These results indicated that calpain inhibition prevented the degeneration of optic nerve fibers, rescuing axons from the process of axonal degeneration. However, analysis of retinal ganglion cell survival demonstrated no difference between the calpain inhibitor- and vehicle-treated groups, suggesting that although the calpain inhibitor prevented axonal degeneration, it had no effect on RGC survival after optic nerve damage.

  15. Cobalamin C Deficiency Shows a Rapidly Progressing Maculopathy With Severe Photoreceptor and Ganglion Cell Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Lucas; Ficicioglu, Can H; Serrano, Leona; Han, Grace; Morgan, Jessica I W; Mills, Monte D; Forbes, Brian J; Davidson, Stefanie L; Binenbaum, Gil; Kaplan, Paige B; Nichols, Charles W; Verloo, Patrick; Leroy, Bart P; Maguire, Albert M; Aleman, Tomas S

    2015-12-01

    To describe in detail the retinal structure and function of a group of patients with cobalamin C (cblC) disease. Patients (n = 11, age 4 months to 15 years) with cblC disease (9/11, early onset) diagnosed by newborn screening underwent complete ophthalmic examinations, fundus photography, near-infrared reflectance imaging, and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed in a subset of patients. Patients carried homozygous or compound heterozygote mutations in the methylmalonic aciduria and homocystinuria type C (MMACHC) gene. Late-onset patients had a normal exam. All early-onset patients showed a maculopathy; older subjects had a retina-wide degeneration (n = 4; >7 years of age). In general, retinal changes were first observed before 1 year of age and progressed within months to a well-established maculopathy. Pseudocolobomas were documented in three patients. Measurable visual acuities ranged from 20/200 to 20/540. Nystagmus was present in 8/11 patients; 5/6 patients had normal ERGs; 1/6 had reduced rod-mediated responses. Spectral-domain OCT showed macular thinning, with severe ganglion cell layer (GCL) and outer nuclear layer (ONL) loss. Inner retinal thickening was observed in areas of total GCL/ONL loss. A normal lamination pattern in the peripapillary nasal retina was often seen despite severe central and/or retina-wide disease. Patients with early-onset cblC and MMACHC mutations showed an early-onset, unusually fast-progressing maculopathy with severe central ONL and GCL loss. An abnormally thickened inner retina supports a remodeling response to both photoreceptor and ganglion cell degeneration and/or an interference with normal development in early-onset cblC.

  16. Neuroarchitecture of aminergic systems in the larval ventral ganglion of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Vömel

    Full Text Available Biogenic amines are important signaling molecules in the central nervous system of both vertebrates and invertebrates. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, biogenic amines take part in the regulation of various vital physiological processes such as feeding, learning/memory, locomotion, sexual behavior, and sleep/arousal. Consequently, several morphological studies have analyzed the distribution of aminergic neurons in the CNS. Previous descriptions, however, did not determine the exact spatial location of aminergic neurite arborizations within the neuropil. The release sites and pre-/postsynaptic compartments of aminergic neurons also remained largely unidentified. We here used gal4-driven marker gene expression and immunocytochemistry to map presumed serotonergic (5-HT, dopaminergic, and tyraminergic/octopaminergic neurons in the thoracic and abdominal neuromeres of the Drosophila larval ventral ganglion relying on Fasciclin2-immunoreactive tracts as three-dimensional landmarks. With tyrosine hydroxylase- (TH or tyrosine decarboxylase 2 (TDC2-specific gal4-drivers, we also analyzed the distribution of ectopically expressed neuronal compartment markers in presumptive dopaminergic TH and tyraminergic/octopaminergic TDC2 neurons, respectively. Our results suggest that thoracic and abdominal 5-HT and TH neurons are exclusively interneurons whereas most TDC2 neurons are efferent. 5-HT and TH neurons are ideally positioned to integrate sensory information and to modulate neuronal transmission within the ventral ganglion, while most TDC2 neurons appear to act peripherally. In contrast to 5-HT neurons, TH and TDC2 neurons each comprise morphologically different neuron subsets with separated in- and output compartments in specific neuropil regions. The three-dimensional mapping of aminergic neurons now facilitates the identification of neuronal network contacts and co-localized signaling molecules, as exemplified for DOPA decarboxylase

  17. Synchronized Firings in Retinal Ganglion Cells in Response to Natural Stimulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying-Ying; XIAO Lei; LIU Wen-Zhong; GONG Hai-Qing; LIANG Pei-Ji

    2011-01-01

    The response of synchronously firing groups of population retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to natural movies (NMs)and pseudo-random white-noise checker-board flickering (CB, as control) are investigated using an informationtheoretic algorithm.The main results are: (1) the population RGCs tend to fire in synchrony far more frequently than expected by chance during both NM and CB stimulation; (2) more synchronous groups could be formed and each group contains more neurons under NM than CB stimulation; (3) the individual neurons also participate in more groups and have more distinct partners in NM than CB stimulation.All these results suggest that the synchronized firings in RGCs are more extensive and diverse, which may account for more effective information processing in representing the natural visual environment.%@@ The response of synchronously firing groups of population retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) to natural movies (NMs) and pseudo-random white-noise checker-board flickering (CB, as control) are investigated using an information-theoretic algorithm.The main results are: (1) the population RGCs tend to fire in synchrony far more frequently than expected by chance during both NM and CB stimulation; (2) more synchronous groups could be formed and each group contains more neurons under NM than CB stimulation; (3) the individual neurons also participate in more groups and have more distinct partners in NM than CB stimulation.All these results suggest that the synchronized firings in RGCs are more extensive and diverse, which may account for more effective information processing in representing the natural visual environment.

  18. Cometin is a novel neurotrophic factor that promotes neurite outgrowth and neuroblast migration in vitro and supports survival of spiral ganglion neurons in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jesper Roland; Fransson, Anette; Fjord-Larsen, Lone

    2012-01-01

    protein family. During early mouse development, Cometin is found exclusively in the floor plate and from E13.5 also in dorsal root ganglions and inner ear but apparently not in the adult nervous system. In vitro, Cometin promotes neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion cells which can be blocked...... properties in vitro, combined with the restricted inner ear expression during development, we further investigated Cometin in relation to deafness. In neomycin deafened guinea pigs, two weeks intracochlear infusion of recombinant Cometin supports spiral ganglion neuron survival and function. In contrast...

  19. The role of NgR-Rhoa-Rock signal pathway in retinal ganglion cell apoptosis of early diabetic rats

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    Yun-Jie Fu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To study the function and mechanism of the NgR-Rhoa-Rock signal pathways which exists in the retinal ganglion cells apoptosis in diabetes mellitus(DMrats. METHODS: Some healthy SD rats were operated by means of single intraperitoneal injection of 1% streptozotocin based on the standard of 50mg/kg wight, after that the blood sugar value was greater than 16.7mmol/L as DM model, then randomly divided into 3 groups, each group was 10 rats. In addition to take 10 healthy SD rats as control group. Four groups of rats were bilaterally eyeball intravitreal injection in turn with NgR-siRNA virus 10μL(siRNA group, NgR-siRNA virus diluted 10μL(DM group, NgR-siRNA virus-negative-control solution 10μL(siRNA blank group, NgR-siRNA virus diluted 10μL(normal control group, and fed normally. During that time, some life indexes like blood glucose, body mass, etc. were measured and recorded. After 12wk, the expression of NgR and Rhoa, HE staining, and TUNNEL staining were detected by Western blot analysis. RESULTS: Western blot analysis: compared with normal control group, the expression of NgR and Rhoa in DM group and siRNA blank group increased significantly(PP>0.05; compared with DM group and siRNA blank group, the expression of those proteins significantly lowered in siRNA group. HE staining: compared with normal control group, some extent ganglion cells arranged disorder, irregular shape, spacing not consistent were all found in three groups of model rats; compared with DM group and siRNA blank group, there was some improvement in siRNA group of ganglion cells about the order and shape size. TUNEL staining: compared with normal control group, there were retinal ganglion cells apoptosis in all of three groups of model rats. Compared with DM group and siRNA blank group, the number of retinal ganglion cells apoptotic cells was less, and the shape of cells had improved significantly in siRNA group. CONCLUSION: In the DM phase, the expression of NgR and

  20. Image appearances of intraosseous ganglion%骨内腱鞘囊肿的影像学表现

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢志勇; 吴明玉; 庄天阳; 庄丽真; 康江河

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the imaging features and their diagnostic value of intraosseous ganglion. Methods: Clinical and imaging features of 23 cases with intraosseous ganglion were retrospectively analyzed. 15 cases were examined with X-ray. 9 cases were examined with CT and 6 cases with MRI. 4 cases were examined with both of X-ray and CT,and 3 cases with both of X-ray and MRI. Results: Radiographs included a unilocular cyst surround by a full rim of sclerotic bone in the subchondral e-piphysis without any signs of degenerative joint disease. CT with 3D reformat images showed an intraosseous ganglion communicating with adjacent joint in 3 patients. Intraosseous ganglion was seen as low signal on T1 WI, high signal on T2WI and STIR. MRI showed an intraosseous ganglion communicating with adjacent joint in 2 patients. Conclusion: Intraosseous ganglion cysts have characteristic imaging features. CT with 3D reformat images is the first choice because of the advantage of details.%目的:探讨骨内腱鞘囊肿的影像学表现及其诊断价值.方法:回顾性分析经病理证实的23例骨内腱鞘囊肿的临床及影像资料,X线平片检查15例,螺旋CT检查9例,MRI检查6例.4例同时行X线平片和CT检查,3例同时行X线平片和MRI检查.结果:X线、CT表现为骨内邻近关节面的类圆形囊样透亮区,边界清楚,有薄层硬化边,3例CT及其三维重建显示病灶与关节腔相通.MRI在T1WI呈低信号,T2 WI和脂肪抑制T2表现为高信号,MRI显示病灶与关节腔相通2例.结论:骨内腱鞘囊肿影像学表现有一定特征,CT及其三维重建对病灶细节显示清晰,可作为首选检查方法.

  1. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide, nitric oxide synthase, and their receptors in human and rat sphenopalatine ganglion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csati, A; Tajti, J; Kuris, A

    2012-01-01

    Cranial parasympathetic outflow is mediated through the sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG). The present study was performed to examine the expression of the parasympathetic signaling transmitters and their receptors in human and rat SPG. Indirect immunofluorescence technique was used for the demonstra...

  2. c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3 expression in the retina of ocular hypertension mice: a possible target to reduce ganglion cell apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue He

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glaucoma, a type of optic neuropathy, is characterized by the loss of retinal ganglion cells. It remains controversial whether c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK participates in the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells in glaucoma. This study sought to explore a possible mechanism of action of JNK signaling pathway in glaucoma-induced retinal optic nerve damage. We established a mouse model of chronic ocular hypertension by reducing the aqueous humor followed by photocoagulation using the laser ignition method. Results showed significant pathological changes in the ocular tissues after the injury. Apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells increased with increased intraocular pressure, as did JNK3 mRNA expression in the retina. These data indicated that the increased expression of JNK3 mRNA was strongly associated with the increase in intraocular pressure in the retina, and correlated positively with the apoptosis of retinal ganglion cells.

  3. GABA and glycine channels in isolated ganglion cells from the goldfish retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, B N; Fain, G L; Fain, M J

    1989-11-01

    1. Adult goldfish retinas were enzymatically dissociated and ganglion cells were maintained in culture for periods of 1-5 days. Ganglion cells could be identified by their morphology, and this identification was confirmed by retrograde transport of the fluorescent dye Fast Blue injected into the optic nerve stub. 2. All the ganglion cells tested responded to 30 microM-GABA or 100 microM-glycine between 2 and 30 h after enzymatic dissociation of the retina. 3. Whole-cell responses to 30 microM-GABA or glycine declined over a period of seconds during sustained applications of the agonists, probably as a result of desensitization. There was an irreversible decline in the peak whole-cell response to repeated applications of 30 microM-GABA unless the pipette-filling solution contained 2 mM-ATP, 4 mM-Mg2+, 10 mM-EGTA and no added Ca2+. Both GABA and glycine responses also showed an irreversible decline in outside-out patches but, in this case, Mg2+, ATP, and very low Ca2+ failed to stabilize the response. 4. Whole-cell currents activated by both GABA and glycine were demonstrated to be chloride-selective by investigating the dependence of reversal potential (Vr) on internal chloride concentration ([Cl-]i). For GABA responses, the dependence of Vr on [Cl-]i could not be distinguished from that predicted by the Nernst relation. For glycine, deviations from Nernstian dependence were observed, but the permeability to Cl- was at least 20 times greater than to isethionate, SO4(2-), or monovalent cations (Na+ and Cs+). 5. Bicuculline methochloride (10 microM) selectively blocked responses to 3-30 microM-GABA without affecting responses to 30 microM-glycine. Bicuculline itself was not as selective. At agonist concentrations of 30 microM, 3 microM-bicuculline partially blocked the response to GABA but not that to glycine, but bicuculline at 10 microM blocked responses to both GABA and glycine. Strychnine (0.3-1 microM) blocked responses to 30 microM-glycine but also competitively

  4. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence Precursor Transplants Disperse and Integrate as Lineage-Specific Interneurons but Do Not Induce Cortical Plasticity

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    Phillip Larimer

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The maturation of inhibitory GABAergic cortical circuits regulates experience-dependent plasticity. We recently showed that the heterochronic transplantation of parvalbumin (PV or somatostatin (SST interneurons from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE reactivates ocular dominance plasticity (ODP in the postnatal mouse visual cortex. Might other types of interneurons similarly induce cortical plasticity? Here, we establish that caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE-derived interneurons, when transplanted into the visual cortex of neonatal mice, migrate extensively in the host brain and acquire laminar distribution, marker expression, electrophysiological properties, and visual response properties like those of host CGE interneurons. Although transplants from the anatomical CGE do induce ODP, we found that this plasticity reactivation is mediated by a small fraction of MGE-derived cells contained in the transplant. These findings demonstrate that transplanted CGE cells can successfully engraft into the postnatal mouse brain and confirm the unique role of MGE lineage neurons in the induction of ODP.

  5. Application of shock waves to rat skin decreases calcitonin gene-related peptide immunoreactivity in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Norimasa; Wada, Yuichi; Ohtori, Seiji; Saisu, Takashi; Moriya, Hideshige

    2003-09-30

    There have been several reports on the use of extracorporeal shock waves in the treatment of pseudarthrosis, calcifying tendinitis, and tendinopathies of the elbow. However, the pathomechanism of pain relief has not been clarified. To investigate the analgesic properties of shock wave application, we analyzed changes in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive (ir) dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. In the nontreated group, fluorogold-labeled dorsal root ganglion neurons innervating the most middle foot pad of hind paw were distributed in the L4 and L5 dorsal root ganglia. Of these neurons, 61% were CGRP-ir. However, in the shock wave-treated group, the percentage of FG-labeled CGRP-ir DRG neurons decreased to 18%. These data show that relief of clinical pain after shock wave application may result from reduced CGRP expression in DRG neurons.

  6. Focal electrical stimulation of major ganglion cell types in the primate retina for the design of visual prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepson, Lauren H; Hottowy, Pawel; Mathieson, Keith; Gunning, Deborah E; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J

    2013-04-24

    Electrical stimulation of retinal neurons with an advanced retinal prosthesis may eventually provide high-resolution artificial vision to the blind. However, the success of future prostheses depends on the ability to activate the major parallel visual pathways of the human visual system. Electrical stimulation of the five numerically dominant retinal ganglion cell types was investigated by simultaneous stimulation and recording in isolated peripheral primate (Macaca sp.) retina using multi-electrode arrays. ON and OFF midget, ON and OFF parasol, and small bistratified ganglion cells could all be activated directly to fire a single spike with submillisecond latency using brief pulses of current within established safety limits. Thresholds for electrical stimulation were similar in all five cell types. In many cases, a single cell could be specifically activated without activating neighboring cells of the same type or other types. These findings support the feasibility of direct electrical stimulation of the major visual pathways at or near their native spatial and temporal resolution.

  7. Localization of CGRP, CGRP receptor, PACAP and glutamate in trigeminal ganglion. Relation to the blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eftekhari, Sajedeh; Salvatore, Christopher A; Johansson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    ) and related this to the expression of CGRP and its receptor in rhesus trigeminal ganglion. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and glutamate were examined and related to the CGRP system. Furthermore, we examined if the trigeminal ganglion is protected by the blood-brain barrier (BBB......), and the distribution of PACAP and glutamate in rhesus and rat TG. Evans blue was used to examine large molecule penetration into the rat TG. High receptor binding densities were found in rhesus TG. Immunofluorescence revealed expression of CGRP, CLR and RAMP1 in trigeminal cells. CGRP positive neurons expressed PACAP...... but not glutamate. Some neurons expressing CLR and RAMP1 co-localized with glutamate. Evans blue revealed that the TG is not protected by BBB. This study demonstrates CGRP receptor binding sites and expression of the CGRP receptor in rhesus and rat TG. The expression pattern of PACAP and glutamate suggests...

  8. Analysis the macular ganglion cell complex thickness in monocular strabismic amblyopia patients by Fourier-domain OCT

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    Hong-Wei Deng

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To detect the macular ganglion cell complex thickness in monocular strabismus amblyopia patients, in order to explore the relationship between the degree of amblyopia and retinal ganglion cell complex thickness, and found out whether there is abnormal macular ganglion cell structure in strabismic amblyopia. METHODS: Using a fourier-domain optical coherence tomography(FD-OCTinstrument iVue®(Optovue Inc, Fremont, CA, Macular ganglion cell complex(mGCCthickness was measured and statistical the relation rate with the best vision acuity correction was compared Gman among 26 patients(52 eyesincluded in this study. RESULTS: The mean thickness of the mGCC in macular was investigated into three parts: centrial, inner circle(3mmand outer circle(6mm. The mean thicknesses of mGCC in central, inner and outer circle was 50.74±21.51μm, 101.4±8.51μm, 114.2±9.455μm in the strabismic amblyopia eyes(SAE, and 43.79±11.92μm,92.47±25.01μm, 113.3±12.88μm in the contralateral sound eyes(CSErespectively. There was no statistically significant difference among the eyes(P>0.05. But the best corrected vision acuity had a good correlation rate between mGcc thicknesses, which was better relative for the lower part than the upper part.CONCLUSION:There is a relationship between the amblyopia vision acuity and the mGCC thickness. Although there has not statistically significant difference of the mGCC thickness compared with the SAE and CSE. To measure the macular center mGCC thickness in clinic may understand the degree of amblyopia.

  9. TUMOR NECROSIS FACTOR-α INCREASES BDNF EXPRESSION IN TRIGEMINAL GANGLION NEURONS IN AN ACTIVITY-DEPENDENT MANNER

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Many chronic trigeminal pain conditions, such as migraine or temporo-mandibular disorders, are associated with inflammation within peripheral endings of trigeminal ganglion (TG) sensory neurons. A critical role in mechanisms of neuroinflammation is attributed to proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) that also contribute to mechanisms of persistent neuropathic pain resulting from nerve injury. However, the mechanisms of cytokine-mediated synaptic ...

  10. Ultrasound Diagnosis of Double Crush Syndrome of the Ulnar Nerve by the Anconeus Epitrochlearis and a Ganglion

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Double compression of the ulnar nerve, including Guyon's canal syndrome associated with cubital tunnel syndrome caused by the anconeus epitrochlearis muscle, is a very rare condition. We present a case of double crush syndrome of the ulnar nerve at the wrist and elbow in a 55-year-old man, as well as a brief review of the literature. Although electrodiagnostic findings were consistent with an ulnar nerve lesion only at the elbow, ultrasonography revealed a ganglion compressing the ulnar nerve...

  11. Focal Electrical Stimulation of Major Ganglion Cell Types in the Primate Retina for the Design of Visual Prostheses

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of retinal neurons with an advanced retinal prosthesis may eventually provide high-resolution artificial vision to the blind. However, the success of future prostheses depends on the ability to activate the major parallel visual pathways of the human visual system. Electrical stimulation of the five numerically dominant retinal ganglion cell types was investigated by simultaneous stimulation and recording in isolated peripheral primate (Macaca sp.) retina using multi-el...

  12. Differential calcium signaling mediated by voltage-gated calcium channels in rat retinal ganglion cells and their unmyelinated axons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Sargoy

    Full Text Available Aberrant calcium regulation has been implicated as a causative factor in the degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in numerous injury models of optic neuropathy. Since calcium has dual roles in maintaining homeostasis and triggering apoptotic pathways in healthy and injured cells, respectively, investigation of voltage-gated Ca channel (VGCC regulation as a potential strategy to reduce the loss of RGCs is warranted. The accessibility and structure of the retina provide advantages for the investigation of the mechanisms of calcium signalling in both the somata of ganglion cells as well as their unmyelinated axons. The goal of the present study was to determine the distribution of VGCC subtypes in the cell bodies and axons of ganglion cells in the normal retina and to define their contribution to calcium signals in these cellular compartments. We report L-type Ca channel α1C and α1D subunit immunoreactivity in rat RGC somata and axons. The N-type Ca channel α1B subunit was in RGC somata and axons, while the P/Q-type Ca channel α1A subunit was only in the RGC somata. We patch clamped isolated ganglion cells and biophysically identified T-type Ca channels. Calcium imaging studies of RGCs in wholemounted retinas showed that selective Ca channel antagonists reduced depolarization-evoked calcium signals mediated by L-, N-, P/Q- and T-type Ca channels in the cell bodies but only by L-type Ca channels in the axons. This differential contribution of VGCC subtypes to calcium signals in RGC somata and their axons may provide insight into the development of target-specific strategies to spare the loss of RGCs and their axons following injury.

  13. [Stellate ganglion catheter retention with discontinuous block on efficacy and safety in the treatment of sudden deafness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Zhang, Zhizhuo; Guo, Wenping; Zhang, Gaifang

    2015-07-01

    To investigate effect and safty evaluation of stellate ganglion catheter retention with discontinuous block on sudden deafness. One hundred and twenty-six patiens with sudden monaural deafness were randomly divided into Catheterp and block and control groups with 42 cases in each group. All patients' throats were given conventional blood activating drugs, hormone and hyperbaric oxygen therapy. stellate ganglion puncture retained catheter were administrated to the patients in catheter group followed by ropivacaine block 1 times/day, block group stellate ganglion puncture and ropivacaine block 1 times/day. The patients in control group were only received routine comprehensive treatment. Patients in both catheter group and block groups were treated by hyperbaric oxygen therapy after the block treatment. Curative effects of three groups were observed. The patients' satisfaction, heart rate, the chages of blood pressure before and after the block, detachment of tubes, and adverse drug reaction were recorded. The effect of the treatment in both catheter group, block group was better than in control group (85.7%, 37 cases); 83.3%, 35 cases) vs 64.3%, 27 cases, P < 0.05). The satisfactory rate in the patients in catheter group was significantly higher than block group (83.3%, 35 cases vs 61.9%, 26 cases, P < 0.05). The heart rate and the blood pressure before and 5 minutes after catheterization in catheter group and block groupwere changed obviously. Moreover, no adverse drug reaction and detachment of tubes were observed. It is a safe and effective administration of stellate ganglion catheter retention with interrupted ropivacaine block.

  14. Inner nuclear layer thickening is inversley proportional to retinal ganglion cell loss in optic neuritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Kaushik

    Full Text Available AIM: To examine the relationship between retinal ganglion cell loss and changes in the inner nuclear layer (INL in optic neuritis (ON. METHODS: 36 multiple sclerosis (MS patients with a history of ON and 36 age and sex-matched controls underwent Optical Coherence Tomography. The paramacular retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL, combined ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers (GCL/IPL and inner nuclear layer (INL thickness were measured at 36 points around the fovea. To remove inter-subject variability, the difference in thickness of each layer between the ON and fellow eye of each patient was calculated. A topographic analysis was conducted. RESULTS: The INL of the ON patients was thicker than the controls (42.9µm versus 39.6µm, p=0.002. ON patients also had a thinner RNFL (27.8µm versus 32.2µm, p<0.001 and GCL/IPL (69.3µm versus 98.1µm, p<0.001. Among the controls, there was no correlation between RNFL and GCL/IPL as well as RNFL and INL, but a positive correlation was seen between GCL/IPL and INL (r=0.65, p<0.001. In the ON group, there was a positive correlation between RNFL and GCL/IPL (r=0.80, p<0.001 but a negative correlation between RNFL and INL (r=-0.61, p<0.001 as well as GCL/IPL and INL (r=-0.44, p=0.007. The negative correlation between GCL/IPL and INL strengthened in the ON group when inter-subject variability was removed (r=-0.75, p<0.001. Microcysts within the INL were present in 5 ON patients, mainly in the superior and infero-nasal paramacular regions. While patients with microcysts lay at the far end of the correlation curve between GCL/IPL and INL (i.e. larger INL and smaller GCL/IPL compared to other patients, their exclusion did not affect the correlation (r= -0.76, p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: INL enlargement in MS-related ON is associated with the severity of GCL loss. This is a continuous relationship and patients with INL microcysts may represent the extreme end of the scale.

  15. Pharmacological and physiological properties of the after-hyperpolarization current of bullfrog ganglion neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, J W; Pennefather, P S

    1987-12-01

    1. The slowly decaying, calcium-dependent after-hyperpolarization (a.h.p.) that follows action potentials in bullfrog ganglion B cells has previously been shown to be generated by a potassium current called IAHP. We have recorded IAHP using a switched, single-electrode hybrid clamp where current-clamp mode was changed to voltage-clamp mode immediately after repolarization of a spike or the last spike of a train. 2. Reduction of extracellular calcium reduced the decay time of IAHP following a single spike. At all levels of extracellular calcium tested (0.5-4 mM), the decay time of IAHP was longer following a train of action potentials than following a single action potential. Thus, the time course of IAHP evoked by action potentials is a function of the calcium load induced by the action potentials. Conversely, agents that reduce the amount of IAHP activated without affecting its rate of decay, probably do not affect calcium influx. 3. Muscarine (2 or 10 microM) inhibits IAHP following an action potential by at most 30% and has no effect on decay rate of IAHP. These results suggest that muscarine has little or no effect on either calcium influx or sequestration. Decay of the a.h.p. is accelerated by muscarine but this effect is due to an increased leak conductance. 4. Charybdotoxin (CTX) between 4 and 20 nM, prolongs action potential duration in a manner consistent with blockade of the voltage- and calcium-dependent potassium current (Ic) involved in spike repolarization in these cells. This action is consistent with its reported action on analogous channels in other systems. However, CTX also reduces IAHP. Thus, in bullfrog ganglion neurones, two distinct calcium-dependent potassium currents exhibit a comparable sensitivity to CTX. This cannot be due to a decreased influx of calcium because the decay rate of IAHP following an action potential is unchanged. The action of CTX was observed with both crude and purified preparations of CTX. 5. Apamin (25 nM) and

  16. Response profiles of murine spiral ganglion neurons on multi-electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnewald, Stefan; Tscherter, Anne; Marconi, Emanuele; Streit, Jürg; Widmer, Hans Rudolf; Garnham, Carolyn; Benav, Heval; Mueller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert; Roccio, Marta; Senn, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have become the gold standard treatment for deafness. These neuroprosthetic devices feature a linear electrode array, surgically inserted into the cochlea, and function by directly stimulating the auditory neurons located within the spiral ganglion, bypassing lost or not-functioning hair cells. Despite their success, some limitations still remain, including poor frequency resolution and high-energy consumption. In both cases, the anatomical gap between the electrode array and the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) is believed to be an important limiting factor. The final goal of the study is to characterize response profiles of SGNs growing in intimate contact with an electrode array, in view of designing novel CI devices and stimulation protocols, featuring a gapless interface with auditory neurons. Approach. We have characterized SGN responses to extracellular stimulation using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). This setup allows, in our view, to optimize in vitro many of the limiting interface aspects between CIs and SGNs. Main results. Early postnatal mouse SGN explants were analyzed after 6-18 days in culture. Different stimulation protocols were compared with the aim to lower the stimulation threshold and the energy needed to elicit a response. In the best case, a four-fold reduction of the energy was obtained by lengthening the biphasic stimulus from 40 μs to 160 μs. Similarly, quasi monophasic pulses were more effective than biphasic pulses and the insertion of an interphase gap moderately improved efficiency. Finally, the stimulation with an external electrode mounted on a micromanipulator showed that the energy needed to elicit a response could be reduced by a factor of five with decreasing its distance from 40 μm to 0 μm from the auditory neurons. Significance. This study is the first to show electrical activity of SGNs on MEAs. Our findings may help to improve stimulation by and to reduce energy consumption of CIs and

  17. Retinal Waves Modulate an Intraretinal Circuit of Intrinsically Photosensitive Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, David A; Kirkby, Lowry A; Feller, Marla B

    2016-06-29

    Before the maturation of rod and cone photoreceptors, the developing retina relies on light detection by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) to drive early light-dependent behaviors. ipRGCs are output neurons of the retina; however, they also form functional microcircuits within the retina itself. Whether ipRGC microcircuits exist during development and whether they influence early light detection remain unknown. Here, we investigate the neural circuit that underlies the ipRGC-driven light response in developing mice. We use a combination of calcium imaging, tracer coupling, and electrophysiology experiments to show that ipRGCs form extensive gap junction networks that strongly contribute to the overall light response of the developing retina. Interestingly, we found that gap junction coupling was modulated by spontaneous retinal waves, such that acute blockade of waves dramatically increased the extent of coupling and hence increased the number of light-responsive neurons. Moreover, using an optical sensor, we found that this wave-dependent modulation of coupling is driven by dopamine that is phasically released by retinal waves. Our results demonstrate that ipRGCs form gap junction microcircuits during development that are modulated by retinal waves; these circuits determine the extent of the light response and thus potentially impact the processing of early visual information and light-dependent developmental functions. Light-dependent functions in early development are mediated by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs). Here we show that ipRGCs form an extensive gap junction network with other retinal neurons, including other ipRGCs, which shapes the retina's overall light response. Blocking cholinergic retinal waves, which are the primary source of neural activity before maturation of photoreceptors, increased the extent of ipRGC gap junction networks, thus increasing the number of light-responsive cells. We

  18. Influence of bone morphogenetic protein-2 on spiral ganglion neurite growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, D; Hansen, S; Minovi, A; Laub, M; Jennissen, H P; Dazert, S; Neumann, A

    2009-09-01

    Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) is a growth factor of the transforming growth factor-beta superfamily. Members of this protein family are involved in the development of various mammalian tissues, including the inner ear. As their notations indicate, they also have well-known effects on bone formation and regeneration. In this study, we examined the influence of rhBMP-2 on spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth in vitro and showed the presence of its most preferred receptor BMPR-IB in spiral ganglion cells both in vitro and in vivo. SG explants of postnatal day 4 rats were analysed for neurite length and number after organotypical cell culture for 72 h, fixation and immunolabeling. Different concentrations of rhBMP-2 were used in a serum-free culture media. Neurite growth was compared with control groups that lacked stimulative effects; with neutrophin-3 (NT-3), which is a well-established positive stimulus on neurite length and number; and with combinations of these parameters. The results display that neurite number and total neurite length per explant in particular concentrations of rhBMP-2 increased by a maximum factor of two, while the mean neurite length was not affected. NT-3 demonstrated a much more potent effect, delivering a maximum increase of a factor of five. Furthermore, a combination of both growth factors shows a predominant effect on NT-3. Immunohistological detection of BMPR-IB was successful both in cell culture explants and in paraffin-embedded sections of animals of different ages. The results show that rhBMP-2 is, among other growth factors, a positive stimulus for SG neurite growth in vitro. Most growth factors are unstable and cannot be attached to surfaces without loss of their biological function. In contrast, rhBMP-2 can be attached to metal surfaces without loss of activity. Our findings suggest in vivo studies and a future clinical application of rhBMP-2 in cochlear implant technology to improve the tissue

  19. Inner nuclear layer thickening is inversley proportional to retinal ganglion cell loss in optic neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Megha; Wang, Chen Yu; Barnett, Michael H; Garrick, Raymond; Parratt, John; Graham, Stuart L; Sriram, Prema; Yiannikas, Con; Klistorner, Alexandr

    2013-01-01

    To examine the relationship between retinal ganglion cell loss and changes in the inner nuclear layer (INL) in optic neuritis (ON). 36 multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with a history of ON and 36 age and sex-matched controls underwent Optical Coherence Tomography. The paramacular retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL), combined ganglion cell and inner plexiform layers (GCL/IPL) and inner nuclear layer (INL) thickness were measured at 36 points around the fovea. To remove inter-subject variability, the difference in thickness of each layer between the ON and fellow eye of each patient was calculated. A topographic analysis was conducted. The INL of the ON patients was thicker than the controls (42.9µm versus 39.6µm, p=0.002). ON patients also had a thinner RNFL (27.8µm versus 32.2µm, p<0.001) and GCL/IPL (69.3µm versus 98.1µm, p<0.001). Among the controls, there was no correlation between RNFL and GCL/IPL as well as RNFL and INL, but a positive correlation was seen between GCL/IPL and INL (r=0.65, p<0.001). In the ON group, there was a positive correlation between RNFL and GCL/IPL (r=0.80, p<0.001) but a negative correlation between RNFL and INL (r=-0.61, p<0.001) as well as GCL/IPL and INL (r=-0.44, p=0.007). The negative correlation between GCL/IPL and INL strengthened in the ON group when inter-subject variability was removed (r=-0.75, p<0.001). Microcysts within the INL were present in 5 ON patients, mainly in the superior and infero-nasal paramacular regions. While patients with microcysts lay at the far end of the correlation curve between GCL/IPL and INL (i.e. larger INL and smaller GCL/IPL compared to other patients), their exclusion did not affect the correlation (r= -0.76, p<0.001). INL enlargement in MS-related ON is associated with the severity of GCL loss. This is a continuous relationship and patients with INL microcysts may represent the extreme end of the scale.

  20. Use of perfusion index from pulse oximetry to determine efficacy of stellate ganglion block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamazaki H

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Hajime Yamazaki, Junichi Nishiyama, Toshiyasu SuzukiDepartment of Anesthesiology, Surgical Science, Tokai University School of Medicine, Kanagawa, JapanBackground: Stellate ganglion block (SGB is a widely used procedure for treatment of pain in the head and upper body, but the clinical signs used to verify the effectiveness of SGB can be ambiguous or variable in some patients. We observed the chronological changes in perfusion index (PI from pulse oximetry to determine if these changes correlated with the clinical signs associated with an effective SGB. We hypothesized that PI could provide an easy method to assess the effectiveness of SGB.Method: We compared the chronologies in PI on the treated and untreated sides of 21 patients in whom treatment by SGB was found to be effective. The SGB was performed by administering 6 mL of 1% mepivacaine. The effectiveness of the SGB was confirmed on the basis of clinical signs. Additionally, in two patients we tested whether increased PI on the treatment side correlated with increased microcirculation as measured by laser-Doppler blood flowmetry.Results: On the side treated by SGB, PI increased 61.4% in the earlobe and 60.5% from baseline values in the upper limbs, at 5 minutes after initiation of the procedure. Differences in PI before and after treatment were significant at both sites. No time-course increases in PI were found on the untreated side at either site. Following SGB, increases in PI correlated with increases in blood flow as measured by laser-Doppler flowmetry.Conclusion: PI increased in the earlobe and upper limbs on the treated side of 21 patients who received an effective SGB but not on the untreated side. The positive correlations between changes in PI and both presence of clinical signs and changes in blood flow in the skin microcirculation indicate a sympatholytic effect, suggesting that the PI could be useful in determination of the efficacy of SGB.Keywords: stellate ganglion block

  1. Gene transfection mediated by polyethyleneimine-polyethylene glycol nanocarrier prevents cisplatin-induced spiral ganglion cell damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan-gui Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethyleneimine-polyethylene glycol (PEI-PEG, a novel nanocarrier, has been used for transfection and gene therapy in a variety of cells. In our previous study, we successfully carried out PEI-PEG-mediated gene transfer in spiral ganglion cells. It remains unclear whether PEI-PEG could be used for gene therapy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP in the inner ear. In the present study, we performed PEI-PEG-mediated XIAP gene transfection in the cochlea of Sprague-Dawley rats, via scala tympani fenestration, before daily cisplatin injections. Auditory brainstem reflex tests demonstrated the protective effects of XIAP gene therapy on auditory function. Immunohistochemical staining revealed XIAP protein expression in the cytoplasm of cells in the spiral ganglion, the organ of Corti and the stria vascularis. Reverse transcription-PCR detected high levels of XIAP mRNA expression in the cochlea. The present findings suggest that PEI-PEG nanocarrier-mediated XIAP gene transfection results in XIAP expression in the cochlea, prevents damage to cochlear spiral ganglion cells, and protects hearing.

  2. Spiral and vestibular ganglion estimates in archival temporal bones obtained by design based stereology and Abercrombie methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiyama, Gail; Geiger, Christopher; Lopez, Ivan A; Ishiyama, Akira

    2011-03-15

    The objective of this study was to make direct comparisons of the estimates of spiral and vestibular neuronal number in human archival temporal bone specimens using design-based stereology with those using the assumption-based Abercrombie method. Archival human temporal bone specimens from subjects ranging in age from 16 to 80 years old were used. The number of spiral and vestibular ganglia neurons within the counting areas was estimated using the stereology-optical disector technique and compared with estimates obtained using the assumption-based Abercrombie method on the same specimens. Using the optical disector method, there was an average of 41,480 (coefficient of variation=0.12) spiral ganglia neurons and 28,930 (coefficient of variation=0.15) vestibular ganglia neurons. The mean coefficient of error was 0.076 for the spiral ganglion estimates, and 0.091 for the vestibular ganglion estimates. Using the Abercrombie correction method of two-dimensional analysis, an average of 23,110 (coefficient of variation of 0.08) spiral ganglia neurons, and 16,225 vestibular ganglia neurons (coefficient of variation of 0.15) was obtained. We found that there was a large disparity between the estimates with a significant 44% underestimation of the spiral and vestibular ganglion counts obtained using the Abercrombie method when compared with estimates using the optical disector method.

  3. Gene transfection mediated by polyethyleneimine-polyethylene glycol nanocarrier prevents cisplatin-induced spiral ganglion cell damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-gui Chen; Min Mao; Li-zi Qiu; Qi-ming Liu

    2015-01-01

    Polyethyleneimine-polyethylene glycol (PEI-PEG), a novel nanocarrier, has been used for trans-fection and gene therapy in a variety of cells. In our previous study, we successfully carried out PEI-PEG-mediated gene transfer in spiral ganglion cells. It remains unclear whether PEI-PEG could be used for gene therapy with X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) in the inner ear. In the present study, we performed PEI-PEG-mediated XIAP gene transfection in the cochlea of Sprague-Dawley rats,via scala tympani fenestration, before daily cisplatin injections. Audito-ry brainstem relfex tests demonstrated the protective effects ofXIAP gene therapy on auditory function. Immunohistochemical staining revealed XIAP protein expression in the cytoplasm of cells in the spiral ganglion, the organ of Corti and the stria vascularis. Reverse transcription-PCR detected high levels ofXIAP mRNA expression in the cochlea. The present ifndings suggest that PEI-PEG nanocarrier-mediatedXIAP gene transfection results in XIAP expression in the cochlea, prevents damage to cochlear spiral ganglion cells, and protects hearing.

  4. Taurine-induced modulation of voltage-sensitive Na+ channels in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shan-Shan; Yu, Kuai; Gu, Yan; Ruan, Di-Yun

    2005-08-15

    The physiological role of taurine, an abundant free amino acid in the neural system, is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate its effect on TTX-sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX-resistant (TTX-R) Na+ currents in enzymatically dissociated neurons from rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) with conventional whole-cell recording manner under voltage-clamp conditions. A TTX-S Na+ current was recorded preferentially from large DRG neurons and a TTX-R Na+ current preferentially from small ones. For TTX-S Na+ channel, taurine of the concentration > or = 10 mM shifted the activation curve in the depolarizing direction and the inactivation curve in the hyperpolarizing direction. There was no change in the activation curve for TTX-R Na+ channel and the inactivation curve was shifted in the hyperpolarizing direction slightly in the presence of taurine > or = 20 mM. When the recovery kinetics was examined, the presence of taurine resulted in a slower recovery from inactivation of TTX-S currents and no change of TTX-R ones. All the effects of taurine were weakly concentration-dependent and partly recovered quite slowly after washout. Our data indicate that taurine alters the properties of Na+ currents in intact DRG neurons. These may contribute to the understanding of taurine as a natural neuroprotectant and the potential of taurine as a useful medicine for the treatment of sensory neuropathies.

  5. Detailed Anatomy of the Cranial Cervical Ganglion in the Dromedary Camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nourinezhad, Jamal; Mazaheri, Yazdan; Biglari, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    The detailed morphology and topography of the cranial cervical ganglion (CCG) with its surrounding structures were studied in 10 sides of five heads of adult one-humped camel to determine its general arrangement as well as its differences and similarities to other animals. The following detailed descriptions were obtained: (1) the bilateral CCG was constantly present caudal to cranial base at the rostroventral border of the occipital condyle over the caudolateral part of nasopharynx; (2) the CCG was always in close relations medially with the longus capitis muscle, rostrolaterally with the internal carotid artery, and caudally with the vagus nerve; and (3) the branches of the CCG were the internal carotid and external carotid nerves, jugular nerve, cervical interganglionic branch, laryngopharyngeal branch, carotid sinus branch and communicating branches to the vagus, and first spinal nerves. In conclusion, there was no variation regarding topography of dromedary CCG among the specimens, in spite of typical variations in number, and mainly in origin of nerve branches ramifying from the CCG. In comparative anatomy aspect, the close constant relations, and presence of major nerves (internal/external carotid and jugular nerves) of dromedary CCG exhibited a typical reported animal's pattern. However, the shape, structures lateral to the CCG, the origin and course pattern of external carotid and jugular nerves, the number of the major nerves branches, the communicating branches of the CCG to the spinal and cranial nerves, and the separation of most rostral parts of vagosympathetic trunk of dromedary were different from those of most reported animals.

  6. Acute and chronic effects of clozapine on cholinergic transmission in cultured mouse superior cervical ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saur, Taixiang; Cohen, Bruce M; Ma, Qi; Babb, Suzann M; Buttner, Edgar A; Yao, Wei-Dong

    Cholinergic dysfunction contributes to cognitive deficits in schizophrenia. The atypical antipsychotic clozapine improves cognition in patients with schizophrenia, possibly through modulation of the cholinergic system. However, little is known about specific underlying mechanisms. We investigated the acute and chronic effects of clozapine on cholinergic synaptic transmission in cultured superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons. Spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) were detected and were reversibly inhibited by the nicotinic receptor antagonist d-tubocurarine, confirming that the synaptic responses were primarily mediated by nicotinic receptors. Bath application of clozapine at therapeutic concentrations rapidly and reversely inhibited both the amplitude and frequency of sEPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner, without changing either rise or decay time, suggesting that clozapine effects have both presynaptic and postsynaptic origins. The acute effects of clozapine on sEPSCs were recapitulated by chronic treatment of SCG cultures with similar concentrations of clozapine, as clozapine treatment for 4 d reduced the frequency and amplitude of sEPSCs without affecting their kinetics. Cell survival analysis indicated that SCG neuron cell counts after chronic clozapine treatment were comparable to the control group. These results demonstrate that therapeutic concentrations of clozapine suppress nicotinic synaptic transmission in SCG cholinergic synapses, a simple in vitro preparation of cholinergic transmission.

  7. Roles of PACAP-containing retinal ganglion cells in circadian timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Jens

    2006-01-01

    The brain's biological clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) generates circadian rhythms in physiology and behavior. The clock-driven rhythms need daily adjustment (entrainment) to be synchronized with the astronomical day of 24 h. The most important stimulus for entrainment of the clock is the light-dark (LD) cycle. In this review functional elements of the light entrainment pathway will be considered with special focus on the neurotransmitter pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP), which is found exclusively in the monosynaptic neuronal pathway mediating light information to the SCN, the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT). The retinal ganglion cells of the RHT are intrinsically photosensitive due to the expression of melanopsin and seem to constitute a non-image forming photosensitive system in the mammalian eye regulating circadian timing, masking behavior, light-regulated melatonin secretion, and the pupillary light reflex. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies and studies of mice lacking PACAP and the specific PACAP receptor (PAC1) indicate that PACAP and glutamate are neurotransmitters in the RHT which in a clock and concentration-dependent manner interact during light entrainment of the clock.

  8. The retinal projectome reveals brain-area-specific visual representations generated by ganglion cell diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Estuardo; Laurell, Eva; Baier, Herwig

    2014-09-22

    Visual information is transmitted to the vertebrate brain exclusively via the axons of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). The functional diversity of RGCs generates multiple representations of the visual environment that are transmitted to several brain areas. However, in no vertebrate species has a complete wiring diagram of RGC axonal projections been constructed. We employed sparse genetic labeling and in vivo imaging of the larval zebrafish to generate a cellular-resolution map of projections from the retina to the brain. Our data define 20 stereotyped axonal projection patterns, the majority of which innervate multiple brain areas. Morphometric analysis of pre- and postsynaptic RGC structure revealed more than 50 structural RGC types with unique combinations of dendritic and axonal morphologies, exceeding current estimates of RGC diversity in vertebrates. These single-cell projection mapping data indicate that specific projection patterns are nonuniformly specified in the retina to generate retinotopically biased visual maps throughout the brain. The retinal projectome also successfully predicted a functional subdivision of the pretectum. Our data indicate that RGC projection patterns are precisely coordinated to generate brain-area-specific visual representations originating from RGCs with distinct dendritic morphologies and topographic distributions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Subpopulations of rat dorsal root ganglion neurons express active vesicular acetylcholine transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Ada Maria; De Stefano, M Egle; Tomassy, Giulio Srubek; Vilaró, M Teresa; Levey, Allan I; Biagioni, Stefano

    2004-01-15

    The vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) is a transmembrane protein required, in cholinergic neurons, for selective storage of acetylcholine into synaptic vesicles. Although dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons utilize neuropeptides and amino acids for neurotransmission, we have previously demonstrated the presence of a cholinergic system. To investigate whether, in sensory neurons, the vesicular accumulation of acetylcholine relies on the same mechanisms active in classical cholinergic neurons, we investigated VAChT presence, subcellular distribution, and activity. RT-PCR and Western blot analysis demonstrated the presence of VAChT mRNA and protein product in DRG neurons and in the striatum and cortex, used as positive controls. Moreover, in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry showed VAChT staining located mainly in the medium/large-sized subpopulation of the sensory neurons. A few small neurons were also faintly labeled by immunocytochemistry. In the electron microscope, immunolabeling was associated with vesicle-like elements distributed in the neuronal cytoplasm and in both myelinated and unmyelinated intraganglionic nerve fibers. Finally, [(3)H]acetylcholine active transport, evaluated either in the presence or in the absence of ATP, also demonstrated that, as previously reported, the uptake of acetylcholine by VAChT is ATP dependent. This study suggests that DRG neurons not only are able to synthesize and degrade ACh and to convey cholinergic stimuli but also are capable of accumulating and, possibly, releasing acetylcholine by the same mechanism used by the better known cholinergic neurons.

  10. Pacemaker potentials for the periodic burst discharge in the heart ganglion of a stomatopod, Squilla oratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, A; Obara, S; Akiyama, T

    1967-03-01

    From somata of the pacemaker neurons in the Squilla heart ganglion, pacemaker potentials for the spontaneous periodic burst discharge are recorded with intracellular electrodes. The electrical activity is composed of slow potentials and superimposed spikes, and is divided into four types, which are: (a) "mammalian heart" type, (b) "slow generator" type, (c) "slow grower" type, and (d) "slow deficient" type. Since axons which are far from the somata do not produce slow potentials, the soma and dendrites must be where the slow potentials are generated. Hyperpolarization impedes generation of the slow potential, showing that it is an electrically excitable response. Membrane impedance increases on depolarization. Brief hyperpolarizing current can abolish the plateau but brief tetanic inhibitory fiber stimulation is more effective for the abolition. A single stimulus to the axon evokes the slow potential when the stimulus is applied some time after a previous burst. Repetitive stimuli to the axon are more effective in eliciting the slow potential, but the depolarization is not maintained on continuous stimulation. Synchronization of the slow potential among neurons is achieved by: (a) the electrotonic connections, with periodic change in resistance of the soma membrane, (b) active spread of the slow potential, and (c) synchronization through spikes.

  11. The Spread of Excitation among Neurons in the Heart Ganglion of the Stomatopod, Squilla oratoria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Akira; Takeda, Kimihisa

    1963-01-01

    Neurons in the heart ganglion of the mantis shrimp (a stomatopod crustacean) are functionally tightly linked together. The extracellular action potential from the whole trunk very often shows a complex form, but the response is all-or-none to the applied stimulus, indicating that the excitation in one neuron spreads very rapidly to all others. Application of isotonic MgCl2 solution or repetitive stimulation sometimes separates the spike into its components. The resting potential of the soma membrane is 50 to 60 mv. External stimulation elicits a spike of 60 to 80 mv amplitude with a step on its rising phase. Hyperpolarization reveals one more inflection on the rising phase. These inflections divide the soma action potential into three parts, A1, A2, and B spikes in that order from the foot. The B spike disappears on increasing the hyperpolarization, but A1 and A2 remain, indicating that B originates from the soma membrane, whereas A1 and A2 originate from the two axons of the bipolar cell. Thus the impulse invades the soma from two directions, one from the stimulated side, the other from the other side via the "parallel axons" and the "side-connections;" the latter are presumed to interconnect the axons. When the parallel axons are cut, conduction takes place across the soma with a greatly reduced safety factor and a prolonged conduction time. Neuron-to-neuron transmission takes place in either direction. PMID:13999080

  12. The spread of excitation among neurons in the heart ganglion of the stomatopod, Squillia oratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WATANABE, A; TAKEDA, K

    1963-03-01

    Neurons in the heart ganglion of the mantis shrimp (a stomatopod crustacean) are functionally tightly linked together. The extracellular action potential from the whole trunk very often shows a complex form, but the response is all-or-none to the applied stimulus, indicating that the excitation in one neuron spreads very rapidly to all others. Application of isotonic MgCl(2) solution or repetitive stimulation sometimes separates the spike into its components. The resting potential of the soma membrane is 50 to 60 mv. External stimulation elicits a spike of 60 to 80 mv amplitude with a step on its rising phase. Hyperpolarization reveals one more inflection on the rising phase. These inflections divide the soma action potential into three parts, A(1), A(2), and B spikes in that order from the foot. The B spike disappears on increasing the hyperpolarization, but A(1) and A(2) remain, indicating that B originates from the soma membrane, whereas A(1) and A(2) originate from the two axons of the bipolar cell. Thus the impulse invades the soma from two directions, one from the stimulated side, the other from the other side via the "parallel axons" and the "side-connections;" the latter are presumed to interconnect the axons. When the parallel axons are cut, conduction takes place across the soma with a greatly reduced safety factor and a prolonged conduction time. Neuron-to-neuron transmission takes place in either direction.

  13. Electrical properties of the pacemaker neurons in the heart ganglion of a stomatopod, Squilla oratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, A; Obara, S; Akiyama, T; Yumoto, K

    1967-03-01

    In the Squilla heart ganglion, the pacemaker is located in the rostral group of cells. After spontaneous firing ceased, the electrophysiological properties of these cells were examined with intracellular electrodes. Cells respond to electrical stimuli with all-or-none action potentials. Direct stimulation by strong currents decreases the size of action potentials. Comparison with action potentials caused by axonal stimulation and analysis of time relations indicate that with stronger currents the soma membrane is directly stimulated whereas with weaker currents the impulse first arises in the axon and then invades the soma. Spikes evoked in a neuron spread into all other neurons. Adjacent cells are interconnected by electrotonic connections. Histologically axons are tied with the side-junction. B spikes of adjacent cells are blocked simultaneously by hyperpolarization or by repetitive stimulation. Experiments show that under such circumstances the B spike is not directly elicited from the A spike but is evoked by invasion of an impulse or electrotonic potential from adjacent cells. On rostral stimulation a small prepotential precedes the main spike. It is interpreted as an action potential from dendrites.

  14. Glutamatergic motoneurons in the stomatogastric ganglion of the mantis shrimp Squilla oratoria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, C; Tazaki, K

    1992-07-01

    1. Transmitters of motoneurons in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of Squilla were identified by analyzing the excitatory neuromuscular properties of muscles in the posterior cardiac plate (pcp) and pyloric regions. 2. Bath and iontophoretic applications of glutamate produce depolarizations in these muscles. The pharmacological experiments and desensitization of the junctional receptors elucidate the glutamatergic nature of the excitatory junctional potentials (EJPs) evoked in the constrictor and dilator muscles. The reversal potentials for the excitatory junctional current (EJC) and for the glutamate-induced current are almost the same. 3. Some types of dilator muscle show sensitivity to both glutamate and acetylcholine (ACh) exogenously applied. The pharmacological evidence and desensitization of the junctional receptors indicate the glutamatergic nature of neuromuscular junctions in these dually sensitive muscles. The reversal potentials for the EJC and for the ACh-induced current are not identical. 4. Glutamate is a candidate as an excitatory neuro-transmitter at the neuromuscular junctions which the STG motoneurons named PCP, PY, PD, LA and VC make with the identified muscles. Kainic and quisqualic acids which act on glutamate receptors are potent excitants of these muscles. Extrajunctional receptors to ACh are present in two types of the muscle innervated by LA and VC. 5. Neurotransmitters used by the STG motoneurons of stomatopods are compared to those of decapods.

  15. Glutamate dysregulation in the trigeminal ganglion: a novel mechanism for peripheral sensitization of the craniofacial region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, J C; Cairns, B E; Dong, X D; Kumar, U; Somvanshi, R K; Arendt-Nielsen, L; Gazerani, P

    2014-01-03

    In the trigeminal ganglion (TG), satellite glial cells (SGCs) form a functional unit with neurons. It has been proposed that SGCs participate in regulating extracellular glutamate levels and that dysfunction of this SGC capacity can impact nociceptive transmission in craniofacial pain conditions. This study investigated whether SGCs release glutamate and whether elevation of TG glutamate concentration alters response properties of trigeminal afferent fibers. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess glutamate content and the expression of excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT)1 and EAAT2 in TG sections. SGCs contained glutamate and expressed EAAT1 and EAAT2. Potassium chloride (10 mM) was used to evoke glutamate release from cultured rat SGCs treated with the EAAT1/2 inhibitor (3S)-3-[[3-[[4-(trifluoromethyl)ben zoyl]amino]phenyl]methoxy]-L-aspartic acid (TFB-TBOA) or control. Treatment with TFB-TBOA (1 and 10 μM) significantly reduced the glutamate concentration from 10.6 ± 1.1 to 5.8 ± 1.4 μM and 3.0 ± 0.8 μM, respectively (pcraniofacial pain conditions such as migraine headache.

  16. Novel High Content Screen Detects Compounds That Promote Neurite Regeneration from Cochlear Spiral Ganglion Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlon, Donna S; Grover, Mary; Dunne, Sara F; Richter, Sonja; Luan, Chi-Hao; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2015-11-02

    The bipolar spiral ganglion neurons (SGN) carry sound information from cochlear hair cells to the brain. After noise, antibiotic or toxic insult to the cochlea, damage to SGN and/or hair cells causes hearing impairment. Damage ranges from fiber and synapse degeneration to dysfunction and loss of cells. New interventions to regenerate peripheral nerve fibers could help reestablish transfer of auditory information from surviving or regenerated hair cells or improve results from cochlear implants, but the biochemical mechanisms to target are largely unknown. Presently, no drugs exist that are FDA approved to stimulate the regeneration of SGN nerve fibers. We designed an original phenotypic assay to screen 440 compounds of the NIH Clinical Collection directly on dissociated mouse spiral ganglia. The assay detected one compound, cerivastatin, that increased the length of regenerating neurites. The effect, mimicked by other statins at different optimal concentrations, was blocked by geranylgeraniol. These results demonstrate the utility of screening small compound libraries on mixed cultures of dissociated primary ganglia. The success of this screen narrows down a moderately sized library to a single compound which can be elevated to in-depth in vivo studies, and highlights a potential new molecular pathway for targeting of hearing loss drugs.

  17. Ganglion-Based Balance Design of Multi-Layer Model and Its Watchfulness-Keeping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Wei; Shang-Min Luan

    2005-01-01

    An important problem of machine vision is the balance among the efficiency, accuracy and computation cost.The visual system of man can keep watchfulness to the perimeter of a visual field and subtly process information emerging in the center of the visual field at the same time. This kind of requirement assignment of computation can virtually ease the demand of hardware both in quantity and complexity. Therefore designing an artificial model based on biological mechanism is an effective approach. In this paper a multi-layer neural model is designed based on the multi-scale receptive fields of ganglions in retina. The model can keep watch on the periphery part of a scene while processing the center information of the scene. And why it can balance the hardware complexity, processing precision and computational intensity is analyzed.An experiment is done to test the model's sensitivity in watchfulness keeping and its efficiency and veracity in environment sampling. This model may provide valuable inspiration in the implementation of real-time processing and the avoidance of expensive computation cost in machine vision.

  18. Decoding of retinal ganglion cell spike trains evoked by temporally patterned electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Sang Baek; Ye, Jang Hee; Goo, Yong Sook; Kim, Chi Hyun; Kim, Kyung Hwan

    2010-08-12

    For successful restoration of vision by retinal prostheses, the neural activity of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) evoked by electrical stimulation should represent the information of spatiotemporal patterns of visual input. We propose a method to evaluate the effectiveness of stimulation pulse trains so that the crucial temporal information of a visual input is accurately represented in the RGC responses as the amplitudes of pulse trains are modulated according to the light intensity. This was enabled by spike train decoding. The effectiveness of the stimulation was evaluated by the accuracy of decoding pulse amplitude from the RGC spike train, i.e., by the similarity between the original and the decoded pulse amplitude time series. When the parameters of stimulation were suitably determined, the RGC responses were reliably modulated by varying the amplitude of electrical pulses. Accordingly, the temporal pattern of pulse amplitudes could be successfully decoded from multiunit RGC spike trains. The range of pulse amplitude and the pulse rate were critical for accurate representation of input information in RGC responses. These results suggest that pulse amplitude modulation is a feasible means to encode temporal visual information by RGC spike trains and thus to implement stimulus encoding strategies for retinal prostheses.

  19. The neuronal distribution of cannabinoid receptor type 1 in the trigeminal ganglion of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, T J; Helesic, G; Parghi, D; Hargreaves, K M; Flores, C M

    2003-01-01

    Cannabinoid compounds have been shown to produce antinociception and antihyperalgesia by acting upon cannabinoid receptors located in both the CNS and the periphery. A potential mechanism by which cannabinoids could inhibit nociception in the periphery is the activation of cannabinoid receptors located on one or more classes of primary nociceptive neurons. To address this hypothesis, we evaluated the neuronal distribution of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) of the adult rat through combined in situ hybridization (ISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC). CB1 receptor mRNA was localized mainly to medium and large diameter neurons of the maxillary and mandibular branches of the TG. Consistent with this distribution, in a de facto nociceptive sensory neuron population that exhibited vanilloid receptor type 1 immunoreactivity, colocalization with CB1 mRNA was also sparse (CB1 mRNA. In contrast, and consistent with the neuron-size distribution for CB1, nearly 75% of CB1-positive neurons exhibited N52-immunoreactivity, a marker of myelinated axons. These results indicate that in the rat TG, CB1 receptors are expressed predominantly in neurons that are not thought to subserve nociceptive neurotransmission in the noninjured animal. Taken together with the absence of an above background in situ signal for CB2 mRNA in TG neurons, these findings suggest that the peripherally mediated antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids may involve either as yet unidentified receptors or interaction with afferent neuron populations that normally subserve non-nociceptive functions.

  20. Altered neuronatin expression in the rat dorsal root ganglion after sciatic nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chih-Hsien

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several molecular changes occur following axotomy, such as gene up-regulation and down-regulation. In our previous study using Affymetrix arrays, it was found that after the axotomy of sciatic nerve, there were many novel genes with significant expression changes. Among them, neuronatin (Nnat was the one which expression was significantly up-regulated. Nnat was identified as a gene selectively expressed in neonatal brains and markedly reduced in adult brains. The present study investigated whether the expression of Nnat correlates with symptoms of neuropathic pain in adult rats with transected sciatic nerve. Methods Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and the Randall and Selitto test were used to study the protein content, and subcellular localization of Nnat in correlation with pain-related animal behavior. Results It was found that after nerve injury, the expression of Nnat was increased in total protein extracts. Unmyelinated C-fiber and thinly myelinated A-δ fiber in adult dorsal root ganglions (DRGs were the principal sub-population of primary afferent neurons with distributed Nnat. The increased expression of Nnat and its subcellular localization were related to mechanical hyperalgesia. Conclusions The results indicated that there was significant correlation between mechanical hyperalgesia in axotomy of sciatic nerve and the increased expression of Nnat in C-fiber and A-δ fiber of adult DRG neurons.

  1. Sodium metabisulfite modulation of potassium channels in pain-sensing dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Aifang; Wei, Cailing; Meng, Ziqiang

    2009-12-01

    The effects of sodium metabisulfite (SMB), a general food preservative, on potassium currents in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were investigated using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. SMB increased the amplitudes of both transient outward potassium currents and delayed rectifier potassium current in concentration- and voltage-dependent manner. The transient outward potassium currents (TOCs) include a fast inactivating (A-current or IA) current and a slow inactivating (D-current or ID) current. SMB majorly increased IA, and ID was little affected. SMB did not affect the activation process of transient outward currents (TOCs), but the inactivation curve of TOCs was shifted to more positive potentials. The inactivation time constants of TOCs were also increased by SMB. For delayed rectifier potassium current (IK), SMB shifted the activation curve to hyperpolarizing direction. SMB differently affected TOCs and IK, its effects major on A-type K+ channels, which play a role in adjusting pain sensitivity in response to peripheral redox conditions. SMB did not increase TOCs and IK when adding DTT in pipette solution. These results suggested that SMB might oxidize potassium channels, which relate to adjusting pain sensitivity in pain-sensing DRG neurons.

  2. Differentiation of human ESCs to retinal ganglion cells using a CRISPR engineered reporter cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluch, Valentin M; Davis, Chung-ha O; Ranganathan, Vinod; Kerr, Justin M; Krick, Kellin; Martin, Russ; Berlinicke, Cynthia A; Marsh-Armstrong, Nicholas; Diamond, Jeffrey S; Mao, Hai-Quan; Zack, Donald J

    2015-11-13

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) injury and cell death from glaucoma and other forms of optic nerve disease is a major cause of irreversible vision loss and blindness. Human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC)-derived RGCs could provide a source of cells for the development of novel therapeutic molecules as well as for potential cell-based therapies. In addition, such cells could provide insights into human RGC development, gene regulation, and neuronal biology. Here, we report a simple, adherent cell culture protocol for differentiation of hPSCs to RGCs using a CRISPR-engineered RGC fluorescent reporter stem cell line. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting of the differentiated cultures yields a highly purified population of cells that express a range of RGC-enriched markers and exhibit morphological and physiological properties typical of RGCs. Additionally, we demonstrate that aligned nanofiber matrices can be used to guide the axonal outgrowth of hPSC-derived RGCs for in vitro optic nerve-like modeling. Lastly, using this protocol we identified forskolin as a potent promoter of RGC differentiation.

  3. Low-intensity treadmill exercise-related changes in the rat stellate ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalcanti, Renato Albuquerque de Oliveira; da Pureza, Demilto Yamaguchi; de Melo, Mariana Pereira; de Souza, Romeu Rodrigues; Bergamaschi, Cássia T; do Amaral, Sandra Lia; Tang, Helen; Loesch, Andrzej; Ribeiro, Antonio Augusto Coppi Maciel

    2009-05-01

    Stellate ganglion (SG) represents the main sympathetic input to the heart. This study aimed at investigating physical exercise-related changes in the quantitative aspects of SG neurons in treadmill-exercised Wistar rats. By applying state-of-the-art design-based stereology, the SG volume, total number of SG neurons, mean perikaryal volume of SG neurons, and the total volume of neurons in the whole SG have been examined. Arterial pressure and heart rate were also measured at the end of the exercise period. The present study showed that a low-intensity exercise training program caused a 12% decrease in the heart rate of trained rats. In contrast, there were no effects on systolic pressure, diastolic pressure, or mean arterial pressure. As to quantitative changes related to physical exercise, the main findings were a 21% increase in the fractional volume occupied by neurons in the SG, and an 83% increase in the mean perikaryal volume of SG neurons in treadmill-trained rats, which shows a remarkable neuron hypertrophy. It seems reasonable to infer that neuron hypertrophy may have been the result of a functional overload imposed on the SG neurons by initial posttraining sympathetic activation. From the novel stereological data we provide, further investigations are needed to shed light on the mechanistic aspect of neuron hypertrophy: what role does neuron hypertrophy play? Could neuron hypertrophy be assigned to the functional overload induced by physical exercise?

  4. The ciliary margin zone of the mammalian retina generates retinal ganglion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcucci, Florencia; Murcia-Belmonte, Veronica; Coca, Yaiza; Ferreiro-Galve, Susana; Wang, Qing; Kuwajima, Takaaki; Khalid, Sania; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Herrera, Eloisa; Mason, Carol

    2016-01-01

    Summary The retina of lower vertebrates grows continuously by integrating new neurons generated from progenitors in the ciliary margin zone (CMZ). Whether the mammalian CMZ provides the neural retina with retinal cells is controversial. Live-imaging of embryonic retina expressing eGFP in the CMZ shows that cells migrate laterally from the CMZ to the neural retina where differentiated retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) reside. As Cyclin D2, a cell-cycle regulator, is enriched in ventral CMZ, we analyzed Cyclin D2−/− mice to test whether the CMZ is a source of retinal cells. Neurogenesis is diminished in Cyclin D2 mutants, leading to a reduction of RGCs in the ventral retina. In line with these findings, in the albino retina, the decreased production of ipsilateral RGCs is correlated with fewer Cyclin D2+ cells. Together, these results implicate the mammalian CMZ as a neurogenic site that produces RGCs and whose proper generation depends on Cyclin D2 activity. PMID:28009286

  5. Hyperexcitable neurons and altered non-neuronal cells in the compressed spinal ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert H. LaMotte; Chao MA

    2008-01-01

    The cell body or soma in the dosal root ganglion (DRG) is normally excitable and this excitability can increase and persist after an injury of peripheral sensory neurons. In a rat model of radicular pain, an intraforaminal implantation of a rod that chronically compressed the lumbar DRG ("CCD" model) resulted in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity that was accom-panied by hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hind paw. By the 5th day after onset of CCD, there was a novel upregulation in neuronal expression of the chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP- 1 or CCL2) and also its receptor, CCR2. The neurons developed, in response to topically applied MCP-1, an excitatory response that they normally do not have. CCD also activated non-neuronal cells including, for example, the endothelial cells as evidenced by angiogenesis in the form of an increased number of capillaries in the DRG after 7 days. A working hypothesis is that the CCD induced changes in neurons and non-neuronal cells that may act together to promote the survival of the injured tissue. The release of ligands such as CCL2, in addition to possibly activating nociceptive neurons (maintaining the pain), may also act to preserve injured cells in the face of ischemia and hypoxia, for example, by promoting angiogenesis. Thus, somal hyperexcitability, as often said of inflammation, may represent a double edged sword.

  6. Regulator y effects of anandamide on intracellular Ca2+concentration increase in trigeminal ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Zhang; Hong Xie; Gang Lei; Fen Li; Jianping Pan; Changjin Liu; Zhiguo Liu; Lieju Liu; Xuehong Cao

    2014-01-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor type 1 on presynaptic neurons is postulated to suppress neu-rotransmission by decreasing Ca2+influx through high voltage-gated Ca2+channels. However, recent studies suggest that cannabinoids which activate cannabinoid receptor type 1 can increase neurotransmitter release by enhancing Ca2+influx in vitro. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of intracellular Ca2+concentration by the cannabinoid receptor type 1 agonist anandamide, and its underlying mechanisms. Using whole cell voltage-clamp and calcium imaging in cultured trigeminal ganglion neurons, we found that anandamide directly caused Ca2+inlfux in a dose-dependent manner, which then triggered an increase of intracellular Ca2+concentration. The cyclic adenosine and guanosine monophosphate-dependent protein kinase systems, but not the protein kinase C system, were involved in the increased intracellular Ca2+concentration by anandamide. This result showed that anandamide increased intracellu-lar Ca2+concentration and inhibited high voltage-gated Ca2+channels through different signal transduction pathways.

  7. Tlx3 Function in the Dorsal Root Ganglion is Pivotal to Itch and Pain Sensations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengcheng Huang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Itch, a sensation eliciting a desire to scratch, is distinct from but not completely independent of pain. Inspiring achievements have been made in the characterization of itch-related receptors and neurotransmitters, but the molecular mechanisms controlling the development of pruriceptors remain poorly understood. Here, our RNAseq and in situ hybridization data show that the transcription factor Tlx3 is required for the expression of a majority of itch-related molecules in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG. As a result, Tlx3F/F;Nav1.8-cre mice exhibit significantly attenuated acute and dry skin-induced chronic itch. Furthermore, our study indicates that TRPV1 plays a pivotal role in the chronic itch evoked by dry skin and allergic contact dermatitis (ACD. The mutants also display impaired response to cold and inflammatory pain and elevated response to capsaicin, whereas the responses to acute mechanical, thermal stimuli and neuropathic pain remain normal. In Tlx3F/F;Nav1.8-cre mice, TRPV1 is derepressed and expands predominantly into IB4+ non-peptidergic (NP neurons. Collectively, our data reveal a molecular mechanism in regulating the development of pruriceptors and controlling itch and pain sensations.

  8. Modeling the impact of common noise inputs on the network activity of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidne, Michael; Ahmadian, Yashar; Shlens, Jonathon; Pillow, Jonathan W; Kulkarni, Jayant; Litke, Alan M; Chichilnisky, E J; Simoncelli, Eero; Paninski, Liam

    2012-08-01

    Synchronized spontaneous firing among retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), on timescales faster than visual responses, has been reported in many studies. Two candidate mechanisms of synchronized firing include direct coupling and shared noisy inputs. In neighboring parasol cells of primate retina, which exhibit rapid synchronized firing that has been studied extensively, recent experimental work indicates that direct electrical or synaptic coupling is weak, but shared synaptic input in the absence of modulated stimuli is strong. However, previous modeling efforts have not accounted for this aspect of firing in the parasol cell population. Here we develop a new model that incorporates the effects of common noise, and apply it to analyze the light responses and synchronized firing of a large, densely-sampled network of over 250 simultaneously recorded parasol cells. We use a generalized linear model in which the spike rate in each cell is determined by the linear combination of the spatio-temporally filtered visual input, the temporally filtered prior spikes of that cell, and unobserved sources representing common noise. The model accurately captures the statistical structure of the spike trains and the encoding of the visual stimulus, without the direct coupling assumption present in previous modeling work. Finally, we examined the problem of decoding the visual stimulus from the spike train given the estimated parameters. The common-noise model produces Bayesian decoding performance as accurate as that of a model with direct coupling, but with significantly more robustness to spike timing perturbations.

  9. Laser therapy reduces gelatinolytic activity in the rat trigeminal ganglion during temporomandibular joint inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desiderá, A C; Nascimento, G C; Gerlach, R F; Leite-Panissi, C R A

    2015-07-01

    To investigate whether low-level laser therapy (LLLT) alters the expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) during different stages of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation in rats. It also evaluated whether LLLT modifies mechanical allodynia and orofacial hyperalgesia. Wistar rats (±250 g) were divided into groups that received saline (SAL) or complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA, 50 μl) in the TMJ, and that later underwent LLLT (20 J cm(-2) ) at their TMJ or not (groups SAL, SAL + LLLT, CFA, and CFA + LLLT). LLLT was applied on days 3, 5, 7, and 9 after SAL or CFA. Mechanical allodynia was evaluated on days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10; orofacial hyperalgesia was assessed on day 10. Gelatin zymography and in situ zymography aided quantification of MMPs in the TG. Low-level laser therapy abolished the reduction in the mechanical orofacial threshold and the increase in orofacial rubbing during the orofacial formalin test induced by CFA. LLLT also decreased the CFA-induced rise in the levels of MMP-9 and MMP-2 as well as the gelatinolytic activity in the TG. Low-level laser therapy could constitute an adjuvant therapy to treat temporomandibular disorders and prevent inflammation-induced alterations in the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in the gelatinolytic activity in TGs. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Characterizing and modeling the intrinsic light response of rat ganglion-cell photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Olivia J; Zhang, L Samantha; Reifler, Aaron N; Dolikian, Michael E; Forger, Daniel B; Wong, Kwoon Y

    2015-11-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) mediate both image-forming vision and non-image-forming visual responses such as pupillary constriction and circadian photoentrainment. Five types of ipRGCs, named M1-M5, have been discovered in rodents. To further investigate their photoresponse properties, we made multielectrode array spike recordings from rat ipRGCs, classified them into M1, M2/M4, and M3/M5 clusters, and measured their intrinsic, melanopsin-based responses to single and flickering light pulses. Results showed that ipRGC spiking can track flickers up to ∼0.2 Hz in frequency and that flicker intervals between 5 and 14 s evoke the most spikes. We also learned that melanopsin's integration time is intensity and cluster dependent. Using these data, we constructed a mathematical model for each cluster's intrinsic photoresponse. We found that the data for the M1 cluster are best fit by a model that assumes a large photoresponse, causing the cell to enter depolarization block. Our models also led us to hypothesize that the M2/M4 and M3/M5 clusters experience comparable photoexcitation but that the M3/M5 cascade decays significantly faster than the M2/M4 cascade, resulting in different response waveforms between these clusters. These mathematical models will help predict how each ipRGC cluster might respond to stimuli of any waveform and could inform the invention of lighting technologies that promote health through melanopsin stimulation.

  11. Expanding the spectrum of human ganglionic eminence region anomalies on fetal magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Righini, Andrea; Parazzini, Cecilia; Izzo, Giana [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Cesaretti, Claudia [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Medical Genetics Unit, Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Ca' Granda, Milan (Italy); Conte, Giorgio [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); Frassoni, Carolina; Inverardi, Francesca [Fondazione I.R.C.C.S. Istituto Neurologico ' ' C. Besta' ' , Clinical Epileptology and Experimental Neurophysiology Unit, Milan (Italy); Bulfamante, Gaetano; Avagliano, Laura [San Paolo Hospital, Division of Human Pathology, Milan (Italy); Rustico, Mariangela [Children' s Hospital ' ' V. Buzzi' ' , Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Prenatal Diagnosis, Milan (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    Ganglionic eminence (GE) is a transient fetal brain structure that harvests a significant amount of precursors of cortical GABA-ergic interneurons. Prenatal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features of GE anomalies (i.e., cavitations) have already been reported associated with severe micro-lissencephaly. The purpose of this report was to illustrate the MR imaging features of GE anomalies in conditions other than severe micro-lissencephalies. Among all the fetuses submitted to prenatal MR imaging at our center from 2005 to 2014, we collected eight cases with GE anomalies and only limited associated brain anomalies. The median gestational age at the time of MR imaging was 21 weeks ranging from 19 to 29 weeks. Two senior pediatric neuroradiologists categorized the anomalies of the GE region in two groups: group one showing cavitation in the GE region and group two showing enlarged GE region. For each fetal case, associated cranial anomalies were also reported. Five out of the eight cases were included in group one and three in group two. Besides the GE region abnormality, all eight cases had additional intracranial anomalies, such as mild partial callosal agenesis, vermian hypoplasia and rotation, cerebellar hypoplasia, ventriculomegaly, enlarged subarachnoid spaces, molar tooth malformation. Ultrasound generally detected most of the associated intracranial anomalies, prompting the MR investigation; on the contrary in none of the cases, GE anomalies had been detected by ultrasound. Our observation expands the spectrum of human GE anomalies, demonstrating that these may take place also without associated severe micro-lissencephalies. (orig.)

  12. Origins and neurochemical complexity of preganglionic neurons supplying the superior cervical ganglion in the domestic pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juranek, Judyta K; Wojtkiewicz, Joanna A

    2015-02-01

    The superior cervical ganglion (SCG) is a center of sympathetic innervation of all head and neck organs. SCG sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) were found in the nucleus intermediolateralis pars principalis (IMLpp), the nucleus intermediolateralis pars funicularis (IMLpf), the nucleus intercalatus spinalis (IC), and the nucleus intercalatus spinalis pars paraependymalis (ICpe). Despite its importance, little is known of SCG innervation and chemical coding in the laboratory pig, a model that is physiologically and anatomically representative of humans. Here in our study, we established the distribution and chemical coding of Fast Blue (FB) retrogradely labelled SPN innervating porcine SCG. After unilateral injection of FB retrograde tracer into the left SCG, labeled neurons were found solely on the ipsilateral side with approximately 98% located in Th1-Th3 segments and predominantly distributed in the IMLpp and IMLpf. Neurochemical analysis revealed that approximately 80% of SPN were positive both to choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and were surrounded by a plethora of opioidergic and peptiergic nerve terminals. The results of our study provide a detailed description of the porcine preganglionic neuroarchitecture of neurons controlling the SCG, setting the stage for further studies concerning SPN plasticity under experimental/pathological conditions.

  13. Apigenin prevents TNF-α induced apoptosis of primary rat retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, M-S; Zhu, B-J; Luo, D-W

    2014-11-25

    TNF-α has recently been identified to be a mediator of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death, while glial cells are relatively protected against this death stimulus. Exposure of RGCs to TNF-α is thought to contribute to RGC apoptosis. Apigenin is a flavone with powerful anti-inflammatory properties that exists naturally in various plants and Chinese medicine. In our study, MTT assays showed that apigenin significantly inhibited the decrease of RGC viability induced by TNF-α in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with apigenin prevented TNF-α-induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner as shown by flow cytometry. The production of ATP and the total oxygen uptake were also promoted after apigenin administration. TNF-α stimulation led to a significant reduction of bcl-2 and enhancement of bax, which was reversed by apigenin treatment. Apigenin treatment also alleviated the increased caspase-3 activity induced by TNF-α. Moreover, luciferase reporter assay indicated that apigenin dose-dependently decreased NF-κB activation induced by TNF-α, but had no significant effect on activation of AP-1. Collectively, these data demonstrated that apigenin alleviated TNF-α-induced apoptosis through inhibition of caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway and activation of nuclear factor-kappaB. Therefore, apigenin may be developed as an anti-apoptotic drug to treat retinopathy.

  14. Hypotonicity modulates tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current in trigeminal ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Lei

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs play an important role in the control of membrane excitability. We previously reported that the excitability of nociceptor was increased by hypotonic stimulation. The present study tested the effect of hypotonicity on tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium current (TTX-S current in cultured trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons. Our data show that after hypotonic treatment, TTX-S current was increased. In the presence of hypotonicity, voltage-dependent activation curve shifted to the hyperpolarizing direction, while the voltage-dependent inactivation curve was not affected. Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 receptor (TRPV4 activator increased TTX-S current and hypotonicity-induced increase was markedly attenuated by TRPV4 receptor blockers. We also demonstrate that inhibition of PKC attenuated hypotonicity-induced inhibition, whereas PKA system was not involved in hypotonic-response. We conclude that hypotonic stimulation enhances TTX-S current, which contributes to hypotonicity-induced nociception. TRPV4 receptor and PKC intracellular pathway are involved in the increase of TTX-S current by hypotonicity.

  15. An invertebrate-like phototransduction cascade mediates light detection in the chicken retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Maria Ana; Verra, Daniela M; Guido, Mario E

    2006-12-01

    Prebilaterian animals perceived ambient light through nonvisual rhabdomeric photoreceptors (RPs), which evolved as support of the chordate visual system. In vertebrates, the identity of nonvisual photoreceptors and the phototransduction cascade involved in nonimage forming tasks remain uncertain. We investigated whether chicken retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) could be nonvisual photoreceptors and the nature of the photocascade involved. We found that primary cultures of chicken embryonic RGCs express such RP markers as transcription factors Pax6 and Brn3, photopigment melanopsin, and G-protein q but not markers for ciliary photoreceptors (alpha-transducin and Crx). To investigate the photoreceptive capability of RGCs, we assessed the direct effect of light on 3H-melatonin synthesis in RGC cultures synchronized to 12:12 h light-dark cycles. In constant dark, RGCs displayed a daily variation in 3H-melatonin levels peaking at subjective day, which was significantly inhibited by light. This light effect was further increased by the chromophore all-trans-retinal and suppressed by specific inhibitors of the invertebrate photocascade involving phosphoinositide hydrolysis (100 microM neomycin; 5 microM U73122) and Ca2+ mobilization (10 mM BAPTA; 1 mM lanthanum). The results demonstrate that chicken RGCs are intrinsically photosensitive RPs operating via an invertebrate-like phototransduction cascade, which may be responsible for early detection of light before vision occurs.

  16. Hearing development and spiral ganglion neurite growth in VASP deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazert, Stefan; Schick, Bernhard; Hartensuer, Rene; Volkenstein, Stefan; Aletsee, Christoph; Hansen, Stefan; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa E; Eigenthaler, Martin; Walter, Ulrich; Ryan, Allen F; Brors, Dominik

    2007-10-31

    Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) has been found to be involved in intracellular signalling pathways and to play an important role in the actin associated organization and formation of the cytoskeleton. Since differential VASP expression was noted in inner ear tissues, the present study was performed to investigate the hearing development in VASP deficient mice. Hearing development in VASP-/- mice and wild type animals was investigated by auditory brain stem (ABR) measurements. In addition, inner ear tissues of wild type animals were tested for VASP expression using PCR, Western blot analysis, in situ hybridisation, and immunohistochemistry. To compare spiral ganglion (SG) neurite growth, SG explants from VASP-/- and wild type mice were analyzed under cell culture conditions. The electroacoustical results of the present study indicate that VASP deficient mice present with a later onset of hearing during postnatal development compared to wild type animals. Transient VASP expression was detected in neonatal SG of wild type mice. Tissue culture experiments with SG explants from VASP-/- animals revealed significant alterations in SG neurite extension compared to wild types. The present findings suggest a role for VASP during neonatal development of the mammalian cochlea and allow speculation on a possible delayed innervation of cochlear hair cells due to changes in SG neurite growth in VASP-deficient mice. Temporary VASP deficits in the neonatal inner ear may be compensated by related proteins like MENA leading to a delayed but complete development of hearing function in VASP-/- animals.

  17. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ming-lei Han; Guo-hua Liu; Jin Guo; Shu-juan Yu; Jing Huang

    2016-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cell (RGC) degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB)-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H2O2. Western blot assay showed that in H2O2-damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H2O2-induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H2O2-induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway.

  18. Chemokine ligand 2 in the trigeminal ganglion regulates pain induced by experimental tooth movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi; Luo, Wei; Wang, Jing; Tan, Yu; Fu, Runqing; Fang, Bing

    2014-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that the chemokine ligand 2/chemokine receptor 2 (CCL2/CCR2) signaling pathway plays an important role in pain induced by experimental tooth movement. Expression of CCL2/CCR2 in the trigeminal ganglion (TG) was determined by Western blotting 0 hours, 4 hours, 1 day, 3 days, 5 days, and 7 days after tooth movement. CCL2 localization and cell size distribution were revealed by immunohistochemistry. The effects of increasing force on CCL2 expression and behavioral changes were investigated. Furthermore, the effects of CCL2/CCR2 antagonists on these changes in pain behaviors were all evaluated. Exogenous CCL2 was injected into periodontal tissues and cultured TG neurons with different concentrations, and then the pain responses or c-fos expression were assessed. Experimental tooth movement led to a statistically significant increase in CCL2/CCR2 expression from day 3 to day 7, especially in small to medium-sized TG neurons. It also triggered an increase in the time spent on directed face-grooming behaviors in a force magnitude-dependent and CCL2 dose-dependent manner. Pain induced by experimental tooth movement was effectively blocked by a CCR2 antagonist and by CCL2 neutralizing antibody. Also, exogenous CCL2 led to an increase in c-fos expression in cultured TG neurons, which was blocked by CCL2 neutralizing antibody. The peripheral CCL2/CCR2 axis is modulated by experimental tooth movement and involved in the development of tooth movement pain.

  19. Optic neuritis and retinal ganglion cell loss in a chronic murine model of multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eQuinn

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE are neurodegenerative diseases with characteristic inflammatory demyelination in the central nervous system, including the optic nerve. Neuronal and axonal damage is considered to be the main cause of long-term disability in patients with MS. Neuronal loss, including retinal ganglion cell (RGC apoptosis in eyes with optic neuritis, also occurs in EAE. However, there is significant variability in the clinical course and level of neuronal damage in MS and EAE. The current studies examine the mechanisms and kinetics of RGC loss in C57BL/6 mice immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein to induce a chronic EAE disease. Clinical progression of EAE was scored daily and vision was assessed by optokinetic responses. At various time points, RGCs were counted and optic nerves were examined for inflammatory cell infiltration. Almost all EAE mice develop optic neuritis by day 15 post-immunization; however, RGC loss is delayed in these mice. No RGC loss is detected 25 days post-immunization, whereas RGC numbers in EAE mice significantly and progressively decrease compared to controls from 35-50 days post-immunization. The delayed time course of RGC loss is in stark contrast to that reported in relapsing EAE, as well as in rats with chronic EAE. Results suggest that different clinical disease courses of optic nerve inflammation may trigger distinct mechanisms of neuronal damage, or RGCs in different rodent strains may have variable resistance to neuronal degeneration.

  20. Therapeutic effect of bone cement injection in the treatment of intraosseous ganglion of the carpal bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Kunlun; Shao, Xinzhong; Tian, Dehu; Bai, Jiangbo; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Yingze

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to treat intraosseous ganglia of the carpal bones with injectable bone cement grafting. Between January 2012 and December 2013, 4 patients (3 men and 1 woman) presenting with wrist pain and activity limitation were diagnosed with intraosseous ganglion of the carpal bones by radiography. The patients were treated with minimal invasive curettage and bone cement injection surgery. All patients were followed up for a mean time of 17 months (range, 12-22 months). The wrist pain was significantly reduced in all patients following surgery. In addition, the activity range and grip strength were also improved compared with the preoperative parameters. Subsequent to treatment, the Mayo wrist score and the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand score presented mean values of 78.8 (range, 75-80) and 11 (range, 7.7-15.0), respectively. These results suggested that the patients showed a good recovery. All patients were satisfied with the postoperative results and returned to work within 4 weeks. In conclusion, bone cement injection is an effective and safe therapeutic strategy for the treatment of intraosseous ganglia of the carpal bone.

  1. Pan-retinal characterisation of Light Responses from Ganglion Cells in the Developing Mouse Retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgen, Gerrit; Pirmoradian, Sahar; Pamplona, Daniela; Kornprobst, Pierre; Cessac, Bruno; Hennig, Matthias H.; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2017-01-01

    We have investigated the ontogeny of light-driven responses in mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Using a large-scale, high-density multielectrode array, we recorded from hundreds to thousands of RGCs simultaneously at pan-retinal level, including dorsal and ventral locations. Responses to different contrasts not only revealed a complex developmental profile for ON, OFF and ON-OFF responses, but also unveiled differences between dorsal and ventral RGC responses. At eye-opening, dorsal RGCs of all types were more responsive to light, perhaps indicating an environmental priority to nest viewing for pre-weaning pups. The developmental profile of ON and OFF responses exhibited antagonistic behaviour, with the strongest ON responses shortly after eye-opening, followed by an increase in the strength of OFF responses later on. Further, we found that with maturation receptive field (RF) center sizes decrease, spike-triggered averaged responses to white noise become stronger, and centers become more circular while maintaining differences between RGC types. We conclude that the maturation of retinal functionality is not spatially homogeneous, likely reflecting ecological requirements that favour earlier maturation of the dorsal retina. PMID:28186129

  2. Electrical activity of ON and OFF retinal ganglion cells: a modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Tianruo; Tsai, David; Morley, John W.; Suaning, Gregg J.; Kameneva, Tatiana; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) demonstrate a large range of variation in their ionic channel properties and morphologies. Cell-specific properties are responsible for the unique way RGCs process synaptic inputs, as well as artificial electrical signals such as that from a visual prosthesis. A cell-specific computational modelling approach allows us to examine the functional significance of regional membrane channel expression and cell morphology. Approach. In this study, an existing RGC ionic model was extended by including a hyperpolarization activated non-selective cationic current as well as a T-type calcium current identified in recent experimental findings. Biophysically-defined model parameters were simultaneously optimized against multiple experimental recordings from ON and OFF RGCs. Main results. With well-defined cell-specific model parameters and the incorporation of detailed cell morphologies, these models were able to closely reconstruct and predict ON and OFF RGC response properties recorded experimentally. Significance. The resulting models were used to study the contribution of different ion channel properties and spatial structure of neurons to RGC activation. The techniques of this study are generally applicable to other excitable cell models, increasing the utility of theoretical models in accurately predicting the response of real biological neurons.

  3. Immortalized human dorsal root ganglion cells differentiate into neurons with nociceptive properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymon, H K; Thode, S; Zhou, J; Friedman, G C; Pardinas, J R; Barrere, C; Johnson, R M; Sah, D W

    1999-07-01

    A renewable source of human sensory neurons would greatly facilitate basic research and drug development. We had established previously conditionally immortalized human CNS cell lines that can differentiate into functional neurons (). We report here the development of an immortalized human dorsal root ganglion (DRG) clonal cell line, HD10.6, with a tetracycline-regulatable v-myc oncogene. In the proliferative condition, HD10.6 cells have a doubling time of 1.2 d and exhibit a neuronal precursor morphology. After differentiation of clone HD10.6 for 7 d in the presence of tetracycline, v-myc expression was suppressed, and >50% of the cells exhibited typical neuronal morphology, stained positively for neuronal cytoskeletal markers, and fired action potentials in response to current injection. Furthermore, this cell line was fate-restricted to a neuronal phenotype; even in culture conditions that promote Schwann cell or smooth muscle differentiation of neural crest stem cells, HD10.6 differentiated exclusively into neurons. Moreover, differentiated HD10.6 cells expressed sensory neuron-associated transcription factors and exhibited capsaicin sensitivity. Taken together, these data indicate that we have established an immortalized human DRG cell line that can differentiate into sensory neurons with nociceptive properties. The cell line HD10.6 represents the first example of a human sensory neuronal line and will be valuable for basic research, as well as for the discovery of novel drug targets and clinical candidates.

  4. Stanniocalcin-1 protects retinal ganglion cells by inhibiting apoptosis and oxidative damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Jin Kim

    Full Text Available Optic neuropathy including glaucoma is one of the leading causes of irreversible vision loss, and there are currently no effective therapies. The hallmark of pathophysiology of optic neuropathy is oxidative stress and apoptotic death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, a population of neurons in the central nervous system with their soma in the inner retina and axons in the optic nerve. We here tested that an anti-apoptotic protein stanniocalcin-1 (STC-1 can prevent loss of RGCs in the rat retina with optic nerve transection (ONT and in cultures of RGC-5 cells with CoCl2 injury. We found that intravitreal injection of STC-1 increased the number of RGCs in the retina at days 7 and 14 after ONT, and decreased apoptosis and oxidative damage. In cultures, treatment with STC-1 dose-dependently increased cell viability, and decreased apoptosis and levels of reactive oxygen species in RGC-5 cells that were exposed to CoCl2. The expression of HIF-1α that was up-regulated by injury was significantly suppressed in the retina and in RGC-5 cells by STC-1 treatment. The results suggested that intravitreal injection of STC-1 might be a useful therapy for optic nerve diseases in which RGCs undergo apoptosis through oxidative stress.

  5. Response properties of ON-OFF retinal ganglion cells to high-order stimulus statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Lei; Gong, Han-Yan; Gong, Hai-Qing; Liang, Pei-Ji; Zhang, Pu-Ming

    2014-10-17

    The visual stimulus statistics are the fundamental parameters to provide the reference for studying visual coding rules. In this study, the multi-electrode extracellular recording experiments were designed and implemented on bullfrog retinal ganglion cells to explore the neural response properties to the changes in stimulus statistics. The changes in low-order stimulus statistics, such as intensity and contrast, were clearly reflected in the neuronal firing rate. However, it was difficult to distinguish the changes in high-order statistics, such as skewness and kurtosis, only based on the neuronal firing rate. The neuronal temporal filtering and sensitivity characteristics were further analyzed. We observed that the peak-to-peak amplitude of the temporal filter and the neuronal sensitivity, which were obtained from either neuronal ON spikes or OFF spikes, could exhibit significant changes when the high-order stimulus statistics were changed. These results indicate that in the retina, the neuronal response properties may be reliable and powerful in carrying some complex and subtle visual information.

  6. Spontaneous oscillatory rhythms in the degenerating mouse retina modulate retinal ganglion cell responses to electrical stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sook eGoo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the electrical activity of the retina in the animal models of retinal degeneration has been carried out in part to understand the progression of retinal degenerative diseases like age-related macular degeneration (AMD and retinitis pigmentosa (RP, but also to determine optimum stimulus paradigms for use with retinal prosthetic devices. The models most studied in this regard have been the two lines of mice deficient in the β-subunit of phosphodiesterase (rd1 and rd10 mice, where the degenerating retinas exhibit characteristic spontaneous hyperactivity and oscillatory local field potentials (LFPs. Additionally, there is a robust ~10 Hz rhythmic burst of retinal ganglion cell (RGC spikes on the trough of the oscillatory LFP. In rd1 mice, the rhythmic burst of RGC spikes is always phase-locked with the oscillatory LFP and this phase-locking property is preserved regardless of postnatal ages. However, in rd10 mice, the frequency of the oscillatory rhythm changes according to postnatal age, suggesting that this rhythm might be a marker of the stage of degeneration. Furthermore when a biphasic current stimulus is applied to rd10 mice degenerate retina, distinct RGC response patterns that correlate with the stage of degeneration emerge. This review also considers the significance of these response properties.

  7. Substance P-mediated membrane currents in voltage-clamped guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, W H; Hills, J M; Brown, D A

    1988-01-01

    Responses to substance P (SP) and to hypogastric nerve stimulation were recorded from voltage-clamped guinea pig inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) neurons, and compared with those to muscarine. Muscarine produced a voltage-dependent inward current accompanied by a reduced input conductance and inhibition of IM a time- and voltage-dependent K+-current (Brown and Adams: Nature 283:673-676, 1980). SP also produced an inward current, accompanied by a fall in input conductance (20 out of 31 cells) or a rise in input conductance (7 out of 31 cells). The fall in input conductance was not accompanied by an inhibition of M-current (unlike frog ganglia: Adams et al.: British Journal of Pharmacology 79:330-333, 1983) or an inhibition of the inward rectifier current (unlike globus pallidus neurons: Stanfield et al.: Nature 315:498-501, 1985). Repetitive hypogastric nerve stimulation (10-20 Hz, 2-10 s) produced a slow inward postsynaptic current lasting 1-3 min, with decreases or increases of input conductance matching those produced by SP. The postsynaptic current did not show a consistent or reproducible change in amplitude on varying the holding potential between -90 and -25 mV. It is concluded that SP and hypogastric stimulation produce complex and variable changes in ionic conductance in IMG neurons.

  8. Neuroprotection by GH against excitotoxic-induced cell death in retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, Carlos G; Ávila-Mendoza, José; Wu, Yilun; Arellanes-Licea, Elvira Del Carmen; Louie, Marcela; Luna, Maricela; Arámburo, Carlos; Harvey, Steve

    2016-08-01

    Retinal growth hormone (GH) has been shown to promote cell survival in retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) during developmental waves of apoptosis during chicken embryonic development. The possibility that it might also against excitotoxicity-induced cell death was therefore examined in the present study, which utilized quail-derived QNR/D cells as an in vitro RGC model. QNR/D cell death was induced by glutamate in the presence of BSO (buthionine sulfoxamide) (an enhancer of oxidative stress), but this was significantly reduced (PGH (rcGH). Similarly, QNR/D cells that had been prior transfected with a GH plasmid to overexpress secreted and non-secreted GH. This treatment reduced the number of TUNEL-labeled cells and blocked their release of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). In a further experiment with dissected neuroretinal explants from ED (embryonic day) 10 embryos, rcGH treatment of the explants also reduced (PGH-overexpressing QNR/D cells. As rcGH treatment and GH-overexpression cells also increased the content of IGF-1 and IGF-1 mRNA this neuroprotective action of GH is likely to be mediated, at least partially, through an IGF-1 mechanism. This possibility is supported by the fact that the siRNA knockdown of GH or IGF-1 significantly reduced QNR/D cell viability, as did the immunoneutralization of IGF-1. GH is therefore neuroprotective against excitotoxicity-induced RGC cell death by anti-apoptotic actions involving IGF-1 stimulation.

  9. Fetal calf serum-mediated inhibition of neurite growth from ciliary ganglion neurons in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, G E; Skaper, S D; Manthorpe, M; Moonen, G; Varon, S

    1984-01-01

    Embryonic chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons cultured in fetal calf serum-containing medium have been previously reported to extend neurites on polyornithine (PORN) substrata precoated with a neurite-promoting factor (PNPF) from rat schwannoma-conditioned medium. On PORN substrata alone, however, no neuritic growth occurred. This was interpreted as evidence that PORN was an incompetent substratum for ciliary neuritic growth. In this study, we now find that an untreated PORN substratum allows neuritic growth in serum-free defined medium. When PNPF was added to PORN, a more rapid and extensive neuritic response occurred. After 5 hr of culture, a 60% neuritic response occurred on PNPF/PORN, whereas no neurons initiated neurites until 10-12 hr on PORN. The inhibitory effect of fetal calf serum noted above on PORN could be obtained in part by pretreating the substratum with serum for 1 hr. Maximal inhibitory effects in the PORN pretreatment were achieved after 30 min and were not further improved by treatments up to 4 hr. Bovine serum albumin was also found to inhibit neurite growth on PORN to about 60% of the inhibition obtained by an equivalent amount of serum protein. Fetal calf serum was shown to cause a 15% reduction in the percentage of neurons bearing neurites after its addition to 18-hr serum-free PORN cultures and to cause statistically significant reductions in neurite lengths measured 2 hr later.

  10. Nerve growth factor protects against palmitic acid-induced injury in retinal ganglion cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pan-shi Yan; Shu Tang; Hai-feng Zhang; Yuan-yuan Guo; Zhi-wen Zeng; Qiang Wen

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports an important role for nerve growth factor (NGF) in diabetic retinopathy. We hypothesized that NGF has a protective effect on rat retinal ganglion RGC-5 cells injured by palmitic acid (PA), a metabolic factor implicated in the development of dia-betes and its complications. Our results show that PA exposure caused apoptosis of RGC-5 cells, while NGF protected against PA insult in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, NGF signiifcantly attenuated the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialde-hyde (MDA) in RGC-5 cells. Pathway inhibitor tests showed that the protective effect of NGF was completely reversed by LY294002 (PI3K inhibitor), Akt VIII inhibitor, and PD98059 (ERK1/2 inhibitor). Western blot analysis revealed that NGF induced the phosphorylation of Akt/FoxO1 and ERK1/2 and reversed the PA-evoked reduction in the levels of these proteins. These results indicate that NGF protects RGC-5 cells against PA-induced injury through anti-oxidation and inhibition of apoptosis by modulation of the PI3K/Akt and ERK1/2 sig-naling pathways.

  11. Gap junctions are essential for generating the correlated spike activity of neighboring retinal ganglion cells.

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    Béla Völgyi

    Full Text Available Neurons throughout the brain show spike activity that is temporally correlated to that expressed by their neighbors, yet the generating mechanism(s remains unclear. In the retina, ganglion cells (GCs show robust, concerted spiking that shapes the information transmitted to central targets. Here we report the synaptic circuits responsible for generating the different types of concerted spiking of GC neighbors in the mouse retina. The most precise concerted spiking was generated by reciprocal electrical coupling of GC neighbors via gap junctions, whereas indirect electrical coupling to a common cohort of amacrine cells generated the correlated activity with medium precision. In contrast, the correlated spiking with the lowest temporal precision was produced by shared synaptic inputs carrying photoreceptor noise. Overall, our results demonstrate that different synaptic circuits generate the discrete types of GC correlated activity. Moreover, our findings expand our understanding of the roles of gap junctions in the retina, showing that they are essential for generating all forms of concerted GC activity transmitted to central brain targets.

  12. Temperature dependence of rapidly adapting mechanically activated currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhanfeng; Ling, Jennifer; Gu, Jianguo G

    2012-08-01

    Rapidly adapting mechanically activated channels (RA) are expressed on somatosensory neurons and thought to play a role in mechanical transduction. Because mechanical sensations can be significantly affected by temperatures, we examined thermal sensitivity of RA currents in cultured dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons to see if RA channel activity is highly temperature-dependent. RA currents were evoked from DRG neurons by membrane displacements and recorded by the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique. We found that RA currents were significantly enhanced by warming temperatures from 22 to 32 °C and reduced by cooling temperatures from 24 to 14 °C. RA channel activation exhibited steep temperature-dependence with a large temperature coefficient (Q10>5) and a high activation energy (Ea>30 kcal/mol). We further showed that RA channel activation by mechanical stimulation led to membrane depolarization, which could result in action potential firing at 22 °C or 32 °C but not at 14 °C. Taken together, our results provide the measurements of thermal dynamics and activation energy of RA channels, and suggest that a high energy barrier is present for RA channels to open. These findings are in agreement with temperature sensitivity of mechanical sensations in mammals.

  13. Retinal nerve fiber layer and ganglion cell complex thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

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    Mehmet Demir

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the following study is to evaluate the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL and ganglion cell complex (GCC thickness in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM. Materials and Methods: Average, inferior, and superior values of RNFL and GCC thickness were measured in 123 patients using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. The values of participants with DM were compared to controls. Diabetic patients were collected in Groups 1, 2 and 3. Group 1 = 33 participants who had no diabetic retinopathy (DR; Group 2 = 30 participants who had mild nonproliferative DR and Group 3 = 30 participants who had moderate non-proliferative DR. The 30 healthy participants collected in Group 4. Analysis of variance test and a multiple linear regression analysis were used for statistical analysis. Results: The values of RNFL and GCC in the type 2 diabetes were thinner than controls, but this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusions: This study showed that there is a nonsignificant loss of RNFL and GCC in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. NF-Protocadherin Regulates Retinal Ganglion Cell Axon Behaviour in the Developing Visual System.

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    Louis C Leung

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules play a central role in mediating axonal tract development within the nascent nervous system. NF-protocadherin (NFPC, a member of the non-clustered protocadherin family, has been shown to regulate retinal ganglion cell (RGC axon and dendrite initiation, as well as influencing axonal navigation within the mid-optic tract. However, whether NFPC mediates RGC axonal behaviour at other positions within the optic pathway remains unclear. Here we report that NFPC plays an important role in RGC axonogenesis, but not in intraretinal guidance. Moreover, axons with reduced NFPC levels exhibit insensitivity to Netrin-1, an attractive guidance cue expressed at the optic nerve head. Netrin-1 induces rapid turnover of NFPC localized to RGC growth cones, suggesting that the regulation of NFPC protein levels may underlie Netrin-1-mediated entry of RGC axons into the optic nerve head. At the tectum, we further reveal a function for NFPC in controlling RGC axonal entry into the final target area. Collectively, our results expand our understanding of the role of NFPC in RGC guidance and illustrate that this adhesion molecule contributes to axon behaviour at multiple points in the optic pathway.

  15. Hyperexcitable neurons and altered non-neuronal cells in the compressed spinal ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaMotte, Robert H; Ma, Chao

    2008-10-25

    The cell body or soma in the dosal root ganglion (DRG) is normally excitable and this excitability can increase and persist after an injury of peripheral sensory neurons. In a rat model of radicular pain, an intraforaminal implantation of a rod that chronically compressed the lumbar DRG ("CCD" model) resulted in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity that was accompanied by hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hind paw. By the 5th day after onset of CCD, there was a novel upregulation in neuronal expression of the chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1 or CCL2) and also its receptor, CCR2. The neurons developed, in response to topically applied MCP-1, an excitatory response that they normally do not have. CCD also activated non-neuronal cells including, for example, the endothelial cells as evidenced by angiogenesis in the form of an increased number of capillaries in the DRG after 7 days. A working hypothesis is that the CCD induced changes in neurons and non-neuronal cells that may act together to promote the survival of the injured tissue. The release of ligands such as CCL2, in addition to possibly activating nociceptive neurons (maintaining the pain), may also act to preserve injured cells in the face of ischemia and hypoxia, for example, by promoting angiogenesis. Thus, somal hyperexcitability, as often said of inflammation, may represent a double edged sword.

  16. Electroacupuncture upregulated platelet derived growth factor expression in spared dorsal root ganglion of cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xifeng Wang; Lianshuang Zhang; Xiaobo Xu; Wei Zhao; Guixiang Liu

    2012-01-01

    A bilateral spared dorsal root ganglion model was established in healthy adult cats by bilateral resection of L1-5 and L7-S2 dorsal root ganglia. L6 dorsal root ganglia were spared. Zusanli (ST36) and Xuanzhong (BL39) or Futu (ST32) and Sanyinjiao (SP6) were alternatively electro-stimulated on the right leg. Immunohistochemical staining of anti-serum platelet-derived growth factor demonstrated that the number of total neurons and medium-small sized platelet-derived growth factor positive neurons was significantly decreased on the 7th day following injury. After 7 days of acupuncture, the total number of positive and large neurons staining for platelet-derived growth factor on the acupuncture side significantly increased compared to the non-acupuncture side. After acupuncture for 14 days, the total positive and medium-small sized neurons significantly increased compared with the non-acupuncture side. Results indicate that acupuncture promoted the synthesis of platelet-derived growth factor in spared dorsal root ganglia.

  17. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

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    Jana Schwieger

    Full Text Available The functionality of cochlear implants (CI depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN. The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth.Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml, alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours.The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture.The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  18. Aquaporin-1 water permeability as a novel determinant of axonal regeneration in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Verkman, A S

    2015-03-01

    Dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons transduce peripheral pain signals through small-diameter, non-myelinated C-fibers, which, when injured, can regenerate to restore pain sensation. Water channel aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is expressed at the plasma membrane of cell bodies and axons of DRG neurons, where it modulates the sensing of certain types of pain. Here, we found that AQP1 is also involved in DRG axonal growth and regeneration by a mechanism that may involve water transport-facilitated extension of axonal outgrowths. Spontaneous and nerve growth factor-stimulated axonal extension was reduced in cultures of AQP1-deficient DRG neurons and DRG explants compared to the wildtype. Axonal growth in AQP1-deficient DRG cultures was rescued by transfection with AQP1 or a different water-transporting AQP (AQP4), but not by a non-water-transporting AQP1 mutant. Following sciatic nerve compression injury AQP1 expression was increased in DRG neurons in wildtype mice, and DRG axonal growth was impaired in AQP1-deficient mice. Our results indicate AQP1 as a novel determinant of DRG axonal regeneration and hence a potential therapeutic target to accelerate neuronal regeneration. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwieger, Jana; Warnecke, Athanasia; Lenarz, Thomas; Esser, Karl-Heinz; Scheper, Verena

    2015-01-01

    The functionality of cochlear implants (CI) depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN). The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth. Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml), alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours. The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture. The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  20. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, E Matthew; Zhang, Zijia; Schechter, Ruben; Miller, Kenneth E

    2016-01-13

    Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS) is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir) with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA) compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm²), presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy.

  1. Glutaminase Increases in Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons after Unilateral Adjuvant-Induced Hind Paw Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Matthew Hoffman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is a neurotransmitter used at both the peripheral and central terminals of nociceptive primary sensory neurons, yet little is known concerning regulation of glutamate metabolism during peripheral inflammation. Glutaminase (GLS is an enzyme of the glutamate-glutamine cycle that converts glutamine into glutamate for neurotransmission and is implicated in producing elevated levels of glutamate in central and peripheral terminals. A potential mechanism for increased levels of glutamate is an elevation in GLS expression. We assessed GLS expression after unilateral hind paw inflammation by measuring GLS immunoreactivity (ir with quantitative image analysis of L4 dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons after one, two, four, and eight days of adjuvant-induced arthritis (AIA compared to saline injected controls. No significant elevation in GLS-ir occurred in the DRG ipsilateral to the inflamed hind paw after one or two days of AIA. After four days AIA, GLS-ir was elevated significantly in all sizes of DRG neurons. After eight days AIA, GLS-ir remained elevated in small (<400 µm2, presumably nociceptive neurons. Western blot analysis of the L4 DRG at day four AIA confirmed the elevated GLS-ir. The present study indicates that GLS expression is increased in the chronic stage of inflammation and may be a target for chronic pain therapy.

  2. Imipramine protects retinal ganglion cells from oxidative stress through the tyrosine kinase receptor B signaling pathway

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    Ming-lei Han

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Retinal ganglion cell (RGC degeneration is irreversible in glaucoma and tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB-associated signaling pathways have been implicated in the process. In this study, we attempted to examine whether imipramine, a tricyclic antidepressant, may protect hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 -induced RGC degeneration through the activation of the TrkB pathway in RGC-5 cell lines. RGC-5 cell lines were pre-treated with imipramine 30 minutes before exposure to H 2 O 2 . Western blot assay showed that in H 2 O 2 -damaged RGC-5 cells, imipramine activated TrkB pathways through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase/TrkB phosphorylation. TUNEL staining assay also demonstrated that imipramine ameliorated H 2 O 2 -induced apoptosis in RGC-5 cells. Finally, TrkB-IgG intervention was able to reverse the protective effect of imipramine on H 2 O 2 -induced RGC-5 apoptosis. Imipramine therefore protects RGCs from oxidative stress-induced apoptosis through the TrkB signaling pathway.

  3. A general principle governs vision-dependent dendritic patterning of retinal ganglion cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong-Ping; Sun, Jin Hao; Tian, Ning

    2014-10-15

    Dendritic arbors of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) collect information over a certain area of the visual scene. The coverage territory and the arbor density of dendrites determine what fraction of the visual field is sampled by a single cell and at what resolution. However, it is not clear whether visual stimulation is required for the establishment of branching patterns of RGCs, and whether a general principle directs the dendritic patterning of diverse RGCs. By analyzing the geometric structures of RGC dendrites, we found that dendritic arbors of RGCs underwent a substantial spatial rearrangement after eye-opening. Light deprivation blocked both the dendritic growth and the branch patterning, suggesting that visual stimulation is required for the acquisition of specific branching patterns of RGCs. We further showed that vision-dependent dendritic growth and arbor refinement occurred mainly in the middle portion of the dendritic tree. This nonproportional growth and selective refinement suggest that the late-stage dendritic development of RGCs is not a passive stretching with the growth of eyes, but rather an active process of selective growth/elimination of dendritic arbors of RGCs driven by visual activity. Finally, our data showed that there was a power law relationship between the coverage territory and dendritic arbor density of RGCs on a cell-by-cell basis. RGCs were systematically less dense when they cover larger territories regardless of their cell type, retinal location, or developmental stage. These results suggest that a general structural design principle directs the vision-dependent patterning of RGC dendrites.

  4. The organization of the cardiac ganglion of the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melinek, R; Mirolli, M

    1988-09-01

    The heart of the axolotl Ambystoma mexicanum was studied with histochemical methods to determine the distribution of neurons containing acetylcholine esterase, catecholamines and 5-hydroxytryptamine. The cardiac ganglion is made up of cholinergic nerve fibers and somata, and of catecholaminergic fibers. Small intensely fluorescent cells were found along blood vessels in the pericardial wall at the base of the heart, but not in the heart itself, except, in a few instances, in the region bordering the pericardial wall. Both the cholinergic and the catecholaminergic innervation of the heart were poorly developed at hatching and reached their mature state after a few months. Cholinesterase staining fibers appeared several weeks before catecholaminergic fibers. The number of postganglionic cholinergic neurons in the heart increased several-fold during the first month after hatching. Histofluorescence studies of organ cultures suggested that all the catecholamine present in the heart are of extrinsic origin. Liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection demonstrated that the dominant catecholamine in the heart is norepinephrine. No neurons containing 5-hydroxytryptamine were found.

  5. Loss of Melanopsin-Expressing Retinal Ganglion Cells in Severely Staged Glaucoma Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obara, Elisabeth Anne; Hannibal, Jens; Heegaard, Steffen;

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple studies have shown overwhelming evidence supporting the impairment of melanopsin function due to glaucoma. However, few studies have been carried out in humans analyzing the histology of melanopsin-expressing retinal ganglion cells (mRGCs) in retinas with glaucoma. The aim...... of this study was to analyze the pattern of expression of mRGCs relative to RGCs in the normal retina and retinas harboring varying stages of glaucoma. Methods: Paraffin-embedded human donor eyes with glaucoma (n = 11) and age-matched controls (n = 10) were obtained from Department of Pathology at Rigshospital...... difference was observed in mRGC expression in the normal retinas and mild-staged retinas with glaucoma; the densities of mRGCs were 3.08 ± 0.47 and 3.00 ± 0.13 cell counts/mm2, respectively. However, the severely staged retinas with glaucoma showed a significant loss in mRGCs density, 1.09 ± 0.35 cell counts...

  6. NKCC1-deficiency results in abnormal proliferation of neural progenitor cells of the lateral ganglionic eminence

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    Ana Cathia Magalhães

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The proliferative pool of neural progenitor cells is maintained by exquisitely controlled mechanisms for cell cycle regulation. The Na-K-Cl cotransporter NKCC1 is important for regulating cell volume and the proliferation of different cell types in vitro. NKCC1 is expressed in ventral telencephalon of embryonic brains suggesting a potential role in neural development of this region. The ventral telencephalon is a major source for both interneuron and oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Whether NKCC1 is involved in the proliferation of these cell populations remains unknown. In order to assess this question, we monitored several markers for neural, neuronal, and proliferating cells in wild-type and NKCC1 knockout mouse brains. We found that NKCC1 was expressed in neural progenitor cells from the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE at E12.5. Mice lacking NKCC1 expression displayed reduced PH3-labeled mitotic cells in the ventricular zone and reduced cell cycle reentry. Accordingly, we found a significant reduction of Sp8-labeled immature interneurons migrating from the dorsal LGE in NKCC1-deficient mice at a later developmental stage. Interestingly, at E14.5, NKCC1 regulated also the formation of Olig2-labeled oligodendrocyte precursor cells. Collectively, these findings show that NKCC1 serves in vivo as a modulator of the cell cycle decision in the developing ventral telencephalon at the early stage of neurogenesis. These results present a novel mechanistic avenue to be considered in the recent proposed involvement of chloride transporters in a number of developmentally related diseases such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia.

  7. Mice deficient of glutamatergic signaling from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells exhibit abnormal circadian photoentrainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purrier, Nicole; Engeland, William C; Kofuji, Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Several aspects of behavior and physiology, such as sleep and wakefulness, blood pressure, body temperature, and hormone secretion exhibit daily oscillations known as circadian rhythms. These circadian rhythms are orchestrated by an intrinsic biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) of the hypothalamus which is adjusted to the daily environmental cycles of day and night by the process of photoentrainment. In mammals, the neuronal signal for photoentrainment arises from a small subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) that send a direct projection to the SCN. ipRGCs also mediate other non-image-forming (NIF) visual responses such as negative masking of locomotor activity by light, and the pupillary light reflex (PLR) via co-release of neurotransmitters glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) from their synaptic terminals. The relative contribution of each neurotransmitter system for the circadian photoentrainment and other NIF visual responses is still unresolved. We investigated the role of glutamatergic neurotransmission for circadian photoentrainment and NIF behaviors by selective ablation of ipRGC glutamatergic synaptic transmission in mice. Mutant mice displayed delayed re-entrainment to a 6 h phase shift (advance or delay) in the light cycle and incomplete photoentrainment in a symmetrical skeleton photoperiod regimen (1 h light pulses between 11 h dark periods). Circadian rhythmicity in constant darkness also was reduced in some mutant mice. Other NIF responses such as the PLR and negative masking responses to light were also partially attenuated. Overall, these results suggest that glutamate from ipRGCs drives circadian photoentrainment and negative masking responses to light.

  8. Efficacy of ultrasound-stellate ganglion block in breast cancer with postoperative neuropathic pain

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    LIU Cheng-jun

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective To compare the efficacy of ultrasound-stellate ganglion block (US-SGB with that of blind SGB (B-SGB in the management of breast cancer patients with postoperative neuropathic pain (NP. Methods Forty-eight breast cancer patients with postoperative neuropathic pain were randomly assigned to either US-SGB group (N = 24 or B-SGB group (N = 24. The mean age of US-SGB and B-SGB groups were (51.35 ± 5.63 and (49.54 ± 4.77 years, respectively. Two blockade procedures with 8-day interval were performed on the affected side. Visual Analogue Scale (VAS was assessed before treatment, and in the 4th and 8th week after treatment. Results In both groups, VAS scores were significantly decreased after 4 and 8 weeks. The VAS score in US-SGB group was decreased from 5.44 ± 1.52 before treatment to 2.68 ± 1.33 at 4th week and to 1.32 ± 0.85 at 8th week after treatment, while in B-SGB group decreased from 5.36 ± 1.21 before treatment to 3.31 ± 1.27 at 4th week and to 2.09 ± 1.02 at 8th week after treatment. The alleviation of pain in US-SGB group was more significant than that in B-SGB group (4th week: t = 2.251, P = 0.038; 8th week: t = 1.971, P = 0.029. Conclusion Both US-SGB and B-SGB techniques were effective in relieving pain in breast cancer patients with neuropathic pain. However, with postoperative favorable clinical efficacy, US-SGB was better in pain relief in comparison with B-SGB.

  9. Central projections of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the macaque monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, J.; Kankipati, L.; Strang, C.E.; Peterson, B.B.; Dacey, D.; Gamlin, P.D.

    2014-01-01

    Circadian rhythms generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle via intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin and the neuropeptide PACAP. The ipRGCs regulate other non-image-forming visual functions such as the pupillary light reflex, masking behaviour and light induced melatonin suppression. To evaluate whether PACAP immunoreactive retinal projections are useful as a marker for central projection of ipRGCs in the monkey brain, we characterized the occurrence of PACAP in melanopsin expressing ipRGCs and in the retinal target areas in the brain visualized by the anterograde tracer Cholera Toxin subunit B (CtB) in combination with PACAP staining. In the retina, PACAP and melanopsin were found to be co-stored in 99% of melanopsin expressing cells characterized as inner and outer stratifying melanopsin RGCs. Two macaque monkeys were anesthetized and received a unilateral intravitreal injection of CtB. Bilateral retinal projections containing co-localized CtB and PACAP immunostaining were identified in the SCN, the lateral geniculate complex (LGN) including the pregeniculate nucleus (PrGC), the pretectal olivary nucleus (PON), the nucleus of the optic tract (NOT), the brachium of the superior colliculus (BSC), and the superior colliculus (SC). In conclusion, PACAP immunoreactive projections with co-localized CtB represent retinal projections of ipRGCs in the macaque monkey, and support previous retrograde tracer studies demonstrating that melanopsin containing retinal projections reach areas in the primate brain involved in both image and non-image-forming visual processing. PMID:24752373

  10. Cannabinoids inhibit acid-sensing ion channel currents in rat dorsal root ganglion neurons.

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    Yu-Qiang Liu

    Full Text Available Local acidosis has been found in various pain-generating conditions such as inflammation and tissue injury. Cannabinoids exert a powerful inhibitory control over pain initiation via peripheral cognate receptors. However, the peripheral molecular targets responsible for the antinociceptive effects of cannabinoids are still poorly understood. Here, we have found that WIN55,212-2, a cannabinoid receptor agonist, inhibits the activity of native acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs in rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons. WIN55,212-2 dose-dependently inhibited proton-gated currents mediated by ASICs. WIN55,212-2 shifted the proton concentration-response curve downwards, with an decrease of 48.6±3.7% in the maximum current response but with no significant change in the EC(50 value. The inhibition of proton-gated current induced by WIN55,212-2 was almost completely blocked by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist AM 281, but not by the CB2 receptor antagonist AM630. Pretreatment of forskolin, an AC activator, and the addition of cAMP also reversed the inhibition of WIN55,212-2. Moreover, WIN55,212-2 altered acid-evoked excitability of rat DRG neurons and decreased the number of action potentials induced by acid stimuli. Finally, WIN55,212-2 attenuated nociceptive responses to injection of acetic acid in rats. These results suggest that WIN55,212-2 inhibits the activity of ASICs via CB1 receptor and cAMP dependent pathway in rat primary sensory neurons. Thus, cannabinoids can exert their analgesic action by interaction with ASICs in the primary afferent neurons, which was novel analgesic mechanism of cannabinoids.

  11. Retinal ganglion cell neuroprotection in a rat model of glaucoma following brimonidine, latanoprost or combined treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, María; Urcola, J Haritz; Vecino, Elena

    2008-05-01

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of two antiglaucomatous substances, regardless of their hypotensive effect in the eye. Brimonidine, which does not reduce IOP when administered intraperitoneally, and latanoprost, which has a renowned hypotensive effect topically. We examined rat retinal ganglion cell (RGC) survival and size distribution in experimental glaucoma in response to different glaucomatous agents. IOP was elevated by episcleral vein cauterization (EVC) prior to the application of different treatments: (I) PBS application (control group), (II) intraperitoneal administration of brimonidine (a general hypotensive agent), (III) topical application of latanoprost (an ocular hypotensive agent), and (IV) latanoprost combined with brimonidine. After 12 weeks, RGCs were retrogradely labeled with fluorogold and RGC density was analyzed. EVC caused a significant increase (42%) in IOP in each group before drug treatment. After 12weeks of EVC, RGC survival in control vs. EVC rats was 78.9+/-3.2%. No IOP reduction was observed in brimonidine injected rats, but RGC survival at 12 weeks was total (103.7+/-2.7%). In latanoprost treated rats, IOP dropped by around 22% and 94.7+/-3.7% of the RGC population survived. Finally in the latanoprost+brimonidine combined group, IOP was significantly reduced by 25% and 94.4+/-2.2% of RGCs survived. Surprisingly, whereas EVC led to a 6% increase in RGC soma size, brimonidine treatment was associated with a 9% reduction in the soma size of RGCs at 12 weeks. We conclude that brimonidine exerts a neuroprotective effect via a mechanism which is independent of IOP reduction. These findings indicate that cell survival in glaucoma may be enhanced by neuroprotective strategies which are independent of IOP reduction. No synergistic neuroprotective effect was observed when both treatments were applied simultaneously.

  12. Chronic nerve injury-induced Mas receptor expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons alleviates neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuanting; Qin, Yue; Liu, Tuanjiang; Hao, Dingjun

    2015-12-01

    Neuropathic pain, which is characterized by hyperalgesia, allodynia and spontaneous pain, is one of the most painful symptoms that can be experienced in the clinic. It often occurs as a result of injury to the peripheral nerves, dorsal root ganglion (DRG), spinal cord or brain. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) plays an important role in nociception. As an essential component of the RAS, the angiotensin (Ang)-(1-7)/Mas axis may be involved in antinociception. The aim of the present study was to explore the expression pattern of Mas in DRG neurons following chronic nerve injury and examine the effects of Mas inhibition and activation on neuropathic pain in a chronic constriction injury (CCI) rat model. The results showed, that compared with the sham group, CCI caused a time-dependent induction of Mas expression at both the mRNA and the protein levels in DRG neurons. Consistent with the results, isolated DRG neurons showed a time-dependent increase in Ang-(1-7) binding on the cell membrane following the CCI surgery, but not the sham surgery. Compared with the sham control groups, CCI significantly decreased the paw withdrawal latency and threshold, and this was markedly improved and aggravated by intrathecal injection of the selective Mas agonist Ang-(1-7) and the selective Mas inhibitor D-Pro7-Ang-(1-7), respectively. In conclusion, this study has provided the first evidence, to the best of our knowledge, that the Mas expression in DRG neurons is time-dependently induced by chronic nerve injury and that the intrathecal activation and inhibition of Mas can improve and aggravate CCI-induced neuropathic pain, respectively. This study has provided novel insights into the pathophysiological process of neuropathic pain and suggests that the Ang-(1-7)/Mas axis could be an effective therapeutic target for neuropathic pain, warranting further study.

  13. Role of TRPM8 in dorsal root ganglion in nerve injury-induced chronic pain

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    Su Lin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic neuropathic pain is an intractable pain with few effective treatments. Moderate cold stimulation can relieve pain, and this may be a novel train of thought for exploring new methods of analgesia. Transient receptor potential melastatin 8 (TRPM8 ion channel has been proposed to be an important molecular sensor for cold. Here we investigate the role of TRPM8 in the mechanism of chronic neuropathic pain using a rat model of chronic constriction injury (CCI to the sciatic nerve. Results Mechanical allodynia, cold and thermal hyperalgesia of CCI rats began on the 4th day following surgery and maintained at the peak during the period from the 10th to 14th day after operation. The level of TRPM8 protein in L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG ipsilateral to nerve injury was significantly increased on the 4th day after CCI, and reached the peak on the 10th day, and remained elevated on the 14th day following CCI. This time course of the alteration of TRPM8 expression was consistent with that of CCI-induced hyperalgesic response of the operated hind paw. Besides, activation of cold receptor TRPM8 of CCI rats by intrathecal application of menthol resulted in the inhibition of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia and the enhancement of cold hyperalgesia. In contrast, downregulation of TRPM8 protein in ipsilateral L5 DRG of CCI rats by intrathecal TRPM8 antisense oligonucleotide attenuated cold hyperalgesia, but it had no effect on CCI-induced mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia. Conclusions TRPM8 may play different roles in mechanical allodynia, cold and thermal hyperalgesia that develop after nerve injury, and it is a very promising research direction for the development of new therapies for chronic neuroapthic pain.

  14. Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ glows in superior cervical ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jun YAO; Cai-hong WU; Jie LIU; Zhuan ZHOU; He-ping CHENG; Gang WANG; Kun-fu OU-YANG; Chao-liang WEI; Xian-hua WANG; Shi-rong WANG; Wei YAO; Hong-ping HUANG; Jian-hong LUO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an integral component of neuronal Ca2+ signaling. The present study is to investigate properties of local Ca2+ release events in superior cervical ganglion (SCO) neurons. Methods: Primary cultured SCO neurons were prepared from neonatal rats (P3-P7). Low concentration of caffeine was used to induce Ca2+ release from the ER Ca2+ store, and intracellular Ca2+ was recorded by high-resolution line scan confocal imaging and the Ca2+ indicator Fluo-4. Results: Two populations of local Ca2+ release events with distinct temporal characteristics were evoked by 1.5 mmol/L caffeine near the surface membrane in the soma and the neurites of SCG neurons. Brief events similar to classic Ca2+ sparks lasted a few hundreds of milliseconds, whereas long-lasting events displayed duration up to tens of seconds. Typical somatic and neurite sparks were of 0.3- and 0.52-fold increase in local Fluo-4 fluorescence, respectively. Typical Ca2+ glows were brighter (△F/F0 approximately 0.6), but were highly confined in space. The half maximum of full duration of neurite sparks was much longer than those in the soma (685 vs 381 ms). Conclusion: Co-existence of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ glows in SCG neurons indicates distinctive local regulation of Ca2+ release kinetics. The local Ca2+ signals of variable, site-specific temporal length may bear important implications in encoding a "memory" of the trigger signal.

  15. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists modify the pyloric output of the crustacean stomatogastric ganglion.

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    Pérez-Acevedo, Nivia L; Krenz, Wulf D

    2005-11-16

    We have studied the effects of groups I, II, and III metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) agonists and antagonists on pyloric activity in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the Caribbean spiny lobster Panulirus argus. We have found that agonists for all three groups of mGluRs modify the pyloric output. The group I agonist, l-quisqualic acid (l-QA), activated the pyloric central pattern generator (CPG). When the pyloric rhythm was partially suppressed by sucrose-block of input fibers in the stomatogastric nerve (stn), l-QA accelerated the rhythmic activity. In addition, the number of spike discharges was increased in pyloric motoneurons: pyloric (PY), and lateral pyloric (LP). In completely blocked preparations, a slow pyloric rhythm was initiated by l-QA. Groups II and III agonists exerted an inhibitory effect on pyloric activity. The group II agonist, (2S,1'S,2'S)-2-(Carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-I), decreased both the frequency of the pyloric rhythm and the number of spike discharges in the motoneurons: ventricular dilator (VD), PY, and LP. The effects of L-CCG-I were dose-dependent. The group III agonist, l-(+)-2-Amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (l-AP4), slightly decreased the frequency of the pyloric rhythm and suppressed spike discharges in the VD neuron. All effects of mGluR agonists were reversible. The effect of l-QA was blocked by the broad spectrum mGluR antagonist (S)-Methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG). The inhibitory effect of L-CCG-I was prevented by MCPG and by the group II/III mGluR antagonist (RS)-alpha-Methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG), and was partially blocked by the group II mGluR antagonist (RS)-1-amino-5-phosphonoindan-1-carboxylic acid (APICA). The inhibitory effect of l-AP4 was blocked by MPPG and partially blocked by APICA.

  16. Enrichment and proteomic analysis of plasma membrane from rat dorsal root ganglions

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    Lin Yong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons are primary sensory neurons that conduct neuronal impulses related to pain, touch and temperature senses. Plasma membrane (PM of DRG cells plays important roles in their functions. PM proteins are main performers of the functions. However, mainly due to the very low amount of DRG that leads to the difficulties in PM sample collection, few proteomic analyses on the PM have been reported and it is a subject that demands further investigation. Results By using aqueous polymer two-phase partition in combination with high salt and high pH washing, PMs were efficiently enriched, demonstrated by western blot analysis. A total of 954 non-redundant proteins were identified from the plasma membrane-enriched preparation with CapLC-MS/MS analysis subsequent to protein separation by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE or shotgun digestion. 205 (21.5% of the identified proteins were unambiguously assigned as PM proteins, including a large number of signal proteins, receptors, ion channel and transporters. Conclusion The aqueous polymer two-phase partition is a simple, rapid and relatively inexpensive method. It is well suitable for the purification of PMs from small amount of tissues. Therefore, it is reasonable for the DRG PM to be enriched by using aqueous two-phase partition as a preferred method. Proteomic analysis showed that DRG PM was rich in proteins involved in the fundamental biological processes including material exchange, energy transformation and information transmission, etc. These data would help to our further understanding of the fundamental DRG functions.

  17. Anatomic approach for ganglionic plexi ablation in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.

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    Katritsis, Demosthenes; Giazitzoglou, Eleftherios; Sougiannis, Demetrios; Goumas, Nicolaos; Paxinos, George; Camm, A John

    2008-08-01

    There is evidence that parasympathetic denervation may prevent atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrences. This study aimed at applying an anatomic approach for ablation of atrial ganglionic plexi (GPs) in patients with paroxysmal AF. Nineteen patients with symptomatic, paroxysmal AF underwent anatomically guided radiofrequency ablation at the location of the 4 main left atrial GPs and were prospectively assessed for recurrence of AF or other atrial arrhythmia. This group was compared with 19 age- and gender-matched patients who previously underwent conventional circumferential pulmonary vein ablation. All ablation procedures were uneventful. Circumferential and GP ablations were accomplished with a radiofrequency delivery time of 28 +/- 5 versus 18 +/- 3 min (p <0.001) and a fluoroscopy time of 31 +/- 5 versus 18 +/- 5 min (p <0.001), respectively. Parasympathetic reflexes during radiofrequency ablation were elicited in 4 patients (21%). Arrhythmia recurred in 7 patients (37%) with circumferential ablation and 14 patients (74%) with GP ablation, during 1-year follow-up (p for log-rank test = 0.017). In 2 patients with GP ablation, left atrial flutters were documented in addition to AF during follow-up. Patients who underwent GP ablation had an almost 2.5 times higher risk of AF recurrence compared with those who underwent circumferential ablation (hazard ratio 2.6, 95% confidence interval 1.0 to 6.6, p = 0.038). In conclusion, anatomically guided GP ablation is feasible and safe in the electrophysiology laboratory, but this approach yields inferior clinical results compared with circumferential ablation.

  18. Reprogramming amacrine and photoreceptor progenitors into retinal ganglion cells by replacing Neurod1 with Atoh7.

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    Mao, Chai-An; Cho, Jang-Hyeon; Wang, Jing; Gao, Zhiguang; Pan, Ping; Tsai, Wen-Wei; Frishman, Laura J; Klein, William H

    2013-02-01

    The specification of the seven retinal cell types from a common pool of retina progenitor cells (RPCs) involves complex interactions between the intrinsic program and the environment. The proneural basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcriptional regulators are key components for the intrinsic programming of RPCs and are essential for the formation of the diverse retinal cell types. However, the extent to which an RPC can re-adjust its inherent program and the mechanisms through which the expression of a particular bHLH factor influences RPC fate is unclear. Previously, we have shown that Neurod1 inserted into the Atoh7 locus activates the retinal ganglion cell (RGC) program in Atoh7-expressing RPCs but not in Neurod1-expressing RPCs, suggesting that Atoh7-expressing RPCs are not able to adopt the cell fate determined by Neurod1, but rather are pre-programmed to produce RGCs. Here, we show that Neurod1-expressing RPCs, which are destined to produce amacrine and photoreceptor cells, can be re-programmed into RGCs when Atoh7 is inserted into the Neurod1 locus. These results suggest that Atoh7 acts dominantly to convert a RPC subpopulation not destined for an RGC fate to adopt that fate. Thus, Atoh7-expressing and Neurod1-expressing RPCs are intrinsically different in their behavior. Additionally, ChIP-Seq analysis identified an Atoh7-dependent enhancer within the intronic region of Nrxn3. The enhancer recognized and used Atoh7 in the developing retina to regulate expression of Nrxn3, but could be forced to use Neurod1 when placed in a different regulatory context. The results indicate that Atoh7 and Neurod1 activate distinct sets of genes in vivo, despite their common DNA-binding element.

  19. A five-primary photostimulator suitable for studying intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cell functions in humans.

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    Cao, Dingcai; Nicandro, Nathaniel; Barrionuevo, Pablo A

    2015-01-26

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) can respond to light directly through self-contained photopigment, melanopsin. IpRGCs also receive synaptic inputs from rods and cones. Thus, studying ipRGC functions requires a novel photostimulating method that can account for all of the photoreceptor inputs. Here, we introduced an inexpensive LED-based five-primary photostimulator that can control the excitations of rods, S-, M-, L-cones, and melanopsin-containing ipRGCs in humans at constant background photoreceptor excitation levels, a critical requirement for studying the adaptation behavior of ipRGCs with rod, cone, or melanopsin input. We described the theory and technical aspects (including optics, electronics, software, and calibration) of the five-primary photostimulator. Then we presented two preliminary studies using the photostimulator we have implemented to measure melanopsin-mediated pupil responses and temporal contrast sensitivity function (TCSF). The results showed that the S-cone input to pupil responses was antagonistic to the L-, M- or melanopsin inputs, consistent with an S-OFF and (L + M)-ON response property of primate ipRGCs (Dacey et al., 2005). In addition, the melanopsin-mediated TCSF had a distinctive pattern compared with L + M or S-cone mediated TCSF. Other than controlling individual photoreceptor excitation independently, the five-primary photostimulator has the flexibility in presenting stimuli modulating any combination of photoreceptor excitations, which allows researchers to study the mechanisms by which ipRGCs combine various photoreceptor inputs. © 2015 ARVO.

  20. The role of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in nonimage-forming responses to light

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    Warthen DM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Daniel M Warthen,1,2 Ignacio Provencio11Department of Biology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA; 2Department of Pharmacology, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, USAAbstract: Light exerts many effects on behavior and physiology. These effects can be characterized as either image-forming or nonimage-forming (NIF visual processes. Image-forming vision refers to the process of detecting objects and organisms in the environment and distinguishing their physical characteristics, such as size, shape, and direction of motion. NIF vision, in contrast, refers to effects of light that are independent of fine spatiotemporal vision. NIF effects are many and varied, ranging from modulation of basal physiology, such as heart rate and body temperature, to changes in higher functions, such as mood and cognitive performance. In mammals, many NIF effects of light are dependent upon the inner retinal photopigment melanopsin and the cells in which melanopsin is expressed, the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs. The ipRGCs project broadly throughout the brain. Many of these projections terminate in areas known to mediate NIF effects, while others terminate in regions whose link to photoreception remains to be established. Additionally, the presence of ipRGC projections to areas of the brain with no known link to photoreception suggests the existence of additional ipRGC-mediated NIF effects. This review summarizes the known NIF effects of light and the role of melanopsin and ipRGCs in driving these effects, with an eye toward stimulating further investigation of the many and varied effects of light on physiology and behavior.Keywords: amygdala, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, melanopsin, opsin, optic nerve, retina

  1. Mice deficient of glutamatergic signaling from intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells exhibit abnormal circadian photoentrainment.

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    Nicole Purrier

    Full Text Available Several aspects of behavior and physiology, such as sleep and wakefulness, blood pressure, body temperature, and hormone secretion exhibit daily oscillations known as circadian rhythms. These circadian rhythms are orchestrated by an intrinsic biological clock in the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN of the hypothalamus which is adjusted to the daily environmental cycles of day and night by the process of photoentrainment. In mammals, the neuronal signal for photoentrainment arises from a small subset of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs that send a direct projection to the SCN. ipRGCs also mediate other non-image-forming (NIF visual responses such as negative masking of locomotor activity by light, and the pupillary light reflex (PLR via co-release of neurotransmitters glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP from their synaptic terminals. The relative contribution of each neurotransmitter system for the circadian photoentrainment and other NIF visual responses is still unresolved. We investigated the role of glutamatergic neurotransmission for circadian photoentrainment and NIF behaviors by selective ablation of ipRGC glutamatergic synaptic transmission in mice. Mutant mice displayed delayed re-entrainment to a 6 h phase shift (advance or delay in the light cycle and incomplete photoentrainment in a symmetrical skeleton photoperiod regimen (1 h light pulses between 11 h dark periods. Circadian rhythmicity in constant darkness also was reduced in some mutant mice. Other NIF responses such as the PLR and negative masking responses to light were also partially attenuated. Overall, these results suggest that glutamate from ipRGCs drives circadian photoentrainment and negative masking responses to light.

  2. Morphological and physiological species-dependent characteristics of the rodent Grueneberg ganglion

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    Julien eBrechbühl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the mouse, the Grueneberg ganglion (GG is an olfactory subsystem implicated both in chemo- and thermo-sensing. It is specifically involved in the recognition of volatile danger cues such as alarm pheromones and structurally-related predator scents. No evidence for these GG sensory functions has been reported yet in other rodent species. In this study, we used a combination of histological and physiological techniques to verify the presence of a GG and investigate its function in the rat, hamster and gerbil comparing with the mouse. By scanning and transmitted electron microscopy, we found isolated or groups of large GG cells of different shapes that in spite of their gross anatomical similarities, display important structural differences between species. We performed a comparative and morphological study focusing on the conserved olfactory features of these cells. We found fine ciliary processes, mostly wrapped in ensheating glial cells, in variable number of clusters deeply invaginated in the neuronal soma. Interestingly, the glial wrapping, the amount of microtubules and their distribution in the ciliary processes were different between rodents. Using immunohistochemistry, we were able to detect the expression of known GG proteins, such as the membrane guanylyl cyclase G and the cyclic nucleotide-gated channel A3. Both the expression and the subcellular localization of these signaling proteins were found to be species-dependent. Calcium imaging experiments on acute tissue slice preparations from rodent GG demonstrated that the chemo- and thermo-evoked neuronal responses were different between species. Thus GG neurons from mice and rats displayed both chemo- and thermo-sensing, while hamsters and gerbils showed profound differences in their sensitivities. We suggest that the integrative comparison between the structural morphologies, the sensory properties and the ethological contexts supports species-dependent GG features prompted by the

  3. Neuroprotective effect of peroxiredoxin 6 against hypoxia-induced retinal ganglion cell damage

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    Kumar Anil

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability to respond to changes in the extra-intracellular environment is prerequisite for cell survival. Cellular responses to the environment include elevating defense systems, such as the antioxidant defense system. Hypoxia-evoked reactive oxygen species (ROS-driven oxidative stress is an underlying mechanism of retinal ganglion cell (RGC death that leads to blinding disorders. The protein peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 plays a pleiotropic role in negatively regulating death signaling in response to stressors, and thereby stabilizes cellular homeostasis. Results We have shown that RGCs exposed to hypoxia (1% or hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride display reduced expression of PRDX6 with higher ROS expression and activation of NF-κB. These cells undergo apoptosis, while cells with over-expression of PRDX6 demonstrate resistance against hypoxia-driven RGC death. The RGCs exposed to hypoxia either with 1% oxygen or cobalt chloride (0-400 μM, revealed ~30%-70% apoptotic cell death after 48 and 72 h of exposure. Western analysis and real-time PCR showed elevated expression of PRDX6 during hypoxia at 24 h, while PRDX6 protein and mRNA expression declined from 48 h onwards following hypoxia exposure. Concomitant with this, RGCs showed increased ROS expression and activation of NF-κB with IkB phosphorylation/degradation, as examined with H2DCF-DA and transactivation assays. These hypoxia-induced adverse reactions could be reversed by over-expression of PRDX6. Conclusion Because an abundance of PRDX6 in cells was able to attenuate hypoxia-induced RGC death, the protein could possibly be developed as a novel therapeutic agent acting to postpone RGC injury and delay the progression of glaucoma and other disorders caused by the increased-ROS-generated death signaling related to hypoxia.

  4. α-Lipoic acid antioxidant treatment limits glaucoma-related retinal ganglion cell death and dysfunction.

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    Inman, Denise M; Lambert, Wendi S; Calkins, David J; Horner, Philip J

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including glaucoma. However, due to the lack of clinically relevant models and expense of long-term testing, few studies have modeled antioxidant therapy for prevention of neurodegeneration. We investigated the contribution of oxidative stress to the pathogenesis of glaucoma in the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma. Similar to other neurodegenerative diseases, we observed lipid peroxidation and upregulation of oxidative stress-related mRNA and protein in DBA/2J retina. To test the role of oxidative stress in disease progression, we chose to deliver the naturally occurring, antioxidant α-lipoic acid (ALA) to DBA/2J mice in their diet. We used two paradigms for ALA delivery: an intervention paradigm in which DBA/2J mice at 6 months of age received ALA in order to intervene in glaucoma development, and a prevention paradigm in which DBA/2J mice were raised on a diet supplemented with ALA, with the goal of preventing glaucoma development. At 10 and 12 months of age (after 4 and 11 months of dietary ALA respectively), we measured changes in genes and proteins related to oxidative stress, retinal ganglion cell (RGC) number, axon transport, and axon number and integrity. Both ALA treatment paradigms showed increased antioxidant gene and protein expression, increased protection of RGCs and improved retrograde transport compared to control. Measures of lipid peroxidation, protein nitrosylation, and DNA oxidation in retina verified decreased oxidative stress in the prevention and intervention paradigms. These data demonstrate the utility of dietary therapy for reducing oxidative stress and improving RGC survival in glaucoma.

  5. Superior Cervical Sympathetic Ganglion: Normal Imaging Appearance on 3T-MRI

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    Lee, Joo Yeon; Lee, Jeong Hyun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Joon Seon; Song, Min Jeong [Department of Pathology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Seung-Jun [Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Ra Gyoung [Department of Radiology, Catholic Kwandong University International St. Mary' s Hospital, Catholic Kwandong University College of Medicine, Incheon 22711 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Seung Won; Park, Ji Eun [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of); Heo, Young Jin [Department of Radiology, Busan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 47392 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Young Jun; Baek, Jung Hwan [Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul 05505 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To identify superior cervical sympathetic ganglion (SCSG) and describe their characteristic MR appearance using 3T-MRI. In this prospective study, we recruited 53 consecutive patients without history of head and neck irradiation. Using anatomic location based on literature review, both sides of the neck were evaluated to identify SCSGs in consensus. SCSGs were divided into definite (medial to internal carotid artery [ICA] and lateral to longus capitis muscle [LCM]) and probable SCSGs based on relative location to ICA and LCM. Two readers evaluated signal characteristics including intraganglionic hypointensity of all SCSGs and relative location of probable SCSGs. Interrater and intrarater agreements were quantified using unweighted kappa. Ninety-one neck sites in 53 patients were evaluated after exclusion of 15 neck sites with pathology. Definite SCSGs were identified at 66 (73%) sites, and probable SCSGs were found in 25 (27%). Probable SCSGs were located anterior to LCM in 16 (18%), lateral to ICA in 6 (7%), and posterior to ICA in 3 (3%). Intraganglionic hypointensity was identified in 82 (90%) on contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images. There was no statistical difference in the relative location between definite and probable SCSGs of the right and left sides with intragnalionic hypointensity on difference pulse sequences. Interrater and intrarater agreements on the location and intraganglionic hypointensity were excellent (κ-value, 0.749–1.000). 3T-MRI identified definite SCSGs at 73% of neck sites and varied location of the remaining SCSGs. Intraganglionic hypointensity was a characteristic feature of SCSGs.

  6. Superior cervical sympathetic ganglion: Normal imaging appearance on 3T-MRI

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    Lee, Joo Yeon; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Song, Joon Seon [Dept. of Radiology, and Research Institute of Radiology, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-09-15

    To identify superior cervical sympathetic ganglion (SCSG) and describe their characteristic MR appearance using 3T-MRI. In this prospective study, we recruited 53 consecutive patients without history of head and neck irradiation. Using anatomic location based on literature review, both sides of the neck were evaluated to identify SCSGs in consensus. SCSGs were divided into definite (medial to internal carotid artery [ICA] and lateral to longus capitis muscle [LCM]) and probable SCSGs based on relative location to ICA and LCM. Two readers evaluated signal characteristics including intraganglionic hypointensity of all SCSGs and relative location of probable SCSGs. Interrater and intrarater agreements were quantified using unweighted kappa. Ninety-one neck sites in 53 patients were evaluated after exclusion of 15 neck sites with pathology. Definite SCSGs were identified at 66 (73%) sites, and probable SCSGs were found in 25 (27%). Probable SCSGs were located anterior to LCM in 16 (18%), lateral to ICA in 6 (7%), and posterior to ICA in 3 (3%). Intraganglionic hypointensity was identified in 82 (90%) on contrast-enhanced fat-suppressed T1-weighted images. There was no statistical difference in the relative location between definite and probable SCSGs of the right and left sides with intragnalionic hypointensity on difference pulse sequences. Interrater and intrarater agreements on the location and intraganglionic hypointensity were excellent (κ-value, 0.749–1.000). 3T-MRI identified definite SCSGs at 73% of neck sites and varied location of the remaining SCSGs. Intraganglionic hypointensity was a characteristic feature of SCSGs.

  7. Dietary grape seed polyphenols repress neuron and glia activation in trigeminal ganglion and trigeminal nucleus caudalis

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    Durham Paul L

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation and pain associated with temporomandibular joint disorder, a chronic disease that affects 15% of the adult population, involves activation of trigeminal ganglion nerves and development of peripheral and central sensitization. Natural products represent an underutilized resource in the pursuit of safe and effective ways to treat chronic inflammatory diseases. The goal of this study was to investigate effects of grape seed extract on neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis in response to persistent temporomandibular joint inflammation. Sprague Dawley rats were pretreated with 200 mg/kg/d MegaNatural-BP grape seed extract for 14 days prior to bilateral injections of complete Freund's adjuvant into the temporomandibular joint capsule. Results In response to grape seed extract, basal expression of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase 1 was elevated in neurons and glia in trigeminal ganglia and trigeminal nucleus caudalis, and expression of the glutamate aspartate transporter was increased in spinal glia. Rats on a normal diet injected with adjuvant exhibited greater basal levels of phosphorylated-p38 in trigeminal ganglia neurons and spinal neurons and microglia. Similarly, immunoreactive levels of OX-42 in microglia and glial fibrillary acidic protein in astrocytes were greatly increased in response to adjuvant. However, adjuvant-stimulated levels of phosphorylated-p38, OX-42, and glial fibrillary acidic protein were significantly repressed in extract treated animals. Furthermore, grape seed extract suppressed basal expression of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide in spinal neurons. Conclusions Results from our study provide evidence that grape seed extract may be beneficial as a natural therapeutic option for temporomandibular joint disorders by suppressing development of peripheral and central sensitization.

  8. Citral sensing by Transient [corrected] receptor potential channels in dorsal root ganglion neurons.

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    Stephanie C Stotz

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels mediate key aspects of taste, smell, pain, temperature sensation, and pheromone detection. To deepen our understanding of TRP channel physiology, we require more diverse pharmacological tools. Citral, a bioactive component of lemongrass, is commonly used as a taste enhancer, as an odorant in perfumes, and as an insect repellent. Here we report that citral activates TRP channels found in sensory neurons (TRPV1 and TRPV3, TRPM8, and TRPA1, and produces long-lasting inhibition of TRPV1-3 and TRPM8, while transiently blocking TRPV4 and TRPA1. Sustained citral inhibition is independent of internal calcium concentration, but is state-dependent, developing only after TRP channel opening. Citral's actions as a partial agonist are not due to cysteine modification of the channels nor are they a consequence of citral's stereoisoforms. The isolated aldehyde and alcohol cis and trans enantiomers (neral, nerol, geranial, and geraniol each reproduce citral's actions. In juvenile rat dorsal root ganglion neurons, prolonged citral inhibition of native TRPV1 channels enabled the separation of TRPV2 and TRPV3 currents. We find that TRPV2 and TRPV3 channels are present in a high proportion of these neurons (94% respond to 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate, consistent with our immunolabeling experiments and previous in situ hybridization studies. The TRPV1 activation requires residues in transmembrane segments two through four of the voltage-sensor domain, a region previously implicated in capsaicin activation of TRPV1 and analogous menthol activation of TRPM8. Citral's broad spectrum and prolonged sensory inhibition may prove more useful than capsaicin for allodynia, itch, or other types of pain involving superficial sensory nerves and skin.

  9. Central projections of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells in the macaque monkey.

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    Hannibal, J; Kankipati, L; Strang, C E; Peterson, B B; Dacey, D; Gamlin, P D

    2014-07-01

    Circadian rhythms generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) are entrained to the environmental light/dark cycle via intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) expressing the photopigment melanopsin and the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP). The ipRGCs regulate other nonimage-forming visual functions such as the pupillary light reflex, masking behavior, and light-induced melatonin suppression. To evaluate whether PACAP-immunoreactive retinal projections are useful as a marker for central projection of ipRGCs in the monkey brain, we characterized the occurrence of PACAP in melanopsin-expressing ipRGCs and in the retinal target areas in the brain visualized by the anterograde tracer cholera toxin subunit B (CtB) in combination with PACAP staining. In the retina, PACAP and melanopsin were found to be costored in 99% of melanopsin-expressing cells characterized as inner and outer stratifying melanopsin RGCs. Two macaque monkeys were anesthetized and received a unilateral intravitreal injection of CtB. Bilateral retinal projections containing colocalized CtB and PACAP immunostaining were identified in the SCN, the lateral geniculate complex including the pregeniculate nucleus, the pretectal olivary nucleus, the nucleus of the optic tract, the brachium of the superior colliculus, and the superior colliculus. In conclusion, PACAP-immunoreactive projections with colocalized CtB represent retinal projections of ipRGCs in the macaque monkey, supporting previous retrograde tracer studies demonstrating that melanopsin-containing retinal projections reach areas in the primate brain involved in both image- and nonimage-forming visual processing.

  10. Alcohol percutaneous neurolysis of the sphenopalatine ganglion in the management of refractory cranio-facial pain

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    Kastler, Adrian [Grenoble University Hospital, Neuroradiology Department, Grenoble (France); Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory, EA4268, IFR133, Besancon (France); Cadel, Gilles; Gory, Guillaume [Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory, EA4268, IFR133, Besancon (France); Comte, Alexandre [University Hospital Besancon, Functional Imaging Research Department, Besancon (France); Piccand, Veronique [University Hospital Jean Minjoz, Pain Evaluation and Treatment Unit, Besancon (France); Tavernier, Laurent [Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory, EA4268, IFR133, Besancon (France); University Hospital Jean Minjoz, Head and Neck Surgery-Otolaryngology Unit, Besancon (France); Kastler, Bruno [Franche Comte University, I4S Laboratory, EA4268, IFR133, Besancon (France); University Hospital Jean Minjoz, Interventional Pain Management Unit, Besancon (France)

    2014-07-15

    The sphenopalatine ganglion (SPN) has been proven to be involved in various types of facial pain syndromes. Management of these cranio-facial pain syndromes can be challenging, and existing specific treatments are sometimes inefficient and may fail. The purpose of this study is to describe and evaluate alcohol SPN in the management of cranio-facial pain. Forty-two patients suffering from refractory facial pain who underwent 58 consecutive SPN were included in this study between 2000 and 2013. Patients were divided into three groups: group ''cluster headache'' (CH), group ''persistent idiopathic facial pain'' (PFIP), and group ''Other''. Pain was assessed using Visual Analogue Scale scores (measured immediately before and after procedure and at regular intervals following the procedure). Alcohol SPN was considered to be effective when pain relief was equal to or greater than 50 % and lasting for at least 1 month. All procedures were realized ambulatory under CT guidance and consisted of an injection of 1 ml of absolute alcohol. Overall efficacy rate of alcohol SPN was 67.2 %, with mean pain relief duration of 10.3 months. Procedure was graded either not painful or tolerable by patients in 64.2 %. Analysis showed a higher efficacy rate in the groups CH (76.5 %) and PFIP (85.7 %) compared to the group Other (40 %). No difference was found between groups regarding the recurrence rate. Alcohol SPN under CT guidance appears as a safe and effective treatment of refractory facial pain, especially in cases of cluster headache and persistent idiopathic facial pain. (orig.)

  11. The morphology and intrinsic excitability of developing mouse retinal ganglion cells.

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    Juan Qu

    Full Text Available The retinal ganglion cells (RGCs have diverse morphology and physiology. Although some studies show that correlations between morphological properties and physiological properties exist in cat RGCs, these properties are much less distinct and their correlations are unknown in mouse RGCs. In this study, using three-dimensional digital neuron reconstruction, we systematically analyzed twelve morphological parameters of mouse RGCs as they developed in the first four postnatal weeks. The development of these parameters fell into three different patterns and suggested that contact from bipolar cells and eye opening might play important roles in RGC morphological development. Although there has been a general impression that the morphological parameters are not independent, such as RGCs with larger dendritic fields usually have longer but sparser dendrites, there was not systematic study and statistical analysis proving it. We used Pearson's correlation coefficients to determine the relationship among these morphological parameters and demonstrated that many morphological parameters showed high statistical correlation. In the same cells we also measured seven physiological parameters using whole-cell patch-clamp recording, focusing on intrinsic excitability. We previously reported the increase in intrinsic excitability in mouse RGCs during early postnatal development. Here we showed that strong correlations also existed among many physiological parameters that measure the intrinsic excitability. However, Pearson's correlation coefficient revealed very limited correlation across morphological and physiological parameters. In addition, principle component analysis failed to separate RGCs into clusters using combined morphological and physiological parameters. Therefore, despite strong correlations within the morphological parameters and within the physiological parameters, postnatal mouse RGCs had only limited correlation between morphology and

  12. Reactive nucleolar and Cajal body responses to proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons.

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    Palanca, Ana; Casafont, Iñigo; Berciano, María T; Lafarga, Miguel

    2014-06-01

    The dysfunction of the ubiquitin proteasome system has been related to a broad array of neurodegenerative disorders in which the accumulation of misfolded protein aggregates causes proteotoxicity. The ability of proteasome inhibitors to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis has emerged as a powerful strategy for cancer therapy. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor used as an antineoplastic drug, although its neurotoxicity frequently causes a severe sensory peripheral neuropathy. In this study we used a rat model of bortezomib treatment to study the nucleolar and Cajal body responses to the proteasome inhibition in sensory ganglion neurons that are major targets of bortezomib-induced neurotoxicity. Treatment with bortezomib induced dose-dependent dissociation of protein synthesis machinery (chromatolysis) and nuclear retention of poly(A) RNA granules resulting in neuronal dysfunction. However, as a compensatory response to the proteotoxic stress, both nucleoli and Cajal bodies exhibited reactive changes. These include an increase in the number and size of nucleoli, strong nucleolar incorporation of the RNA precursor 5'-fluorouridine, and increased expression of both 45S rRNA and genes encoding nucleolar proteins UBF, fibrillarin and B23. Taken together, these findings appear to reflect the activation of the nucleolar transcription in response to proteotoxic stress Furthermore, the number of Cajal bodies, a parameter related to transcriptional activity, increases upon proteasome inhibition. We propose that nucleoli and Cajal bodies are important targets in the signaling pathways that are activated by the proteotoxic stress response to proteasome inhibition. The coordinating activity of these two organelles in the production of snRNA, snoRNA and rRNA may contribute to neuronal survival after proteasome inhibition. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Role of the Nucleolus in Human Disease.

  13. Lentiviral gene transfer into the dorsal root ganglion of adult rats

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    Park Frank

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lentivector-mediated gene delivery into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG is a promising method for exploring pain pathophysiology and for genetic treatment of chronic neuropathic pain. In this study, a series of modified lentivector particles with different cellular promoters, envelope glycoproteins, and viral accessory proteins were generated to evaluate the requirements for efficient transduction into neuronal cells in vitro and adult rat DRG in vivo. Results In vitro, lentivectors expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under control of the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α promoter and pseudotyped with the conventional vesicular stomatitis virus G protein (VSV-G envelope exhibited the best performance in the transfer of EGFP into an immortalized DRG sensory neuron cell line at low multiplicities of infection (MOIs, and into primary cultured DRG neurons at higher MOIs. In vivo, injection of either first or second-generation EF1α-EGFP lentivectors directly into adult rat DRGs led to transduction rates of 19 ± 9% and 20 ± 8% EGFP-positive DRG neurons, respectively, detected at 4 weeks post injection. Transduced cells included a full range of neuronal phenotypes, including myelinated neurons as well as both non-peptidergic and peptidergic nociceptive unmyelinated neurons. Conclusion VSV-G pseudotyped lentivectors containing the human elongation factor 1α (EF1α-EGFP expression cassette demonstrated relatively efficient transduction to sensory neurons following direct injection into the DRG. These results clearly show the potential of lentivectors as a viable system for delivering target genes into DRGs to explore basic mechanisms of neuropathic pain, with the potential for future clinical use in treating chronic pain.

  14. Estrous Cycle Induces Peripheral Sensitization in Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons: An Animal Model of Menstrual Migraine.

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    Saleeon, Wachirapong; Jansri, Ukkrit; Srikiatkhachorn, Anan; Bongsebandhu-phubhakdi, Saknan

    2016-02-01

    Many women experience menstrual migraines that develop into recurrent migraine attacks during menstruation. In the human menstrual cycle, the estrogen level fluctuates according to changes in the follicular and luteal phases. The rat estrous cycle is used as an animal model to study the effects of estrogen fluctuation. To investigate whether the estrous cycle is involved in migraine development by comparing the neuronal excitability of trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons in each stage of the estrous cycle. Female rats were divided into four experimental groups based on examinations of the cytologies of vaginal smears, and serum analyses of estrogen levels following each stage of the estrous cycle. The rats in each stage of the estrous cycle were anesthetized and their trigeminal ganglia were removed The collections of trigeminal ganglia were cultured for two to three hours, after which whole-cell patch clamp experiments were recorded to estimate the electrophysiological properties of the TG neurons. There were many vaginal epithelial cells and high estrogen levels in the proestrus and estrus stages of the estrous cycle. Electrophysiological studies revealed that the TG neurons in the proestrus and estrus stages exhibited significantly lower thresholds of stimulation, and significant increase in total spikes compared to the TG neurons that were collected in the diestrus stage. Our results revealed that high estrogen levels in the proestrus and estrus stages altered the thresholds, rheobases, and total spikes of the TG neurons. High estrogen levels in the estrous cycle induced an increase in neuronal excitability and the peripheral sensitization of TG neurons. These findings may provide an explanation for the correlation of estrogen fluctuations during the menstrual cycle with the pathogenesis of menstrual migraines.

  15. Epinephrine release from the heart during left stellate ganglion stimulation in dogs.

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    Péronnet, F; Nadeau, R; Boudreau, G; Cardinal, R; Lamontagne, D; Yamaguchi, N; De Champlain, J

    1988-04-01

    Plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) concentrations were measured (radioenzymatic assay) in blood samples simultaneously withdrawn from the aorta (Ao) and coronary sinus (CS) on 10 anesthetized dogs immediately before and during a 1-min period of electrical stimulation of the left stellate ganglion (4 V, 4 ms, 10 Hz). Heart rate and systolic blood pressure significantly increased in response to electrical stimulation (152 +/- 8 to 180 +/- 15 beats/min and 128 +/- 12 to 149 +/- 12 mmHg, mean +/- SE; P less than 0.05). Plasma NE concentrations were not significantly different in the Ao and the CS (432 +/- 110 and 319 +/- 67 pg/ml) before the stimulation, whereas a net removal of E was present across the myocardium (Ao, 172 +/- 61; CS, 71 +/- 22 pg/ml). A large NE spillover in the CS was observed during the stimulation (Ao, 1,555 +/- 513; CS, 10,583 +/- 3,753 pg/ml). A significant output of E from the myocardium was also present (Ao, 165 +/- 42; CS, 291 +/- 74 pg/ml) during the stimulation. Determination of NE and E concentrations by high-performance liquid chromatography in five of the dogs confirmed the observation made with the radioenzymatic assay, i.e., a significant uptake (66%) of blood-borne E was present across the myocardium in the control situation (Ao, 320 +/- 97; CS, 110 +/- 23 pg/ml), whereas plasma E concentrations in the CS (280 +/- 61 pg/ml) were 1.5 times the values found in Ao (184 +/- 56 pg/ml) under electrical stimulation. These observations give further support to the hypothesis that endogenous tissue E can act as a cotransmitter of sympathetic fibers.

  16. Losartan Treatment Protects Retinal Ganglion Cells and Alters Scleral Remodeling in Experimental Glaucoma.

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    Harry A Quigley

    Full Text Available To determine if oral losartan treatment decreases the retinal ganglion cell (RGC death caused by experimental intraocular pressure (IOP elevation in mice.We produced IOP increase in CD1 mice and performed unilateral optic nerve crush. Mice received oral losartan, spironolactone, enalapril, or no drug to test effects of inhibiting angiotensin receptors. IOP was monitored by Tonolab, and blood pressure was monitored by tail cuff device. RGC loss was measured in masked axon counts and RGC bodies by β-tubulin labeling. Scleral changes that could modulate RGC injury were measured including axial length, scleral thickness, and retinal layer thicknesses, pressure-strain behavior in inflation testing, and study of angiotensin receptors and pathways by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry.Losartan treatment prevented significant RGC loss (median loss = 2.5%, p = 0.13, while median loss with water, spironolactone, and enalapril treatments were 26%, 28% and 43%; p < 0.0001. The lower RGC loss with losartan was significantly less than the loss with spironolactone or enalapril (regression model p = 0.001; drug treatment group term p = 0.01. Both losartan and enalapril significantly lowered blood pressure (p< 0.001, but losartan was protective, while enalapril led to worse than water-treated RGC loss. RGC loss after crush injury was unaffected by losartan treatment (difference from control p = 0.9. Survival of RGC in cell culture was not prolonged by sartan treatment. Axonal transport blockade after 3 day IOP elevations was less in losartan-treated than in control glaucoma eyes (p = 0.007. Losartan inhibited effects of glaucoma, including reduction in extracellular signal-related kinase activity and modification of glaucoma-related changes in scleral thickness and creep under controlled IOP.The neuroprotective effect of losartan in mouse glaucoma is associated with adaptive changes in the sclera expressed at

  17. Transcorneal electrical stimulation alters morphology and survival of retinal ganglion cells after optic nerve damage.

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    Henrich-Noack, Petra; Voigt, Nadine; Prilloff, Sylvia; Fedorov, Anton; Sabel, Bernhard A

    2013-05-24

    Traumatic optic nerve injury leads to retrograde death of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), but transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES) can increase the cell survival rate. To understand the mechanisms and to further define the TES-induced effects we monitored in living animals RGC morphology and survival after optic nerve crush (ONC) in real time by using in vivo confocal neuroimaging (ICON) of the retina. ONC was performed in rats and ICON was performed before crush and on post-lesion days 3, 7 and 15 which allowed us to repeatedly record RGC number and size. TES or sham-stimulation were performed immediately after the crush and on post-injury day 11. Three days after ONC we detected a higher percentage of surviving RGCs in the TES group as compared to sham-treated controls. However, the difference was below significance level on day 7 and disappeared completely by day 15. The death rate was more variable amongst the TES-treated rats than in the control group. Morphological analysis revealed that average cell size changed significantly in the control group but not in stimulated animals and the morphological alterations of surviving neurons were smaller in TES-treated compared to control cells. In conclusion, TES delays post-traumatic cell death significantly. Moreover, we found "responder animals" which also benefited in the long-term from the treatment. Our in vivo cellular imaging results provide evidence that TES reduces ONC-associated neuronal swelling and shrinkage especially in RGCs which survived long-term. Further studies are now needed to determine the differences of responders vs. non-responders.

  18. Rac1 selective activation improves retina ganglion cell survival and regeneration.

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    Erika Lorenzetto

    Full Text Available In adult mammals, after optic nerve injury, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs do not regenerate their axons and most of them die by apoptosis within a few days. Recently, several strategies that activate neuronal intracellular pathways were proposed to prevent such degenerative processes. The rho-related small GTPase Rac1 is part of a complex, still not fully understood, intracellular signaling network, mediating in neurons many effects, including axon growth and cell survival. However, its role in neuronal survival and regeneration in vivo has not yet been properly investigated. To address this point we intravitreally injected selective cell-penetrating Rac1 mutants after optic nerve crush and studied the effect on RGC survival and axonal regeneration. We injected two well-characterized L61 constitutively active Tat-Rac1 fusion protein mutants, in which a second F37A or Y40C mutation confers selectivity in downstream signaling pathways. Results showed that, 15 days after crush, both mutants were able to improve survival and to prevent dendrite degeneration, while the one harboring the F37A mutation also improved axonal regeneration. The treatment with F37A mutant for one month did not improve the axonal elongation respect to 15 days. Furthermore, we found an increase of Pak1 T212 phosphorylation and ERK1/2 expression in RGCs after F37A treatment, whereas ERK1/2 was more activated in glial cells after Y40C administration. Our data suggest that the selective activation of distinct Rac1-dependent pathways could represent a therapeutic strategy to counteract neuronal degenerative processes in the retina.

  19. Spatially divergent cardiac responses to nicotinic stimulation of ganglionated plexus neurons in the canine heart.

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    Cardinal, René; Pagé, Pierre; Vermeulen, Michel; Ardell, Jeffrey L; Armour, J Andrew

    2009-01-28

    Ganglionated plexuses (GPs) are major constituents of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system, the final common integrator of regional cardiac control. We hypothesized that nicotinic stimulation of individual GPs exerts divergent regional influences, affecting atrial as well as ventricular functions. In 22 anesthetized canines, unipolar electrograms were recorded from 127 atrial and 127 ventricular epicardial loci during nicotine injection (100 mcg in 0.1 ml) into either the 1) right atrial (RA), 2) dorsal atrial, 3) left atrial, 4) inferior vena cava-inferior left atrial, 5) right ventricular, 6) ventral septal ventricular or 7) cranial medial ventricular (CMV) GP. In addition to sinus and AV nodal function, neural effects on atrial and ventricular repolarization were identified as changes in the area subtended by unipolar recordings under basal conditions and at maximum neurally-induced effects. Animals were studied with intact AV node or following ablation to achieve ventricular rate control. Atrial rate was affected in response to stimulation of all 7 GPs with an incidence of 50-95% of the animals among the different GPs. AV conduction was affected following stimulation of 6/7 GP with an incidence of 22-75% among GPs. Atrial and ventricular repolarization properties were affected by atrial as well as ventricular GP stimulation. Distinct regional patterns of repolarization changes were identified in response to stimulation of individual GPs. RAGP predominantly affected the RA and posterior right ventricular walls whereas CMVGP elicited biatrial and biventricular repolarization changes. Spatially divergent and overlapping cardiac regions are affected in response to nicotinic stimulation of neurons in individual GPs.

  20. Quantitative morphometric analysis of the myenteric nervous plexus ganglion structures along the human digestive tract

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    Mandić Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. All the functions of the digestive system are controlled, guided and initiated by the autonomic nervous system. A special part of this system placed in the wall of the gastrointestinal tract is known as the enteric or metasympathetic nervous system. The aim of this study was to analyse myenteric nervous plexus in different parts of the digestive tract. Methods. We examined the myenteric nervous plexus of the esophagus, stomach, duodenum, jejunum, ileum, transverse colon and rectum in tissue samples taken from 30 cadavers of persons aged 20-84 years. After standard histological processing sections were stained with hematoxylineosin, cresyl violet (CV and AgNO3 method. Multipurpose test system M42 was used in morphometric analysis. The results were analyzed by t-test and analysis of variance. Results. The number of neurons per cm2 surface was the lowest in the esophagus (2.045 ± 310.30 and the largest in the duodenum (65,511 ± 5,639. The statistical processing showed significant differences (p < 0.001 in the number of neurons between the esophagus and all other parts of the digestive tract. The maximal value of the average surface of the myenteric nervous plexus neurons was observed in the esophagus (588.93 ± 30.45 μm2 and the lowest in the stomach (296.46 ± 22.53 μm2. Conclusion. There are differences in the number of ganglion cells among different parts of the human digestive tract. The differences range from a few to several tens of thousands of neuron/cm2. The myenteric nervous plexus of the esophagus was characterized by a significantly smaller number of neurons but their bodies and nuclei are significantly larger compared to other parts of the digestive tract.