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Sample records for ptc taste sensitivity

  1. PTC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ruqaiya Hussain

    2013-07-25

    Jul 25, 2013 ... of PTC taste sensitivity among some Muslim populations of North India, as till now no detailed information is available. .... provided the basis for a new, integrative investigation of PTC .... This trait is of genetic, epidemiologic and evolutionary interest .... ABO blood group, PTC taste ability, and red-green color.

  2. Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) Tasting and Reported Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittemore, Paul B.

    1986-01-01

    The phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste test was investigated for its potential as a genetically based biological marker for depression. Results indicated PTC tasters reported significantly higher levels of depression on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) than nontasters and they scored higher on 5 of the 21 items. (Author/BL)

  3. PERCEPTION OF TASTE OF PHENYLTHIOUREA (PTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Examining 213 students of the first year at the faculty (3/4 women), 24.88% were found nontasting PTC . The differences between sexes are not...represented. With a quinine control test among nontasting, a small correlation to PTC was established. The results are in agreement with literature data. (Author)

  4. PTC

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ruqaiya Hussain

    2013-07-25

    Jul 25, 2013 ... adopted as per the sorting technique of serial dilutions of. Harris and Kalmus [16] .... ABO blood group, PTC taste ability, and red-green color · blindness. Biol Bull .... related to coffee as a dietary source of niacin. Chem Senses.

  5. Multiplex minisequencing screening for PTC genotype associated with bitter taste perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagong, Borum; Bae, Jae Woong; Rhyu, Mee Ra; Kim, Un-Kyung; Ye, Mi-Kyung

    2014-03-01

    Sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) has a bimodal distribution pattern and the genotype of the TAS2R38 gene, which is composed of combinations of three coding single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), p.A49P (c.145G>C), p.V262A (c.785T>C) and p.I296 V (c.886A>G), determines the ability or inability to taste PTC. In this study, we developed a tool for genotyping of these SNPs in the TAS2R38 gene using SNaPshot minisequencing and investigated the accuracy of the tool in 100 subjects who were genotyped by Sanger sequencing. The minor allele frequencies of the three SNPs were 0.39, and these genotypes corresponded to those determined by direct sequencing. In conclusion, we successfully developed a precise and rapid genetic tool for analysis of PTC genotype associated with bitter taste perception.

  6. The relationship between taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide and anhedonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Justin; Al-Mesaabi, Wahda; Bahusain, Eman; Mutawa, Meera

    2014-02-28

    It has been proposed that taste sensitivity to bitter compounds such as, phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP), represents a genetic marker for an increased vulnerability to depressive illness. Previous explorations of this idea have proven equivocal. This study refines and further explores this idea by focusing specifically on anhedonia (diminished hedonic capacity), a key symptom in some depressive illness, linked also with sensory pleasure. It is hypothesized that diminished PTC taste sensitivity will be associated with more general decrements in hedonic capacity (anhedonia). An opportunity sample of 198 university students were assessed using paper strips impregnated with PTC, the same participants also completed a widely used assessment of hedonic capacity, the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS). Hedonic capacity scores positively correlated with PTC taste sensitivity; specifically, heightened hedonic capacity was associated with heightened sensitivity to the bitter taste of PTC. Furthermore, modest differences were observed between those least (non-tasters) and most (supertasters) sensitive to PTC, with non-tasters reporting significantly lower hedonic capacity scores than supertasters. PTC taste sensitivity may represent a peripheral risk factor for anhedonia.

  7. Prevalence and Genetic Analysis of Bitter Taste Perception for Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) Among Some Muslim Populations of Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Ruqaiya; Shah, Ahsana; Afzal, Mohammad

    2014-04-01

    The ability to taste Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), a bitter organic compound, described as a bimodal autosomal trait is widely used to know the heritable trait in both genetic and anthropological studies. The present study was carried out to analyze the prevalence of PTC taste sensitivity and to determine the gene frequencies among some Muslim populations of Uttar Pradesh, India. This study has some physiological relevance to highlight the adaptability of endogamous groups to behavioral traits in the same place. Unrelated, healthy individuals of both sexes (Male-403, Female-418) belonging to different populations of Uttar Pradesh, India were randomly selected with the age range of 16-45 years observed for phenylthiocarbamide to taste sensitivity. PTC tasting ability was measured by using a serial dilution method of Harris and Kalmus. The phenotypic frequency of tasters was higher as compared to non-tasters, and the same is statistically significant (χ(2)= 11.92, df = 5, P = 0.036). There were more females among tasters (67.94%) than males (64.76%). This observation was statistically significant (χ(2) = 14.79, df = 5, P = 0.011). The frequency of PTC tasters is greater than non-tasters and the females have lower non-taster pheno-types as compared to males. This type of study will provide background information about genetic structure of population and serves as useful interaction of genetics, food preferences and dietary patterns.

  8. Prevalence and Genetic Analysis of Bitter Taste Perception for Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC Among Some Muslim Populations of Uttar Pradesh, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruqaiya Hussain

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability to taste Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC, a bitter organic compound, described as a bimodal autosomal trait is widely used to know the heritable trait in both genetic and anthropological studies. The present study was carried out to analyze the prevalence of PTC taste sensitivity and to determine the gene frequencies among some Muslim populations of Uttar Pradesh, India. This study has some physiological relevance to highlight the adaptability of endogamous groups to behavioral traits in the same place.Unrelated, healthy individuals of both sexes (Male-403, Female-418 belonging to different populations of Uttar Pradesh, India were randomly selected with the age range of 16-45 years observed for phenylthiocarbamide to taste sensitivity. PTC tasting ability was measured by using a serial dilution method of Harris and Kalmus.The phenotypic frequency of tasters was higher as compared to non-tasters, and the same is statistically significant (χ(2= 11.92, df = 5, P = 0.036. There were more females among tasters (67.94% than males (64.76%. This observation was statistically significant (χ(2 = 14.79, df = 5, P = 0.011.The frequency of PTC tasters is greater than non-tasters and the females have lower non-taster pheno-types as compared to males. This type of study will provide background information about genetic structure of population and serves as useful interaction of genetics, food preferences and dietary patterns.

  9. Tasting Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC): A New Integrative Genetics Lab with an Old Flavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Robert B.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Slatko, Barton; Weiner, Michael P.; Ingram, Jessica; Sciarra, Kristianna; Weiner, Evan

    2008-01-01

    First reported in the early 1930s, variation in the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) has since become one of the most widely studied of all human genetic traits. Guo and Reed (2001) provide an excellent review of work on this polymorphism prior to the identification and sequencing of the PTC gene by Kim et al. (2003), and Wooding (2006)…

  10. Tasting Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC): A New Integrative Genetics Lab with an Old Flavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Robert B.; Bierwert, Lou Ann; Slatko, Barton; Weiner, Michael P.; Ingram, Jessica; Sciarra, Kristianna; Weiner, Evan

    2008-01-01

    First reported in the early 1930s, variation in the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) has since become one of the most widely studied of all human genetic traits. Guo and Reed (2001) provide an excellent review of work on this polymorphism prior to the identification and sequencing of the PTC gene by Kim et al. (2003), and Wooding (2006)…

  11. Fitting mixture distributions to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) sensitivity.

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, P N; G.J. McLachlan

    1991-01-01

    A technique for fitting mixture distributions to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) sensitivity is described. Under the assumptions of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, a mixture of three normal components is postulated for the observed distribution, with the mixing parameters corresponding to the proportions of the three genotypes associated with two alleles A and a acting at a single locus. The corresponding genotypes AA, Aa, and aa are then considered to have separate means and variances. This paper is c...

  12. A Study on Prevalence of Phenyl Thiocarbamide (PTC) Taste Blindness Among Obese Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veluswami, Deepika; Meena, B Ambigai; Latha, S; Fathima, I Gayathri; Soundariya, K; Selvi, K Senthamil

    2015-05-01

    Taste blindness to the phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is an inherited trait that is shown to influence our food and dietary preferences which in turn influence our body weight. Obesity is a global epidemic issue known to be on rise among the developing countries. Relating taste perception to obesity, the present study was undertaken to assess the prevalence of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste blindness among obese individuals. Three hundred and fifty individuals of age group 20-40 y were recruited from the local community for the present cross sectional study. Anthropometric measurements were taken and BMI was calculated. Subjects were classified as underweight, normal, overweight and obese based on their BMI. Normal, overweight and obese individuals were then asked to taste the commercially available PTC test papers and classified as non tasters and tasters of PTC. Out of 350 individuals, mean age group of 30±6.02 y, based on their BMI they were divided into 4 groups, Group A-underweight (16%), Group B-normal (35%), Group C-overweight (28%) and Group D-obese (21%) individuals. In group B, 28% were non tasters of PTC and 65% were tasters. In group C, 82% were non tasters and 13% were tasters and in Group D, 81% were non tasters and 19% were tasters of PTC. The PTC non taster phenotype individuals showed higher BMI as compared with the tasters' phenotype. Exploring the novel connections between taste perception and obesity would help us to gain a control over the global epidemic-Obesity, which is the crux factor for various other health problems. The study advocates the usage of PTC tasting as a reliable indicator of weight gain susceptibility.

  13. Positional cloning of the human quantitative trait locus underlying taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un-kyung; Jorgenson, Eric; Coon, Hilary; Leppert, Mark; Risch, Neil; Drayna, Dennis

    2003-02-21

    The ability to taste the substance phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) has been widely used for genetic and anthropological studies, but genetic studies have produced conflicting results and demonstrated complex inheritance for this trait. We have identified a small region on chromosome 7q that shows strong linkage disequilibrium between single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and PTC taste sensitivity in unrelated subjects. This region contains a single gene that encodes a member of the TAS2R bitter taste receptor family. We identified three coding SNPs giving rise to five haplotypes in this gene worldwide. These haplotypes completely explain the bimodal distribution of PTC taste sensitivity, thus accounting for the inheritance of the classically defined taste insensitivity and for 55 to 85% of the variance in PTC sensitivity. Distinct phenotypes were associated with specific haplotypes, which demonstrates that this gene has a direct influence on PTC taste sensitivity and that sequence variants at different sites interact with each other within the encoded gene product.

  14. PTC bitter taste genetic polymorphism, food choices, physical growth in body height and body fat related traits among adolescent girls from Kangra Valley, Himachal Pradesh (India).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishan; Kaur, Goga Kirandeep

    2014-01-01

    Bitter sensitivity among individuals and ethnic groups is partly due to polymorphic bitter taste receptor genes (TAS2Rs). PTC/PROP bitter taste responsiveness at locus TAS2R38 is a well-established index of individual variation in oral sensation that has been linked with predicting food liking and consumption. Previous studies suggest that the relationship between PTC/PROP and anthropometric traits remains controversial. To explore the role of TAS2R38 locus in taste choices, adolescent growth trend for body height, weight and fat patterning among girls and to evaluate their growth status. Cross-sectional data on 210 girls ranging in age from 11-18 years were collected from Palampur in the Kangra valley of Himachal Pradesh. The proportion of PTC non-tasters was 19.52%. PTC tasters and non-tasters had some differences in their food choices and preferences. More sensitive PTC tasters had a low preference for raw cruciferous vegetables and bitter tasting foods (like bitter gourd) and beverages, while they had higher preference for sweet-tasting foods (p < 0.05). PTC tasters overtook their PTC non-taster counterparts from age 14 through 16 years in having higher mean average skinfold, percentage body fat, fat mass index and fat-free mass index. PTC non-tasters had higher mean stature than tasters through all age groups. PTC tasters had slightly higher mean body weight than tasters at age 11, but in later years the advantage was lost; the total gain among non-tasters through adolescence was higher (78.20%) than tasters (66.92%). PTC thresholds significantly and negatively correlated with body height. TAS2R38 locus seems to have a role in food tastes, choices and preferences. Perceived bitterness of PTC/PROP thresholds were significantly and negatively correlated with body height and fat-free mass. These results, thus, tentatively suggest that the PTC non-taster gene may help in better absorption of calcium than its counter taster allele. Studies on differences in

  15. Extraversion and taste sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zverev, Yuriy; Mipando, Mwapatsa

    2008-03-01

    The rationale for investigating the gustatory reactivity as influenced by personality dimensions was suggested by some prior findings of an association between extraversion and acuity in other sensory systems. Detection thresholds for sweet, salty, and bitter qualities of taste were measured in 60 young healthy male and female volunteers using a two-alternative forced-choice technique. Personality of the responders was assessed using the Eysenck Personality Inventory. Multivariate analysis of variance failed to demonstrate a statistically significant interaction between an extraversion-introversion score, neuroticism score, smoking, gender and age. The only reliable negative association was found between the body mass index (BMI) and taste sensitivity (Roy's largest root = 0.05, F(7436.5) = 8.34, P = 0.003). Possible reasons for lack of differences between introverts and extraverts in the values of taste detection thresholds were discussed.

  16. Taste Quality Confusions: Influences of Age, Smoking, PTC Taster Status, and other Subject Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L; Chen, Jonathan H; Overend, Jane

    2017-01-01

    Many persons misidentify the quality of taste stimuli, a phenomenon termed "taste confusion." In this study of 1000 persons, we examined the influences of age, sex, causes of chemosensory disturbances, and genetically determined phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taster status on taste quality confusions for four tastants (sucrose, citric acid, sodium chloride, caffeine). Overall, sour-bitter confusions were most common (19.3%), followed by bitter-sour (11.4%), salty-bitter (7.3%), salty-sour (7.0%), bitter-salty (3.5%), bitter-sweet (3.4), and sour-salty (2.4%) confusions. Confusions for sweet were PTC tasters had fewer confusions than non-tasters except for salty-bitter confusions. Confusions typically increased monotonically with age. Current smokers exhibited more sour-bitter confusions than never smokers (48.9% vs. 32.2%), whereas past smokers had more bitter-sour confusions than never smokers (23.8% vs. 14.2%). Previous head trauma was associated with higher bitter-salty and salty-bitter confusions relative to those of some other etiologies. This study demonstrates, for the first time, that multiple subject factors influence taste confusions and, along with literature accounts, supports the view that there are both biological and psychological determinants of taste quality confusions.

  17. Independent evolution of bitter-taste sensitivity in humans and chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, Stephen; Bufe, Bernd; Grassi, Christina; Howard, Michael T; Stone, Anne C; Vazquez, Maribel; Dunn, Diane M; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Weiss, Robert B; Bamshad, Michael J

    2006-04-13

    It was reported over 65 years ago that chimpanzees, like humans, vary in taste sensitivity to the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC). This was suggested to be the result of a shared balanced polymorphism, defining the first, and now classic, example of the effects of balancing selection in great apes. In humans, variable PTC sensitivity is largely controlled by the segregation of two common alleles at the TAS2R38 locus, which encode receptor variants with different ligand affinities. Here we show that PTC taste sensitivity in chimpanzees is also controlled by two common alleles of TAS2R38; however, neither of these alleles is shared with humans. Instead, a mutation of the initiation codon results in the use of an alternative downstream start codon and production of a truncated receptor variant that fails to respond to PTC in vitro. Association testing of PTC sensitivity in a cohort of captive chimpanzees confirmed that chimpanzee TAS2R38 genotype accurately predicts taster status in vivo. Therefore, although Fisher et al.'s observations were accurate, their explanation was wrong. Humans and chimpanzees share variable taste sensitivity to bitter compounds mediated by PTC receptor variants, but the molecular basis of this variation has arisen twice, independently, in the two species.

  18. An examination of associations between the inability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and clinical characteristics and trait markers in first-episode, nonaffective psychotic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Michael T; Ionescu, Dawn F; Broussard, Beth; Cristofaro, Sarah L; Johnson, Stephanie; Haggard, Patrick J; Potts, Amy A; Wan, Claire Ramsay; Walker, Elaine F

    2013-08-30

    Research findings are mixed as to whether or not the inability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) might represent an endophenotypic trait marker for schizophrenia. We hypothesized associations between PTC-tasting status and select clinical characteristics and trait markers in patients with psychotic disorders that, if present, would provide support for the inability to taste PTC as a trait marker. In a first-episode psychosis sample (n=93), we measured PTC tasting, family history of psychosis, age at onset of prodrome and psychosis, severity of positive and negative symptoms, global impairment in functioning, neurological soft signs, and four neurocognitive domains (verbal learning/memory, visual learning/memory, verbal working memory, and spatial working memory). Associations between PTC-non-tasting and clinical/neurocognitive variables were examined with χ(2) tests and independent samples t tests. Among participants, 67.7% tasted PTC in comparison to a strip of control paper, and 25.8% were non-tasters. Tasters and non-tasters did not show statistically significant differences with respect to family history, age at onset, severity of symptoms, neurological soft signs, or the four neurocognitive domains. In conjunction with other findings, it is unlikely that PTC-non-tasting is a trait marker of schizophrenia, though a conclusive study is warranted. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of high altitude on sensitivity to the taste of phenylthiocarbamide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S. B.; Chatterjee, A.; Panjwani, U.; Yadav, D. K.; Selvamurthy, W.; Sharma, K. N.

    Sensitivity to the taste of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) was studied using the Harris-Kalmus method in healthy human volunteers at sea level and then subsequently at an altitude of 3500 m over a period of 3 weeks, after which they were brought back to sea level. Blood sugar, insulin and blood cortisol levels were estimated weekly. The results indicated that, out of 51 subjects studied, 26 (55%) were PTC tasters at sea level. Eight of those unable to taste PTC at sea level tested as tasters at high altitude, and 2 of them reverted to being non-tasters on return to sea level. In the blood, an increase in cortisol and blood insulin levels was seen without any significant change in sugar levels. All the changes recorded at high altitude tended to return to basal values after re-induction to sea level. The study suggests that high-altitude hypoxia in some way, possibly involving changes in hormonal profile among other factors, causes an alteration in sensitivity to the taste of PTC, resulting in some of the individuals shifting to lower PTC sensitivity.

  20. Variability in Human Bitter Taste Sensitivity to Chemically Diverse Compounds Can Be Accounted for by Differential TAS2R Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roura, Eugeni; Aldayyani, Asya; Thavaraj, Pridhuvi; Prakash, Sangeeta; Greenway, Delma; Thomas, Walter G; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Roudnitzky, Natacha; Foster, Simon R

    2015-07-01

    The human population displays high variation in taste perception. Differences in individual taste sensitivity may also impact on nutrient intake and overall appetite. A well-characterized example is the variable perception of bitter compounds such as 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), which can be accounted for at the molecular level by polymorphic variants in the specific type 2 taste receptor (TAS2R38). This phenotypic variation has been associated with influencing dietary preference and other behaviors, although the generalization of PROP/PTC taster status as a predictor of sensitivity to other tastes is controversial. Here, we proposed that the taste sensitivities of different bitter compounds would be correlated only when they activate the same bitter taste receptor. Thirty-four volunteers were exposed to 8 bitter compounds that were selected based on their potential to activate overlapping and distinct repertoires of TAS2Rs. Taste intensity ratings were evaluated using the general Labeled Magnitude Scale. Our data demonstrate a strong interaction between the intensity for bitter substances when they activate common TAS2Rs. Consequently, PROP/PTC sensitivity was not a reliable predictor of general bitter sensitivity. In addition, our findings provide a novel framework to predict taste sensitivity based on their specific T2R activation profile.

  1. Reduced taste sensitivity in congenital blindness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagnon, Lea; Kupers, Ron; Ptito, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Sight is undoubtedly not only important for food identification and selection but also for the modulation of gustatory sensitivity. We can, therefore, assume that taste sensitivity and eating habits are affected by visual deprivation from birth. We measured taste detection and identification...... behavioral results showed that compared with the normal sighted, blind subjects have increased thresholds for taste detection and taste identification. This finding is at odds with the superior performance of congenitally blind subjects in several tactile, auditory and olfactory tasks. Our psychometric data...... further indicate that blind subjects more strongly rely on internal hunger and satiety cues, instead of external contextual or emotional cues, to decide when and what to eat. We suggest that the lower taste sensitivity observed in congenitally blind individuals is due to various blindness...

  2. Reduced taste sensitivity in congenital blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Lea; Kupers, Ron; Ptito, Maurice

    2013-07-01

    Sight is undoubtedly not only important for food identification and selection but also for the modulation of gustatory sensitivity. We can, therefore, assume that taste sensitivity and eating habits are affected by visual deprivation from birth. We measured taste detection and identification thresholds of the 5 basic tastants in 13 congenitally blind and 13 sighted control subjects. Participants also answered several eating habits questionnaires, including the Food Neophobia Scale, the Food Variety Seeking Tendency Scale, the Intuitive Eating Scale, and the Body Awareness Questionnaire. Our behavioral results showed that compared with the normal sighted, blind subjects have increased thresholds for taste detection and taste identification. This finding is at odds with the superior performance of congenitally blind subjects in several tactile, auditory and olfactory tasks. Our psychometric data further indicate that blind subjects more strongly rely on internal hunger and satiety cues, instead of external contextual or emotional cues, to decide when and what to eat. We suggest that the lower taste sensitivity observed in congenitally blind individuals is due to various blindness-related obstacles when shopping for food, cooking and eating out, all of which contribute to underexpose the gustatory system to a larger variety of taste stimuli.

  3. Possible relationship between phenylthiocarbamide taste sensitivity and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S K; Sharma, K; Pathak, A; Sawhney, I M S; Prabhakar, S

    2004-06-01

    The study was based on the data of a sample of 400 epileptic patients (200 idiopathic and 200 symptomatic) and 100 normal healthy individuals serving as controls. The PTC threshold distribution was bimodal. The number of non-tasters among idiopathic epileptics (35.5%) and symptomatic epileptics (32.5%) was significantly higher than controls (20%). The relative incidence of non-tasters in idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies was 2.20 and 1.93 respectively. There is evidence that non-tasters tend to ingest a greater quantity of bitter tasting goitrogenic substances present naturally in edible plants which in turn exert greater thyroid stress in non-tasters or less sensitive tasters. Such a stress during intrauterine or early childhood growth and development might have affected neurological maturation which in turn made them more susceptible to epilepsy than tasters, who faced lesser stress.

  4. Possible relationship between phenylthiocarbamide taste sensitivity and epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pal S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was based on the data of a sample of 400 epileptic patients (200 idiopathic and 200 symptomatic and 100 normal healthy individuals serving as controls. The PTC threshold distribution was bimodal. The number of non-tasters among idiopathic epileptics (35.5% and symptomatic epileptics (32.5% was significantly higher than controls (20%. The relative incidence of non-tasters in idiopathic and symptomatic epilepsies was 2.20 and 1.93 respectively. There is evidence that non-tasters tend to ingest a greater quantity of bitter tasting goitrogenic substances present naturally in edible plants which in turn exert greater thyroid stress in non-tasters or less sensitive tasters. Such a stress during intrauterine or early childhood growth and development might have affected neurological maturation which in turn made them more susceptible to epilepsy than tasters, who faced lesser stress.

  5. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 is a sensitive and diagnostically useful immunohistochemical marker of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and of PTC-like nuclear alterations in Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K E; Ge, Shu-Jian; Lin, Xiao-Yan; Lv, Bei-Bei; Cao, Zhi-Xin; Li, Jia-Mei; Xu, Jia-Wen; Wang, Qiang-Xiu

    2016-03-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) is important in the progression of inflammatory responses. Recently, increased levels of ICAM-1 have been reported in a number of types of malignancy. The present study aimed to investigate ICAM-1 expression in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) and in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) with PTC-like nuclear alterations, and to assess the predictive value of ICAM-1 in thyroid lesions. ICAM-1 expression was retrospectively investigated in 132 consecutive cases of PTC, 72 cases of HT, 10 of follicular cancer, 15 of follicular adenoma, 16 of nodular goiter and 8 samples of normal thyroid tissue using immunohistochemical analyses, and in 42 PTC patients using western blotting. ICAM-1 expression was not detected in normal follicular cells, follicular lesions (adenoma and cancer) and benign nodular hyperplasia, but was frequently overexpressed in PTC cells. ICAM-1 overexpression was associated with extra-thyroidal invasion and lymph node metastasis; no association was found with age, gender, tumor size, multifocality, pathological stage, recurrence or distant metastasis. ICAM-1 expression in HT patients with PTC-like nuclear alterations was significantly higher than that in HT cases with non-PTC-like features. Compared with antibodies against cytokeratin 19, galectin-3 and Hector Battifora mesothelial-1, ICAM-1 was the most sensitive marker for the detection of PTC-like features in HT. These findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression is upregulated in PTC and in HT with PTC-like nuclear alterations. This feature may be an important factor in the progression of cancer of the thyroid gland.

  6. [A comparative study of the taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide in rats differing by the threshold of nervous system excitability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlova, M B

    1997-01-01

    Taste sensitivity to a bitter substance, phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) was studied in rat strains selected for the threshold of excitability of the nervous system. In the period of 17 days the drinking behaviour of the rats was estimated after giving them a series of PTC solutions with increasing concentrations and water as a control. The interstrain differences were found in the mean level of this index and its dynamics during the experimental period. Rats of the strain with high excitability showed the rhythmical changes of taste sensitivity to PTC related to the phases of moon rhythm. The obtained evidence points to relation between the sign under study and individual characteristics of the nervous system, namely, its excitability, and suggests the differences in activity of the second messenger system (Ca++, c-AMP and others) in the studied rat strains.

  7. Change of Taste Sensitivity of Clove Cigarette Smokers in Medan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlina Simamora

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Tongue has taste buds that contain taste receptor which affected by many factors, including smoking habit. Objective: To analyze the differences of sweet and bitter taste sensitivity in the pedicab driver clove cigarette smokers compared to non-smokers in Medan Padang Bulan. Methods: This study was conducted by placing the sweet taste strips and bitter taste strips on four taste receptors of the tongue, with increasing solution concentration in 74 subjects. This was a cross sectional study on pedicab driver population in Medan Padang Bulan. Results: There were differences between clove cigarette smokers and non-smokers on sweet taste examination (p<0.005. There was a difference between clove cigarette smokers and non-smokers on examination bitter taste receptors (p<0.005. On the clove cigarette smokers, there was no significant difference between sweet taste and bitter taste on the receptors itself. Conclusion: Non-smokers are more sensitive to sweet taste than the clove cigarette smokers. Bitter taste sensitivity is greater in cigarettes smokers than in non-smokers. Taste receptors on all location of the tongue could taste sweet and bitter substances, but a certain location of taste receptors were more sensitive compared to others.

  8. Relationship of Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) Taster Status to Olfactory and Gustatory Function in Patients with Chemosensory Disturbances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L; De Fonte, Tatiana Prosini

    2016-10-01

    Poor sensitivity to the bitter taste of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and related substances has been associated with a number of diseases. We determined, in patients with chemosensory dysfunction from multiple etiologies, whether PTC "tasters" (n = 511) exhibit less smell and taste dysfunction than their non-PTC-tasting counterparts (n = 432) on a comprehensive battery of olfactory and gustatory tests. The proportion of tasters (54%) in our study population was much lower than that calculated from 11 North American population studies (76.5%; P PTC tasters (P PTC tasting status was unrelated to scores on the olfactory tests (which included tests of odor identification, detection threshold, and odor memory/discrimination), tasters significantly outperformed nontasters on suprathreshold identification and intensity taste tests employing both bitter (caffeine) and nonbitter (sucrose, citric acid, sodium chloride) tasting stimuli. Regardless of PTC taster status, women outperformed men on the taste tests. Our findings suggest the possibility that the T2R38 gene may protect against significant olfactory dysfunction, but once such dysfunction becomes manifest at a level where professional help is sought, such protection is not evident. However, other hypotheses for this phenomenon are possible. This study demonstrates that patients with chemosensory disturbances who are PTC tasters outperform their non-PTC taster counterparts in both identifying and perceiving the intensity of a range of suprathreshold tastants, including ones that do not taste bitter. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Bitter taste study in a sardinian genetic isolate supports the association of phenylthiocarbamide sensitivity to the TAS2R38 bitter receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prodi, D A; Drayna, D; Forabosco, P; Palmas, M A; Maestrale, G B; Piras, D; Pirastu, M; Angius, A

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a major locus on chromosome 7q was found in association with the taste sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) in humans. This region contains the TAS2R38 gene that encodes a member of the TAS2R bitter taste receptor family. Three SNPs within this gene demonstrated a strong association with taster status in Utah families and in an additional sample of 85 unrelated individuals. We studied a small isolated village in eastern Sardinia and carried out a genome-wide scan to map the genetic basis of PTC perception in this population. We performed both qualitative and quantitative PTC-taste linkage analysis. Qualitative analysis was carried out by defining a cut-off from the bimodal distribution of the trait and classifying subjects as tasters and non-tasters (75 and 25%, respectively). Linkage analysis on 131 subjects belonging to a unique large multi-generation pedigree comprising 239 subjects confirmed significant evidence for linkage at 7q35 also in our population. Haplotype analyses of the three SNPs inside the PTC gene allowed us to identify only two haplotypes that were associated with the non-taster phenotype (80% AVI homozygous) and to taster phenotype (40% PAV homozygous and 56% PAV/AVI heterozygous). Sex, age and haplotype effect explained 77.2 % of the total variance in PTC sensitivity.

  10. Investigation of the phenylthiocarbamide-taste sensitivity in students of Henan Han population%河南汉族大学生群体苯硫脲尝味能力调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚燕飞; 黄艳梅; 王迪; 张光谋; 张林; 郭柯利

    2011-01-01

    目的 调查河南汉族大学生群体苯硫脲(PTC)味盲基因频率的分布情况.方法 采用阈值法研究新乡医学院2006级和2007级1 009名在校大学生的尝味能力,并计算味盲率.结果 1 009名在校大学生的味盲率为13.08%,味盲基因频率为36.30%.男、女生味盲率分别为13.68%和12.69%,二者比较差别无统计学意义(P>0.05).结论 河南汉族大学生群体味盲率与中国其他省汉族人群味盲率一致,且PTC尝味能力的分布与性别无关.%Objective To investigate the distribution of phenylthiocarbamide( PTC)-taste blindness in the students of Henan Han population. Methods The PTC-taste sensitivity of 1 009 students from Grade 2006 and Grade 2007 in Xinxiang medical college was detected by threshold method, allelic and genotype frequencies of PTC-taste blindness were calculated by statistics method. Results The phenotype frequency of PTC-taste blindness in the students was 13.08% ,and allelic frequency of PTC-taste blindness was 36. 30%. The phenotype frequencies of PTC-taste blindness in male and female students were 13.68% and 12.69% respectively, and there was no significant difference on the distribution of PTC-taste blindness between males and females (P > 0.05 ). Conclusion Frequency of PTC-taste blindness in Henan Han population was accord with other Han population in China. There is no gender difference on distribution of the PTC-taste sensitivity.

  11. Verbal priming and taste sensitivity make moral transgressions gross.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Rachel S

    2014-02-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess whether: (a) visceral and moral disgust share a common oral origin (taste); (b) moral transgressions that are also viscerally involving are evaluated accordingly as a function of individual differences in taste sensitivity; (c) verbal priming interacts with taste sensitivity to alter how disgust is experienced in moral transgressions; and (d) whether gender moderates these effects. Standard tests of disgust sensitivity, a questionnaire developed for this research assessing different types of moral transgressions (nonvisceral, implied-visceral, visceral) with the terms "angry" and "grossed-out," and a taste sensitivity test of 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) were administered to 102 participants. Results confirmed past findings that the more sensitive to PROP a participant was the more disgusted they were by visceral, but not moral, disgust elicitors. Importantly, the findings newly revealed that taste sensitivity had no bearing on evaluations of moral transgressions, regardless of their visceral nature, when "angry" was the emotion primed. However, when "grossed-out" was primed for evaluating moral violations, the more intense PROP tasted to a participant the more "grossed-out" they were by all transgressions. Women were generally more disgust sensitive and morally condemning than men, but disgust test, transgression type, and priming scale modulated these effects. The present findings support the proposition that moral and visceral disgust do not share a common oral origin, but show that linguistic priming can transform a moral transgression into a viscerally repulsive event and that susceptibility to this priming varies as a function of an individual's sensitivity to the origins of visceral disgust-bitter taste.

  12. Exercise intensity differentially impacts sensitivity thresholds to specific tastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakanishi Y

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the impact of exercise intensity on sensitivity to four major tastes of sweet, sour, salty, and bitter. Ten subjects completed two separate 30-min cycling exercise bouts, one at low intensity (50% V •O2max and the other at high intensity (70% V •O2max. Sensitivity to the four tastes was assessed before and after each exercise bout, using taste discs. Comparative data were analyzed using paired t-tests and the relationships between work-related physiologic measures and taste sensitivities were calculated using Pearson correlation. Significance was established at the 0.05 level of probability. Post-exercise sourness threshold was higher (p≤0.05 following the high intensity exercise compared to the low intensity exercise, sweetness threshold decreased following the higher intensity exercise (p≤0.05, while no differences were observed in threshold sensitivities for the other two tastes at either workload. The increased sensitivity to sweetness (decreased threshold was strongly related to changes in blood glucose following both low (r2=0.62; p<0.01 and high (r2=0.50; p≤0.05 intensity exercises. As well, changes observed in sourness threshold were directly related to the changes in core temperature (r2=0.49; p≤0.05 but only for the low intensity exercise bout.

  13. Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) perception in patients with schizophrenia and first-degree family members: relationship to clinical symptomatology and psychophysical olfactory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Paul J; McGue, Colleen; Kanes, Stephen J; Roalf, David R; Balderston, Catherine C; Gur, Raquel E; Kohler, Christian G; Turetsky, Bruce I

    2007-02-01

    The inability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC; "taste-blindness") has been associated with a number of medical and neurological illnesses not typically related to taste. We examined PTC sensitivity in 67 schizophrenia patients, 30 healthy controls, and 30 first-degree relatives to determine whether taster status could represent a simple vulnerability marker. A higher prevalence of non-tasters was seen in patients and family members relative to healthy controls. Among patients, non-tasters exhibited increased levels of negative and first-rank symptoms as well as poorer right nostril odor identification skills relative to PTC tasters. These differences were not explained by age, sex, education, smoking, or intensity differences. Phenotypic variation in PTC sensitivity is thought to be genetic in origin and suggests greater illness risk for those subjects with recessive taster alleles.

  14. Functional characterization of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor for phenylthiocarbamide in colobine monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purba, Laurentia Henrieta Permita Sari; Widayati, Kanthi Arum; Tsutsui, Kei; Suzuki-Hashido, Nami; Hayakawa, Takashi; Nila, Sarah; Suryobroto, Bambang; Imai, Hiroo

    2017-01-01

    Bitterness perception in mammals is mostly directed at natural toxins that induce innate avoidance behaviours. Bitter taste is mediated by the G protein-coupled receptor TAS2R, which is located in taste cell membranes. One of the best-studied bitter taste receptors is TAS2R38, which recognizes phenylthiocarbamide (PTC). Here we investigate the sensitivities of TAS2R38 receptors to PTC in four species of leaf-eating monkeys (subfamily Colobinae). Compared with macaque monkeys (subfamily Cercopithecinae), colobines have lower sensitivities to PTC in behavioural and in vitro functional analyses. We identified four non-synonymous mutations in colobine TAS2R38 that are responsible for the decreased sensitivity of the TAS2R38 receptor to PTC observed in colobines compared with macaques. These results suggest that tolerance to bitterness in colobines evolved from an ancestor that was sensitive to bitterness as an adaptation to eating leaves. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Determination and Analysis on Taste-Blindness Gene Frequency to Phenylthiocarbamide(PTC)%苯硫脲(PTC)味盲基因频率的测定与分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵淑娟; 庞有志; 杨又兵; 郭晓红

    2005-01-01

    目的测定河南省汉族青少年苯硫脲(PTC)味盲基因频率.方法采用阈值法测定219名汉族青少年对PTC的尝味敏感性.结果味盲率为8.22%,味盲基因频率为0.2867,尝味基因频率为0.7133.结论尝味能力与民族、地理位置以及某些疾病有关.

  16. Adult picky eating. Phenomenology, taste sensitivity, and psychological correlates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauer, Jane; Pelchat, Marcia L; Rozin, Paul; Zickgraf, Hana F

    2015-07-01

    To explore psychosocial correlates of picky eating in adults, document differences in the taste sensitivity of picky and non-picky eating adults, and examine behavioral characteristics of this understudied phenomenon. In Study One, 489 participants completed a survey on food choice and habits, including questions that asked participants to self-identify as picky eaters. Picky and non-picky eaters were compared on their rates of endorsement of a range of food selection behaviors and attitudes. In Study Two, participants who identified as either picky or non-picky responded to questionnaire measures of obsessive compulsive disorder, depression, disordered eating symptoms, disgust sensitivity, and food and general neophobia. Participants also rated the intensity of bitter and sweet solutions at three concentrations on a Labeled Magnitude Scale. In Study One, picky eaters were more likely to endorse a variety of anomalous eating behaviors and attitudes toward food, including rejection of foods based on sensory characteristics (taste, color, texture). Picky eaters were less likely to endorse enjoyment of eating, and more likely to report that they were unhealthy eaters. In Study Two, picky eaters had significantly higher OCD symptoms, disgust sensitivity, and food neophobia than non-picky eaters, and were more likely to score within the clinical range of depression symptoms, but did not have higher scores on measures of disordered eating or general neophobia. Picky eaters rated both bitter and sweet tastants as more intense than did non-picky eaters. Implications of findings for the future study of the correlates and mechanisms of Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder are discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differences in salivary α-amylase levels among women with different taste sensitivities

    OpenAIRE

    Sequeira, Márcia; Rodrigues, Lénia; Costa, Ana R; Pinheiro, C.; Antunes, Célia M.; Lamy, Elsa

    2013-01-01

    Saliva is the main component of taste receptor cells external environment, and consequently it may have a decisive role in taste perception. Taste sensitivity varies among different individuals. Sensitivity to the compound n-6-propylthiouracil (PROP) has been considerably studied and besides the known influence of genetic background, the contribution of perireceptor environment is not completely clear yet. Salivary α-amylase (one of the main proteins of saliva) is involved in carbohydrate dig...

  18. Differences in salivary α-amylase levels among women ith different taste sensitivities.

    OpenAIRE

    Sequeira, Márcia; Rodrigues, Lénia; R Costa, Ana; Antunes, Célia; Pinheiro, Cristina; Lamy, Elsa

    2012-01-01

    Saliva is the main component of taste receptor cells external environment, and consequently it may have a decisive role in taste perception. Taste sensitivity varies among different individuals. Sensitivity to the compound n-6-propylthiouracil (PROP) has been considerably studied and besides the known influence of genetic background, the contribution of perireceptor environment is not completely clear yet. Salivary α-amylase (one of the main proteins of saliva) is involved in carbohydrate dig...

  19. On the teaching of the relationship between genes and taste-blindness of phenylthiocarbamide(PTC)%对"基因和苯硫脲(PTC)味盲的关系"的教学探讨

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王苏豫

    2010-01-01

    以"基因和苯硫脲(PTC)味盲的关系"的教学为例,对研究性学习的教学内容和方法进行了初步探讨.针对基因和苯硫脲味盲的关系的研究,从问题的提出、假设的形成和实验所涉及的实验试剂的配制、试剂浓度、尝味方法多方面引导学生进行讨论,力图通过生物学教学中真实的科学研究过程,提高学生的生物科学素养.

  20. Amiloride-sensitive channels in type I fungiform taste cells in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clapp Tod R

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste buds are the sensory organs of taste perception. Three types of taste cells have been described. Type I cells have voltage-gated outward currents, but lack voltage-gated inward currents. These cells have been presumed to play only a support role in the taste bud. Type II cells have voltage-gated Na+ and K+ current, and the receptors and transduction machinery for bitter, sweet, and umami taste stimuli. Type III cells have voltage-gated Na+, K+, and Ca2+ currents, and make prominent synapses with afferent nerve fibers. Na+ salt transduction in part involves amiloride-sensitive epithelial sodium channels (ENaCs. In rodents, these channels are located in taste cells of fungiform papillae on the anterior part of the tongue innervated by the chorda tympani nerve. However, the taste cell type that expresses ENaCs is not known. This study used whole cell recordings of single fungiform taste cells of transgenic mice expressing GFP in Type II taste cells to identify the taste cells responding to amiloride. We also used immunocytochemistry to further define and compare cell types in fungiform and circumvallate taste buds of these mice. Results Taste cell types were identified by their response to depolarizing voltage steps and their presence or absence of GFP fluorescence. TRPM5-GFP taste cells expressed large voltage-gated Na+ and K+ currents, but lacked voltage-gated Ca2+ currents, as expected from previous studies. Approximately half of the unlabeled cells had similar membrane properties, suggesting they comprise a separate population of Type II cells. The other half expressed voltage-gated outward currents only, typical of Type I cells. A single taste cell had voltage-gated Ca2+ current characteristic of Type III cells. Responses to amiloride occurred only in cells that lacked voltage-gated inward currents. Immunocytochemistry showed that fungiform taste buds have significantly fewer Type II cells expressing PLC signalling

  1. Sensitivity of genome-wide-association signals to phenotyping strategy: the PROP-TAS2R38 taste association as a benchmark.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich K Genick

    Full Text Available Natural genetic variation can have a pronounced influence on human taste perception, which in turn may influence food preference and dietary choice. Genome-wide association studies represent a powerful tool to understand this influence. To help optimize the design of future genome-wide-association studies on human taste perception we have used the well-known TAS2R38-PROP association as a tool to determine the relative power and efficiency of different phenotyping and data-analysis strategies. The results show that the choice of both data collection and data processing schemes can have a very substantial impact on the power to detect genotypic variation that affects chemosensory perception. Based on these results we provide practical guidelines for the design of future GWAS studies on chemosensory phenotypes. Moreover, in addition to the TAS2R38 gene past studies have implicated a number of other genetic loci to affect taste sensitivity to PROP and the related bitter compound PTC. None of these other locations showed genome-wide significant associations in our study. To facilitate further, target-gene driven, studies on PROP taste perception we provide the genome-wide list of p-values for all SNPs genotyped in the current study.

  2. Threshold distributions of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) in the Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, S W; Shen, F M; Wang, Y D; Zheng, C J

    1998-11-30

    The ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is a well-documented Mendelian trait. Mapping and cloning the gene(s) responsible for the PTC tasting ability would help to delineate the molecular basis for the variations in PTC tasting ability in humans and to shed new light on taste chemosensory functions. In view of the spectacular successes in genome science, the positional cloning strategy seems to be a feasible approach to the isolation of the gene(s) underlying the PTC tasting ability. As a first step toward mapping the gene(s), we collected PTC taste threshold data on 106 individuals, most of them being university students, in Shanghai, China. Using various parametric and nonparametric statistical methods, we have found that the data set is best described by a bimodal distribution. The frequency of PTC nontasters is estimated to be 10%. This is consistent with the view that the PTC nontasting ability follows a recessive mode of inheritance. Several authors had previously reported PTC data on Chinese living outside China. Our data are, to our knowledge, the first ever collected from the Chinese population within China.

  3. Application of the Peroxotitanium Complex (PTC) for Flexible Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC)%过氧化钛配合物(PTC)体系在柔性染料敏化太阳能电池中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张阳; 曾庆慧; 只金芳

    2009-01-01

    The anatase TiO_2 sol prepared from Peroxotitanium Complex (PTC) at low temperature was used as the additive for photo-anode of flexible dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC). It is found that the photoelectric performance of DSSC was obviously increased by 50 % with the addition of TiO_2 sol. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of the sol content and reaction time on the pho-toelectric performance. It is proved that there is an optimal addition value for the DSSC application. When the content (volume) of PTC sol is 10% and refluxing time reaches to 9 h, the best photo-electric performance is obtained.%本文利用水性过氧化钛配合物(peoxotitanium complex:PTC)前驱体可低温合成锐钛矿TiO_2溶胶的特性,将其用作柔性染料敏化太阳能电池(DSSC)中的光阳极材料的成膜助剂.研究发现:加入基于PTC制得的TiO_2溶胶可以明显提高DSSC的光电转换性能,在制备DSSC的浆料中加入10%(体积分数)的基于PTC制得的TiO_2溶胶后,电池的光电效率可以提升50%.我们进一步研究了光电转换效率的影响因素,结果表明,溶胶的加入量和反应时间均有一最佳值,当基于PTC的TiO_2溶胶添加量为10%,反应时间为9 h,所得到电池的光电性能最好.

  4. Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) perception in ultra-high risk for psychosis participants who develop schizophrenia: testing the evidence for an endophenotypic marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Warrick J; Lin, Ashleigh; Moberg, Paul J; Smutzer, Gregory; Nelson, Barnaby; Yung, Alison R; Pantelis, Christos; McGorry, Patrick D; Turetsky, Bruce I; Wood, Stephen J

    2012-08-30

    Reports suggesting that schizophrenia participants are more likely to be phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) non-tasters when compared to controls have recently been controversial. If supported, a genetic-based phenotypic variation in PTC taster status is implicated, suggesting a greater illness risk for those participants with recessive alleles for the TAS2R38 receptor. Should PTC insensitivity be a schizophrenia endophenotype, then it would be expected in follow-up of ultra high-risk for psychosis participants who later develop schizophrenia (UHR-S). UHR-S was hypothesised to show reduced PTC sensitivity compared to those who were previously at risk, but did not transition (UHR-NP). PTC perception was assessed in 219 UHR participants at long-term follow-up, of whom 53 had transitioned to psychosis (UHR-P) during the follow-up period. Fifteen of the 219 participants were diagnosed with schizophrenia. Seventy-eight had a family history of psychotic disorder. No differences in PTC taster status were found in UHR participants based upon transition to psychosis status, schizophrenia diagnosis, or family history of schizophrenia. This report indicates that schizophrenia development among UHR participants is not associated with PTC tasting deficits and fails to support previous findings that inability to detect the bitter taste of PTC is a schizophrenia endophenotype. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Taste sensitivity, nutritional status and metabolic syndrome: Implication in weight loss dietary interventions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Simona; Bertoli; Monica; Laureati; Alberto; Battezzati; Valentina; Bergamaschi; Emanuele; Cereda; Angela; Spadafranca; Laila; Vignati; Ella; Pagliarini

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the relationship between taste sensitivity, nutritional status and metabolic syndrome and possible implications on weight loss dietary program. METHODS: Sensitivity for bitter, sweet, salty and sour tastes was assessed by the three-Alternative-Forced-Choice method in 41 overweight(OW), 52 obese(OB) patients and 56 normal-weight matched controls. OW and OB were assessed also for body composition(by impedence), resting energy expenditure(by indirect calorimetry) and presence of metabolic syndrome(MetS) and were prescribed a weight loss diet. Compliance to the weight loss dietary program was defined as adherence to control visits and weight loss ≥ 5% in 3 mo. RESULTS: Sex and age-adjusted multiple regression models revealed a significant association between body mass index(BMI) and both sour taste(P < 0.05) and global taste acuity score(GTAS)(P < 0.05), with lower sensitivity with increasing BMI. This trend in sensitivity for sour taste was also confirmed by the model refitted on the OW/OB group while the association with GTAS was marginally significant(P = 0.06). MetS+ subjects presented higher thresholds for salty taste when compared to MetS- patients while no significant difference was detected for the other tastes and GTAS. As assessed by multiple regression model, the association between salty taste and MetS appeared to be independent of sex, age and BMI. Patients continuing the program(n = 37) did not show any difference in baseline taste sensitivity when compared to drop-outs(n = 29). Similarly, no significant difference was detected between patients reporting and not reporting a weight loss ≥ 5% of the initial body weight. No significant dif-ference in taste sensitivity was detected even after dividing patients on the basis of nutritional(OW and OB) or metabolic status(MetS+ and MetS-). CONCLUSION: There is no cause-effect relationship between overweight and metabolic derangements. Taste thresholds assessment is not useful in

  6. Development of an umami taste sensitivity test and its clinical use.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shizuko Satoh-Kuriwada

    Full Text Available There is a close relationship between perception of umami, which has become recognized as the fifth taste, and the human physical condition. We have developed a clinical test for umami taste sensitivity using a filter paper disc with a range of six monosodium glutamate (MSG concentrations. We recruited 28 patients with taste disorders (45-78 years and 184 controls with no taste disorders (102 young [18-25 years] and 82 older [65-89 years] participants. Filter paper discs (5 mm dia. were soaked in aqueous MSG solutions (1, 5, 10, 50, 100 and 200 mM, then placed on three oral sites innervated by different taste nerves. The lowest concentration participants correctly identified was defined as the recognition threshold (RT for MSG. This test showed good reproducibility for inter- and intra-observer variability. We concluded that: (1 The RT of healthy controls differed at measurement sites innervated by different taste nerves; that is, the RT of the anterior tongue was higher than that of either the posterior tongue or the soft palate in both young and older individuals. (2 No significant difference in RT was found between young adults and older individuals at any measurement site. (3 The RT of patients with taste disorders was higher before treatment than that of the healthy controls at any measurement site. (4 The RT after treatment in these patients improved to the same level as that of the healthy controls. (5 The cutoff values of RT, showing the highest diagnostic accuracy (true positives + true negatives, were 200 mM MSG for AT and 50 mM MSG for PT and SP. The diagnostic accuracy at these cutoff values was 0.92, 0.87 and 0.86 for AT, PT and SP, respectively. Consequently, this umami taste sensitivity test is useful for discriminating between normal and abnormal umami taste sensations.

  7. Phenylthiocarbamide taste perception as a possible genetic association marker for nutritional habits and obesity tendency of people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastan, SevgiDurna; Degerli, Naci; Dastan, Taner; Yildiz, Fazilet; Yildir, Yavuz; Durna, Yusuf Muhammed; Atessahin, Dilek; Karan, Tunay

    2015-05-01

    Ability to taste Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) a bitter molecule, is usually used to know the heritable characteristic in both genetic and physiological studies. So far, no research has yet attested whether PTC blindness relation with obesity and some nutrition behaviors of human. This study is the first attempt on a large scale to examine PTC sensitivity in healthy and overweight people in Turkish population to define in the perception of bitter senses which is associated with nutrition habits, body mass index, age, gender, and to be in stable weight. PTC taste perception was measured by tasting PTC solution filtered in a paper. The results showed that tasters were significantly more frequent (81,8%) than nontasters (18,2%) in all population. A higher proportion of nontasters were observed in the quite fat individual group (BMI >40kg/m(2)). Alterations explained these differences in basic taste sensitivity, age, gender, BMI, individuals' family obesity situations, vegetarian nourishment. Increased frequency of nontasters allele is evident with obesity condition. This could be due to lack of preference for nutrition among nontasters. So the phenotypic variation in PTC sensitivity is genetic in origin; it may represent an association with obesity, dietary habits, regular weight, gender, and age.

  8. Determinants of Obesity in Italian Adults: The Role of Taste Sensitivity, Food Liking, and Food Neophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proserpio, Cristina; Laureati, Monica; Bertoli, Simona; Battezzati, Alberto; Pagliarini, Ella

    2016-02-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that factors related to sensory perception may explain excess weight. The objective of this study was to consider multiple aspects while investigating the phenomenon of obesity. One goal was to compare taste acuity (taste threshold and density of fungiform papillae) in both normal weight and obese subjects. Thresholds for 4 basic tastes and the fat stimulus were investigated. A second research goal was to study the relationship between food neophobia and food liking according to the body mass index and taste sensitivity. The results showed that obese subjects seem to have higher threshold values and a reduced number of fungiform papillae than do normal weight subjects. Food neophobia did not vary with nutritional status, whereas differences were found for food liking, with obese subjects showing significantly higher liking ratings for high energy dense products compared with normal weight subjects.

  9. Phenylthiocarbamide tasting and family history of depression, revisited: low rates of depression in families of supertasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Thomas E; Perez, Marisol

    2004-04-15

    Past studies suggest that phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste status is related to vulnerability to depression, such that those sensitive to PTC are more vulnerable. We questioned this, reasoning that those insensitive to PTC may be more vulnerable (because they may have lower hedonic tone and higher risk for alcohol abuse). Forty-two volunteers responded to questionnaires regarding family history of depression, and were assigned to supertaster, taster, or non-taster categories based on taste reactions to a 3.80 x 1.43 cm piece of commercially prepared paper treated with PTC. Supertasters were significantly less likely to report first-degree relatives with a history of depression than were tasters and non-tasters. Supertasters may be afforded some protection from depression; elucidating the mechanisms of this protection is a potentially interesting avenue for future research.

  10. The relationships between phenylthiocarbamide taste perception and smoking, work out habits and susceptibility to depression

    OpenAIRE

    Sevgi Durna Daştan; Yusuf Muhammed Durna; Taner Daştan

    2015-01-01

    Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) is known as phenylthiourea and it is an organic compound that has the phenyl ring. Ability to perceive the tastes of PTC chemical is related to the dominance of taste genes. There are a large number of population studies regarding the PTC taste perception and different personal characteristics or disease conditions. The purpose of this study is to reveal and compare the relation between the PTC taste perception and work-out habits, smoking, alcohol consumption and te...

  11. Association of schizophrenia with the phenylthiocarbamide taste receptor haplotype on chromosome 7q.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moberg, Paul J; Li, Mingyao; Kanes, Stephen J; Gur, Raquel E; Kamath, Vidyulata; Turetsky, Bruce I

    2012-12-01

    Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste sensitivity is an inherited trait determined primarily by allelic variation of the taste-receptor gene TAS2R38 on chromosome 7q. Results of prior studies examining the ability to taste PTC in patients with schizophrenia have been mixed because of the difficulties in measuring PTC taste sensitivity behaviorally. In the current study, we examined the TAS2R38 genotypes of schizophrenia patients to determine whether the increased prevalence of nontasters in this patient population was indicative of a specific genetic association. Our a-priori hypothesis was that schizophrenia patients would show an increased prevalence of the nontaster phenotype compared with controls. The genotypes of two nonsynonymous coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms in TAS2R38 were assayed for 176 schizophrenia patients and 229 healthy control individuals, and the two-allele haplotypes were estimated. There was an over-representation of the major PTC nontaster haplotype among patients of European descent, relative to control individuals of similar ancestry. Patients and controls of African ancestry did not differ. The PTC nontaster haplotype is a genetic marker that may be used to identify subsets of schizophrenia patients who potentially harbor vulnerability genes in this region of chromosome 7q.

  12. Phenylthiocarbamide produces conditioned taste aversions in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St John, Steven J; Pour, Lindsay; Boughter, John D

    2005-06-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that SWR/J (SW) mice avoid phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) to a greater degree than C3HeB/FeJ mice in 48 h, two-bottle preference tests given in ascending series. The authors hypothesized, based also on previous work, that SW mice might form a conditioned taste aversion over time due to the toxic properties of PTC. We directly tested this hypothesis by attempting to condition a taste aversion to sucrose by injections of PTC. In experiment 1, PTC was nearly as effective as a strong dose of LiCl in reducing sucrose drinking. In experiment 2, the sucrose aversions were parametrically modified by both sucrose concentration and PTC dose, a hallmark of conditioned taste aversion. We conclude that PTC can cause a conditioned taste aversion and discuss the importance of considering toxic effects of aversive tastants when analyzing behavioral strain differences.

  13. Dietary fat restriction increases fat taste sensitivity in people with obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Lisa P.; Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P.; Susan J. Torres; Keast, Russell S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Individuals with obesity may be less sensitive to the taste of fat, and it is hypothesized that this is due to excess dietary fat intake. This study assessed the effect of a 6‐week low‐fat (LF) or portion control (PC) diet matched for weight loss on fat taste thresholds, fat perception, and preference in people with overweight/obesity. Methods Participants (n = 53) completed a randomized dietary intervention and consumed either a LF diet (25% fat) or PC diet (33% fat) for 6 weeks. F...

  14. High maltose sensitivity of sweet taste receptors in the Japanese macaque (Macaca fuscata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Emiko; Tsutsui, Kei; Imai, Hiroo

    2016-01-01

    Taste sensitivity differs among animal species depending on feeding habitat. To humans, sucrose is one of the sweetest natural sugars, and this trait is expected to be similar in other primates. However, previous behavioral tests have shown that some primate species have equal preferences for maltose and sucrose. Because sweet tastes are recognized when compounds bind to the sweet taste receptor Tas1R2/Tas1R3, we evaluated the responses of human and Japanese macaque Tas1R2/Tas1R3 to various natural sugars using a heterologous expression system. Human Tas1R2/Tas1R3 showed high sensitivity to sucrose, as expected; however, Japanese macaque Tas1R2/Tas1R3 showed equally high sensitivity to maltose and sucrose. Furthermore, Japanese macaques showed equally high sensitivity to sucrose and maltose in a two-bottle behavioral experiment. These results indicate that Japanese macaques have high sensitivity to maltose, and this sensitivity is directly related to Tas1R2/Tas1R3 function. This is the first molecular biological evidence that for some primate species, sucrose is not the most preferable natural sugar, as it is for humans. PMID:27982108

  15. Higher sensitivity to sweet and salty taste in obese compared to lean individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardikar, Samyogita; Höchenberger, Richard; Villringer, Arno; Ohla, Kathrin

    2017-04-01

    Although putatively taste has been associated with obesity as one of the factors governing food intake, previous studies have failed to find a consistent link between taste perception and Body Mass Index (BMI). A comprehensive comparison of both thresholds and hedonics for four basic taste modalities (sweet, salty, sour, and bitter) has only been carried out with a very small sample size in adults. In the present exploratory study, we compared 23 obese (OB; BMI > 30), and 31 lean (LN; BMI salty), citric acid (sour), and quinine hydrochloride (bitter) dissolved in water. Recognition thresholds were estimated with an adaptive Bayesian staircase procedure (QUEST). Intensity and pleasantness ratings were acquired using visual analogue scales (VAS). It was found that OB had lower thresholds than LN for sucrose and NaCl, indicating a higher sensitivity to sweet and salty tastes. This effect was also reflected in ratings of intensity, which were significantly higher in the OB group for the lower concentrations of sweet, salty, and sour. Calculation of Bayes factors further corroborated the differences observed with null-hypothesis significance testing (NHST). Overall, the results suggest that OB are more sensitive to sweet and salty, and perceive sweet, salty, and sour more intensely than LN. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Taste sensitivity, nutritional status and metabolic syndrome: Implication in weight loss dietary interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertoli, Simona; Laureati, Monica; Battezzati, Alberto; Bergamaschi, Valentina; Cereda, Emanuele; Spadafranca, Angela; Vignati, Laila; Pagliarini, Ella

    2014-01-01

    AIM: We investigated the relationship between taste sensitivity, nutritional status and metabolic syndrome and possible implications on weight loss dietary program. METHODS: Sensitivity for bitter, sweet, salty and sour tastes was assessed by the three-Alternative-Forced-Choice method in 41 overweight (OW), 52 obese (OB) patients and 56 normal-weight matched controls. OW and OB were assessed also for body composition (by impedence), resting energy expenditure (by indirect calorimetry) and presence of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and were prescribed a weight loss diet. Compliance to the weight loss dietary program was defined as adherence to control visits and weight loss ≥ 5% in 3 mo. RESULTS: Sex and age-adjusted multiple regression models revealed a significant association between body mass index (BMI) and both sour taste (P nutritional (OW and OB) or metabolic status (MetS+ and MetS-). CONCLUSION: There is no cause-effect relationship between overweight and metabolic derangements. Taste thresholds assessment is not useful in predicting the outcome of a diet-induced weight loss program. PMID:25317249

  17. Does mere exposure mediate sensitivity to bitter taste on consumer liking and acceptability of whole grain foods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health benefits of whole grains (WG) are well known, yet consumption by Americans falls far short of recommended amounts. Roughly 75% of Americans are sensitive to bitter taste, and WG are known to contain bitter tasting phenolic compounds. It has been reported that individuals with the highest se...

  18. Changes of the sweet taste sensitivity due to aerobic physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Luh Putu Ayu Wardhani

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sweet taste is a pleasant sensation. Sweet taste is mostly consumed and fancied by many people. Physiologically, glucose is body's source of energy, but if over used it can be affected to the body's metabolism. This can be worsen if the person's not doing a healthy lifestyle. One way to implement a healthy lifestyle is by doing physical exercises. Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine changes in sensory sensitivity of sweet taste due to aerobic physical exercise. Methods: This study was conducted on subjects aged 20 to 30 years. The subjects did aerobic exercise using 80% load of MHR. The measurement sensitivity of the senses of the sweet taste was done for three times before the subject take aerobic physical exercise, four weeks after doing aerobic physical exercise, and eight weeks after doing aerobic physical exercise. Results: There was significant difference towards sensitivity of sweet taste sense before doing aerobic physical exercise, 4 week after doing the aerobic physical exercise, and 8 week after doing aerobic physical exercise. Conclusion: Aerobic physical exercise during eight weeks increase sweet taste sensitivity.Latar belakang: Rasa manis memberikan sensasi yang menyenangkan. Rasa manis merupakan jenis rasa yang paling banyak dikonsumsi dan disukai oleh sekelompok orang. Secara fisiologis, glukosa bisa berperan sebagai sumber energi, namun apabila dikonsumsi secara berlebihan dapat menimbulkan efek patologis. Hal ini dihubungkan dengan individu yang mempunyai gaya hidup yang tidak sehat. Salah satu cara yang bisa dilakukan untuk membiasakan gaya hidup sehat adalah dengan latihan fisik (olah raga. Tujuan: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membuktikan adanya perubahan sensitivitas indera kecap rasa manis setelah melakukan latihan fisik aerobik. Metode: Penelitian ini melibatkan subyek laki-laki, berusia 20–30 tahun. Subjek melakukan latihan fisik aerobik dengan intensitas sebesar 80% maximal heart rate

  19. Haplotypes at the Tas2r locus on distal chromosome 6 vary with quinine taste sensitivity in inbred mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munger Steven D

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The detection of bitter-tasting compounds by the gustatory system is thought to alert animals to the presence of potentially toxic food. Some, if not all, bitter stimuli activate specific taste receptors, the T2Rs, which are expressed in subsets of taste receptor cells on the tongue and palate. However, there is evidence for both receptor-dependent and -independent transduction mechanisms for a number of bitter stimuli, including quinine hydrochloride (QHCl and denatonium benzoate (DB. Results We used brief-access behavioral taste testing of BXD/Ty recombinant inbred (RI mouse strains to map the major quantitative trait locus (QTL for taste sensitivity to QHCl. This QTL is restricted to a ~5 Mb interval on chromosome 6 that includes 24 genes encoding T2Rs (Tas2rs. Tas2rs at this locus display in total 307 coding region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs between the two BXD/Ty RI parental strains, C57BL/6J (quinine-sensitive and DBA/2J (quinine insensitive; approximately 50% of these mutations are silent. Individual RI lines contain exclusively either C57BL/6J or DBA/2J Tas2r alleles at this locus, and RI lines containing C57BL/6J Tas2r alleles are more sensitive to QHCl than are lines containing DBA/2J alleles. Thus, the entire Tas2r cluster comprises a large haplotype that correlates with quinine taster status. Conclusion These studies, the first using a taste-salient assay to map the major QTL for quinine taste, indicate that a T2R-dependent transduction cascade is responsible for the majority of strain variance in quinine taste sensitivity. Furthermore, the large number of polymorphisms within coding exons of the Tas2r cluster, coupled with evidence that inbred strains exhibit largely similar bitter taste phenotypes, suggest that T2R receptors are quite tolerant to variation.

  20. Influence of stimulus and oral adaptation temperature on gustatory responses in central taste-sensitive neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinrong; Lemon, Christian H

    2015-04-01

    The temperature of taste stimuli can modulate gustatory processing. Perceptual data indicate that the adapted temperature of oral epithelia also influences gustation, although little is known about the neural basis of this effect. Here, we electrophysiologically recorded orosensory responses (spikes) to 25°C (cool) and 35°C (warm) solutions of sucrose (0.1 and 0.3 M), NaCl (0.004, 0.1, and 0.3 M), and water from taste-sensitive neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract in mice under varied thermal adaptation of oral epithelia. Conditions included presentation of taste stimuli isothermal to adaptation temperatures of 25°C (constant cooling) and 35°C (constant warming), delivery of 25°C stimuli following 35°C adaptation (relative cooling), and presentation of 35°C stimuli following 25°C adaptation (relative warming). Responses to sucrose in sucrose-oriented cells (n = 15) were enhanced under the constant and relative warming conditions compared with constant cooling, where contiguous cooling across adaptation and stimulus periods induced the lowest and longest latency responses to sucrose. Yet compared with constant warming, cooling sucrose following warm adaptation (relative cooling) only marginally reduced activity to 0.1 M sucrose and did not alter responses to 0.3 M sucrose. Thus, warmth adaptation counteracted the attenuation in sucrose activity associated with stimulus cooling. Analysis of sodium-oriented (n = 25) neurons revealed adaptation to cool water, and cooling taste solutions enhanced unit firing to 0.004 M (perithreshold) NaCl, whereas warmth adaptation and stimulus warming could facilitate activity to 0.3 M NaCl. The concentration dependence of this thermal effect may reflect a dual effect of temperature on the sodium reception mechanism that drives sodium-oriented cells.

  1. Fat Taste Sensitivity Is Associated with Short-Term and Habitual Fat Intake

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    Andrew Costanzo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Evidence suggests individuals less sensitive to fat taste (high fat taste thresholds (FTT may be overweight or obese and consume greater amounts of dietary fat than more sensitive individuals. The aims of this study were to assess associations between FTT, anthropometric measurements, fat intake, and liking of fatty foods. FTT was assessed in 69 Australian females (mean age 41.3 (15.6 (SD years and mean body mass index 26.3 (5.7 kg/m2 by a 3-alternate forced choice methodology and transformed to an ordinal scale (FT rank. Food liking was assessed by hedonic ratings of high-fat and reduced-fat foods, and a 24-h food recall and food frequency questionnaire was completed. Linear mixed regression models were fitted. FT rank was associated with dietary % energy from fat ( β ^ = 0.110 [95% CI: 0.003, 0.216], % energy from carbohydrate ( β ^ = −0.112 [−0.188, −0.035], and frequency of consumption of foods per day from food groups: high-fat dairy ( β ^ = 1.091 [0.106, 2.242], meat & meat alternatives ( β ^ = 0.669 [0.168, 1.170], and grain & cereals ( β ^ = 0.771 [0.212, 1.329] (adjusted for energy and age. There were no associations between FT rank and anthropometric measurements or hedonic ratings. Therefore, fat taste sensitivity appears to be associated with short-term fat intake, but not body size in this group of females.

  2. Extensive Gustatory Cortex Lesions Significantly Impair Taste Sensitivity to KCl and Quinine but Not to Sucrose in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Michelle B; Schier, Lindsey A; Blonde, Ginger D; Spector, Alan C

    2015-01-01

    Recently, we reported that large bilateral gustatory cortex (GC) lesions significantly impair taste sensitivity to salts in rats. Here we extended the tastants examined to include sucrose and quinine in rats with ibotenic acid-induced lesions in GC (GCX) and in sham-operated controls (SHAM). Presurgically, immediately after drinking NaCl, rats received a LiCl or saline injection (i.p.), but postsurgical tests indicated a weak conditioned taste aversion (CTA) even in controls. The rats were then trained and tested in gustometers to discriminate a tastant from water in a two-response operant taste detection task. Psychometric functions were derived for sucrose, KCl, and quinine. Our mapping system was used to determine placement, size, and symmetry of the lesions (~91% GC damage on average). For KCl, there was a significant rightward shift (ΔEC50 = 0.57 log10 units; pquinine sensitivity. Surprisingly, taste sensitivity to sucrose was unaffected by the extensive lesions and was comparable between GCX and SHAM rats. The fact that such large bilateral GC lesions did not shift sucrose psychometric functions relative to SHAM, but did significantly compromise quinine and KCl sensitivity suggests that the neural circuits responsible for the detection of specific taste stimuli are partially dissociable. Lesion-induced impairments were observed in expression of a postsurgical CTA to a maltodextrin solution as assessed in a taste-oriented brief-access test, but were not reflected in a longer term 46-h two-bottle test. Thus, deficits observed in rats after extensive damage to the GC are also dependent on the test used to assess taste function. In conclusion, the degree to which the GC is necessary for the maintenance of normal taste detectability apparently depends on the chemical and/or perceptual features of the stimulus.

  3. SMOKING INCLINED GROUPS ACCORDING TO THE PHENOTYPE OF THE PTC GENE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khukhunaishvili, R; Tskvitinidze, S; Koridze, M; Nagervadze, M; Chelidze, N

    2016-09-01

    The ability to sense phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) bitterness represents a well-known and convenient genetic marker for human populations and biomedical studies. Two basic phenotypes can be dichotomized by PTC sensitivity: PTC-sensitive or "tester" and PTC-insensitive or "non-tester". The majority of the population (approximately 70%) belong to the PTC-sensitive phenotype, while the remaining 30% are PTC-insensitive. The distribution of PTC sensitivities varies by consumption of alcohol, bitter coffee and cigarettes. This study was conducted among randomly selected 90 cigarette smokers living in the Ajara Region of Georgia. Our results indicate that PTC-insensitive phenotypes are correlated with cigarette consumption and should be considered as an important genetic proxy for cigarette use. This marker may prove very useful for identifying adolescents who might benefit from a focused smoking prevention intervention.

  4. Supertaster, super reactive: oral sensitivity for bitter taste modulates emotional approach and avoidance behavior in the affective startle paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Cornelia; Platte, Petra; Wiemer, Julian; Macht, Michael; Blumenthal, Terry D

    2014-08-01

    People differ in both their sensitivity for bitter taste and their tendency to respond to emotional stimuli with approach or avoidance. The present study investigated the relationship between these sensitivities in an affective picture paradigm with startle responding. Emotion-induced changes in arousal and attention (pupil modulation), priming of approach and avoidance behavior (startle reflex modulation), and subjective evaluations (ratings) were examined. Sensitivity for bitter taste was assessed with the 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP)-sensitivity test, which discriminated individuals who were highly sensitive to PROP compared to NaCl (PROP-tasters) and those who were less sensitive or insensitive to the bitter taste of PROP. Neither pupil responses nor picture ratings differed between the two taster groups. The startle eye blink response, however, significantly differentiated PROP-tasters from PROP-insensitive subjects. Facilitated response priming to emotional stimuli emerged in PROP-tasters but not in PROP-insensitive subjects at shorter startle lead intervals (200-300ms between picture onset and startle stimulus onset). At longer lead intervals (3-4.5s between picture onset and startle stimulus onset) affective startle modulation did not differ between the two taster groups. This implies that in PROP-sensitive individuals action tendencies of approach or avoidance are primed immediately after emotional stimulus exposure. These results suggest a link between PROP taste perception and biologically relevant patterns of emotional responding. Direct perception-action links have been proposed to underlie motivational priming effects of the startle reflex, and the present results extend these to the sensory dimension of taste.

  5. Extensive Gustatory Cortex Lesions Significantly Impair Taste Sensitivity to KCl and Quinine but Not to Sucrose in Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle B Bales

    Full Text Available Recently, we reported that large bilateral gustatory cortex (GC lesions significantly impair taste sensitivity to salts in rats. Here we extended the tastants examined to include sucrose and quinine in rats with ibotenic acid-induced lesions in GC (GCX and in sham-operated controls (SHAM. Presurgically, immediately after drinking NaCl, rats received a LiCl or saline injection (i.p., but postsurgical tests indicated a weak conditioned taste aversion (CTA even in controls. The rats were then trained and tested in gustometers to discriminate a tastant from water in a two-response operant taste detection task. Psychometric functions were derived for sucrose, KCl, and quinine. Our mapping system was used to determine placement, size, and symmetry of the lesions (~91% GC damage on average. For KCl, there was a significant rightward shift (ΔEC50 = 0.57 log10 units; p<0.001 in the GCX psychometric function relative to SHAM, replicating our prior work. There was also a significant lesion-induced impairment (ΔEC50 = 0.41 log10 units; p = 0.006 in quinine sensitivity. Surprisingly, taste sensitivity to sucrose was unaffected by the extensive lesions and was comparable between GCX and SHAM rats. The fact that such large bilateral GC lesions did not shift sucrose psychometric functions relative to SHAM, but did significantly compromise quinine and KCl sensitivity suggests that the neural circuits responsible for the detection of specific taste stimuli are partially dissociable. Lesion-induced impairments were observed in expression of a postsurgical CTA to a maltodextrin solution as assessed in a taste-oriented brief-access test, but were not reflected in a longer term 46-h two-bottle test. Thus, deficits observed in rats after extensive damage to the GC are also dependent on the test used to assess taste function. In conclusion, the degree to which the GC is necessary for the maintenance of normal taste detectability apparently depends on the chemical and

  6. 湖南侗族青少年苯硫脲尝味能力测定与分析%Determination and Analysis of the Taste Ability of Teenages of Dong Nationality to Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) in Hunan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皮建辉; 舒孝顺; 佘朝文

    2003-01-01

    目的测定湖南侗族青少年苯硫脲(PTC)的尝味能力.方法采用阈值法,以5号液为味盲界限.结果侗族青少年味盲率为5.18%,男女间无明显差异,但尝味者平均尝味阈值女性(9.32±1.56)明显高于男性(8.84±1.68,P<0.01).结论湖南侗族青少年是一个对PTC尝味很敏感的群体.

  7. Taste perception with age: pleasantness and its relationships with threshold sensitivity and supra-threshold intensity of five taste qualities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, J.; Christ-Hazelhof, E.; Heidema, J.

    2005-01-01

    The relationships between threshold sensitivity, supra-threshold intensity of NaCl, KCl, sucrose, aspartame, acetic acid, citric acid, caffeine, quinine HCl, monosodium glutamate (MSG) and inosine 5¿-monophosphate (IMP), and the pleasantness of these stimuli in products, were studied in 21 young sub

  8. Drosophila bitter taste(s

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    Alice eFrench

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Most animals possess taste receptors neurons detecting potentially noxious compounds. In humans, the ligands which activate these neurons define a sensory space called bitter. By extension, this term has been used in animals and insects to define molecules which induce aversive responses. In this review, based on our observations carried out in Drosophila, we examine how bitter compounds are detected and if the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons respond only to molecules bitter to humans. Like most animals, flies detect bitter chemicals through a specific population of taste neurons, distinct from those responding to sugars or to other modalities. Activating bitter-sensitive taste neurons induce aversive reactions and inhibits feeding. Bitter molecules also contribute to the suppression of sugar-neuron responses and can lead to a complete inhibition of the responses to sugar at the periphery. Since some bitter molecules activate bitter-sensitive neurons and some inhibit sugar detection, bitter molecules are represented by two sensory spaces which are only partially congruent. In addition to molecules which impact feeding, we recently discovered that the activation of bitter-sensitive neurons also induces grooming. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the wings and of the legs can sense chemicals from the gram negative bacteria, Escherichia coli, thus adding another biological function to these receptors. Bitter-sensitive neurons of the proboscis also respond to inhibitory pheromones such as 7-tricosene. Activating these neurons by bitter molecules in the context of sexual encounter inhibits courting and sexual reproduction, while activating these neurons with 7-tricosene in a feeding context will inhibit feeding. The picture that emerges from these observations is that the taste system is composed of detectors which monitor different categories of ligands, which facilitate or inhibit behaviors depending on the context (feeding, sexual reproduction

  9. Genetics and bitter taste responses to goitrin, a plant toxin found in vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooding, Stephen; Gunn, Howard; Ramos, Purita; Thalmann, Sophie; Xing, Chao; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-10-01

    The perceived bitterness of cruciferous vegetables such as broccoli varies from person to person, but the functional underpinnings of this variation are not known. Some evidence suggests that it arises, in part, from variation in ability to perceive goitrin (5-vinyloxazolidine-2-thione), a potent antithyroid compound found naturally in crucifers. Individuals vary in ability to perceive synthetic compounds similar to goitrin, such as 6-propyl-2-thiouracil (PROP) and phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), as the result of mutations in the TAS2R38 gene, which encodes a bitter taste receptor. This suggests that taste responses to goitrin itself may be mediated by TAS2R38. To test this hypothesis, we examined the relationships between genetic variation in TAS2R38, functional variation in the encoded receptor, and threshold taste responses to goitrin, PROP, and PTC in 50 subjects. We found that threshold responses to goitrin were associated with responses to both PROP (P = 8.9 x 10(-4); r(s) = 0.46) and PTC (P = 7.5 x 10(-4); r(s) = 0.46). However, functional assays revealed that goitrin elicits a weaker response from the sensitive (PAV) allele of TAS2R38 (EC(50) = 65.0 μM) than do either PROP (EC(50) = 2.1 μM) or PTC (EC(50) = 1.1 μM) and no response at all from the insensitive (AVI) allele. Furthermore, goitrin responses were significantly associated with mutations in TAS2R38 (P = 9.3 × 10(-3)), but the same mutations accounted for a smaller proportion of variance in goitrin response (r(2) = 0.16) than for PROP (r(2) = 0.50) and PTC (r(2) = 0.57). These findings suggest that mutations in TAS2R38 play a role in shaping goitrin perception, but the majority of variance must be explained by other factors.

  10. Genetic Variation in the TAS2R38 Bitter Taste Receptor and Smoking Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide S.; Kozlitina, Julia; Sainz, Eduardo; Gutierrez, Joanne; Wooding, Stephen; Getachew, Betelihem; Luiselli, Donata; Berg, Carla J.

    2016-01-01

    Common TAS2R38 taste receptor gene variants specify the ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and structurally related compounds. Tobacco smoke contains a complex mixture of chemical substances of varying structure and functionality, some of which activate different taste receptors. Accordingly, it has been suggested that non-taster individuals may be more likely to smoke because of their inability to taste bitter compounds present in tobacco smoke, but results to date have been conflicting. We studied three cohorts: 237 European-Americans from the state of Georgia, 1,353 European-Americans and 2,363 African-Americans from the Dallas Heart Study (DHS), and 4,973 African-Americans from the Dallas Biobank. Tobacco use data was collected and TAS2R38 polymorphisms were genotyped for all participants, and PTC taste sensitivity was assessed in the Georgia population. In the Georgia group, PTC tasters were less common among those who smoke: 71.5% of smokers were PTC tasters while 82.5% of non-smokers were PTC tasters (P = 0.03). The frequency of the TAS2R38 PAV taster haplotype showed a trend toward being lower in smokers (38.4%) than in non-smokers (43.1%), although this was not statistically significant (P = 0.31). In the DHS European-Americans, the taster haplotype was less common in smokers (37.0% vs. 44.0% in non-smokers, P = 0.003), and conversely the frequency of the non-taster haplotype was more common in smokers (58.7% vs. 51.5% in non-smokers, P = 0.002). No difference in the frequency of these haplotypes was observed in African Americans in either the Dallas Heart Study or the Dallas Biobank. We conclude that TAS2R38 haplotypes are associated with smoking status in European-Americans but not in African-American populations. PTC taster status may play a role in protecting individuals from cigarette smoking in specific populations. PMID:27711175

  11. Genetic Sensitivity to the Bitter Taste of 6-n-Propylthiouracil (PROP and Its Association with Physiological Mechanisms Controlling Body Mass Index (BMI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beverly J. Tepper

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Taste sensitivity to the bitter compound 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP is considered a marker for individual differences in taste perception that may influence food preferences and eating behavior, and thereby energy metabolism. This review describes genetic factors that may contribute to PROP sensitivity including: (1 the variants of the TAS2R38 bitter receptor with their different affinities for the stimulus; (2 the gene that controls the gustin protein that acts as a salivary trophic factor for fungiform taste papillae; and (3 other specific salivary proteins that could be involved in facilitating the binding of the PROP molecule with its receptor. In addition, we speculate on the influence of taste sensitivity on energy metabolism, possibly via modulation of the endocannabinoid system, and its possible role in regulating body composition homeostasis.

  12. The relationships between phenylthiocarbamide taste perception and smoking, work out habits and susceptibility to depression

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    Sevgi Durna Daştan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC is known as phenylthiourea and it is an organic compound that has the phenyl ring. Ability to perceive the tastes of PTC chemical is related to the dominance of taste genes. There are a large number of population studies regarding the PTC taste perception and different personal characteristics or disease conditions. The purpose of this study is to reveal and compare the relation between the PTC taste perception and work-out habits, smoking, alcohol consumption and tendency to the depression of people. A total of 2500 adults were volunteered to be included in this study. PTC taste perception was measured by tasting with PTC solution (10 mg/L filtered in a paper. It showed that tasters were significantly more frequent (81.8% than nontasters (18.2% in all population. And in some parameters analyzed in this study, there are significant differences. The taste genetics show up with environmental factors and create the sense of taste, which develops the feeding behaviors. The taste perception resulting from food and beverages diversifies by genetic and environmental effects and the nervous system interprets this perception. This study is enlightening in terms of presenting that the taste perception of people affects their lifestyles and lead them to start and either continue or discontinue some habits.

  13. Testing taste sensitivity and aversion in very young children : development of a procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J; Kroeze, J.H.A.; Kamps, WA; Bijleveld, CMA

    2000-01-01

    Taste perception in 45 3- to 6-year-old children was tested using procedures specifically designed for this age group. Detection thresholds for sucrose and urea were measured by a staircase method and aversion to urea was assessed hedonically, using drawings of facial expressions. All children under

  14. Testing taste sensitivity and aversion in very young children: development of a procedure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, J.; Kroeze, J.H.A.; Kamps, W.A.; Bijleveld, C.M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Taste perception in 45 3- to 6-year-old children was tested using procedures specifically designed for this age group. Detection thresholds for sucrose and urea were measured by a staircase method and aversion to urea was assessed hedonically, using drawings of facial expressions. All children under

  15. Influences of age, tongue region, and chorda tympani nerve sectioning on signal detection measures of lingual taste sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Richard L; Heidt, Julie M; MacGillivray, Michael R; Dsouza, Merle; Tracey, Elisabeth H; Mirza, Natasha; Bigelow, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    Although the ability to taste is critical for ingestion, nutrition, and quality of life, a clear understanding of the influences of age, sex, and chorda tympani (CT) resection on taste function in different regions of the anterior tongue is generally lacking. In this study we employed criterion-free signal detection analysis to assess electric and chemical taste function on multiple tongue regions in normal individuals varying in age and sex and in patients with unilateral CT resections. The subjects were 33 healthy volunteers, ranging from 18 to 87 years of age, and 9 persons, 27 to 77 years of age, with unilateral CT lesions. The influences of age, sex, tongue region, and chorda tympani resections on signal detection sensitivity (d') and response bias (β) measures was assessed in 16 tongue regions to weak electric currents and solutions of sucrose, sodium chloride, and caffeine. Significant age-related decrements in d' were found for sucrose (p=0.012), sodium chloride (p=0.002), caffeine (p=0.006), and electric current (EC) (p=0.0001). Significant posterior to anterior, and medial to lateral, gradients of increasing performance were present for most stimuli. β was larger on the anterior than the posterior tongue for the electrical stimulus in the youngest subjects, whereas the opposite was true for sucrose in the oldest subjects. No sex differences were apparent. d' was depressed ipsilateral to the CT lesion side to varying degrees in all tongue regions, with the weakest influences occurring on the medial and anterior tongue. CT did not meaningfully influence β. This study is the first to employ signal detection analysis to assess the regional sensitivity of the tongue to chemical and electrical stimuli. It clearly demonstrates that tongue regions differ from one another in terms of their age-related sensitivity and their susceptibility to CT lesions.

  16. Association of Oral Fat Sensitivity with Body Mass Index, Taste Preference, and Eating Habits in Healthy Japanese Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Masanobu; Hong, Guang; Matsuyama, Yusuke; Wang, Weiqi; Izumi, Satoshi; Izumi, Masayuki; Toda, Takashi; Kudo, Tada-Aki

    2016-01-01

    Oral fat sensitivity (OFS, the ability to detect fat) may be related to overeating-induced obesity. However, it is largely unknown whether OFS affects taste preference and eating habits. Therefore, we aimed to evaluate (1) the association between body mass index (BMI) and OFS and (2) the relationship of OFS with four types of taste preference (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter) and eating habits using serial concentrations of oleic acid (OA) homogenized in non-fat milk and a self-reported questionnaire. Participants were 25 healthy Japanese individuals (mean age: 27.0 ± 5.6 years), among whom the OA detection threshold was significantly associated with BMI. Participants were divided into two subgroups based on oral sensitivity to 2.8 mM OA: hypersensitive (able to detect 2.8 mM OA, n = 16) and hyposensitive (unable to detect 2.8 mM OA, n = 9). The degree of sweet taste preference of the hypersensitive group was significantly higher than that of the hyposensitive group. Furthermore, there was significantly higher degree of preference for high-fat sweet foods than low-fat sweet foods in the hypersensitive group. There was also a significant inverse correlation between the OA detection threshold and the degree of both spare eating and postprandial satiety. Thus, OFS is associated not only with BMI, but also with the preference for high-fat sweet foods and eating habits. The present study provides novel insights that measuring OFS may be useful for assessing the risk of obesity associated with overeating in countries, including Japan, where BMI is increasing in the population.

  17. MAD-X PTC Integration

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Frank; Goddard, B; Jacquet, D; Kain, V; Lamont, M; Mertens, V; Uythoven, J; Wenninger, J

    2005-01-01

    MAD-X is CERN's successor for MAD8, a program for accelerator design with a long history. MAD-X is a modular, better maintainable re-write of MAD8 with data structures written in `C'. Early on in the design of MAD-X we relied on the fact that older or doubtful modules could be replaced by new modules using the PTC code by E. Forest. Both codes remain independent entities but are linked via a converter to the MAD-X data structures. PTC is used for symplectic tracking of smaller machines and transfer line using better defined physical models of the elements and taking into account of how the elements are placed in the tunnel. The matching of the LHC will profit form the fact that the high order nonlinear parameters are provided by a PTC Normal Form analysis.

  18. Taste - impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of what is perceived as "taste" is actually smell. People who have taste problems often have a smell disorder that can make it hard to identify ... flavor. (Flavor is a combination of taste and smell.) Taste problems can be caused by anything that ...

  19. Increased N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Expression in Amygdala and Perirhinal Cortex during Habituation of Taste Neophobia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Chacón, Beatriz; Gámiz, Fernando; Foster, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between GluR2 and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) mediate AMPA receptors trafficking. This might be linked with molecular mechanisms related with memory formation. Previous research has shown basolateral amygdala (BLA) dependent activity changes in the perirhinal cortex (PRh) during the formation of taste memory. In the present experiments we investigate both the behavioral performance and the expression profile of NSF and GluR2 genes in several brain areas, including PRh, BLA, and hippocampus. Twenty-one naïve male Wistar rats were exposed to a saccharin solution (0.4%) during the first (novel), the second (Familiar I), and the sixth presentation (Familiar II). Total RNA was extracted and gene expression was measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using TaqMan gene expression assays. In addition the expression of the synaptic plasticity related immediate early genes, Homer 1 and Narp, was also assessed. We have found increased expression of NSF gene in BLA and PRh in Group Familiar I in comparison with Familiar II. No changes in the expression of GluR2, Homer 1, and Narp genes were found. The results suggest the relevance of a potential network in the temporal lobe for taste recognition memory and open new possibilities for understanding the molecular mechanisms mediating the impact of sensory experience on brain circuit function. PMID:26839712

  20. Activation of bitter taste receptors in pulmonary nociceptors sensitizes TRPV1 channels through the PLC and PKC signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qihai David; Joe, Deanna S; Gilbert, Carolyn A

    2017-03-01

    Bitter taste receptors (T2Rs), a G protein-coupled receptor family capable of detecting numerous bitter-tasting compounds, have recently been shown to be expressed and play diverse roles in many extraoral tissues. Here we report the functional expression of T2Rs in rat pulmonary sensory neurons. In anesthetized spontaneously breathing rats, intratracheal instillation of T2R agonist chloroquine (10 mM, 0.1 ml) significantly augmented chemoreflexes evoked by right-atrial injection of capsaicin, a specific activator for transient receptor potential vanilloid receptor 1 (TRPV1), whereas intravenous infusion of chloroquine failed to significantly affect capsaicin-evoked reflexes. In patch-clamp recordings with isolated rat vagal pulmonary sensory neurons, pretreatment with chloroquine (1-1,000 µM, 90 s) concentration dependently potentiated capsaicin-induced TRPV1-mediated inward currents. Preincubating with diphenitol and denatonium (1 mM, 90 s), two other T2R activators, also enhanced capsaicin currents in these neurons but to a lesser extent. The sensitizing effect of chloroquine was effectively prevented by the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 (1 µM) or by the protein kinase C inhibitor chelerythrine (10 µM). In summary, our study showed that activation of T2Rs augments capsaicin-evoked TRPV1 responses in rat pulmonary nociceptors through the phospholipase C and protein kinase C signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Increased N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Expression in Amygdala and Perirhinal Cortex during Habituation of Taste Neophobia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gómez-Chacón

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between GluR2 and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF mediate AMPA receptors trafficking. This might be linked with molecular mechanisms related with memory formation. Previous research has shown basolateral amygdala (BLA dependent activity changes in the perirhinal cortex (PRh during the formation of taste memory. In the present experiments we investigate both the behavioral performance and the expression profile of NSF and GluR2 genes in several brain areas, including PRh, BLA, and hippocampus. Twenty-one naïve male Wistar rats were exposed to a saccharin solution (0.4% during the first (novel, the second (Familiar I, and the sixth presentation (Familiar II. Total RNA was extracted and gene expression was measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR using TaqMan gene expression assays. In addition the expression of the synaptic plasticity related immediate early genes, Homer 1 and Narp, was also assessed. We have found increased expression of NSF gene in BLA and PRh in Group Familiar I in comparison with Familiar II. No changes in the expression of GluR2, Homer 1, and Narp genes were found. The results suggest the relevance of a potential network in the temporal lobe for taste recognition memory and open new possibilities for understanding the molecular mechanisms mediating the impact of sensory experience on brain circuit function.

  2. Increased N-Ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor Expression in Amygdala and Perirhinal Cortex during Habituation of Taste Neophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Chacón, Beatriz; Gámiz, Fernando; Foster, Thomas C; Gallo, Milagros

    2016-01-01

    Interactions between GluR2 and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor (NSF) mediate AMPA receptors trafficking. This might be linked with molecular mechanisms related with memory formation. Previous research has shown basolateral amygdala (BLA) dependent activity changes in the perirhinal cortex (PRh) during the formation of taste memory. In the present experiments we investigate both the behavioral performance and the expression profile of NSF and GluR2 genes in several brain areas, including PRh, BLA, and hippocampus. Twenty-one naïve male Wistar rats were exposed to a saccharin solution (0.4%) during the first (novel), the second (Familiar I), and the sixth presentation (Familiar II). Total RNA was extracted and gene expression was measured by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using TaqMan gene expression assays. In addition the expression of the synaptic plasticity related immediate early genes, Homer 1 and Narp, was also assessed. We have found increased expression of NSF gene in BLA and PRh in Group Familiar I in comparison with Familiar II. No changes in the expression of GluR2, Homer 1, and Narp genes were found. The results suggest the relevance of a potential network in the temporal lobe for taste recognition memory and open new possibilities for understanding the molecular mechanisms mediating the impact of sensory experience on brain circuit function.

  3. Genetic study of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taste perception among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohd Fareed

    2012-03-04

    Mar 4, 2012 ... Mendelian traits in human populations, ranking alongside eye color and blood types in the canon of classic examples. The major gene .... can throw fresh light on the origin and evolution of the popu- lation under study.

  4. Type 2C protein phosphatase Ptc6 participates in activation of the Slt2-mediated cell wall integrity pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from an equilibrium between the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Reversible protein phosphorylation is an important aspect of signal transduction that regulate many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes 40 PPases, including seven members of the protein phosphatase 2C subfamily (PTC1 to PTC7). In contrast to other PPases, the cellular roles of PTCs have not been investigated in detail. Here, we sought to determine the cellular role of PTC6 in S. cerevisiae with disruption of PTC genes. We found that cells with Δptc6 disruption were tolerant to the cell wall-damaging agents Congo red (CR) and calcofluor white (CFW); however, cells with simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 were very sensitive to these agents. Thus, simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 gave a synergistic response to cell wall damaging agents. The level of phosphorylated Slt2 increased significantly after CR treatment in Δptc1 cells and more so in Δptcptc6 cells; therefore, deletion of PTC6 enhanced Slt2 phosphorylation in the Δptc1 disruptant. The level of transcription of KDX1 upon exposure to CR increased to a greater extent in the Δptcptc6 double disruptant than the Δptc1 single disruptant. The Δptcptc6 double disruptant cells showed normal vacuole formation under standard growth conditions, but fragmented vacuoles were present in the presence of CR or CFW. Our analyses indicate that S. cerevisiae PTC6 participates in the negative regulation of Slt2 phosphorylation and vacuole morphogenesis under cell wall stress conditions.

  5. Genetic sensitivity to bitter taste of 6-n Propylthiouracil: A useful diagnostic aid to detect early childhood caries in pre-school children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Pidamale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Genetic factor to bitter taste perception appears to be largely mediated by the TAS2R38 gene. The insensitivity to bitter compounds like 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP is mediated by this gene. PROP, a pharmacological drug used in treatment of Graves′ disease, proved to be useful tool in determining the genetic sensitivity levels to bitter and sweet taste. The purpose of this study is to show much simpler PROP sensitivity technique for the clinical examiner and its application as a diagnostic aid in Early Childhood Caries (ECC detection among preschool children. Materials and Methods: A total of 119 children belonging to the age group of 36 to 71 months of both sexes, were recruited from A. J. Institute of Dental Sciences, Mangalore (Karnataka. PROP sensitivity test was carried out to determine the inherent genetic ability to taste a bitter or sweet substance. This study used simpler scaling method to find out genetic sensitivity to bitter taste; one who tasted bitter as taster and one who was not able to differentiate/tasted like paper as non-taster. A questionnaire was provided to evaluate their dietary habits and caries experience was recorded. Collected data were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis. Results: In the total of 119 children the mean dmfs was definitely higher in non-taster children compared to tasters. The tasters had a mean dmfs value of 9.5120 (S.D. 7.0543 and non-tasters had a value of 7.7250 (S.D. 8.33147, which was statistically significant. The results suggested that there was increase in caries experience among the group of non-tasters as compared to tasters. Tasters tended to be sweet dislikers and non-tasters tended to be sweet likers. On the whole, tasters had a bad dentition as compared to non tasters. Conclusion: The PROP sensitivity test (filter paper test proved to be a useful diagnostic tool in determining the genetic sensitivity levels of bitter taste. The knowledge of a child′s taste

  6. Taste Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may help scientists develop drugs targeting the gut taste receptors to treat obesity and diabetes. Where can I ... Smell Smell Disorders News Unraveling the enigma of salty taste detection: New findings could help identify successful ...

  7. Taste sensitivity to sucrose is lower in outbred Sprague-Dawley phenotypic obesity-prone rats than obesity-resistant rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Huiling; Yan, Junbao; Sun, Bo; Song, Lin; Yan, Jianqun

    2017-07-22

    The purpose of the present study was to better understand the role of sweet taste perception in dietary behavior and body weight in outbred Sprague-Dawley phenotypic obesity-prone and obesity-resistant rats by measuring sucrose taste sensitivity using a conditioned taste aversion paradigm. Rats were given a high fat diet for 2 weeks and were assigned as obesity-prone (P, upper tertile) or obesity-resistant (R, lower tertile) based on weight gain. Each group was then given either chow (C, 10% fat) or the high fat diet (F, 46% fat) for the remainder of the experiment (∼18 weeks) such that there were four groups - obesity-prone on chow (C-P), obesity-prone on high fat (H-P), obesity-resistant on chow (C-R), obesity-resistant on high fat (H-R). The sucrose sensitivity of phenotypic obesity-prone rats is lower than that of obesity-resistant rats in either H-fed or C-fed group, and all H-fed rats were more sensitivity than their C-fed counterparts (H-P vs. C-P; H-R vs. C-R). Body weight gain and total calories intake of phenotypic obesity-prone rats are more than that of obesity-resistant rats. The results suggest that lower sucrose taste sensitivity may contribute to body weight gain and total calories intake of phenotypic obesity-prone rats compared to obesity-resistant rats, and there is correlation between the change in the sweet taste threshold and diet treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Ptc6 is required for proper rapamycin-induced down-regulation of the genes coding for ribosomal and rRNA processing proteins in S. cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asier González

    Full Text Available Ptc6 is one of the seven components (Ptc1-Ptc7 of the protein phosphatase 2C family in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to other type 2C phosphatases, the cellular role of this isoform is poorly understood. We present here a comprehensive characterization of this gene product. Cells lacking Ptc6 are sensitive to zinc ions, and somewhat tolerant to cell-wall damaging agents and to Li(+. Ptc6 mutants are sensitive to rapamycin, albeit to lesser extent than ptc1 cells. This phenotype is not rescued by overexpression of PTC1 and mutation of ptc6 does not reproduce the characteristic genetic interactions of the ptc1 mutation with components of the TOR pathway, thus suggesting different cellular roles for both isoforms. We show here that the rapamycin-sensitive phenotype of ptc6 cells is unrelated to the reported role of Pt6 in controlling pyruvate dehydrogenase activity. Lack of Ptc6 results in substantial attenuation of the transcriptional response to rapamycin, particularly in the subset of repressed genes encoding ribosomal proteins or involved in rRNA processing. In contrast, repressed genes involved in translation are Ptc6-independent. These effects cannot be attributed to the regulation of the Sch9 kinase, but they could involve modulation of the binding of the Ifh1 co-activator to specific gene promoters.

  9. 49 CFR 236.1031 - Previously approved PTC systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Previously approved PTC systems. 236.1031 Section... Train Control Systems § 236.1031 Previously approved PTC systems. (a) Any PTC system fully implemented and operational prior to March 16, 2010, may receive PTC System Certification if the applicable PTC...

  10. Expressions of miRNAs in papillary thyroid carcinoma and their associations with the clinical characteristics of PTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jianxia; Li, Chengqian; Liu, Chongkai; Zhao, Shihua; Wang, Yangang; Fu, Zhengju

    2017-01-01

    The sensitivity and specificity of biomarkers which have been used in clinical practice for diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) are low, it is essential to develop novel diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers for PTC. To explore the expressions of miR-940, miR-15a, miR-16 and IL-23 in PTC tissues and plasma and their associations with the clinical characteristics of PTC. We investigated the expressions of miR-940, miR-15a, miR-16 and IL-23 in plasma and thyroid tissues of PTC, nodular goiter and healthy people with qRT-PCR, and further analyzed the associations between their levels and the clinical characteristics of PTC. Level of IL-23 expression was higher while levels of miR-940, miR-15a and miR-16 expression in the PTC tissues were lower compared with the nodular goiter tissues and perineoplastic thyroid tissues. And the levels of miR-940, miR-15a, miR-16 and IL-23 expression in the PTC tissues were associated with some clinical characteristics of PTC, including bilateral tumor, multicentricity, extrallyroidal invasion, cervical lymph node metastasis, distant metastasis and clinical advanced stages (III/IV). Expressions of miR-940, miR-15a, miR-16 and IL-23 in PTC tissues might be useful biomarkers and promising targets in the diagnosis of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

  11. Genetic Sensitivity to Phenylthiocarbamide – Effect on Body Mass Indices and DNA damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gursatej Gandhi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available As sensitivity to bitter taste (phenylthiocarbamide [PTC] perception has been maintained at high frequency worldwide, its use as a potential genetic marker for food preferences and dietary choices and its influence on body weight/adiposity which in turn maybe a contributor to various co-morbidities including malignancy needs to be explored in the Punjabi context where there is higher per capita income, an adapted ‘western’ dietary pattern with traditional culinary habits and reduced physical activity. Since studies linking PTC tasting status, indices of obesity and DNA damage have not come to attention, the present study, using the alkaline Single Cell Gel Electrophoresis assay was carried out to assess genomic damage in peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL of 144 individuals, both obese (n=96, as determined by body mass index [BMI] and waist-hip ratio [WHR] and normal weight healthy (n=46 subjects. Their PTC status revealed 73 tasters and 69 non-tasters. The odds ratio revealed a 2.51 times increased risk in non-tasters (OR=2.51; 95%CI 1.20-5.25 for having BMI≥ 25.0 kg/m2 in comparison to risk in tasters while the risk ratio revealed a 1.32 times increased probability of non-tasters for having BMI≥ 25.0 kg/m2 in comparison to tasters (RR=1.32; 95%CI 1.05-1.66. The genetic damage in the obese group (characterized on the bases of their gender and PTC tasting ability was very highly significant (p<0.001 compared to the values in the matched control group (healthy, normal weight subjects. In both the taster and non-taster groups, BMI and WC (waist circumference significantly correlated to genetic damage indices though PTC tasting ability did not appear to influence BMI, WHR and WC.

  12. RET/PTC rearrangement in benign and malignant thyroid diseases: a clinical standpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marotta, Vincenzo; Guerra, Anna; Sapio, Maria Rosaria; Vitale, Mario

    2011-10-01

    Cytological examination of fine needle aspiration biopsy is the primary means for distinguishing benign from malignant nodules. However, as inconclusive cytology is very frequent, the introduction of molecular markers in the preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules has been proposed in recent years. In this article, we review the clinical implications of preoperative detection of rearrangements of the RET gene (RET/papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC)) in thyroid nodules. The prevalence of RET/PTC in PTC depends on the histological subtypes, geographical factors, radiation exposure, and detection method. Initially, RET/PTC was considered an exclusive PTC hallmark and later it was also found sporadically in benign thyroid lesions. More recently, the very sensitive detection methods, interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and Southern blot on RT-PCR amplicons, demonstrated that the oligoclonal occurrence of RET rearrangement in benign thyroid lesions is not a rare event and suggested that it could be associated with a faster enlargement in benign nodules. For this reason, RET/PTC cannot be considered as an absolute marker of PTC, and its diagnostic application must be limited to assays able to distinguish between clonal and oligoclonal expression. Detection of RET/PTC by quantitative assays will be useful for diagnostic purposes in cytology specimens when a precise cutoff will be fixed in a clinical setting. Until that time, less sensitive RET/PTC detection methods and FISH analysis remain the most appropriate means to refine inconclusive cytology. Future studies with a long follow-up will further clarify the clinical significance of low level of RET rearrangements in benign nodules.

  13. Sixth taste – starch taste?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zygmunt Zdrojewicz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientists from Oregon State University, USA, came up with the newest theory of the sixth taste – starch taste that might soon join the basic five tastes. This argument is supported by studies done on both animals and humans, the results of which seem to indicate the existence of separate receptors for starch taste, others than for sweet taste. Starch is a glucose homopolymer that forms an α-glucoside chain called glucosan or glucan. This polysaccharide constitutes the most important source of carbohydrates in food. It can be found in groats, potatoes, legumes, grains, manioc and corn. Apart from its presence in food, starch is also used in textile, pharmaceutical, cosmetic and stationery industries as well as in glue production. This polysaccharide is made of an unbranched helical structure – amylose (15–20%, and a structure that forms branched chains – amylopectin (80–85%. The starch structure, degree of its crystallisation or hydration as well as its availability determine the speed of food-contained starch hydrolysis by amylase. So far, starch has been considered tasteless, but the newest report shows that for people of different origins it is associated with various aliments specific for each culture. Apart from a number of scientific experiments using sweet taste inhibitors, the existence of the sixth taste is also confirmed by molecular studies. However, in order to officially include starch taste to the basic human tastes, it must fulfil certain criteria. The aim of the study is to present contemporary views on starch.

  14. Taste and hypertension in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura, Eugeni; Foster, Simon; Winklebach, Anja;

    2016-01-01

    The association between salty taste and NaCl intake with hypertension is well-established, although it is far from completely understood. Other taste types such as sweet, umami or bitter have also been related to alterations in blood pressure. Here, we review the mutual relationship between taste...... and hypertension to identify potential avenues to better control blood pressure. This review focuses on published data involving humans, with the exception of a section on molecular mechanisms. There is compelling evidence to suggest that changes in salty taste sensitivity can be used to predict the onset...... of hypertension. This goes hand in hand with the medical concept of sodium sensitivity, which also increases with age, particularly in hypertensive patients. The association of hypertension with the loss of taste acuity less definitive with some data/conclusions masked by the use of anti-hypertensive drugs...

  15. PTC thermistor protects multiloaded power supplies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverone, H.; Mandell, N.

    1964-01-01

    A PTC /Positive-Temperature-Coefficient/ thermistor placed in series with each branch load of a multiload circuit prevents power loss in parallel branches. This thermistor may be used in any circuit requiring current limiting or intended overload resetting.

  16. Advances in MAD-X using PTC

    CERN Document Server

    Skowronski, P K; Forest, E

    2007-01-01

    For the last few years the MAD-X program makes use of the Polymorphic Tracking Code (PTC) to perform calculations related to beamdynamics in the nonlinear regime. An important new feature is the extension of the matching module to allow fitting of non-linear parameters to any order. Moreover, calculations can now be performed with parameter dependence defined in the MAD-X input. In addition, the user can access the PTC routines for the placement of a magnet with arbitrary position and orientation. This facilitates the design of non-standard lattices, in particular since a 3D visualization of a lattice is now available. For the LHC studies during commissioning it is of special interest that one has access to within the thick PTC elements which allows e.g. to find PTC Twiss parameters at any point in the ring.

  17. TRPs in taste and chemesthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    TRP channels are expressed in taste buds, nerve fibers, and keratinocytes in the oronasal cavity. These channels play integral roles in transducing chemical stimuli, giving rise to sensations of taste, irritation, warmth, coolness, and pungency. Specifically, TRPM5 acts downstream of taste receptors in the taste transduction pathway. TRPM5 channels convert taste-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release into membrane depolarization to trigger taste transmitter secretion. PKD2L1 is expressed in acid-sensitive (sour) taste bud cells but is unlikely to be the transducer for sour taste. TRPV1 is a receptor for pungent chemical stimuli such as capsaicin and for several irritants (chemesthesis). It is controversial whether TRPV1 is present in the taste buds and plays a direct role in taste. Instead, TRPV1 is expressed in non-gustatory sensory afferent fibers and in keratinocytes of the oronasal cavity. In many sensory fibers and epithelial cells lining the oronasal cavity, TRPA1 is also co-expressed with TRPV1. As with TRPV1, TRPA1 transduces a wide variety of irritants and, in combination with TRPV1, assures that there is a broad response to noxious chemical stimuli. Other TRP channels, including TRPM8, TRPV3, and TRPV4, play less prominent roles in chemesthesis and no known role in taste, per se. The pungency of foods and beverages is likely highly influenced by the temperature at which they are consumed, their acidity, and, for beverages, their carbonation. All these factors modulate the activity of TRP channels in taste buds and in the oronasal mucosa.

  18. 49 CFR 236.1011 - PTC Implementation Plan content requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PTC Implementation Plan content requirements. 236... Positive Train Control Systems § 236.1011 PTC Implementation Plan content requirements. Link to an...) How the PTC railroad intends to comply with §§ 236.1009(c) and (d); (3) How the PTC system will...

  19. Smell and Taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ENTCareers Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Smell & Taste Smell & Taste Patient Health Information News media ... passages, or, at times, brain tumors. HOW DO SMELL AND TASTE WORK? Smell and taste belong to ...

  20. Taste and hypertension in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura, Eugeni; Foster, Simon; Winklebach, Anja

    2016-01-01

    approaches to mitigate cardiovascular disease (CVD) could well take a different spin in the future following the discovery of taste receptors (TAS1R and TAS2R) in the cardiovascular system. Finally, long-term dietary strategies to minimize the risk of development of hypertension and CVD are discussed......The association between salty taste and NaCl intake with hypertension is well-established, although it is far from completely understood. Other taste types such as sweet, umami or bitter have also been related to alterations in blood pressure. Here, we review the mutual relationship between taste...... and hypertension to identify potential avenues to better control blood pressure. This review focuses on published data involving humans, with the exception of a section on molecular mechanisms. There is compelling evidence to suggest that changes in salty taste sensitivity can be used to predict the onset...

  1. Associations of phenylthiocarbamide tasting to alcohol problems and family history of alcoholism differ by gender.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driscoll, Kimberly A; Perez, Marisol; Cukrowicz, Kelly C; Butler, Melanie; Joiner, Thomas E

    2006-06-30

    Past research associating phenylthiocarbamide/propylthiouracil (PTC/PROP) taste status with alcoholism has produced equivocal results. Some have found higher proportions of nontasters among those with a family history of alcoholism than controls, whereas others have not. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between PTC taste status, alcohol problems, and family history of alcoholism. A total of 244 undergraduate students participated in this study, with a gender distribution of 75% female and 25% male. We found support for our hypothesis that male supertasters would report fewer problems with alcohol and a less significant family history of alcoholism. Interestingly, we also found that female supertasters had a greater family history of alcoholism and more current problems associated with alcohol use. Implications for the genetic link between PTC taste status and alcoholism are discussed.

  2. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  3. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  4. 49 CFR 236.1027 - PTC system exclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PTC system exclusions. 236.1027 Section 236.1027... Systems § 236.1027 PTC system exclusions. (a) The requirements of this subpart apply to each office... PTC system. For purposes of this section, “office automation system” means any centralized or...

  5. Changing Tastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillersdal, Line; Christensen, Bodil Just; Holm, Lotte

    2016-01-01

    Gastric bypass surgery is a specific medical technology that alters the body in ways that force the patient to fundamentally change his or her eating habits. When patients enrol for surgery, they enter a learning process, encountering new and at times contested ways of sensing their bodies, tasting......’ and hence a rupture in the person’s sense of self and social relations. We suggest that eating should be conceptualised as a practice that extends beyond the boundaries of our bodies and into diverse realms of relations and practices, and that changing the way we eat also changes the fundamentally embodied...

  6. Taste and Smell Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our senses of taste and smell give us great pleasure. Taste helps us enjoy food and beverages. Smell lets us enjoy the scents and fragrances like roses or coffee. Taste and smell also protect us, letting us know when food ...

  7. What Are Taste Buds?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your taste buds for letting you appreciate the saltiness of pretzels and the sweetness of ice cream. ... allow you to experience tastes that are sweet, salty, sour, and bitter. How exactly do your taste ...

  8. [Sensors for Measuring Taste and Smell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toko, Kiyoshi

    2017-05-01

    Gustatory and olfactory senses receive chemical substances at the biological membranes of taste and olfactory cells, respectively. The present review article describes electronic tongue (taste sensor) and electronic nose (odor sensor) developed based on biomimetic technology. A taste sensor is now commercially sold and utilized in pharmaceutical and food companies across the world. An electronic nose with high sensitivity was also commercialized in Japan. These sensors provide novel methods for analyzing chemical substances instead of using conventional tools.

  9. A2BR adenosine receptor modulates sweet taste in circumvallate taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kataoka

    Full Text Available In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3 on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate, but not anterior (fungiform, palate taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields.

  10. Habitual Tastes and Embedded Taste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Liselotte

    2016-01-01

    of the national cuisine indicates continuity over time. There seems, hence, to be a gap between the multiplicity of instances of experience and recollection that belongs to the sphere of the individual and a historical memory embedded in the larger context of a society. From a common-sense perspective, this gap...... may be bridged by story-telling or other ways of handing over historically embedded practices, but this leaves a more fundamental question unanswered. Namely, that given that all remembrance has individual recollection as the point of departure, then how does individual recollection of tastes...

  11. Changing Tastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillersdal, Line; Christensen, Bodil Just; Holm, Lotte

    2017-01-01

    Gastric bypass surgery is a specific medical technology that alters the body in ways that force the patient to fundamentally change his or her eating habits. When patients enrol for surgery, they enter a learning process, encountering new and at times contested ways of sensing their bodies, tasting......, and experiencing hunger and fullness. In this paper, we explore how patients begin to eat again after gastric bypass surgery. The empirical data used here are drawn from a Danish fieldwork study of persons undergoing obesity surgery. The material presented shows how the patients used instructions on how to eat. We...... explore the ways in which diverse new experiences and practices of hunger and fullness are part of the process of undergoing surgery for severe obesity. New sensory experiences lead to uncertainty; as a result, patients practice what we term mimetic eating, which reflects a ‘sensory displacement...

  12. Contribution of different taste cells and signaling pathways to the discrimination of "bitter" taste stimuli by an insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendinning, John I; Davis, Adrienne; Ramaswamy, Sudha

    2002-08-15

    Animals can discriminate among many different types of foods. This discrimination process involves multiple sensory systems, but the sense of taste is known to play a central role. We asked how the taste system contributes to the discrimination of different "bitter" taste stimuli in Manduca sexta caterpillars. This insect has approximately eight bilateral pairs of taste cells that respond selectively to bitter taste stimuli. Each bilateral pair of bitter-sensitive taste cells has a different molecular receptive range (MRR); some of these taste cells also contain two signaling pathways with distinctive MRRs and temporal patterns of spiking. To test for discrimination, we habituated the caterpillar's taste-mediated aversive response to one bitter taste stimulus (salicin) and then asked whether this habituation phenomenon generalized to four other bitter taste stimuli (caffeine, aristolochic acid, Grindelia extract, and Canna extract). We inferred that the two compounds were discriminable if the habituation phenomenon failed to generalize (e.g., from salicin to aristolochic acid). We found that M. sexta could discriminate between salicin and those bitter taste stimuli that activate (1) different populations of bitter-sensitive taste cells (Grindelia extract and Canna extract) or (2) different signaling pathways within the same bitter-sensitive taste cell (aristolochic acid). M. sexta could not discriminate between salicin and a bitter taste stimulus that activates the same signaling pathway within the same bitter-sensitive taste cell (caffeine). We propose that the heterogeneous population of bitter-sensitive taste cells and signaling pathways within this insect facilitates the discrimination of bitter taste stimuli.

  13. A case study on the association of variation of bitter-taste receptor gene TAS2R38 with the height, weight and energy intake in Japanese female college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroko; Yamakawa-Kobayashi, Kimiko; Suzuki, Yuichi; Nakano, Teruyo; Hayashi, Hisayoshi; Kuwano, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    One of the critical factors that determines individual differences in dietary behavior and nutritional status is the sensory-affecting quality of food, in particular its taste. Variation of one bitter taste receptor gene, TAS2R38, which is associated with the differential sensitivity to phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP), has been demonstrated to affect the dietary intake pattern. A case study was performed to examine the association of the TAS2R38 genotypes/haplotypes with the body size (height, weight and BMI) and with the food and nutrient intake. Eighty-four college students, all females, with an age range of 18-21 y were recruited from the University of Shizuoka. The genotypes of two common single nucleotide polymorphisms in TAS2R38 (A49P and I296V) were determined by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) method. The height, weight and body mass index (BMI), and (in a subgroup of 47 subjects) food and nutrition intake estimated from 3 d of food recording, were compared between homozygotes for the PTC/PROP-nontaster haplotype (AI haplotype) and carriers with the PTC/PROP-taster haplotype (PV haplotype). The results show that the homozygotes with AI haplotype were taller and heavier than the carriers of PV haplotype, while BMI values were similar between them. The former group also had higher energy and carbohydrate intakes than the latter group. Neither vegetable nor dairy product intake was different between the homozygotes with AI haplotype and the carriers of PV haplotype. In conclusion, the PTC/PROP-nontaster TAS2R38 genotype/haplotype was associated with height and weight but not with BMI, which may in turn have influenced the energy and carbohydrate intakes.

  14. Mammalian Sweet Taste Receptors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Greg; Hoon, Mark A; Chandrashekar, Jayaram; Zhang, Yifeng; Ryba, Nicholas J.P; Zuker, Charles S

    2001-01-01

    ... and information coding, and have focused on the isolation and characterization of genes encoding sweet and bitter taste receptors. The identification of taste receptors generates powerful molecular tools to investigate not only the function of taste receptor cells, but also the logic of taste coding. For example, defining the size and diversity of the re...

  15. Expression of the RET/PTC fusion gene as a marker for papillary carcinoma in Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wirtschafter, A; Schmidt, R; Rosen, D

    1997-01-01

    -polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay, we found messenger RNA (mRNA) expression for the RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 oncogenes in 95% of the Hashimoto's patients studied. All Hashimoto's patients presenting without histopathologic evidence of papillary thyroid cancer showed molecular genetic evidence of cancer......Hashimoto's thyroiditis is an inflammatory disease of the thyroid gland with autoimmune etiology. Patients afflicted with Hashimoto's have a higher risk of thyroid malignancies such as papillary thyroid carcinoma. In the present study, we investigated the frequency of papillary thyroid carcinoma...... specific genes in patients diagnosed with Hashimoto's disease. The newly identified oncogenes RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 provide useful and specific markers of the early stages of papillary carcinoma as they are highly specific for malignant cells. Using a sensitive and specific reverse transcriptase...

  16. Assessing RET/PTC in thyroid nodule fine-needle aspirates: the FISH point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caria, Paola; Dettori, Tinuccia; Frau, Daniela V; Borghero, Angela; Cappai, Antonello; Riola, Alessia; Lai, Maria L; Boi, Francesco; Calò, Piergiorgio; Nicolosi, Angelo; Mariotti, Stefano; Vanni, Roberta

    2013-08-01

    RET/PTC rearrangement and BRAF(V600E) mutation are the two prevalent molecular alterations associated with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), and their identification is increasingly being used as an adjunct to cytology in diagnosing PTC. However, there are caveats associated with the use of the molecular approach in fine-needle aspiration (FNA), particularly for RET/PTC, that should be taken into consideration. It has been claimed that a clonal or sporadic presence of this abnormality in follicular cells can distinguish between malignant and benign nodules. Nevertheless, the most commonly used PCR-based techniques lack the capacity to quantify the number of abnormal cells. Because fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is the most sensitive method for detecting gene rearrangement in a single cell, we compared results from FISH and conventional RT-PCR obtained in FNA of a large cohort of consecutive patients with suspicious nodules and investigated the feasibility of setting a FISH-FNA threshold capable of distinguishing non-clonal from clonal molecular events. For this purpose, a home brew break-apart probe, able to recognize the physical breakage of RET, was designed. While a ≥3% FISH signal for broken RET was sufficient to distinguish nodules with abnormal follicular cells, only samples with a ≥6.8% break-apart FISH signal also exhibited positive RT-PCR results. On histological analysis, all nodules meeting the ≥6.8% threshold proved to be malignant. These data corroborate the power of FISH when compared with RT-PCR in quantifying the presence of RET/PTC in FNA and validate the RT-PCR efficiency in detecting clonal RET/PTC alterations.

  17. Exploring taste hyposensitivity in Japanese senior high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Mari; Shinada, Kayoko; Ueno, Masayuki; Zaitsu, Takashi; Wright, Fredrick Allan Clive; Kawaguchi, Yoko

    2012-02-01

    The main objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of taste hyposensitivity and the relationships between sex, oral health status, and eating habits with taste hyposensitivity in Japanese senior high school students. Oral examinations, sweet and salt whole-mouth taste tests, and a questionnaire about eating habits were conducted on 234 senior high school students. Factors affecting taste hyposensitivity were investigated using a multivariate analysis. Sweet-taste hyposensitivity was observed in 7.3% of the students, and salt-taste hyposensitivity in 22.2%. Approximately 3% of the students had both sweet- and salt-taste hyposensitivity, and 22.6% had either sweet- or salt-taste hyposensitivity. In total, 26% had a taste hyposensitivity. There were significant relationships between the intake of instant noodles with sweet-taste hyposensitivity, and the intake of vegetables or isotonic drinks with salt-taste hyposensitivity. There was a significant association between eating habits and taste hyposensitivity in Japanese senior high school students. Taste tests would be a helpful adjunct for students to recognize variations in taste sensitivity, and a questionnaire about their eating habits might provide an effective self-review of their eating habits, and therefore, provide motivation to change. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. 49 CFR 236.1015 - PTC Safety Plan content requirements and PTC System Certification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... vendor or supplier to be addressed during the life-cycle of the PTC system, including maximum threshold...) A description of the safety assurance concepts that are to be used for system development, including... System Certification. 236.1015 Section 236.1015 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to...

  19. Ihog and Boi elicit Hh signaling via Ptc but do not aid Ptc in sequestering the Hh ligand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Darius; Haitian He, Billy; Li, Sally; Althaus, Irene W; Holtz, Alexander M; Allen, Benjamin L; Charron, Frédéric; van Meyel, Donald J

    2014-10-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) proteins are secreted molecules essential for tissue development in vertebrates and invertebrates. Hh reception via the 12-pass transmembrane protein Patched (Ptc) elicits intracellular signaling through Smoothened (Smo). Hh binding to Ptc is also proposed to sequester the ligand, limiting its spatial range of activity. In Drosophila, Interference hedgehog (Ihog) and Brother of ihog (Boi) are two conserved and redundant transmembrane proteins that are essential for Hh pathway activation. How Ihog and Boi activate signaling in response to Hh remains unknown; each can bind both Hh and Ptc and so it has been proposed that they are essential for both Hh reception and sequestration. Using genetic epistasis we established here that Ihog and Boi, and their orthologs in mice, act upstream or at the level of Ptc to allow Hh signal transduction. In the Drosophila developing wing model we found that it is through Hh pathway activation that Ihog and Boi maintain the boundary between the anterior and posterior compartments. We dissociated the contributions of Ptc from those of Ihog/Boi and, surprisingly, found that cells expressing Ptc can retain and sequester the Hh ligand without Ihog and Boi, but that Ihog and Boi cannot do so without Ptc. Together, these results reinforce the central role for Ptc in Hh binding in vivo and demonstrate that, although Ihog and Boi are dispensable for Hh sequestration, they are essential for pathway activation because they allow Hh to inhibit Ptc and thereby relieve its repression of Smo.

  20. 低钠饮食性缺钠对大鼠咸味觉敏感性的影响%Effects of sodium depletion induced by low sodium diet on salty taste sensitivity in rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕波; 闫剑群; 陈坷; 李金容

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effects of chronic sodium depletion induced by low sodium diet on salty taste function using conditioned taste aversion (CTA)-two-bottle choice test. Methods Rats fed with normal or low sodium diet were both divided into conditioned and unconditioned groups with 10 in each group. After CTA to 0. 1 mol/L NaCl was established, a series of 30 min two-bottle choice tests were performed with NaCl solutions and distilled water in two bottles. Preference scores for each NaCl solution were calculated. Salty taste detection threshold is defined as the lowest concentration at which there is a reliable difference in the preference scores between conditioned and control subjects. Results The salty taste detection threshold of normal rats was 0. 003-0.005 mol/L NaCl while the detection threshold of rats fed with 14-day low sodium diet decreased to 0.001 - 0.003 mol/L. Conclusion Chronic sodium depletion induced by low sodium diet decreases the salty taste detection threshold, thus increasing rats' sensitivity to salty taste.%目的 采用条件性厌味(conditioned taste aversion,CTA)——双瓶选择方法检测低钠饮食性缺钠对咸味觉感受功能的影响.方法 正常饮食大鼠及低钠饮食大鼠均分为条件组和非条件组,每组10只.建立实验大鼠对0.1mol/L NaCl溶液CTA后,给予系列浓度的NaCl和蒸馏水30 min的双瓶选择测试,计算各溶液的味觉喜好值.根据条件组大鼠喜好值显著低于非条件组喜好值的最低味觉溶液浓度,确定咸味觉检测阈值.结果 正常大鼠咸味觉检测阈值为0.003~0.005 mol/L NaCl,而低钠饮食14d后该阈值降至0.001~0.003 mol/L.结论 慢性脱钠可下调咸味觉检测阈值,使大鼠对咸味刺激更加敏感.

  1. High osmolarity glycerol response PtcB phosphatase is important for Aspergillus fumigatus virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkelströter, Lizziane K; Bom, Vinícius Leite Pedro; de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Ramalho, Leandra Naira Zambelli; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Brown, Neil Andrew; Rajendran, Ranjith; Ramage, Gordon; Bovier, Elodie; Dos Reis, Thaila Fernanda; Savoldi, Marcela; Hagiwara, Daisuke; Goldman, Gustavo H

    2015-04-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is a fungal pathogen that is capable of adapting to different host niches and to avoid host defenses. An enhanced understanding of how, and which, A. fumigatus signal transduction pathways are engaged in the regulation of these processes is essential for the development of improved disease control strategies. Protein phosphatases are central to numerous signal transduction pathways. To comprehend the functions of protein phosphatases in A. fumigatus, 32 phosphatase catalytic subunit encoding genes were identified. We have recognized PtcB as one of the phosphatases involved in the high osmolarity glycerol response (HOG) pathway. The ΔptcB mutant has both increased phosphorylation of the p38 MAPK (SakA) and expression of osmo-dependent genes. The ΔptcB strain was more sensitive to cell wall damaging agents, had increased chitin and β-1,3-glucan, and impaired biofilm formation. The ΔptcB strain was avirulent in a murine model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis. These results stress the importance of the HOG pathway in the regulation of pathogenicity determinants and virulence in A. fumigatus.

  2. Vismodegib, an antagonist of hedgehog signaling, directly alters taste molecular signaling in taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hyekyung; Cong, Wei-Na; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Egan, Josephine M

    2015-02-01

    Vismodegib, a highly selective inhibitor of hedgehog (Hh) pathway, is an approved treatment for basal-cell carcinoma. Patients on treatment with vismodegib often report profound alterations in taste sensation. The cellular mechanisms underlying the alterations have not been studied. Sonic Hh (Shh) signaling is required for cell growth and differentiation. In taste buds, Shh is exclusively expressed in type IV taste cells, which are undifferentiated basal cells and the precursors of the three types of taste sensing cells. Thus, we investigated if vismodegib has an inhibitory effect on taste cell turnover because of its known effects on Hh signaling. We gavaged C57BL/6J male mice daily with either vehicle or 30 mg/kg vismodegib for 15 weeks. The gustatory behavior and immunohistochemical profile of taste cells were examined. Vismodegib-treated mice showed decreased growth rate and behavioral responsivity to sweet and bitter stimuli, compared to vehicle-treated mice. We found that vismodegib-treated mice had significant reductions in taste bud size and numbers of taste cells per taste bud. Additionally, vismodegib treatment resulted in decreased numbers of Ki67- and Shh-expressing cells in taste buds. The numbers of phospholipase Cβ2- and α-gustducin-expressing cells, which contain biochemical machinery for sweet and bitter sensing, were reduced in vismodegib-treated mice. Furthermore, vismodegib treatment resulted in reduction in numbers of T1R3, glucagon-like peptide-1, and glucagon-expressing cells, which are known to modulate sweet taste sensitivity. These results suggest that inhibition of Shh signaling by vismodegib treatment directly results in alteration of taste due to local effects in taste buds.

  3. Behavioral genetics and taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bachmanov Alexander A

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review focuses on behavioral genetic studies of sweet, umami, bitter and salt taste responses in mammals. Studies involving mouse inbred strain comparisons and genetic analyses, and their impact on elucidation of taste receptors and transduction mechanisms are discussed. Finally, the effect of genetic variation in taste responsiveness on complex traits such as drug intake is considered. Recent advances in development of genomic resources make behavioral genetics a powerful approach for understanding mechanisms of taste.

  4. Gut bitter taste receptor signalling induces ABCB1 through a mechanism involving CCK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Tae-Il; Seo, Young-Kyo; Osborne, Timothy F

    2011-08-15

    T2Rs (bitter taste-sensing type 2 receptors) are expressed in the oral cavity to prevent ingestion of dietary toxins through taste avoidance. They are also expressed in other cell types, including gut enteroendocrine cells, where their physiological role is enigmatic. Previously, we proposed that T2R-dependent CCK (cholecystokinin) secretion from enteroendocrine cells limits absorption of dietary toxins, but an active mechanism was lacking. In the present study we show that T2R signalling activates ABCB1 (ATP-binding cassette B1) in intestinal cells through a CCK signalling mechanism. PTC (phenylthiocarbamide), an agonist for the T2R38 bitter receptor, increased ABCB1 expression in both intestinal cells and mouse intestine. PTC induction of ABCB1 was decreased by either T2R38 siRNA (small interfering RNA) or treatment with YM022, a gastrin receptor antagonist. Thus gut ABCB1 is regulated through signalling by CCK/gastrin released in response to PTC stimulation of T2R38 on enteroendocrine cells. We also show that PTC increases the efflux activity of ABCB1, suggesting that T2R signalling limits the absorption of bitter tasting/toxic substances through modulation of gut efflux membrane transporters.

  5. Fabrication of taste sensor for education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao; Tahara, Yusuke; Toko, Kiyoshi; Kuriyaki, Hisao

    2017-03-01

    In order to solve the unconcern to usefulness of learning science among high school students in Japan, we developed a simple fabricated taste sensor with sensitivity and selectivity to each taste quality, which can be applied in science class. A commercialized Teflon membrane was used as the polymer membrane holding lipids. In addition, a non-adhesive method is considered to combine the membrane and the sensor electrode using a plastic cap which is easily accessible. The taste sensor for education fabricated in this way showed a good selectivity and sensitivity. By adjusting the composition of trioctylmethylammonium chloride (TOMA) and phosphoric acid di(2-ethylhexyl) ester (PAEE) included in lipid solution, we improved the selectivity of this simple taste sensor to saltiness and sourness. To verify this taste sensor as a useful science teaching material for science class, we applied this taste sensor into a science class for university students. By comparing the results between the sensory test and the sensor response, humans taste showed the same tendency just as the sensor response, which proved the sensor as a useful teaching material for science class.

  6. Acetylcholine is released from taste cells, enhancing taste signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Roper, Stephen D

    2012-07-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh), a candidate neurotransmitter that has been implicated in taste buds, elicits calcium mobilization in Receptor (Type II) taste cells. Using RT-PCR analysis and pharmacological interventions, we demonstrate that the muscarinic acetylcholine receptor M3 mediates these actions. Applying ACh enhanced both taste-evoked Ca2+ responses and taste-evoked afferent neurotransmitter (ATP) secretion from taste Receptor cells. Blocking muscarinic receptors depressed taste-evoked responses in Receptor cells, suggesting that ACh is normally released from taste cells during taste stimulation. ACh biosensors confirmed that, indeed, taste Receptor cells secrete acetylcholine during gustatory stimulation. Genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors resulted in significantly diminished ATP secretion from taste buds. The data demonstrate a new role for acetylcholine as a taste bud transmitter. Our results imply specifically that ACh is an autocrine transmitter secreted by taste Receptor cells during gustatory stimulation, enhancing taste-evoked responses and afferent transmitter secretion.

  7. Structural basis for bitter taste receptor activation and its potential role in targeting diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravinder Abrol

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Taste receptors are G protein-coupled receptors that, besides being present in the taste buds, have also been shown to be present in the gastrointestinal (GI system, respiratory system, and brain, though their function at these locations is not well understood. Objective: To understand the nutrient mediated release of gut peptides like GLP-1 from enteroendocrine L-cells of the GI system, we focused on a bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 (based on animal models to investigate the structural basis of its potential role in the release of gut peptides. Methods: The atomic-level structure of bitter taste receptor TAS2R38 was predicted using GEnSeMBLE, a first-principle based GPCR structure prediction method. These structures were obtained for the dominant taster haplotype (PAV as well as for the nontaster haplotype (AVI of the receptor. The known ligands phenylthiocarbamide (PTC and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PTU were docked to these structures to provide a structural basis for the taster and nontaster haplotypes. Results: Docking of known ligands PTU and PTC to taster and nontaster haplotypes of the bitter taste receptor showed a backbone hydrogen bond to residue 262 in taster but not in nontaster haplotype, suggesting a potential mode of action of these molecules in the activation of the bitter taste receptor. Conclusion: These results, combined with the ability of PTC to release gut peptides from in vitro models of the enteroendocrine L-cells, suggest a potential structural basis for TAS2R38 activation that can lead to the release of those peptides. This release has a therapeutic benefit for type 2 diabetes and implies a role for bitter tasting (but safe natural compounds targeting TAS2R38 as potential drug candidates for curing type 2 diabetes.

  8. Tasting with Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Sakai

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Whenever we eat and drink something, we experience the sense of taste. We attribute the sense of taste to gustation without doubt, but it is not true. The olfaction is the most important component of the flavor. On the other hand, the gustation (basic tastes is affected strongly by the olfaction; when participants tasted solutions containing odors without any tastants, they reported there were some tastes. Odors of the foods and beverages show interaction with (potentiate and/or inhibit basic tastes, and determined the flavor of them. Here, some experiments exploring about the role of the vision in the sense of taste are shown: The color of sushi distorted (enhanced or eliminated the perception of fishy, the color of the packages of chocolate distorted the perception of taste, the color of syrup determined the participants' ability of identification of the flavor, and so on. These results show the vision is an important component of the sense of taste. These visual effects on taste are supposed to be mediated by the olfaction. It is because there are many studies showing the vision affects the olfaction, but studies showing the vision affects gustation are very little and inconsistent with each other.

  9. Taste perception and food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, Rossella; Di Feola, Mariarosaria; Di Domenico, Simone; Scala, M Giuseppa; Artesi, Ginevra; Valente, Serena; Smarrazzo, Andrea; Turco, Francesca; Morini, Gabriella; Greco, Luigi

    2012-05-01

    The extent to which variation in taste perception influences food preferences is, to date, controversial. Bitterness in food triggers an innate aversion that is responsible for dietary restriction in children. We investigated the association among genetic variations in bitter receptor TAS2R38 and food choices in healthy children in the Mediterranean area, to develop appropriate tools to evaluate the relation among genetic predisposition, dietary habits, and feeding disorders. The aims of the study were to get a first baseline picture of taste sensitivity in healthy adults and their children and to explore taste sensitivity in a preliminary sample of obese children and in samples affected by functional gastrointestinal diseases. Individuals (98 children, 87 parents, 120 adults) were recruited from the general population in southern Italy. Bitterness sensitivity was assessed by means of a suprathreshold method with 6-propyl-2-thiouracil. Genomic DNA from saliva was used to genotype individuals for 3 polymorphisms of TAS2R38 receptor, A49P, A262 V, and V296I. Food intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Children's taste sensation differed from that of adults: we observed a higher frequency of supertasters among children even in the mother-child dyads with the same diplotypes. Among adults, supertaster status was related with proline-alanine-valine (taster allele) homozygous haplotype, whereas supertaster children were mainly heterozygous. Regarding the food choices, we found that a higher percentage of taster children avoided bitter vegetables or greens altogether compared with taster adults. Taster status was also associated with body mass index in boys. Greater sensitivity to 6-propyl-2-thiouracil predicts lower preferences for vegetables in children, showing an appreciable effect of the genetic predisposition on food choices. None of the obese boys was a supertaster.

  10. High rate of BRAF and RET/PTC dual mutations associated with recurrent papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Ying C; Shellenberger, Thomas D; Williams, Michelle D; El-Naggar, Adel K; Fredrick, Mitchell J; Cieply, Kathleen M; Clayman, Gary L

    2009-01-15

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), the most common thyroid malignancy, usually possesses BRAF mutation or rearranged in translation (RET)/PTC rearrangements. PTC usually possesses BRAF mutation or RET/PTC rearrangements. The mutation status of patients with recurrent PTC has never been characterized in a large population. Mutation status was determined in a cohort of 54 patients with recurrent PTC and analyzed for clinicopathologic relationships. BRAF and ras mutations were determined by PCR and sequencing of genomic DNA. RET/PTC rearrangements were analyzed by reverse transcription-PCR. BRAF mutation in exon 15 (V600E) was found in 42/54 (77.8%) recurrent PTC patients. The RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in 9 of 54 (16.7%) patients. In addition, 5 of 54 (9.3%) recurrent PTC patients had both a BRAF mutation and a RET/PTC rearrangement. The prevalence of tumors with dual mutations found in the recurrent population far exceeds the frequency historically reported for patients with primary PTC. Patients with dual mutations were significantly older (80% older than 45 years) than patients with a BRAF mutation alone (38% older than 45 years). Recurrent PTC is significantly associated with a predominant BRAF mutation. RET/PTC rearrangements, although commonly associated with primary PTCs in younger patients, are uncommonly found in recurrent PTC patients. In addition, the incidence of dual mutations was higher in patients with recurrent PTC than in those primary PTC, as reported by others.

  11. Overexpression of wild-type c-RET and zero prevalence of RET/PTC rearrangements are associated with papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Abdallah, Abir A; Junaid, Thamradeen A

    2011-02-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is common in Kuwait. The activation of the RET oncogene by DNA rearrangement (RET/PTC) is known to have an important role in PTC carcinogenesis. However, the real frequency of the RET/PTC expression in PTC is variable between different studies. This study seeks to determine the prevalence of RET/PTC and to analyze the RET oncogene expression associated with PTC in Kuwait. RET expression and DNA rearrangements (RET/PTC 1, RET/PTC 2 and RET/PTC 3) were studied by RT-PCR in different thyroid diseases. Results were confirmed by the Southern blot and by immunohistochemistry. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to determine the level of RET mRNA expression in PTCs. Wild-type (nonrearranged) c-RET oncogene was overexpressed in 60% of PTC cases and absent in follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC), anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC), follicular adenomas (FA) or normal thyroid. No RET/PTC rearrangement was detected in any sample. The c-RET expression in Hashimoto's thyroiditis and multinodular goiter was limited to follicular cells with PTC-like nuclear changes. The overexpression of wild-type c-RET is a characteristic molecular event of PTCs in Kuwait. The prevalence of RET/PTC is zero and among the lowest recorded in the world. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Tasting in mundane practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Anna

    2015-01-01

    in a restaurant; medical professionals and patients in a hospital; and people gathered for a wine tasting event, daily dinner or a meal in a convent. The ethnographic materials are used to engage with what so far social science literatures on tasting tend to take for granted: that tasting is a physiological......This thesis presents an ethnographic investigation into practices of tasting. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in various Western Europe settings in which people sensually engaged with food and drinks, the chapters show how tasting is done by research subjects in sensory science laboratories; guests...... particular practices, the chapters unpack each of these assumptions. What emerges is an alternative, composite understanding of tasting as variously done in varied mundane practices....

  13. Insights into the binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC agonist to its target human TAS2R38 bitter receptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xevi Biarnés

    Full Text Available Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs. Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38 by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models.

  14. Insights into the binding of Phenyltiocarbamide (PTC) agonist to its target human TAS2R38 bitter receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biarnés, Xevi; Marchiori, Alessandro; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Lanzara, Carmela; Gasparini, Paolo; Carloni, Paolo; Born, Stephan; Brockhoff, Anne; Behrens, Maik; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2010-08-25

    Humans' bitter taste perception is mediated by the hTAS2R subfamily of the G protein-coupled membrane receptors (GPCRs). Structural information on these receptors is currently limited. Here we identify residues involved in the binding of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and in receptor activation in one of the most widely studied hTAS2Rs (hTAS2R38) by means of structural bioinformatics and molecular docking. The predictions are validated by site-directed mutagenesis experiments that involve specific residues located in the putative binding site and trans-membrane (TM) helices 6 and 7 putatively involved in receptor activation. Based on our measurements, we suggest that (i) residue N103 participates actively in PTC binding, in line with previous computational studies. (ii) W99, M100 and S259 contribute to define the size and shape of the binding cavity. (iii) W99 and M100, along with F255 and V296, play a key role for receptor activation, providing insights on bitter taste receptor activation not emerging from the previously reported computational models.

  15. A question of taste

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchison, T.J.

    2013-01-01

    A career in science is shaped by many factors, one of the most important being our tastes in research. These typically form early and are shaped by subsequent successes and failures. My tastes run to microscopes, chemistry, and spatial organization of cytoplasm. I will try to identify where they came from, how they shaped my career, and how they continue to evolve. My hope is to inspire young scientists to identify and celebrate their own unique tastes.

  16. Leptin Suppresses Mouse Taste Cell Responses to Sweet Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenshi; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Jyotaki, Masafumi; Takahashi, Ichiro; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Leptin is known to selectively suppress neural and behavioral responses to sweet-tasting compounds. However, the molecular basis for the effect of leptin on sweet taste is not known. Here, we report that leptin suppresses sweet taste via leptin receptors (Ob-Rb) and KATP channels expressed selectively in sweet-sensitive taste cells. Ob-Rb was more often expressed in taste cells that expressed T1R3 (a sweet receptor component) than in those that expressed glutamate-aspartate transporter (a marker for Type I taste cells) or GAD67 (a marker for Type III taste cells). Systemically administered leptin suppressed taste cell responses to sweet but not to bitter or sour compounds. This effect was blocked by a leptin antagonist and was absent in leptin receptor–deficient db/db mice and mice with diet-induced obesity. Blocking the KATP channel subunit sulfonylurea receptor 1, which was frequently coexpressed with Ob-Rb in T1R3-expressing taste cells, eliminated the effect of leptin on sweet taste. In contrast, activating the KATP channel with diazoxide mimicked the sweet-suppressing effect of leptin. These results indicate that leptin acts via Ob-Rb and KATP channels that are present in T1R3-expressing taste cells to selectively suppress their responses to sweet compounds. PMID:26116698

  17. Probenecid inhibits the human bitter taste receptor TAS2R16 and suppresses bitter perception of salicin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiffani A Greene

    Full Text Available Bitter taste stimuli are detected by a diverse family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs expressed in gustatory cells. Each bitter taste receptor (TAS2R responds to an array of compounds, many of which are toxic and can be found in nature. For example, human TAS2R16 (hTAS2R16 responds to β-glucosides such as salicin, and hTAS2R38 responds to thiourea-containing molecules such as glucosinolates and phenylthiocarbamide (PTC. While many substances are known to activate TAS2Rs, only one inhibitor that specifically blocks bitter receptor activation has been described. Here, we describe a new inhibitor of bitter taste receptors, p-(dipropylsulfamoylbenzoic acid (probenecid, that acts on a subset of TAS2Rs and inhibits through a novel, allosteric mechanism of action. Probenecid is an FDA-approved inhibitor of the Multidrug Resistance Protein 1 (MRP1 transporter and is clinically used to treat gout in humans. Probenecid is also commonly used to enhance cellular signals in GPCR calcium mobilization assays. We show that probenecid specifically inhibits the cellular response mediated by the bitter taste receptor hTAS2R16 and provide molecular and pharmacological evidence for direct interaction with this GPCR using a non-competitive (allosteric mechanism. Through a comprehensive analysis of hTAS2R16 point mutants, we define amino acid residues involved in the probenecid interaction that result in decreased sensitivity to probenecid while maintaining normal responses to salicin. Probenecid inhibits hTAS2R16, hTAS2R38, and hTAS2R43, but does not inhibit the bitter receptor hTAS2R31 or non-TAS2R GPCRs. Additionally, structurally unrelated MRP1 inhibitors, such as indomethacin, fail to inhibit hTAS2R16 function. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of probenecid in cellular experiments translates to inhibition of bitter taste perception of salicin in humans. This work identifies probenecid as a pharmacological tool for understanding the cell

  18. The taste of music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesz, Bruno; Trevisan, Marcos A; Sigman, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Zarlino, one of the most important music theorists of the XVI century, described the minor consonances as 'sweet' (dolci) and 'soft' (soavi) (Zarlino 1558/1983, in On the Modes New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1983). Hector Berlioz, in his Treatise on Modern Instrumentation and Orchestration (London: Novello, 1855), speaks about the 'small acid-sweet voice' of the oboe. In line with this tradition of describing musical concepts in terms of taste words, recent empirical studies have found reliable associations between taste perception and low-level sound and musical parameters, like pitch and phonetic features. Here we investigated whether taste words elicited consistent musical representations by asking trained musicians to improvise on the basis of the four canonical taste words: sweet, sour, bitter, and salty. Our results showed that, even in free improvisation, taste words elicited very reliable and consistent musical patterns:'bitter' improvisations are low-pitched and legato (without interruption between notes), 'salty' improvisations are staccato (notes sharply detached from each other), 'sour' improvisations are high-pitched and dissonant, and 'sweet' improvisations are consonant, slow, and soft. Interestingly, projections of the improvisations of taste words to musical space (a vector space defined by relevant musical parameters) revealed that, in musical space, improvisations based on different taste words were nearly orthogonal or opposite. Decoding methods could classify binary choices of improvisations (i.e., identify the improvisation word from the melody) at performance of around 80%--well above chance. In a second experiment we investigated the mapping from perception of music to taste words. Fifty-seven non-musical experts listened to a fraction of the improvisations. We found that listeners classified with high performance the taste word which had elicited the improvisation. Our results, furthermore, show that associations of taste and music

  19. Molecular characteristics of papillary thyroid carcinomas without BRAF mutation or RET/PTC rearrangement: relationship with clinico-pathological features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Stéphanie; Ferraro-Peyret, Carole; Joufre, Mireille; Chave, Annie; Borson-Chazot, Françoise; Selmi-Ruby, Samia; Rousset, Bernard

    2009-06-01

    About 60-70% of papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) present a BRAF(T1799A) gene mutation or a rearrangement of RET gene (RET/PTC). In this study, we examined whether PTC without BRAF(T1799A) mutation and without RET/PTC rearrangement named PTC-ga(-) were distinguishable from PTC-ga(+) (with one or the other gene alteration) on the basis of gene expression characteristics. We analyzed the mutational state of 116 PTC and we compared gene expression profiles of PTC-ga(+) and PTC-ga(-) from data of a 200 gene macroarray and quantitative PCR. Seventy five PTC were PTC-ga(+) and 41 were PTC-ga(-). Unsupervised analyses of macroarray data by hierarchical clustering led to a complete segregation of PTC-ga(+) and PTC-ga(-). In a series of 42 genes previously recognized as PTC 'marker' genes, 22 were found to be expressed at a comparable level in PTC-ga(-) and normal tissue. Thyroid-specific genes, TPO, TG, DIO1, and DIO2 were under-expressed in PTC-ga(+) but expressed at a normal level in PTC-ga(-). A few genes including DUOX1 and DUOX2 were selectively dys-regulated in PTC-ga(-). Tumor grade of PTC-ga(-) was lower than that of PTC-ga(+). There was a strong association between the mutational state and histiotype of PTC; 81% of PTC follicular variants were corresponded to PTC-ga(-), whereas 84% of PTC of classical form were PTC-ga(+). In conclusion, we show that PTC without BRAF(T1799A) mutation or RET/PTC rearrangement, mainly corresponding to follicular variants, maintain a thyroid differentiation expression level close to that of normal tissue and should be of better prognosis than PTC with one or the other gene alteration.

  20. Clindamycin and taste disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, Mark C H; van Puijenbroek, Eugène P

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Topical use of clindamycin has been associated with taste disorders in the literature, but little is known about the nature of this adverse drug reaction. The aim of this article was to describe reports of clindamycin-induced taste disorders and to analyse the factors involved. METHODS: The ad

  1. Assessment of RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in fine-needle aspiration biopsy specimens collected from patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyniak-Magierska Anna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RET/PTC rearrangements are the most frequent molecular changes in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC. So far, 15 main RET/PTC rearrangements have been described, among which RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 are the most common in PTC - especially in radiation-induced tumours. RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 are the result of intrachromosomal paracentric inversions in chromosome 10, where RET and the activating genes (H4 and ELE1, respectively are located. Recently, RET/PTC rearrangements have been shown not only in PTC but also in benign thyroid lesions, including Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT. The aim of study was an assessment of RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Materials and methods Thyroid aspirates, eligible for the study, were obtained from 26 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis by fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB. Each aspirate was smeared for conventional cytology, while its remaining part was immediately washed out of the needle. The cells, obtained from the needle, were used in further investigation. Total RNA from FNAB was extracted by use of an RNeasy Micro Kit, based on modified Chomczynski and Sacchi's method and reverse transcription (RT-PCR was done. Quantitative evaluation of RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements by real-time PCR was performed by an ABI PRISM® 7500 Sequence Detection System. In the study, PTC tissues with known RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements served as a reference standard (calibrator, while β-actin gene was used as endogenous control. Results Amplification reactions were done in triplicate for each examined sample. No RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements were found in the examined samples. Conclusions Our results indicate that RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in Hashimoto's thyroiditis, if any, are rather rare events and further investigations should be conducted in order to determine molecular changes, connecting Hashimoto's thyroiditis with PTC.

  2. Electrochemical Behavior of Mitoxantrone and Its Determination at a Pt/C Implanted Modified Microelectrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Yong-gui; SUN Zi-jie; HU Jing-bo; LU Yi-qiang; LI Qi-long

    2004-01-01

    In a 0.02 mol/L Na2HPO4-KH2PO4(PBS) buffer solution(pH=6.82), the electrochemical behavior of mitoxantrone was studied by linear-sweep voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry at a Pt/C ion implantation modified microelectrode. A sensitive reduction peak was observed. The peak potential was -0.72 V(vs.SCE), the peak current was proportional to the concentration of mitoxantrone within the ranges of 7.0×10-8-9.0×10-7 mol/L and 1.0×10-6-2.4×10-5 mol/L, with a detection limit of 4.0×10-8 mol/L. The linear correlation coefficients were 0.9994 and 0.9992, respectively. This method has been applied to the direct determination of mitoxantrone in simulated urine. The recoveries were in the range from 96.2% to 105.9%. The reduction process was a quasi-reversible one with adsorptive characteristics at the Pt/C microelectrode. The electrode reaction rate constant ks and the electron transfer coefficient α of the system were determined to be 4.5 and 0.65 s-1, respectively. The experiments showed that Pt element had surely been implanted into the surface of the carbon fiber, and the atomic Pt improved the electrocatalytic activity. The Pt/C microelectrode had a good stability and reproducibility.

  3. Materials for damping the PTC-induced thermal fluctuations of the cold-head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catarino, I.; Martins, D.; Sudiwala, R.

    2015-12-01

    The cold head on mechanical Pulse Tube Cryocoolers (PTCs) is subject to substantially less mechanical vibration and electromagnetic interference compared to that typically found in Gifford MacMahon coolers. However, thermal fluctuations at the PTC frequency are still present at the cold-head, typically at a level of 200 mK peak-to-peak at 1.4 Hz for a Cryomech Model PT405 cooler running at 4 K. It is highly desirable to damp out these fluctuations if PTCs are to be used successfully for running systems sensitive to such thermal fluctuations, for example, bolometeric detectors. We report here the characterization over the temperature range 2.5 K to 6 K of two materials, GOS (Gd2O2S) and GAP (GdAlO3), for use as low-pass thermal filters. These materials have antiferromagnetic transitions at around 4 K giving rise to an enhanced heat capacity and have a high thermal conductance. These are two highly desirable properties for thermal dampers in this application. Those materials were fired as ceramic discs to be tested as thermal dumpers. Thermal filter assemblies with discs of diameter 75 mm and thickness 2.5 mm and 1.6 mm (GOS and GAP, respectively) mounted in a PTC show thermal attenuation levels of x0.12 (GOS) and x0.11 (GAP) at 0.01Hz with a clean-side temperature of 4 K; the PTC induced fluctuations at 1.48 Hz are damped completely to within the noise limits (0.2 mK) of the thermometers. Experimentally determined thermal conductance and heat capacity data are reported. For this system, with a PTC cold-head (dirty-side) temperature of 3.3 K, a clean-side power dissipation of up to 30 mW is realized before its temperature rises above 4.2 K.

  4. Navigating the management of follicular variant papillary thyroid carcinoma subtypes: a classic PTC comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Brendan M; Kleiman, David A; Scognamiglio, Theresa; Aronova, Anna; Beninato, Toni; Fahey, Thomas J; Zarnegar, Rasa

    2015-04-01

    There are three subtypes of follicular variant papillary thyroid carcinoma (fvPTC): completely encapsulated, well circumscribed, and infiltrative. While infiltrative tumors are more aggressive than completely encapsulated, controversy exists regarding management of fvPTC subtypes. We compared the clinicopathologic features of fvPTC subtypes to those of classic PTC (cPTC) to help guide fvPTC management, using cPTC as a reference. A retrospective review was performed on 316 patients with PTC treated at a single institution from 2004 to 2011. There were 197 cPTC and 119 fvPTC tumors, including completely encapsulated (n = 46), well circumscribed (n = 46), and infiltrative (n = 27). Clinicopathologic data were compared between groups. fvPTC patients had larger tumors than cPTC patients (1.6 cm vs. 1.2 cm, p = 0.001), but age, sex, and family history did not differ. Thirty-one percent of cPTC tumors had extrathyroidal extension compared to 0 % of completely encapsulated, 0 % of well-circumscribed, and 52 % of infiltrative fvPTC tumors (p management algorithm for fvPTC.

  5. Genetic variation in bitter taste receptor gene TAS2R38, PROP taster status and their association with body mass index and food preferences in Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshaware, Shweta; Singhal, Rekha

    2017-09-05

    Polymorphisms in bitter taste receptor gene TAS2R38 alter the ability to sense the intensity of bitterness of phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP). Genetic variation in sensitivity towards PTC and PROP may affect food preferences and susceptibility to certain diseases. This is the first study aimed at investigating frequency and distribution of TAS2R38 haplotypes in an Indian cohort. Additionally, we studied the association of TAS2R38 and PROP taster status with BMI and food preference. Three hundred and ninety three healthy adults who were 19-55years of age were selected as a convenience sample from 4 geographical regions of India. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of TAS2R38 (rs713598, s1726866 and rs10246939) were analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The prevalence of PAV/PAV diplotype was 9.9% and that of AVI/AVI diplotype was 43.76% among this Indian population. PROP status was determined on the basis of its threshold concentration of detecting bitterness, as evaluated by one-solution test. The PROP status revealed 25.95% supertasters, 32.06% medium tasters and 41.98% non-tasters (NT). BMI neither significantly (p>0.05) correlated with TAS2R38 genotypes nor with PROP taster status. Food preferences did not significantly (p>0.05) correlate with TAS2R38 diplotypes or PROP phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. 3D structure prediction of TAS2R38 bitter receptors bound to agonists phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jun; Abrol, Ravinder; Trzaskowski, Bartosz; Goddard, William A

    2012-07-23

    The G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) TAS2R38 is a bitter taste receptor that can respond to bitter compounds such as phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP). This receptor was chosen because its four haplotypes (based on three residue site polymorphism) hTAS2R38PAV, hTAS2R38AVI, hTAS2R38AAI, and hTAS2R38PVV are known to have dramatically different responses to PTC and PROP. We aimed to identify the protein-ligand interaction features that determine whether the bitter taste signal from this receptor is sent to the cortex. To do this we predicted the 3D structures of the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor using our new BiHelix and SuperBiHelix Monte Carlo methods (No experimental determinations of the 3D structure have been reported for any taste receptors.). We find that residue 262 (2nd position in the polymorphism) is involved in the interhelical hydrogen bond network stabilizing the GPCR structure in tasters (hTAS2R38PAV, hTAS2R38AAI, and hTAS2R38PVV), while it is not in the nontaster (hTAS2R38AVI). This suggests that the hydrogen bond interactions between TM3 and TM6 or between TM5 and TM6 may play a role in activating this GPCR. To further validate these structures, we used the DarwinDock method to predict the binding sites and 3D structures for PTC and PROP bound to hTAS2R38PAV, hTAS2R38AVI, hTAS2R38AAI, and hTAS2R38PVV, respectively. Our results show that PTC and PROP can form H-bonds with the backbone of residue 262 in the tasters (hTAS2R38PAV, hTAS2R38AAI, and hTAS2R38PVV) but not in the nontaster (hTAS2R38AVI). Thus it appears that the hydrogen bond interaction between TM3 and TM6 may activate the receptor to pass the ligand binding signal to intracellular processes and that the H-bond between agonists and residue 262 in tasters is involved in the bitter tasting. This is in agreement with experimental observations, providing validation of the predicted ligand-protein complexes and also a potential activation mechanism for the TAS2R38 receptor.

  7. Abnormality of taste and smell in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mussadiq; Deeb, Jacquie; Fernando, Marina; Noyce, Alastair; Visentin, Elisa; Findley, Leslie J; Hawkes, Christopher H

    2009-03-01

    Smell sense is impaired in classic Parkinson's disease (PD). An initial study found no change in taste threshold in non-demented PD subjects and pathological studies suggest that the first relay for taste, the nucleus of the solitary tract, is spared. We wished to determine if taste is abnormal in PD and whether it is associated with smell dysfunction. Taste threshold was estimated using the Rion electrogustometer and olfaction by the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) in 75 non-demented PD patients and 74 controls. There was a significant impairment of taste threshold and severe disorder of smell identification in the PD group. Age, duration of symptoms, disability, and smoking had no important effect on threshold measurement and there was no correlation between taste and smell dysfunction. Sensitivity analysis suggested that a provisional diagnosis of PD would be confirmed if smell or taste were abnormal; conversely, the diagnosis would merit review if both modalities were normal. Impaired taste appreciation was found in about 27% of patients with clinically defined PD. There were no important effects from age, disease severity or smell sense. Given the sparing of the first and second order taste neurones in PD, disorder of taste in PD most likely signifies involvement of the frontal operculum or orbitofrontal cortex, in keeping with advanced disease, although confounding by drug effects and changes in salivary constitution could not be excluded completely.

  8. MAD-X/PTC lattice design for DAPHNE at Frascati

    CERN Document Server

    Forest, Etienne; Schmidt, Frank

    2006-01-01

    In absence of a program that takes as an input the desired or known location of the magnets in the tunnel, accelerator designers have been using MAD that looks at a ring as a sequence of magnets without a connection to the tunnel. In many simple examples that is just fine, but once more complicated structures are treated one is bound to play tricks with MAD. Here PTC comes to the rescue. It is shown how pieces of this machine that exist in MADX format are used in PTC to create this double ring, as found on the accelerator floor, with a proper survey in the forward and backward direction. Special elements have been implemented in MAD-X to allow the full PTC description of the machine.

  9. Application of New Electrolyte Model to Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC) Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Phase transfer catalyst (PTC) is used to transfer the desirable active form of an anion from the aqueous phase to organic phase where the reaction occurs. One of major challenges for process design of the PTC system is to establish a reliable thermodynamic model capable of describing phase...... in PTC systems, thereby, extending the application range of the PTC-system model. The solubility of PTC in organic solvents, which is a key factor for strategy of PTC and solvent selection, has been calculated using the e-NRTL-SAC model....

  10. Taste as feeling

    OpenAIRE

    Highmore, Ben

    2016-01-01

    This article is premised on two presumptions. The first is, I think, uncontroversial, the second less so. The first presumption is that today, serious discussions about taste usually start out by rehearsing Pierre Bourdieu’s contribution to our understanding of how taste preferences operate in society. This, then, is merely to recognize that when Bourdieu first published books such as The Love of Art (1969, written with Alain Darbel) and Distinctions: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Tas...

  11. Smell and taste disorders [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landis, Basile N.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Smell and taste disorders can markedly affect the quality of life. In recent years we have become much better in the assessment of the ability to smell and taste. In addition, information is now available to say something about the prognosis of individual patients. With regard to therapy there also seems to be low but steady progress. Of special importance for the treatment is the ability of the olfactory epithelium to regenerate.

  12. Gustatory insular cortex, aversive taste memory and taste neophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jian-You; Arthurs, Joe; Reilly, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Prior research indicates a role for the gustatory insular cortex (GC) in taste neophobia. Rats with lesions of the GC show much weaker avoidance to a novel and potentially dangerous taste than do neurologically intact animals. The current study used the retention of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) as a tool to determine whether the GC modulates neophobia by processing taste novelty or taste danger. The results show that GC lesions attenuate CTA retention (Experiment 1) and impair taste neophobia (Experiment 2). Given that normal CTA retention does not involve the processing of taste novelty, the pattern of results suggests that the GC is involved in taste neophobia via its function in processing the danger conveyed by a taste stimulus.

  13. [RET/PTC rearrangement affects multifocal formation of papillary thyroid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Su, X; Chen, W C; Li, Y; Yang, Z Y; Deng, W Z; Deng, T C; Yang, A K

    2017-06-07

    Objective:RET/PTC gene rearrangement can lead to aberrant activation of tyrosine kinase receptors, which is a common mutation in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). This study focuses on the association of RET/PTC rearrangements with PTC clinical factors. Methods: From January 2011 to December 2013, a total of 114 patients with PTC were enrolled in this study. Clinicopathological parameters, lifestyle, and thyroid hormone levels were collected. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected by TaqMan PCR and verified by Sanger sequencing.Data were analyzed with SPSS software, including chi-square test, Fisher's exact test, Mann-Whitney U test, Student's t-test, and Logistic regression. Results:RET/PTC rearrangements were not found in all paracancerous normal thyroid tissues, and were detected in 23.68% (27/114) of PTC. Further analysis revealed no correlation between RET/PTC rearrangement and thyroid function, clinicopathologic parameters, and lifestyle in the total PTC group or in the subgroup of patients with concomitant diseases (including Hashimoto's thyroiditis and nodular goiter). But in the subgroup of PTC without concomitant disease, RET/PTC rearrangement was associated with tumor multifocal (P=0.018), and RET/PTC-positive PTC patients had an increased risk of tumor multifocal (OR=5.57, 95% CI 1.39-22.33). It was also found that RET/PTC rearrangement was associated with an abnormal increase in TSH level of one month after surgery (P= 0.037). Conclusion: Nodular goiter and Hashimoto 's thyroiditis may be a confounding factor in PTC. RET/PTC rearrangement may play an important role in the occurrence of thyroid carcinoma multifocal after exclusion of this confounding factor.

  14. SYNTHESIS OF ACRYLIC ESTERS IN PTC: KINETICS AND ECOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.Torosyan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of esters of acrylic acids, which are applied for synthesis of polymeric materials by phase transfer catalysis were discussed (PTC, which is very useful for reduction of reaction consumption of materials and power.This method has substantial advantages including high speed of the process, soft condition of reaction and reduced pollution.

  15. Computational studies of ligand-receptor interactions in bitter taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguet, Laurence; Zhang, Ziding; Grigorov, Martin G

    2006-01-01

    Phenylthiocarbamide tastes intensely bitter to some individuals, but others find it completely tasteless. Recently, it was suggested that phenylthiocarbamide elicits bitter taste by interacting with a human G protein-coupled receptor (hTAS2R38) encoded by the PTC gene. The phenylthiocarbamide nontaster trait was linked to three single nucleotide polymorphisms occurring in the PTC gene. Using the crystal structure of bovine rhodopsin as template, we generated the 3D structure of hTAS2R38 bitter taste receptor. We were able to map on the receptor structure the amino acids affected by the genetic polymorphisms and to propose molecular functions for two of them that explained the emergence of the nontaster trait. We used molecular docking simulations to find that phenylthiocarbamide exhibited a higher affinity for the target receptor than the structurally similar molecule 6-n-propylthiouracil, in line with recent experimental studies. A 3D model was constructed for the hTAS2R16 bitter taste receptor as well, by applying the same protocol. We found that the recently published experimental ligand binding affinity data for this receptor correlated well with the binding scores obtained from our molecular docking calculations.

  16. Array CGH demonstrates characteristic aberration signatures in human papillary thyroid carcinomas governed by RET/PTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, K; Malisch, E; Thomas, G; Braselmann, H; Walch, A; Jackl, G; Lewis, P; Lengfelder, E; Bogdanova, T; Wienberg, J; Zitzelsberger, H

    2008-07-31

    The aim of this study is to investigate additional genetic alterations in papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) with known RET/PTC rearrangements. We applied array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) to 33 PTC (20 PTC from adults, 13 post-Chernobyl PTC from children) with known RET/PTC status. Principal component analysis and hierarchical cluster analysis identified cases with similar aberration patterns. Significant deviations between tumour-groups were obtained by statistical testing (Fisher's exact test in combination with Benjamini-Hochberg FDR-controlling procedure). FISH analysis on FFPE sections was applied to validate the array CGH data. Deletions were found more frequently in RET/PTC-positive and RET/PTC-negative tumours than amplifications. Specific aberration signatures were identified that discriminated between RET/PTC-positive and RET/PTC-negative cases (aberrations on chromosomes 1p, 3q, 4p, 7p, 9p/q, 10q, 12q, 13q and 21q). In addition, childhood and adult RET/PTC-positive cases differ significantly for a deletion on the distal part of chromosome 1p. There are additional alterations in RET/PTC-positive tumours, which may act as modifiers of RET activation. In contrast, alterations in RET/PTC-negative tumours indicate alternative routes of tumour development. The data presented serve as a starting point for further studies on gene expression and function of genes identified in this study.

  17. (Re)tasting places

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Liselotte

    2015-01-01

    What does geographical origin mean? It is an expression that associates food and wine with a specific place, an association embedded in the concept ‘terroir’ that refers to the complex interaction between a physical environment and local craftsmanship. It is a claim protected through labelling...... particularly attractive Central to the interest of this paper is to approach an understanding of geographical origin as a point of reference for taste. In terms of being sensory experience, taste is subjective. It is difficult to describe verbally and yet at the same time it is a trigger of the memory of past...

  18. Functional rescue of REP1 following treatment with PTC124 and novel derivative PTC-414 in human choroideremia fibroblasts and the nonsense-mediated zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosajee, Mariya; Tracey-White, Dhani; Smart, Matthew; Weetall, Marla; Torriano, Simona; Kalatzis, Vasiliki; da Cruz, Lyndon; Coffey, Peter; Webster, Andrew R; Welch, Ellen

    2016-08-15

    Choroideremia (CHM) is an X-linked chorioretinal dystrophy that is caused by mutations within a single gene, CHM Currently no effective treatment exists for these patients. Since over 30% of patients harbour nonsense mutations in CHM, nonsense suppression therapy using translational readthrough inducing drugs may provide functional rescue of REP1, thus attenuating progressive sight loss. Here, we employed two CHM model systems to systematically test the efficacy and safety of ataluren (PTC124) and its novel analog PTC-414: (1) the chm(ru848) zebrafish, the only nonsense mutation animal model of CHM harbouring a TAA nonsense mutation, and (2) a primary human fibroblast cell line from a CHM patient harbouring a TAG nonsense mutation. PTC124 or PTC-414 treatment of chm(ru848) embryos led to a ∼2.0-fold increase in survival, prevented the onset of retinal degeneration with reduced oxidative stress and apoptosis, increased rep1 protein by 23.1% (PTC124) and 17.2% (PTC-414) and restored biochemical function as confirmed through in vitro prenylation assays (98 ± 2% [PTC124] and 68 ± 5% [PTC-414]). In CHM(Y42X/y) fibroblasts, there was a recovery of prenylation activity following treatment with either PTC124 (42 ± 5%) or PTC-414 (36 ± 11%), although an increase in REP1 protein was not detected in these cells, in contrast to the zebrafish model. This comprehensive study on the use of PTC124 and PTC-414 as successful nonsense suppression agents for the treatment of CHM highlights the translational potential of these drugs for inherited retinal disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Variation in the Ability to Taste Bitter Thiourea Compounds: Implications for Food Acceptance, Dietary Intake, and Obesity Risk in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Kathleen L; Adise, Shana

    2016-07-17

    The ability to taste bitter thiourea compounds, such as phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP), is inherited. Polymorphisms in the bitter-taste receptor TAS2R38 explain the majority of phenotypic variation in the PROP phenotype. It has been hypothesized that the PROP phenotype is a marker for perception of a variety of chemosensory experiences. In this review, we discuss studies that have investigated the relationship between bitter-taste response and dietary behaviors and chronic health in children. Investigators have hypothesized that children who are PROP tasters have lower liking and consumption of bitter foods, such as cruciferous vegetables. Additionally, several studies suggest that children who are unable to taste PROP (i.e., nontasters) like and consume more dietary fat and are prone to obesity. The relationship between the PROP phenotype and obesity is influenced by multiple confounders, including sex, food access, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status. Future studies that adjust for these variables are needed.

  20. Association between Salivary Leptin Levels and Taste Perception in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lénia Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The satiety inducing hormone leptin acts not only at central nervous system but also at peripheral level. Leptin receptors are found in several sense related organs, including the mouth. A role of leptin in sweet taste response has been suggested but, until now, studies have been based on in vitro experiments, or in assessing the levels of the hormone in circulation. The present study investigated whether the levels of leptin in saliva are related to taste perception in children and whether Body Mass Index (BMI affects such relationship. Sweet and bitter taste sensitivity was assessed for 121 children aged 9-10 years and unstimulated whole saliva was collected for leptin quantification, using ELISA technique. Children females with lower sweet taste sensitivity presented higher salivary leptin levels, but this is only in the normal weight ones. For bitter taste, association between salivary leptin and caffeine threshold detection was observed only in preobese boys, with higher levels of salivary hormone in low sensitive individuals. This study is the first presenting evidences of a relationship between salivary leptin levels and taste perception, which is sex and BMI dependent. The mode of action of salivary leptin at taste receptor level should be elucidated in future studies.

  1. RET/PTC Translocations and Clinico-Pathological Features in Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romei, Cristina; Elisei, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    Thyroid carcinoma is the most frequent endocrine cancer accounting for 5-10% of thyroid nodules. Papillary histotype (PTC) is the most prevalent form accounting for 80% of all thyroid carcinoma. Although much is known about its epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical, and biological behavior, the only documented risk factor for PTC is the ionizing radiation exposure. Rearrangements of the Rearranged during Transfection (RET) proto-oncogene are found in PTC and have been shown to play a pathogenic role. The first RET rearrangement, named RET/PTC, was discovered in 1987. This rearrangement constitutively activates the transcription of the RET tyrosine-kinase domain in follicular cell, thus triggering the signaling along the MAPK pathway and an uncontrolled proliferation. Up to now, 13 different types of RET/PTC rearrangements have been reported but the two most common are RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3. Ionizing radiations are responsible for the generation of RET/PTC rearrangements, as supported by in vitro studies and by the evidence that RET/PTC, and particularly RET/PTC3, are highly prevalent in radiation induced PTC. However, many thyroid tumors without any history of radiation exposure harbor similar RET rearrangements. The overall prevalence of RET/PTC rearrangements varies from 20 to 70% of PTCs and they are more frequent in childhood than in adulthood thyroid cancer. Controversial data have been reported on the relationship between RET/PTC rearrangements and the PTC prognosis. RET/PTC3 is usually associated with a more aggressive phenotype and in particular with a greater tumor size, the solid variant, and a more advanced stage at diagnosis which are all poor prognostic factors. In contrast, RET/PTC1 rearrangement does not correlate with any clinical-pathological characteristics of PTC. Moreover, the RET protein and mRNA expression level did not show any correlation with the outcome of patients with PTC and no correlation between RET/PTC rearrangements and the

  2. Crowdsourcing taste research: genetic and phenotypic predictors of bitter taste perception as a model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole L. Garneau

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the influence of taste perception on food choice has captured the interest of academics, industry, and the general public. The latter as evidenced by the extent of popular media coverage and use of the term supertaster. Supertasters are highly sensitive to the bitter tastant propylthiouracil (PROP and its chemical relative phenylthiocarbamide. The well-researched differences in taste sensitivity to these bitter chemicals are partially controlled by variation in the TAS2R38 gene; however this variation alone does not explain the supertaster phenomenon. It has been suggested that density of papillae, which house taste buds, may explain supertasting. To address the unresolved role of papillae, we used crowdsourcing in the museum-based Genetics of Taste Lab. This community lab is uniquely situated to attract both a large population of human subjects and host a team of citizen scientists to research population-based questions about human genetics, taste, and health. Using this model, we find that PROP bitterness is not in any way predicted by papillae density. This result holds within the whole sample, when divided into major diplotypes, and when correcting for age, sex, and genotype. Furthermore, it holds when dividing participants into oft-used taster status groups. These data argue against the use of papillae density in predicting taste sensitivity and caution against imprecise use of the term supertaster. Furthermore, it supports a growing volume of evidence that sets the stage for hyperguesia, a reconceptualization of heightened oral sensitivity that is not based solely on PROP or papillae density. Finally, our model demonstrates how community-based research can serve as a unique venue for both study participation and citizen science that makes scientific research accessible and relevant to people’s everyday lives.

  3. Mixing methods, tasting fingers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mann, Anna; Mol, Annemarie; Satalkar, Priya

    2011-01-01

    hard to name. Pleasure and embarrassment, food-­like vitality, erotic titillation, the satisfaction or discomfort that follow a meal-we suggest that these may all be included in "tasting." Thus teasing the language alters what speakers and eaters may sense and say. It complements the repertoires...

  4. The taste looks good

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2005-01-01

    For over two decades, fruit and other agricultural products have been sorted using the 'electronic eye'. The eye selects purely by such external properties as colour, and cannot judge taste. Dr Gerrit Polder, an electrical engineer at Wageningen University, carried out his doctorate research at Delf

  5. The taste looks good

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2005-01-01

    For over two decades, fruit and other agricultural products have been sorted using the 'electronic eye'. The eye selects purely by such external properties as colour, and cannot judge taste. Dr Gerrit Polder, an electrical engineer at Wageningen University, carried out his doctorate research at

  6. The development of taste transduction and taste chip technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yan; LIU Qingjun; XU Ying; CAI Hua; QIN Lifeng; WANG Lijiang; WANG Ping

    2005-01-01

    The intrinsic perception process of taste is obviously far less known than those of vision, audition, touch and olfaction. Despite that taste cells utilize a variety of sensory mechanisms to translate plenty of gustatory sensations such as sour, sweet, bitter, salty and umami into cellular signals, gustatory perception mechanisms are still under exploration due to the lack of effective methods on cellular and molecular level. Recently the development of molecular biological and electrophysiological studies has promoted exploration of olfactory and gustatory transduction and coding mechanisms dramatically. Based on the studies of artificial olfaction, artificial taste and cell-based biosensor in our laboratory, this paper reviews the current research on taste transduction mechanism. We introduce the recent advances in cell chip that combined biology with microelectronics, discuss taste cell chip as well as its potential of prospective application in taste transduction mechanism in detail and propose the research trends of taste chip in future.

  7. PHENYLTHIOCARBAMIDE (PTC) TASTER STATUS IN SOUTH INDIAN ADULT MEDICAL STUDENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sachin Rathod; Pallavi Jawale; Suresh Babu Kondaveeti; Chitra Pillai

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The objective of this study was to determine Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) taster status in adults who are studying medicine and its relationship with anthropometric variables such as Body Mass Index (BMI), Body Fat Percentage (BFP) and pleasantness of sugar, salt, and fat. A total of 112 subjects rated the intensity of Phenylthiocarbamide and sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions using the labelled magnitude scale. For pleasantness evaluation, it was used with concentrated l...

  8. Learning through the taste system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas R. Scott

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Taste is the final arbiter of which chemicals from the environment will be admitted to the body. The action of swallowing a substance leads to a physiological consequence of which the taste system should be informed. Accordingly, taste neurons in the central nervous system are closely allied with those that receive input from the viscera so as to monitor the impact of a recently ingested substance. There is behavioral, anatomical, electrophysiological, gene expression, and neurochemical evidence that the consequences of ingestion influence subsequent food selection through development of either a conditioned taste aversion (if illness ensues or a conditioned taste preference (if satiety. This ongoing communication between taste and the viscera permits the animal to tailor its taste system to its individual needs over a lifetime.

  9. Diet-induced obesity reduces the responsiveness of the peripheral taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda B Maliphol

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Obesity is a growing epidemic that causes many serious health related complications. While the causes of obesity are complex, there is conclusive evidence that overconsumption coupled with a sedentary lifestyle is the primary cause of this medical condition. Dietary consumption is controlled by appetite which is in turn regulated by multiple neuronal systems, including the taste system. However, the relationship between taste and obesity has not been well defined. Growing evidence suggests that taste perception in the brain is altered in obese animals and humans, however no studies have determined if there are altered taste responses in the peripheral taste receptor cells, which is the initiation site for the detection and perception of taste stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we used C57Bl/6 mice which readily become obese when placed on a high fat diet. After ten weeks on the high fat diet, we used calcium imaging to measure how taste-evoked calcium signals were affected in the obese mice. We found that significantly fewer taste receptor cells were responsive to some appetitive taste stimuli while the numbers of taste cells that were sensitive to aversive taste stimuli did not change. Properties of the taste-evoked calcium signals were also significantly altered in the obese mice. Behavioral analyses found that mice on the high fat diet had reduced ability to detect some taste stimuli compared to their littermate controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings demonstrate that diet-induced obesity significantly influences peripheral taste receptor cell signals which likely leads to changes in the central taste system and may cause altered taste perception.

  10. Voltage-gated sodium channels in taste bud cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Mark E

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste bud cells transmit information regarding the contents of food from taste receptors embedded in apical microvilli to gustatory nerve fibers innervating basolateral membranes. In particular, taste cells depolarize, activate voltage-gated sodium channels, and fire action potentials in response to tastants. Initial cell depolarization is attributable to sodium influx through TRPM5 in sweet, bitter, and umami cells and an undetermined cation influx through an ion channel in sour cells expressing PKD2L1, a candidate sour taste receptor. The molecular identity of the voltage-gated sodium channels that sense depolarizing signals and subsequently initiate action potentials coding taste information to gustatory nerve fibers is unknown. Results We describe the molecular and histological expression profiles of cation channels involved in electrical signal transmission from apical to basolateral membrane domains. TRPM5 was positioned immediately beneath tight junctions to receive calcium signals originating from sweet, bitter, and umami receptor activation, while PKD2L1 was positioned at the taste pore. Using mouse taste bud and lingual epithelial cells collected by laser capture microdissection, SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channel transcripts were expressed in taste tissue. SCN2A, SCN3A, and SCN9A were expressed beneath tight junctions in subsets of taste cells. SCN3A and SCN9A were expressed in TRPM5 cells, while SCN2A was expressed in TRPM5 and PKD2L1 cells. HCN4, a gene previously implicated in sour taste, was expressed in PKD2L1 cells and localized to cell processes beneath the taste pore. Conclusion SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A voltage-gated sodium channels are positioned to sense initial depolarizing signals stemming from taste receptor activation and initiate taste cell action potentials. SCN2A, SCN3A and SCN9A gene products likely account for the tetrodotoxin-sensitive sodium currents in taste receptor cells.

  11. Taste didactic reflection theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Qvortrup, Lars

    and gastrophysicists), and social sciences (anthropologists) as well as educators (preschool, elementary, secondary and vocational schools, colleges and universities) and chefs. Through interdisciplinary research collaboration and communication we attempt to span the perceived chasm separating food-sensory science...... and the humanities and social sciences. We do so by engaging scholars from different disciplines in a close, collaborative effort hereby generating new knowledge on taste. The center thus includes researchers from several universities and colleges, chefs from innovation kitchens, and teachers from elementary schools......, high schools and vocational educations. By integrating research, taste, learning, didactics and communication, our projects focus on three main areas: sensory sciences and didactics; gastrophysics and the integration of scientific disciplines; and innovation and honing of culinary skills. While we...

  12. Tasting the World

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    in the West there seems now to be a growing openness towards other ­­- pop, sub, non-western etc. - cultures. But what does this mean? Have we finally learned to overcome cultural differences, understand foreign art forms and maybe even approach what is common to all? Has the increasing globalization......Recent research in sociology of art indicates an increasing heterogeneity and openness in cultural taste and consumption. This tendency also appears to be sanctified by developments in the arts and aesthetic theory of the last decades. Compared to former more exclusive and elitist cultures of taste...... and aestheticization made us appreciate cultural diversity? The aim of this article is to examine the character and possible social implications of the apparent new openness. To do this it presents the main results of the resent research in sociology of art. Combining an aesthetic and a sociological perspective...

  13. [Oncogenes RET/PTC and mechanisms of their involvement in thyroid cancerogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voskoboĭnyk, L H

    2009-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinomas are the most common type of thyroid oncopathology, and are rather often associated with the expression of RET/PTC oncogens. The first oncogen RET/PTC1 was isolated more than 20 years ago. Now 13 different forms of RET/PTC are known, and 12 different partner-genes are described, that could be involved in formation of RET/PTC oncogenes. The most common of them are RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 forms. The great majority of oncogens RET/PTC, except for two--ELKS-RET and HOOK3-RET, have been founded in radioaction-induced thyroid tumors. There is an opinion that the key role in development of papillary thyroid carcinomas belongs to RET/PTC oncogens. The data about different types of RET/PTC oncogens, factors, that lead to their formation have been described in the present review. Also different mechanisms of activation of transduction pathways and gene's expression in thyroid cells after RET/PTC induction have been presented.

  14. Secondary taste neurons that convey sweet taste and starvation in the Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kain, Pinky; Dahanukar, Anupama

    2015-02-18

    The gustatory system provides vital sensory information to determine feeding and appetitive learning behaviors. Very little is known, however, about higher-order gustatory circuits in the highly tractable model for neurobiology, Drosophila melanogaster. Here we report second-order sweet gustatory projection neurons (sGPNs) in the Drosophila brain using a powerful behavioral screen. Silencing neuronal activity reduces appetitive behaviors, whereas inducible activation results in food acceptance via proboscis extensions. sGPNs show functional connectivity with Gr5a(+) sweet taste neurons and are activated upon sucrose application to the labellum. By tracing sGPN axons, we identify the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) as an immediate higher-order processing center for sweet taste. Interestingly, starvation increases sucrose sensitivity of the sGPNs in the AMMC, suggesting that hunger modulates the responsiveness of the secondary sweet taste relay. Together, our results provide a foundation for studying gustatory processing and its modulation by the internal nutrient state.

  15. Tasting edge effects

    CERN Document Server

    Bocquet, L

    2006-01-01

    We show that the baking of potato wedges constitutes a crunchy example of edge effects, which are usually demonstrated in electrostatics. A simple model of the diffusive transport of water vapor around the potato wedges shows that the water vapor flux diverges at the sharp edges in analogy with its electrostatic counterpart. This increased evaporation at the edges leads to the crispy taste of these parts of the potatoes.

  16. Tasting edge effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocquet, Lydéric

    2007-02-01

    We show that the baking of potato wedges constitutes a crunchy example of edge effects, which are usually demonstrated in electrostatics. A simple model of the diffusive transport of water vapor around the potato wedges shows that the water vapor flux diverges at the sharp edges in analogy with its electrostatic counterpart. This increased evaporation at the edges leads to the crispy taste of these parts of the potatoes.

  17. Endogenous peripheral neuromodulators of the mammalian taste bud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin

    2010-10-01

    The sensitivity of the mammalian taste system displays a degree of plasticity based on short-term nutritional requirements. Deficiency in a particular substance may lead to a perceived increase in palatability of this substance, providing an additional drive to redress this nutritional imbalance through modification of intake. This alteration occurs not only in the brain but also, before any higher level processing has occurred, in the taste buds themselves. A brief review of recent advances is offered.

  18. The Ca2+-calmodulin-dependent kinase II is activated in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) and mediates cell proliferation stimulated by RET/PTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusciano, Maria Rosaria; Salzano, Marcella; Monaco, Sara; Sapio, Maria Rosaria; Illario, Maddalena; De Falco, Valentina; Santoro, Massimo; Campiglia, Pietro; Pastore, Lucio; Fenzi, Gianfranco; Rossi, Guido; Vitale, Mario

    2010-03-01

    RET/papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), TRK-T, or activating mutations of Ras and BRaf are frequent genetic alterations in PTC, all leading to the activation of the extracellular-regulated kinase (Erk) cascade. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) in the signal transduction leading to Erk activation in PTC cells. In normal thyroid cells, CaMKII and Erk were in the inactive form in the absence of stimulation. In primary PTC cultures and in PTC cell lines harboring the oncogenes RET/PTC-1 or BRaf(V600E), CaMKII was active also in the absence of any stimulation. Inhibition of calmodulin or phospholipase C (PLC) attenuated the level of CaMKII activation. Expression of recombinant RET/PTC-3, BRaf(V600E), or Ras(V12) induced CaMKII activation. Inhibition of CaMKII attenuated Erk activation and DNA synthesis in thyroid papillary carcinoma (TPC-1), a cell line harboring RET/PTC-1, suggesting that CaMKII is a component of the Erk signal cascade in this cell line. In conclusion, PTCs contain an active PLC/Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent signal inducing constitutive activation of CaMKII. This kinase is activated by BRaf(V600E), oncogenic Ras, and by RET/PTC. CaMKII participates to the activation of the Erk pathway by oncogenic Ras and RET/PTC and contributes to their signal output, thus modulating tumor cell proliferation.

  19. Behavioral analysis of Drosophila transformants expressing human taste receptor genes in the gustatory receptor neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Ryota; Sasaki, Yuko; Morita, Hiromi; Komai, Michio; Shirakawa, Hitoshi; Goto, Tomoko; Furuyama, Akira; Isono, Kunio

    2012-06-01

    Transgenic Drosophila expressing human T2R4 and T2R38 bitter-taste receptors or PKD2L1 sour-taste receptor in the fly gustatory receptor neurons and other tissues were prepared using conventional Gal4/UAS binary system. Molecular analysis showed that the transgene mRNAs are expressed according to the tissue specificity of the Gal4 drivers. Transformants expressing the transgene taste receptors in the fly taste neurons were then studied by a behavioral assay to analyze whether transgene chemoreceptors are functional and coupled to the cell response. Since wild-type flies show strong aversion against the T2R ligands as in mammals, the authors analyzed the transformants where the transgenes are expressed in the fly sugar receptor neurons so that they promote feeding ligand-dependently if they are functional and activate the neurons. Although the feeding preference varied considerably among different strains and individuals, statistical analysis using large numbers of transformants indicated that transformants expressing T2R4 showed a small but significant increase in the preference for denatonium and quinine, the T2R4 ligands, as compared to the control flies, whereas transformants expressing T2R38 did not. Similarly, transformants expressing T2R38 and PKD2L1 also showed a similar preference increase for T2R38-specific ligand phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and a sour-taste ligand, citric acid, respectively. Taken together, the transformants expressing mammalian taste receptors showed a small but significant increase in the feeding preference that is taste receptor and also ligand dependent. Although future improvements are required to attain performance comparable to the endogenous robust response, Drosophila taste neurons may serve as a potential in vivo heterologous expression system for analyzing chemoreceptor function.

  20. Taste Receptors Mediate Sinonasal Immunity and Respiratory Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jennifer E.; Cohen, Noam A.

    2017-01-01

    The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), where the receptor functions to enhance upper respiratory innate immunity through a triad of beneficial immune responses. Individuals with a functional version of T2R38 are tasters for the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and exhibit an anti-microbial response in the upper airway to certain invading pathogens, while those individuals with a non-functional version of the receptor are PTC non-tasters and lack this beneficial response. The clinical ramifications are significant, with the non-taster genotype being an independent risk factor for CRS requiring surgery, poor quality-of-life (QOL) improvements post-operatively, and decreased rhinologic QOL in patients with cystic fibrosis. Furthermore, indirect evidence suggests that non-tasters also have a larger burden of biofilm formation. This new data may influence the clinical management of patients with infectious conditions affecting the upper respiratory tract and possibly at other mucosal sites throughout the body. PMID:28218655

  1. Taste Receptors Mediate Sinonasal Immunity and Respiratory Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer E. Douglas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS, where the receptor functions to enhance upper respiratory innate immunity through a triad of beneficial immune responses. Individuals with a functional version of T2R38 are tasters for the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC and exhibit an anti-microbial response in the upper airway to certain invading pathogens, while those individuals with a non-functional version of the receptor are PTC non-tasters and lack this beneficial response. The clinical ramifications are significant, with the non-taster genotype being an independent risk factor for CRS requiring surgery, poor quality-of-life (QOL improvements post-operatively, and decreased rhinologic QOL in patients with cystic fibrosis. Furthermore, indirect evidence suggests that non-tasters also have a larger burden of biofilm formation. This new data may influence the clinical management of patients with infectious conditions affecting the upper respiratory tract and possibly at other mucosal sites throughout the body.

  2. Taste Receptors Mediate Sinonasal Immunity and Respiratory Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Jennifer E; Cohen, Noam A

    2017-02-17

    The bitter taste receptor T2R38 has been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS), where the receptor functions to enhance upper respiratory innate immunity through a triad of beneficial immune responses. Individuals with a functional version of T2R38 are tasters for the bitter compound phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and exhibit an anti-microbial response in the upper airway to certain invading pathogens, while those individuals with a non-functional version of the receptor are PTC non-tasters and lack this beneficial response. The clinical ramifications are significant, with the non-taster genotype being an independent risk factor for CRS requiring surgery, poor quality-of-life (QOL) improvements post-operatively, and decreased rhinologic QOL in patients with cystic fibrosis. Furthermore, indirect evidence suggests that non-tasters also have a larger burden of biofilm formation. This new data may influence the clinical management of patients with infectious conditions affecting the upper respiratory tract and possibly at other mucosal sites throughout the body.

  3. Relevance of BRAF(V600E) mutation testing versus RAS point mutations and RET/PTC rearrangements evaluation in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Martina; Buratto, Mattia; Tagliati, Federico; Rossi, Roberta; Lupo, Sabrina; Trasforini, Giorgio; Lanza, Giovanni; Franceschetti, Paola; Bruni, Stefania; Degli Uberti, Ettore; Zatelli, Maria Chiara

    2015-02-01

    A molecular profile including BRAF and RAS mutations as well as RET/PTC rearrangement evaluation has been proposed to provide an accurate presurgical assessment of thyroid nodules and to reduce the number of unnecessary diagnostic surgeries, sparing patients' health and saving healthcare resources. However, the application of such molecular analyses may provide different results among different centers and populations in real-life settings. Our aims were to evaluate the diagnostic utility of assessing the presence of BRAF and RAS mutations and RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3 rearrangements in all cytological categories in an Italian group of thyroid nodule patients assessed prospectively, and to understand whether and which mutation testing might be helpful in cytologically indeterminate nodules. A total of 911 patients were submitted to ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration biopsy examination. Cytological evaluation was performed in parallel with molecular testing and compared to pathological results in 940 thyroid nodules, including 140 indeterminate lesions. BRAF mutation testing provided the best contribution to cancer diagnosis, allowing the disease to be detected at an early stage, and identifying indeterminate nodules in which diagnostic lobectomy could be spared. On the contrary, RAS and RET/PTC analysis did not further increase diagnostic sensitivity for thyroid cancer. In addition, we found RET/PTC rearrangements in benign lesions, indicating that this molecular marker might not be useful for the detection of thyroid cancer. BRAF(V600E) mutation analysis is superior to RAS point mutations and evaluation of RET/PTC rearrangements in the diagnosis of thyroid cancer, even in indeterminate lesions.

  4. Frequently consumed vegetables have almost no taste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prof. dr Olaf van Kooten; Vera van Stokkom; M Mars; M Stieger; P.S Teo; C de Graaf

    2015-01-01

    Taste is a main driver in preferences and food choices. Humans are predispositioned to prefer sweet and salty tastes and reject bitter and sour tastes, therefore bitter taste is often thought to cause the rejection of vegetables by children. In our study we investigated the taste and fattiness

  5. The anterior insular cortex represents breaches of taste identity expectation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldhuizen, Maria G; Douglas, Danielle; Aschenbrenner, Katja; Gitelman, Darren R; Small, Dana M

    2011-10-12

    Despite the importance of breaches of taste identity expectation for survival, its neural correlate is unknown. We used fMRI in 16 women to examine brain response to expected and unexpected receipt of sweet taste and tasteless/odorless solutions. During expected trials (70%), subjects heard "sweet" or "tasteless" and received the liquid indicated by the cue. During unexpected trials (30%), subjects heard sweet but received tasteless or they heard tasteless but received sweet. After delivery, subjects indicated stimulus identity by pressing a button. Reaction time was faster and more accurate after valid cuing, indicating that the cues altered expectancy as intended. Tasting unexpected versus expected stimuli resulted in greater deactivation in fusiform gyri, possibly reflecting greater suppression of visual object regions when orienting to, and identifying, an unexpected taste. Significantly greater activation to unexpected versus expected stimuli occurred in areas related to taste (thalamus, anterior insula), reward [ventral striatum (VS), orbitofrontal cortex], and attention [anterior cingulate cortex, inferior frontal gyrus, intraparietal sulcus (IPS)]. We also observed an interaction between stimulus and expectation in the anterior insula (primary taste cortex). Here response was greater for unexpected versus expected sweet compared with unexpected versus expected tasteless, indicating that this region is preferentially sensitive to breaches of taste expectation. Connectivity analyses confirmed that expectation enhanced network interactions, with IPS and VS influencing insular responses. We conclude that unexpected oral stimulation results in suppression of visual cortex and upregulation of sensory, attention, and reward regions to support orientation, identification, and learning about salient stimuli.

  6. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium.

  7. Concomitant RAS, RET/PTC, or BRAF mutations in advanced stage of papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Minjing; Baitei, Essa Y; Alzahrani, Ali S; BinHumaid, Faisal S; Alkhafaji, Dania; Al-Rijjal, Roua A; Meyer, Brian F; Shi, Yufei

    2014-08-01

    RET/PTC rearrangement, RAS, and BRAF mutations are considered to be mutually exclusive in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). However, although concomitant mutations of RET/PTC, RAS, or BRAF have been reported recently, their significance for tumor progression and survival remains unclear. We sought to examine the prognostic value of concomitant mutations in PTC. We investigated 88 PTC for concomitant mutations. Mutation in BRAF exon 15, KRAS, NRAS, and HRAS were studied by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-sequencing of tumor DNA; RET/PTC rearrangement was determined by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR-sequencing of tumor cDNA. BRAF(V600E) was detected in 39 of 82 classic PTC (CPTC) and in all three tall-cell variants (49%, 42/85). KRAS mutation (p.Q61R and p.S65N) was detected in two CPTC (2%, 2/88) and NRAS(Q61R) in one CPTC and two follicular variant PTC (FVPTC; 3%, 3/88). KRAS(S65N) was identified for the first time in thyroid cancer and could activate mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPK). RET/PTC-1 was detected in nine CPTC, one tall-cell variant, and two FVPTC. Concomitant BRAF(V600E) and KRAS, or BRAF(V600E) and RET/PTC-1 mutations were found in two CPTC, and six CPTC and one tall-cell variant, respectively. In total, 11 concomitant mutations were found in 88 PTC samples (13%), and most of them were in the advanced stage of disease (8/11, 73%; pPTC and are associated with poor prognosis. The concomitant mutations may represent intratumor heterogeneity and could exert a gene dosage effect to promote disease progression. KRAS(S65N) can constitutively activate the MAPK pathway.

  8. Regulation of Protein Kinase B Tyrosine Phosphorylation by Thyroid-Specific Oncogenic RET/PTC Kinases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jung, Hye Sook; Kim, Dong Wook; Jo, Young Suk; Chung, Hyo Kyun; Song, Jung Hun; Park, Jong Sun; Park, Ki Cheol; Park, Su Hyeon; Hwang, Jung Hwan; Jo, Ki-Won; Shong, Minho

    2005-01-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is a heterogenous disorder characterized by unique gene rearrangements and gene mutations that activate signaling pathways responsible for cellular transformation, survival, and antiapoptosis...

  9. PTC MathCAD and Workgroup Manager: Implementation in a Multi-Org System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Corey

    2015-01-01

    In this presentation, the presenter will review what was done at Kennedy Space Center to deploy and implement PTC MathCAD and PTC Workgroup Manager in a multi-org system. During the presentation the presenter will explain how they configured PTC Windchill to create custom soft-types and object initialization rules for their custom numbering scheme and why they choose these methods. This presentation will also include how to modify the EPM default soft-type file in the PTC Windchill server codebase folder. The presenter will also go over the code used in a start up script to initiate PTC MathCAD and PTC Workgroup Manager in the proper order, and also set up the environment variables when running both PTC Workgroup Manager and PTC Creo. The configuration.ini file the presenter used will also be reviewed to show you how to set up the PTC Workgroup Manager and customized it to their user community. This presentation will be of interest to administrators trying to create a similar set-up in either a single org or multiple org system deployment. The big take away will be ideas and best practices learned through implementing this system, and the lessons learned what to do and not to do when setting up this configuration. Attendees will be exposed to several different sets of code used and that worked well and will hear some limitations on what the software can accomplish when configured this way.

  10. Preparation of Polyacrylate-based Conductive Coatings and Its PTC Effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Chuan-xi; HU Hui-rong; ZHOU Zhi-yong; ZHANG Yi; DONG Li-jie

    2004-01-01

    Polyacrylate- based conductive coatings were prepared from polyacrylate emulsion as matrix andcarbon black (CB) whose surface was treated with titanate coupling agent as conducting particles. One kind oforganic crystal was added to study its effects on the electrical conductivity and PTC ( positive temperature coeffi-cient ) effect of the conductive coatings. Experimental results show that the coatings containing only polyacrylateemulsion and CB exhibit an excellent electrical conductivity but bad PTC effect, and when organic crystal is added,PTC effect is characterized and can increase by 2 orders of magtitude. The critical transformation temperature ofpolyacrylate emulsion/CB PTC composites is decided by melting point of organic crystals.

  11. Design criteria for stable Pt/C fuel cell catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Josef C; Galeano, Carolina; Katsounaros, Ioannis; Witte, Jonathon; Bongard, Hans J; Topalov, Angel A; Baldizzone, Claudio; Mezzavilla, Stefano; Schüth, Ferdi; Mayrhofer, Karl J J

    2014-01-01

    Platinum and Pt alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon are the state of the art electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To develop a better understanding on how material design can influence the degradation processes on the nanoscale, three specific Pt/C catalysts with different structural characteristics were investigated in depth: a conventional Pt/Vulcan catalyst with a particle size of 3-4 nm and two Pt@HGS catalysts with different particle size, 1-2 nm and 3-4 nm. Specifically, Pt@HGS corresponds to platinum nanoparticles incorporated and confined within the pore structure of the nanostructured carbon support, i.e., hollow graphitic spheres (HGS). All three materials are characterized by the same platinum loading, so that the differences in their performance can be correlated to the structural characteristics of each material. The comparison of the activity and stability behavior of the three catalysts, as obtained from thin film rotating disk electrode measurements and identical location electron microscopy, is also extended to commercial materials and used as a basis for a discussion of general fuel cell catalyst design principles. Namely, the effects of particle size, inter-particle distance, certain support characteristics and thermal treatment on the catalyst performance and in particular the catalyst stability are evaluated. Based on our results, a set of design criteria for more stable and active Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C materials is suggested.

  12. Modeling of PEM fuel cell Pt/C catalyst degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wu; Fuller, Thomas F.

    Pt/C catalyst degradation remains as one of the primary limitations for practical applications of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Pt catalyst degradation mechanisms with the typically observed Pt nanoparticle growth behaviors have not been completely understood and predicted. In this work, a physics-based Pt/C catalyst degradation model is proposed with a simplified bi-modal particle size distribution. The following catalyst degradation processes were considered: (1) dissolution of Pt and subsequent electrochemical deposition on Pt nanoparticles in cathode; (2) diffusion of Pt ions in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA); and (3) Pt ion chemical reduction in membrane by hydrogen permeating through the membrane from the negative electrode. Catalyst coarsening with Pt nanoparticle growth was clearly demonstrated by Pt mass exchange between small and large particles through Pt dissolution and Pt ion deposition. However, the model is not adequate to predict well the catalyst degradation rates including Pt nanoparticle growth, catalyst surface area loss and cathode Pt mass loss. Additional catalyst degradation processes such as new Pt cluster formation on carbon support and neighboring Pt clusters coarsening was proposed for further simulative investigation.

  13. Design criteria for stable Pt/C fuel cell catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef C. Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum and Pt alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon are the state of the art electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To develop a better understanding on how material design can influence the degradation processes on the nanoscale, three specific Pt/C catalysts with different structural characteristics were investigated in depth: a conventional Pt/Vulcan catalyst with a particle size of 3–4 nm and two Pt@HGS catalysts with different particle size, 1–2 nm and 3–4 nm. Specifically, Pt@HGS corresponds to platinum nanoparticles incorporated and confined within the pore structure of the nanostructured carbon support, i.e., hollow graphitic spheres (HGS. All three materials are characterized by the same platinum loading, so that the differences in their performance can be correlated to the structural characteristics of each material. The comparison of the activity and stability behavior of the three catalysts, as obtained from thin film rotating disk electrode measurements and identical location electron microscopy, is also extended to commercial materials and used as a basis for a discussion of general fuel cell catalyst design principles. Namely, the effects of particle size, inter-particle distance, certain support characteristics and thermal treatment on the catalyst performance and in particular the catalyst stability are evaluated. Based on our results, a set of design criteria for more stable and active Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C materials is suggested.

  14. Effects of Salt and Fat Combinations on Taste Preference and Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P.; Newman, Lisa P.; Russell S. J. Keast

    2015-01-01

    Fat and salt are a common and attractive combination in food and overconsumption of either is associated with negative health outcomes. The major aim was to investigate contributions and interactions of salt and fat on taste pleasantness and perception. The minor aim was to investigate individual fat taste sensitivity (detection threshold of oleic acid [C18:1]) on pleasantness for fat. In a complete factorial design, 49 participants (18–54 years, 12 males) tasted tomato soups with 4 different...

  15. Acquiring taste in home economics?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenbak Larsen, Christian

    2015-01-01

    appreciated by the group of boys, and others again learned to stick with their idiosyncrasies when pressured by the teacher. Conclusions: Children were acquiring taste in the home economic lessons, but not only the kind of tastes that the teacher had planned for. This leads to reflections on the very complex...

  16. Tasting Wine: A Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tanya J.; Donaldson, Jilleen A.; Harry, Emma

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a field trip by senior undergraduate anthropology students to a local winery, where they participated in a wine-tasting class with winery staff. In response to explicit hints from a wine-tasting facilitator, and more subtle cues from the cultural capital embedded in their surroundings and the winery staff, the students…

  17. Tasting Wine: A Learning Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Tanya J.; Donaldson, Jilleen A.; Harry, Emma

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a field trip by senior undergraduate anthropology students to a local winery, where they participated in a wine-tasting class with winery staff. In response to explicit hints from a wine-tasting facilitator, and more subtle cues from the cultural capital embedded in their surroundings and the winery staff, the students…

  18. Mouse taste cells with G protein-coupled taste receptors lack voltage-gated calcium channels and SNAP-25

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medler Kathryn F

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taste receptor cells are responsible for transducing chemical stimuli from the environment and relaying information to the nervous system. Bitter, sweet and umami stimuli utilize G-protein coupled receptors which activate the phospholipase C (PLC signaling pathway in Type II taste cells. However, it is not known how these cells communicate with the nervous system. Previous studies have shown that the subset of taste cells that expresses the T2R bitter receptors lack voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, which are normally required for synaptic transmission at conventional synapses. Here we use two lines of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP from two taste-specific promoters to examine Ca2+ signaling in subsets of Type II cells: T1R3-GFP mice were used to identify sweet- and umami-sensitive taste cells, while TRPM5-GFP mice were used to identify all cells that utilize the PLC signaling pathway for transduction. Voltage-gated Ca2+ currents were assessed with Ca2+ imaging and whole cell recording, while immunocytochemistry was used to detect expression of SNAP-25, a presynaptic SNARE protein that is associated with conventional synapses in taste cells. Results Depolarization with high K+ resulted in an increase in intracellular Ca2+ in a small subset of non-GFP labeled cells of both transgenic mouse lines. In contrast, no depolarization-evoked Ca2+ responses were observed in GFP-expressing taste cells of either genotype, but GFP-labeled cells responded to the PLC activator m-3M3FBS, suggesting that these cells were viable. Whole cell recording indicated that the GFP-labeled cells of both genotypes had small voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents, but no evidence of Ca2+ currents. A subset of non-GFP labeled taste cells exhibited large voltage-dependent Na+ and K+ currents and a high threshold voltage-gated Ca2+ current. Immunocytochemistry indicated that SNAP-25 was expressed in a separate population of taste cells

  19. 49 CFR 236.1029 - PTC system use and en route failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PTC system use and en route failures. 236.1029..., INSPECTION, MAINTENANCE, AND REPAIR OF SIGNAL AND TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Positive Train Control Systems § 236.1029 PTC system use and en route failures. (a) When any safety-critical...

  20. Effectiveness of different formulations of Endo-PTC to promote root canal cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Evaldo; Albergaria, Sílvio; Barbosa, Gabriela L R; Santoro, Mariana; Pacheco, Paulo; Leal Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira

    2015-01-01

    Endo-PTC are used during endodontic treatment; however, until now no study evaluated the cleaning of dentin walls after use of different Endo-PTC formulations. The aim of this study was to assess qualitatively, by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images, the cleaning of dentin walls of root canals after chemomechanical preparation (CMP) using Endo-PTC cream and Endo-PTC light associated to 2.5% sodium hypochlorite and 17% ethylenediamine tetraacetate (EDTA). Forty single-rooted human maxillary central incisors with straight canals and fully formed apex were selected. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups depending on the type of Endo-PTC and the final rinse with 17% EDTA. After CMP, all specimens were sectioned and processed for observation of the apical thirds by using SEM. Three calibrated evaluators attributed scores to each specimen. The differences between irrigation protocols were analyzed with Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons. The significance level was set at α = 0.05. The use of Endo-PTC cream or Endo-PTC light did not influence the smear-layer (SL) removal (P > 0.05). When EDTA were used, it was obtained the best cleaning results with no significant difference between the substances (P PTC formulation.

  1. What is taste and how do we teach taste?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Qvortrup, Lars

    2017-01-01

    . Here, the intention is to use ‘taste’ as a means to teach home economics and food education. This section answers the question of how to teach in a way that enables the students to develop knowledge and skills in relation to the four dimensions of taste. In this section four knowledge types...... and argument forms are presented, each related to one of the four taste dimensions, because they provide a basis for structuring an appropriate curriculum of taste. The final aim is to enable students to make well-reasoned food decisions with ‘taste’ as the compass of judgment....

  2. Estimating the recombination frequency for the PTC-Kell linkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne-Spence, M; Falk, C T; Neiswanger, K; Field, L L; Marazita, M L; Allen, F H; Siervogel, R M; Roche, A F; Crandall, B F; Sparkes, R S

    1984-01-01

    Two data sets are analyzed for linkage between the PTC and Kell blood group loci. The original report of close linkage for these loci was that of Conneally et al. (1976), where the maximum likelihood estimate of theta was 0.05. These two new data sets give a combined maximum likelihood estimate of theta m = f = 0.28. Estimating the recombination frequency for the sexes separately gave theta m = 0.29, theta f = 0.23. The combined maximum likelihood estimate over all published data sets including this report is theta m = f = 0.14, Zmax = 8.94. There is statistically significant evidence of heterogeneity among the published studies.

  3. Optimization study of using PTC for human body heating dissipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu Adrian SALAORU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A better knowledge of the human body heat loses mechanisms is important for both diminishing the number of deaths during the surgical procedures of the patients under effect of full anaesthesia and increasing the efficiency of the Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC systems. For these studies it is necessary to manufacture a human body mannequin having its surface temperature maintained on a value close to the real human body temperature. A number of PTC (Positive Temperature Coefficient thermistors placed on the entire external surface of the mannequin can be used for this purpose. This paper presents a study of the transient heating regime and the stability of the maintained temperature, performed on these devices.

  4. A Taste of Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Verde, L

    2013-01-01

    This is the summary of two lectures that aim to give an overview of cosmology. I will not try to be too rigorous in derivations, nor to give a full historical overview. The idea is to provide a "taste" of cosmology and some of the interesting topics it covers. The standard cosmological model is presented and I highlight the successes of cosmology over the past decade or so. Keys to the development of the standard cosmological model are observations of the cosmic microwave background and of large-scale structure, which are introduced. Inflation and dark energy and the outlook for the future are also discussed. Slides from the lectures are available from the school website: physicschool.web.cern.ch/PhysicSchool/CLASHEP/CLASHEP2011/.

  5. Influence of γ-ray Irradiation on the PTC Effect of EPDM/Carbon Black Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Introduction The positive temperature coefficient(PTC) effect is characterized by an increase of resistivity with an elevated temperature.The PTC effect of carbon black(CB) filled polymers is useful for self-regulation heaters,over-current protectors,sensors,etc.Much work has been done on the PTC effect of the carbon black filled crystalline polymer composite[1-4],whereas carbon black filled amorphous polymers have not drawn researchers much attention because the PTC effect in these composites is small or cannot be detected[5-7].In this work,the influence of γ-ray irradiation on the PTC effect of CB filled amorphous ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer(EPDM) composites was studied.

  6. Colorimetric Sensor Array for White Wine Tasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soo; Park, Tu San; Park, Soo Hyun; Kim, Joon Yong; Park, Seongmin; Son, Daesik; Bae, Young Min; Cho, Seong In

    2015-07-24

    A colorimetric sensor array was developed to characterize and quantify the taste of white wines. A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera captured images of the sensor array from 23 different white wine samples, and the change in the R, G, B color components from the control were analyzed by principal component analysis. Additionally, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to analyze the chemical components of each wine sample responsible for its taste. A two-dimensional score plot was created with 23 data points. It revealed clusters created from the same type of grape, and trends of sweetness, sourness, and astringency were mapped. An artificial neural network model was developed to predict the degree of sweetness, sourness, and astringency of the white wines. The coefficients of determination (R2) for the HPLC results and the sweetness, sourness, and astringency were 0.96, 0.95, and 0.83, respectively. This research could provide a simple and low-cost but sensitive taste prediction system, and, by helping consumer selection, will be able to have a positive effect on the wine industry.

  7. Colorimetric Sensor Array for White Wine Tasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Chung

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A colorimetric sensor array was developed to characterize and quantify the taste of white wines. A charge-coupled device (CCD camera captured images of the sensor array from 23 different white wine samples, and the change in the R, G, B color components from the control were analyzed by principal component analysis. Additionally, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC was used to analyze the chemical components of each wine sample responsible for its taste. A two-dimensional score plot was created with 23 data points. It revealed clusters created from the same type of grape, and trends of sweetness, sourness, and astringency were mapped. An artificial neural network model was developed to predict the degree of sweetness, sourness, and astringency of the white wines. The coefficients of determination (R2 for the HPLC results and the sweetness, sourness, and astringency were 0.96, 0.95, and 0.83, respectively. This research could provide a simple and low-cost but sensitive taste prediction system, and, by helping consumer selection, will be able to have a positive effect on the wine industry.

  8. Taste preference changes throughout different life stages in male rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Takashi; Ueda, Katsura; Nakatsuka, Michiko; Kumabe, Shunji; Inui, Tadashi; Iwai, Yasutomo

    2017-01-01

    Taste preference, a key component of food choice, changes with aging. However, it remains unclear how this occurs. To determine differences in taste preference between rats in different life stages, we examined the consumption of taste solutions and water using a two-bottle test. Male Sprague-Dawley rats of different ages were used: juvenile (3–6 weeks), young adult (8–11 weeks), adult (17–20 weeks), middle-aged (34–37 weeks), and old-aged (69–72 weeks). The intakes of the high and low concentration solutions presented simultaneously were measured. We observed that the old-aged group had lower preference ratios for 0.3 M sucrose and 0.1 M MSG in comparison with other groups. The preference ratio for 0.03 mM QHCl was higher in the middle-aged group than in the three younger groups and higher in the old-aged group than the juvenile group. The taste preferences for HCl and NaCl did not significantly differ among the age groups. The old-aged group tended to prefer high concentrations of sucrose, QHCl, NaCl, and MSG to low concentrations, indicating age-related decline in taste sensitivity. We also aimed to investigate differences between life stages in the electrophysiological responses of the chorda tympani nerve, one of the peripheral gustatory nerves, to taste stimuli. The electrophysiological recordings showed that aging did not alter the function of the chorda tympani nerve. This study showed that aging induced alterations in taste preference. It is likely that these alterations are a result of functional changes in other peripheral taste nerves, the gastrointestinal system, or the central nervous system. PMID:28742813

  9. Taste processing in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthi A. Apostolopoulou

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The sense of taste allows animals to detect chemical substances in their environment to initiate appropriate behaviors: to find food or a mate, to avoid hostile environments and predators. Drosophila larvae are a promising model organism to study gustation. Their simple nervous system triggers stereotypic behavioral responses, and the coding of taste can be studied by genetic tools at the single cell level. This review briefly summarizes recent progress on how taste information is sensed and processed by larval cephalic and pharyngeal sense organs. The focus lies on several studies, which revealed cellular and molecular mechanisms required to process sugar, salt, and bitter substances.

  10. The gustin (CA6) gene polymorphism, rs2274333 (A/G), as a mechanistic link between PROP tasting and fungiform taste papilla density and maintenance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melis, Melania; Atzori, Elena; Cabras, Stefano; Zonza, Andrea; Calò, Carla; Muroni, Patrizia; Nieddu, Mariella; Padiglia, Alessandra; Sogos, Valeria; Tepper, Beverly J; Tomassini Barbarossa, Iole

    2013-01-01

    Taste sensitivity to PROP varies greatly among individuals and is associated with polymorphisms in the bitter receptor gene TAS2R38, and with differences in fungiform papilla density on the anterior tongue surface...

  11. The Gustin (CA6) Gene Polymorphism, rs2274333 (A/G), as a Mechanistic Link between PROP Tasting and Fungiform Taste Papilla Density and Maintenance: e74151

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Melania Melis; Elena Atzori; Stefano Cabras; Andrea Zonza; Carla Calò; Patrizia Muroni; Mariella Nieddu; Alessandra Padiglia; Valeria Sogos; Beverly J Tepper; Iole Tomassini Barbarossa

    2013-01-01

      Taste sensitivity to PROP varies greatly among individuals and is associated with polymorphisms in the bitter receptor gene TAS2R38, and with differences in fungiform papilla density on the anterior tongue surface...

  12. Taste as didactic element in food education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen

    argues that most of the research literature on taste education has a very reductive understanding of taste and is essentially totally distrustful concerning children’s taste. Taste is seen as a barrier for ‘correct’ eating habits and not as an important sense, a source to pleasure or happiness...

  13. Modulation of sweet taste by umami compounds via sweet taste receptor subunit hT1R2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewon Shim

    Full Text Available Although the five basic taste qualities-sweet, sour, bitter, salty and umami-can be recognized by the respective gustatory system, interactions between these taste qualities are often experienced when food is consumed. Specifically, the umami taste has been investigated in terms of whether it enhances or reduces the other taste modalities. These studies, however, are based on individual perception and not on a molecular level. In this study we investigated umami-sweet taste interactions using umami compounds including monosodium glutamate (MSG, 5'-mononucleotides and glutamyl-dipeptides, glutamate-glutamate (Glu-Glu and glutamate-aspartic acid (Glu-Asp, in human sweet taste receptor hT1R2/hT1R3-expressing cells. The sensitivity of sucrose to hT1R2/hT1R3 was significantly attenuated by MSG and umami active peptides but not by umami active nucleotides. Inhibition of sweet receptor activation by MSG and glutamyl peptides is obvious when sweet receptors are activated by sweeteners that target the extracellular domain (ECD of T1R2, such as sucrose and acesulfame K, but not by cyclamate, which interact with the T1R3 transmembrane domain (TMD. Application of umami compounds with lactisole, inhibitory drugs that target T1R3, exerted a more severe inhibitory effect. The inhibition was also observed with F778A sweet receptor mutant, which have the defect in function of T1R3 TMD. These results suggest that umami peptides affect sweet taste receptors and this interaction prevents sweet receptor agonists from binding to the T1R2 ECD in an allosteric manner, not to the T1R3. This is the first report to define the interaction between umami and sweet taste receptors.

  14. Type 1 Taste Receptors in Taste and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochem, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Our sense of taste allows us to evaluate the nutritive value of foods prior to ingesting them. Sweet taste signals the presence of sugars, and savory taste signals the presence of amino acids. The ability to identify these macronutrients in foods was likely crucial for the survival of our species when nourishing food sources were sparse. In modern, industrialized settings, taste perception continues to play an important role in human health as we attempt to prevent and treat conditions stemming from overnutrition. Recent research has revealed that type 1 taste receptors (T1Rs), which are largely responsible for sweet and umami taste, may also influence the absorption and metabolism of the foods we eat. Preliminary research shows that T1Rs contribute to intestinal glucose absorption, blood sugar and insulin regulation, and the body's responses to excessive energy intake. In light of these findings, T1Rs have come to be understood as nutrient sensors, among other roles, that facilitate the selection, digestion, and metabolism of foods. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Understanding taste dysfunction in patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Laura; Mahon, Suzanne M

    2012-04-01

    Taste dysfunction is a significant but underestimated issue for patients with cancer. Impaired taste results in changes in diet and appetite, early satiety, and impaired social interactions. Nurses can play a key role in educating patients and families on the pathophysiology of taste dysfunction by suggesting interventions to treat the consequences of taste dysfunction, when available, and offering psychosocial support as patients cope with this often devastating consequence of treatment. Taste recognition helps humans identify the nutritional quality of food and signals the digestive tract to begin secreting enzymes. Spoiled or tainted foods typically are recognized by their bad taste. Along with the other sensory systems, taste is crucial for helping patients treated for cancer feel normal. This article will review the anatomy and physiology of taste; define the different types of taste dysfunction, including the underlying pathophysiologic basis related to cancer treatment; and discuss potential nursing interventions to manage the consequences of taste dysfunction.

  16. 49 CFR 236.1013 - PTC Development Plan and Notice of Product Intent content requirements and Type Approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PTC Development Plan and Notice of Product Intent... TRAIN CONTROL SYSTEMS, DEVICES, AND APPLIANCES Positive Train Control Systems § 236.1013 PTC Development Plan and Notice of Product Intent content requirements and Type Approval. (a) For a PTC system to...

  17. [Factors that alter taste perception].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffeis, E R; Silva-Netto, C R

    1990-01-01

    Dysfunction of taste perception is a significant problem for many individuals. Taste anomalies may affect health not only by directly affecting liquid and solid food intake, but also by creating a state of depression due to the loss of an important source of pleasure. Many factors alter taste perception, such as lesions of the oral mucosa, cigarette smoking, radiation, chemotherapy, renal disease, hepatitis, leprosy, hormones, nutrition, use of dentures, medications, and aging. Gum or ice chewing may temporarily help loss of taste. Patients should be encouraged to chew their food thoroughly, alternating the sides of the mouth, or alternating different foods. Unfortunately, in many cases there is no cure for this alteration, and patience is then the only possibility.

  18. Molecular neurobiology of Drosophila taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Erica Gene; Dahanukar, Anupama

    2015-10-01

    Drosophila is a powerful model in which to study the molecular and cellular basis of taste coding. Flies sense tastants via populations of taste neurons that are activated by compounds of distinct categories. The past few years have borne witness to studies that define the properties of taste neurons, identifying functionally distinct classes of sweet and bitter taste neurons that express unique subsets of gustatory receptor (Gr) genes, as well as water, salt, and pheromone sensing neurons that express members of the pickpocket (ppk) or ionotropic receptor (Ir) families. There has also been significant progress in terms of understanding how tastant information is processed and conveyed to higher brain centers, and modulated by prior dietary experience or starvation.

  19. Taste is a didactic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jacob Højgaard

    2015-01-01

    of expectations to students’ learning. This article presents the results of a new quantitative study that investigates students’ work with taste in relation to their own expected learning in the subject Food Knowledge, viewed in the light of three didactic elements: motivation, student participation...... and innovation in school. The method is a questionnaire among students (N= 769) who have competed in Food Fight, a competition that forms part of Food Knowledge. The connection between taste and learning is a relatively unexplored field, and the analysis in this article indicates that the experience of working...... with taste in Food Knowledge may have an effect on students’ expected learning that is equally positive – or even more so – as that of known didactic elements like student participation and innovation. Therefore, teachers need to create balance between didactic elements and remember to incorporate taste...

  20. Taste of Clindamycin and Acetaminophen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiba, Kimberlee A; Wo, Shane R; Yamamoto, Loren G

    2017-02-01

    This study evaluated the taste palatability of liquid clindamycin and acetaminophen products on the market. Subjects rated the palatability of 3 clindamycin suspensions, 1 amoxicillin suspension (tasted twice), an acetaminophen elixir, and an acetaminophen suspension in a randomized blinded fashion on a 0 to 5 scale. Forty-six adults aged 20 to 82 years volunteered for this study. Means (and 95% confidence intervals) were as follows: amoxicillin-first taste 3.6 (3.3-3.9), amoxicillin-second taste 3.5 (3.2-3.7). Clindamycin Rising, Perrigo, Greenstone; 2.0 (1.6-2.5), 3.0 (2.7-3.3), and 2.2 (1.8-2.6), respectively. Acetaminophen elixir 0.6 (0.4-0.8) and acetaminophen suspension 3.4 (3.1-3.6). One clindamycin tasted significantly better than the others. Additionally, although 2 acetaminophen formulations are currently available over-the-counter, the suspension is more palatable and less costly. Medicaid drug programs that perpetuate the use of elixir should change their coverage to save money and provide patients access to better tasting acetaminophen.

  1. [Pooled Analysis of RET/PTC Gene Rearrangement Rate in Sporadic and Radiogenic Thyroid Papillary Carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenkova, L N; Koterov, A N; Biryukov, A P

    2015-01-01

    The database of publications on molecular epidemiology of RET/PTC rearrangements in sporadic and radiogenic thyroid papillary carcinoma has been formed (197 sources at the end of 2014; coverage of 100%). Based on this database a pooled analysis of data on the rates of RET/PTC1, RET/PTC3 and RET/PTC in total was conducted. Statistical approach involves a simple pooling, as well as calculations on the models of random and fixed effects. Since almost all the strata were characterized by heterogeneity, simple pooling and random effect models were adequate. Calculations using both models led to almost identical results. For rates of RET/PTC1, RET/PTC3 and RET/PTC in total with respect to formed carcinoma striations the following values (pooling, in %) were obtained: sporadic, total--13.2; 8.9; 21.2; sporadic, adults--13.3; 9.9; 21.1; sporadic, children--22.4; 17.5; 44.5; radiogenic, total--20.9; 20.3; 40.4; radiotherapy (exposure in childhood)--31.1; 11.8; 42.5; children affected after the Chernobyl accident--19.9; 23.6; 46.1; radiological incidents (exposure in adulthood)--19.9; 7.7; 18.4. Statistically proven is the reliability of differences of carcinoma indicators for children compared with adults (both sporadic and radiogenic tumors) and for radiogenic cancer compared with sporadic. The greatest increase in rate after irradiation was found for RET/PTC1, previously characterized in vitro as one of radiogenic types of RET/PTC.

  2. The Characteristics and Applied Limits for the Test Code ASME PTC6 and ASME PTC46%发电设备性能试验规程ASME PTC6与ASME PTC46的特点及适用范围

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王兴平

    2003-01-01

    对美国机械工程师协会汽轮机及全厂性试验规程ASME PTC6与ASME PTC46的目的、方法、边界条件等作了分析论述,着重介绍了ASME PTC46的特点和方法,并根据国内的实际情况,并提出了实际应用方面的建议.表1参4

  3. Development of taste sensing system using inorganic membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Yohichiro; Hasegawa, Yuki

    2011-09-01

    We developed a novel taste sensor for liquid and verified its effectiveness using coffee. We fabricated an inorganic metal oxide membrane liquid sensor using the laser ablation method. The sensor shows a sufficient sensitivity for electrolyte solutions, while it shows a relatively low response for non-electrolyte solutions. We differentiated and identified five brands of commercially available coffee using the sensor.

  4. Chronic ataluren (PTC124) treatment of nonsense mutation cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilschanski, M; Miller, L L; Shoseyov, D; Blau, H; Rivlin, J; Aviram, M; Cohen, M; Armoni, S; Yaakov, Y; Pugatsch, T; Pugatch, T; Cohen-Cymberknoh, M; Miller, N L; Reha, A; Northcutt, V J; Hirawat, S; Donnelly, K; Elfring, G L; Ajayi, T; Kerem, E

    2011-07-01

    In a subset of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), nonsense mutations (premature stop codons) disrupt production of full-length, functional CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). Ataluren (PTC124) allows ribosomal readthrough of premature stop codons in mRNA. We evaluated drug activity and safety in patients with nonsense mutation CF who took ataluren three times daily (morning, midday and evening) for 12 weeks at either a lower dose (4, 4 and 8 mg·kg(-1)) or higher dose (10, 10 and 20 mg·kg(-1)). The study enrolled 19 patients (10 males and nine females aged 19-57 yrs; dose: lower 12, higher seven) with a classic CF phenotype, at least one CFTR nonsense mutation allele, and an abnormal nasal total chloride transport. Both ataluren doses were similarly active, improving total chloride transport with a combined mean change of -5.4 mV (pataluren administration produced time-dependent improvements in CFTR activity and clinical parameters with generally good tolerability.

  5. PHENYLTHIOCARBAMIDE (PTC TASTER STATUS IN SOUTH INDIAN ADULT MEDICAL STUDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Rathod

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND The objective of this study was to determine Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC taster status in adults who are studying medicine and its relationship with anthropometric variables such as Body Mass Index (BMI, Body Fat Percentage (BFP and pleasantness of sugar, salt, and fat. A total of 112 subjects rated the intensity of Phenylthiocarbamide and sodium chloride (NaCl solutions using the labelled magnitude scale. For pleasantness evaluation, it was used with concentrated lemon juice (sugar and mashed potato (salt and fat. The subjects were classified as non-tasters (n=32, medium-tasters (n=31 and super-tasters (n=49. In this study, no relationship was found between phenylthiocarbamide taster status and age, sex, weight, body mass index, and pleasantness. Although genetic markers may influence the degree of liking of certain foods, one must consider that the mechanisms influencing eating behaviour in humans are complex, and that psychological, social, and economic factors play a key role in response to food.

  6. Modulation of Sweet Taste by Umami Compounds via Sweet Taste Receptor Subunit hT1R2: e0124030

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jaewon Shim; Hee Jin Son; Yiseul Kim; Ki Hwa Kim; Jung Tae Kim; Hana Moon; Min Jung Kim; Takumi Misaka; Mee-Ra Rhyu

    2015-01-01

    ...), in human sweet taste receptor hT1R2/hT1R3-expressing cells. The sensitivity of sucrose to hT1R2/hT1R3 was significantly attenuated by MSG and umami active peptides but not by umami active nucleotides...

  7. [Diagnostic value of BRAFV600E and RET/PTC oncogenes in thyroid nodule aspirates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Anna; Carrano, Mario; Angrisani, Elisabetta; Vitale, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNC) is the primary means to distinguish benign form malignant nodules. Aim of this study is to evaluate the diagnostic value of BRAF(V600E) and RET/PTC oncogenes in a large cohort of thyroid nodules with inconclusive FNC. We searched for BRAF(V600E) and RET/PTC in 299 thyroid nodule aspirates then removed by surgery. RET/PTC demonstrated a poor specificity. The search for BRAF(V600E) demonstrated to be useful in 25 cases, identifying a PTC in 2 false negative, 2 inadequate, 11 indeterminate and 10 suspicious FNC. Detection of BRAF(V600E) revealed to be a useful tool to refine inconclusive cytology.

  8. Controlling or trusting children’s taste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Leer, Jonatan

    2016-01-01

    that design and evaluate taste education programs for children. Our main argument is that most of the literature on taste education has a very reductive understanding of taste and is essentially totally distrustful concerning children’s taste. Taste is seen as a barrier for ‘correct’ eating habits...... and not as an important sense, a source to pleasure, or a central way of sensually understanding and approaching the world. In other words, taste literacy becomes a tool to push children towards ‘hegemonic nutrition’. Theoretically, the paper is inspired by the reworking of Foucault’s governmentality concept in recent...

  9. Food reward in the absence of taste receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Ivan E; Oliveira-Maia, Albino J; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Gainetdinov, Raul R; Caron, Marc G; Nicolelis, Miguel A L; Simon, Sidney A

    2008-03-27

    Food palatability and hedonic value play central roles in nutrient intake. However, postingestive effects can influence food preferences independently of palatability, although the neurobiological bases of such mechanisms remain poorly understood. Of central interest is whether the same brain reward circuitry that is responsive to palatable rewards also encodes metabolic value independently of taste signaling. Here we show that trpm5-/- mice, which lack the cellular machinery required for sweet taste transduction, can develop a robust preference for sucrose solutions based solely on caloric content. Sucrose intake induced dopamine release in the ventral striatum of these sweet-blind mice, a pattern usually associated with receipt of palatable rewards. Furthermore, single neurons in this same ventral striatal region showed increased sensitivity to caloric intake even in the absence of gustatory inputs. Our findings suggest that calorie-rich nutrients can directly influence brain reward circuits that control food intake independently of palatability or functional taste transduction.

  10. Sweet and bitter taste perception of women during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nanou, Evangelia; Brandt, Sarah Østergaard; Weenen, Hugo;

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Changes in sweet and bitter taste perception during pregnancy have been reported in a limited number of studies leading, however, to inconclusive results. The current study aimed to investigate possible differences in perceived intensity and liking of sweetness and bitterness between...... and bitterness, respectively. Pregnant women completed also a self-administered questionnaire on changes in sweet and bitter taste perception due to pregnancy. Results: Perceived intensity of sweetness and bitterness was not different between pregnant and nonpregnant women for any of the products. However......, the liking of the least sweet apple + berry juice was significantly higher, and the optimal preferred sugar content was significantly lower in pregnant compared to nonpregnant women. With regards to self-report, pregnant women who reported higher sensitivity in sweet or bitter taste did not have...

  11. Neural correlates of taste perception in congenital blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, L; Kupers, R; Ptito, M

    2015-04-01

    Sight is undoubtedly important for the perception and the assessment of the palatability of tastants. Although many studies have addressed the consequences of visual impairment on food selection, feeding behavior, eating habits and taste perception, nothing is known about the neural correlates of gustation in blindness. In the current study we examined brain responses during gustation using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We scanned nine congenitally blind and 14 age- and sex-matched blindfolded sighted control subjects, matched in age, gender and body mass index (BMI), while they made judgments of either the intensity or the (un)pleasantness of different tastes (sweet, bitter) or artificial saliva that were delivered intra-orally. The fMRI data indicated that during gustation, congenitally blind individuals activate less strongly the primary taste cortex (right posterior insula and overlying Rolandic operculum) and the hypothalamus. In sharp contrast with results of multiple other sensory processing studies in congenitally blind subjects, including touch, audition and smell, the occipital cortex was not recruited during taste processing, suggesting the absence of taste-related compensatory crossmodal responses in the occipital cortex. These results underscore our earlier behavioral demonstration that congenitally blind subjects have a lower gustatory sensitivity compared to normal sighted individuals. We hypothesize that due to an underexposure to a variety of tastants, training-induced crossmodal sensory plasticity to gustatory stimulation does not occur in blind subjects.

  12. Sodium taste threshold in children and its relationship to blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguelles, J; Diaz, J J; Malaga, I; Perillan, C; Costales, M; Vijande, M

    2007-05-01

    Popular science has emphasized the risks of high sodium intake and many studies have confirmed that salt intake is closely related to hypertension. The present mini-review summarizes experiments about salt taste sensitivity and its relationship with blood pressure (BP) and other variables of clinical and familial relevance. Children and adolescents from control parents (N = 72) or with at least one essential hypertensive (EHT) parent (N = 51) were investigated. Maternal questionnaires on eating habits and vomiting episodes were collected. Offspring, anthropometric, BP, and salt taste sensitivity values were recorded and blood samples analyzed. Most mothers declared that they added "little salt" when cooking. Salt taste sensitivity was inversely correlated with systolic BP (SBP) in control youngsters (r = -0.33; P = 0.015). In the EHT group, SBP values were similar to control and a lower salt taste sensitivity threshold. Obese offspring of EHT parents showed higher SBP and C-reactive protein values but no differences in renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity. Salt taste sensitivity was correlated with SBP only in the non-obese EHT group (N = 41; r = 0.37; P = 0.02). Salt taste sensitivity was correlated with SBP in healthy, normotensive children and adolescents whose mothers reported significant vomiting during the first trimester (N = 18; r = -0.66; P blood pressure, salt intake and sensitivity, perinatal environment and obesity, with potential physiopathological implications in humans. This relationship has not been studied comprehensively using homogeneous methods and therefore more research is needed in this field.

  13. Preparation of Pt/C Catalyst with Solid Phase Reaction Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Pt/C catalyst was prepared with solid phase reaction method (Pt/C(S)) for the first time. Its performances were compared with that prepared by the traditional liquid phase reaction method. The results demonstrate that the electrocatalytic activity of Pt/C catalyst with solid phase reaction method for methanol oxidation is higher than that with liquid phase reaction method. XRD and TEM measurements indicate that the Pt/C(S) possesses low crystalline extent and small particle size.

  14. Transcriptional control of Shh/Ptc1 signaling in embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shi-Lung; Chang, Shin-Ju E; Ying, Shao-Yao

    2006-02-15

    In vivo profiling of signal-directed gene expression patterns is a major bottleneck in studying developmental biology. A signal molecule initiates its specific gene expression pattern through the activation of certain transcription factor (TF); however, tissue heterogeneity often masks this pattern due to intercellular complexity of other signal transduction pathways. To decipher the synergistic regulation of signal-directed gene expression in the tissue level, we report here a unique transcriptional responsive element (TRE) existing in the 5'-upstream promoter regions (5'-UPR) of the genes responding to the Shh/Ptc1 signal transduction pathway during feather placode development in chicken embryos. By locating the TRE homologue and its interactive TF, we were able to reveal the gene expression pattern of the Shh/Ptc1 signaling. We firstly demonstrated that homology profiling of the 5'-UPR of the genes, Gli1, TGF-beta2 and Msx2, responding to the Shh/Ptc1 signaling showed a more than 70% conserved region. Computer alignment of the consensus sequences in the conserved region revealed a 37-nucleotide TRE sequence, containing two regulatory elements homologous to human and mouse Gli-binding sites. Activation of this newly identified Shh/Ptc1-responsive TRE by active Smo signaling in chicken hepatoepithelial carcinoma cells elicited a strong synergistic expression of the Shh/Ptc1-downstream genes. Based on previous bioinformatics and the present experimental findings, we successfully established an in vivo signaling model for the Shh/Ptc1-directed embryonic feather morphogenesis.

  15. Sunitinib inhibits papillary thyroid carcinoma with RET/PTC rearrangement but not BRAF mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Woo-Jin; Mo, Ji-Hun; Park, Min Woo; Choi, Ik Joon; An, Soo-Youn; Jeon, Eun-Hee; Ahn, Soon-Hyun

    2011-09-01

    Sunitinib, a multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is frequently incorporated into the management of papillary thyroid carcinoma refractory to standard therapies. Although clinical trials are in progress, the mechanism of action in papillary thyroid carcinomas is not clear, especially regarding the effect on BRAF mutation. We investigated the effect of sunitinib on papillary thyroid carcinoma cells harboring RET/PTC rearrangement and BRAF mutation using TPC-1M, SNU-790, and B-cPAP cell lines. Cell growth of papillary thyroid cancer cells with RET/PTC rearrangement was effectively inhibited at low doses of sunitinib (IC50=0.658 μM), whereas that of BRAF mutated cells required higher doses. Immunoblotting revealed effective blocking of MEK/ERK pathway in RET/PTC rearrangement cells, but not in BRAF mutated cells. Cell cycle analysis showed G1 arrest in RET/PTC rearrangement cells. In vivo orthotopic thyroid cancer mouse model demonstrated statistically significant tumor growth inhibition by sunitinib in RET/PTC rearrangement cancer cells. We conclude that sunitinib effectively inhibits RET/PTC rearrangement cells but not BRAF mutated cells. These data suggest that sunitinib exerts its effect by inhibiting the upstream MAPK signaling cascade. These findings support the unsatisfactory treatment outcomes of sunitinib in many already ongoing clinical trials compared to other tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Clinical application of sunitinib should be directed accordingly.

  16. Taste-modifying protein from miracle fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, K; Beidler, L M

    1968-09-20

    The active principle of miracle fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) is a basic glycoprotein with a probable molecular weight of 44,000. Application of the protein to the tongue modifies the taste so that one tastes sour substances as sweet.

  17. A National Test of Taste and Smell

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is the only national U.S. health survey that combines both in-person interviews with physical examinations. In ... Read More "Taste, Smell, Hearing, Language, Voice, Balance" Articles At Last: A National Test of Taste and ...

  18. Preexposure to Salty and Sour Taste Enhances Conditioned Taste Aversion to Novel Sucrose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Veronica L.; Moran, Anan; Bernstein, Max; Katz, Donald B.

    2016-01-01

    Conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is an intensively studied single-trial learning paradigm whereby animals are trained to avoid a taste that has been paired with malaise. Many factors influence the strength of aversion learning; prominently studied among these is taste novelty--the fact that preexposure to the taste conditioned stimulus (CS)…

  19. Association of TERT Promoter Mutation, But Not BRAF Mutation, With Increased Mortality in PTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Jonathan R; Henderson, Ying C; Williams, Michelle D; Roberts, Dianna B; Hei, Hu; Lai, Stephen Y; Clayman, Gary L

    2015-12-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) carrying the BRAF mutation has been reported to be associated with high recurrence and potentially increased mortality. PTC carrying the TERT promoter mutation has been associated with older age, recurrence, and aggressive disease. The objective of this study was to determine the association of BRAF and TERT promoter gene alterations with recurrence and survival in a high-risk population. Genomic DNA was analyzed for the BRAF mutation from 256 persistent/recurrent PTC (p/rPTC; 202 new, 54 previously reported) and for the TERT promoter mutation and polymorphism (242 p/rPTC). Two-tailed Fisher exact tests or the Pearson χ(2) test were performed for the associations between mutations and other variables. Overall and disease-free survivals were compared by log rank tests on Kaplan-Meier plots and by Cox regression analysis. TERT promoter constructs were tested in PTC cell lines to determine their activities in these cells. BRAF V600E mutation was identified in 235 of 256 (91.8%), TERT promoter mutation at -124 was detected in 77 of 242 (31.8%), and TERT promoter polymorphism at -245 was found in 113 of 242 (46.7%) p/rPTC patients. A significant difference in survival was found in p/rPTC patients with the TERT promoter mutation, which also displayed increased activity in vitro as compared to the nonmutated promoter sequence. No association was noted between the BRAF mutation or TERT promoter polymorphism and recurrence or survival. A drawback of our study could be the limited number of patients with nonmutated BRAF (21 of 256 [8.2%]). Mutation in the TERT promoter, but not in BRAF, was associated with decreased survival in 19 (24.7%) p/rPTC patients who died of disease and in 38 (49.4%) p/rPTC patients who died at last contact. The presence or absence of the BRAF mutation and TERT promoter polymorphism, however, was not significantly correlated with survival.

  20. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James (NIH); (Kansas); (HWMRI)

    2010-04-07

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 {angstrom} cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the 'off-target' effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism.

  1. Molecular basis for the high-affinity binding and stabilization of firefly luciferase by PTC124

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Douglas S.; Lovell, Scott; Thorne, Natasha; Lea, Wendy A.; Maloney, David J.; Shen, Min; Rai, Ganesha; Battaile, Kevin P.; Thomas, Craig J.; Simeonov, Anton; Hanzlik, Robert P.; Inglese, James

    2010-01-01

    Firefly luciferase (FLuc), an ATP-dependent bioluminescent reporter enzyme, is broadly used in chemical biology and drug discovery assays. PTC124 (Ataluren; (3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid) discovered in an FLuc-based assay targeting nonsense codon suppression, is an unusually potent FLuc-inhibitor. Paradoxically, PTC124 and related analogs increase cellular FLuc activity levels by posttranslational stabilization. In this study, we show that FLuc inhibition and stabilization is the result of an inhibitory product formed during the FLuc-catalyzed reaction between its natural substrate, ATP, and PTC124. A 2.0 Å cocrystal structure revealed the inhibitor to be the acyl-AMP mixed-anhydride adduct PTC124-AMP, which was subsequently synthesized and shown to be a high-affinity multisubstrate adduct inhibitor (MAI; KD = 120 pM) of FLuc. Biochemical assays, liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry, and near-attack conformer modeling demonstrate that formation of this novel MAI is absolutely dependent upon the precise positioning and reactivity of a key meta-carboxylate of PTC124 within the FLuc active site. We also demonstrate that the inhibitory activity of PTC124-AMP is relieved by free coenzyme A, a component present at high concentrations in luciferase detection reagents used for cell-based assays. This explains why PTC124 can appear to increase, instead of inhibit, FLuc activity in cell-based reporter gene assays. To our knowledge, this is an unusual example in which the “off-target” effect of a small molecule is mediated by an MAI mechanism. PMID:20194791

  2. High growth rate of benign thyroid nodules bearing RET/PTC rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapio, Maria Rosaria; Guerra, Anna; Marotta, Vincenzo; Campanile, Elisabetta; Formisano, Raffaele; Deandrea, Maurilio; Motta, Manuela; Limone, Paolo Piero; Fenzi, Gianfranco; Rossi, Guido; Vitale, Mario

    2011-06-01

    Benign thyroid nodules display a broad range of behaviors from a stationary size to a progressive growth. The RET/PTC oncogene has been documented in a fraction of benign thyroid nodules, besides papillary thyroid carcinomas, and it might therefore influence their growth. The aim of the present work was to evaluate whether RET/PTC in benign thyroid nodules associates with a different nodular growth rate. In this prospective multicentric study, 125 subjects with benign nodules were included. RET rearrangements were analyzed in cytology samples; clinical and ultrasonographic nodule characteristics were assessed at the start and at the end of the study. RET/PTC was present in 19 nodules. The difference between the mean baseline nodular volume of the RET/PTC- and RET/PTC+ nodules was not significant. After 36 months of follow-up, the RET/PTC+ group (n = 16) reached a volume higher than the RET/PTC- group (n = 90) (5.04 ± 2.67 vs. 3.04 ± 2.26 ml; P = 0.0028). We calculated the monthly change of nodule volumes as a percentage of baseline. After a mean follow-up of 36.6 months, the monthly volume increase of nodules bearing a RET rearrangement was 4.3-fold that of nodules with wild-type RET (1.83 ± 1.2 vs. 0.43 ± 1.0% of baseline volume; P < 0.0001). Benign thyroid nodules bearing RET rearrangements grow more rapidly than those with wild-type RET. Searching for RET rearrangements in benign thyroid nodules might be useful to the clinician in choosing the more appropriate and timely therapeutic option.

  3. A novel objective sour taste evaluation method based on near-infrared spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshi, Ayaka; Aoki, Soichiro; Kouno, Emi; Ogasawara, Masashi; Onaka, Takashi; Miura, Yutaka; Mamiya, Kanji

    2014-05-01

    One of the most important themes in the development of foods and drinks is the accurate evaluation of taste properties. In general, a sensory evaluation system is frequently used for evaluating food and drink. This method, which is dependent on human senses, is highly sensitive but is influenced by the eating experience and food palatability of individuals, leading to subjective results. Therefore, a more effective method for objectively estimating taste properties is required. Here we show that salivary hemodynamic signals, as measured by near-infrared spectroscopy, are a useful objective indicator for evaluating sour taste stimulus. In addition, the hemodynamic responses of the parotid gland are closely correlated to the salivary secretion volume of the parotid gland in response to basic taste stimuli and respond to stimuli independently of the hedonic aspect. Moreover, we examined the hemodynamic responses to complex taste stimuli in food-based solutions and demonstrated for the first time that the complicated phenomenon of the "masking effect," which decreases taste intensity despite the additional taste components, can be successfully detected by near-infrared spectroscopy. In summary, this study is the first to demonstrate near-infrared spectroscopy as a novel tool for objectively evaluating complex sour taste properties in foods and drinks.

  4. Bitter taste – cheese failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Kirin

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Bitter taste is serous and very often cheese failure in modern cheesemaking process. In this paper the sources and bitter taste development in cheese will be presented. Bitterness in cheese is linked to bitter compounds development during cheese ripening. Most of the bitter compounds come from bitter peptides, the mechanism of theirs development being due to proteasepeptidase system of the cured enzymes and the milk cultures as well as other proteases present in cheese. By the action of curd enzymes, the milk protein - casein - is firstly degraded into high molecular weight compounds possessing no bitter taste. Those compounds are then degraded, by milk protease cultures, to hydrophobic bitter peptides of low molecular weight further degraded, by bacterial endopeptidase during cheese ripening, to bitter peptides and amino acids. In the case when no balance exists, between bitter compounds development and breakdown by lactic acid bacteria peptidase, an accumulation of bitter peptides occurs thus having an influence on cheese bitterness. During cheese ripening naturally occurring milk protease – plasmin, and thermostable proteases of raw milk microflora are also involved in proteolytic process. Fat cheese lipases, initiated by lipase originating from psychrotrophic bacteria in raw milk as well as other cheese lipases, are also associated with bitter taste generation. The other sources of bitterness come from the forages, the medicament residues as well as washing and disinfecting agents. In order to eliminate these failures a special care should be taken in milk quality as well as curd and milk culture selection. At this point technological norms and procedures, aimed to maintain the proteolysis balance during cheese ripening, should be adjusted, thus eliminating the bitter taste of the cheese.

  5. Characterization and vectorization of siRNA targeting RET/PTC1 in human papillary thyroid carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massade L.

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available RET/PTC1 fusion oncogene is the most common genetic alteration identified to date in thyroid papillary carcinomas (PTC and represents a good target for small interfering RNA (siRNA. Our aim was: i to target the RET/PTC1 oncogene by siRNAs, ii to assess the knockdown effects on cell growth and cell cycle regulation and iii to vectorize it in order to protect it from degradation. Methods. Human cell lines expressing RET/PTC1 were transfected by siRNA RET/PTC1, inhibition of the oncogene expression was assessed by qRT-PCR and by Western blot. Conjugation of siRNA RET/PTC1 to squalene was performed by coupling it to squalene. In vivo studies are performed in nude mice. Conclusion. In this short communication, we report the main published results obtained during last years.

  6. Sugars, Sweet Taste Receptors, and Brain Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Allen A; Owyang, Chung

    2017-06-24

    Sweet taste receptors are composed of a heterodimer of taste 1 receptor member 2 (T1R2) and taste 1 receptor member 3 (T1R3). Accumulating evidence shows that sweet taste receptors are ubiquitous throughout the body, including in the gastrointestinal tract as well as the hypothalamus. These sweet taste receptors are heavily involved in nutrient sensing, monitoring changes in energy stores, and triggering metabolic and behavioral responses to maintain energy balance. Not surprisingly, these pathways are heavily regulated by external and internal factors. Dysfunction in one or more of these pathways may be important in the pathogenesis of common diseases, such as obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  7. Structural and electronic properties of bulk and low-index surfaces of zincblende PtC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhan Sensoy, Mehmet; Toffoli, Daniele; Ustunel, Hande

    2017-03-01

    Transition metal carbides have been extensively used in diverse applications over the past decade. Their versatility is in part thanks to their unique bonding, which displays a mixture of ionic, metallic and covalent character. While the bulk structure of zincblende (ZB) PtC has been investigated several times, a detailed understanding of the electronic and structural properties of its low-index surfaces is lacking. In this work, we present an ab initio investigation of the properties of five crystallographic ZB PtC surfaces (Pt/C-terminated PtC(1 0 0), PtC(1 1 0) and Pt/C-terminated PtC(1 1 1)). Upon geometry optimization, both polar and nonpolar surfaces undergo a mild interlayer relaxation, without extensive reconstructions. Calculated vacancy formation energies indicate facile C removal on the (1 1 1) surface while Pt-vacancy formation is endothermic. Finally, atomic O adsorption energies on all surfaces reveal a high affinity of the C-terminated surfaces towards this species.

  8. Activity improvement of Pt/C catalysts by adding CeO2 nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yuying; ZHANG Ziyu; HU Zhongai

    2011-01-01

    Carbon-supported platinum catalysts were prepared by NaBH4 reduction of metal precursors and the CeO2 nanoparticles were prepared by citric acid sol-gel method. The structure and morphology of two kinds of nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The Pt particles were uniformly dispersed on the carbon surface and showed the rod-like morphology. The CeO2 was spherical in shape. The appropriate amount of CeO2 nanoparticles was added into Pt/C systems to improve activity of the catalysts. Several electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammogram (CV), chronoamperometry (I-t)and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to investigate the properties of CeO2-Pt/C catalysts for methanol electrooxidation in 1 mol/L CH3OH+0.5H2SO4 aqueous solutions. The results revealed that compared with Pt/C catalysts CeO2-pt/C exhibited a higher activity and stability for methanol electro-oxidation. Moreover, the effect of CeO2 content on the activity of Pt/C catalysts was discussed in detail.

  9. Evaluation of Annual Modis Ptc Data for Deforestation and Forest Degradation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y.; Ghilardi, A.; Mas, J. F.; Paneque-Galvez, J.; Skutsch, M.

    2016-06-01

    Anthropogenic land-cover change, e.g. deforestation and forest degradation cause carbon emissions. To estimate deforestation and forest degradation, it is important to have reliable data on forest cover. In this analysis, we evaluated annual MODIS Percent Tree Cover (PTC) data for the detection of forest change including deforestation, forest degradation, reforestation and revegetation. The annual MODIS PTC data (2000 - 2010) were pre-processed by applying quality layer. Based on the PTC values of the annual MODIS data, forest change maps were produced and assessed by comparing with the data from visual interpretation of SPOT-5 images. The assessment was applied to two case-studies: Ayuquila Basin and Monarch Reserve. Results show that the detected deforestation patches by visual interpretation are roughly 4 times in quantity more than those by MODIS PTC data, which can be partially due to the much higher spatial resolution of SPOT-5, being able to pick up small deforestation patches. This analysis found poor spatial overlapping for both case-studies. Possible reasons for the discrepancy in quantity and spatial coincidence were provided. It is necessary to refine the methodology for forest change detection by PTC images; also to refine the validation data in terms of data periods and forest change categories to ensure a better assessment.

  10. Permission to contact (PTC)--a strategy to enhance patient engagement in translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, Stefanie; O'Donoghue, Sheila; Daudt, Helena; Dee, Simon; LeBlanc, Jodi; Braun, Lauren; Barnes, Rebecca; Vercauteren, Suzanne; Boone, Robert H; Watson, Peter H

    2013-08-01

    Improving patient recruitment and consent to participate in clinical studies is an important issue. The process of consent involves three steps: patient referral for contact, the preliminary interview to determine patient interest, and the informed consent discussion. We hypothesized that putting the first step of the consent process into a 'Permission to Contact' (PTC) platform would improve patient engagement, would improve the efficiency of the other steps of the process, and would be acceptable to diverse patient groups. To test this hypothesis, four PTC platforms were established in three types of outpatient health clinics (cancer, cardiac, maternal health) in different British Columbia health centers. Each began as a research project where clinic personnel were engaged, clinic flow processes were mapped, and a design for each PTC was derived by consensus. All patients at these clinics were asked for 'permission to be contacted for future research purposes.' Patient approach and permission response rates were assessed and operational costs were estimated. Overall permission rates were high for all projects, but ranged from 94% of 'cancer' patients to 80% of 'congenital heart' patients who were approached (pPTC platform is a feasible mechanism to engage patients in research programs such as biobanking. It is well supported by clinic staff and receives high engagement and acceptance from patients. Patient-approach rates vary in different clinics, likely due to both clinic and PTC process factors, but this strategy provides an efficient means of engaging patients in research and sets the stage for enhanced enrollment into translational research programs.

  11. RET/PTC rearrangement is prevalent in follicular Hürthle cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Margriet M; Celestino, Ricardo; Castro, Patricia; Eloy, Catarina; Máximo, Valdemar; van der Wal, Jacqueline E; Plukker, John T M; Links, Thera P; Hofstra, Robert M W; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2012-11-01

    The molecular alterations underlying follicular Hürthle cell carcinomas (FHCCs) are largely unknown. In an attempt to clarify this issue, we analysed a series of Hürthle cell tumours for the presence of RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARG rearrangements and BRAF, HRAS and NRAS mutations. We investigated a series of 20 follicular Hürthle cell tumours [17 FHCCs and three follicular Hürthle cell adenomas (FHCAs)]. RET/PTC rearrangements were found in 33% of FHCAs and in 38% of FHCCs. All RET/PTC-positive FHCCs had a solid pattern of growth. PAX8/PPARG rearrangement was present in 27% of the FHCCs which displayed, in most cases, a follicular architecture. NRAS mutation was detected in one FHCC. An FHCC with a solid/microfollicular growth pattern scored positive for both RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARG rearrangement. Our study has shown a significant association between RET/PTC rearrangements and FHCCs with a solid growth pattern, thus raising the possibility of using tyrosine kinase inhibitors for the treatment of patients with FHCCs, which are often refractory to radioiodine treatment. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Limited.

  12. Structural and electronic properties of bulk and low-index surfaces of zincblende PtC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensoy, Mehmet Gokhan; Toffoli, Daniele; Ustunel, Hande

    2017-03-29

    Transition metal carbides have been extensively used in diverse applications over the past decade. Their versatility is in part thanks to their unique bonding, which displays a mixture of ionic, metallic and covalent character. While the bulk structure of zincblende (ZB) PtC has been investigated several times, a detailed understanding of the electronic and structural properties of its low-index surfaces is lacking. In this work, we present an ab initio investigation of the properties of five crystallographic ZB PtC surfaces (Pt/C-terminated PtC(1 0 0), PtC(1 1 0) and Pt/C-terminated PtC(1 1 1)). Upon geometry optimization, both polar and nonpolar surfaces undergo a mild interlayer relaxation, without extensive reconstructions. Calculated vacancy formation energies indicate facile C removal on the (1 1 1) surface while Pt-vacancy formation is endothermic. Finally, atomic O adsorption energies on all surfaces reveal a high affinity of the C-terminated surfaces towards this species.

  13. Performance Characteristics of PTC Elements for an Electric Vehicle Heating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hyuk Shin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-voltage positive temperature coefficient (PTC heater has a simple structure and a swift response. Therefore, for cabin heating in electric vehicles (EVs, such heaters are used either on their own or with a heat pump system. In this study, the sintering process in the manufacturing of PTC elements for an EV heating system was improved to enhance surface uniformity. The electrode production process entailing thin-film sputtering deposition was applied to ensure the high heating performance of PTC elements and reduce the electrode thickness. The allowable voltage and surface heat temperature of the high-voltage PTC elements with thin-film electrodes were 800 V and 172 °C, respectively. The electrode layer thickness was uniform at approximately 3.8 μm or less, approximately 69% less electrode materials were required compared to that before process improvement. Furthermore, a heater for the EV heating system was manufactured using the developed high-voltage PTC elements to verify performance and reliability.

  14. Alterations in taste perception as a result of hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman-Petrycka, Magdalena; Knefel, Grzegorz; Lebiedowska, Agata; Kosmala, Joanna; Klimacka-Nawrot, Ewa; Kawecki, Marek; Nowak, Mariusz; Błońska-Fajfrowska, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    The present study evaluates the effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on taste sensitivity, hedonic perception of taste, and food preferences. The studied groups included 197 people in total (79 in the study group; 118 in the control group). All patients from the study group were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy due to chronic non-healing wounds. The control group consisted of healthy people, who did not receive hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The taste intensity, recognition thresholds, and hedonic perception were examined using gustatory tests. The aqueous solutions of sucrose for sweet, sodium chloride for salty, citric acid for sour, quinine hydrochloride for bitter, and monosodium glutamate for umami taste were used. The participants fulfilled the questionnaire to examine pleasure derived from eating certain types of dishes. Gustatory tests and analyses of the pleasure derived from eating in the study group were carried out before the first exposure to hyperbaric oxygen and then at the end of therapy, after at least 25 sessions of treatment. In the control group, examination of perception of taste sensations was conducted only once. The results of comparing patients with non-healing wounds with healthy people are characterized by reduced taste sensitivity. After participation in hyperbaric oxygen therapy, the improvement in perception of taste sensations and changes in hedonic evaluation have occurred among patients with non-healing wounds. In terms of food preference, a decreased desire for eating sweet desserts, chocolate, and crisps was observed in those patients who received hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  15. A novel RET/PTC variant detected in a pediatric patient with papillary thyroid cancer without ionization history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halkova, Tereza; Dvorakova, Sarka; Vaclavikova, Eliska; Sykorova, Vlasta; Vcelak, Josef; Sykorova, Pavla; Vlcek, Petr; Reboun, Martin; Katra, Rami; Kodetova, Daniela; Schrumpf, Melanie; van Wezel, Tom; Morreau, Hans; Bendlova, Bela

    2015-12-01

    Papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) is the most frequent type of thyroid cancer. Its development is often caused by the formation of RET/PTC fused genes. RET/PTC1 is the most prevalent form, where exon 1 of CCDC6 gene is fused with the intracellular portion of RET protooncogene starting with exon 12. We have discovered a novel RET/PTC1 variant which we have named RET/PTC1ex9 in metastatic PTC of 8-year-old boy. RET/PTC1ex9 detection was performed by real-time polymerase chain reaction with melting curve analysis and subsequent Sanger and next-generation sequencing. A fusion of exon 1 of CCDC6 with exon 9 of extracellular domain of RET followed by exon 12 of RET was revealed. This is the first RET/PTC variant among PTC cases that contain the extracellular part of RET. This observation could be probably explained by incorrect splicing of RET due to the somatic 32-bp deletion in exon-intron 11 boundary of RET. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Expected taste intensity affects response to sweet drinks in primary taste cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Andrew T; Lloyd, Donna M; Kuenzel, Johanna; Poliakoff, Ellen; Dijksterhuis, Garmt B; Thomas, Anna

    2011-06-11

    Expectations about a food can impact on its taste, but this may represent a perceptual change or a bias in response at the decision-making stage. We hypothesised that expectation of taste intensity should be underpinned by modulation of activity in primary taste cortex. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we found that expecting a very sweet drink, but receiving a less sweet drink, enhanced the reported sweetness and bolstered activity in taste cortex, relative to a less sweet drink without this expectation. The activation overlapped with primary taste cortex activation found in 11 recent taste studies. Our findings provide evidence that taste expectation modulates activity in an area consistently reported as primary taste cortex, implying that expectation effects do indeed impact on taste perception.

  17. The tarsal taste of honey bees: behavioral and electrophysiological analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Gabriela eDe Brito Sanchez

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Taste plays a crucial role in the life of honey bees as their survival depends on the collection and intake of nectar and pollen, and other natural products. Here we studied the tarsal taste of honey bees through a series of behavioral and electrophysiological analyses. We characterized responsiveness to various sweet, salty and bitter tastants delivered to gustatory sensilla of the fore tarsi. Behavioral experiments showed that stimulation of opposite fore tarsi with sucrose and bitter substances or water yielded different outcomes depending on the stimulation sequence. When sucrose was applied first, thereby eliciting proboscis extension, no bitter substance could induce proboscis retraction, thus suggesting that the primacy of sucrose stimulation induced a central excitatory state. When bitter substances or water were applied first, sucrose stimulation could still elicit proboscis extension but to a lower level, thus suggesting central inhibition based on contradictory gustatory input on opposite tarsi. Electrophysiological experiments showed that receptor cells in the gustatory sensilla of the tarsomeres are highly sensitive to saline solutions at low concentrations. No evidence for receptors responding specifically to sucrose or to bitter substances was found in these sensilla. Receptor cells in the gustatory sensilla of the claws are highly sensitive to sucrose. Although bees do not possess dedicated bitter-taste receptors on the tarsi, indirect bitter detection is possible because bitter tastes inhibit sucrose receptor cells of the claws when mixed with sucrose solution. By combining behavioral and electrophysiological approaches, these results provide the first integrative study on tarsal taste detection in the honey bee.

  18. Taste masking analysis in pharmaceutical formulation development using an electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jack Y; Keeney, Melissa P

    2006-03-09

    The purpose of this study is to assess the feasibility for taste masking and comparison of taste intensity during formulation development using a multichannel taste sensor system (e-Tongue). Seven taste sensors used in the e-Tongue were cross-selective for five basic tastes while having different sensitivity or responsibility for different tastes. Each of the individual sensors concurrently contributes to the detection of most substances in a complicated sample through the different electronic output. Taste-masking efficiency was evaluated using quinine as a bitter model compound and a sweetener, acesulfame K, as a bitterness inhibitor. In a 0.2 mM quinine solution, the group distance obtained from e-Tongue analysis was reduced with increasing concentration of acesulfame K. This result suggests that the sensors could detect the inhibition of bitterness by a sweetener and could be used for optimization of the sweetener level in a liquid formulation. In addition, the bitterness inhibition of quinine by using other known taste-masking excipients including sodium acetate, NaCl, Prosweet flavor, and Debittering powder or soft drinks could be detected by the e-Tongue. These results further suggest that the e-Tongue should be useful in a taste-masking evaluation study on selecting appropriate taste-masking excipients for a solution formulation or a reconstitution vehicle for a drug-in-bottle formulation. In another study, the intensity of the taste for several drug substances known to be bitter was compared using the e-Tongue. It was found that the group distance was 695 for prednisolone and 686 for quinine, which is much higher than that of caffeine (102). These results indicate that the taste of prednisolone and quinine is stronger or more bitter than that of caffeine as expected. Based on the group distance, the relative intensity of bitterness for these compounds could be ranked in the following order: ranitidine HCl>prednisolone Na>quinine HCl approximately

  19. Altered lipid and salt taste responsivity in ghrelin and GOAT null mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huan Cai

    Full Text Available Taste perception plays an important role in regulating food preference, eating behavior and energy homeostasis. Taste perception is modulated by a variety of factors, including gastric hormones such as ghrelin. Ghrelin can regulate growth hormone release, food intake, adiposity, and energy metabolism. Octanoylation of ghrelin by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT is a specific post-translational modification which is essential for many biological activities of ghrelin. Ghrelin and GOAT are both widely expressed in many organs including the gustatory system. In the current study, overall metabolic profiles were assessed in wild-type (WT, ghrelin knockout (ghrelin(-/-, and GOAT knockout (GOAT(-/- mice. Ghrelin(-/- mice exhibited decreased food intake, increased plasma triglycerides and increased ketone bodies compared to WT mice while demonstrating WT-like body weight, fat composition and glucose control. In contrast GOAT(-/- mice exhibited reduced body weight, adiposity, resting glucose and insulin levels compared to WT mice. Brief access taste behavioral tests were performed to determine taste responsivity in WT, ghrelin(-/- and GOAT(-/- mice. Ghrelin and GOAT null mice possessed reduced lipid taste responsivity. Furthermore, we found that salty taste responsivity was attenuated in ghrelin(-/- mice, yet potentiated in GOAT(-/- mice compared to WT mice. Expression of the potential lipid taste regulators Cd36 and Gpr120 were reduced in the taste buds of ghrelin and GOAT null mice, while the salt-sensitive ENaC subunit was increased in GOAT(-/- mice compared with WT mice. The altered expression of Cd36, Gpr120 and ENaC may be responsible for the altered lipid and salt taste perception in ghrelin(-/- and GOAT(-/- mice. The data presented in the current study potentially implicates ghrelin signaling activity in the modulation of both lipid and salt taste modalities.

  20. Altered lipid and salt taste responsivity in ghrelin and GOAT null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huan; Cong, Wei-Na; Daimon, Caitlin M; Wang, Rui; Tschöp, Matthias H; Sévigny, Jean; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Taste perception plays an important role in regulating food preference, eating behavior and energy homeostasis. Taste perception is modulated by a variety of factors, including gastric hormones such as ghrelin. Ghrelin can regulate growth hormone release, food intake, adiposity, and energy metabolism. Octanoylation of ghrelin by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) is a specific post-translational modification which is essential for many biological activities of ghrelin. Ghrelin and GOAT are both widely expressed in many organs including the gustatory system. In the current study, overall metabolic profiles were assessed in wild-type (WT), ghrelin knockout (ghrelin(-/-)), and GOAT knockout (GOAT(-/-)) mice. Ghrelin(-/-) mice exhibited decreased food intake, increased plasma triglycerides and increased ketone bodies compared to WT mice while demonstrating WT-like body weight, fat composition and glucose control. In contrast GOAT(-/-) mice exhibited reduced body weight, adiposity, resting glucose and insulin levels compared to WT mice. Brief access taste behavioral tests were performed to determine taste responsivity in WT, ghrelin(-/-) and GOAT(-/-) mice. Ghrelin and GOAT null mice possessed reduced lipid taste responsivity. Furthermore, we found that salty taste responsivity was attenuated in ghrelin(-/-) mice, yet potentiated in GOAT(-/-) mice compared to WT mice. Expression of the potential lipid taste regulators Cd36 and Gpr120 were reduced in the taste buds of ghrelin and GOAT null mice, while the salt-sensitive ENaC subunit was increased in GOAT(-/-) mice compared with WT mice. The altered expression of Cd36, Gpr120 and ENaC may be responsible for the altered lipid and salt taste perception in ghrelin(-/-) and GOAT(-/-) mice. The data presented in the current study potentially implicates ghrelin signaling activity in the modulation of both lipid and salt taste modalities.

  1. STUDY ON THE OPTIMIZATION OF IGBT THERMAL MANAGEMENT FOR PTC HEATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. JEONG

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is essential to optimize HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning system for a thermal plant or an electric vehicle since it has a significant effect on the thermal efficiency. PTC (positive temperature coefficient heaters are often used for a heating system and the power module of the PTC heaters, IGBT (insulated gate bipolar mode transistor, requires thermal management. In this study, in order to maximize the cooling performance for IGBT, a novel method that uses forced convection inside the HVAC duct with heat sinks was developed. In addition, heat sinks were optimized in terms of IGBT junction temperature and heat sink weight by 3-dimensional CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation. The results show that the junction temperature of IGBT for 5.6kW PTC heater can be maintained at about 335K.

  2. Design of a Low-Frequency Oscillator with PTC Memristor and an Inductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamani, Vetriveeran; Yang, Changju; Kim, Hyongsuk; Chua, Leon

    An electronic oscillator circuit is designed by connecting an inductor in series with a locally-active PTC Memristor and a battery. The PTC Memristor is locally active on the negative resistance region of its DC VM-IM curve. A DC operating point Q is chosen on the locally-active region of the PTC Memristor and a small-signal equivalent circuit at Q is derived via Taylor series. The small-signal admittance YCM(s; V ) of the composite one-port in Fig. 1 is derived using the small-signal equivalent circuit at Q, in series with an inductor whose value is chosen such that YCM(iω0; V ) = 0 at some s = iω0. The sinusoidal oscillation computed numerically from this circuit is shown to emerge from a supercritical Hopf bifurcation.

  3. The Importance of Taste for Food Demand and the Experienced Taste Effect of Healthy Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunström, Linda; Nordström, Leif Jonas

    This paper quantitatively analyzes the importance of taste versus health in food demand, as well as the effect on consumers’ experienced taste of the non-intrinsic value of healthy labels. Our analysis is based on taste experiments and Vickrey second price auctions on potato chips and bread. Our...... findings imply a large positive effect on demand for potato chips from higher taste scores: when consumers’ experienced taste from potato chips improves by one unit, the average WTP for a 150 gram bag of chips increases by 20 euro cents. The effect from taste on bread demand seems smaller, but may...

  4. Patterns of Sweet Taste Liking: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asao, Keiko; Miller, Jason; Arcori, Leann; Lumeng, Julie C.; Han-Markey, Theresa; Herman, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Two distinct patterns of sweet taste liking have been described: one showing a peak liking response in the mid-range of sucrose concentrations and the other showing a monotonic liking response at progressively higher sucrose concentrations. Classification of these patterns has been somewhat arbitrary. In this report, we analyzed patterns of sweet taste liking in a pilot study with 26 adults including 14 women and 12 men, 32.6 ± 14.5 years of age with body mass index 26.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 (mean ± SD). Sweet taste liking was measured for 10 levels of sucrose solutions (0.035 M to 1.346 M). Participants rated their liking of each solution using a visual analog scale with 0 indicating strongly disliking and 100 strongly liking. The cluster analysis demonstrated two distinct groups: 13 liked relatively low sucrose concentrations and liked high sucrose concentrations less, and 13 liked high sucrose concentrations greatly. If we use the 0.598 M sucrose solution alone and a cutoff liking score of 50, we can distinguish the two clusters with high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (100%). If validated in additional studies, this simple tool may help us to better understand eating behaviors and the impact of sweet taste liking on nutrition-related disorders. PMID:26404363

  5. Patterns of Sweet Taste Liking: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiko Asao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Two distinct patterns of sweet taste liking have been described: one showing a peak liking response in the mid-range of sucrose concentrations and the other showing a monotonic liking response at progressively higher sucrose concentrations. Classification of these patterns has been somewhat arbitrary. In this report, we analyzed patterns of sweet taste liking in a pilot study with 26 adults including 14 women and 12 men, 32.6 ± 14.5 years of age with body mass index 26.4 ± 5.1 kg/m2 (mean ± SD. Sweet taste liking was measured for 10 levels of sucrose solutions (0.035 M to 1.346 M. Participants rated their liking of each solution using a visual analog scale with 0 indicating strongly disliking and 100 strongly liking. The cluster analysis demonstrated two distinct groups: 13 liked relatively low sucrose concentrations and liked high sucrose concentrations less, and 13 liked high sucrose concentrations greatly. If we use the 0.598 M sucrose solution alone and a cutoff liking score of 50, we can distinguish the two clusters with high sensitivity (100% and specificity (100%. If validated in additional studies, this simple tool may help us to better understand eating behaviors and the impact of sweet taste liking on nutrition-related disorders.

  6. Enhancement of premature stop codon readthrough in the CFTR gene by Ataluren (PTC124) derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pibiri, Ivana; Lentini, Laura; Melfi, Raffaella; Gallucci, Giulia; Pace, Andrea; Spinello, Angelo; Barone, Giampaolo; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2015-08-28

    Premature stop codons are the result of nonsense mutations occurring within the coding sequence of a gene. These mutations lead to the synthesis of a truncated protein and are responsible for several genetic diseases. A potential pharmacological approach to treat these diseases is to promote the translational readthrough of premature stop codons by small molecules aiming to restore the full-length protein. The compound PTC124 (Ataluren) was reported to promote the readthrough of the premature UGA stop codon, although its activity was questioned. The potential interaction of PTC124 with mutated mRNA was recently suggested by molecular dynamics (MD) studies highlighting the importance of H-bonding and stacking π-π interactions. To improve the readthrough activity we changed the fluorine number and position in the PTC124 fluoroaryl moiety. The readthrough ability of these PTC124 derivatives was tested in human cells harboring reporter plasmids with premature stop codons in H2BGFP and FLuc genes as well as in cystic fibrosis (CF) IB3.1 cells with a nonsense mutation. Maintaining low toxicity, three of these molecules showed higher efficacy than PTC124 in the readthrough of the UGA premature stop codon and in recovering the expression of the CFTR protein in IB3.1 cells from cystic fibrosis patient. Molecular dynamics simulations performed with mutated CFTR mRNA fragments and active or inactive derivatives are in agreement with the suggested interaction of PTC124 with mRNA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Wine Expertise Predicts Taste Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, John E; Pickering, Gary J

    2012-03-01

    Taste phenotypes have long been studied in relation to alcohol intake, dependence, and family history, with contradictory findings. However, on balance - with appropriate caveats about populations tested, outcomes measured and psychophysical methods used - an association between variation in taste responsiveness and some alcohol behaviors is supported. Recent work suggests super-tasting (operationalized via propylthiouracil (PROP) bitterness) not only associates with heightened response but also with more acute discrimination between stimuli. Here, we explore relationships between food and beverage adventurousness and taste phenotype. A convenience sample of wine drinkers (n=330) were recruited in Ontario and phenotyped for PROP bitterness via filter paper disk. They also filled out a short questionnaire regarding willingness to try new foods, alcoholic beverages and wines as well as level of wine involvement, which was used to classify them as a wine expert (n=110) or wine consumer (n=220). In univariate logisitic models, food adventurousness predicted trying new wines and beverages but not expertise. Likewise, wine expertise predicted willingness to try new wines and beverages but not foods. In separate multivariate logistic models, willingness to try new wines and beverages was predicted by expertise and food adventurousness but not PROP. However, mean PROP bitterness was higher among wine experts than wine consumers, and the conditional distribution functions differed between experts and consumers. In contrast, PROP means and distributions did not differ with food adventurousness. These data suggest individuals may self-select for specific professions based on sensory ability (i.e., an active gene-environment correlation) but phenotype does not explain willingness to try new stimuli.

  8. Taste: The Bedrock of Flavor

    OpenAIRE

    Beauchamp, Gary K.

    2014-01-01

    The significance of taste for human health:Throughout most of human evolution, the daily decisions of what to put into ones mouth and swallow and what to reject presented challenges fraught with danger. Energy-rich foods were often difficult to find; protein was in short supply; sodium was scarce. Moreover, many plants that did contain nutrients were also equipped with defensive compounds that were poisonous. Now many humans over consume exactly the foods that they evolved to find particu...

  9. Tasting Beijing ,Approaching Olympic Games

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ Sponsored by Beijing Tour Administration, co-organized by Singapore Conference and Exhibition Administration Service Co., Ltd. and Beijing Relation Exhibition Co., Ltd., "2007 Beijing International Tour Expo" was held in Beijing in June. Commissioner Du Jiang gave a presentation with the opening ceremmony, and pointed out that with the theme of "Tasting Beijing, Approaching Olympic Games", the expo was a platform of promoting the communication and cooperation between the Chinese and foreign tourism industries.

  10. Essential PTC Mathcad Prime 3.0 a guide for new and current users

    CERN Document Server

    Maxfield, Brent

    2013-01-01

    Learn how to use PTC Mathcad Prime 3.0, one of the world's leading tools for technical computing, in the context of engineering, science, and math applications. Quickly harness the power of Mathcad to solve simple and complex problems. Essential PTC Mathcad is perfect for college students and first-time users as well as for experienced Mathcad users who are moving to Prime 3.0. The book introduces the most powerful functions and features of the new Prime 3.0 software and teaches how to apply them to create comprehensive calculations for any quantitative subject. Examples from several fields

  11. Steady-state solution of the PTC thermistor problem using a quadratic spline finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahadir A. R.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of heat transfer in a Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC thermistor, which may form one element of an electric circuit, is solved numerically by a finite element method. The approach used is based on Galerkin finite element using quadratic splines as shape functions. The resulting system of ordinary differential equations is solved by the finite difference method. Comparison is made with numerical and analytical solutions and the accuracy of the computed solutions indicates that the method is well suited for the solution of the PTC thermistor problem.

  12. Multidimensional Evaluation of Endogenous and Health Factors Affecting Food Preferences, Taste and Smell Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, D; Perna, S; Carrai, M; Barale, R; Grassi, M; Rondanelli, M

    2016-01-01

    This study, by taking a holistic approach, investigates the relationships between taste, smell sensitivity and food preference with prognostic (endogenous and health) factors including age, gender, genetic taste markers, body mass, cigarette smoking, and number of drugs used. Cross sectional study. Northern Italy. 203 healthy subjects (160 women/43 men; mean age: 58.2±19.8 years) were examined. Individual taste sensitivity was determined by saccharose, sodium chloride, acetic acid and caffeine solutions and by 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) responsiveness test. Olfactory sensitivity has been assessed by «Sniffin' Sticks». Four tag Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in regions of interest were genotyped. Factor analysis and multivariate regression were performed for scaling food preferences and screening prognostic factors, respectively. Increasing age is associated with decreased responsiveness to NaCl (P=0.001), sweet solutions (P=0.044), and smell perception (Pmore than younger. Regarding number of drugs taken, there is a significant negative effect on smell perception (Peffect was shown, on sweet perception (P=0.006). Variation in taste receptor genes can give rise to differential perception of sweet, acid and bitter tastes. No effect of gender and smoking was observed. Our study suggested that age, genetic markers, BMI and drugs use are the factors which affect taste and smell perception and food preferences.

  13. Taste and physiological responses to glucosinolates: seed predator versus seed disperser.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Samuni-Blank

    Full Text Available In contrast to most other plant tissues, fleshy fruits are meant to be eaten in order to facilitate seed dispersal. Although fleshy fruits attract consumers, they may also contain toxic secondary metabolites. However, studies that link the effect of fruit toxins with seed dispersal and predation are scarce. Glucosinolates (GLSs are a family of bitter-tasting compounds. The fleshy fruit pulp of Ochradenus baccatus was previously found to harbor high concentrations of GLSs, whereas the myrosinase enzyme, which breaks down GLSs to produce foul tasting chemicals, was found only in the seeds. Here we show the differential behavioral and physiological responses of three rodent species to high dose (80% Ochradenus' fruits diets. Acomys russatus, a predator of Ochradenus' seeds, was the least sensitive to the taste of the fruit and the only rodent to exhibit taste-related physiological adaptations to deal with the fruits' toxins. In contrast, Acomys cahirinus, an Ochradenus seed disperser, was more sensitive to a diet containing the hydrolyzed products of the GLSs. A third rodent (Mus musculus was deterred from Ochradenus fruits consumption by the GLSs and their hydrolyzed products. We were able to alter M. musculus avoidance of whole fruit consumption by soaking Ochradenus fruits in a water solution containing 1% adenosine monophosphate, which blocks the bitter taste receptor in mice. The observed differential responses of these three rodent species may be due to evolutionary pressures that have enhanced or reduced their sensitivity to the taste of GLSs.

  14. Oxytocin signaling in mouse taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Sinclair

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The neuropeptide, oxytocin (OXT, acts on brain circuits to inhibit food intake. Mutant mice lacking OXT (OXT knockout overconsume salty and sweet (i.e. sucrose, saccharin solutions. We asked if OXT might also act on taste buds via its receptor, OXTR. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using RT-PCR, we detected the expression of OXTR in taste buds throughout the oral cavity, but not in adjacent non-taste lingual epithelium. By immunostaining tissues from OXTR-YFP knock-in mice, we found that OXTR is expressed in a subset of Glial-like (Type I taste cells, and also in cells on the periphery of taste buds. Single-cell RT-PCR confirmed this cell-type assignment. Using Ca2+ imaging, we observed that physiologically appropriate concentrations of OXT evoked [Ca2+]i mobilization in a subset of taste cells (EC50 approximately 33 nM. OXT-evoked responses were significantly inhibited by the OXTR antagonist, L-371,257. Isolated OXT-responsive taste cells were neither Receptor (Type II nor Presynaptic (Type III cells, consistent with our immunofluorescence observations. We also investigated the source of OXT peptide that may act on taste cells. Both RT-PCR and immunostaining suggest that the OXT peptide is not produced in taste buds or in their associated nerves. Finally, we also examined the morphology of taste buds from mice that lack OXTR. Taste buds and their constituent cell types appeared very similar in mice with two, one or no copies of the OXTR gene. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that OXT elicits Ca2+ signals via OXTR in murine taste buds. OXT-responsive cells are most likely a subset of Glial-like (Type I taste cells. OXT itself is not produced locally in taste tissue and is likely delivered through the circulation. Loss of OXTR does not grossly alter the morphology of any of the cell types contained in taste buds. Instead, we speculate that OXT-responsive Glial-like (Type I taste bud cells modulate taste signaling and afferent

  15. Frequently consumed vegetables have almost no taste : Posterpresentatie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokkom, Vera van; Kooten, Olaf van; Teo, P.S; Mars, M; Stieger, M; Graaf, C de

    2015-01-01

    Taste is a main driver in preferences and food choices. Humans are predispositioned to prefer sweet and salty tastes and reject bitter and sour tastes, therefore bitter taste is often thought to cause the rejection of vegetables by children. In our study we investigated the taste and fattiness inten

  16. Anatomy, physiology and diagnostic considerations of taste and smell disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, A.; Jager-Wittenaar, H.; Visser, A.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Weissenbruch, R. van; Nieuw Amerongen, A. van

    2013-01-01

    Taste and smell perception are closely related. The taste perception is performed by taste buds which can distinguish salt, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami. Moreover, 2,000-4,000 smells can be recognized. Many taste disorders are in fact smell disorders. Saliva affects taste perception because it ser

  17. RET/PTC Rearrangements Are Associated with Elevated Postoperative TSH Levels and Multifocal Lesions in Papillary Thyroid Cancer without Concomitant Thyroid Benign Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xuan; He, Caiyun; Ma, Jiangjun; Tang, Tao; Zhang, Xiao; Ye, Zulu; Long, Yakang; Shao, Qiong; Shao, Jianyong; Yang, Ankui

    2016-01-01

    RET/PTC rearrangements, resulting in aberrant activity of the RET protein tyrosine kinase receptor, occur exclusively in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). In this study, we examined the association between RET/PTC rearrangements and thyroid hormone homeostasis, and explored whether concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis influenced this association. A total of 114 patients diagnosed with PTC were enrolled in this study. Thyroid hormone levels, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle were obtained through medical records and surgical pathology reports. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected using TaqMan RT-PCR and validated by direct sequencing. No RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in benign thyroid tissues. RET/PTC rearrangements were detected in 23.68% (27/114) of PTC tissues. No association between thyroid function, clinicopathological parameters and lifestyle was observed either in total thyroid cancer patients or the subgroup of patients with concomitant disease. In the subgroup of PTC patients without concomitant disease, RET/PTC rearrangement was associated with multifocal cancer (P = 0.018). RET/PTC rearrangement was also correlated with higher TSH levels at one month post-surgery (P = 0.037). Based on likelihood-ratio regression analysis, the RET/PTC-positive PTC cases showed an increased risk of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland (OR = 5.57, 95% CI, 1.39-22.33). Our findings suggest that concomitant diseases such as nodular goiter and Hashimoto's thyroiditis in PTC may be a confounding factor when examining the effects of RET/PTC rearrangements. Excluding the potential effect of this confounding factor showed that RET/PTC may confer an increased risk for the development of multifocal cancers in the thyroid gland. Aberrantly increased post-operative levels of TSH were also associated with RET/PTC rearrangement. Together, our data provides useful information for the treatment of papillary thyroid cancer.

  18. Taste of Milk from Inflamed Breasts of Breastfeeding Mothers with Mastitis Evaluated Using a Taste Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshida, Michiko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Kumagai, Masanori; Muto, Hajime; Kodama, Hideya

    2014-01-01

    Background: The refusal of infants to suckle from a breast that is inflamed with mastitis suggests that the taste of the milk has changed. However, the taste of milk from a breast with mastitis has never been empirically determined. The present study compares the taste of milk from breastfeeding mothers with or without mastitis and identifies specific changes in the taste of milk from mothers with mastitis.

  19. TASTE MASKING IN PHARMACEUTICAL: AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Saurabh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Taste is an important factor in the development of dosage form. Nevertheless it is that arena of product development that has been overlooked and undermined for its importance. The problem of bitter and obnoxious taste of is a challenge to the pharmacist in the present scenario. Taste is an important parameter governing compliance. Several oral pharmaceuticals and bulking agents have unpleasant, bitter-tasting components. In numerous cases, the bitter taste modality is an undesirable trait of the product or formulations and can considerably affect its acceptability by consumers. Bitter characteristics found in such systems have been eliminated or minimized by various known processes, but no universally applicable technology for bitterness inhibition has ever been recognized. The desire of improved palatability in these products has prompted the development of numerous formulations with improved performance and acceptability Taste masking technologies offer a great scope for invention and patents. Several approaches like adding flavors and sweeteners, use of coating polymers for inhibiting bitterness, microencapsulation, prodrug formation, formation of inclusion and molecular complexes, solid dispersion system, addition of effervescent agents and application of ion exchange resins have been tried by the formulators to mask the unpleasant taste of the bitter drugs. The present review attempts to give a brief account of different technologies of taste masking with respect to dosage form and novel methods of evaluation of taste masking effect.

  20. Role of CCK1 and Y2 receptors in activation of hindbrain neurons induced by intragastric administration of bitter taste receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Shuzhen; Sternini, Catia; Raybould, Helen E

    2008-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors signaling bitter taste (T2Rs) in the oral gustatory system and the alpha-subunit of the taste-specific G-protein gustducin are expressed in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. alpha-Subunit of the taste-specific G-protein gustducin colocalizes with markers of enteroendocrine cells in human and mouse GI mucosa, including peptide YY. Activation of T2Rs increases cholecystokinin (CCK) release from the enteroendocrine cell line, STC-1. The aim of this study was to determine whether T2R agonists in the GI tract activate neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and whether this activation is mediated by CCK and peptide YY acting at CCK(1) and Y(2) receptors. Immunocytochemistry for the protooncogene c-Fos protein, a marker for neuronal activation, was used to determine activation of neurons in the midregion of the NTS, the region where vagal afferents from the GI tract terminate. Intragastric administration of the T2R agonist denatonium benzoate (DB), or phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), or a combination of T2R agonists significantly increased the number of Fos-positive neurons in the mid-NTS; subdiaphragmatic vagotomy abolished the NTS response to the mixture of T2R agonists. Deletion of CCK(1) receptor gene or blockade of CCK(1) receptors with devazepide abolishes the activation of NTS neurons in response to DB, but had no effect on the response to PTC. Administration of the Y(2) receptor antagonist BIIE0246 blocks the activation of NTS neurons to DB, but not PTC. These findings suggest that activation of neurons in the NTS following administration of T2R agonists to the GI tract involves CCK(1) and Y(2) receptors located on vagal afferent terminals in the gut wall. T2Rs may regulate GI function via release of regulatory peptides and activation of the vagal reflex pathway.

  1. Hydrogenation of fructose to 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran using a sulfur poisoned Pt/C catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    In order to expand the number of biobased chemicals available, fructose has been hydrogenated to 2,5-dimethyltetrahydrofuran using a sulfided Pt/C catalyst. The reaction was carried out in a stirred reactor at 10.3 MPa H2 and 175°C which allowed a 10% fructose solution to be converted in about 2 h. ...

  2. Mediation as Problem-Solving Scene in the Light of PTC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Németh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mediation does not only mean a specific procedure or protocol but the related attitude, mindset as well. This perspective gives opportunity to demonstrate the problem in a different way than previously. In the present study, the Participatory Theory of Communication (PTC appears as a framework which makes the communication of participants of the mediation interpretable and transparent.

  3. Implications of a PTC Extension on U.S. Wind Deployment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, E.; Steinberg, D.; Mendelsohn, M.; Zinaman, O.; James, T.; Porro, G.; Hand, M.; Mai, T.; Logan, J.; Heeter, J.; Bird, L.

    2014-04-01

    This analysis explores the potential effects of wind production tax credit expiration and various extension scenarios on future wind deployment with the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS), a model of the U.S. electricity sector. The analysis does not estimate the potential implications on government tax revenue associated with the PTC. Key findings include: Under a scenario in which the PTC is not extended and all other policies remain unchanged, wind capacity additions are expected to be between 3 and 5 GW per year from 2013-2020; PTC extension options that ramp-down from the current level to zero-credit by year-end 2022 appear to be insufficient to support deployment at the recent historical average; Extending the PTC at its historical level may provide the best opportunity to support deployment consistent with recent levels across a range of potential market conditions; it therefore may also provide the best opportunity to sustain wind power installation and manufacturing sector at current levels.

  4. Activated RET/PTC oncogene elicits immediate early and delayed response genes in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califano, D; Monaco, C; de Vita, G; D'Alessio, A; Dathan, N A; Possenti, R; Vecchio, G; Fusco, A; Santoro, M; de Franciscis, V

    1995-07-06

    The expression of the receptor-like tyrosine kinase RET is associated with tumors, tissues or cell lines of neural crest origin. In addition RET products (Ret) are involved in determining cell fate during the differentiation of the enteric nervous system and during renal organogenesis. However, as yet, no direct evidence exists to indicate that the Ret kinase activity might interfere in a specific way with cellular differentiation, or proliferation, of a neural crest derived cell line. By using two constitutively activated forms of RET (RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3) in transient transfection experiments, we have obtained evidence that active RET could reprogramme the gene expression pattern in the rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line. Transcription driven by gene promoters, such as NGFI-A and vgf, which belong, respectively, to primary and delayed response genes to nerve growth factor (NGF), and by the neuron-specific enolase (NSE) promoter, is rapidly induced by the expression of activated RET oncogenes. This induction is not elicited in other non neural derived cell types tested. We also demonstrate that endogenous ras activity is required for RET induction of these neural markers. Finally, in the RET/PTC transfected PC12 cells, NGF is unable to induce further their transcription. This suggests that RET/PTC could share an intracellular signalling pathway with the NGF-receptor.

  5. 49 CFR 236.1006 - Equipping locomotives operating in PTC territory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Equipping locomotives operating in PTC territory. 236.1006 Section 236.1006 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued... territory. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each train operating on any...

  6. Catalytic Liquefaction of Humin Substances from Sugar Biorefineries with Pt/C in 2-Propanol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.; Agarwal, S.; Heeres, H. J.

    The catalytic liquefaction of humins, the solid byproduct from the conversion of C6 sugars (glucose, fructose) to S-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) and levulinic acid (LA), using a supported Pt/C catalyst in isopropanol (IPA) as the solvent was investigated. At bench mark conditions (400 degrees C, 7 h,

  7. When Proteins Start to Make Sense: Fine-tuning Aminoglycosides for PTC Suppression Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Moran; Baasov, Timor

    2014-08-01

    Aminoglycosides (AGs) are highly potent antibacterial agents, which are known to exert their deleterious effects on bacterial cells by interfering with the translation process, leading to aberrant protein synthesis that usually results in cell death. Nearly 45 years ago, AGs were shown to induce read-through activity in prokaryotic systems by selectively encoding tRNA molecules at premature termination codon (PTC) positions; resulting in the generation of full length functional proteins. However, only in the last 20 years this ability has been demonstrated in eukaryotic systems, highlighting their potential as therapeutic agents to treat PTC induced genetic disorders. Despite the great potential, AGs use in these manners is quite restricted due to relatively high toxicity values observed upon their administration. Over the last few years several synthetic derivatives were developed to overcome some of the enhanced toxicity issues, while in parallel showed significantly improved PTC suppression activity in various in-vitro, ex-vivo and in-vivo models of a variety of different diseases models underling by PTC mutations. Although these derivatives hold great promise to serve as therapeutic candidates they also demonstrate the necessity to further understand the molecular mechanisms of which AGs confer their biological activity in eukaryotic cells for further rational drug design. Recent achievements in structural research shed light on AGs mechanism of action and opened a new avenue in the development of new and improved therapeutic derivatives. The following manuscript highlights these accomplishments and summarizes their contributions to the state of art rational drug design.

  8. RET/PTC rearrangement is prevalent in follicular Hurthle cell carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Margriet M.; Celestino, Ricardo; Castro, Patricia; Eloy, Catarina; Maximo, Valdemar; van der Wal, Jacqueline E.; Plukker, John T. M.; Links, Thera P.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Sobrinho-Simoes, Manuel; Soares, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Aims: The molecular alterations underlying follicular Hurthle cell carcinomas (FHCCs) are largely unknown. In an attempt to clarify this issue, we analysed a series of Hurthle cell tumours for the presence of RET/PTC and PAX8/PPARG rearrangements and BRAF, HRAS and NRAS mutations. Methods and result

  9. PTC 2005: Pulaski Technical College's Strategic Plan for Serving Central Arkansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark

    Intended as a long-range agenda for Arkansas' Pulaski Technical College (PTC), this plan describes the planning process used at the college, sets forth college goals through the year 2005, and reviews strategies to help the college achieve its goals. Following introductory sections, the educational and training needs of Central Arkansas are…

  10. Association of ATM Gene Polymorphism with PTC Metastasis in Female Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Yulu; Liu, Xiaoli; Yu, Yaqin; Shi, Jieping; Ai, Lizhe; Sun, Hui; Kanu, Joseph Sam; Wang, Chong; Liu, Yawen

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene is critical in the process of recognizing and repairing DNA lesions and is related to invasion and metastasis of malignancy. The incidence rate of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) has increased for several decades and is higher in females than males. In this study, we want to investigate whether ATM polymorphisms are associated with gender-specific metastasis of PTC. 358 PTC patients in Northern China, including 109 males and 249 females, were included in our study. Four ATM single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Association between genotypes and the gender-specific risk of metastasis was assessed by odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) under the unconditional logistic regression analysis. Significant associations were observed between rs189037 and metastasis of PTC in females under different models of inheritance (codominant model: OR = 0.15, 95% CI 0.04-0.56, P = 0.01 for GA versus GG and OR = 0.08, 95% CI 0.01-0.74, P = 0.03 for AA versus GG, resp.; dominant model: OR = 0.49, 95% CI 0.25-0.98, P = 0.04; overdominant model: OR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.25-0.89, P = 0.02). However, no association remained significant after Bonferroni correction. Our findings suggest a possible association between ATM rs189037 polymorphisms and metastasis in female PTCs.

  11. High-Throughput Screening for Readthrough Modulators of CFTR PTC Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Feng; Shang, Haibo; Jordan, Nikole J; Wong, Eric; Mercadante, Dayna; Saltz, Josef; Mahiou, Jerome; Bihler, Hermann J; Mense, Martin

    2017-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a hereditary disease caused by mutations in the gene coding for the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). A large number of nearly 2000 reported mutations, including the premature termination codon (PTC) mutations, urgently require new and personalized medicines. We have developed cell-based assays for readthrough modulators of CFTR PTC mutations (or nonsense mutation suppressors), based on the trafficking and surface expression of CFTR. Approximately 85,000 compounds have been screened for two PTC mutations (Y122X and W1282X). The hit rates at the threshold of 50% greater than vehicle response are 2% and 1.4% for CFTR Y122X and CFTR W1282X, respectively. The overlap of the two hit sets at this stringent hit threshold is relatively small. Only ~28% of the hits from the W1282X screen were also hits in the Y122X screen. The overlap increases to ~50% if compounds are included that in the second screen achieve only a less stringent hit criterion, that is, horseradish peroxidase (HRP) activity greater than three standard deviations above the mean of the vehicle. Our data suggest that personalization may not need to address individual genotypes, but that patients with different CFTR PTC mutations could benefit from the same medicines.

  12. The Importance of Taste for Food Demand and the Experienced Taste Effect of Healthy Labels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thunström, Linda; Nordström, Leif Jonas

    This paper quantitatively analyzes the importance of taste versus health in food demand, as well as the effect on consumers’ experienced taste of the non-intrinsic value of healthy labels. Our analysis is based on taste experiments and Vickrey second price auctions on potato chips and bread. Our...

  13. MIR141 expression differentiates Hashimoto Thyroiditis from PTC and benign thyrocytes in Irish archival thyroid tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma R Dorris

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small non-coding RNAs approximately 22 nucleotides in length that function as regulators of gene expression. Dysregulation of miRNAs has been associated with initiation and progression of oncogenesis in humans. Our group has previously described a unique miRNA expression signature, including the MIR200 family member MIR141, which can differentiate papillary thyroid cancer (PTC cell lines from a control thyroid cell line. An investigation into the expression of MIR141 in a series of archival thyroid malignancies (n=140; classic PTC, follicular variant PTC, follicular thyroid carcinoma (FTC, Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT, or control thyrocytes was performed. Each cohort had a minimum of 20 validated samples surgically excised within the period 1980 - 2009. A subset of the HT and cPTC cohorts (n=3 were also analysed for expression of TGFβR1, a key member of the TGFβ pathway and known target of MIR141. Laser capture microdissection was used to specifically dissect target cells from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival tissue. Thyrocyte- and lymphocyte-specific markers (TSHR and LSP1 respectively confirmed the integrity of cell populations in the HT cohort. RNA was extracted and quantitative RT-PCR was performed using comparative CT (ΔΔCT analysis. Statistically significant (p<0.05 differential expression profiles of MIR141 were found between tissue types. HT samples displayed significant downregulation of MIR141 compared to both classic PTC and control thyrocytes. Furthermore, TGFβR1 expression was detected in cPTC samples but not in HT thyrocytes. It is postulated that the down-regulation of this miRNA is due, at least in part, to its involvement in regulating the TGFβ pathway. This pathway is exquisitely involved in T-cell autoimmunity and has previously been linked with HT. In conclusion, HT epithelium can be distinguished from cPTC epithelium and control epithelium based on the relative expression of MIR141.

  14. Taste: The Bedrock of Flavor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary K Beauchamp

    2014-07-01

    There are two general approaches to reducing dietary sodium. First, there is considerable interest in developing salt substitutes and salt enhancers. Potassium chloride is widely used (usually in combination with NaCl as a substitute but it is not ideal since many find it has an unpleasant off-taste. There is considerable academic and industry research to identify new substitutes but to date there are none for salty as there are for sweet taste. A second approach to lowering sodium intake on a population-wide level in the United States, where more than 80% of the average person’s salt intake comes from food purchased and not from being added during cooking or at the table, is for food manufacturers and restaurants to gradually reduce the amount of salt in prepared foods. Experimental studies have demonstrated that if one reduces salt intake preferences for salt are similarly reduced. Based on this, the Institute of Medicine (IOM recommended that the Food and Drug Administration require gradual reduction by food manufacturers and large restaurant chains (IOM. The FDA has not acted on this recommendation. Conclusion. As illustrated by the difficulties in reducing salt in spite of the health benefits (a similar set of arguments for reducing excess consumption of carbohydrate sugars could be made, the sense of taste is a powerful driver of food intake. A deeper understanding of this important but neglected sensory system is required if we are to adequately address critical health problems in modern society that are often driven by excess consumption of tasty nutrients.

  15. Upregulation of Shh and Ptc1 in hyperoxia‑induced acute lung injury in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hongxing; Wang, Shaohua; Yang, Lin; Fang, Fang; Xu, Feng

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh) and Ptc signaling molecules in the lungs of newborn rats exposed to prolonged hyperoxia, and to explore the role of the SHH signaling pathway in hyperoxia‑induced lung injury. Newborn Sprague-Dawley rat pups were placed in chambers containing room air or oxygen above 95% for 14 days following birth. The rats were sacrificed after 3, 7 or 14 days and their lungs were removed. Sections were fixed and subjected to hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. Shh and Ptc1 were quantitated by immunohistochemistry. The total RNA and protein were also extracted from lung tissue; real-time PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis were utilized to assess the mRNA and protein expression of Shh and Ptc1. H&E staining demonstrated significant histomorphological changes in the hyperoxia‑exposed lungs at 3, 7 and 14 days of age. The results of the immunohistochemistry, RT-PCR and western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of Shh was significantly higher in the hyperoxia-exposed lungs at 3, 7 and 14 days, while Ptc1 was significantly elevated at 7 and 14 days. Exposure of the neonatal rat lung to prolonged hyperoxia resulted in acute lung injury and histomorphological changes. Shh and Ptc1 were upregulated in a time-dependent manner in the course of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. The SHH signal pathway may be involved in the pathogenesis of hyperoxia-induced lung injury. This is the first evidence that in vivo hyperoxia induces activation of the SHH signal transduction pathway in newborn lung.

  16. Use of a combined SpO₂/PtcCO₂ sensor in the delivery room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubortone, Serena Antonia; De Carolis, Maria Pia; Lacerenza, Serafina; Bersani, Iliana; Occhipinti, Federica; Romagnoli, Costantino

    2012-01-01

    Arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2)) and partial arterial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO(2)) are important respiratory parameters in critically ill neonates. A sensor combining a pulse oximeter with the Stow-Severinghaus electrode, required for the measurement of peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO(2)) and transcutaneous partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PtcCO(2)), respectively, has been recently used in neonatal clinical practice (TOSCA(500Ò)Radiometer). We evaluated TOSCA usability and reliability in the delivery room (DR), throughout three different periods, on term, late-preterm, and preterm neonates. During the first period (period A), 30 healthy term neonates were simultaneously monitored with both TOSCA and a MASIMO pulse oximeter. During the second period (period B), 10 healthy late-preterm neonates were monitored with both TOSCA and a transcutaneous device measuring PtcCO(2) (TINA(Ò) TCM3, Radiometer). During the third period (period C), 15 preterm neonates were monitored with TOSCA and MASIMO after birth, during stabilization, and during transport to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Blood gas analyses were performed to compare transcutaneous and blood gas values. TOSCA resulted easily and safely usable in the DR, allowing reliable noninvasive SaO(2) estimation. Since PtcCO(2) measurements with TOSCA required at least 10 min to be stable and reliable, this parameter was not useful during the early resuscitation immediately after birth. Moreover, PtcCO(2) levels were less precise if compared to the conventional transcutaneous monitoring. However, PtcCO(2) measurement by TOSCA was useful as trend-monitoring after stabilization and during transport to NICU.

  17. Mechanism of PTC124 activity in cell-based luciferase assays of nonsense codon suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Douglas S.; Thorne, Natasha; Maguire, William F.; Inglese, James

    2009-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays used in drug discovery frequently use reporter enzymes such as firefly luciferase (FLuc) as indicators of target activity. An important caveat to consider, however, is that compounds can directly affect the reporter, leading to nonspecific but highly reproducible assay signal modulation. In rare cases, this activity appears counterintuitive; for example, some FLuc inhibitors, acting through posttranslational Fluc reporter stabilization, appear to activate gene expression. Previous efforts to characterize molecules that influence luciferase activity identified a subset of 3,5-diaryl-oxadiazole-containing compounds as FLuc inhibitors. Here, we evaluate a number of compounds with this structural motif for activity against FLuc. One such compound is PTC124 {3-[5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl]benzoic acid}, a molecule originally identified in a cell-based FLuc assay as having nonsense codon suppression activity [Welch EM, et al., Nature (2007) 447:87–91]. We find that the potency of FLuc inhibition for the tested compounds strictly correlates with their activity in a FLuc reporter cell-based nonsense codon assay, with PTC124 emerging as the most potent FLuc inhibitor (IC50 = 7 ± 1 nM). However, these compounds, including PTC124, fail to show nonsense codon suppression activity when Renilla reniformis luciferase (RLuc) is used as a reporter and are inactive against the RLuc enzyme. This suggests that the initial discovery of PTC124 may have been biased by its direct effect on the FLuc reporter, implicating firefly luciferase as a molecular target of PTC124. Our results demonstrate the value of understanding potential interactions between reporter enzymes and chemical compounds and emphasize the importance of implementing the appropriate control assays before interpreting HTS results. PMID:19208811

  18. Failure of Serial Taste-Taste Compound Presentations to Produce Overshadowing of Extinction of Conditioned Taste Aversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineno, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to study overshadowing of extinction in a conditioned taste aversion preparation. In both experiments, aversive conditioning with sucrose was followed by extinction treatment with either sucrose alone or in compound with another taste, citric acid. Experiment 1 employed a simultaneous compound extinction treatment…

  19. Changes in taste perception and eating behavior after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Bradley, David; Eagon, J. Christopher; Sullivan, Shelby; Abumrad, Nada A.; Klein, Samuel

    2013-01-01

    Objective Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery causes greater weight loss than laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). We tested the hypothesis that RYGB has weight loss-independent effects on taste perception which influence eating behavior and contribute to the greater weight loss. Design and Methods Subjects were studied before and after ~20% weight loss induced by RYGB (n=17) or LAGB (n=10). We evaluated: taste sensitivity for sweet, salty and savory stimuli; sucrose and monosodium glutamate (MSG) preferences; sweetness palatability; eating behavior; and expression of taste-related genes in biopsies of fungiform papillae. Results Weight loss induced by both procedures caused the same decrease in: preferred sucrose concentration (−12±10%), perceived sweetness of sucrose (−7±5%), cravings for sweets and fast-foods (−22 ±5%), influence of emotions (−27±5%) and external food cues (−30±4%) on eating behavior, and expression of α-gustducin in fungiform papillae (all P-values <0.05). RYGB, but not LAGB, shifted sweetness palatability from pleasant to unpleasant when repetitively tasting sucrose (P=0.05). Neither procedure affected taste detection thresholds or MSG preferences. Conclusions LAGB and RYGB cause similar alterations in eating behaviors, when weight loss is matched. These changes in eating behavior were not associated with changes in taste sensitivity, suggesting other, as yet unknown, mechanisms are involved. PMID:24167016

  20. Changes in taste perception and eating behavior after bariatric surgery-induced weight loss in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino, Marta Yanina; Bradley, David; Eagon, J Christopher; Sullivan, Shelby; Abumrad, Nada A; Klein, Samuel

    2014-05-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery causes greater weight loss than laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB). We tested the hypothesis that RYGB has weight loss-independent effects on taste perception, which influence eating behavior and contribute to the greater weight loss. Subjects were studied before and after ∼20% weight loss induced by RYGB (n = 17) or LAGB (n = 10). The following have been evaluated: taste sensitivity for sweet, salty and savory stimuli, sucrose and monosodium glutamate (MSG) preferences, sweetness palatability, eating behavior, and expression of taste-related genes in biopsies of fungiform papillae. Weight loss induced by both procedures caused the same decrease in: preferred sucrose concentration (-12 ± 10%), perceived sweetness of sucrose (-7 ± 5%), cravings for sweets and fast-foods (-22 ± 5%), influence of emotions (-27 ± 5%), and external food cues (-30 ± 4%) on eating behavior, and expression of α-gustducin in fungiform papillae (all P values <0.05). RYGB, but not LAGB, shifted sweetness palatability from pleasant to unpleasant when repetitively tasting sucrose (P = 0.05). Neither procedure affected taste detection thresholds nor MSG preferences. LAGB and RYGB cause similar alterations in eating behaviors, when weight loss is matched. These changes in eating behavior were not associated with changes in taste sensitivity, suggesting other, as yet unknown, mechanisms are involved. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  1. Adenosine enhances sweet taste through A2B receptors in the taste bud.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Dvoryanchikov, Gennady; Pereira, Elizabeth; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Mammalian taste buds use ATP as a neurotransmitter. Taste Receptor (type II) cells secrete ATP via gap junction hemichannels into the narrow extracellular spaces within a taste bud. This ATP excites primary sensory afferent fibers and also stimulates neighboring taste bud cells. Here we show that extracellular ATP is enzymatically degraded to adenosine within mouse vallate taste buds and that this nucleoside acts as an autocrine neuromodulator to selectively enhance sweet taste. In Receptor cells in a lingual slice preparation, Ca(2+) mobilization evoked by focally applied artificial sweeteners was significantly enhanced by adenosine (50 μM). Adenosine had no effect on bitter or umami taste responses, and the nucleoside did not affect Presynaptic (type III) taste cells. We also used biosensor cells to measure transmitter release from isolated taste buds. Adenosine (5 μM) enhanced ATP release evoked by sweet but not bitter taste stimuli. Using single-cell reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR on isolated vallate taste cells, we show that many Receptor cells express the adenosine receptor, Adora2b, while Presynaptic (type III) and Glial-like (type I) cells seldom do. Furthermore, Adora2b receptors are significantly associated with expression of the sweet taste receptor subunit, Tas1r2. Adenosine is generated during taste stimulation mainly by the action of the ecto-5'-nucleotidase, NT5E, and to a lesser extent, prostatic acid phosphatase. Both these ecto-nucleotidases are expressed by Presynaptic cells, as shown by single-cell RT-PCR, enzyme histochemistry, and immunofluorescence. Our findings suggest that ATP released during taste reception is degraded to adenosine to exert positive modulation particularly on sweet taste.

  2. 49 CFR Appendix F to Part 236 - Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Third-Party Assessment of PTC System Safety Verification and Validation F Appendix F to Part 236... F to Part 236—Minimum Requirements of FRA Directed Independent Third-Party Assessment of PTC System... independent third-party assessment of PTC system safety verification and validation pursuant to subpart H or I...

  3. Taste receptors in the gastrointestinal tract III. Salty and sour taste: sensing of sodium and protons by the tongue

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DeSimone, John A; Lyall, Vijay

    2006-01-01

    .... The sodium-specific salt taste receptor is the epithelial sodium channel whereas a nonspecific salt taste receptor is a taste variant of the vanilloid receptor-1 nonselective cation channel, TRPV1...

  4. Sodium taste threshold in children and its relationship to blood pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Arguelles

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Popular science has emphasized the risks of high sodium intake and many studies have confirmed that salt intake is closely related to hypertension. The present mini-review summarizes experiments about salt taste sensitivity and its relationship with blood pressure (BP and other variables of clinical and familial relevance. Children and adolescents from control parents (N = 72 or with at least one essential hypertensive (EHT parent (N = 51 were investigated. Maternal questionnaires on eating habits and vomiting episodes were collected. Offspring, anthropometric, BP, and salt taste sensitivity values were recorded and blood samples analyzed. Most mothers declared that they added "little salt" when cooking. Salt taste sensitivity was inversely correlated with systolic BP (SBP in control youngsters (r = -0.33; P = 0.015. In the EHT group, SBP values were similar to control and a lower salt taste sensitivity threshold. Obese offspring of EHT parents showed higher SBP and C-reactive protein values but no differences in renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity. Salt taste sensitivity was correlated with SBP only in the non-obese EHT group (N = 41; r = 0.37; P = 0.02. Salt taste sensitivity was correlated with SBP in healthy, normotensive children and adolescents whose mothers reported significant vomiting during the first trimester (N = 18; r = -0.66; P < 0.005, but not in "non-vomiter offspring" (N = 54; r = -0.18; nonsignificant. There is evidence for a linkage between high blood pressure, salt intake and sensitivity, perinatal environment and obesity, with potential physiopathological implications in humans. This relationship has not been studied comprehensively using homogeneous methods and therefore more research is needed in this field.

  5. Shrinkage of ipsilateral taste buds and hyperplasia of contralateral taste buds following chorda tympani nerve transection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-ke Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphological changes that occur in the taste buds after denervation are not well understood in rats, especially in the contralateral tongue epithelium. In this study, we investigated the time course of morphological changes in the taste buds following unilateral nerve transection. The role of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the taste buds was also examined. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups: control, unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection and unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection. Rats were allowed up to 42 days of recovery before being euthanized. The taste buds were visualized using a cytokeratin 8 antibody. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers were quantified and compared among groups. No significant difference was detected between the chorda tympani nerve transection and chorda tympani nerve transection + lingual nerve transection groups. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers on the ipsilateral side all decreased significantly compared with control. On the contralateral side, the number of taste buds remained unchanged over time, but they were larger, and taste receptor cells were more numerous postoperatively. There was no evidence for a role of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the anterior taste buds.

  6. Shrinkage of ipsilateral taste buds and hyperplasia of contralateral taste buds following chorda tympani nerve transection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-ke Li; Juan-mei Yang; Yi-bo Huang; Dong-dong Ren; Fang-lu Chi

    2015-01-01

    The morphological changes that occur in the taste buds after denervation are not well under-stood in rats, especially in the contralateral tongue epithelium. In this study, we investigated the time course of morphological changes in the taste buds following unilateral nerve transection. The role of the trigeminal component of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the taste buds was also examined. Twenty-four Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into three groups:control, unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection and unilateral chorda tympani nerve transection+lingual nerve transection. Rats were allowed up to 42 days of re-covery before being euthanized. The taste buds were visualized using a cytokeratin 8 antibody. Taste bud counts, volumes and taste receptor cell numbers were quantiifed and compared among groups. No signiifcant difference was detected between the chorda tympani nerve transection and chorda tympani nerve transection+lingual nerve transection groups. Taste bud counts, vol-umes and taste receptor cell numbers on the ipsilateral side all decreased signiifcantly compared with control. On the contralateral side, the number of taste buds remained unchanged over time, but they were larger, and taste receptor cells were more numerous postoperatively. There was no evidence for a role of the trigeminal branch of the lingual nerve in maintaining the structural integrity of the anterior taste buds.

  7. Incentives through Consumer Learning about Tastes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schumacher, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    no equilibrium in which the firm always exerts high effort. However, when consumers learn about their own tastes, such an equilibrium can exist. Consumer learning about tastes therefore is an alternative to reputational concerns that produces stable incentives. We discuss the implications of this mechanism...

  8. TActical Sensor network TEst bed (TASTE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, P. van; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Sandbrink, R.D.J.

    2008-01-01

    TASTE is a software tool for specifying and deploying unattended ground sensors (UGS) in a composition which the commander assumes will suit his needs the best. With TASTE different sensor types such as acoustic, magnetic, seismic, radar and IR imaging sensors can be deployed virtually and their

  9. TActical Sensor network TEst bed (TASTE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, P. van; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Sandbrink, R.D.J.

    2008-01-01

    TASTE is a software tool for specifying and deploying unattended ground sensors (UGS) in a composition which the commander assumes will suit his needs the best. With TASTE different sensor types such as acoustic, magnetic, seismic, radar and IR imaging sensors can be deployed virtually and their ind

  10. Water Treatment Technology - Taste, Odor & Color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross-Harrington, Melinda; Kincaid, G. David

    One of twelve water treatment technology units, this student manual on taste, odor, and color provides instructional materials for three competencies. (The twelve units are designed for a continuing education training course for public water supply operators.) The competencies focus on the following areas: taste and odor determination, control of…

  11. Do Natural Pictures Mean Natural Tastes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Viktor; Barratt, Daniel; Sørensen, Henrik Selsøe

    2015-01-01

    A widespread assumption in Danish consumer law is that if the package of a food product carries a picture of a potentially taste-giving ingredient (say, a strawberry), then consumers will expect the corresponding taste to stem primarily from that ingredient rather than from artificial flavouring...

  12. College-Aged Males Experience Attenuated Sweet and Salty Taste with Modest Weight Gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Corinna A; Cassano, Patricia A; Dando, Robin

    2017-08-23

    Background: Human and animal studies report a blunted sense of taste in people who are overweight or obese, with heightened sensitivity also reported after weight loss. However, it is unknown if taste changes concurrently with weight gain.Objective: This study investigated the association of weight gain with changes in suprathreshold taste intensity perception in a free-living population of young adults.Methods: Taste response, anthropometric measures, and diet changes were assessed with a longitudinal study design in first-year college students 3 times throughout the academic year. At baseline, 93 participants (30 males, 63 females) were an average of 18 y old, with a body mass index (in kg/m(2)) of 21.9. Sweet, umami, salty, sour, and bitter taste intensities were evaluated at 3 concentrations by using the general Labeled Magnitude Scale. Ordinary least-squares regression models assessed the association of weight gain and within-person taste change, adjusting for sex, race, and diet changes.Results: Participants gained an average of 3.9% in weight, ranging from -5.7% to +13.8%. With each 1% increase in body weight, males perceived sweet and salty as less intense, with taste responses decreasing by 11.0% (95% CI: -18.9%, -2.3%; P = 0.015) and 7.5% (95% CI: -13.1%, -1.5%; P = 0.015) from baseline, respectively. Meanwhile, females did not experience this decrement, and even perceived a 6.5% increase (95% CI: 2.6%, 10.5%; P = 0.007) in sour taste with similar amounts of weight gain. Changes in the consumption of meat and other umami-rich foods also negatively correlated with umami taste response (-39.1%; 95% CI: -56.3%, -15.0%; P = 0.004).Conclusions: A modest weight gain is associated with concurrent taste changes in the first year of college, especially in males who experience a decrement in sweet and salty taste. This suggests that young-adult males may be susceptible to taste loss when gaining weight. © 2017 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor based on graphite oxide, Prussian blue, and PTC-NH2 for the detection of α2,6-sialylated glycans in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Liuliu; He, Junlin; Xu, Wailan; Zhang, Jing; Hui, Junmin; Guo, Yanlei; Li, Wenjuan; Yu, Chao

    2014-12-15

    α2,6-Sialylated glycans are crucial molecular targets for cancer diagnosis and clinical research. In this work, a novel ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor was fabricated based on a graphite oxide (GO), Prussian blue (PB), and PTC-NH2 (an ammonolysis product of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride) nanocomposite for the selective detection of α2,6-sialylated glycans. To increase the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor, gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were immobilized on a GO-PB-PTC-NH2 modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Sambucus nigra agglutinins (SNAs), which specifically bind with α2,6-sialylated glycans, were covalently immobilized on GNPs for the sensitive detection of α2,6-sialylated glycans in serum. This proposed method can be applied to human serum, and it worked well over a broad linear range (0.1 pg mL(-1)-500 ng mL(-1)) with detection limits of 0.03 pg mL(-1). Moreover, recovery of the spiked samples ranged from 100.2% to 105.0%, suggesting that this excellent electrochemical biosensor can be used for the practical detection of α2,6-sialylated glycans. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. The use of PTC and RFA as treatment alternatives with low procedural morbidity in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Yeong Hun; Kim, So Ri; Lee, Kyung Sun; Lee, Ka Young; Park, Seoung Ju; Jin, Gong Yong; Lee, Yong Chul

    2009-07-01

    Minimally invasive percutaneous ablative therapies for treating lung cancers are currently being studied as treatment alternatives. This present study investigated the efficacies of percutaneous thoracic cryotherapy (PTC) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on clinical courses of pulmonary malignant tumours, especially in the setting of non-surgical candidates. Sixty-five patients with lung malignancy underwent sixty-seven sessions of RFA and nine sessions of PTC. We evaluated the results of RFA and PTC including efficacies, local progression rate, survival rate, and complications. Twenty-nine patients (43.3%) treated with RFA and six patients (66.7%) with PTC attained complete ablation. In small-sized lung mass (3 cm), complete ablation rate of RFA and PTC was increased to 76.2% and 85.7%, respectively. Additionally, we have found that the complete ablation group had significantly higher survival duration and progression free survival duration compared with the partial ablation group. Moreover, the complication profile was acceptable and the pain associated with the procedures disappeared within 1 day; 42 patients (62.7%) after RFA and all patients after PTC. This study provides evidence for the use of PTC and RFA as treatment alternatives with low procedural morbidity in the management of inoperable pulmonary malignant tumours, although the current study is limited by the small sample size and the short follow-up period.

  15. The BMI1 inhibitor PTC-209 is a potential compound to halt cellular growth in biliary tract cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Christian; Wagner, Andrej; Loeffelberger, Magdalena; Bruckner, Daniela; Jakab, Martin; Berr, Frieder; Di Fazio, Pietro; Ocker, Matthias; Neureiter, Daniel; Pichler, Martin; Kiesslich, Tobias

    2016-01-05

    BMI1 is a core component of the polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1) and is up-regulated in biliary tract cancer (BTC), contributing to aggressive clinical features. In this study we investigated the cytotoxic effects of PTC-209, a recently developed inhibitor of BMI1, in BTC cells. PTC-209 reduced overall viability in BTC cell lines in a dose-dependent fashion (0.04 - 20 µM). Treatment with PTC-209 led to slightly enhanced caspase activity and stop of cell proliferation. Cell cycle analysis revealed that PTC-209 caused cell cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint. A comprehensive investigation of expression changes of cell cycle-related genes showed that PTC-209 caused significant down-regulation of cell cycle-promoting genes as well as of genes that contribute to DNA synthesis initiation and DNA repair, respectively. This was accompanied by significantly elevated mRNA levels of cell cycle inhibitors. In addition, PTC-209 reduced sphere formation and, in a cell line-dependent manner, aldehyde dehydrogease-1 positive cells. We conclude that PTC-209 might be a promising drug for future in vitro and in vivo studies in BTC.

  16. Global diversity in the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor: revisiting a classic evolutionary PROPosal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Davide S.; Mezzavilla, Massimo; Pagani, Luca; Robino, Antonietta; Morini, Gabriella; Tofanelli, Sergio; Carrai, Maura; Campa, Daniele; Barale, Roberto; Caradonna, Fabio; Gasparini, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata; Wooding, Stephen; Drayna, Dennis

    2016-05-01

    The ability to taste phenylthiocarbamide (PTC) and 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) is a polymorphic trait mediated by the TAS2R38 bitter taste receptor gene. It has long been hypothesized that global genetic diversity at this locus evolved under pervasive pressures from balancing natural selection. However, recent high-resolution population genetic studies of TAS2Rs suggest that demographic events have played a critical role in the evolution of these genes. We here utilized the largest TAS2R38 database yet analyzed, consisting of 5,589 individuals from 105 populations, to examine natural selection, haplotype frequencies and linkage disequilibrium to estimate the effects of both selection and demography on contemporary patterns of variation at this locus. We found signs of an ancient balancing selection acting on this gene but no post Out-Of-Africa departures from neutrality, implying that the current observed patterns of variation can be predominantly explained by demographic, rather than selective events. In addition, we found signatures of ancient selective forces acting on different African TAS2R38 haplotypes. Collectively our results provide evidence for a relaxation of recent selective forces acting on this gene and a revised hypothesis for the origins of the present-day worldwide distribution of TAS2R38 haplotypes.

  17. The sweetness and bitterness of childhood: Insights from basic research on taste preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennella, Julie A; Bobowski, Nuala K

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we review findings from basic, experimental research on children that suggest that the liking of sweet and the dislike of bitter tastes reflect children's basic biology. Children are born preferring sweet tastes, which attract them to mother's milk and even act as an analgesic. They prefer higher levels of sweet than do adults, with preferences declining to adult levels during middle to late adolescence, which coincides with the cessation of physical growth. The level of sweetness most preferred by children has remained heightened relative to adults for nearly a decade, despite reductions in sugar, both consumed and in the food environment. In spite of these reductions, however, children's intake of sugar remains higher than that recommended by health organizations worldwide. In contrast to sweet taste, children dislike and reject bitter taste, which protects them from ingesting poisons. Although variation in bitter taste receptor genes such as TAS2R38 accounts for people's marked differences in perceptions of the same bitter-tasting compounds, basic research revealed that these genotype-phenotype relationships are modified with age, with children of the same genotype being more bitter sensitive than adults and the changeover occurring during mid-adolescence. This heightened bitter sensitivity is also evident in the taste of the foods (green vegetables) or medicines (liquid formulations of drugs) they dislike and reject. While bitter taste can be masked or blocked to varying degrees by sugars and salts, their efficacy in modulating bitterness is not only based on the type of bitter ligand but on the person's age. Children's heightened preference for sweet and dislike of bitter, though often detrimental in the modern food environment, reflects their basic biology. Increasing knowledge of individual variation in taste due to both age and genetics will shed light on potential strategies to promote healthier eating since chronic diseases derive in

  18. Water as an Independent Taste Modality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew M Rosen

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available To qualify as a basic taste quality or modality, defined as a group of chemicals that taste alike, three empirical benchmarks have commonly been used. The first is that a candidate group of tastants must have a dedicated transduction mechanism in the peripheral nervous system. The second is that the tastants evoke physiological responses in dedicated afferent taste nerves innervating the oropharyngeal cavity. Last, the taste stimuli evoke activity in central gustatory neurons, some of which may respond only to that group of tastants. Here we argue that water may also be an independent taste modality. This argument is based on the identification of a water dedicated transduction mechanism in the peripheral nervous system, water responsive fibers of the peripheral taste nerves and the observation of water responsive neurons in all gustatory regions within the central nervous system. We have described electrophysiological responses from single neurons in nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS and parabrachial nucleus of the pons (PbN, respectively the first two central relay nuclei in the rodent brainstem, to water presented as a taste stimulus in anesthetized rats. Responses to water were in some cases as robust as responses to other taste qualities and sometimes occurred in the absence of responses to other tastants. Both excitatory and inhibitory responses were observed. Also, the temporal features of the water response resembled those of other taste responses. We argue that water may constitute an independent taste modality that is processed by dedicated neural channels at all levels of the gustatory neuraxis. Water-dedicated neurons in the brainstem may constitute key elements in the regulatory system for fluid in the body, i.e. thirst, and as part of the swallowing reflex circuitry.

  19. ret/PTC-1 expression alters the immunoprofile of thyroid follicular cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aherne Sinead

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hashimoto Thyroiditis (H.T. is a destructive autoimmune thyroid condition whose precise molecular pathogenesis remains unclear. ret/PTC-1 is a chimeric transcript which has been described in autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD and thyroid neoplasia. The purpose of this study was to observe the immunogenic effect exposure to H.T. and control lymphocyte supernatant would have on normal (Nthy-ori and ret/PTC-1 (TPC-1 expressing thyroid cell line models. Results A 2 × 2 matrix comprising Nthy-ori and TPC-1 cell lines and H.T. and control lymphocyte supernatant was designed and utilised as follows; activated lymphocytic supernatant from a H.T. and normal control were co-cultured with a cell line derived from normal thyroid (Nthy-ori and also a cell line derived from a papillary thyroid carcinoma that endogenously expresses ret/PTC-1 (TPC-1. The co-cultures were harvested at 0, 6 and 18 hour time points. Gene expression analysis was performed on RNA extracted from thyrocytes using TaqMan® Immune profiling Low-Density Arrays (Applied Biosystems, CA, USA comprising gene expression markers for 93 immune related targets plus 3 endogenous controls. Stimulation of the normal thyroid cell line model with activated T cell supernatant from the H.T. donor yielded global up-regulation of immune targets when compared with control supernatant stimulation. In particular, a cohort of targets (granzyme B, CD3, CD25, CD152, CD45 associated with cytotoxic cell death; T cell receptor (TCR and T cell signaling were up-regulated in the normal cell line model. When the ret/PTC-1 expressing thyroid cell line was co-cultured with H.T. lymphocyte supernatant, in comparison to control supernatant stimulation, down-regulation of the same subset of immune targets was seen. Conclusion Co-culturing H.T. lymphocyte supernatant with a normal thyroid cell line model leads to over-expression of a subset of targets which could contribute to the pathogenesis of H

  20. [The correlation between BRAF mutations, RET/PTC rearrangements and platelet-derived growth factor B expression in papillary thyroid carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Wang, Yan-gang; Zhao, Wen-juan; Fu, Yu-dong; Wang, Luan; Wang, Fang; Zhao, Shi-hua

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the prevalence of BRAF T1799A mutation and RET/PTC rearrangement in Qingdao and detect the expression of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) in order to investigate the correlation between gene mutation and PDGF-B. Fresh tissue from 48 papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC) patients was examined for BRAF mutation RET rearrangements (RET/PTC1 and RET/PTC3) by PCR, followed by direct-sequence analysis. The expression of PDGF was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Among the 48 patients, 14 (29.2%) were micro PTC; 18 (37.5%) had BRAF T1799A mutations and 23(47.9%) had RET/PTC rearrangement. There were 17 (35.4%) cases of RET/PTC1 and 6 (12.5%) of RET/PTC3, with no multiple rearrangements. Both BRAF T1799A mutation and RET/PTC rearrangement were present in 6 (12.5%) cases of non-micro PTC. The level of PDGF-B expression in BRAF T1799A positive was higher than that in the negative, and the level of PDGF-B expression in RET/PTC3 was higher than that in RET/PTC1 (P PTC rearrangement is higher in Qingdao. BRAF T1799A mutation and RET/PTC3 rearrangement in patients suggests a poorer prognosis than the negative one. The BRAF T1799A mutation and RET/PTC3 rearrangement may strengthen the expression of PDGF-B. Both variations suggest a poor prognosis.

  1. Receptor Polymorphism and Genomic Structure Interact to Shape Bitter Taste Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roudnitzky, Natacha; Behrens, Maik; Engel, Anika; Kohl, Susann; Thalmann, Sophie; Hübner, Sandra; Lossow, Kristina; Wooding, Stephen P; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The ability to taste bitterness evolved to safeguard most animals, including humans, against potentially toxic substances, thereby leading to food rejection. Nonetheless, bitter perception is subject to individual variations due to the presence of genetic functional polymorphisms in bitter taste receptor (TAS2R) genes, such as the long-known association between genetic polymorphisms in TAS2R38 and bitter taste perception of phenylthiocarbamide. Yet, due to overlaps in specificities across receptors, such associations with a single TAS2R locus are uncommon. Therefore, to investigate more complex associations, we examined taste responses to six structurally diverse compounds (absinthin, amarogentin, cascarillin, grosheimin, quassin, and quinine) in a sample of the Caucasian population. By sequencing all bitter receptor loci, inferring long-range haplotypes, mapping their effects on phenotype variation, and characterizing functionally causal allelic variants, we deciphered at the molecular level how a subjects' genotype for the whole-family of TAS2R genes shapes variation in bitter taste perception. Within each haplotype block implicated in phenotypic variation, we provided evidence for at least one locus harboring functional polymorphic alleles, e.g. one locus for sensitivity to amarogentin, one of the most bitter natural compounds known, and two loci for sensitivity to grosheimin, one of the bitter compounds of artichoke. Our analyses revealed also, besides simple associations, complex associations of bitterness sensitivity across TAS2R loci. Indeed, even if several putative loci harbored both high- and low-sensitivity alleles, phenotypic variation depended on linkage between these alleles. When sensitive alleles for bitter compounds were maintained in the same linkage phase, genetically driven perceptual differences were obvious, e.g. for grosheimin. On the contrary, when sensitive alleles were in opposite phase, only weak genotype-phenotype associations were seen

  2. HDPE/EPDM/CB复合物的PTC效应%PTC Effect in HDPE/EPDM/CB Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赫秀娟; 陈欣方; 王丽杰; 刘志城

    2001-01-01

    Polymer positive temperature coefficient(PTC) material comprising conductive particles,e.g.carbon black (CB),dispersed in polymer matrix is suitable for use as electrical devices such as circuit overcurrent protection device,self-regulation heaters,sensors,etc..In this paper,the PTC effect of carbon black filled polyethylene and ethylene-propylene-diene terpolymer blends was studied.Effects of raw material ratio and type of carbon black were investigated.The distribution of CB in polymer matrix and the function of crystallites on PTC effect were discussed.

  3. Bioelectronic tongue using heterodimeric human taste receptor for the discrimination of sweeteners with human-like performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun Seok; Jin, Hye Jun; Ahn, Sae Ryun; Kim, Daesan; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Un-Kyung; Simons, Christopher T; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Tai Hyun

    2014-10-28

    The sense of taste helps humans to obtain information and form a picture of the world by recognizing chemicals in their environments. Over the past decade, large advances have been made in understanding the mechanisms of taste detection and mimicking its capability using artificial sensor devices. However, the detection capability of previous artificial taste sensors has been far inferior to that of animal tongues, in terms of its sensitivity and selectivity. Herein, we developed a bioelectronic tongue using heterodimeric human sweet taste receptors for the detection and discrimination of sweeteners with human-like performance, where single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors were functionalized with nanovesicles containing human sweet taste receptors and used to detect the binding of sweeteners to the taste receptors. The receptors are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) composed of human taste receptor type 1 member 2 (hTAS1R2) and human taste receptor type 1 member 3 (hTAS1R3), which have multiple binding sites and allow a human tongue-like broad selectivity for the detection of sweeteners. This nanovesicle-based bioelectronic tongue can be a powerful tool for the detection of sweeteners as an alternative to labor-intensive and time-consuming cell-based assays and the sensory evaluation panels used in the food and beverage industry. Furthermore, this study also allows the artificial sensor to exam the functional activity of dimeric GPCRs.

  4. Expression and Functional Activity of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R38 in Human Placental Tissues and JEG-3 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ute Wölfle

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well as in airway smooth muscle cells, in the testis and in the brain. In the present work we addressed the question if bitter taste receptors might also be expressed in other epithelial tissues as well. By staining a tissue microarray with 45 tissue spots from healthy human donors with an antibody directed against the best characterized bitter taste receptor TAS2R38, we observed an unexpected strong TAS2R38 expression in the amniotic epithelium, syncytiotrophoblast and decidua cells of the human placenta. To analyze the functionality we first determined the TAS2R38 expression in the placental cell line JEG-3. Stimulation of these cells with diphenidol, a clinically used antiemetic agent that binds TAS2Rs including TAS2R38, demonstrated the functionality of the TAS2Rs by inducing calcium influx. Restriction enzyme based detection of the TAS2R38 gene allele identified JEG-3 cells as PTC (phenylthiocarbamide-taster cell line. Calcium influx induced by PTC in JEG-3 cells could be inhibited with the recently described TAS2R38 inhibitor probenecid and proved the specificity of the TAS2R38 activation. The expression of TAS2R38 in human placental tissues points to further new functions and hitherto unknown endogenous ligands of TAS2Rs far beyond bitter tasting.

  5. Expression and Functional Activity of the Human Bitter Taste Receptor TAS2R38 in Human Placental Tissues and JEG-3 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wölfle, Ute; Elsholz, Floriana A; Kersten, Astrid; Haarhaus, Birgit; Schumacher, Udo; Schempp, Christoph M

    2016-03-03

    Bitter taste receptors (TAS2Rs) are expressed in mucous epithelial cells of the tongue but also outside the gustatory system in epithelial cells of the colon, stomach and bladder, in the upper respiratory tract, in the cornified squamous epithelium of the skin as well as in airway smooth muscle cells, in the testis and in the brain. In the present work we addressed the question if bitter taste receptors might also be expressed in other epithelial tissues as well. By staining a tissue microarray with 45 tissue spots from healthy human donors with an antibody directed against the best characterized bitter taste receptor TAS2R38, we observed an unexpected strong TAS2R38 expression in the amniotic epithelium, syncytiotrophoblast and decidua cells of the human placenta. To analyze the functionality we first determined the TAS2R38 expression in the placental cell line JEG-3. Stimulation of these cells with diphenidol, a clinically used antiemetic agent that binds TAS2Rs including TAS2R38, demonstrated the functionality of the TAS2Rs by inducing calcium influx. Restriction enzyme based detection of the TAS2R38 gene allele identified JEG-3 cells as PTC (phenylthiocarbamide)-taster cell line. Calcium influx induced by PTC in JEG-3 cells could be inhibited with the recently described TAS2R38 inhibitor probenecid and proved the specificity of the TAS2R38 activation. The expression of TAS2R38 in human placental tissues points to further new functions and hitherto unknown endogenous ligands of TAS2Rs far beyond bitter tasting.

  6. Taste of milk from inflamed breasts of breastfeeding mothers with mastitis evaluated using a taste sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Michiko; Shinohara, Hitomi; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Kumagai, Masanori; Muto, Hajime; Kodama, Hideya

    2014-03-01

    The refusal of infants to suckle from a breast that is inflamed with mastitis suggests that the taste of the milk has changed. However, the taste of milk from a breast with mastitis has never been empirically determined. The present study compares the taste of milk from breastfeeding mothers with or without mastitis and identifies specific changes in the taste of milk from mothers with mastitis. The intensity of four basic tastes (sourness, saltiness, bitterness, and umami) of breastmilk from 24 healthy mothers at 3-5 days and at 2-3, 4-5, and 8-10 weeks postpartum and from 14 mothers with mastitis was determined objectively using a taste sensor. The intensity of each basic taste and the concentrations of main taste substances in milk were compared between the inflamed breasts and the normal breasts of control mothers or the contralateral asymptomatic breast of mothers with unilateral mastitis. The transition from colostrum to mature milk was accompanied by changes in the taste of the milk, such as decreased saltiness and umami and increased bitterness and sourness. Umami and saltiness increased in milk from inflamed breasts. Contents of sodium, glutamate, and guanosine monophosphate increased in milk from inflamed breasts. Tastes that were specifically associated with inflamed breasts appeared to include an increase in umami and saltiness, which might have resulted from an increased content in factors associated with umami and sodium.

  7. Mental and physical workload, salivary stress biomarkers and taste perception: Mars desert research station expedition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Balwant; Kaur, Jasdeep

    2012-11-01

    Very few studies have been conducted on the effects of simulation of Mars conditions on taste. This study was planned to find the effects of physical and mental workload on taste sensitivity and salivary stress biomarkers. Twelve crew members were selected. Taste reactions and intensity of the taste sensations to quinine sulfate, citric acid, and sucrose were tested before and after mental and physical tasks for one hour. Also, psychological mood states by profile of mood state, salivary, salivary alpha amylase and cortisol, and current stress test scores were measured before and after mental and physical tasks. Average time intensity evaluation showed that after the mental and physical tasks, the perceived duration of bitter, sour, and sweet taste sensations was significantly shortened relative to control group. There were good correlations between average time intensity of sweetness, bitterness, sourness and cortisol levels. Taste alterations due to stress can have an effect on the health and confidence of astronauts in long- term space missions. Thus, this issue remains one of the important issues for future human explorations.

  8. Synthesis and Reactions of Five-Membered Heterocycles Using Phase Transfer Catalyst (PTC Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. El-Sayed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase transfer catalysts (PTCs have been widely used for the synthesis of organic compounds particularly in both liquid-liquid and solid-liquid heterogeneous reaction mixtures. They are known to accelerate reaction rates by facilitating formation of interphase transfer of species and making reactions between reagents in two immiscible phases possible. Application of PTC instead of traditional technologies for industrial processes of organic synthesis provides substantial benefits for the environment. On the basis of numerous reports it is evident that phase-transfer catalysis is the most efficient way for generation and reactions of many active intermediates. In this review we report various uses of PTC in syntheses and reactions of five-membered heterocycles compounds and their multifused rings.

  9. Electrochemical characterisation of Pt/C suspensions for the reduction of oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, R.; Chaparro, A.M.; Daza, L. [Dep. Combustibles Fosiles, CIEMAT, Av. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2005-10-10

    Electrodes based on carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts (Pt/C) have been studied in aqueous electrolyte electrochemical cells. The electrodes are prepared from suspensions of commercial Pt/C catalyst, deposited onto a carbon-covered Pt disk. Three deposition methods have been used, impregnation, spray and electrospray. The utilisation of Pt, i.e. the amount of Pt that really participates in the electrochemical reaction, was determined for each preparation method from measurements of the mass of Pt deposited on the electrode, and of the electroactive area of Pt. Higher utilisation rates are found on electrodes prepared by the impregnation method. The activity towards oxygen reduction in aqueous electrolyte was studied with the rotating electrode at different temperatures. (author)

  10. A PTC Optimization and Control Surface Interference Study HSR Airframe Technical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Raymond; Cliff, Susan; Rimlinger, Mark; Murman, Scott; Reuther, James

    1999-01-01

    This report considers the effect of canard and horizontal tail vertical position on the aerodynamic characteristics of the PTC configuration without nacelles and diverters. This analysis is followed by three optimization studies using canard and tail incidence as design variables in the first problem followed by an optimization run with canard and tail incidence and wing camber design variables and finally an optimization run with canard incidence and wing camber. The first problem was run at fixed lift while the other two problems were run at fixed angle of attack. The final investigation reported here will show data from a component buildup study using the PTC configuration. This final study will show the aerodynamic interference between the canard, wing and horizontal tail.

  11. Ultrasound assisted PTC catalyzed saponification of vegetable oils using aqueous alkali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatkhande, B S; Samant, S D

    1998-03-01

    A few vegetable oils were saponified using aqueous KOH and different PTCs at room temperature in the presence of ultrasound. The extent of saponification was studied using the saponification value as a reference. Optimizations of various parameters such as time, selection of PTC, quantity of PTC, quantity of KOH and quantity of water were carried out using soyabean oil as a sample oil under sonication with stirring. To study the effect of ultrasound, the saponification was also carried out at 35 +/- 2 degrees C under different conditions, namely stirring, sonication, stirring and sonication, and heating at 100 degrees C. It was found that the heterogeneous liquid-liquid phase saponification of different vegetable oils using aq. KOH/CTAB was remarkably accelerated at 35 +/- 2 degrees C in the presence of ultrasound along with stirring.

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of High-activity Pt/C Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Borami; Kim, Joung Woon; Hwang, Seung Jun; Yoo, Sung Jong; Cho, Eun Ae; Lim, Tae Hoon; Kim, Soo Kil [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-06-15

    A 20 wt % Pt/C is fabricated and characterized for use as the cathode catalyst in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). By using the polyol method, the fabrication process is optimized by modifying the carbon addition sequence and precursor mixing conditions. The crystallographic structure, particle size, dispersion, and activity toward oxygen reduction of the as-prepared catalysts are compared with those of commercial Pt/C catalysts. The most effective catalyst is obtained by ultrasonic treatment of ethylene glycol-carbon mixture and immediate mixing of this mixture with a Pt precursor at the beginning of the synthesis. The catalyst exhibits very uniform particle size distribution without agglomeration. The mass activities of the as-prepared catalyst are 13.4 mA/mgPt and 51.0 mA/mgPt at 0.9 V and 0.85 V, respectively, which are about 1.7 times higher than those of commercial catalysts.

  13. Exploring Ethnic Differences in Taste Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Johnny A; Bartoshuk, Linda M; Fillingim, Roger B; Dotson, Cedrick D

    2016-06-01

    It is well known that nutritional intake can vary substantially as a function of demographic variables such as ethnicity and/or sex. Although a variety of factors are known to underlie the relationship between these demographic variables and nutritional intake, it is interesting to speculate that variation in food intake associated with ethnicity or sex may result, in part, from differences in the perceived taste of foods in these different populations. Thus, we initiated a study to evaluate taste responsiveness in different ethnic groups. Moreover, because of the known differences in taste responsiveness between males and females, analyses were stratified by sex. The ethnic groups tested differed significantly from one another in reported perceived taste intensity. Our results showed that Hispanics and African Americans rated taste sensations higher than non-Hispanic Whites and that these differences were more pronounced in males. Understanding the nature of these differences in taste perception is important, because taste perception may contribute to dietary health risk. When attempting to modify diet, individuals of different ethnicities may require personalized interventions that take into account the different sensory experience that these individuals may have when consuming foods.

  14. RNA sequencing identifies crucial genes in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jie; Zhang, Wenwei; Xia, Qingsheng; Liu, Fuxue; Li, Li; Zhao, Shuwei; Gao, Xian; Zang, Chuanshan; Ge, Ruifeng; Sun, Yan

    2016-02-01

    The study aims to uncover molecular mechanisms of PTC (papillary thyroid carcinoma) progression and provide therapeutic biomarkers. The paired tumor and control tissues were obtained from 5 PTC patients. RNA was extracted and cDNA libraries were constructed. RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform using paired-end method. After preprocessing of the RNA-seq data, gene expression value was calculated by RPKM. Then the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified with edgeR. Functional enrichment and protein-protein interaction (PPI) network analyses were conducted for the DEGs. Module analysis of the PPI network was also performed. Transcription factors (TFs) of DEGs were predicted. A cohort of 496 up-regulated DEGs mainly correlating with the ECM degradation pathways, and 440 down-regulated DEGs predominantly enriching in transmembrane transport process were identified. Hub nodes in the PPI network were RRM2 and a set of collagens (COL1A1, COL3A1 and COL5A1), which were also remarkable in module 3 and module 5, respectively. Genes in module 3 were associated with cell cycle pathways, while in module 5 were related to ECM degradation pathways. PLAU, PSG1 and EGR2 were the crucial TFs with higher transcriptional activity in PTC than in control. Several genes including COL1A1, COL3A1, RRM2, PLAU, and EGR2 might be used as biomarkers of PTC therapy. Among them, COL1A1 and COL3A1 might exert their functions via involving in ECM degradation pathway, while RRM2 through cell cycle pathway. PLAU might be an active TF, whereas EGR2 might be a tumor suppressor. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Polyol synthesis of nanosized Pt/C electrocatalysts assisted by pulse microwave activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebegue, E.; Baranton, S.; Coutanceau, C. [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique (LACCO), UMR 6503 CNRS, Universite de Poitiers, 40 av recteur Pineau, F-86000 Poitiers (France)

    2011-02-01

    A polyol process assisted by pulse microwave activation was used to prepare efficient Pt/C electrocatalysts for PEMFC applications with reducing cost. Catalysts from pulsed microwave method were compared with a catalyst issued from a classical method, in terms of active surface area, platinum loading and activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction. A design of experiments (DOE derived from the Taguchi method) has been implemented to optimize experimental parameters only related to pulse microwave activation, the intrinsic synthesis parameters (concentration of platinum salt, platinum/carbon weight ratio and pH) being kept constant. Controlled parameters were duration of microwave pulse, maximum temperature and total duration of the synthesis. Considered responses were catalyst active surface area and the Pt/C loading. An optimized configuration of synthesis parameter was proposed. The confirmation experiment revealed a trend in agreement with that expected. Three catalysts (two from pulsed microwave synthesis method and one prepared by the classical method) were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and CO stripping. Catalysts from pulsed microwave method display higher characteristics than the one prepared by the classical method. The Pt/C catalyst from the confirmation experiment displays the highest catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction. (author)

  16. PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC rearrangement detection is feasible in routine air dried fine needle aspiration (FNA) smears

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferraz, Carolina; Rehfeld, Christian; Krogdahl, Annelise;

    2012-01-01

    Background: The diagnostic limitations of fine needle aspiration (FNA), like the "indeterminate" category, can be partially overcome by molecular analysis. As PAX8/PPARG and RET/PTC rearrangements have been detected in follicular carcinomas (FTC) and papillary carcinomas (PTC), their detection...... as generally not suitable for testing these rearrangements in a clinical setting. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of extracting RNA from routine-air-dried FNA smears for the detection of these rearrangements with RT-PCR. Methods: A new method for RNA extraction......). Similarly, RET/PTC was found in 3 of 96 FFPEs and in 4 of 96 FNAs. Two of 21 PTC samples and 3 of 42 FA samples carried this rearrangement. Conclusion: These data are the first to show the feasibility of extracting RNA from routine air dried FNA smears for the detection of PAX8/PPARG and RET...

  17. Quantitative shear wave elastography as a prognostic implication of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC): elasticity index can predict extrathyroidal extension (ETE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun Joo; Kim, Jeong-Ah; Son, Eun Ju; Youk, Ji Hyun; Park, Cheong Soo

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the quantitative elasticity index of shear wave elastography (SWE) can predict extrathyroidal extension (ETE) of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) preoperatively. A total of 208 patients with pathology confirmed PTC whom underwent SWE during preoperative staging US between April 2011 to June 2012 were included.SWE indices of E mean, E max, E min of the index malignancy, the ratios between E mean of the lesion and parenchyma (E ratio-P), and muscle (E ratio-M), and grayscale US findings, including ETE, multifocality, bilaterality, and central and lateral lymph node (LN) metastasis were evaluated. The correlations of SWE indices and grayscale US findings with pathologic prognostic factors of PTC were analyzed by Chi square or Fisher's exact test, and multivariate regression analysis. ETE was associated with E mean, E max, E min, and E ratio-M (P = 0.005, 0.009, 0.016 and PTC.

  18. Comparison of C4d detection on erythrocytes and PTC-C4d to histological signs of antibody-mediated rejection in kidney transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, F; Kisserli, A; Tabary, T; McGregor, B; Noel, L H; Réveil, B; Toupance, O; Rieu, P; Thervet, E; Legendre, C; Morelon, E; Issa, N; Cohen, J H M

    2012-06-01

    C4d on erythrocytes (EC4d), C4d peritubular capillary deposition (PTC-C4d) staining and histology were compared in a cross-sectional cohort of 146 renal allograft biopsies (132 patients). EC4d levels paralleled PTC-C4d staining, but were more predictive of peritubular capillaritis (PTC). Donor-specific antibodies (DSA), PTC-C4d, EC4d and PTC were analyzed in an independent longitudinal follow-up cohort (96 biopsies, 76 patients). Seventy-six samples were PTC and EC4d concordant, 11 positive and 65 negative, 7 PTC-EC4d+ and 13 PTC+EC4d-. EC4d levels were related to DSA occurrence. With ABMR defined by PTC and DSA, all apparently discordant patients, EC4d negative, were correctly reassigned comparing EC4d level curves with rejection kinetics, with positive EC4d samples predating biopsy or late biopsies compared with ABMR flare-ups. All EC4d-positive patients without PTC or DSA had permanent high EC4d levels unrelated to rejection. EC4d was more abundant in PTC-positive (mean = 108.5%± 3.4; n = 50) than PTC-negative samples (mean = 88.1%± 1.3; n= 96; p PTC-C4d and EC4d for PTC were, respectively, 75%, 79%; 64%, 76% (p < 0.05); 28%, 46% (p < 0.05) and 93%, 94%. Values were similar for DSA. A noninvasive blood test, EC4d, and particularly longitudinally monitoring EC4d levels, may increase surrogate ABMR testing options. © Copyright 2012 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  19. A type 2C protein phosphatase FgPtc3 is involved in cell wall integrity, lipid metabolism, and virulence in Fusarium graminearum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua Jiang

    Full Text Available Type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs play important roles in regulating many biological processes in eukaryotes. Currently, little is known about functions of PP2Cs in filamentous fungi. The causal agent of wheat head blight, Fusarium graminearum, contains seven putative PP2C genes, FgPTC1, -3, -5, -5R, -6, -7 and -7R. In order to investigate roles of these PP2Cs, we constructed deletion mutants for all seven PP2C genes in this study. The FgPTC3 deletion mutant (ΔFgPtc3-8 exhibited reduced aerial hyphae formation and deoxynivalenol (DON production, but increased production of conidia. The mutant showed increased resistance to osmotic stress and cell wall-damaging agents on potato dextrose agar plates. Pathogencity assays showed that ΔFgPtc3-8 is unable to infect flowering wheat head. All of the defects were restored when ΔFgPtc3-8 was complemented with the wild-type FgPTC3 gene. Additionally, the FgPTC3 partially rescued growth defect of a yeast PTC1 deletion mutant under various stress conditions. Ultrastructural and histochemical analyses showed that conidia of ΔFgPtc3-8 contained an unusually high number of large lipid droplets. Furthermore, the mutant accumulated a higher basal level of glycerol than the wild-type progenitor. Quantitative real-time PCR assays showed that basal expression of FgOS2, FgSLT2 and FgMKK1 in the mutant was significantly higher than that in the wild-type strain. Serial analysis of gene expression in ΔFgPtc3-8 revealed that FgPTC3 is associated with various metabolic pathways. In contrast to the FgPTC3 mutant, the deletion mutants of FgPTC1, FgPTC5, FgPTC5R, FgPTC6, FgPTC7 or FgPTC7R did not show aberrant phenotypic features when grown on PDA medium or inoculated on wheat head. These results indicate FgPtc3 is the key PP2C that plays a critical role in a variety of cellular and biological functions, including cell wall integrity, lipid and secondary metabolisms, and virulence in F. graminearum.

  20. [RET/PTC Gene Rearrangements in the Sporadic and Radiogenic Thyroid Tumors: Molecular Genetics, Radiobiology and Molecular Epidemiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushenkova, L N; Koterov, A N; Biryukov, A P

    2015-01-01

    A review of molecular genetic, radiobiological and molecular epidemiological studies of gene (chromosome) rearrangements RET/PTC in the cells of the thyroid gland as well as the laws in relation to radiation exposure in vitro, in vivo and human populations identified with them are submitted. The data on the c-RET gene and its chimeric constructs with the gene-donors (RET/PTC rearrangements) are considered. The information about the history of the RET/PTC discovery, their types, carcinogenic potential and specificity both to tumor and non-tumor thyroid disease especially for papillary thyroid carcinoma are provided. The data (seven studies) on the induction of RET/PTC after irradiation of tumor and normal thyroid cells in vitro and mice are reviewed. The mechanisms of RET/PTC induction may be associated with DNA double strand breaks and oxidative stress. Some information (three publications) about the possibility of RET/PTC induction by low doses of radiation with low LET (to 0.1 Gy) is given and it is concluded that their potential evidentiary is generally weak. The achievements in the molecular epidemiology of RET/PTC frequency for exposed and unexposed cohorts are stated. At the same time it is noted that, despite the vast array. of data accumulated from 30 countries of the world and more than 20 years of research, the formed provisions are weakly confirmed statistically and have no base corresponding to the canons of evidence-based medicine. The possibility of use of the RET/PTC presence or their frequencies as markers of the papillary thyroid carcinomas and, specifically, their radiogenic forms, is considered. In the first case the answer may be positive, while in the second, the situation is characterized by uncertainty. Based to the above mentioned we came to a conclusion about the need of a pooled or meta-analysis of the totality of the published data.

  1. Neural crest contribution to lingual mesenchyme, epithelium and developing taste papillae and taste buds

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Mistretta, Charlotte M.

    2012-01-01

    The epithelium of mammalian tongue hosts most of the taste buds that transduce gustatory stimuli into neural signals. In the field of taste biology, taste bud cells have been described as arising from “local epithelium”, in distinction from many other receptor organs that are derived from neurogenic ectoderm including neural crest (NC). In fact, contribution of NC to both epithelium and mesenchyme in the developing tongue is not fully understood. In the present study we used two independent, ...

  2. Vismodegib, an antagonist of hedgehog signaling, directly alters taste molecular signaling in taste buds

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Hyekyung; Cong, Wei-Na; Yoon, Jeong Seon; Egan, Josephine M.

    2014-01-01

    Vismodegib, a highly selective inhibitor of hedgehog (Hh) pathway, is an approved treatment for basal-cell carcinoma. Patients on treatment with vismodegib often report profound alterations in taste sensation. The cellular mechanisms underlying the alterations have not been studied. Sonic Hh (Shh) signaling is required for cell growth and differentiation. In taste buds, Shh is exclusively expressed in type IV taste cells, which are undifferentiated basal cells and the precursors of the three ...

  3. Concomitant BRAF(V600E) mutation and RET/PTC rearrangement is a frequent occurrence in papillary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Anna; Zeppa, Pio; Bifulco, Maurizio; Vitale, Mario

    2014-02-01

    The tyrosine kinase receptors/RAS/RAF/MAPK cascade is a site of mutational events associated with thyroid carcinogenesis. Some studies suggest the reciprocal exclusion of different oncogenes in the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, whereas others suggest that BRAF mutations and RET rearrangements can simultaneously occur in sporadic cases. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of concomitant BRAF(V600E) mutation and RET/PTC rearrangements in the same tumor and its association with some clinicopathological features. The percentage of mutant BRAF alleles and the presence of RET/PTC rearrangements were determined by means of pyrosequencing and Southern blot analysis of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction products in a series of 72 conventional papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs). Then, the associations between clinicopathological characteristics and mutation status were assessed. BRAF(V600E) alleles were present in 32 out of 72 PTCs (44.4%) in the range of 5.1-44.7% of total BRAF alleles. RET/PTC was present in 26 tumors (36.1%). Concomitant subclonal BRAF and RET/PTC were demonstrated in 14 PTCs (19.4%), and none of the oncogenes was detected in 22 tumors (30.5%). Only BRAF(V600E) was associated with a more advanced tumor staging. The present study demonstrates that concomitant BRAF mutation and RET/PTC rearrangement is a frequent event in PTC.

  4. A longitudinal descriptive study of self-reported abnormal smell and taste perception in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Steven; Broman, Daniel A; Olofsson, Jonas K; Wulff, Marianne

    2004-06-01

    Self-reported abnormal sensitivity, qualitative distortions and phantom sensations with respect to smell and taste was assessed with a longitudinal design, based on questions referring to gestational weeks 13-16 and 31-34 of pregnancy in comparison with 9-12 weeks post partum and with non-pregnant women with corresponding time durations and intervals. The results show that abnormal smell and/or taste perception was reported by 76% of the pregnant women, typically believed to be caused by their pregnancy. Increased smell sensitivity was found to be very common at the early stage of pregnancy (67% of all pregnant respondents) and occasionally accompanied by qualitative smell distortions (17%) and phantom smells (14%). The smell abnormalities were less common at the late pregnancy stage and almost absent post partum. Abnormal taste sensitivity was fairly commonly reported (26%), often described as increased bitter sensitivity and decreased salt sensitivity. These results, suggesting that abnormal smell and/or taste perception is experienced by a large majority of pregnant women, imply that further research is needed to understand to what extent these chemosensory changes may underlie food aversions and craving with implications for food intake during pregnancy.

  5. IL-4, IL-10 and high sensitivity-CRP as potential serum biomarkers of persistent/recurrent disease in papillary thyroid carcinoma with/without Hashimoto's thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanciu, Adina E; Serdarevic, Nafija; Hurduc, Anca E; Stanciu, Marcel M

    2015-11-01

    To investigate the potential role of interleukin 4 (IL-4), interleukin 10 (IL-10) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) as serum biomarkers of persistent/recurrent disease in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with/without Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT). Eighty consecutive patients (64 F/16 M, 43.2 ± 12.7 years) with PTC and 40 (37 F/3 M, 40.6 ± 12.3 years) with papillary thyroid carcinoma associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis (PTC + HT) were evaluated before radioiodine therapy. A control group of 20 patients with HT without thyroid cancer (18 F/2 M, 47.3 ± 2.8 years) was included in the study for the comparison of cytokine levels. No meaningful differences were found in clinical outcomes between PTC and PTC + HT groups (47.5% vs. 45% persistent/recurrent disease). Serum IL-4, IL-10 and hs-CRP levels were higher in patients with persistent/recurrent disease compared to those without recurrence (p disease than in patients with HT or PTC (with or without recurrence) (p disease. Increased levels of serum IL-4, IL-10 and hs-CRP are associated with persistent/recurrent disease in PTC and PTC + HT patients. Our results suggest that these biomarkers might be used to improve patient stratification according to the risk of recurrence, especially in patients with PTC + HT, where Tg levels are not reliable due to presence of TgAb.

  6. Molecular mechanism for the umami taste synergism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Klebansky, Boris; Fine, Richard M; Xu, Hong; Pronin, Alexey; Liu, Haitian; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong

    2008-12-30

    Umami is one of the 5 basic taste qualities. The umami taste of L-glutamate can be drastically enhanced by 5' ribonucleotides and the synergy is a hallmark of this taste quality. The umami taste receptor is a heteromeric complex of 2 class C G-protein-coupled receptors, T1R1 and T1R3. Here we elucidate the molecular mechanism of the synergy using chimeric T1R receptors, site-directed mutagenesis, and molecular modeling. We propose a cooperative ligand-binding model involving the Venus flytrap domain of T1R1, where L-glutamate binds close to the hinge region, and 5' ribonucleotides bind to an adjacent site close to the opening of the flytrap to further stabilize the closed conformation. This unique mechanism may apply to other class C G-protein-coupled receptors.

  7. Molecular mechanism of the sweet taste enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Klebansky, Boris; Fine, Richard M; Liu, Haitian; Xu, Hong; Servant, Guy; Zoller, Mark; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong

    2010-03-01

    Positive allosteric modulators of the human sweet taste receptor have been developed as a new way of reducing dietary sugar intake. Besides their potential health benefit, the sweet taste enhancers are also valuable tool molecules to study the general mechanism of positive allosteric modulations of T1R taste receptors. Using chimeric receptors, mutagenesis, and molecular modeling, we reveal how these sweet enhancers work at the molecular level. Our data argue that the sweet enhancers follow a similar mechanism as the natural umami taste enhancer molecules. Whereas the sweeteners bind to the hinge region and induce the closure of the Venus flytrap domain of T1R2, the enhancers bind close to the opening and further stabilize the closed and active conformation of the receptor.

  8. Musical taste, employment, education, and global region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Adrian C; Davidson, Jane W

    2013-10-01

    Sociologists have argued that musical taste should vary between social groups, but have not considered whether the effect extends beyond taste into uses of music and also emotional reactions to music. Moreover, previous research has ignored the culture in which participants are located. The present research employed a large sample from five post-industrial global regions and showed that musical taste differed between regions but not according to education and employment; and that there were three-way interactions between education, employment, and region in the uses to which participants put music and also their typical emotional reactions. In addition to providing partial support for existing sociological theory, the findings highlight the potential of culture as a variable in future quantitative research on taste.

  9. The anatomy of mammalian sweet taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chéron, Jean-Baptiste; Golebiowski, Jérôme; Antonczak, Serge; Fiorucci, Sébastien

    2017-02-01

    All sweet-tasting compounds are detected by a single G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR), the heterodimer T1R2-T1R3, for which no experimental structure is available. The sweet taste receptor is a class C GPCR, and the recently published crystallographic structures of metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR) 1 and 5 provide a significant step forward for understanding structure-function relationships within this family. In this article, we recapitulate more than 600 single point site-directed mutations and available structural data to obtain a critical alignment of the sweet taste receptor sequences with respect to other class C GPCRs. Using this alignment, a homology 3D-model of the human sweet taste receptor is built and analyzed to dissect out the role of key residues involved in ligand binding and those responsible for receptor activation. Proteins 2017; 85:332-341. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Taste violations in the scalar correlator in mixed action simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubin, C.; /Columbia U. /William-Mary Coll.; Laiho, Jack; /Fermilab /Washington U., St. Louis; Van de Water, Ruth S.; /Fermilab

    2007-10-01

    We study the behavior of the isovector scalar correlator, which is particularly sensitive to lattice artifacts, using domain-wall valence quarks on a staggered sea (generated by the MILC collaboration). We analyze this according to the prediction from chiral perturbation theory determined by Prelovsek, which indicates that the leading unitarity violations come from taste breaking effects. We show that our data behaves in the way predicted by Prelovsek, thus verifying that the largest contribution to the violations of unitarity which arise at finite lattice spacing can be described by the mixed-action chiral perturbation theory.

  11. Wine Tasting Discourse: Traditional Knowledge, and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    STENGEL, Kilien; Marinescu, Angelica-Helena

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Traditions, brotherhoods, wines of terroir, vintage wines…so many expressions that, beyond the numerical value, compose the wine tasting speech, in France as well as in Romania, among others. The rising of awareness concerning traditions and heritage notions has largely evolved during the XXth century, spanning from the vineyard as a field for the theatricality of the brotherhoods to the considerations given to rites and customs, as well as to wine-tasting, till the la...

  12. ASME power test code ptc 4.1 for steam generators; Codigo de pruebas de potencia ASME ptc 4.1 para generadores de vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plauchu Alcantara, Jorge Alberto [Plauchu Consultores, Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    This presentation is oriented towards those who in this subject have experience in the design and equipment specification, plant projects, factory and field testing, operation or result analyses. An important fraction of the national energy supply, approximately 13%, is applied to the steam generation in the different aspects of the industrial activity, in the electrical industry of public service and in the commercial and services sector. The development of the national programs of energy efficiency verifies this when dedicating to this use of the energy important projects, some of them with support of the USAID. The measurement of the energy utilization or the efficiency of steam generators (or boilers) is made applying some procedure agreed by the parts and the one of greater acceptance and best known in Mexico and internationally is the ASME Power Test Code PTC 4.1 for Steam Generators. The purpose and formality in the determination of efficiency and of steam generation capacity behavior, thermal basic regime or fulfillment of guarantees, radically changes the exigencies of strict attachment to the PTC 4.1 This definition will determine the importance of the test method selected, the deviations and convened exceptions, the influence of the precision and the measurement errors, the consideration of auxiliary equipment, etc. An interpretation or incorrect application of the Test Code has lead and will lead to results and nonreliable decisions. [Spanish] Esta exposicion se orienta a quienes en este tema cuenta con experiencia en diseno y especificacion de equipo, proyecto de planta, pruebas en fabrica y campo, operacion o analisis de resultados. Una fraccion importante de la oferta nacional de energia, 13% aproximadamente, se aplica a la generacion de vapor en diferentes giros de actividad industrial, en la industria electrica, de servicio publico y en el sector de servicios y comercial. El desarrollo de los programas nacionales de eficiencia energetica comprueba

  13. Smell and taste in inflammatory bowel disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Silke; Reindl, Wolfgang; Dempfle, Astrid; Schuster, Anna; Wolf, Petra; Hundt, Walter; Huber, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the olfactory/gustatory functions of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) by smell/taste tests, and to determine if disease activity or medication might influence the olfactory/gustatory functions of patients. In total, 59 IBD patients (37 Crohn's disease (CD) and 22 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients) were studied using "Sniffin' sticks" and "taste strips" for olfactory and gustatory tests, respectively, and compared to healthy controls and published normative data. Among IBD (CD and UC) patients, the values for odor threshold, but not for odor identification or discrimination, were significantly lower than that of the normative data. Further, these patients showed lower values than the normative taste values and the control group for all tastes, except sour; 57.6% of the IBD patients were hyposmic, while 30.5% were hypogeusic. Subjective self-assessments showed that the patients were not aware of their reduced olfactory/gustatory functions. There were no relevant differences in taste and smell abilities between the CD and UC patients. Disease activity and treatment did not influence the olfactory/gustatory functions. IBD (CD and UC) patients exhibited significant reductions in the olfactory and gustatory functions. Therefore, patients should be tested by smell/taste tests, in order to be adequately informed of their olfactory/gustatory functions and provided an understanding of how to overcome their limitations, and thus improve their quality of life.

  14. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotson, Cedrick D; Zhang, Lan; Xu, Hong; Shin, Yu-Kyong; Vigues, Stephan; Ott, Sandra H; Elson, Amanda E T; Choi, Hyun Jin; Shaw, Hillary; Egan, Josephine M; Mitchell, Braxton D; Li, Xiaodong; Steinle, Nanette I; Munger, Steven D

    2008-01-01

    TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+) and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease.

  15. Bitter taste receptors influence glucose homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cedrick D Dotson

    Full Text Available TAS1R- and TAS2R-type taste receptors are expressed in the gustatory system, where they detect sweet- and bitter-tasting stimuli, respectively. These receptors are also expressed in subsets of cells within the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, where they mediate nutrient assimilation and endocrine responses. For example, sweeteners stimulate taste receptors on the surface of gut enteroendocrine L cells to elicit an increase in intracellular Ca(2+ and secretion of the incretin hormone glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, an important modulator of insulin biosynthesis and secretion. Because of the importance of taste receptors in the regulation of food intake and the alimentary responses to chemostimuli, we hypothesized that differences in taste receptor efficacy may impact glucose homeostasis. To address this issue, we initiated a candidate gene study within the Amish Family Diabetes Study and assessed the association of taste receptor variants with indicators of glucose dysregulation, including a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus and high levels of blood glucose and insulin during an oral glucose tolerance test. We report that a TAS2R haplotype is associated with altered glucose and insulin homeostasis. We also found that one SNP within this haplotype disrupts normal responses of a single receptor, TAS2R9, to its cognate ligands ofloxacin, procainamide and pirenzapine. Together, these findings suggest that a functionally compromised TAS2R receptor negatively impacts glucose homeostasis, providing an important link between alimentary chemosensation and metabolic disease.

  16. Neural crest contribution to lingual mesenchyme, epithelium and developing taste papillae and taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Xiang; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Mishina, Yuji; Mistretta, Charlotte M

    2012-08-15

    The epithelium of mammalian tongue hosts most of the taste buds that transduce gustatory stimuli into neural signals. In the field of taste biology, taste bud cells have been described as arising from "local epithelium", in distinction from many other receptor organs that are derived from neurogenic ectoderm including neural crest (NC). In fact, contribution of NC to both epithelium and mesenchyme in the developing tongue is not fully understood. In the present study we used two independent, well-characterized mouse lines, Wnt1-Cre and P0-Cre that express Cre recombinase in a NC-specific manner, in combination with two Cre reporter mouse lines, R26R and ZEG, and demonstrate a contribution of NC-derived cells to both tongue mesenchyme and epithelium including taste papillae and taste buds. In tongue mesenchyme, distribution of NC-derived cells is in close association with taste papillae. In tongue epithelium, labeled cells are observed in an initial scattered distribution and progress to a clustered pattern between papillae, and within papillae and early taste buds. This provides evidence for a contribution of NC to lingual epithelium. Together with previous reports for the origin of taste bud cells from local epithelium in postnatal mouse, we propose that NC cells migrate into and reside in the epithelium of the tongue primordium at an early embryonic stage, acquire epithelial cell phenotypes, and undergo cell proliferation and differentiation that is involved in the development of taste papillae and taste buds. Our findings lead to a new concept about derivation of taste bud cells that include a NC origin.

  17. RET/PTC1-Driven Neoplastic Transformation and Proinvasive Phenotype of Human Thyrocytes Involve Met Induction and β-Catenin Nuclear Translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Cassinelli

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the RET gene by chromosomal rearrangements generating RET/PTC oncogenes is a frequent, early, and causative event in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC. We have previously shown that, in human primary thyrocytes, RET/PTC1 induces a transcriptional program including the MET proto-oncogene. In PTCs, β-catenin is frequently mislocated to the cytoplasm nucleus. We investigated the interplay between Ret/ptc1 signaling and Met in regulating the proinvasive phenotype and β-catenin localization in cellular models of human PTC. Here, we show that Met protein is expressed and is constitutively active in human thyrocytes exogenously expressing RET/PTC1 as well as a mutant (Y451F devoid of the main Ret/ptc1 multidocking site. Both in transformed thyrocytes and in the human PTC cell line TPC-1, Ret/ptc1-Y451-dependent signaling and Met cooperated to promote a proinvasive phenotype. Accordingly, gene/functional silencing of either RET/PTC1 or MET abrogated early branching morphogenesis in TPC-1 cells. The same effect was obtained by blocking the common downstream effector Akt. Y451 of Ret/ptc1 was required to promote proliferation and nuclear translocation of β-catenin, suggesting that these oncogene-driven effects are Met-independent. Pharmacologic inhibition of Ret/ptc1 and Met tyrosine kinases by the multitarget small molecule RPI-1 blocked cell proliferation and invasive ability and dislocated β-catenin from the nucleus. Altogether, these results support that Ret/ptc1 cross talks with Met at transcriptional and signaling levels and promotes β-catenin transcriptional activity to drive thyrocyte neoplastic transformation. Such molecular network, promoting disease initiation and acquisition of a proinvasive phenotype, highlights new options to design multitarget therapeutic strategies for PTCs.

  18. Taste preferences and taste thresholds to classical taste substances in the carnivorous fish, kutum Rutilus frisii kutum (Teleostei: Cyprinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goli, Sheyda; Jafari, Valiollah; Ghorbani, Rassol; Kasumyan, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the taste preferences in the closely related sympatric fish species with different feeding patterns. For this purpose, palatability for four classical taste substances was evaluated for carnivorous kutum Rutilus frisii kutum and the results were compared with the taste preferences of the omnivorous roach Rutilus rutilus which had been studied earlier. In addition, the threshold concentration and the dose-response relationship of the most palatable tastants were evaluated and the ability of kutum to differentiate food with tastants in different concentrations was estimated. It was found that citric acid significantly increases the agar gel pellet consumption within the range of concentrations from 0.01M to 0.52M; the pellets with a concentration of 0.026M were the most palatable. The pellet consumption is significantly different if the concentration of citric acid in the pellets differs more than two times. The absolute threshold concentration is 0.01M, or 2.74μg of citric acid per pellet. Sucrose and NaCl have deterrent taste at the highest concentrations tested (0.29 and 1.73M, respectively). Both substances are palatable at 10 times lower concentrations and become indifferent after further gradual decrease in their concentration. CaCl2 decreases the pellets consumption at 0.9M but is an indifferent tastant at lower concentrations (0.45, 0.09 and 0.045M). The number of rejections and repeated grasps of a food pellet is fewness and is not related to the pellet's palatability, while the retention time of pellet in the oral cavity positively and highly correlates with the pellet's palatability. Kutum have opposite taste preferences for most substances tested in comparison with the roach. It indicates that the taste preferences mediated by the oral taste receptors are different in closely related sympatric fish displayed diet divergences.

  19. The influence of chemotherapy on taste perception and food hedonics: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltong, Anna; Keast, Russell

    2012-04-01

    Altered food relationships in people receiving chemotherapy are prevalent and distressing. Whether, or to what extent, taste perception and food hedonics plays in altered food relationships is unknown among people receiving chemotherapy. This two-armed systematic review addressed the question "Does chemotherapy influence taste perception and hedonic experience of food?" A systematic review was undertaken of (1) taste perception and (2) food hedonics. Search phrases used in the taste arm were: "chemotherapy AND taste", and in the food hedonics arm, "chemotherapy AND (liking OR food OR appetite OR hedonic(∗))". Databases searched were PsycINFO, PubMed, Medline, CINAHL, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library. English language, peer-reviewed publications investigating adults (>18years) receiving chemotherapy as the only cancer treatment were eligible. One hundred and sixty three papers were screened in the taste arm, of which eight (5%) met inclusion criteria. Nine hundred and seventy two papers were screened in the food hedonics arm of which 25 (3%) met inclusion criteria. Chemotherapy had variable influence on both taste sensitivity and perceived intensity of the taste qualities sweet, salty, sour and bitter. Liking of food and drink decreased after chemotherapy treatment commenced. Caffeinated foods and drinks, red meat and citrus fruits or juices were most frequently reported as aversive during chemotherapy. A reduction in appetite was reported between baseline (pre-chemotherapy) and cycles 1-3 of chemotherapy with no further worsening in latter chemotherapy cycles and an improvement after completion of chemotherapy treatment. There was a lack of consistency of results between studies due to differences in study design, chemotherapy regimen, tumor type and stage of treatment examined. These results provide insufficient evidence to suggest chemotherapy has a significant or consistent influence on taste. There is a consistent, albeit small, body of evidence indicating

  20. Altered processing of rewarding and aversive basic taste stimuli in symptomatic women with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa: An fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Esposito, Fabrizio; Prinster, Anna; Volpe, Umberto; Cantone, Elena; Pellegrino, Francesca; Canna, Antonietta; Milano, Walter; Aiello, Marco; Di Salle, Francesco; Maj, Mario

    2017-02-21

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have displayed a dysregulation in the way in which the brain processes pleasant taste stimuli in patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) and bulimia nervosa (BN). However, exactly how the brain processes disgusting basic taste stimuli has never been investigated, even though disgust plays a role in food intake modulation and AN and BN patients exhibit high disgust sensitivity. Therefore, we investigated the activation of brain areas following the administration of pleasant and aversive basic taste stimuli in symptomatic AN and BN patients compared to healthy subjects. Twenty underweight AN women, 20 symptomatic BN women and 20 healthy women underwent fMRI while tasting 0.292 M sucrose solution (sweet taste), 0.5 mM quinine hydrochloride solution (bitter taste) and water as a reference taste. In symptomatic AN and BN patients the pleasant sweet stimulus induced a higher activation in several brain areas than that induced by the aversive bitter taste. The opposite occurred in healthy controls. Moreover, compared to healthy controls, AN patients showed a decreased response to the bitter stimulus in the right amygdala and left anterior cingulate cortex, while BN patients showed a decreased response to the bitter stimulus in the right amygdala and left insula. These results show an altered processing of rewarding and aversive taste stimuli in ED patients, which may be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of AN and BN.

  1. Extinction, Spontaneous Recovery and Renewal of Flavor Preferences Based on Taste-Taste Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Estrella; De la Casa, L. G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents evidence of extinction, spontaneous recovery and renewal in a conditioned preferences paradigm based on taste-taste associations. More specifically, in three experiments rats exposed to a simultaneous compound of citric acid-saccharin solution showed a preference for the citric solution when the preference was measured with a…

  2. Extinction, Spontaneous Recovery and Renewal of Flavor Preferences Based on Taste-Taste Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Estrella; De la Casa, L. G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents evidence of extinction, spontaneous recovery and renewal in a conditioned preferences paradigm based on taste-taste associations. More specifically, in three experiments rats exposed to a simultaneous compound of citric acid-saccharin solution showed a preference for the citric solution when the preference was measured with a…

  3. Effect of concentration on taste-taste interactions with foods for elderly and young subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojet, J.; Heidema, J.; Christ-Hazelhof, E.

    2004-01-01

    An increase in concentration of one of the tastants in a 'real food' might affect not only the perception of the taste quality of that manipulated tastant but also the other perceivable taste qualities. The influence of concentration increase of sodium or potassium chloride in tomato soup, sucrose o

  4. Interactions between Flavor and Taste: Using Dashi Soup as a Taste Stimulus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuyuki Sakai

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many researches showing interactions between olfaction and taste. Many of them supported that the interactions are not innate, but are learned through our daily eating experiences. Stevenson (2009 called this phenomenon as “learned synesthesia”. The authors also showed the interactions between flavor and taste are learned and processed by higher cognitive systems in rats and humans (Sakai et al., 2001; Sakai and Imada, 2003. Here the interactions between umami taste and dashi flavors are developed by the daily eating experience of Japanese traditional cuisine. Twenty flavors (such as sea weed, bonito, onion, garlic, ginger etc. by courtesy of YAMAHO CO. Ltd. were used as flavor stimuli. Taste stimuli are monosodium glutamate (umami substance, MSG, miso soup, and Katsuo Dashi (bonito soup stock. Participants tasted these stimuli, 12∼20 stimuli in a day, and evaluated the strength of umami taste, the palatability, congruity between taste and flavor with 100 mm visual analogue scales. The results of evaluations analyzed with the participants' daily eating experience showed the interactions between taste and flavor are developed by their own daily intake of traditional Japanese cuisine, especially dashi soup.

  5. Facilitation of Taste Memory Acquisition by Experiencing Previous Novel Taste Is Protein-Synthesis Dependent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merhav, Maayan; Rosenblum, Kobi

    2008-01-01

    Very little is known about the biological and molecular mechanisms that determine the effect of previous experience on implicit learning tasks. In the present study, we first defined weak and strong taste inputs according to measurements in the behavioral paradigm known as latent inhibition of conditioned taste aversion. We then demonstrated that…

  6. High TPOAb Levels (>1300 IU/mL) Indicate Multifocal PTC in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis Patients and Support Total Thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuai; Xia, Qing; Wu, Yi-Jun

    2015-07-01

    We aimed to identify whether thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb) are indicative of multifocal papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) in Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) patients and may help to determine necessity for total thyroidectomy. Retrospective cohort study. Teaching hospital. A total of 808 consecutive patients with HT alone or with HT and unifocal or multifocal PTC were included. Preoperative thyroid function tests, TPOAb determination, preoperative ultrasonography, intraoperative frozen biopsy, and postoperative routine pathologic examination to confirm thyroid nodules were performed for all patients. Patients with nodules or malignancy potential on ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration cytology were included. Patients with hyperthyroidism, concomitant chronic disease, a history of other malignant tumors, or history of major diseases were excluded. All patients underwent surgery, and HT and PTC were confirmed by postoperative pathologic results. No significant differences were found in age and sex between groups (P > .05). TPOAb ≤1300 IU/mL were more prevalent in the HT + unifocal PTC group than in the other groups (99.57% vs 15.52% and 60.75%, P 1300 IU/mL were more prevalent in the HT + multifocal PTC group than in the other groups (84.48% vs 0.43% and 39.25%; P PTC group had higher percentages of patients with elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone and positive central lymph node (LN) metastasis (elevated thyroid-stimulating hormone: 8.7% vs 3.2% and 6.5%, P = .008; positive central LN metastasis: 74.57% vs 67.38% and 0%, P 1300 IU/mL) are definitive indicators of multifocal PTC in HT patients, which may support surgical treatment with total thyroidectomy. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  7. The Association between Sweet Taste Function, Anthropometry, and Dietary Intake in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Julia Y. Q.; Lacy, Kathleen E.; McBride, Robert; Keast, Russell S. J.

    2016-01-01

    Variation in ability to detect, recognize, and perceive sweetness may influence food consumption, and eventually chronic nutrition-related conditions such as overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults. Participants’ (n = 60; mean age in years = 26, SD = ±7.8) sweet taste function for a range of sweeteners (glucose, fructose, sucrose, sucralose, erythritol, and Rebaudioside A) was assessed by measuring detection and recognition thresholds and sweetness intensity. Height, weight, and waist circumference were also measured, and participants also completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire. There was large inter-individual variation in detection, recognition and sweetness intensity measures. Pearson’s correlation coefficient revealed no robust correlations between measures of sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake, with the exception of suprathreshold intensity, which was moderately correlated with total energy intake (r = 0.23–0.40). One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between the most and least sensitive participants in terms of BMI, waist circumference, and dietary intake for all measures of sweet taste function and sweeteners (all p > 0.01). When stratified into BMI categories, there were no significant differences in any measure of sweet taste function between the normal weight and overweight/obese participants (all p > 0.01). Results show that that sweet taste function is not associated with anthropometry and sweetness intensity measures are the most appropriate measure when assessing links between sweet taste and food consumption. PMID:27120614

  8. The Association between Sweet Taste Function, Anthropometry, and Dietary Intake in Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Y. Q. Low

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Variation in ability to detect, recognize, and perceive sweetness may influence food consumption, and eventually chronic nutrition-related conditions such as overweight and obesity. The aim of this study was to investigate the associations between sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake in adults. Participants’ (n = 60; mean age in years = 26, SD = ±7.8 sweet taste function for a range of sweeteners (glucose, fructose, sucrose, sucralose, erythritol, and Rebaudioside A was assessed by measuring detection and recognition thresholds and sweetness intensity. Height, weight, and waist circumference were also measured, and participants also completed a Food Frequency Questionnaire. There was large inter-individual variation in detection, recognition and sweetness intensity measures. Pearson’s correlation coefficient revealed no robust correlations between measures of sweet taste function, anthropometry, and dietary intake, with the exception of suprathreshold intensity, which was moderately correlated with total energy intake (r = 0.23–0.40. One-way analysis of variance revealed no significant differences between the most and least sensitive participants in terms of BMI, waist circumference, and dietary intake for all measures of sweet taste function and sweeteners (all p > 0.01. When stratified into BMI categories, there were no significant differences in any measure of sweet taste function between the normal weight and overweight/obese participants (all p > 0.01. Results show that that sweet taste function is not associated with anthropometry and sweetness intensity measures are the most appropriate measure when assessing links between sweet taste and food consumption.

  9. Using sound-taste correspondences to enhance the subjective value of tasting experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso Carvalho, Felipe; Van Ee, Raymond; Rychtarikova, Monika; Touhafi, Abdellah; Steenhaut, Kris; Persoone, Dominique; Spence, Charles

    2015-01-01

    The soundscapes of those places where we eat and drink can influence our perception of taste. Here, we investigated whether contextual sound would enhance the subjective value of a tasting experience. The customers in a chocolate shop were invited to take part in an experiment in which they had to evaluate a chocolate’s taste while listening to an auditory stimulus. Four different conditions were presented in a between-participants design. Envisioning a more ecological approach, a pre-recorded piece of popular music and the shop’s own soundscape were used as the sonic stimuli. The results revealed that not only did the customers report having a significantly better tasting experience when the sounds were presented as part of the food’s identity, but they were also willing to pay significantly more for the experience. The method outlined here paves a new approach to dealing with the design of multisensory tasting experiences, and gastronomic situations. PMID:26388813

  10. BRAF V600E mutation in prognostication of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarniecka, Agnieszka; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Małgorzata; Barczyński, Marcin

    2016-10-01

    Papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) offers excellent prognosis, however relapse risk or persistent disease is related to ~30%. Currently, attention is paid to the possibility of patient group selection of different risk of unfavorable outcome to match a particular therapeutic approach. Therefore, interest in new prognostic and predictive markers known preoperatively is observed. BRAF V600E mutation is such a marker. Many studies analyzing the prevalence of the mutation and its relationship with other clinico-pathological risk factors were reported but with controversial conclusions. The prognostic significance of BRAF mutation was confirmed by some single centre studies, a few meta-analyses and a large multicenter retrospective international study. They confirmed a correlation between the mutation and the risk of recurrence. The strongest argument against using BRAF mutation as an independent prognostic and predictive factor in PTC is its high prevalence (30-80%). At present it seems that BRAF mutation is one of the factors influencing the prognosis and it should be analyzed in correlation with other prognostic factors. The most recent ATA recommendations do not indicate a routine application of BRAF status for initial risk stratification in differentiated thyroid cancer due to a lack of evident confirmation of a direct influence of mutation on the increase in relapse risk. However, ATA demonstrates the continuous risk scale for the relapse risk assessment, considering BRAF and/or TERT status. At present, researchers are working on determining the role of BRAF mutation in patients from a low-risk group and its correlations with others molecular events. Currently, BRAF mutation cannot be used as a single, independent predictive factor. However, its usefulness in the context of other molecular and clinico-pathological risk factors cannot be excluded. They may be used to make modern prognostic scales of relapse risk and be applied to individualized diagnostic and

  11. Expectations influence sensory experience in a wine tasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegrist, Michael; Cousin, Marie-Eve

    2009-06-01

    Information about a product may shape consumers' taste experience. In a wine tasting experiment, participants received (positive or negative) information about the wine prior to or after the tasting. When the information was given prior to the tasting, negative information about the wine resulted in lower ratings compared to the group that received positive information. No such effect was observed when participants received the information after the tasting but before they evaluated the wine. Results suggest that the information about the wine affected the experience itself and not only participants' overall assessment of the wine after the tasting.

  12. A portable and multiplexed bioelectronic sensor using human olfactory and taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Manki; Kim, Daesan; Ko, Hwi Jin; Hong, Seunghun; Park, Tai Hyun

    2017-01-15

    A multiplexed bioelectronic sensor was developed for the purpose of rapid, on-site, and simultaneous detection of various target molecules. Olfactory and taste receptors were produced in Escherichia coli, and the reconstituted receptors were immobilized onto a multi-channel type carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. This device mimicked the human olfactory/taste system and simultaneously measured the conductance changes with high sensitivity and selectivity following treatment with various odor and taste molecules commonly known to be indicators of food contamination. Various pattern recognition of odorants and tastants was available with a customized platform for the simultaneous measurement of electrical signals. The simple portable bioelectronic device was suitable for efficient monitoring of food freshness and is expected to be used as a rapid on-site sensing platform with various applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Food Science of Dashi and Umami Taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ninomiya, Kumiko

    2016-01-01

     Umami is a basic tastes, along with sweet, salty, bitter and sour, which is imparted by glutamate, one of the free amino acids in foods. Since its discovery of umami by a Japanese scientist in 1908, umami is now perceived globally a basic taste. Recent collaboration among chefs and researchers on traditional soup stocks showed a difference in taste profiles of Japanese soup stock 'dashi' and Western style soup stock. The free amino acids profile's in dashi and soup stock showed how Japanese have traditionally adopted a simple umami taste. The exchange of knowledge on cooking methods and diverse types of umami rich foods in different countries displays the blending of the culinary arts, food science and technology for healthy and tasty solutions. Since Japanese cuisine 'WASHOKU' was listed in the 'Intangible Heritage of UNESCO' in 2013, many people in the world now have great interest in Japanese cuisine. One of the unique characteristics of this cuisine is that 'dashi' is an indispensable material for cooking a variety of Japanese dishes. Many chefs from Europe, US and South America have come to Japan to learn Japanese cuisine in the last 10 years, and umami has become recognized as a common taste worldwide. Researchers and culinary professionals have begun to pay attention to the traditional seasonings and condiments rich in glutamate available throughout the world.

  14. A constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway due to BRAFV600E positively regulates AHR pathway in PTC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhi, Gianluca; Barollo, Susi; Regazzo, Daniela; Bertazza, Loris; Galuppini, Francesca; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie Lise; Vianello, Federica; Ciato, Denis; Ceccato, Filippo; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Boscaro, Marco; Scaroni, Carla; Mian, Caterina

    2015-10-13

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the toxicity and tumor-promoting properties of dioxin. AHR has been reported to be overexpressed and constitutively active in a variety of solid tumors, but few data are currently available concerning its role in thyroid cancer. In this study we quantitatively explored a series of 51 paired-normal and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues for AHR-related genes. We identified an increased AHR expression/activity in PTC, independently from its nuclear dimerization partner and repressor but strictly related to a constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway. The AHR up-regulation followed by an increased expression of AHR target genes was confirmed by a meta-analysis of published microarray data, suggesting a ligand-independent active AHR pathway in PTC. In-vitro studies using a PTC-derived cell line (BCPAP) and HEK293 cells showed that BRAFV600E may directly modulate AHR localization, induce AHR expression and activity in an exogenous ligand-independent manner. The AHR pathway might represent a potential novel therapeutic target for PTC in the clinical practice.

  15. A constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway due to BRAFV600E positively regulates AHR pathway in PTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regazzo, Daniela; Bertazza, Loris; Galuppini, Francesca; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie Lise; Vianello, Federica; Ciato, Denis; Ceccato, Filippo; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Boscaro, Marco; Scaroni, Carla; Mian, Caterina

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the toxicity and tumor-promoting properties of dioxin. AHR has been reported to be overexpressed and constitutively active in a variety of solid tumors, but few data are currently available concerning its role in thyroid cancer. In this study we quantitatively explored a series of 51 paired-normal and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues for AHR-related genes. We identified an increased AHR expression/activity in PTC, independently from its nuclear dimerization partner and repressor but strictly related to a constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway. The AHR up-regulation followed by an increased expression of AHR target genes was confirmed by a meta-analysis of published microarray data, suggesting a ligand-independent active AHR pathway in PTC. In-vitro studies using a PTC-derived cell line (BCPAP) and HEK293 cells showed that BRAFV600E may directly modulate AHR localization, induce AHR expression and activity in an exogenous ligand-independent manner. The AHR pathway might represent a potential novel therapeutic target for PTC in the clinical practice. PMID:26392334

  16. DNA sequence analysis of the composite plasmid pTC conferring virulence and antimicrobial resistance for porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekete, Péter Z; Brzuszkiewicz, Elzbieta; Blum-Oehler, Gabriele; Olasz, Ferenc; Szabó, Mónika; Gottschalk, Gerhard; Hacker, Jörg; Nagy, Béla

    2012-01-01

    In this study the plasmid pTC, a 90 kb self-conjugative virulence plasmid of the porcine enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strain EC2173 encoding the STa and STb heat-stable enterotoxins and tetracycline resistance, has been sequenced in two steps. As a result we identified five main distinct regions of pTC: (i) the maintenance region responsible for the extreme stability of the plasmid, (ii) the TSL (toxin-specific locus comprising the estA and estB genes) which is unique and characteristic for pTC, (iii) a Tn10 transposon, encoding tetracycline resistance, (iv) the tra (plasmid transfer) region, and (v) the colE1-like origin of replication. It is concluded that pTC is a self-transmissible composite plasmid harbouring antibiotic resistance and virulence genes. pTC belongs to a group of large conjugative E. coli plasmids represented by NR1 with a widespread tra backbone which might have evolved from a common ancestor. This is the first report of a completely sequenced animal ETEC virulence plasmid containing an antimicrobial resistance locus, thereby representing a selection advantage for spread of pathogenicity in the presence of antimicrobials leading to increased disease potential. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  17. Effects of Salt and Fat Combinations on Taste Preference and Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhuis, Dieuwerke P; Newman, Lisa P; Keast, Russell S J

    2016-03-01

    Fat and salt are a common and attractive combination in food and overconsumption of either is associated with negative health outcomes. The major aim was to investigate contributions and interactions of salt and fat on taste pleasantness and perception. The minor aim was to investigate individual fat taste sensitivity (detection threshold of oleic acid [C18:1]) on pleasantness for fat. In a complete factorial design, 49 participants (18-54 years, 12 males) tasted tomato soups with 4 different fat concentrations (0-20%) and 5 different salt concentrations (0.04-2.0%). The preferred concentration and the discrimination ability for both fat and salt were determined by ranking tests. Results show that salt and fat affected pleasantness separately (P salt having the strongest effect. Fat concentrations 0%, 5%, and 10% did not differ in pleasantness, whereas 20% was less pleasant (P salt on pleasantness or saltiness and fattiness intensity. Fat taste sensitive participants preferred lower fat concentrations than less sensitive participants (P = 0.008). In conclusion, the strong effect of salt on pleasantness in this study suggests that salt, rather than fat, play a major role in the attraction to savory fatty foods.

  18. Effects of haemodialysis on taste and thirst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, R; Farleigh, C A; Atkinson, C; Pryor, J S

    1987-10-01

    Fifteen patients undergoing haemodialysis tasted soup varying in salt concentration and apple puree varying in sucrose concentration, immediately before and after dialysis. Matched controls tasted the same foods with a similar interval between tastings. The samples were rated for intensity, and on a relative-to-ideal scale. For the salt, the slopes of the functions plotted against log (concentration) were higher after dialysis than before, whilst the most preferred concentration was lower. There were no effects found for the sweetness ratings or for the controls. Likewise there were no overall differences in the ratings between the patients and controls. Thirst was found to increase on dialysis, and there was a trend of this being higher for the patients than for the controls. The reduction in preferences for salt by dialysis would make compliance with a reduced salt diet easier, but the increase in thirst would make compliance with reduced fluid intake more difficult.

  19. Taste-immunosuppression engram: reinforcement and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, Maj-Britt; Härting, Margarete; Kou, Wei; Del Rey, Adriana; Besedovsky, Hugo O; Schedlowski, Manfred; Pacheco-López, Gustavo

    2007-08-01

    Several Pavlovian conditioning paradigms have documented the brain's abilities to sense immune-derived signals or immune status, associate them with concurrently relevant extereoceptive stimuli, and reinstate such immune responses on demand. Specifically, the naturalistic relation of food ingestion with its possible immune consequences facilitates taste-immune associations. Here we demonstrate that the saccharin taste can be associated with the immunosuppressive agent cyclosporine A, and that such taste-immune associative learning is subject to reinforcement. Furthermore, once consolidated, this saccharin-immunosuppression engram is resistant to extinction when avoidance behavior is assessed. More importantly, the more this engram is activated, either at association or extinction phases, the more pronounced is the conditioned immunosuppression.

  20. Is fat taste ready for primetime?

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPatrizio, Nicholas V

    2014-09-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that gustation is important for the orosensory detection of dietary fats, and might contribute to preferences that humans, rodents, and possibly other mammals exhibit for fat-rich foods. In contrast to sweet, sour, salty, bitter, and umami, fat is not widely recognized as a primary taste quality. Recent investigations, however, provide a wealth of information that is helping to elucidate the specific molecular, cellular, and neural mechanisms required for fat detection in mammals. The latest evidence supporting a fat taste will be explored in this review, with a particular focus on recent studies that suggest a surprising role for gut-brain endocannabinoid signaling in controlling intake and preference for fats based on their proposed taste properties.

  1. Sensing via intestinal sweet taste pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L Young

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The detection of nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract is of fundamental significance to the control of motility, glycaemia and energy intake, and yet we barely know the most fundamental aspects of this process. This is in stark contrast to the mechanisms underlying the detection of lingual taste, which have been increasingly well characterised in recent years, and which provide an excellent starting point for characterising nutrient detection in the intestine. This review focuses on the form and function of sweet taste transduction mechanisms identified in the intestinal tract; it does not focus on sensors for fatty acids or proteins. It examines the intestinal cell types equipped with sweet taste transduction molecules in animals and humans, their location, and potential signals that transduce the presence of nutrients to neural pathways involved in reflex control of gastrointestinal motility.

  2. Methanol electro-oxidation on Pt/C modified by polyaniline nanofibers for DMFC applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhiani, Mohammad; Rezaei, Behzad; Jalili, Jalal [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran)

    2010-09-15

    In the present study, in order to achieve an inexpensive tolerable anode catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell applications, a composite of polyaniline nanofibers and Pt/C nano-particles, identified by PANI/Pt/C, was prepared by in-situ electropolymerization of aniline and trifluoromethane sulfonic acid on glassy carbon. The effect of synthesized PANI nanofibers in methanol electrooxidation reaction was compared by bare Pt/C by different electrochemical methods such as; cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and chronoamperometry. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was also employed to morphological study of the modified catalyst layer. The test results reveal that introduction of PANI nanofibers within catalyst layer improves the catalyst activity in methanol oxidation, hinders and prevents catalyst from more poisoning by intermediate products of methanol oxidation and improves the mechanical properties of the catalyst layer. SEM images also indicate that PANI nanofibers placed between platinum particles and anchor platinum particles and alleviate the Pt migration during methanol electrooxidation. (author)

  3. Increase of a group of PTC(+) transcripts by curcumin through inhibition of the NMD pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Dairong; Su, Ruey-Chyi; Zou, Liping; Triggs-Raine, Barbara; Huang, Shangzhi; Xie, Jiuyong

    2015-08-01

    Nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), an mRNA surveillance mechanism, eliminates premature termination codon-containing (PTC⁺) transcripts. For instance, it maintains the homeostasis of splicing factors and degrades aberrant transcripts of human genetic disease genes. Here we examine the inhibitory effect on the NMD pathway and consequent increase of PTC+ transcripts by the dietary compound curcumin. We have found that several PTC⁺ transcripts including that of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) were specifically increased in cells by curcumin. We also observed a similar curcumin effect on the PTC⁺ mutant transcript from a Tay-Sachs-causing HEXA allele or from a beta-globin reporter gene. The curcumin effect was accompanied by significantly reduced expression of the NMD factors UPF1, 2, 3A and 3B. Consistently, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, curcumin specifically reduced the occupancy of acetyl-histone H3 and RNA polymerase II at the promoter region (-376 to -247nt) of human UPF1, in a time- and dosage-dependent way. Importantly, knocking down UPF1 abolished or substantially reduced the difference of PTC(+) transcript levels between control and curcumin-treated cells. The disrupted curcumin effect was efficiently rescued by expression of exogenous Myc-UPF1 in the knockdown cells. Together, our data demonstrate that a group of PTC⁺ transcripts are stabilized by a dietary compound curcumin through the inhibition of UPF factor expression and the NMD pathway.

  4. The New Heat Treatment Technology of A356 Aluminium Alloy Prepared by Ptc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lianyong; Jiang, Yanhua; Ma, Zhuang; Wang, Wenkui

    Phase Transition Cooling (PTC), using the absorbed latent heat during the melting of phase transition cooling medium to cool and solidify alloys in the process of casting, is a new casting technology. Specimens of A356 casting aluminum alloy were prepared by this method in the paper. The new heat treatment process (cast and then aging directly without solid solution) of A356 alloy was performed. For comparison, the conventional T6 heat treatment (solution and then aging treatment) was performed too. The mechanical properties of A356 alloy with different heat treatments were measured by tensile strength testing methods and microstructures of the alloy with different heat treatment process were investigated by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-rays diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) too. The results show that ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of A356 alloy with the new heat treatment process is much higher than that with conventional heat treatment while the elongations with the two heat treatment processes are very close. This is due to the grain refinement obtained after PTC processing.

  5. The Kto-Skd complex can regulate ptc expression by interacting with Cubitus interruptus (Ci) in the Hedgehog signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Feifei; Yang, Xiaofeng; Fu, Lin; Lv, Xiangdong; Zhang, Zhao; Wu, Wenqing; Yang, Siqi; Zhou, Zhaocai; Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Yun

    2014-08-08

    The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway plays a very important role in metazoan development by controlling pattern formation. Drosophila imaginal discs are subdivided into anterior and posterior compartments that derive from adjacent cell populations. The anterior/posterior (A/P) boundaries, which are critical to maintaining the position of organizers, are established by a complex mechanism involving Hh signaling. Here, we uncover the regulation of ptc in the Hh signaling pathway by two subunits of mediator complex, Kto and Skd, which can also regulate boundary location. Collectively, we provide further evidence that Kto-Skd affects the A/P-axial development of the whole wing disc. Kto can interact with Cubitus interruptus (Ci), bind to the Ci-binding region on ptc promoter, which are both regulated by Hh signals to down-regulate ptc expression. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor-α and interferon-γ, induce EMT in human PTC cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Nannan; Gao, Yun; Guan, Haixia; Wu, Dan; Ding, Shuangning; Teng, Weiping; Shan, Zhongyan

    2015-10-01

    Inflammatory mediators, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ, promote adverse outcomes in numerous types of cancer; however, their role in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) remains unclear. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of TNF-α and IFN-γ on the migration, invasion and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of the three PTC cell lines, TPC-1, BCPAP and K1. The effect of TNF-α and IFN-γ on cell migration and invasion was assessed by wound-healing and Transwell assays. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression levels of the EMT makers, E-cadherin, N-cadherin and vimentin, were analyzed using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) and immunoblot analysis. The wound-healing and Transwell experiments revealed that TNF-α and IFN-γ increased the migratory and invasive behavior of PTC cells (PPTC cells.

  7. UK: Organic foods win the taste test

    OpenAIRE

    Paull, John

    2013-01-01

    Nine categories of organic versus non-organic products were scored for taste on a scale of 1 to 5. The organic products were from the Duchy Originals range produced by Prince Charles’s organic food company and sold at Waitrose, a UK supermarket chain. The comparable alternatives were sourced from Tesco, Sainsbury, Morrisons, Marks & Spencer, ASDA, Lidl, and Aldi. In these taste tests conducted by UK journalist/chef Anne Shooter the organic products lead in seven of the nine product categories...

  8. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, I.; Renken, R. J.; ter Horst, G. J.; Reyners, A. K. L.

    Background: Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic

  9. Metallic taste in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ijpma, I.; Renken, R. J.; ter Horst, G. J.; Reyners, A. K. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Metallic taste is a taste alteration frequently reported by cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Attention to this side effect of chemotherapy is limited. This review addresses the definition, assessment methods, prevalence, duration, etiology, and management strategies of metallic

  10. Is There Any Effect on Smell and Taste Functions with Levothyroxine Treatment in Subclinical Hypothyroidism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskoy, Kamil; Ay, Seyid Ahmet; Altundag, Aytug; Kurt, Onuralp; Salihoglu, Murat; Deniz, Ferhat; Tekeli, Hakan; Yonem, Arif; Hummel, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Subclinical hypothyroidism has been accused for coronary heart disease, lipid metabolism disorders, neuropsychiatric disorders, infertility or pregnancy related problems with various strength of evidence. Currently there is insufficient knowledge about olfaction and taste functions in subclinical hypothyroidism. Aim of the present study is to investigate the degree of smell and taste dysfunction in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. 28 subclinical hypothyroid patients, and 31 controls enrolled in the prospective study in Istanbul, Turkey. Subclinical hypothyroid patients were treated with L-thyroxine for 3 months. Psychophysiological olfactory testing was performed using odor dispensers similar to felt-tip pens ("Sniffin' Sticks", Burghart, Wedel, Germany). Taste function tests were made using "Taste Strips" (Burghart, Wedel, Germany) which are basically tastant adsorbed filter paper strip. Patients scored lower on psychophysical olfactory tests than controls (odor thresholds:8.1±1.0 vs 8.9±1.1, p = 0.007; odor discrimination:12.4±1.3 vs 13.1±0.9, p = 0.016; odor identification:13.1±0.9 vs 14.0±1.1, p = 0.001; TDI score: 33.8±2.4 vs 36.9±2.1, p = 0.001). In contrast, results from psychophysical gustatory tests showed only a decreased score for "bitter" in patients, but not for other tastes (5.9±1.8 vs 6.6±1.0, p = 0.045). Three month after onset of treatment olfactory test scores already indicated improvement (odor thresholds:8.1±1.0 vs 8.6±0.6, psmell and taste, with thyroid function test were also evaluated. TSH, fT4 were found have no correlation with smell and taste changes with treatment. However bitter taste found positively correlated with T3 with treatment(r: 0.445, p: 0.018). Subclinical hypothyroid patients exhibited a significantly decreased olfactory sensitivity; in addition, bitter taste was significantly affected. Most importantly, these deficits can be remedied on average within 3 months with adequate treatment.

  11. Circadian-temporal context and latent inhibition of conditioned taste aversion: Effect of restriction in the intake of the conditioned taste stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero-Chamizo, Andrés

    2016-11-11

    Latent inhibition of conditioned taste aversion (CTA) is sensitive to changes in the temporal context. A change in the time of day of conditioning with respect to the time of day of the preexposure can disrupt the latent inhibition. This contextual change in the time of day may reveal a temporal specificity of latent inhibition. The optimum procedure to induce this temporal specificity is not well established. For example, it has been shown that a long period of habituation to temporal contexts is one factor that can determine the effect. However, the experimental conditions on the conditioning day that facilitate this phenomenon are unknown. The aim of this study is to elucidate whether a restriction in the intake of the conditioned taste stimulus affects the temporal specificity of latent inhibition. Two main groups of Wistar rats were tested in a latent inhibition of CTA paradigm, in which the temporal specificity of this phenomenon was analyzed by a change in the time of day of conditioning. The intake of the taste stimulus was restricted in the conditioning day in one of the groups, but this restriction was not applied in the other group. The results indicated temporal specificity of latent inhibition only in the group without restriction, but not in the group with limitation in the intake of the taste stimulus during conditioning. These findings can help to elucidate the characteristics of the procedure to induce temporal specificity of latent inhibition.

  12. Maintenance of Mouse Gustatory Terminal Field Organization Is Disrupted following Selective Removal of Peripheral Sodium Salt Taste Activity at Adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skyberg, Rolf; Sun, Chengsan; Hill, David L

    2017-08-09

    Neural activity plays a critical role in the development of central circuits in sensory systems. However, the maintenance of these circuits at adulthood is usually not dependent on sensory-elicited neural activity. Recent work in the mouse gustatory system showed that selectively deleting the primary transduction channel for sodium taste, the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC), throughout development dramatically impacted the organization of the central terminal fields of three nerves that carry taste information to the nucleus of the solitary tract. More specifically, deleting ENaCs during development prevented the normal maturation of the fields. The present study was designed to extend these findings by testing the hypothesis that the loss of sodium taste activity impacts the maintenance of the normal adult terminal field organization in male and female mice. To do this, we used an inducible Cre-dependent genetic recombination strategy to delete ENaC function after terminal field maturation occurred. We found that removal of sodium taste neural activity at adulthood resulted in significant reorganization of mature gustatory afferent terminal fields in the nucleus of the solitary tract. Specifically, the chorda tympani and greater superficial petrosal nerve terminal fields were 1.4× and 1.6× larger than age-matched controls, respectively. By contrast, the glossopharyngeal nerve, which is not highly sensitive to sodium taste stimulation, did not undergo terminal field reorganization. These surprising results suggest that gustatory nerve terminal fields remain plastic well into adulthood, which likely impacts central coding of taste information and taste-related behaviors with altered taste experience.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neural activity plays a major role in the development of sensory circuits in the mammalian brain. However, the importance of sensory-driven activity in maintaining these circuits at adulthood, especially in subcortical structures, appears to be

  13. Targeting of BMI-1 with PTC-209 shows potent anti-myeloma activity and impairs the tumour microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolomsky, Arnold; Schlangen, Karin; Schreiner, Wolfgang; Zojer, Niklas; Ludwig, Heinz

    2016-03-02

    The polycomb complex protein BMI-1 (BMI-1) is a putative oncogene reported to be overexpressed in multiple myeloma (MM). Silencing of BMI-1 was shown to impair the growth and survival of MM cells. However, therapeutic agents specifically targeting BMI-1 were not available so far. Here, we investigated PTC-209, a novel small molecule inhibitor of BMI-1, for its activity in MM. BMI-1 expression was analysed in human MM cell lines and primary MM cells by using publically available gene expression profiling (GEP) data. The anti-MM activity of PTC-209 was investigated by viability testing, cell cycle analysis, annexin V and 7-AAD staining, quantification of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), JC-1 as well as colony formation assays. Deregulation of central myeloma growth and survival genes was studied by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, the impact of PTC-209 on in vitro osteoclast, osteoblast and tube formation was analysed. We confirmed overexpression of BMI-1 in MM patients by using publically available GEP datasets. Of note, BMI-1 expression was further increased at relapse which translated into significantly shorter overall survival in relapsed/refractory patients treated with bortezomib or dexamethasone. Treatment with PTC-209 significantly decreased viable cell numbers in human MM cell lines, induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, promoted apoptosis and demonstrated synergistic activity with pomalidomide and carfilzomib. The anti-MM activity of PTC-209 was accompanied by a significant decrease of cyclin D1 (CCND1) and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) expression as well as upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A) and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B). We also observed upregulation of NOXA (up to 3.6 ± 1.2-fold induction, P = 0.009) and subsequent downregulation of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL-1) protein levels, which likely mediates the apoptotic effects of PTC-209

  14. Gustology As A Science About The Aesthetical Taste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NataliaG.Kalashnik

    2003-01-01

    The new problem to be solved together; Last decade's changes of the world; The aesthetical taste as a part of day-by-day life; Gustology - the new science; Definitions and the double nature of the aesthetical taste; History of the aesthetical taste studying.

  15. Representation of Sweet and Salty Taste Intensity in the Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetter, M.S.; Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, de C.; Viergever, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The intensity of the taste of a food is affected mostly by the amount of sugars (mono- and disaccharides) or salt it contains. To season savory-tasting foods mainly table salt (NaCl) is used and to sweeten foods, sugars like sucrose are used. Foods with highly intense tastes are consumed in smaller

  16. Representation of Sweet and Salty Taste Intensity in the Brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spetter, M.S.; Smeets, P.A.M.; Graaf, de C.; Viergever, M.A.

    2010-01-01

    The intensity of the taste of a food is affected mostly by the amount of sugars (mono- and disaccharides) or salt it contains. To season savory-tasting foods mainly table salt (NaCl) is used and to sweeten foods, sugars like sucrose are used. Foods with highly intense tastes are consumed in smaller

  17. Optimization and validation of a taste dilution analysis to characterize wine taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, R; Mateo-Vivaracho, L; Cacho, J; Ferreira, V

    2007-08-01

    A procedure for the general taste dilution analysis (TDA) of wine has been optimized and applied to characterize the tastants of 5 different wines. Samples are concentrated first by vacuum distillation at 20 degrees C to obtain a dearomatized concentrate. Such concentrate is redissolved in water and injected in a semipreparative C18-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) column. The effluent is separated in fractions that are collected and concentrated by vacuum distillation. Sequential dilutions of the fractions are further evaluated by a sensory panel to assess the intensity of the basic tastes and in-mouth sensations. Fractions were also submitted to HPLC-mass spectrometry (MS) analysis to screen for known tastants of wines. The Taste Dilution chromatograms showed that taste differences between wines are mainly located in fractions 1, 2, and 6, and are mainly related to bitterness and astringency. Different aspects of the method setup and of its reliability are evaluated and discussed.

  18. The sweet taste of true synergy: positive allosteric modulation of the human sweet taste receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Guy; Tachdjian, Catherine; Li, Xiaodong; Karanewsky, Donald S

    2011-11-01

    A diet low in carbohydrates helps to reduce the amount of ingested calories and to maintain a healthy weight. With this in mind, food and beverage companies have reformulated a large number of their products, replacing sugar or high fructose corn syrup with several different types of zero-calorie sweeteners to decrease or even totally eliminate their caloric content. A challenge remains, however, with the level of acceptance of some of these products in the market-place. Many consumers believe that zero-calorie sweeteners simply do not taste like sugar. A recent breakthrough reveals that positive allosteric modulators of the human sweet taste receptor, small molecules that enhance the receptor activity and sweetness perception, could be more effective than other reported taste enhancers at reducing calories in consumer products without compromising on the true taste of sugar. A unique mechanism of action at the receptor level could explain the robust synergy achieved with these new modulators.

  19. Tasteful Brands: Products of Brands Perceived to be Warm and Competent Taste Subjectively Better

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyka Bratanova

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Using survey and experimental data, the present research examines the effect of brand perception on experienced taste. The content of brand perception can be organized along the two social perception dimensions of warmth and competence. We use these two dimensions to systematically investigate the influence of brand perception on experienced taste and consumer behavior toward food products. The brand’s perceived warmth and competence independently influenced taste, both when it was measured as a belief and as an embodied experience following consumption. Taste mediated the link between brand’s warmth and competence perceptions and three consumer behavioral tendencies crucial for the marketing success of brands: buying intentions, brand loyalty, and support for the brand.

  20. Loss of smell but not taste in adult women with Turner's syndrome and other congenital hypogonadisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Cristina; Alobid, Isam; Centellas, Silvia; Balasch, Juan; Mullol, Joaquim; Castelo-Branco, Camil

    2012-11-01

    To assess the impact of Turner's syndrome (TS) and other congenital hypogonadisms (OCH) on the sense of smell and taste. An analytical study of three independent cohorts was designed: patients affected by TS, OCH, and a control group of healthy women taking contraception. Gynaecological Endocrinology Unit and Smell Clinic in Rhinology Unit of Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Thirty TS patients between 20 and 50 years of age receiving hormone replacement treatment (HT) were included as the exposed cohort; fourteen age-matched women with OCH taking HT were recruited; forty-three age-matched healthy controls receiving hormone contraception treatment were selected as the control group. This group was matched with an historical cohort of forty healthy women without contraception, used to validate BAST-24 in Hospital Clinic of Barcelona. Clinical history, presence of nasal symptoms, general physical examination, nasal endoscopy, and Barcelona Smell Test-24 (BAST-24) and gustometry were carried out on all patients. TS physical dysmorphology features, intensity of nasal symptoms and signs of nasal obstruction were collected. BAST-24 test included 24 odours to assess both sensory (detection, memory and forced choice) and sensitivity (intensity, irritability, freshness and pleasantness) odour characteristics, as well as 4 tastes to evaluate taste domains (detection and forced choice). Healthy women taking hormone contraception felt odours with more intensity (p=0.002) and less irritability (psmell memory (psmell but not of taste, compared to OCH and healthy controls taking contraception. Smell sensitivity was not affected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Infants’ and Children’s Salt Taste Perception and Liking: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Sodium is an essential nutrient for the human body. It is widely used as sodium chloride (table salt) in (processed) foods and overconsumed by both children and adults, placing them at risk for adverse health effects such as high blood pressure and cardiovascular diseases. The current review focusses on the development of salt taste sensitivity and preferences, and its association with food intake. Three -to- four month old infants are able to detect and prefer sodium chloride solutions over plain water, which is thought to be a biological unlearned response. Liking for water with sodium chloride mostly decreases when infants enter early childhood, but liking for sodium chloride in appropriate food contexts such as soup and snack foods remains high. The increased acceptance and preference of sodium chloride rich foods coincides with infants’ exposure to salty foods, and is therefore thought to be mostly a learned response. Children prefer higher salt concentrations than adults, but seem to be equally sensitive to salt taste. The addition of salt to foods increases children’s consumption of those foods. However, children’s liking for salt taste as such does not seem to correlate with children’s consumption of salty foods. Decreasing the exposure to salty tasting foods during early infancy is recommended. Salt plays an important role in children’s liking for a variety of foods. It is, however, questionable if children’s liking for salt per se influences the intake of salty foods. PMID:28902163

  2. Effects of pharmacologic reductions in salivary flow on taste thresholds in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, C M; Navazesh, M; Brightman, V J

    1984-01-01

    The effects of short-term salivary flow reductions on human taste thresholds were measured. Recognition and detection thresholds were obtained from 65 subjects during periods of both normal and reduced salivary flow. Decreased salivary flow was achieved by oral administration of either Elavil, Benadryl or atropine. Thresholds were measured for NaCl, citric acid, quinine sulphate and sucrose with a traditional series of aqueous solutions as well as with a series of dry taste stimuli using a filter-paper base. Whole mouth resting flow and stimulated salivary flow were measured before and after taste testing. The pharmacologic agents produced depressions in salivary flow ranging between 30 and 75 per cent of normal levels. The large decreases in flow produced no measurable changes in taste thresholds with the exception that an increased sensitivity to aqueous and dry citric acid stimuli consistently was observed following atropine administration. Changes in salivary bicarbonate levels, produced by atropine, may have mediated the observed shifts in oral sensitivity to citric acid.

  3. Utilitarian Aggregation of Beliefs and Tastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Itzhak; Samet, Dov; Schmeidler, David

    2004-01-01

    Harsanyi's utilitarianism is extended here to Savage's framework. We formulate a Pareto condition that implies that both society's utility function and its probability measure are linear combinations of those of the individuals. An indiscriminate Pareto condition has been shown to contradict linear aggregation of beliefs and tastes. We argue that…

  4. Utilitarian Aggregation of Beliefs and Tastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilboa, Itzhak; Samet, Dov; Schmeidler, David

    2004-01-01

    Harsanyi's utilitarianism is extended here to Savage's framework. We formulate a Pareto condition that implies that both society's utility function and its probability measure are linear combinations of those of the individuals. An indiscriminate Pareto condition has been shown to contradict linear aggregation of beliefs and tastes. We argue that…

  5. Music Taste Groups and Problem Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Juul; ter Bogt, Tom; Raaijmakers, Quinten; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2007-01-01

    Internalizing and externalizing problems differ by musical tastes. A high school-based sample of 4159 adolescents, representative of Dutch youth aged 12 to 16, reported on their personal and social characteristics, music preferences and social-psychological functioning, measured with the Youth Self-Report (YSR). Cluster analysis on their music…

  6. Subjective intensity and pleasantness in taste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuizen, M.G.

    2006-01-01

    This thesis contains studies on intensity and pleasantness in taste perception. There is a formal relationship between intensity and hedonic value of stimuli, which can be expressed in an inverted U. The fact that pleasantness depends partially on stimulus intensity poses a problem when one wants to

  7. Music taste groups and problem behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, Juul; Bogt, Tom ter; Raaijmakers, Quinten; Vollebergh, Wilma

    2007-01-01

    Internalizing and externalizing problems differ by musical tastes. A high school-based sample of 4159 adolescents, representative of Dutch youth aged 12 to 16, reported on their personal and social characteristics, music preferences and social-psychological functioning, measured with the Youth Self-

  8. Nutritional And Taste Characteristics Of Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karel, M.; Nakhost, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes investigation of chemical composition of blue-green algae Synechococcus 6311, as well as preparation of protein isolate from green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and incorporation into variety of food products evaluated for taste. Part of program to investigate growth of microalgae aboard spacecraft for use as food.

  9. Genetic characterization of the CcpA-dependent, cellobiose-specific PTS system comprising CelB, PtcB and PtcA that transports lactose in Lactococcus lactis IL1403.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleksandrzak-Piekarczyk, Tamara; Polak, Jolanta; Jezierska, Beata; Renault, Pierre; Bardowski, Jacek

    2011-01-31

    Lactose metabolism is one of the most important areas of research on Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB). In rapidly acidifying industrial Lactococcus lactis strains, lactose is transported by a lactose-specific phosphotransferase system (PTS) encoded by a plasmid. However, an alternative lactose catabolic pathway was evidenced in the plasmid-cured, and thus initially lactose-negative L. lactis IL1403. We showed that in this strain the chromosomally-encoded cellobiose-specific PTS system comprising the celB, ptcB and ptcA genes is also able to transport lactose. By expression studies in the wild type IL1403 strain and IBB550, its ccpA-deficient derivative, we demonstrated that celB, ptcB and ptcA are tightly regulated by the general catabolite repression system, whereas celB additionally requires the presence of cellobiose to be fully induced. The comparison of expression levels of sugar catabolic genes indicated that the efficiency of CcpA-mediated catabolic repression depends on conservation of the cre sequence, and that in the case of perfect matching with the cre consensus, CcpA still drives a strong repression even under non-repressing conditions.

  10. Receptor Polymorphism and Genomic Structure Interact to Shape Bitter Taste Perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natacha Roudnitzky

    Full Text Available The ability to taste bitterness evolved to safeguard most animals, including humans, against potentially toxic substances, thereby leading to food rejection. Nonetheless, bitter perception is subject to individual variations due to the presence of genetic functional polymorphisms in bitter taste receptor (TAS2R genes, such as the long-known association between genetic polymorphisms in TAS2R38 and bitter taste perception of phenylthiocarbamide. Yet, due to overlaps in specificities across receptors, such associations with a single TAS2R locus are uncommon. Therefore, to investigate more complex associations, we examined taste responses to six structurally diverse compounds (absinthin, amarogentin, cascarillin, grosheimin, quassin, and quinine in a sample of the Caucasian population. By sequencing all bitter receptor loci, inferring long-range haplotypes, mapping their effects on phenotype variation, and characterizing functionally causal allelic variants, we deciphered at the molecular level how a subjects' genotype for the whole-family of TAS2R genes shapes variation in bitter taste perception. Within each haplotype block implicated in phenotypic variation, we provided evidence for at least one locus harboring functional polymorphic alleles, e.g. one locus for sensitivity to amarogentin, one of the most bitter natural compounds known, and two loci for sensitivity to grosheimin, one of the bitter compounds of artichoke. Our analyses revealed also, besides simple associations, complex associations of bitterness sensitivity across TAS2R loci. Indeed, even if several putative loci harbored both high- and low-sensitivity alleles, phenotypic variation depended on linkage between these alleles. When sensitive alleles for bitter compounds were maintained in the same linkage phase, genetically driven perceptual differences were obvious, e.g. for grosheimin. On the contrary, when sensitive alleles were in opposite phase, only weak genotype

  11. TASTE MASKING METHODS AND AGENTS IN PHARMACEUTICAL FORMULATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirajkar Reshma Nilesh

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Taste is a critical factor during development of any dosage form and it is important parameter in administering drugs orally. Undesirable and particularly bitter taste is one of the important formulation problems that are encountered with many drugs. Proven methods for bitterness reduction and inhibition have resulted in improved palatability of oral pharmaceuticals. The present review explains in detail the various methods and agents used for taste-masking like, Inclusion complexation, Ion exchange resin, Coating, Granulation, Microencapsulation, Flavors, and Sweeteners, Pro-drug etc.The review also highlights factors affecting the selection of technology for taste masking and methods for evaluation of taste.

  12. Modifications and Modeling of the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.

    2008-01-01

    An actively pumped alkali metal flow circuit, designed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, underwent a range of tests at MSFC in early 2007. During this period, system transient responses and the performance of the liquid metal pump were evaluated. In May of2007, the circuit was drained and cleaned to prepare for multiple modifications: the addition of larger upper and lower reservoirs, the installation of an annular linear induction pump (ALIP), and the inclusion of a closeable orifice in the test section. Performance of the ALIP, provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will be evaluated when testing resumes. Data from the first round of testing has been used to refine the working system model, developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). This paper covers the modifications of the FSP-PTC and the updated GFSSP system model.

  13. Recent Updates to the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.

    2008-01-01

    An actively pumped alkali metal flow circuit, designed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, underwent a range of tests at MSFC in early 2007. During this period, system transient responses and the performance of the liquid metal pump were evaluated. In May of 2007, the circuit was drained and cleaned to prepare for multiple modifications: the addition of larger upper and lower reservoirs, the installation of an annular linear induction pump (ALIP), and the inclusion of a closeable orifice in the test section. Modifications are now complete and testing has resumed. Performance of the ALIP, provided by Idaho National Laboratory (1NL), is the subject of the first round of experimentation. This presentation details the physical changes made to the FSP-PTC and the current test program.

  14. PENGENDALIAN MESIN HOIST HANGER DALAM PROSES PTC/ED MENGGUNAKAN PLC OMRON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyudi Wahyudi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of technology demands efficient and work speed, so it needs a system which can handleseveral things.This problem can be covered with PLC (Programmable Logic Control that can integrateseveral self standing component to be an integrated control system and can be changed the configurationwithout change all instrument. Modify the ladder program can alter system of PLC. This paper showsHoist Hanger system in PTC/ED (Pre Treatment Chemical/Electrocoat Dispotition process that controlledby PLC. Above input from limit switch, sensor, or the other input, PLC system drives the motorrelay Hoist Hanger machine. That cause the motor relay Hoist Hanger change its condition, so the movingof Hoist Hanger machine will be suitable with PLC program.

  15. PTC/NTC Behavior of PVDF Composites Filled with GF and CF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Xin-lei; ZHANG Guo; LI Ji-xin; LI Zhuo-shi; LIU Zhan-fang; LIU Xiu-qi

    2008-01-01

    Conductive polyvinylidene fluoride(PVDF) matrix composites filled with graphited fiber(GF) or carbon fiber(CF) were prepared by the melt-mixing method.The breakage and length distribution of the fibers in the polymer matrix were studied by scanning electron microscope(SEM) and optical microscope(OM) observations,respectively.The differences in the positive temperature coefficient(PTC) effects of the composites were mainly attributed to inter-fiber contact ability.The elimination of the negative temperature coefficient(NTC) effect for CF/PVDF composite was because of an increase in the viscosity of the polymer matrix.With the same filler content,CF could be more effective,to eliminate the NTC effect when compared with GF.Addition of 2% CF(mass fraction) in the PVDF composite with 7% GF(mass fraction) could effectively eliminate the NTC phenomenon of the composite.

  16. Nickel-doped ceria nanoparticles for promoting catalytic activity of Pt/C for ethanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qiang; Du, Chunyu; Sun, Yongrong; Du, Lei; Yin, Geping; Gao, Yunzhi

    2014-10-01

    This paper reports the facile synthesis of monodispersed nickel-doped ceria nanoparticles by a thermal decomposition method, which is used to promote catalytic properties of Pt/C. The Pt/Ni-doped CeO2/C catalyst obtained exhibits remarkably high activity and stability towards the ethanol electrooxidation in acidic media. This is attributed to higher oxygen releasing capacity and stronger interaction of Ni-doped CeO2 with Pt than pure CeO2 nanoparticles that contribute positively to the removal of poisoning intermediates. We believe that the design concept and synthetic strategy of metal doped oxides used for fuel cell catalysts can be potentially extended to other catalytic fields.

  17. Modifications and Modeling of the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.

    2008-01-01

    An actively pumped alkali metal flow circuit, designed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, underwent a range of tests at MSFC in early 2007. During this period, system transient responses and the performance of the liquid metal pump were evaluated. In May of2007, the circuit was drained and cleaned to prepare for multiple modifications: the addition of larger upper and lower reservoirs, the installation of an annular linear induction pump (ALIP), and the inclusion of a closeable orifice in the test section. Performance of the ALIP, provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will be evaluated when testing resumes. Data from the first round of testing has been used to refine the working system model, developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). This paper covers the modifications of the FSP-PTC and the updated GFSSP system model.

  18. GUSTATORY SYSTEM AND MASKING THE TASTE OF BITTER HERBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Kale, Chetan Tapre and Abhay Ittadwar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The oral route is the most easy and favorable route of drug administration. The development of oral formulations containing bitter herbs has widely been required in pharmaceutical and herbal industry. The human gustatory system is capable of identifying five major taste qualities: sweet, sour, salty, bitter and umami (savory. Different receptors and transduction mechanisms are involved in the detection of each taste quality. Many efforts have been focused to improve the palatability in these products that has prompted in the development of numerous techniques of taste masking. Once a method for taste masking is adopted, it becomes apparent to evaluate the effectiveness of the taste masked product. The major hurdle in evaluation of measuring the effectiveness of taste masking is that the taste is a highly subjective property and it varies demographically and with the age and gender. This communication gives a brief account of gustatory system, the receptor and transduction mechanism of bitter taste and various techniques used in taste masking of the bitters. The review also reveals the in-vitro and in-vivo methods for evaluating taste masked efficiency of developed product. Finally, the review concludes that proper choice of method for taste masking method is essential and it might depend on the properties of the herbs.

  19. Differences in Swallowing between High and Low Concentration Taste Stimuli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Nagy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Taste is a property that is thought to potentially modulate swallowing behavior. Whether such effects depend on taste, intensity remains unclear. This study explored differences in the amplitudes of tongue-palate pressures in swallowing as a function of taste stimulus concentration. Tongue-palate pressures were collected in 80 healthy women, in two age groups (under 40, over 60, stratified by genetic taste status (nontasters, supertasters. Liquids with different taste qualities (sweet, sour, salty, and bitter were presented in high and low concentrations. General labeled magnitude scale ratings captured perceived taste intensity and liking/disliking of the test liquids. Path analysis explored whether factors of taste, concentration, age group, and/or genetic taste status impacted: (1 perceived intensity; (2 palatability; and (3 swallowing pressures. Higher ratings of perceived intensity were found in supertasters and with higher concentrations, which were more liked/disliked than lower concentrations. Sweet stimuli were more palatable than sour, salty, or bitter stimuli. Higher concentrations elicited stronger tongue-palate pressures independently and in association with intensity ratings. The perceived intensity of a taste stimulus varies as a function of stimulus concentration, taste quality, participant age, and genetic taste status and influences swallowing pressure amplitudes. High-concentration salty and sour stimuli elicit the greatest tongue-palate pressures.

  20. PTC simulations, stochastic optimization and safety strategies for groundwater pumping management: case study of the Hersonissos Coastal Aquifer in Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, P. N.; Dokou, Z. A.; Karatzas, G. P.; Papadopoulou, E. P.; Saridakis, Y. G.

    2016-06-01

    Recently, the well-known Princeton Transport Code (PTC), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulator, has been coupled with the ALgorithm of Pattern EXtraction (ALOPEX), a real-time stochastic optimization method, to provide a freshwater pumping management tool for coastal aquifers, aiming in preventing saltwater intrusion. In our previous work (Proceedings of INASE/CSCC-WHH 2015, Recent Advances in Environmental and Earth Sciences and Economics, pp 329-334, 2015), the PTC-ALOPEX approach was used in studying the saltwater contamination problem for the coastal aquifer at Hersonissos, Crete. Extending these results, in the present study the PTC-ALOPEX approach is equipped with a nodal safety strategy that effectively controls saltwater front's advancement inside the aquifer. In cooperation with an appropriate penalty system, the performance of PTC-ALOPEX algorithm is studied considering several pumping and weather condition scenarios. This study also establishes pumping/well scenarios that ensure the needed volume of fresh water to the local community without risking saltwater contamination.

  1. Successful Strategies for Rapidly Upgrading PTC Windchill 9.1 to Windchill 10.1 on a Light Budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearrow, Charles A.

    2013-01-01

    Topics covered include: The Frugal Times Historical Upgrade Process; Planning for Possible Constraints; PTC Compatibility Matrix; In-Place Upgrade Process; Pre-Upgrade Activities; Upgrade Activities; Post Upgrade Activities; Results of the Upgrade; Tips for an Upgrade On a Shoestring Budget.

  2. Development of latent fingermarks on surfaces submerged in water: Optimization studies for phase transfer catalyst (PTC) based reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasuja, O P; Kumar, Parveen; Singh, Gagandeep

    2015-09-01

    The use of a phase transfer catalyst (PTC) based reagent for the development of latent fingermarks is relatively a recent one and therefore a thorough evaluation is required before making any suggestion for its use in the routine fingermark development protocol. In the present study, non-porous surfaces including the sticky side of adhesive tapes loaded with latent fingermarks (eccrine, groomed and natural fingermarks) were submerged in water for different times and were treated with a PTC based reagent to develop fingermarks. The PTC based reagent was able to develop latent fingermarks on various surfaces submerged in water for different time intervals. The proposed method has been compared with standard methods like superglue fuming, small particle reagent and gentian violet (for adhesive tapes). The results have shown that the duration of submersion and the method selected for visualization have influences on the quality of developed fingermarks. The performance of the PTC technique against conventional methods was evaluated and compared thoroughly as a part of the optimization studies for the reagent. Copyright © 2015 Forensic Science Society. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The ret/ptc1 oncogene is activated in familial adenomatous polyposis-associated thyroid papillary carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetta, F; Chiappetta, G; Melillo, R M; Petracci, M; Montalto, G; Santoro, M; Fusco, A

    1998-03-01

    Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is caused by germ-line mutations of the apc gene, and it is associated with an increased risk of developing papillary thyroid carcinomas. We have previously reported that a significant fraction of sporadic human papillary thyroid carcinomas is characterized by gene rearrangements affecting the ret protooncogene. These rearrangements generate chimeric transforming oncogenes designated ret/ptc. By a combined immunohistochemical and RT-PCR approach, we analyzed, for ret/ptc oncogene activation, papillary thyroid carcinomas occurred in two FAP kindreds, both showing typical apc gene mutations. Kindred 1 had seven members affected by FAP, and among these, three patients showed papillary thyroid carcinomas. Kindred 2 had two patients, mother and daughter, affected by colonic polyposis; the 20-yr-old daughter showed also a papillary carcinoma. Here we report that ret/ptc1 oncogene was activated in two of the three papillary carcinomas of FAP kindred 1 and in the papillary carcinoma of FAP kindred 2. These findings document that loss of function of apc coexists with gain of function of ret in some papillary thyroid carcinomas, suggesting that ret/ptc1 oncogene activation could be a progression step in the development of FAP-associated thyroid tumors.

  4. PTC simulations, stochastic optimization and safety strategies for groundwater pumping management: case study of the Hersonissos Coastal Aquifer in Crete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratis, P. N.; Dokou, Z. A.; Karatzas, G. P.; Papadopoulou, E. P.; Saridakis, Y. G.

    2017-09-01

    Recently, the well-known Princeton Transport Code (PTC), a groundwater flow and contaminant transport simulator, has been coupled with the ALgorithm of Pattern EXtraction (ALOPEX), a real-time stochastic optimization method, to provide a freshwater pumping management tool for coastal aquifers, aiming in preventing saltwater intrusion. In our previous work (Proceedings of INASE/CSCC-WHH 2015, Recent Advances in Environmental and Earth Sciences and Economics, pp 329-334, 2015), the PTC-ALOPEX approach was used in studying the saltwater contamination problem for the coastal aquifer at Hersonissos, Crete. Extending these results, in the present study the PTC-ALOPEX approach is equipped with a nodal safety strategy that effectively controls saltwater front's advancement inside the aquifer. In cooperation with an appropriate penalty system, the performance of PTC-ALOPEX algorithm is studied considering several pumping and weather condition scenarios. This study also establishes pumping/well scenarios that ensure the needed volume of fresh water to the local community without risking saltwater contamination.

  5. The discovery and mechanism of sweet taste enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Servant, Guy; Tachdjian, Catherine

    2011-08-01

    Excess sugar intake posts several health problems. Artificial sweeteners have been used for years to reduce dietary sugar content, but they are not ideal substitutes for sugar owing to their off-taste. A new strategy focused on allosteric modulation of the sweet taste receptor led to identification of sweet taste 'enhancers' for the first time. The enhancer molecules do not taste sweet, but greatly potentiate the sweet taste of sucrose and sucralose selectively. Following a similar mechanism as the natural umami taste enhancers, the sweet enhancer molecules cooperatively bind with the sweeteners to the Venus flytrap domain of the human sweet taste receptor and stabilize the active conformation. Now that the approach has proven successful, enhancers for other sweeteners and details of the molecular mechanism for the enhancement are being actively pursued.

  6. Using Single Colors and Color Pairs to Communicate Basic Tastes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy T. Woods

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently, it has been demonstrated that people associate each of the basic tastes (e.g., sweet, sour, bitter, and salty with specific colors (e.g., red, green, black, and white. In the present study, we investigated whether pairs of colors (both associated with a particular taste or taste word would give rise to stronger associations relative to pairs of colors that were associated with different tastes. We replicate the findings of previous studies highlighting the existence of a robust crossmodal correspondence between individual colors and basic tastes. However, while there was evidence that pairs of colors could indeed communicate taste information more consistently than single colors, our participants took more than twice as long to match the color pairs with tastes than the single colors. Possible reasons for these results are discussed.

  7. Is There Any Effect on Smell and Taste Functions with Levothyroxine Treatment in Subclinical Hypothyroidism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil Baskoy

    correlation with smell and taste changes with treatment. However bitter taste found positively correlated with T3 with treatment(r: 0.445, p: 0.018. Subclinical hypothyroid patients exhibited a significantly decreased olfactory sensitivity; in addition, bitter taste was significantly affected. Most importantly, these deficits can be remedied on average within 3 months with adequate treatment.

  8. Targeted taste cell-specific overexpression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in adult taste buds elevates phosphorylated TrkB protein levels in taste cells, increases taste bud size, and promotes gustatory innervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrat, Irina V; Margolskee, Robert F; Nosrat, Christopher A

    2012-05-11

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is the most potent neurotrophic factor in the peripheral taste system during embryonic development. It is also expressed in adult taste buds. There is a lack of understanding of the role of BDNF in the adult taste system. To address this, we generated novel transgenic mice in which transgene expression was driven by an α-gustducin promoter coupling BDNF expression to the postnatal expression of gustducin in taste cells. Immunohistochemistry revealed significantly stronger BDNF labeling in taste cells of high BDNF-expressing mouse lines compared with controls. We show that taste buds in these mice are significantly larger and have a larger number of taste cells compared with controls. To examine whether innervation was affected in Gust-BDNF mice, we used antibodies to neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and ATP receptor P2X3. The total density of general innervation and specifically the gustatory innervation was markedly increased in high BDNF-expressing mice compared with controls. TrkB and NCAM gene expression in laser capture microdissected taste epithelia were significantly up-regulated in these mice. Up-regulation of TrkB transcripts in taste buds and elevated taste cell-specific TrkB phosphorylation in response to increased BDNF levels indicate that BDNF controls the expression and activation of its high affinity receptor in taste cells. This demonstrates a direct taste cell function for BDNF. BDNF also orchestrates and maintains taste bud innervation. We propose that the Gust-BDNF transgenic mouse models can be employed to further dissect the specific roles of BDNF in the adult taste system.

  9. Low dose irradiation of thyroid cells reveals a unique transcriptomic and epigenetic signature in RET/PTC-positive cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abou-El-Ardat, Khalil, E-mail: kabouela@sckcen.be [Radiobiology Unit, Molecular and Cellular Biology, GKD Building, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Universiteit Gent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Monsieurs, Pieter [Radiobiology Unit, Molecular and Cellular Biology, GKD Building, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Anastasov, Natasa; Atkinson, Mike [Department of Radiation Sciences, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Munich (Germany); Derradji, Hanane [Radiobiology Unit, Molecular and Cellular Biology, GKD Building, Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie - Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire (SCK-CEN), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); De Meyer, Tim [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Universiteit Gent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Department of Applied Mathematics, Biometrics and Process Control, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Universiteit Gent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Bekaert, Sofie [Clinical Research Center, Faculty for Medicine and Health Sciences, Universiteit Gent, 185 De Pintelaan, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Van Criekinge, Wim [Department of Molecular Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Universiteit Gent, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); and others

    2012-03-01

    The high doses of radiation received in the wake of the Chernobyl incident and the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki have been linked to the increased appearance of thyroid cancer in the children living in the vicinity of the site. However, the data gathered on the effect of low doses of radiation on the thyroid remain limited. We have examined the genome wide transcriptional response of a culture of TPC-1 human cell line of papillary thyroid carcinoma origin with a RET/PTC1 translocation to various doses (0.0625, 0.5, and 4 Gy) of X-rays and compared it to response of thyroids with a RET/PTC3 translocation and against wild-type mouse thyroids irradiated with the same doses using Affymetrix microarrays. We have found considerable overlap at a high dose of 4 Gy in both RET/PTC-positive systems but no common genes at 62.5 mGy. In addition, the response of RET/PTC-positive system at all doses was distinct from the response of wild-type thyroids with both systems signaling down different pathways. Analysis of the response of microRNAs in TPC-1 cells revealed a radiation-responsive signature of microRNAs in addition to dose-responsive microRNAs. Our results point to the fact that a low dose of X-rays seems to have a significant proliferative effect on normal thyroids. This observation should be studied further as opposed to its effect on RET/PTC-positive thyroids which was subtle, anti-proliferative and system-dependent.

  10. Genetic and molecular basis of individual differences in human umami taste perception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriatsu Shigemura

    Full Text Available Umami taste (corresponds to savory in English is elicited by L-glutamate, typically as its Na salt (monosodium glutamate: MSG, and is one of five basic taste qualities that plays a key role in intake of amino acids. A particular property of umami is the synergistic potentiation of glutamate by purine nucleotide monophosphates (IMP, GMP. A heterodimer of a G protein coupled receptor, TAS1R1 and TAS1R3, is proposed to function as its receptor. However, little is known about genetic variation of TAS1R1 and TAS1R3 and its potential links with individual differences in umami sensitivity. Here we investigated the association between recognition thresholds for umami substances and genetic variations in human TAS1R1 and TAS1R3, and the functions of TAS1R1/TAS1R3 variants using a heterologous expression system. Our study demonstrated that the TAS1R1-372T creates a more sensitive umami receptor than -372A, while TAS1R3-757C creates a less sensitive one than -757R for MSG and MSG plus IMP, and showed a strong correlation between the recognition thresholds and in vitro dose-response relationships. These results in human studies support the propositions that a TAS1R1/TAS1R3 heterodimer acts as an umami receptor, and that genetic variation in this heterodimer directly affects umami taste sensitivity.

  11. Instrumental measurement of bitter taste in red wine using an electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitskaya, Alisa; Nieuwoudt, Hélène H; Muller, Nina; Legin, Andrey; du Toit, Maret; Bauer, Florian F

    2010-08-01

    An electronic tongue (ET) based on potentiometric chemical sensors was assessed as a rapid tool for the quantification of bitterness in red wines. A set of 39 single cultivar Pinotage wines comprising 13 samples with medium to high bitterness was obtained from the producers in West Cape, South Africa. Samples were analysed with respect to a set of routine wine parameters and major phenolic compounds using Fourier transform infrared-multiple internal reflection spectroscopy (WineScan) and high-performance liquid chromatography, respectively. A trained sensory panel assessed the bitterness intensity of 15 wines, 13 of which had a bitter taste of medium to high intensity. Thirty-one wine samples including seven bitter-tasting ones were measured by the ET. Influence of the chemical composition of wine on the occurrence of the bitter taste was evaluated using one-way analysis of variance. It was found that bitter-tasting wines had higher concentrations of phenolic compounds (catechin, epicatechin, gallic and caffeic acids and quercetin) than non-bitter wines. Sensitivity of the sensors of the array to the phenolic compounds related to the bitterness was studied at different pH levels. Sensors displayed sensitivity to all studied compounds at pH 7, but only to quercetin at pH 3.5. Based on these findings, the pH of wine was adjusted to 7 prior to measurements. Calibration models for classification of wine samples according to the presence of the bitter taste and quantification of the bitterness intensity were calculated by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) regression. Statistical significance of the classification results was confirmed by the permutation test. Both ET and chemical analysis data could discriminate between bitter and control wines with the correct classification rates of 94% and 91%, respectively. Prediction of the bitterness intensity with good accuracy (root mean square error of 2 and mean relative error of 6% in validation) was

  12. Analysis of taste qualities and ingredients of beer by taste sensing system; Mikaku sensor ni yoru beer no ajishitsu to seibun no bunseki

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezaki, S.; Yuki, T. [Kinki University, Osaka (Japan); Toko, K. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Tsuda, Y.; Nakatani, K. [Suntory Ltd., Osaka (Japan)

    1997-08-20

    The taste of beer was measured using a taste sensing system with eight kinds of lipid membrane. The output from the sensor has high discriminating power and high correlation with taste substances in beer and sensory test by human. The estimation of the concentration of taste substances by multiple regression analysis was fairly well. The taste sensor also well estimated the result of sensory test of many keywords concerning beer taste. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Sociocultural theory and blind taste-tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Paul Gee

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In his entertaining 1986 book, The Real Coke, the Real Story, Thomas Oliver tells the story of the now infamous “New Coke”, a story retold in Malcolm Gladwell’s (2005 best-seller Blink. In the early 1980s, Pepsi began running commercials in which people took a sip from two glasses, not knowing which was Coke and which Pepsi. The majority preferred Pepsi. The Coca-Cola Company replicated these blind taste-tests and found the same result. Losing market share, Coke—long the dominant brand—changed its old formula and came out with “New Coke”, a soda made to a new formula, one that in a new round of blind taste-tests came out above Pepsi. But New Coke was a disaster.Consumers hated it. Coke not only returned to its old formula, but Pepsi never did overtake Coke, which remains today the dominant brand world-wide.

  14. Preparation and evaluation of taste masked oral suspension of arbidol hydrochloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Wang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to cover the bitter taste of arbidol hydrochloride (ARB and develop dry suspension with combination of solid dispersion and flavors. Taste masking was successfully done by solid dispersion using octadecanol as the carrier by fusion method. Suspending agents, carriers and other excipients were selected. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR were performed to identify the physicochemical interaction between drug and carrier, DSC analysis indicated that ARB was amorphous in the solid dispersion, FTIR spectroscopy showed no interaction between drug and carrier. Taste masking was evaluated on six volunteers with a score of 4.9. The results demonstrated successful taste masking. Water was used to study the in vitro dissolution performance of the three formulations of commercial tablet, capsule and self-made suspension. The self-made suspension showed a lower and slower release, the insoluble carrier octadecanol blocked the drug dissolving from the solid dispersion. It was indicated from the primary stability study, the self-made suspensions were sensitive to high temperature, high humidity and strong light conditions, they should be stored in sealed containers away from heat, light and humidity.

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Taste Recognition: Considerations about the Role of Saliva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tibor Károly Fábián

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The gustatory system plays a critical role in determining food preferences and food intake, in addition to nutritive, energy and electrolyte balance. Fine tuning of the gustatory system is also crucial in this respect. The exact mechanisms that fine tune taste sensitivity are as of yet poorly defined, but it is clear that various effects of saliva on taste recognition are also involved. Specifically those metabolic polypeptides present in the saliva that were classically considered to be gut and appetite hormones (i.e., leptin, ghrelin, insulin, neuropeptide Y, peptide YY were considered to play a pivotal role. Besides these, data clearly indicate the major role of several other salivary proteins, such as salivary carbonic anhydrase (gustin, proline-rich proteins, cystatins, alpha-amylases, histatins, salivary albumin and mucins. Other proteins like glucagon-like peptide-1, salivary immunoglobulin-A, zinc-α-2-glycoprotein, salivary lactoperoxidase, salivary prolactin-inducible protein and salivary molecular chaperone HSP70/HSPAs were also expected to play an important role. Furthermore, factors including salivary flow rate, buffer capacity and ionic composition of saliva should also be considered. In this paper, the current state of research related to the above and the overall emerging field of taste-related salivary research alongside basic principles of taste perception is reviewed.

  16. PROP test: prediction of caries risk by genetic taste perception among the visually impaired children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Vabitha; B L, Pooja; Hegde, Amitha M

    2014-01-01

    The study sample consisted of 100 children with visual impairment aged 6-14 years. 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) sensitivity test was carried out. The Caries experience was recorded, estimation of Streptococcus mutans done and their taste likes and dislikes assessed through a food preference questionnaire. The Caries experience and S. mutans levels were highest in the non-tasters, comparatively low in medium tasters and the least in the supertasters. Dietary preferences indicated tasters were sweet dislikers and non-tasters, sweet likers. PROP test can be a useful tool in determining genetic taste sensitivity levels amongst the visually impaired children and thus used as a screening tool in those children who are at a high risk of developing dental caries.

  17. Using Sound-Taste Correspondences to Enhance the Subjective Value of Tasting Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe eReinoso Carvalho

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The soundscapes of those places where we eat and drink can influence our perception of taste. Here, we investigated whether contextual sound would enhance the subjective value of a tasting experience. The customers in a chocolate shop were invited to take part in an experiment in which they had to evaluate a chocolate’s taste while listening to an auditory stimulus. Four different conditions were presented to four different groups in a between-participants design. Envisioning a more ecological approach, a pre-recorded piece of popular music and the shop’s own soundscape were used as the sonic stimuli. The results revealed that not only did the customers report having a significantly better tasting experience when the sounds were presented as part of the food’s identity, but they were also willing to pay significantly more for the experience. The method outlined here paves a new approach to dealing with the design of multisensory tasting experiences, and gastronomic situations.

  18. Taste effects of lingual application of cardiovascular medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervakis, J; Graham, B G; Schiffman, S S

    2000-01-01

    Medications used to treat cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, high blood pressure, and arrhythmia, are prescribed extensively in Western countries. However, taste complaints are common side effects of many of these cardiovascular medications. Although clinical observations are helpful in determining potential taste problems from a medication, experimental studies are necessary to obtain quantitative data on taste. In the studies performed here, nine cardiovascular medications (labetalol HCl, captopril, diltiazem HCl, enalapril maleate, hydrochlorothiazide, propranolol HCl, mexiletine HCl, procainamide HCl, and propafenone HCl) were applied to the tongue in human volunteers to measure the direct effect of these drugs on taste receptors. The medications were applied topically to the tongue surface of both young and elderly subjects to mimic the situation in which the drug is secreted into the saliva. Detection thresholds ranged from 0.048 mM (propafenone) to 0.438 mM (procainamide). The detection thresholds of healthy elderly subjects did not significantly differ from young controls. The compounds tested had a predominantly bitter taste with other qualities as well. In addition, topical application of the medications to the tongue affected the taste of one or more taste stimuli, with medications differing in the pattern of taste effects exhibited. The mechanism of taste effects is not fully known, but the results of this study suggest one route may be due to medications' effect on peripheral taste receptors.

  19. [Changes in taste ability in patients with vestibular schwannoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boessert, P; Grüttner, C; van Ewijk, R; Haxel, B

    2014-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are rare tumors that can cause different symptoms due to their anatomical relationship to the cranial nerves in the inner auditory canal. So far little data is known to the effect of VS on the somatosensory function of the intermediate nerve. This study aimed to investigate the taste function of patients suffering from single sided VS. Therefore the well validated psychophysical test "Taste Strips" has been used. 26 patients who consulted our outpatient clinic at a university hospital could be included in the study. All patients were asked carefully for their medical history. A full ENT examination was done. Each side of the anterior two thirds of the tongue was tested separately using the Taste Strips. The average age was 52 years with both gender equally represented. Throughout all age groups the taste score was lower on the tumor vs. the non affected side. Testing for significance just failed the level of 0.05. No correlation between tumor size and location of the tumor with the taste score could be detected. Only 2 patients complained of taste dysfunction. They had a taste score below the 10. percentile of their age group on tumor while normal scores on the non affected side. To sum up a decreased taste score on the tumor side vs. the non affected side could be confirmed. Only 8% of the patients complained of taste disturbance as a symptom. That supports the observation that taste is a whole mouth experience and dysfunction can be compensated.

  20. Bitter taste receptor polymorphisms and human aging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Campa

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that genetic factors account for 25% of the variation in human life span. On the basis of published molecular, genetic and epidemiological data, we hypothesized that genetic polymorphisms of taste receptors, which modulate food preferences but are also expressed in a number of organs and regulate food absorption processing and metabolism, could modulate the aging process. Using a tagging approach, we investigated the possible associations between longevity and the common genetic variation at the three bitter taste receptor gene clusters on chromosomes 5, 7 and 12 in a population of 941 individuals ranging in age from 20 to 106 years from the South of Italy. We found that one polymorphism, rs978739, situated 212 bp upstream of the TAS2R16 gene, shows a statistically significant association (p = 0.001 with longevity. In particular, the frequency of A/A homozygotes increases gradually from 35% in subjects aged 20 to 70 up to 55% in centenarians. These data provide suggestive evidence on the possible correlation between human longevity and taste genetics.

  1. What do love and jealousy taste like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kai Qin; Tong, Eddie M W; Tan, Deborah H; Koh, Alethea H Q

    2013-12-01

    Metaphorical expressions linking love and jealousy to sweet, sour, and bitter tastes are common in normal language use and suggest that these emotions may influence perceptual taste judgments. Hence, we investigated whether the phenomenological experiences of love and jealousy are embodied in the taste sensations of sweetness, sourness, and bitterness. Studies 1A and 1B validated that these metaphors are widely endorsed. In three subsequent studies, participants induced to feel love rated a variety of tastants (sweet-sour candy, bitter-sweet chocolates, and distilled water) as sweeter than those who were induced to feel jealous, neutral, or happy. However, those induced to feel jealous did not differ from those induced to feel happy or neutral on bitter and sour ratings. These findings imply that emotions can influence basic perceptual judgments, but metaphors that refer to the body do not necessarily influence perceptual judgments the way they imply. We further suggest that future research in metaphoric social cognition and metaphor theory may benefit from investigating how such metaphors could have originated.

  2. A lack of premature termination codon read-through efficacy of PTC124 (Ataluren in a diverse array of reporter assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart P McElroy

    Full Text Available The drug molecule PTC124 (Ataluren has been described as a read-through agent, capable of suppressing premature termination codons (PTCs and restoring functional protein production from genes disrupted by nonsense mutations. Following the discovery of PTC124 there was some controversy regarding its mechanism of action with two reports attributing its activity to an off-target effect on the Firefly luciferase (FLuc reporter used in the development of the molecule. Despite questions remaining as to its mechanism of action, development of PTC124 continued into the clinic and it is being actively pursued as a potential nonsense mutation therapy. To thoroughly test the ability of PTC124 to read through nonsense mutations, we conducted a detailed assessment comparing the efficacy of PTC124 with the classical aminoglycoside antibiotic read-through agent geneticin (G418 across a diverse range of in vitro reporter assays. We can confirm the off-target FLuc activity of PTC124 but found that, while G418 exhibits varying activity in every read-through assay, there is no evidence of activity for PTC124.

  3. A lack of premature termination codon read-through efficacy of PTC124 (Ataluren) in a diverse array of reporter assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Stuart P; Nomura, Toshifumi; Torrie, Leah S; Warbrick, Emma; Gartner, Ulrike; Wood, Gavin; McLean, W H Irwin

    2013-01-01

    The drug molecule PTC124 (Ataluren) has been described as a read-through agent, capable of suppressing premature termination codons (PTCs) and restoring functional protein production from genes disrupted by nonsense mutations. Following the discovery of PTC124 there was some controversy regarding its mechanism of action with two reports attributing its activity to an off-target effect on the Firefly luciferase (FLuc) reporter used in the development of the molecule. Despite questions remaining as to its mechanism of action, development of PTC124 continued into the clinic and it is being actively pursued as a potential nonsense mutation therapy. To thoroughly test the ability of PTC124 to read through nonsense mutations, we conducted a detailed assessment comparing the efficacy of PTC124 with the classical aminoglycoside antibiotic read-through agent geneticin (G418) across a diverse range of in vitro reporter assays. We can confirm the off-target FLuc activity of PTC124 but found that, while G418 exhibits varying activity in every read-through assay, there is no evidence of activity for PTC124.

  4. Prevalence of RET/PTC expression in papillary thyroid carcinoma and its correlation with prognostic factors in a north Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, A; Agrawal, V; Krishnani, N; Mishra, S K

    2009-01-01

    The prevalence of Rearranged during Transfection/Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma (RET/PTC) rearrangement in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) varies in different geographic regions and its prognostic significance remains unclear. The aim of this study was to recognize the prevalence of RET/PTC expression in PTC from the endemically iodine-deficient region in Northern India and to correlate the expression with the clinicopathologic prognostic factors. Retrospective. Archival tissue used. Immunohistochemistry was performed to look for activated RET protein expression in 50 cases of PTC. No patient had any history of prior irradiation. Chi-square method, Student t test, and binary regression method. A P value of PTC (47.5%), followed by tumors with poorly differentiated areas (25%) and follicular variant (16.7%). RET expression was more prevalent in young patients (45.5 vs. 35.3%), females (43.3 vs. 40.0%), small tumors (33.3 vs. 26.7%), multicentric tumors (36.8 vs. 33.3%), tumors with extrathyroidal invasion (38.9 vs. 32.4%), and regional lymphadenopathy (55.2 vs. 22.2%), while it was less in cases with distant metastases (20 vs. 43.9%). There was no significant correlation of immunoreactivity with any prognostic factor. However, when the cases having immunoreactivity within histiocytes (n=26) and histiocytes + tumor tissue (n=28) were considered, then the expression was significantly more in cases with lymphadenopathy (P values=.009, in both instances). However, the exact clinical significance of RET/PTC positive histiocytes remained unexplained. Prevalence of RET/PTC in our study was consistent with the reported prevalence from other geographic areas. There was no significant correlation with the clinicopathologic factors. However, uniform techniques of detection and large international collaborative studies could clear the uncertainties regarding the prognostic importance of RET/PTC.

  5. Effectiveness of Taste Lessons with and without additional experiential learning activities on children's willingness to taste vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battjes-Fries, Marieke C E; Haveman-Nies, Annemien; Zeinstra, Gertrude G; van Dongen, Ellen J I; Meester, Hante J; van den Top-Pullen, Rinelle; Van't Veer, Pieter; de Graaf, Kees

    2017-02-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of the Dutch school programme Taste Lessons with and without additional experiential learning activities on children's willingness to taste unfamiliar vegetables. Thirty-three primary schools (877 children in grades 6-7 with a mean age of 10.3 years) participated in Taste Lessons Vegetable Menu (TLVM, lessons and extra activities), Taste Lessons (TL, lessons), or a control group. A baseline and follow-up measurement was used to assess for each child: number of four familiar and four unfamiliar vegetables tasted, quantity tasted, choice of vegetable of which to eat more, and number of vegetables willing to taste again later. Furthermore, children filled out a questionnaire on daily vegetable intake and food neophobia. Multilevel and Cox regression analyses were conducted to compare changes in the outcome measures between the three study groups. No significant intervention effects were found on willingness to taste unfamiliar vegetables. Neither were effects found on familiar vegetables, except for number of familiar vegetables tasted (p < 0.05). Furthermore, no significant intervention effects were found on daily vegetable consumption and food neophobia. These results indicate that more intensive school-based nutrition education activities are needed to increase children's willingness to taste unfamiliar vegetables and increase their vegetable intake. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Promotion effect of manganese oxide on the electrocatalytic activity of Pt/C for methanol oxidation in acid medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Hameed, R.M., E-mail: randa311eg@yahoo.com [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Fetohi, Amani E.; Amin, R.S.; El-Khatib, K.M. [Chemical Engineering Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Giza (Egypt)

    2015-12-30

    Graphical abstract: Physical and electrochemical properties of Pt/C, Pt–MnO{sub 2}/C-1 and Pt–MnO{sub 2}/C-2 electrocatalysts. - Highlights: • Adding MnO{sub 2} to Pt/C improved the dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. • The existence of MnO{sub 2} improved the kinetics of methanol oxidation reaction. • R{sub ct} value of Pt–MnO{sub 2}/C was about 10 times as low as that at Pt/C. • The removal of CO{sub ads} poisoning species was facilitated at Pt–MnO{sub 2}/C. - Abstract: The modification of Pt/C by incorporating metal oxides for electrocatalytic oxidation of methanol has gained major attention because of the efficiency loss during the course of long-time operation. This work describes the preparation of Pt–MnO{sub 2}/C electrocatalysts through a chemical route using ethylene glycol or a mixture of ethylene glycol and sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. The crystallite structure and particle size of synthesized electrocatalysts are determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The addition of MnO{sub 2} improves the dispersion of Pt nanoparticles. The electrocatalytic activity of Pt–MnO{sub 2}/C towards methanol oxidation in H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution is investigated using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The onset potential value of methanol oxidation peak is negatively shifted by 169 mV when MnO{sub 2} is introduced to Pt/C. Moreover, the charge transfer resistance value at Pt–MnO{sub 2}/C is about 10 times as low as that at Pt/C. Chronoamperometry and chronopotentiometry show that CO tolerance is greatly improved at Pt–MnO{sub 2}/C. The increased electrocatalytic activity and enhanced ability to clean platinum surface elect manganese oxide as a suitable promoter for the anode performance in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs).

  7. [Oral medicine 3. Anatomy, physiology and diagnostic considerations of taste and smell disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissink, A; Jager-Wittenaar, H; Visser, A; Spijkervet, F K L; van Weissenbruch, R; van Nieuw Amerongen, A

    2013-01-01

    Taste and smell perception are closely related. The taste perception is performed by taste buds which can distinguish salt, sour, sweet, bitter, and umami. Moreover, 2,000-4,000 smells can be recognized. Many taste disorders are in fact smell disorders. Saliva affects taste perception because it serves as a solvent for taste substances and as a protecting agent for the taste receptors. Therefore, hyposalivation leads to a reduction in taste perception, in which the concentration of zinc ions and specific proteins in saliva play an important role. In addition, zinc and iron deficiencies may cause diminished taste and smell perception.

  8. Extraoral Taste Receptor Discovery: New Light on Ayurvedic Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilca, Marilena; Dragos, Dorin

    2017-01-01

    More and more research studies are revealing unexpectedly important roles of taste for health and pathogenesis of various diseases. Only recently it has been shown that taste receptors have many extraoral locations (e.g., stomach, intestines, liver, pancreas, respiratory system, heart, brain, kidney, urinary bladder, pancreas, adipose tissue, testis, and ovary), being part of a large diffuse chemosensory system. The functional implications of these taste receptors widely dispersed in various organs or tissues shed a new light on several concepts used in ayurvedic pharmacology (dravyaguna vijnana), such as taste (rasa), postdigestive effect (vipaka), qualities (guna), and energetic nature (virya). This review summarizes the significance of extraoral taste receptors and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels for ayurvedic pharmacology, as well as the biological activities of various types of phytochemical tastants from an ayurvedic perspective. The relative importance of taste (rasa), postdigestive effect (vipaka), and energetic nature (virya) as ethnopharmacological descriptors within Ayurveda boundaries will also be discussed.

  9. Improve Your Wine Sales:Host a Wine Tasting Evening

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, James Peter

    2011-01-01

    Wine sales have grown in Ireland, wine distributors have improved their portfolios in response to heightened competition in the marketplace. For publicans the increased interest in wine has created new opportunities for bars to form small wine clubs or host regular wine tasting evenings for customers. This article highlights the points to remember when hosting regular wine tasting events. Remember wine tasting is intelligent drinking for customers it is an exercise in verbalising what they ar...

  10. Dynamic evolution of bitter taste receptor genes in vertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Jones Gareth; Dong Dong; Zhang Shuyi

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Sensing bitter tastes is crucial for many animals because it can prevent them from ingesting harmful foods. This process is mainly mediated by the bitter taste receptors (T2R), which are largely expressed in the taste buds. Previous studies have identified some T2R gene repertoires, and marked variation in repertoire size has been noted among species. However, the mechanisms underlying the evolution of vertebrate T2R genes remain poorly understood. Results To better unders...

  11. 接枝炭黑/聚乙烯导电复合材料正电阻温度系数(PTC)效应研究%Study on PTC Characteristics in Grafting Carbon Black/Polyethylene Conductive Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李勇; 路庆华

    2001-01-01

    用接枝炭黑作导电粒子研究了在聚乙烯基材中的正(电阻)温度系数(PTC)效应。结果发现,甲基丙烯酸甲酯接枝的炭黑在高密度聚乙烯中能表现出较好的PTC效应。从实验现象分析,接枝炭黑的PTC效应是结晶熔融和体积膨胀双重变化共同作用的结果。%Composites based on grafting carbon black/polyethylene were prepared to study the positivetemperature coefficients properties. The effects of various grafting CB for conductive particles in the PTCcomposites were investigated. It showed that PTC properties of MMA-g-CB/HDPE composites were im-proved. The mechanism of PTC effects in the grafting carbon black/polyethylene are the results of crystalmelting and volume expandsion.

  12. Modifications and Modelling of the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    An actively pumped alkali metal flow circuit, designed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, underwent a range of tests at MSFC in early 2007. During this period, system transient responses and the performance of the liquid metal pump were evaluated. In May of 2007, the circuit was drained and cleaned to prepare for multiple modifications: the addition of larger upper and lower reservoirs, the installation of an annular linear induction pump (ALIP), and the inclusion of the Single Flow Cell Test Apparatus (SFCTA) in the test section. Performance of the ALIP, provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will be evaluated when testing resumes. The SFCTA, which will be tested simultaneously, will provide data on alkali metal flow behavior through the simulated core channels and assist in the development of a second generation thermal simulator. Additionally, data from the first round of testing has been used to refine the working system model, developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). This paper covers the modifications of the FSP-PTC and the updated GFSSP system model.

  13. Capabilities and Testing of the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.

    2007-01-01

    An actively pumped alkali metal flow circuit, designed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, is currently undergoing testing in the Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF). Sodium potassium (NaK), which was used in the SNAP-10A fission reactor, was selected as the primary coolant. Basic circuit components include: simulated reactor core, NaK to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic (EM) liquid metal pump, liquid metal flowmeter, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, test section, and instrumentation. Operation of the circuit is based around a 37-pin partial-array core (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in a full core), designed to operate at 33 kWt. NaK flow rates of greater than 1 kg/sec may be achieved, depending upon the power applied to the EM pump. The heat exchanger provides for the removal of thermal energy from the circuit, simulating the presence of an energy conversion system. The presence of the test section increases the versatility of the circuit. A second liquid metal pump, an energy conversion system, and highly instrumented thermal simulators are all being considered for inclusion within the test section. This paper summarizes the capabilities and ongoing testing of the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC).

  14. Modifications and Modelling of the Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Ann E.

    2008-01-01

    An actively pumped alkali metal flow circuit, designed and fabricated at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, underwent a range of tests at MSFC in early 2007. During this period, system transient responses and the performance of the liquid metal pump were evaluated. In May of 2007, the circuit was drained and cleaned to prepare for multiple modifications: the addition of larger upper and lower reservoirs, the installation of an annular linear induction pump (ALIP), and the inclusion of the Single Flow Cell Test Apparatus (SFCTA) in the test section. Performance of the ALIP, provided by Idaho National Laboratory (INL), will be evaluated when testing resumes. The SFCTA, which will be tested simultaneously, will provide data on alkali metal flow behavior through the simulated core channels and assist in the development of a second generation thermal simulator. Additionally, data from the first round of testing has been used to refine the working system model, developed using the Generalized Fluid System Simulation Program (GFSSP). This paper covers the modifications of the FSP-PTC and the updated GFSSP system model.

  15. Enhancement of anodic oxidation of formic acid on palladium decorated Pt/C catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan Ni; Liao, Shi Jun; Su, Yun Lan; Zeng, Jian Huang; Dang, Dai

    A palladium decorated Pt/C catalyst, Pt@Pd/C, is prepared by a colloidal approach with a small amount of platinum as core. It is found that the catalyst shows excellent activity towards anodic oxidation of formic acid at room temperature and its activity is 60% higher than that of Pd/C. Decoration of palladium shell on the platinum core is supported by XPS results. Due to the use of platinum as core, active components are dispersed very well and the particle sizes are smaller than those of Pd/C. The cyclic voltammetry measurement clearly shows synthetic electro-oxidation effects of formic acid on Pt@Pd/C. It is speculated that the high performance of Pt@Pd/C may result from the unique core-shell structure and synergistic effect of Pt and Pd at the interface. The preparation method for Pt@Pd/C reported in this work will provide additional options for the design of catalysts for direct formic acid fuel cell (DFAFC).

  16. Taste and pheromone perception in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebbs, Michelle L; Amrein, Hubert

    2007-08-01

    Taste is an essential sense for detection of nutrient-rich food and avoidance of toxic substances. The Drosophila melanogaster gustatory system provides an excellent model to study taste perception and taste-elicited behaviors. "The fly" is unique in the animal kingdom with regard to available experimental tools, which include a wide repertoire of molecular-genetic analyses (i.e., efficient production of transgenics and gene knockouts), elegant behavioral assays, and the possibility to conduct electrophysiological investigations. In addition, fruit flies, like humans, recognize sugars as a food source, but avoid bitter tasting substances that are often toxic to insects and mammals alike. This paper will present recent research progress in the field of taste and contact pheromone perception in the fruit fly. First, we shall describe the anatomical properties of the Drosophila gustatory system and survey the family of taste receptors to provide an appropriate background. We shall then review taste and pheromone perception mainly from a molecular genetic perspective that includes behavioral, electrophysiological and imaging analyses of wild type flies and flies with genetically manipulated taste cells. Finally, we shall provide an outlook of taste research in this elegant model system for the next few years.

  17. Music Influences Hedonic and Taste Ratings in Beer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso Carvalho, Felipe; Velasco, Carlos; van Ee, Raymond; Leboeuf, Yves; Spence, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The research presented here focuses on the influence of background music on the beer-tasting experience. An experiment is reported in which different groups of customers tasted a beer under three different conditions (N = 231). The control group was presented with an unlabeled beer, the second group with a labeled beer, and the third group with a labeled beer together with a customized sonic cue (a short clip from an existing song). In general, the beer-tasting experience was rated as more enjoyable with music than when the tasting was conducted in silence. In particular, those who were familiar with the band that had composed the song, liked the beer more after having tasted it while listening to the song, than those who knew the band, but only saw the label while tasting. These results support the idea that customized sound-tasting experiences can complement the process of developing novel beverage (and presumably also food) events. We suggest that involving musicians and researchers alongside brewers in the process of beer development, offers an interesting model for future development. Finally, we discuss the role of attention in sound-tasting experiences, and the importance that a positive hedonic reaction toward a song can have for the ensuing tasting experience. PMID:27199862

  18. Dye-coupling among frog (Rana catesbeiana) taste disk cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sata, O; Okada, Y; Miyamoto, T; Sato, T

    1992-09-01

    1. Dye-coupling among taste disk cells in the bullfrog fungiform papillae was examined histologically by injecting a fluorescent dye (Lucifer yellow) into the cell, and the effects of the dye-coupling on depolarizing responses induced by taste stimuli were studied electrophysiologically. 2. With dye injection into a taste cell, dye-coupling was found between taste cells (23%) or between taste cell and supporting cell (28%). With dye injection into a supporting cell, dye-coupling was found between supporting cells (34%) or between supporting cell and taste cell (27%). 3. Depolarizing responses recorded from either a taste cell or a supporting cell to stimulation with 0.5 M NaCl or 10 mM quinine-HCl were the same in amplitude whether the dye-coupling to another cell was present or not. On the other hand, depolarizing responses recorded from a taste cell for 0.5 mM acetic acid became significantly larger when dye-coupled to a supporting cell. 4. It is concluded that gustatory transduction for acid stimuli is influenced by supporting cells coupled to taste cells.

  19. Recent patents and patented technology platforms for pharmaceutical taste masking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Deepak; Dureja, Harish

    2014-04-01

    Taste masking is an important factor in the development of oral dosage forms containing bitter active pharmaceutical ingredients. Currently numerous techniques are being applied to overcome this problem. Realizing this, several researchers and pharmaceutical companies are now engaged in developing novel techniques to address the problem of taste masking evident by numerous patents filed in this area in recent times. In this review the most recent patents for taste masking are discussed and how these patents overcome the limitations of conventional approaches of taste masking is also highlighted. Novel techniques based on some recent patents such as nanohybrid, melt extrusion, non-complex cyclodextrin compositions and off taste masking are providing new realms to taste masking of bitter drugs. The present article also provides an overview of various patented platform technologies based on different techniques/mechanisms employed for taste masking. The unique features and principles of taste-masking approaches used in various patented technologies are also discussed. A better understanding of these new patents and patented technologies will help researchers and pharmaceutical industries to select the appropriate platform, or to develop innovative products with improved taste masking properties.

  20. Identification of functional bitter taste receptors and their antagonist in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Bapon; Kawabata, Fuminori; Kawabata, Yuko; Yoshida, Yuta; Nishimura, Shotaro; Tabata, Shoji

    2017-01-22

    Elucidation of the taste sense of chickens is important not only for the development of chicken feedstuffs for the chicken industry but also to help clarify the evolution of the taste sense among animals. There are three putative chicken bitter taste receptors, chicken T2R1 (cT2R1), cT2R2 and cT2R7, which were identified using genome information and cell-based assays. Previously, we have shown that cT2R1 is a functional bitter taste receptor through both cell-based assays and behavioral tests. In this study, therefore, we focused on the sensitivities of the other two bitter receptors, cT2R2 and cT2R7, by using their agonists in behavioral tests. We tested three agonists of cT2R2 and three agonists of cT2R7. In a 10-min drinking study, the intakes of cT2R2 agonist solutions were not different from that of water. On the other hand, the intakes of cT2R7 agonist solutions were significantly lower compared to water. In addition, we constructed cT2R1-and cT2R7-expressing cells in order to search for an antagonist for these functional bitter taste receptors. By using Ca(2+) imaging methods, we found that 6-methoxyflavanone (6-meth) can inhibit the activities of both cT2R1 and cT2R7. Moreover, 6-meth also inhibited the reduction of the intake of bitter solutions containing cT2R1 or cT2R7 agonists in behavioral tests. Taken together, these results suggested that cT2R7 is a functional bitter taste receptor like cT2R1, but that cT2R2 is not, and that 6-meth is an antagonist for these two functional chicken bitter taste receptors. This is the first identification of an antagonist of chicken bitter receptors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting of BMI-1 with PTC-209 shows potent anti-myeloma activity and impairs the tumour microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Bolomsky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polycomb complex protein BMI-1 (BMI-1 is a putative oncogene reported to be overexpressed in multiple myeloma (MM. Silencing of BMI-1 was shown to impair the growth and survival of MM cells. However, therapeutic agents specifically targeting BMI-1 were not available so far. Here, we investigated PTC-209, a novel small molecule inhibitor of BMI-1, for its activity in MM. Methods BMI-1 expression was analysed in human MM cell lines and primary MM cells by using publically available gene expression profiling (GEP data. The anti-MM activity of PTC-209 was investigated by viability testing, cell cycle analysis, annexin V and 7-AAD staining, quantification of cleaved poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, JC-1 as well as colony formation assays. Deregulation of central myeloma growth and survival genes was studied by quantitative PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. In addition, the impact of PTC-209 on in vitro osteoclast, osteoblast and tube formation was analysed. Results We confirmed overexpression of BMI-1 in MM patients by using publically available GEP datasets. Of note, BMI-1 expression was further increased at relapse which translated into significantly shorter overall survival in relapsed/refractory patients treated with bortezomib or dexamethasone. Treatment with PTC-209 significantly decreased viable cell numbers in human MM cell lines, induced a G1 cell cycle arrest, promoted apoptosis and demonstrated synergistic activity with pomalidomide and carfilzomib. The anti-MM activity of PTC-209 was accompanied by a significant decrease of cyclin D1 (CCND1 and v-myc avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC expression as well as upregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1B (CDKN1B. We also observed upregulation of NOXA (up to 3.6 ± 1.2-fold induction, P = 0.009 and subsequent downregulation of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (MCL-1 protein levels, which likely

  2. PTC-6 vacuum system: WallWalker{trademark} and Blastrac{reg_sign} shot blast cleaning system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The LTC Americas, Inc. wall decontamination technology consisted of two pneumatic hand-held tools: (1) a roto-peen scaler that used star cutters and (2) a 3-piston hammer with reciprocating bits. The hand-held tools were used in conjunction with the LTC PTC-6 vacuum system which captured dust and debris as the wall decontamination took place. Recommendations for improved worker safety and health during use of the PTC-6 vacuum system with hand-held tools include: (1) keeping all hoses and lines as orderly as possible in compliance with good housekeeping requirements; (2) ergonomic training to include techniques in lifting, bending, stooping, twisting, etc.; (3) use of a clamping system to hold hoses to the vacuum system; (4) a safety line on the air line connections; (5) use of a mechanical lifting system for waste drum removal; and (6) the use of ergonomically designed tools.

  3. A constitutive active MAPK/ERK pathway due to BRAFV600E positively regulates AHR pathway in PTC

    OpenAIRE

    Occhi, Gianluca; Barollo, Susi; Regazzo, Daniela; Bertazza, Loris; Galuppini, Francesca; Guzzardo, Vincenza; Jaffrain-Rea, Marie Lise; Vianello, Federica; Ciato, Denis; Ceccato, Filippo; Watutantrige-Fernando, Sara; Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Pennelli, Gianmaria; Boscaro, Marco

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor mediating the toxicity and tumor-promoting properties of dioxin. AHR has been reported to be overexpressed and constitutively active in a variety of solid tumors, but few data are currently available concerning its role in thyroid cancer. In this study we quantitatively explored a series of 51 paired-normal and papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) tissues for AHR-related genes. We identified an increased AHR expressio...

  4. Expression of zebrafish hip: response to Hedgehog signalling, comparison with ptc1 expression, and possible role in otic patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Katherine L; Whitfield, Tanya T

    2009-09-01

    In zebrafish, Hedgehog (Hh) signalling is required to specify posterior otic identity. This presents a conundrum, as the nearest source of Hh to the developing inner ear is the ventral midline, in the notochord and floorplate. How can a source of Hh that is ostensibly constant with respect to the anteroposterior axis of the otic vesicle specify posterior otic identity? One possibility is that localised inhibition of Hh signalling is involved. Here we show that genes coding for three inhibitors of Hh signalling, su(fu), dzip1 and hip, are expressed in and around the developing otic vesicle. su(fu) and dzip1 are ubiquitously expressed and unaffected by Hh levels. The expression of hip, however, is positively regulated by Hh signalling and has a complex, dynamic pattern. It is detectable in the neural tube, otic vesicle, statoacoustic ganglion, brain, fin buds, mouth, somites, pronephros and branchial arches. These expression domains bear some similarity, but are not identical, to those of ptc1, a Hh receptor gene that is also positively regulated by Hh signalling. In the neural tube, for instance, hip is expressed in a subset of the ptc1 expression domain, while in other regions, including the otic vesicle, hip and ptc1 expression domains differ. Significantly, we find that initial expression of hip is higher in and adjacent to anterior otic regions, while ptc1 expression becomes progressively restricted to the posterior of the ear. Hip-mediated inhibition of Hh signalling may therefore be important in restricting the effects of Hh to posterior regions of the developing inner ear.

  5. Characteristics and Applied Limits for the Test Code ASME PTC 6.2 of Steam Turbine Performance%汽轮机性能试验规程ASME PTC6.2的特点及适用范围

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘利; 张敏

    2011-01-01

    对美国机械工程师学会制定的试验规程ASME PTC 6.2中蒸汽轮机的试验特点和试验方法等(联合循环)进行了系统阐述.ASME PTC 6.2规程具有边界条件、二元加法修正法等特点,适用于各种形式联合循环中汽轮机性能试验.将ASME PTC 6.2、ASME PTC 6和ASME PTC 46规程进行了比较分析,指出了规程的适用范围,得出了相关结论.

  6. 3,4-Methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV)-induced conditioned taste avoidance in the F344/N and LEW rat strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Heather E; Wetzell, Bradley; Rice, Kenner C; Riley, Anthony L

    2014-11-01

    The inbred Fischer (F344) and Lewis (LEW) rats, while originally developed as animal models for cancer and tissue transplantation research, have since been used to study genetic differences in a variety of physiological and behavioral endpoints. In this context, LEW rats show greater sensitivity to the aversive effects of cocaine as compared to F344 rats in a conditioned taste avoidance procedure. Like cocaine, 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV; "bath salts") acts as a dopamine transport blocker and possesses aversive properties, making it a good candidate for assessing whether the aforementioned strain differences with cocaine would generalize to drugs with similar biochemical action. Accordingly, male F344 and LEW rats were exposed to a novel saccharin solution followed by injections of one of four doses of MDPV in a taste avoidance procedure. Over the four saccharin/MDPV pairings during conditioning, core body temperatures were also assessed. Similar to previous research, MDPV induced robust dose-dependent taste avoidance, although no effect of strain was observed. MDPV also produced hyperthermia that was independent of strain and unrelated to the conditioned taste avoidance. These findings argue for a complex influence of multiple (and likely interacting) monoaminergic systems mediating MDPV-induced taste avoidance in the two strains and suggest different mechanisms of avoidance learning for cocaine and MDPV. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. A matter of good taste: Investigating preferences for in-house water treatment in peri-urban communities in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeuland, M. A.; Orgill, J.; Brown, J.; Shaheed, A.

    2012-12-01

    It is commonly argued that low demand for in-house water treatment technologies is not simply due to their cost, but also results from their other unfavorable features, notably distaste or convenience problems. This research considers household preferences for in-house water treatment in two peri-urban communes around Phnom Penh, Cambodia, with a particular focus on taste. In an effort to measure sensitivity to taste problems, respondents from more than 900 households were given water samples treated with randomly assigned levels of chlorine, as well as a bottled water placebo, and were asked to compare their favorite samples with their existing drinking water source. Households were also asked to complete a series of conjoint tasks in which they selected their preferred drinking water alternative among options that varied in terms of cost, taste, effectiveness against diarrheal disease and quantity of water treated. Our findings suggest that households do perceive distaste for water treated with chlorine products, and that taste is an important feature of their selection of water treatment alternatives. Better understanding of the taste preferences of households in communities without access to safe water is thus critical to interventions seeking to promote in-house water treatment.

  8. Taste acuity of obese adolescents and changes in food neophobia and food preferences during a weight reduction session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monneuse, Marie-Odile; Rigal, Natalie; Frelut, Marie-Laure; Hladik, Claude-Marcel; Simmen, Bruno; Pasquet, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The relationship between taste acuity and food neophobia, food familiarity and liking has been studied in the context of a residential weight reduction session (WRS; mean duration: 10 months) in 39 obese adolescents. Taste acuity was assessed using recognition thresholds for sucrose, citric acid, sodium chloride and 6-n propylthiouracil (PROP) and supra-threshold perceived intensities for sucrose, sodium chloride and PROP. Food neophobia was assessed by using the food neophobia scale at the beginning and at the end of the WRS. At these time points we used also a food familiarity and liking questionnaire to assess changes in food familiarity and likes or dislikes for different food categories. Taste acuity appeared to mediate behavioural food-related changes during the WRS. High taste acuity was associated with limited reductions in food neophobia; less sensitive subjects showed greater increases in the acceptability of healthy foods, especially fruits and vegetables. Therefore, taste perception (and particularly PROP perception) appears to be a predictor of the magnitude of food-related behavioural change achieved during a WRS.

  9. Identification of a PTC-containing DlRan transcript and its differential expression during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Zhi-Zhen; Lai, Cheng-Chun; Zhang, Ya-Ling; Lin, Yu-Ling; Lai, Zhong-Xiong

    2013-10-15

    RAN (Ras-related nuclear protein) plays crucial roles in multiple cellular processes in yeast, animals and plants. Here we present a DlRan gene and its alternative splicing transcripts containing premature terminator codons (PTCs), identified from embryogenic cultures in longan. Multiple alignment and splicing pattern analyses indicated that DlRan-1 transcript harboring PTC was the consequence of alternative splicing. The accumulation of DlRan PTC-containing transcripts increased significantly when the embryogenic calli were treated with the translation inhibitor, cycloheximide, indicating that DlRan-1 may be targeted by NMD. The analysis of expression profiles of DlRan transcripts revealed that differential expression levels of the alternative spliced DlRan transcripts occurred during the development of embryogenic callus, globular-shaped embryos, and cotyledon-shaped embryos, respectively, in the longan somatic embryogenesis, and were in consistent with the embryo development in corresponding wild-type transcripts. The present work offers evidence to speculate that the alternatively spliced PTC-containing transcripts can be functional and may shed light on expression regulation of DlRan during development of the longan somatic embryos. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Aminoglycosides, but not PTC124 (Ataluren), rescue nonsense mutations in the leptin receptor and in luciferase reporter genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolze, Florian; Mocek, Sabine; Zimmermann, Anika; Klingenspor, Martin

    2017-04-21

    In rare cases, monogenetic obesity is caused by nonsense mutations in genes regulating energy balance. A key factor herein is the leptin receptor. Here, we focus on leptin receptor nonsense variants causing obesity, namely the human W31X, murine Y333X and rat Y763X mutations, and explored their susceptibilities to aminoglycoside and PTC124 mediated translational read-through in vitro. In a luciferase based assay, all mutations - when analysed within the mouse receptor - were prone to aminoglycoside mediated nonsense suppression with the highest susceptibility for W31X, followed by Y763X and Y333X. For the latter, the corresponding rodent models appear valuable for in vivo experiments. When W31X was studied in the human receptor, its superior read-through susceptibility - initially observed in the mouse receptor - was eliminated, likely due to the different nucleotide context surrounding the mutation in the two orthologues. The impact of the surrounding context on the read-through opens the possibility to discover novel sequence elements influencing nonsense suppression. As an alternative to toxic aminoglycosides, PTC124 was indicated as a superior nonsense suppressor but inconsistent data concerning its read-through activity are reported. PTC124 failed to rescue W31X as well as different nonsense mutated luciferase reporters, thus, challenging its ability to induce translational read-through.

  11. Texture-taste interactions: Enhancement of taste intensity by structural modifications of the food matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of salt and sugar in food products remains a challenge due to the importance of those ingredients in providing a highly desired taste quality, enhancing flavor, determining the behavior of structuring ingredients, and ensuring microbiological safety. Several technologies have been used

  12. Texture-taste interactions: Enhancement of taste intensity by structural modifications of the food matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stieger, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of salt and sugar in food products remains a challenge due to the importance of those ingredients in providing a highly desired taste quality, enhancing flavor, determining the behavior of structuring ingredients, and ensuring microbiological safety. Several technologies have been used

  13. Exploring the Musical Taste of Expert Listeners: Musicology Students reveal Tendency towards Omnivorous Taste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eElvers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The current study examined the musical taste of musicology students as compared to a control student group. Participants (n=1003 completed an online survey regarding the frequency with which they listened to 22 musical styles. A factor analysis revealed six underlying dimensions of musical taste. A hierarchical cluster analysis then grouped all participants, regardless of their status, according to their similarity on these dimensions. The employed exploratory approach was expected to reveal potential differences between musicology students and controls. A three-cluster solution was obtained. Comparisons of the clusters in terms of musical taste revealed differences in the listening frequency and variety of appreciated music styles: The first cluster (51% musicology students / 27% controls showed the greatest musical engagement across all dimensions although with a tendency towards »sophisticated« musical styles. The second cluster (36% musicology students / 46% controls exhibited an interest in »conventional« music, while the third cluster (13% musicology students / 27% controls showed a strong liking of rock music. The results provide some support for the notion of specific tendencies in the musical taste of musicology students and the contribution of familiarity and knowledge towards musical omnivorousness.

  14. Taste quality and intensity of 100 stimuli as reported by rats: the taste-location association task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shree Hari eGautam

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The interpretation of neural activity related to sensory stimulation requires an understanding of the subject's perception of the stimulation. Previous methods used to evaluate the perception of chemosensory stimuli by rodents have distinct limitations. We developed a novel behavioral paradigm, the taste-location association task, to complement these methods. First we tested if rats are able to learn associations between five basic taste stimuli and their spatial locations. This spatial task was based on 4 prototypical tastants and water. All four rats trained to perform the task reached levels of performance well above chance. Control trials demonstrated that the rats used only taste cues. Further, the learned stimulus set was resistant to interference, allowing for generalization experiments performed subsequently. We tested the rats' gustatory generalizations of 100 tastants to the five trained stimuli, both regarding their taste qualities as well as intensity ratings. The taste profiles generated by these experiments contribute to the understanding of how perception of the specific taste stimuli relate to the perception of the five basic taste qualities in intact behaving rats. In this large taste space we found that intensity plays a major role. Furthermore, umami stimuli were not reported as being similar to other basic tastants. Our new paradigm enables neurophysiological studies of taste-based learning and memory in awake, freely moving animals.

  15. The correlation between BRAF mutations, RET/PTC rearrangements and platelet-derived growth factor B expression in papillary thyroid carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王萍

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of BRAF T1799A mutation and RET/PTC rearrangement in Qingdao and detect the expression of platelet-derived growth factor B(PDGF-B) in order to investigate the correlation

  16. Not Just Gustation: the Cognitive Effects of Multi-Sensory Advertising on Taste Perceptions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryan Elder; Aradhna Krishna

    2010-01-01

    .... Bringing together research in physiology and consumer behavior, we propose that advertisements focusing on multi-sensory components of taste result in higher taste perceptions than ads focusing on taste alone...

  17. Taste and smell dysfunction in childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jennifer; Laing, David G; Wilkes, Fiona J; Chan, Ada; Gabriel, Melissa; Cohn, Richard J

    2014-04-01

    Reduced or altered taste and smell function may occur as a side-effect of cancer therapy. This can lead to altered nutrient and energy intake. Some studies have suggested that taste and smell dysfunction can persist many years after treatment completion but this has not been previously assessed in survivors of childhood cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if taste and smell dysfunction is present in childhood cancer survivors (CCS). Food preference and Quality of Life was also assessed. Fifty-one child cancer survivors (mean age: 19.69±7.09years), more than five years since treatment completion, (mean: 12.4years) were recruited from the long term follow-up clinics at two Sydney-based children's hospitals. Taste function was assessed using a 25 sample taste identification test comprising five concentrations each of sweet, salty, sour and bitter tastes and water. Smell function was assessed by determining the ability of participants to identify 16 common odorants. The participants' Quality of Life was assessed using the Functional Assessment of Anorexia Cachexia scale and food preferences were assessed using a 94-item food liking tool. Taste dysfunction was found in 27.5% of participants (n=14), and smell dysfunction in 3.9% (n=2) of participants. The prevalence of taste dysfunction was higher than that seen in the non-cancer population. The child cancer survivors' appeared to "like" the less healthy food groups such as flavoured beverages, takeaway and snacks over healthier food groups such as vegetables and salad. No correlation was found between those with a taste dysfunction and their food "likes". A high level of taste dysfunction was found in CCS though there did not appear to be an issue with smell dysfunction. Further work is also needed to assess whether a taste dysfunction do play a role in the dietary habits of CCS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Age-dependent MDPV-induced taste aversions and thermoregulation in adolescent and adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merluzzi, Andrew P; Hurwitz, Zachary E; Briscione, Maria A; Cobuzzi, Jennifer L; Wetzell, Bradley; Rice, Kenner C; Riley, Anthony L

    2014-07-01

    Adolescent rats are more sensitive to the rewarding and less sensitive to the aversive properties of various drugs of abuse than their adult counterparts. Given a nationwide increase in use of "bath salts," the present experiment employed the conditioned taste aversion procedure to assess the aversive effects of 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV; 0, 1.0, 1.8, or 3.2 mg/kg), a common constituent in "bath salts," in adult and adolescent rats. As similar drugs induce thermoregulatory changes in rats, temperature was recorded following MDPV administration to assess if thermoregulatory changes were related to taste aversion conditioning. Both age groups acquired taste aversions, although these aversions were weaker and developed at a slower rate in the adolescent subjects. Adolescents increased and adults decreased body temperature following MDPV administration with no correlation to aversions. The relative insensitivity of adolescents to the aversive effects of MDPV suggests that MDPV may confer an increased risk in this population. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Taste Reward Circuitry Related Brain Structures Characterize Ill and Recovered Anorexia Nervosa and Bulimia Nervosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Guido K.; Shott, Megan E.; Hagman, Jennifer O.; Mittal, Vijay A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The pathophysiology of the eating disorder anorexia nervosa remains obscure, but structural brain alterations could be functionally important biomarkers. Here we assessed taste pleasantness and reward sensitivity in relation to brain structure, which might be related to food avoidance commonly seen in eating disorders. Method We used structural magnetic resonance brain imaging to study gray and white matter volumes in individuals with restricting type currently ill (n = 19) or recovered-anorexia nervosa (n = 24), bulimia nervosa (n= 19) and healthy control women (n=24). Results All eating disorder groups showed increased gray matter volume of the medial orbitofrontal cortex (gyrus rectus). Manually tracing confirmed larger gyrus rectus volume, and predicted taste pleasantness across all groups. The analyses also indicated other morphological differences between diagnostic categories: Ill and recovered-anorexia nervosa had increased right, while bulimia nervosa had increased left antero-ventral insula gray matter volumes compared to controls. Furthermore, dorsal striatum volumes were reduced in recovered-anorexia and bulimia nervosa, and predicted sensitivity to reward in the eating disorder groups. The eating disorder groups also showed reduced white matter in right temporal and parietal areas when compared to healthy controls. Notably, the results held when controlling for a range of covariates (e.g., age, depression, anxiety, medications). Conclusion Brain structure in medial orbitofrontal cortex, insula and striatum is altered in eating disorders and suggests altered brain circuitry that has been associated with taste pleasantness and reward value. PMID:23680873

  20. Positive allosteric modulators of the human sweet taste receptor enhance sweet taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servant, Guy; Tachdjian, Catherine; Tang, Xiao-Qing; Werner, Sara; Zhang, Feng; Li, Xiaodong; Kamdar, Poonit; Petrovic, Goran; Ditschun, Tanya; Java, Antoniette; Brust, Paul; Brune, Nicole; DuBois, Grant E; Zoller, Mark; Karanewsky, Donald S

    2010-03-01

    To identify molecules that could enhance sweetness perception, we undertook the screening of a compound library using a cell-based assay for the human sweet taste receptor and a panel of selected sweeteners. In one of these screens we found a hit, SE-1, which significantly enhanced the activity of sucralose in the assay. At 50 microM, SE-1 increased the sucralose potency by >20-fold. On the other hand, SE-1 exhibited little or no agonist activity on its own. SE-1 effects were strikingly selective for sucralose. Other popular sweeteners such as aspartame, cyclamate, and saccharin were not enhanced by SE-1 whereas sucrose and neotame potency were increased only by 1.3- to 2.5-fold at 50 microM. Further assay-guided chemical optimization of the initial hit SE-1 led to the discovery of SE-2 and SE-3, selective enhancers of sucralose and sucrose, respectively. SE-2 (50 microM) and SE-3 (200 microM) increased sucralose and sucrose potencies in the assay by 24- and 4.7-fold, respectively. In human taste tests, 100 microM of SE-1 and SE-2 allowed for a reduction of 50% to >80% in the concentration of sucralose, respectively, while maintaining the sweetness intensity, and 100 microM SE-3 allowed for a reduction of 33% in the concentration of sucrose while maintaining the sweetness intensity. These enhancers did not exhibit any sweetness when tasted on their own. Positive allosteric modulators of the human sweet taste receptor could help reduce the caloric content in food and beverages while maintaining the desired taste.

  1. Exploring the musical taste of expert listeners: musicology students reveal tendency toward omnivorous taste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvers, Paul; Omigie, Diana; Fuhrmann, Wolfgang; Fischinger, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Musicology students are engaged with music on an academic level and usually have an extensive musical background. They have a considerable knowledge of music history and theory and listening to music may be regarded as one of their primary occupations. Taken together, these factors qualify them as ≫expert listeners≪, who may be expected to exhibit a specific profile of musical taste: interest in a broad range of musical styles combined with a greater appreciation of ≫sophisticated≪ styles. The current study examined the musical taste of musicology students as compared to a control student group. Participants (n = 1003) completed an online survey regarding the frequency with which they listened to 22 musical styles. A factor analysis revealed six underlying dimensions of musical taste. A hierarchical cluster analysis then grouped all participants, regardless of their status, according to their similarity on these dimensions. The employed exploratory approach was expected to reveal potential differences between musicology students and controls. A three-cluster solution was obtained. Comparisons of the clusters in terms of musical taste revealed differences in the listening frequency and variety of appreciated music styles: the first cluster (51% musicology students/27% controls) showed the greatest musical engagement across all dimensions although with a tendency toward ≫sophisticated≪ musical styles. The second cluster (36% musicology students/46% controls) exhibited an interest in ≫conventional≪ music, while the third cluster (13% musicology students/27% controls) showed a strong liking of rock music. The results provide some support for the notion of specific tendencies in the musical taste of musicology students and the contribution of familiarity and knowledge toward musical omnivorousness. Further differences between the clusters in terms of social, personality, and sociodemographic factors are discussed.

  2. PTC124 is an orally bioavailable compound that promotes suppression of the human CFTR-G542X nonsense allele in a CF mouse model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Ming; Liu, Xiaoli; Welch, Ellen M.; Hirawat, Samit; Peltz, Stuart W.; Bedwell, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Nonsense mutations inactivate gene function and are the underlying cause of a large percentage of the individual cases of many genetic disorders. PTC124 is an orally bioavailable compound that promotes readthrough of premature translation termination codons, suggesting that it may have the potential to treat genetic diseases caused by nonsense mutations. Using a mouse model for cystic fibrosis (CF), we show that s.c. injection or oral administration of PTC124 to Cftr−/− mice expressing a human CFTR-G542X transgene suppressed the G542X nonsense mutation and restored a significant amount of human (h)CFTR protein and function. Translational readthrough of the premature stop codon was demonstrated in this mouse model in two ways. First, immunofluorescence staining showed that PTC124 treatment resulted in the appearance of hCFTR protein at the apical surface of intestinal glands in Cftr−/− hCFTR-G542X mice. In addition, functional assays demonstrated that PTC124 treatment restored 24–29% of the average cAMP-stimulated transepithelial chloride currents observed in wild-type mice. These results indicate that PTC124 can effectively suppress the hCFTR-G542X nonsense mutation in vivo. In light of its oral bioavailability, safety toxicology profile in animal studies, and efficacy with other nonsense alleles, PTC124 has the potential to be an important therapeutic agent for the treatment of inherited diseases caused by nonsense mutations. PMID:18272502

  3. Toward a rationale for the PTC124 (Ataluren) promoted readthrough of premature stop codons: a computational approach and GFP-reporter cell-based assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentini, Laura; Melfi, Raffaella; Di Leonardo, Aldo; Spinello, Angelo; Barone, Giampaolo; Pace, Andrea; Palumbo Piccionello, Antonio; Pibiri, Ivana

    2014-03-03

    The presence in the mRNA of premature stop codons (PTCs) results in protein truncation responsible for several inherited (genetic) diseases. A well-known example of these diseases is cystic fibrosis (CF), where approximately 10% (worldwide) of patients have nonsense mutations in the CF transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene. PTC124 (3-(5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl)-benzoic acid), also known as Ataluren, is a small molecule that has been suggested to allow PTC readthrough even though its target has yet to be identified. In the lack of a general consensus about its mechanism of action, we experimentally tested the ability of PTC124 to promote the readthrough of premature termination codons by using a new reporter. The reporter vector was based on a plasmid harboring the H2B histone coding sequence fused in frame with the green fluorescent protein (GFP) cDNA, and a TGA stop codon was introduced in the H2B-GFP gene by site-directed mutagenesis. Additionally, an unprecedented computational study on the putative supramolecular interaction between PTC124 and an 11-codon (33-nucleotides) sequence corresponding to a CFTR mRNA fragment containing a central UGA nonsense mutation showed a specific interaction between PTC124 and the UGA codon. Altogether, the H2B-GFP-opal based assay and the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation support the hypothesis that PTC124 is able to promote the specific readthrough of internal TGA premature stop codons.

  4. The complex network of musical tastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buldú, Javier M.; Cano, P.; Koppenberger, M.; Almendral, Juan A.; Boccaletti, S.

    2007-06-01

    We present an empirical study of the evolution of a social network constructed under the influence of musical tastes. The network is obtained thanks to the selfless effort of a broad community of users who share playlists of their favourite songs with other users. When two songs co-occur in a playlist a link is created between them, leading to a complex network where songs are the fundamental nodes. In this representation, songs in the same playlist could belong to different musical genres, but they are prone to be linked by a certain musical taste (e.g. if songs A and B co-occur in several playlists, an user who likes A will probably like also B). Indeed, playlist collections such as the one under study are the basic material that feeds some commercial music recommendation engines. Since playlists have an input date, we are able to evaluate the topology of this particular complex network from scratch, observing how its characteristic parameters evolve in time. We compare our results with those obtained from an artificial network defined by means of a null model. This comparison yields some insight on the evolution and structure of such a network, which could be used as ground data for the development of proper models. Finally, we gather information that can be useful for the development of music recommendation engines and give some hints about how top-hits appear.

  5. Tasting in mundane practices: Ethnographic interventions in social science theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mann, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis presents an ethnographic investigation into practices of tasting. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in various Western Europe settings in which people sensually engaged with food and drinks, the chapters show how tasting is done by research subjects in sensory science laboratories; guests

  6. A permeability barrier surrounds taste buds in lingual epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Robin; Pereira, Elizabeth; Kurian, Mani; Barro-Soria, Rene; Chaudhari, Nirupa; Roper, Stephen D

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues are characterized by specialized cell-cell junctions, typically localized to the apical regions of cells. These junctions are formed by interacting membrane proteins and by cytoskeletal and extracellular matrix components. Within the lingual epithelium, tight junctions join the apical tips of the gustatory sensory cells in taste buds. These junctions constitute a selective barrier that limits penetration of chemosensory stimuli into taste buds (Michlig et al. J Comp Neurol 502: 1003-1011, 2007). We tested the ability of chemical compounds to permeate into sensory end organs in the lingual epithelium. Our findings reveal a robust barrier that surrounds the entire body of taste buds, not limited to the apical tight junctions. This barrier prevents penetration of many, but not all, compounds, whether they are applied topically, injected into the parenchyma of the tongue, or circulating in the blood supply, into taste buds. Enzymatic treatments indicate that this barrier likely includes glycosaminoglycans, as it was disrupted by chondroitinase but, less effectively, by proteases. The barrier surrounding taste buds could also be disrupted by brief treatment of lingual tissue samples with DMSO. Brief exposure of lingual slices to DMSO did not affect the ability of taste buds within the slice to respond to chemical stimulation. The existence of a highly impermeable barrier surrounding taste buds and methods to break through this barrier may be relevant to basic research and to clinical treatments of taste.

  7. The effect of emotional state on taste perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, Corinna; Dando, Robin

    2015-12-01

    Taste perception can be modulated by a variety of extraneously applied influences, such as the manipulation of emotion or the application of acute stress. To evaluate the effect of more commonplace day-to-day emotional variation on taste function, taste intensity ratings and hedonic evaluations were collected from approximately 550 attendees following men's hockey games spanning the 2013-2014 season, a period encompassing 4 wins, 3 losses, and 1 tie. Since different outcomes at competitive sporting events are shown to induce varying affective response, this field study presented a unique environment to evaluate the effect of real-life emotional manipulations on our perception of taste, where previous research focused more on extraneous manipulation within a laboratory environment. Analysis revealed that positive emotions correlated with enhanced sweet and diminished sour intensities while negative emotions associated with heightened sour and decreased sweet tastes. Theoretically, both an increase in sweet and a decrease in sour taste intensity would drive acceptance of a great number of foods. Indeed, hedonic ratings for samples that were less liked (and parenthetically mostly sweet and sour in nature), selectively increased as positive affect grew, possibly due to the perceived decrease in sourness and increase in sweetness. The results of this field study indicate that emotional manipulations in the form of pleasantly or unpleasantly perceived real-life events can influence the intensity perception of taste, driving hedonics for less acceptable foods. These results suggest that such modulation of taste perception could play a role in emotional eating.

  8. What role does taste play in school meal interventions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrero, Kayla; Olsen, Anne Marie; Wistoft, Karen

    2017-01-01

    dialogue around taste on factors such as physical and psychological well-being, empowerment, school enjoyment, and academic outcomes. By taking steps to accurately evaluate and improve the taste of school food and by creating avenues for students to express their opinions and develop a meaningful sense...

  9. Clinical aspects and treatment of taste and smell disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissink, A.; Jager-Wittenaar, H.; Visser, A.; Spijkervet, F.K.L.; Weissenbruch, R.; Nieuw Amerongen, A. van

    2013-01-01

    Taste and smell perception are closely related. Many chemosensory disorders which result in faulty taste are in fact smell disorders. Causes of chemosensory disorders which call for attention are ageing, medication, natural proteins, burning mouth syndrome, nerve injuries, aerate disorders in the ne

  10. Clinical aspects and treatment of taste and smell disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Visser; F.K.L. Spijkervet; R. Weissenbruch; A. van Nieuw Amerongen; A. Vissink; Dr Harriët Jager-Wittenaar

    2013-01-01

    Taste and smell perception are closely related. Many chemosensory disorders which result in faulty taste are in fact smell disorders. Causes of chemosensory disorders which call for attention are ageing, medication, natural proteins, burning mouth syndrome, nerve injuries, aerate disorders in the

  11. Private and Shared Taste in Art and Face Appreciation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leder, Helmut; Goller, Juergen; Rigotti, Tanya; Forster, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Whether beauty is in the eye of the beholder or shared among individuals is a longstanding question in empirical aesthetics. By decomposing the variance structure of data for facial attractiveness, it has been previously shown that beauty evaluations comprise a similar amount of private and shared taste (Hönekopp, 2006). Employing the same methods, we found that, for abstract artworks, components that vary between individuals and relate to personal taste are particularly strong. Moreover, we instructed half of our participants to disregard their own taste and judge stimuli according to the taste of others instead. Ninety-five women rated 100 abstract artworks for liking and 100 faces for attractiveness. We found that the private taste proportion was much higher in abstract artworks, accounting for 75% of taste compared to 40% in the face condition. Abstract artworks were also less affected than faces by the instruction to rate according to others' taste and therefore less susceptible to incorporation of external beauty standards. Together, our findings support the notion that art-and especially abstract art-crystallizes private taste.

  12. The differential role of smell and taste for eating behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesveldt, Sanne; Graaf, de Kees

    2017-01-01

    Food choice and food intake are guided by both sensory and metabolic processes. The senses of taste and smell play a key role in the sensory effects on choice and intake. This article provides a comprehensive overview of, and will argue for, the differential role of smell and taste for eating

  13. Private and Shared Taste in Art and Face Appreciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helmut eLeder

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Whether beauty is in the eye of the beholder or shared among individuals is a longstanding question in empirical aesthetics. By decomposing the variance structure of data for facial attractiveness, it has been previously shown that beauty evaluations comprise a similar amount of private and shared taste (Hönekopp, 2006. Employing the same methods, we found that, for abstract artworks, components that vary between individuals and relate to personal taste are particularly strong. Moreover, we instructed half of our participants to disregard their own taste and judge stimuli according to the taste of others instead. Ninety-five women rated 100 abstract artworks for liking and 100 faces for attractiveness. We found that the private taste proportion was much higher in abstract artworks, accounting for 75% of taste compared to 40% in the face condition. Abstract artworks were also less affected than faces by the instruction to rate according to others’ taste and therefore less susceptible to incorporation of external beauty standards. Together, our findings support the notion that art—and especially abstract art—crystallizes private taste.

  14. Biomimetic chemical sensors using bioengineered olfactory and taste cells

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Liping; Zou, Ling; Zhao, Luhang; Wang, Ping; Wu, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Biological olfactory and taste systems are natural chemical sensing systems with unique performances for the detection of environmental chemical signals. With the advances in olfactory and taste transduction mechanisms, biomimetic chemical sensors have achieved significant progress due to their promising prospects and potential applications. Biomimetic chemical sensors exploit the unique capability of biological functional components for chemical sensing, which are often sourced from sensing ...

  15. Dissolution methodology for taste masked oral dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gittings, Sally; Turnbull, Neil; Roberts, Clive J; Gershkovich, Pavel

    2014-01-10

    Conventional adult dosage forms are often not suitable for the paediatric and geriatric populations due to either swallowing difficulties or patient repulsion and a requirement for tailored dosing to individual compliance or physiological needs. Alternative formulations are available; however these often require the incorporation of more complex taste masking techniques. One approach to taste masking is to reduce contact between the bitter Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) and oral cavity taste bud regions. This is achieved by hindering release in the oral cavity, or including competitive inhibition of bitter sensation for example by using flavours or sweeteners. There may also be other sensational complications from the API such as residual burning, reflux or metallic taste sensations to deal with. In vitro dissolution testing is employed to elucidate taste masking capability by quantifying release of the drug in simulated oral cavity conditions. Dissolution testing approaches may also be used to potentially predict or quantify the effect of the taste masking technique on the resultant pharmacokinetic profile. The present review investigates the anatomy and physiology of the oral cavity and current approaches to taste masking. In vitro dissolution methodologies adopted in the evaluation of taste masked formulations are discussed for their relative merits and drawbacks. A vast array of methodologies has been employed, with little agreement between approaches, and a lack of biorelevance. Future directions in dissolution methodology such as TNO Intestinal Model (TIM) and the Artificial Stomach and Duodenum model (ASD) are also discussed.

  16. The taste sensory evaluation of medicinal plants and Chinese medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Masumi; Tokuyama, Emi; Miyanaga, Yohko; Uchida, Takahiro

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the use of the artificial taste sensor in the evaluation of 11 medicinal plants and 10 Chinese medicines with bitter and/or astringent tastes, and to assess the possible application of the sensor in the evaluation of taste and quality control of medicinal products. Aqueous extracts of the six bitter medicinal plants could be classified into three types, and those of the five astringent medicinal plants into two types, on the basis of sensor output pattern profiles. These differences seem to derive from the different structures of the main components. In the principal component analysis of the taste sensor output of 10 Chinese medicines, a new measure developed, the 'Euclidean distance', defined as the distance between a control and the targeted substance on the principal component map. This measure offers a possibility for indicating the different tastes of Chinese medicines. Lastly, we confirmed that berberine adsorption on the surface of the artificial membrane of the taste sensor was of the Langmuir type. The berberine content in extracts of medicinal plants could be evaluated by the taste sensor, and it was shown to be possible to use the taste sensor for the quality control of medicinal plants.

  17. Functional specialization of the male insula during taste perception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dalenberg, Jelle R.; Hoogeveen, Heleen R.; Renken, Remco J.; Langers, Dave R. M.; ter Horst, Gert J.

    2015-01-01

    The primary gustatory area is located in the insular cortex. Although the insular cortex has been the topic of multiple parcellation studies, its functional specialization regarding taste processing received relatively little attention. Studies investigating the brain response to taste suggested tha

  18. β-Catenin signaling regulates temporally discrete phases of anterior taste bud development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumangalathu, Shoba; Barlow, Linda A.

    2015-01-01

    The sense of taste is mediated by multicellular taste buds located within taste papillae on the tongue. In mice, individual taste buds reside in fungiform papillae, which develop at mid-gestation as epithelial placodes in the anterior tongue. Taste placodes comprise taste bud precursor cells, which express the secreted factor sonic hedgehog (Shh) and give rise to taste bud cells that differentiate around birth. We showed previously that epithelial activation of β-catenin is the primary inductive signal for taste placode formation, followed by taste papilla morphogenesis and taste bud differentiation, but the degree to which these later elements were direct or indirect consequences of β-catenin signaling was not explored. Here, we define discrete spatiotemporal functions of β-catenin in fungiform taste bud development. Specifically, we show that early epithelial activation of β-catenin, before taste placodes form, diverts lingual epithelial cells from a taste bud fate. By contrast, β-catenin activation a day later within Shh+ placodes, expands taste bud precursors directly, but enlarges papillae indirectly. Further, placodal activation of β-catenin drives precocious differentiation of Type I glial-like taste cells, but not other taste cell types. Later activation of β-catenin within Shh+ precursors during papilla morphogenesis also expands taste bud precursors and accelerates Type I cell differentiation, but papilla size is no longer enhanced. Finally, although Shh regulates taste placode patterning, we find that it is dispensable for the accelerated Type I cell differentiation induced by β-catenin. PMID:26525674

  19. [Dose-Response Dependences for Frequency of RET/PTC Gene Rearrangements in Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma after Irradiation. Simple Pooling Analysis of Molecular Epidemiological Data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koterov, A N; Ushenkova, L N; Biryukov, A P

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of all possible publications on the theme included in the previously formed base of sources on molecular epidemiology of RET/PTC rearrangements in thyroid papillary carcinoma a pooled analysis ("simple pooling data") on determination of the dose-effect dependences for RET/PTC frequency in radiogenic carcinomas of various irradiated groups was performed. (They are groups subjected to radiotherapeutic exposure, residents near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CNPP) and victims of nuclear bombing). The tendency to Pearson linear correlation (r = 0.746; p = 0.148) between the frequency of RET/PTC and the estimated dose on thyroid in the regions affected by the CNPP accident was revealed. But this tendency was recognized to be random owing to abnormally low values of the indicator for the most contaminated Gomel region. The method tentatively called "case-control" showed reliable differences in thyroid dose values for carcinomas with RET/PTC and without those. The versatility of changes was found: the lack of RET/PTC for radiotherapeutic impacts was associated with higher doses, whereas in case of the CNPP accident and for nuclear bombing victims it was the opposite. Probably, in the first case the "cellular cleaning" phenomenon after exposure to very high doses took place. Search of direct Pearson correlations between average/median thyroid doses on groups and RET/PTC frequency in carcinomas of these groups showed a high reliability for the dose-effect dependences- at the continuous dose scale (for RET/PTC in total and RET/PTC1 respectively: r = 0.830; p = 0.002 and r = 0.906; p = 0.0003); while there was no significant correlation received for RET/PTC3. When using the weighting least square regression analysis (proceeding from the number of carcinomas in samples), the specified regularities remained. Attempts to influence the strength of correlation by exception ofthe data of all the samples connected with the accident on the CNPP did not significantly

  20. Functional cell types in taste buds have distinct longevities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Perea-Martinez

    Full Text Available Taste buds are clusters of polarized sensory cells embedded in stratified oral epithelium. In adult mammals, taste buds turn over continuously and are replenished through the birth of new cells in the basal layer of the surrounding non-sensory epithelium. The half-life of cells in mammalian taste buds has been estimated as 8-12 days on average. Yet, earlier studies did not address whether the now well-defined functional taste bud cell types all exhibit the same lifetime. We employed a recently developed thymidine analog, 5-ethynil-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU to re-evaluate the incorporation of newly born cells into circumvallate taste buds of adult mice. By combining EdU-labeling with immunostaining for selected markers, we tracked the differentiation and lifespan of the constituent cell types of taste buds. EdU was primarily incorporated into basal extragemmal cells, the principal source for replenishing taste bud cells. Undifferentiated EdU-labeled cells began migrating into circumvallate taste buds within 1 day of their birth. Type II (Receptor taste cells began to differentiate from EdU-labeled precursors beginning 2 days after birth and then were eliminated with a half-life of 8 days. Type III (Presynaptic taste cells began differentiating after a delay of 3 days after EdU-labeling, and they survived much longer, with a half-life of 22 days. We also scored taste bud cells that belong to neither Type II nor Type III, a heterogeneous group that includes mostly Type I cells, and also undifferentiated or immature cells. A non-linear decay fit described these cells as two sub-populations with half-lives of 8 and 24 days respectively. Our data suggest that many post-mitotic cells may remain quiescent within taste buds before differentiating into mature taste cells. A small number of slow-cycling cells may also exist within the perimeter of the taste bud. Based on their incidence, we hypothesize that these may be progenitors for Type III cells.