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Sample records for pt barrow alaska

  1. Overview of environmental and hydrogeologic conditions at Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    To assist the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) in evaluating the potential effects of environmental contamination at their facility in Barrow, Alaska, a general assessment was made of the hydrologic system is the vicinity of the installation. The City of Barrow is located approximately 16 kilometers southwest of Point Barrow, the northernmost point in Alaska, and therefore lies within the region of continuous permafrost. Migration of surface or shallow- subsurface chemical releases in this environ- ment would be largely restricted by near-surface permafrost to surface water and the upper, suprapermafrost zone of the subsurface. In the arctic climate and tundra terrain of the Barrow area, this shallow environment has a limited capacity to attenuate the effects of either physical disturbances or chemical contamination and is therefore highly susceptible to degradation. Esatkuat Lagoon, the present drink- ing water supply for the City of Barrow, is located approximately 2 kilometers from the FAA facility. This lagoon is the only practical source of drinking water available to the City of Barrow because alternative sources of water in the area are (1) frozen throughout most of the year, (2) insufficient in volume, (3) of poor quality, or (4) too costly to develop and distribute.

  2. Tundra vegetation change near Barrow, Alaska (1972-2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, S.; Hollister, R. D.; Johnson, D. R.; Lara, M. J.; Webber, P. J.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2012-03-01

    Knowledge of how arctic plant communities will respond to change has been largely derived from plot level experimental manipulation, not from trends of decade time scale environmental observations. This study documents plant community change in 330 marked plots at 33 sites established during the International Biological Program near Barrow, Alaska in 1972. Plots were resampled in 1999, 2008 and 2010 for species cover and presence. Cluster analysis identified nine plant communities in 1972. Non-metric multidimensional scaling (NMS) indicates that plant communities have changed in different ways over time, and that wet communities have changed more than dry communities. The relative cover of lichens increased over time, while the response of other plant functional groups varied. Species richness and diversity also increased over time. The most dramatic changes in the cover of bryophytes, graminoids and bare ground coincided with a lemming high in 2008.

  3. AFSC/NMML: Bowhead Whale Aerial Abundance Survey off Barrow, Alaska, Spring 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial photographic surveys for bowhead whales were conducted near Point Barrow, Alaska, from 19 April to 6 June in 2011. Approximately 4,594 photographs containing...

  4. Shorelines of the Western Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Colville River to Point Barrow) used in shoreline change analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes shorelines from 65 years ranging from 1947 to 2012 for the north coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow. Shorelines were...

  5. Under-utilized Important Data Sets from Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, A. M.; Misarti, N.

    2012-12-01

    The Barrow region has a number of high resolution data sets of high quality and high scientific and stakeholder relevance. Many are described as being of long duration, yet span mere decades. Here we highlight the fact that there are data sets available in the Barrow area that span considerably greater periods of time (centuries to millennia), at varying degrees of resolution. When used appropriately, these data sets can contribute to the study and understanding of the changing Arctic. However, because these types of data are generally acquired as part of archaeological projects, funded through Arctic Social Science and similar programs, their use in other sciences has been limited. Archaeologists focus on analyzing these data sets in ways designed to answer particular anthropological questions. That in no way precludes archaeological collaboration with other types of scientists nor the analysis of these data sets in new and innovative ways, in order to look at questions of Arctic change over a time span beginning well before the Industrial Revolution introduced complicating factors. One major data group consists of zooarchaeological data from sites in the Barrow area. This consists of faunal remains of human subsistence activities, recovered either from middens (refuse deposits) or dwellings. In effect, occupants of a site were sampling their environment as it existed at the time of occupation, although not in a random or systematic way. When analyzed to correct for biases introduced by taphonomic and human behavioral factors, such data sets are used by archaeologists to understand past people's subsistence practices, and how such practices changed through time. However, there is much additional information that can be obtained from these collections. Certain species have fairly specific habitat requirements, and their presence in significant numbers at a site indicates that such conditions existed relatively nearby at a particular time in the past, and

  6. Quantifying fall migration of Ross's gulls (Rhodostethia rosea) past Point Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher-Koch, Brian D.; Davis, Shanti E.; Maftei, Mark; Gesmundo, Callie; Suydam, R.S.; Mallory, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    The Ross's gull (Rhodostethia rosea) is a poorly known seabird of the circumpolar Arctic. The only place in the world where Ross's gulls are known to congregate is in the near-shore waters around Point Barrow, Alaska where they undertake an annual passage in late fall. Ross's gulls seen at Point Barrow are presumed to originate from nesting colonies in Siberia, but neither their origin nor their destination has been confirmed. Current estimates of the global population of Ross's gulls are based largely on expert opinion, and the only reliable population estimate is derived from extrapolations from previous counts conducted at Point Barrow, but these data are now over 25 years old. In order to update and clarify the status of this species in Alaska, our study quantified the timing, number, and flight direction of Ross's gulls passing Point Barrow in 2011. We recorded up to two-thirds of the estimated global population of Ross's gulls (≥ 27,000 individuals) over 39 days with numbers peaking on 16 October when we observed over 7,000 birds during a three-hour period.

  7. Source regions for atmospheric aerosol measured at Barrow, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissar, A V; Hopke, P K; Harris, J M

    2001-11-01

    Aerosol data consisting of condensation nuclei (CN) counts, black carbon (BC) mass concentration, and aerosol light scattering coefficient at the wavelength of 450 nm (SC) measured at Barrow, AK, from 1986 to 1997 have been analyzed. BC and SC show an annual cycle with the Arctic haze maxima in the winter and spring and the minima in the summer. The CN time series shows two maxima in March and August. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) that combines the aerosol data with air parcel backward trajectories was applied to identify potential source areas and the preferred pathways that give rise to the observed high aerosol concentrations at Barrow. Ten-day isentropic back trajectories arriving twice daily at 500 and 1500 m above sea level were calculated for the period from 1986 to 1997. The PSCF analyses were performed based on the 80th percentile criterion values for the 2- and 24-h averages of the measured aerosol parameters. There was a good correspondence between PSCF maps for the 2- and 24-h averages, indicating that 1-day aerosol sampling in the Arctic adequately represents the aerosol source areas. In winter, the high PSCF values for BC and SC are related to industrial source areas in Eurasia. The trajectory domain in winter and spring is larger than in summer, reflecting weaker transport in summer. No high PSCF areas for BC and SC can be observed in summer. The result is related to the poor transport into the Arctic plus the strong removal of aerosol by precipitation in summer. In contrast to the BC and SC maps, the CN plot for summer shows high PSCF areas in the North Pacific Ocean. High CN values appearto be mostly connected with the long-range transport from Eurasia in winter and spring and with the reduced sulfur compound emission from biogenic activities in the ocean in the summer. PSCF analysis was found to be effective in identifying potential aerosol source areas.

  8. Comparison of UV irradiance measurements at Summit, Greenland; Barrow, Alaska; and South Pole, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernhard

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available An SUV-150B spectroradiometer for measuring solar ultraviolet (UV irradiance was installed at Summit, Greenland, in August 2004. Here we compare the initial data from this new location with similar measurements from Barrow, Alaska, and South Pole. Measurements of irradiance at 345 nm performed at equivalent solar zenith angles (SZAs are almost identical at Summit and South Pole. The good agreement can be explained with the similar location of the two sites on high-altitude ice caps with high surface albedo. Clouds attenuate irradiance at 345 nm at both sites by less than 6% on average, but can reduce irradiance at Barrow by more than 75%. Clear-sky measurements at Barrow are smaller than at Summit by 14% in spring and 36% in summer, mostly due to differences in surface albedo and altitude. Comparisons with model calculations indicate that aerosols can reduce clear-sky irradiance at Summit by 4–6%; aerosol influence is largest in April. Differences in total ozone at the three sites have a large influence on the UV Index. At South Pole, the UV Index is on average 20–80% larger during the ozone hole period than between January and March. At Summit, total ozone peaks in April and UV Indices in spring are on average 10–25% smaller than in the summer. Maximum UV Indices ever observed at Summit, Barrow, and South Pole are 6.7, 5.0, and 4.0, respectively. The larger value at Summit is due to the site's lower latitude. For comparable SZAs, average UV Indices measured during October and November at South Pole are 1.9–2.4 times larger than measurements during March and April at Summit. Average UV Indices at Summit are over 50% greater than at Barrow because of the larger cloud influence at Barrow.

  9. The aerosol at Barrow, Alaska: long-term trends and source locations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polissar, A. V.; Hopke, P. K.; Paatero, P.; Kaufmann, Y. J.; Hall, D. K.; Bodhaine, B. A.; Dutton, E. G.; Harris, J. M.

    Aerosol data consisting of condensation nuclei (CN) counts, black carbon (BC) mass, aerosol light scattering (SC), and aerosol optical depth (AOD) measured at Barrow, Alaska from 1977 to 1994 have been analyzed by three-way positive matrix factorization (PMF3) by pooling all of the different data into one large three-way array. The PMF3 analysis identified four factors that indicate four different combinations of aerosol sources active throughout the year in Alaska. Two of the factors (F1, F2) represent Arctic haze. The first Arctic haze have factor F1 is dominant in January-February while the second factor F2 is dominant in March-April. They appear to be material that is generally ascribed to long-range transported anthropogenic particles. A lower ratio of condensation nuclei to scattering coefficient loadings is obtained for F2 indicating larger particles. Factor F3 is related to condensation nuclei. It has an annual cycle with two maxima, March and July-August indicating some involvement of marine biogenic sources. The fourth factor F4 represents the contribution to the stratospheric aerosol from the eruptions of El Chichon and Mt. Pinatubo. No significant long-term trend for F1 was detected while F2 shows a negative trend over the period from 1982 to 1994 but not over the whole measurement period. A positive trend of F3 over the whole period has been observed. This trend may be related to increased biogenic sulfur production caused by reductions in the sea-ice cover in the Arctic and/or an air temperature increase in the vicinity of Barrow. Potential source contribution function (PSCF) analysis showed that in winter and spring during 1989 to 1993 regions in Eurasia and North America are the sources of particles measured at barrow. In contrast to this, large areas in the North Pacific Ocean and the Arctic Ocean was contributed to observed high concentrations of CN in the summer season. Three-way positive matrix factorization was an effective method to extract

  10. Backscatter from ice growing on shallow tundra lakes near Barrow, Alaska, winter 1991-1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, M. O.; Wakabayashi, H.; Weeks, W. F.; Morris, K.

    1993-01-01

    The timing of freeze-up and break-up of Arctic lake ice is a potentially useful environmental indicator that could be monitored using SAR. In order to do this, it is important to understand how the properties and structure of the ice during its growth and decay affect radar backscatter and thus lake ice SAR signatures. The availability of radiometrically and geometrically calibrated digital SAR data time series from the Alaska SAR Facility has made it possible for the first time to quantify lake ice backscatter intensity (sigma(sup o)) variations. This has been done for ice growing on shallow tundra lakes near Barrow, NW Alaska, from initial growth in September 1991 until thawing and decay in June 1992. Field and laboratory observations and measurements of the lake ice were made in late April 1992. The field investigations of the coastal lakes near Barrow confirmed previous findings that, (1) ice frozen to the lake bottom had a dark signature in SAR images, indicating weak backscatter, while, (2) ice that was floating had a bright signature, indicating strong backscatter. At all sites, regardless of whether the ice was grounded or floating, there was a layer of clear, inclusion-free ice overlaying a layer of ice with dense concentrations of vertically oriented tubular bubbles. At some sites, there was a third layer of porous, snow-ice overlaying the clear ice.

  11. A 15 year legacy of cloud and atmosphere observations in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupe, M.

    2012-12-01

    For the past 15 years, the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has operated the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) atmospheric observatory in Barrow, Alaska. Barrow offers many valuable perspectives on the Arctic environment that complement observations at lower latitudes. Unique features of the Arctic region include cold and dry atmospheric conditions, strong annual variability in sun light, a seasonally high-reflective surface, and persistent clouds that involve mixed-phase processes. ARM's ultimate objective with its flagship observatory at the northernmost point in U.S. territory is to provide measurements that can be used to improve the understanding of these atmospheric physical and radiative properties and processes such that they can be better represented in climate models. The NSA is the most detailed and long-lasting cloud-radiation-atmosphere observatory in the Arctic, providing continuous, sophisticated measurements of climate-relevant parameters. Instrument suites include active radars and lidars at various frequencies, passive radiometers monitoring radiation in microwave, infrared, visible and ultraviolet wavelengths, meteorological towers, and sounding systems. Together these measurements are used to characterize many of the important properties of clouds, aerosols, atmospheric radiation, dynamics, thermodynamics, and the surface. The coordinated nature of these measurements offers important multi-dimensional insight into many fundamental processes linking these different elements of the climate system. Moreover, the continuous operations of the facility support these observations over the full diurnal cycle and in all seasons of the year. This presentation will highlight a number of important studies and key findings that have been facilitated by the NSA observations during the first 15 years in operation. Some of these include: a thorough documentation of clouds, their occurrence frequency, phase, microphysical

  12. k178ar.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity K-1-78-AR in Barrows to Pt. Barrows, Arctic from 08/18/1978 to 09/18/1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity K-1-78-AR in Barrows to Pt. Barrows, Arctic from 08/18/1978 to...

  13. k178ar.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity K-1-78-AR in Barrows to Pt. Barrows, Arctic from 08/18/1978 to 09/18/1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with DGPS navigation data was collected as part of field activity K-1-78-AR in Barrows to Pt. Barrows, Arctic from 08/18/1978 to...

  14. BAID: The Barrow Area Information Database - an interactive web mapping portal and cyberinfrastructure for scientific activities in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cody, R. P.; Kassin, A.; Kofoed, K. B.; Copenhaver, W.; Laney, C. M.; Gaylord, A. G.; Collins, J. A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Barrow area of northern Alaska is one of the most intensely researched locations in the Arctic and the Barrow Area Information Database (BAID, www.barrowmapped.org) tracks and facilitates a gamut of research, management, and educational activities in the area. BAID is a cyberinfrastructure (CI) that details much of the historic and extant research undertaken within in the Barrow region in a suite of interactive web-based mapping and information portals (geobrowsers). The BAID user community and target audience for BAID is diverse and includes research scientists, science logisticians, land managers, educators, students, and the general public. BAID contains information on more than 12,000 Barrow area research sites that extend back to the 1940's and more than 640 remote sensing images and geospatial datasets. In a web-based setting, users can zoom, pan, query, measure distance, save or print maps and query results, and filter or view information by space, time, and/or other tags. Data are described with metadata that meet Federal Geographic Data Committee standards and are archived at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Earth Observing Laboratory (EOL) where non-proprietary BAID data can be freely downloaded. Recent advances include the addition of more than 2000 new research sites, provision of differential global position system (dGPS) and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) support to visiting scientists, surveying over 80 miles of coastline to document rates of erosion, training of local GIS personal to better make use of science in local decision making, deployment and near real time connectivity to a wireless micrometeorological sensor network, links to Barrow area datasets housed at national data archives and substantial upgrades to the BAID website and web mapping applications.

  15. Wind-dependent beluga whale dive behavior in Barrow Canyon, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, K. M.; Citta, J. J.; Okkonen, S. R.; Suydam, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    Beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) are the most abundant cetacean in the Arctic. The Barrow Canyon region, Alaska, is a hotspot for Pacific Arctic belugas, likely because the oceanographic environment provides reliable foraging opportunities. Fronts are known to promote the concentration of planktonic prey; when Barrow-area winds are weak or from the west, a front associated with the Alaskan Coastal Current (ACC) intensifies. This front is weakened or disrupted when strong easterly winds slow or displace the ACC. To determine if winds influence the diving depth of belugas, we used generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) to examine how the dive behavior of animals instrumented with satellite-linked time-depth recorders varied with wind conditions. When projected along-canyon winds are from the WSW and the front associated with the ACC is enhanced, belugas tend to target shallower depths (10-100 m) associated with the front. In contrast, when strong winds from the ENE displaced the ACC, belugas tended to spend more time at depths >200 m where the Arctic halocline grades into relatively warmer Atlantic Water (AW). The probability of diving to >200 m, the number of dives >200 m, and the amount of time spent below 200 m were all significantly related to along-canyon wind stress (p<0.01). From these results and known relationships between wind stress, currents and frontal structure in Barrow Canyon and the characteristic vertical distribution of Arctic cod, we infer that the probability of belugas targeting different depth regimes is based upon how wind stress affects the relative foraging opportunities between these depth regimes. Belugas are known to target AW throughout the Beaufort Sea; however, this is the first work to show that the probability of targeting the AW layer is related to wind stress.

  16. Mapping the Distribution of Traditional Iñupiat Ice Cellars in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klene, A. E.; Nyland, K.; Brown, J.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Nelson, F. E.

    2012-12-01

    Historically, ice cellars excavated in permafrost have been essential to the Iñupiat residents of Barrow, Alaska, and remain so today. These traditional facilities, ranging in age from more than a century to newly excavated, allow secure, year-round frozen storage of subsistence harvests over long periods. Temperatures within the cellars are critical because bacteria can damage meat even at temperatures below the freezing point, and have traditionally been close to those of surrounding permafrost. Climatic change has been suspected of compromising and causing some ice cellars in Barrow to fill with water. Temperatures were monitored in five ice cellars, with little change observed over five years of observation, although sloughing was observed in one cellar. The lack of knowledge about the ice cellars as part of the local infrastructure led to a collaboration begun in 2012 with the North Slope Borough's Department of Planning and Community Services. Several meetings were held in August 2012 with local residents and stakeholders to assemble a GIS data layer of ice-cellar locations and conditions for use by researchers and by Borough representatives. Applications range from developing plans for snow plowing and construction to the protection of foodstuff quality and important cultural resources. Results from this collaboration will lead to improved understanding of the practical aspects of ice cellars use and maintenance in this urban Arctic environment.

  17. Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT at Barrow, Alaska Using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Schaefer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Active layer thickness (ALT is a critical parameter for monitoring the status of permafrost that is typically measured at specific locations using probing, in situ temperature sensors, or other ground-based observations. Here we evaluated the Remotely Sensed Active Layer Thickness (ReSALT product that uses the Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar technique to measure seasonal surface subsidence and infer ALT around Barrow, Alaska. We compared ReSALT with ground-based ALT obtained using probing and calibrated, 500 MHz Ground Penetrating Radar at multiple sites around Barrow. ReSALT accurately reproduced observed ALT within uncertainty of the GPR and probing data in ~76% of the study area. However, ReSALT was less than observed ALT in ~22% of the study area with well-drained soils and in ~1% of the area where soils contained gravel. ReSALT was greater than observed ALT in some drained thermokarst lake basins representing ~1% of the area. These results indicate remote sensing techniques based on InSAR could be an effective way to measure and monitor ALT over large areas on the Arctic coastal plain.

  18. Good Morning from Barrow, Alaska! Helping K-12 students understand the importance of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, M.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation focuses on how an educator experiences scientific research and how those experiences can help foster K-12 students’ understanding of research being conducted in Barrow, Alaska. According to Zhang and Fulford (1994), real-time electronic field trips help to provide a sense of closeness and relevance. In combination with experts in the field, the electronic experience can help students to better understand the phenomenon being studied, thus strengthening the student’s conceptual knowledge (Zhang & Fulford, 1994). During a seven day research trip to study the arctic sea ice, five rural Virginia teachers and their students participated in Skype sessions with the participating educator and other members of the Radford University research team. The students were able to view the current conditions in Barrow, listen to members of the research team describe what their contributions were to the research, and ask questions about the research and Alaska in general. Collaborations between students and scientist can have long lasting benefits for both educators and students in promoting an understanding of the research process and understanding why our world is changing. By using multimedia venues such as Skype students are able to interact with researchers both visually and verbally, forming the basis for students’ interest in science. A learner’s level of engagement is affected by the use of multimedia, especially the level of cognitive processing. Visual images alone do no promote the development of good problem solving skills. However, the students are able to develop better problem solving skills when both visual images and verbal interactions are used together. As students form higher confidence levels by improving their ability to problem solve, their interest in science also increases. It is possible that this interest could turn into a passion for science, which could result in more students wanting to become scientists or science teachers.

  19. The Influence of a Record Heat Wave on Environmental Change in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanitski, Diane; Cox, Christopher; Stone, Robert; Divoky, George

    2016-04-01

    The May 2015 average temperature at the NOAA Global Monitoring Division's Barrow Observatory (BRW), Alaska, set a 90+ year record high, averaging -2.2°C (28°F), nearly 5°C (9°F) above average. The 2015 spring transition in Barrow was notable with the second earliest date of snow melt on record (JD148, May 28) and earliest ice free conditions on a local lagoon (JD178, June 27). Anomalous early snowmelt was also observed at nearby Cooper Island where a colony of sea birds, the Black Guillemot, nests each year once snow disappears. The appearance of "first egg" is well correlated with the date of snowmelt at BRW (Fig. 1), as is the ice-out date at the Isaktoak Lagoon (ISK). In 2015, the first egg was observed on JD159 (June 8), the earliest in the 40-year record (source: Friends of Cooper Island, http://cooperisland.org/). The 2015 melt at BRW was very early due mainly to an unusually intense heat wave affecting all of Alaska. Each day of advance in the melt date at BRW results in an annual net radiation increase at the surface of about 1%. The documented changes can influence biogeochemical cycles, permafrost temperatures, and potentially the release of stored carbon. BRW permafrost temperatures were warmer than the three previous years; the active layer depth (ALD) was ~6 cm deeper in 2015 than in 2014; and the temperature at 120 cm was ~0.5°C warmer. The anomalous warmth that prevailed during spring 2015 can be primarily attributed to atmospheric circulation. Abnormal warmth of the North Pacific and a perturbed jet stream underlie the heat wave and advection of warm air into the Arctic. Warming was likely amplified locally as the early melting of snow increased absorption of solar radiation. Key factors contributing to the anomalous 2015 spring at BRW and the impact early melt had on the 2015 summer surface radiation budget will be discussed. The role of circulation anomalies reported by reanalysis data over the course of the Barrow observational record will

  20. Environmental properties and microbial communities in coastal waters of Barrow, Alaska from July 11, 2007 to January 14, 2009 (NODC Accession 0073540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set consists of basic water column properties of the Beaufort Sea and the Chukchi Sea near Barrow, Alaska. The environmental properties include salinity,...

  1. Trip report for a visit to Alaska Maritime NWR areas in the vicinity of Barrow

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The main objective of the trip to Barrow was to aerially survey barrier islands from Barrow to Utukok Pass, to discuss refuge activities with N. Slope Borough and...

  2. Scientific Infrastructure to Support Atmospheric Science and Aerosol Science for the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Programs at Barrow, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, D. A.; Ivey, M.; Helsel, F.; Hardesty, J.; Dexheimer, D.

    2015-12-01

    Scientific infrastructure to support atmospheric science and aerosol science for the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement programs at Barrow, Alaska.The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's located at Barrow, Alaska is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site. The site provides a scientific infrastructure and data archives for the international Arctic research community. The infrastructure at Barrow has been in place since 1998, with many improvements since then. Barrow instruments include: scanning precipitation Radar-cloud radar, Doppler Lidar, Eddy correlation flux systems, Ceilometer, Manual and state-of-art automatic Balloon sounding systems, Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI), Micro-pulse Lidar (MPL), Millimeter cloud radar, High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) along with all the standard metrological measurements. Data from these instruments is placed in the ARM data archives and are available to the international research community. This poster will discuss what instruments are at Barrow and the challenges of maintaining these instruments in an Arctic site.

  3. Decadal trends in aerosol chemical composition at Barrow, Alaska: 1976–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Shaw

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol measurements at Barrow, Alaska during the past 30 years have identified the long range transport of pollution associated with Arctic Haze as well as ocean-derived aerosols of more local origin. Here, we focus on measurements of aerosol chemical composition to assess (1 trends in Arctic Haze aerosol and implications for source regions, (2 the interaction between pollution-derived and ocean-derived aerosols and the resulting impacts on the chemistry of the Arctic boundary layer, and (3 the response of aerosols to a changing climate. Aerosol chemical composition measured at Barrow, AK during the Arctic haze season is compared for the years 1976–1977 and 1997–2008. Based on these two data sets, concentrations of non-sea salt (nss sulfate (SO4= and non-crustal (nc vanadium (V have decreased by about 60% over this 30 year period. Consistency in the ratios of nss SO4=/ncV and nc manganese (Mn/ncV between the two data sets indicates that, although emissions have decreased in the source regions, the source regions have remained the same over this time period. The measurements from 1997–2008 indicate that, during the haze season, the nss SO4= aerosol at Barrow is becoming less neutralized by ammonium (NH4+ yielding an increasing sea salt aerosol chloride (Cl deficit. The expected consequence is an increase in the release of Cl atoms to the atmosphere and a change in the lifetime of volatile organic compounds (VOCs including methane. In addition, summertime concentrations of biogenically-derived methanesulfonate (MSA and nss SO4= are increasing at a rate of 12 and 8% per year, respectively. Further research is required to assess the environmental factors behind the increasing concentrations of biogenic aerosol.

  4. Bromine atom production and chain propagation during springtime Arctic ozone depletion events in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Chelsea R.; Shepson, Paul B.; Liao, Jin; Huey, L. Greg; Cantrell, Chris; Flocke, Frank; Orlando, John

    2017-03-01

    Ozone depletion events (ODEs) in the Arctic are primarily controlled by a bromine radical-catalyzed destruction mechanism that depends on the efficient production and recycling of Br atoms. Numerous laboratory and modeling studies have suggested the importance of heterogeneous recycling of Br through HOBr reaction with bromide on saline surfaces. On the other hand, the gas-phase regeneration of bromine atoms through BrO-BrO radical reactions has been assumed to be an efficient, if not dominant, pathway for Br reformation and thus ozone destruction. Indeed, it has been estimated that the rate of ozone depletion is approximately equal to twice the rate of the BrO self-reaction. Here, we use a zero-dimensional, photochemical model, largely constrained to observations of stable atmospheric species from the 2009 Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack (OASIS) campaign in Barrow, Alaska, to investigate gas-phase bromine radical propagation and recycling mechanisms of bromine atoms for a 7-day period during late March. This work is a continuation of that presented in Thompson et al. (2015) and utilizes the same model construct. Here, we use the gas-phase radical chain length as a metric for objectively quantifying the efficiency of gas-phase recycling of bromine atoms. The gas-phase bromine chain length is determined to be quite small, at BrO self-reaction is not a sufficient estimate for the rate of O3 depletion.

  5. Spatio-temporal Dynamics of Coastal Bluff Erosion near Barrow Alaska over the Past Decade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, K. B.; Lopez, A. F.; Aguirre, A.; Aiken, Q.; Cody, R. P.; Gaylord, A. G.; Manley, W. F.; Green, E.; Nelson, L.; Lougheed, V.; Velasco, A. A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic coastal systems are recognized as being one of the most climate change - vulnerable ecosystems on Earth and represent a complex nexus for examining change at the interface between marine, terrestrial, atmospheric, cryospheric and social systems. Although coastal erosion has received increased attention in the Arctic, few studies have examined the fine scale spatiotemporal dynamics and variability in erosion rates relative to the range of factors that act concomitantly to control erosion (e.g. duration of ice free seas, bathymetry, wave action, sea and air temperature, landscape morphology). This study reports on the spatiotemporal dynamics of annual DGPS surveys of eroding coastal bluffs in northern Alaska near the city of Barrow. Surveys along ca. 11km of the Elson Lagoon coast have been conducted since 2002 and additional surveys along ca. 120km of Elson Lagoon and Chuckhi Sea coast have been conducted since 2013. There has been strong inter-annual spatiotemporal variability in erosion rates with no indication of a long term change in erosion rates over time. Factors controlling wave intensity (e.g. wind run, off shore bathymetry, aspect of the coast relative to prevailing winds) explain most variability in erosion rates over time but during relatively calm periods, landscape history and morphology become more important. These findings highlight the extreme fine scale spatiotemporal heterogeneity in erosion rates along the Arctic Coast, and the importance of incorporating both storm-related climatic events and landscape characteristics when forecasting future environmental states in Arctic coastal landscapes. Case studies outlining new remote sensing technologies and future directions of study will also be outlined including terrestrial and airborne LiDAR, and Kite, UAV, and satellite imagery that is being used to derive and monitor topographic and hydrological change near eroding coastal bluffs; a wireless sensor network of micrometeorological and optical

  6. Detection of tundra trail damage near Barrow, Alaska using remote imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, K. M.; Eisner, W. R.; Kim, C. J.

    2017-09-01

    In the past several decades, the use of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) has proliferated in many Arctic communities in North America. One example is the village of Barrow, Alaska. This coastal community has only local roads, so all access to the interior utilizes off-road machines. These 4-wheel vehicles are the primary means of tundra traverse and transport in summer by hunters and berry-pickers, and by village residents accessing summer camps. Traveling cross-country is difficult due to the large number of thermokarst lakes, wetlands, and streams, and tundra trails tend to follow dryer higher ground while avoiding areas of high microrelief such as high-centered ice-wedge polygons. Thus, modern ATV trails tend to follow the margins of drained or partially drained thermokarst lake basins where it is flat and relatively dry, and these trails are heavily used. The deeply-ribbed tires of the heavy and powerful ATVs cause damage by destroying the vegetation and disturbing the underlying organic soil. Exposure of the dark soil enhances summer thaw and leads to local thermokarst of the ice-rich upper permafrost. The damage increases over time as vehicles continue to follow the same track, and sections eventually become unusable; this is especially true where the trail crosses ice-wedge troughs. Deep subsidence in the ponded troughs results in ATV users veering to avoid the wettest area, which leads to a widening of the damaged area. Helicopter surveys, site visits, and collection of ground penetrating radar data were combined with time series analysis of high-resolution aerial and satellite imagery for the period 1955-2014. The analysis reveals that there are 507 km of off-road trails on the Barrow Peninsula. About 50% of the total trail length was developed before 1955 in association with resource extraction, and an additional 40% were formed between 1979 and 2005 by ATVs. Segments of the more modern trail are up to 100 m wide. Damage to the tundra is especially pronounced

  7. Modeling Longshore Transport and Coastal Erosion Due to Storms at Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, S. D.

    2006-12-01

    Rapid erosion of Arctic coastlines is well-documented and is a major concern for the residents of Arctic coastal communities. This problem appears to be exacerbated by longer periods of ice-free conditions as the result of climate change. Despite substantial prior work and several engineering reports by agencies and firms charged with the investigation of mitigation options, there have been very few scientific studies aimed at modeling the dominant physical processes and making quantitative predictions of coastal erosion rates along Arctic coastlines in response to various forcing parameters/scenarios and storm return frequencies. Moreover, there has been virtually no work aimed at trying to quantify the relative contributions of various coastal erosion processes, including longshore sediment transport, cross-shore sediment transport due to storm surges and sediment inputs from coastal watersheds. In an effort to quantify erosion rates for the coastline near Barrow, Alaska, a numerical coastal erosion model has been developed that conserves sediment as longshore currents set up by oblique storm waves remove sediment from some locations and deposit it at others. This model uses the well-known CERC formula (or similar formulas), which expresses the longshore sediment transport rate as a nonlinear function of the angle that the coastline makes with the incoming wave crests. The rate of accretion or erosion is then computed from the spatial derivative of this sediment transport rate, with accretion where the derivative is negative and erosion where it is positive. Incoming wave angles are computed from hourly wind data by invoking the simple assumption that a fully-developed sea state is achieved in each time step. While this assumption is not valid in general, it is reasonable for the large, sustained storm events that are responsible for the bulk of the sediment transport. The 1955 coastline near Barrow, as digitized from aerial photos, was used to initialize the

  8. Polar Gateways Arctic Circle Sunrise Conference 2008, Barrow, Alaska: IHY-IPY Outreach on Exploration of Polar and Icy Worlds in the Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, John F.; Kauristie, Kirsti; Weatherwax, Allan T.; Sheehan, Glenn W.; Smith, Roger W.; Sandahl, Ingrid; Ostgaard, Nikolai; Chernouss, Sergey; Thompson, Barbara J.; Peticolas, Laura; Moore, Marla H.; Senske, David A.; Tamppari, Leslie K.; Lewis, Elaine M.

    2008-01-01

    Polar, heliophysical, and planetary science topics related to the International Heliophysical and Polar Years 2007-2009 were addressed during this circumpolar video conference hosted January 23-29, 2808 at the new Barrow Arctic Research Center of the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium in Barrow, Alaska. This conference was planned as an IHY-IPY event science outreach event bringing together scientists and educational specialists for the first week of sunrise at subzero Arctic temperatures in Barrow. Science presentations spanned the solar system from the polar Sun to Earth, Moon, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, and the Kuiper Belt. On-site participants experienced look and feel of icy worlds like Europa and Titan by being in the Barrow tundra and sea ice environment and by going "on the ice" during snowmobile expeditions to the near-shore sea ice environment and to Point Barrow, closest geographic point in the U.S. to the North Pole. Many science presentations were made remotely via video conference or teleconference from Sweden, Norway, Russia, Canada, Antarctica, and the United States, spanning up to thirteen time zones (Alaska to Russia) at various times. Extensive educational outreach activities were conducted with the local Barrow and Alaska North Slope communities and through the NASA Digital Learning Network live from the "top of the world" at Barrow. The Sun- Earth Day team from Goddard, and a videographer from the Passport to Knowledge project, carried out extensive educational interviews with many participants and native Inupiaq Eskimo residents of Barrow. Video and podcast recordings of selected interviews are available at http://sunearthday.nasa.gov/2008/multimedidpodcasts.php. Excerpts from these and other interviews will be included in a new high definition video documentary called "From the Sun to the Stars: The New Science of Heliophysics" from Passport to Knowledge that will later broadcast on NASA TV and other educational networks. Full conference

  9. Interactions of bromine, chlorine, and iodine photochemistry during ozone depletions in Barrow, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Thompson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic is known to be caused by active halogen photochemistry resulting from halogen atom precursors emitted from snow, ice, or aerosol surfaces. The role of bromine in driving ozone depletion events (ODEs has been generally accepted, but much less is known about the role of chlorine radicals in ozone depletion chemistry. While the potential impact of iodine in the High Arctic is more uncertain, there have been indications of active iodine chemistry through observed enhancements in filterable iodide, probable detection of tropospheric IO, and recently, detection of atmospheric I2. Despite decades of research, significant uncertainty remains regarding the chemical mechanisms associated with the bromine-catalyzed depletion of ozone, as well as the complex interactions that occur in the polar boundary layer due to halogen chemistry. To investigate this, we developed a zero-dimensional photochemical model, constrained with measurements from the 2009 OASIS field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. We simulated a 7 day period during late March that included a full ozone depletion event lasting 3 days and subsequent ozone recovery to study the interactions of halogen radicals under these different conditions. In addition, the effects of iodine added to our base model were investigated. While bromine atoms were primarily responsible for ODEs, chlorine and iodine were found to enhance the depletion rates and iodine was found to be more efficient per atom at depleting ozone than Br. The interaction between chlorine and bromine is complex, as the presence of chlorine can increase the recycling and production of Br atoms, while also increasing reactive bromine sinks under certain conditions. Chlorine chemistry was also found to have significant impacts on both HO2 and RO2. The results of this work highlight the need for future studies on the production mechanisms of Br2 and Cl2, as well as on the potential

  10. Monitoring Ecosystem Dynamics Ecosystem Using Hyperspectral Reflectance and a Robotic Tram System in Barrow Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, S.; Gamon, J. A.; Tweedie, C. E.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the future state of the earth system requires improved knowledge of ecosystem dynamics and long term observations of how ecosystem structures and functions are being impacted by global change. Improving remote sensing methods is essential for such advancement because satellite remote sensing is the only means by which landscape to continental-scale change can be observed. The Arctic appears to be impacted by climate change more than any other region on Earth. Arctic terrestrial ecosystems comprise only 6% of the land surface area on Earth yet contain an estimated 25% of global soil organic carbon, most of which is stored in permafrost. If projected increases in plant productivity do not offset forecast losses of soil carbon to the atmosphere as greenhouse gases, regional to global greenhouse warming could be enhanced. Soil moisture is an important control of land-atmosphere carbon exchange in arctic terrestrial ecosystems. However, few studies to date have examined using remote sensing, or developed remote sensing methods for observing the complex interplay between soil moisture and plant phenology and productivity in arctic landscapes. This study was motivated by this knowledge gap and addressed the following questions as a contribution to a large scale, multi investigator flooding and draining experiment funded by the National Science Foundation near Barrow, Alaska from 2005 - 2009. 1. How can optical remote sensing be used to monitor the surface hydrology of arctic landscapes? 2. What are the spatio-temporal dynamics of land-surface phenology (NDVI) in the study area and do hydrological treatment has any effect on inter-annual patterns? A new spectral index, the normalized difference surface water index (NDSWI) was developed and tested at multiple spatial and temporal scales. NDSWI uses the 460nm (blue) and 1000nm (IR) bands and was developed to capture surface hydrological dynamics in the study area using the robotic tram system. When applied to

  11. Spatial Variability of Land-Sea Carbon Exchange at a Coastal Area in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikawa, H.; Oechel, W.; Hastings, S.

    2007-12-01

    Relatively cold and low salinity sea water of the Arctic Ocean was considered to be a sink for atmospheric CO2 (Takahashi et al., 1997) because the solubility of CO2 in seawater increases as temperature decreases, and the arctic sea water transports CO2 to greater depths. However, carbon exchange in the Arctic sea is not well evaluated yet, because available data is very limited (Semiletov et al., 2007). Also, terrestrial inflows, such as thawing permafrost and coastal erosion, also affect oceanic air-sea CO2 exchange especially in the Arctic (ACIA., 2004) creating a variety of regional carbon cycles (Semiletov et al., 2007). Our aim is to quantify an air-sea CO2 exchange of a spatially wide coastal sea area, in Barrow, Alaska and to extrapolate the future carbon cycle in response to climate change. Boat cruises for pCO2 measurements operated from July 29 to August 5, 2007. The surveyed area was mainly divided into three parts: Chukchi Sea, Beaufort Sea, and Elson Lagoon. Conductivity of sea surface (CS) and sea surface temperature (SST) were also measured together with pCO2. The result showed distinct differences in pCO2 among three areas. Average delta pCO2 (dpCO2) (a difference between an atmospheric CO2 and pCO2), CS, and SST were -114.9 ppm, 47.0 mScm-1, and 8.0 C at Chukchi Sea, -53.1 ppm, 43.5 mScm-1, and 8.9 C at Beaufort Sea, and 43.7 ppm, 41.1 mScm-1, and 9.5 C at Elson Lagoon. Relatively high dpCO2 value in the Beaufort Sea implies a large terrestrial input from Elson Lagoon where dpCO2 value is positive. This is supported by lower CS in the Beaufort Sea and Elson Laggon than in the Chukchi Sea. Sea currents from Pacific Ocean, which continuously flow through the Chukchi Sea, are thought to carry warmer water. However, SST was lower in the Chukchi Sea than in the Beaufort Sea. This may be because a prevailing wind from north east creates Ekman transport causing an upwelling along the Chukchi Sea coast and this upwelling carries deep cold water to the

  12. GPR study of a prehistoric archaeological site near Point Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, R. B.; Jensen, A. M.

    2012-12-01

    A ground penetrating radar (GPR) study was performed on the prehistoric Thule cemetery site near Point Barrow, Alaska. The goals of this study were (a) to test this technology in this type of polar environment, and (b) to search for burials and other archaeological features in a location in imminent danger from ocean erosion. The Nuvuk site is currently eroding at an average rate measured at over 6 m/year. Prior archaeological work at the site had recovered over 80 burials with nearly 100 individuals represented, all of which were less than 1 m below surface, and detectable with small test pits. In addition, the first coastal Ipiutak occupation known north of Point Hope had been recently discovered, at a depth of nearly 2m below surface, in the erosion face. The occupation appeared to have been terminated by a large storm which overwashed the site, leaving a strandline immediately superimposed on the living surface. After that, approximately 1.5 m of sterile gravels had been deposited before the surface on which the Thule people were living formed. Both occupations are of considerable scientific interest. The matrix at the site consists of unconsolidated beach gravels, which necessitates opening large surface areas or use of shoring to test even small units to the depths of the Ipiutak deposit (approximately 8m x 8m at the surface to test 1m x 1m at 2m depth). Such excavations promote erosion, and are very costly in terms of time and labor, so a means to detect features buried at depths greater than those exposed by shovel test pits was desirable. GPR seemed a likely candidate, but it had not been used in such conditions before, and thus it was necessary to test it thoroughly prior to relying on GPR to eliminate areas from physical testing. The GPR imaged the subsurface to a depth of 3 meters at a frequency of 500MHz. Meter-deep test pits were placed at 2-meter intervals in the survey area in a grid pattern since the efficacy of the technology had yet to be shown

  13. Effect of Prudhoe Bay emissions on atmospheric aerosol growth events observed in Utqiaġvik (Barrow), Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesar, Katheryn R.; Cellini, Jillian; Peterson, Peter K.; Jefferson, Anne; Tuch, Thomas; Birmili, Wolfram; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Pratt, Kerri A.

    2017-03-01

    The Arctic is a rapidly changing ecosystem, with complex aerosol-cloud-climate feedbacks contributing to more rapid warming of the region as compared to the mid-latitudes. Understanding changes to particle number concentration and size distributions is important to constraining estimates of the effect of anthropogenic activity on the region. During six years of semi-continuous measurements of particle number size distributions conducted near Utqiaġvik (Barrow), Alaska, 37 particle-growth events were observed. The majority of events occurred during spring and summer with a monthly maximum in June, similar to other Arctic sites. Based on backward air mass trajectory analysis, similar numbers of particle-growth events were influenced by marine (46%) and Prudhoe Bay air masses (33%), despite air primarily coming from the Arctic Ocean (75 ± 2% of days) compared to Prudhoe Bay (8 ± 2% of days). The corresponding normalized particle-growth event frequency suggests that emissions from Prudhoe Bay could induce an average of 92 particle-growth events, more than all other air mass sources combined, at Barrow annually. Prudhoe Bay is currently the third largest oil and gas field in the United States, and development in the Arctic region is expected to expand throughout the 21st century as the extent of summertime sea ice decreases. Elevated particle number concentrations due to human activity are likely to have profound impacts on climate change in the Arctic through direct, indirect, and surface albedo feedbacks, particularly through the addition of cloud condensation nuclei.

  14. Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term End Point Rate Calculations for the Sheltered East Chukchi Sea coast of Alaska between Point Barrow and Icy Cape

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of short-term (~33 years) shoreline change rates for the north coast of Alaska between Point Barrow and Icy Cape. Rate calculations were...

  15. Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3 Transects with Short-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for the Exposed West Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of short-term (~33 years) shoreline change rates for the north coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow. Rate calculations...

  16. Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for the Exposed West Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of long-term (~65 years) shoreline change rates for the north coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow. Rate calculations...

  17. Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) version 4.3 Transects with Long-Term Linear Regression Rate Calculations for the Sheltered West Beaufort Sea coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of long-term (~65 years) shoreline change rates for the north coast of Alaska between the Colville River and Point Barrow. Rate calculations...

  18. The Arctic clouds from model simulations and long-term observations at Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming

    The Arctic is a region that is very sensitive to global climate change while also experiencing significant changes in its surface air temperature, sea-ice cover, atmospheric circulation, precipitation, snowfall, biogeochemical cycling, and land surface. Although previous studies have shown that the arctic clouds play an important role in the arctic climate changes, the arctic clouds are poorly understood and simulated in climate model due to limited observations. Furthermore, most of the studies were based on short-term experiments and typically only cover the warm seasons, which do not provide a full understanding of the seasonal cycle of arctic clouds. To address the above concerns and to improve our understanding of arctic clouds, six years of observational and retrieval data from 1999 to 2004 at the Atmospheric Radiation Management (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Barrow site are used to understand the arctic clouds and related radiative processes. In particular, we focus on the liquid-ice mass partition in the mixed-phase cloud layer. Statistical results show that aerosol type and concentration are important factors that impact the mixed-phase stratus (MPS) cloud microphysical properties: liquid water path (LWP) and liquid water fraction (LWF) decrease with the increase of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration; the high dust loading and dust occurrence in the spring are possible reasons for the much lower LWF than the other seasons. The importance of liquid-ice mass partition on surface radiation budgets was analyzed by comparing cloud longwave radiative forcings under the same LWP but different ice water path (IWP) ranges. Results show the ice phase enhance the surface cloud longwave (LW) forcing by 8˜9 W m-2 in the moderately thin MPS. This result provides an observational evidence on the aerosol glaciation effect in the moderately thin MPS, which is largely unknown so far. The above new insights are

  19. Trends of solar ultraviolet irradiance at Barrow, Alaska, and the effect of measurement uncertainties on trend detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Spectral ultraviolet (UV irradiance has been observed near Barrow, Alaska (71° N, 157° W between 1991 and 2011 with an SUV-100 spectroradiometer. The instrument was historically part of the US National Science Foundation's UV Monitoring Network and is now a component of NSF's Arctic Observing Network. From these measurements, trends in monthly average irradiance and their uncertainties were calculated. The analysis focuses on two quantities, the UV Index (which is affected by atmospheric ozone concentrations and irradiance at 345 nm (which is virtually insensitive to ozone. Uncertainties of trend estimates depend on variations in the data due to (1 natural variability, (2 systematic and random errors of the measurements, and (3 uncertainties caused by gaps in the time series. Using radiative transfer model calculations, systematic errors of the measurements were detected and corrected. Different correction schemes were tested to quantify the sensitivity of the trend estimates on the treatment of systematic errors. Depending on the correction method, estimates of decadal trends changed between 1.5% and 2.9%. Uncertainties in the trend estimates caused by error sources (2 and (3 were set into relation with the overall uncertainty of the trend determinations. Results show that these error sources are only relevant for February, March, and April when natural variability is low due to high surface albedo. This method of addressing measurement uncertainties in time series analysis is also applicable to other geophysical parameters. Trend estimates varied between −14% and +5% per decade and were significant (95.45% confidence level only for the month of October. Depending on the correction method, October trends varied between −11.4% and −13.7% for irradiance at 345 nm and between −11.7% and −14.1% for the UV Index. These large trends are consistent with trends in short-wave (0.3–3.0 μm solar irradiance measured with pyranometers at NOAA

  20. Active, passive and satellite borne spectroscopic measurements of tropospheric BrO during the OASIS 2009 campaign in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friess, U.; Sihler, H.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2009-12-01

    Bromine activation plays an important role in the chemistry of the springtime Arctic boundary layer. The presence of elevated BrO levels, leading to the destruction of near-surface ozone down to undetectable concentrations, is a widespread phenomenon over the sea-ice covered Arctic Ocean. BrO is thought to be released from saline surfaces, such as brine and frost flowers, by autocatalytic reaction cycles leading to the exponential increase of reactive bromine in the gas phase - the so-called bromine explosion. However, the direct sources of reactive bromine and the recycling mechanisms taking place at aerosol particles and snow surfaces are still not entirely understood, and the current knowledge on the BrO vertical distribution is very limited. Here we present synergistic multi-platform spectroscopic measurements of BrO performed during the OASIS 2009 field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. Active Long-Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements of BrO and other trace gases (e.g., ozone, NO2, SO2, formaldehyde) directly yield the average near-surface concentration along a light path of several kilometers along the coast using an artificial light source. Simultaneously a passive Multi-Axis DOAS instrument collected scattered skylight from different viewing directions between zenith and close to the horizon, making it very sensitive for the overall tropospheric BrO vertical column density. Furthermore, Multi-Axis DOAS measurements contain information on the vertical distribution of trace gases, allowing the retrieval of BrO vertical profiles. Our ground-based measurements will be compared with BrO vertical column densities from the GOME-2 instrument onboard the MetOp satellite. At high latitudes, this instrument has the capability to scan each location several times a day, allowing for the comparison of the diurnal variation of BrO with the ground-based observations.

  1. Assessment of the subsurface hydrology of the UIC-NARL main camp, near Barrow, Alaska, 1993-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, K.A.; Solin, G.L.

    1995-01-01

    Imikpuk Lake serves as the drinking-water source for the Ukpeagvik Inupiat Corporation-National Arctic Research Laboratory (UIC-NARL, formerly known as the Naval Arctic Research Laboratory) near Barrow, Alaska. Previously acceptable hazardous-waste disposal practices and accidental releases of various fuels and solvents during the past several decades have resulted in contamination of soil and ground water in the vicinity of the lake. As part of an assessment of the risk that subsurface contamination poses to the quality of water in the lake, the subsurface hydrology of the UIC-NARL main camp was examined. The study area is located approximately 530 kilometers north of the Arctic Circle, on the northern coast of Alaska, and the short annual thaw season and the presence of shallow, areally continuous permafrost restrict hydrologic processes. A transient ground-water system is present within the active layer-the shallow subsurface layer that thaws each summer and refreezes each winter. Water-level and thaw-depth data collected during the summers of 1993 and 1994 show that the configurations of both the water table and the subsurface frost govern the ground- water flow system in the UIC-NARL main camp and indicate that recharge to and discharge from the system are small. Spatial irregularities in the vertical extent of the active layer result from variations in land-surface elevation, variations in soil type, and the presence of buildings and other structures that either act as a heat source or block heat transfer to and from the subsurface. Distinct features in the active-layer hydrologic system in the UIC-NARL main camp include a permafrost ridge, which generally acts as a flow-system divide between the Arctic Ocean and inland water bodies; a mound in the water table, which indicates increased impedance to ground- water flow toward Imikpuk Lake and acts as a flow-system divide between the lake and Middle Salt Lagoon; and a depression in the water table, which

  2. The Role of Explicitly Modeling Bryophytes in Simulating Carbon Exchange and Permafrost Dynamics of an Arctic Coastal Tundra at Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, F.; Thornton, P. E.; McGuire, A. D.; Oechel, W. C.; Yang, B.; Tweedie, C. E.; Rogers, A.; Norby, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Bryophyte cover is greater than 50% in many Arctic tundra ecosystems. In regions of the Arctic where shrubs are expanding it is expected that bryophyte cover will be substantially reduced. Such a loss in cover could influence the hydrological, biogeochemical, and permafrost dynamics of Arctic tundra ecosystems. The explicit representation of bryophyte physiological and biophysical processes in large-scale ecological and land surface models is rare, and we hypothesize that the representation of bryophytes has consequences for estimates of the exchange of water, energy, and carbon by these models. This study explicitly represents the effects of bryophyte function and structure on the exchange of carbon (e.g., summer photosynthesis effects) and energy (e.g., summer insulation effects) with the atmosphere in the Community Land Model (CLM-CN). The modified model was evaluated for its ability to simulate C exchange, soil temperature, and soil moisture since the 1970s at Barrow, Alaska through comparison with data from AmeriFlux sites, USDA Soil Climate Networks observation sites at Barrow, and other sources. We also compare the outputs of the CLM-CN simulations with those of the recently developed Dynamical Organic Soil coupled Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (DOS-TEM). Overall, our evaluation indicates that bryophytes are important contributors to land-atmospheric C exchanges in Arctic tundra and that they play an important role to permafrost thermal and hydrological processes which are critical to permafrost stability. Our next step in this study is to examine the climate system effects of explicitly representing bryophyte dynamics in the land surface model. Key Words: Bryophytes, Arctic coastal tundra, Vegetation composition, Net Ecosystem Exchange, Permafrost, Land Surface Model, Terrestrial Ecosystem Model

  3. Alaskan Exemplary Program The Rural Alaska Honors Institute (RAHI) A Quarter Century of Success of Educating, Nurturing, and Retaining Alaska Native and Rural Students An International Polar Year Adventure in Barrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wartes, D.; Owens, G.

    2007-12-01

    RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute, began in 1983 after a series of meetings between the Alaska Federation of Natives and the University of Alaska, to discuss the retention rates of Alaska Native and rural students. RAHI is a six-week college-preparatory summer bridge program on the University of Alaska Fairbanks campus for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. The student body is approximately 94 percent Alaska Native. RAHI students take classes that earn them seven to ten college credits, thus giving them a head start on college. Courses include: writing, study skills, desk top publishing, Alaska Native dance or swimming, and a choice of geoscience, biochemistry, math, business, rural development, or engineering. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities to make up the RAHI program of early preparation for college. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. They are treated as honors students and are expected to meet all rigorous academic and social standards set by the program. All of this effort and activity support the principal goal of RAHI: promoting academic success for rural students in college. Over 25 years, 1,200 students have attended the program. Sixty percent of the RAHI alumni have entered four-year academic programs. Over 230 have earned a bachelors degree, twenty-nine have earned masters degrees, and seven have graduated with professional degrees (J.D., Ph.D., or M.D.), along with 110 associate degrees and certificates. In looking at the RAHI cohort, removing those students who have not been in college long enough to obtain a degree, 27.3 percent of RAHI alums have received a bachelors degree. An April 2006 report by the American Institutes for Research through the National Science Foundation found that: Rural Native students in the

  4. Geochemistry of rare-earth elements and its significance in the study of climatic and environmental change in Barrow, Arctic Alaska

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Geochemical characteristics of rare-earth elements (REE) and sedimentary features were studied in the borehole 96-7-1 from Elson Lagoon in Barrow, Arctic Alaska. The results show that total contents of REE (∑ REE) are lower, suggesting that physical weathering is dominate, therefore, concentrations of rare-earth elements are lower in the paleosediment environment. The chondrite-normalized distribution patterns of RE,Es are characterized by light REE (LREE) enrichment and Eu-depletion with the terrestrial sedimentary rock as the parent materials. In comparison with the borecore AB-67 in Elson Lagoon, the main conclusions for climatic and environmental changes are similar: before 1740 A. D. , it was cold and dry with terrestrial properties,but the comparatively warming around 1400 A.D. and 1550 A. D. ; after 1740 A. D. ,it became warming, or markedly after 1821 A.D. ; but it was cold around 1890 A. D.From 1904 A. D. , it got warm again, but it was relatively cold around 1971 A. D..

  5. Evidence for marine origin and microbial-viral habitability of sub-zero hypersaline aqueous inclusions within permafrost near Barrow, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colangelo-Lillis, J; Eicken, H; Carpenter, S D; Deming, J W

    2016-05-01

    Cryopegs are sub-surface hypersaline brines at sub-zero temperatures within permafrost; their global extent and distribution are unknown. The permafrost barrier to surface and groundwater advection maintains these brines as semi-isolated systems over geological time. A cryopeg 7 m below ground near Barrow, Alaska, was sampled for geochemical and microbiological analysis. Sub-surface brines (in situtemperature of -6 °C, salinity of 115 ppt), and an associated sediment-infused ice wedge (melt salinity of 0.04 ppt) were sampled using sterile technique. Major ionic concentrations in the brine corresponded more closely to other (Siberian) cryopegs than to Standard seawater or the ice wedge. Ionic ratios and stable isotope analysis of water conformed to a marine or brackish origin with subsequent Rayleigh fractionation. The brine contained ∼1000× more bacteria than surrounding ice, relatively high viral numbers suggestive of infection and reproduction, and an unusually high ratio of particulate to dissolved extracellular polysaccharide substances. A viral metagenome indicated a high frequency of temperate viruses and limited viral diversity compared to surface environments, with closest similarity to low water activity environments. Interpretations of the results underscore the isolation of these underexplored microbial ecosystems from past and present oceans.

  6. Metabolic and growth characteristics of novel diverse microbes isolated from deep cores collected at the Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE)-Arctic site in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, R.; Pettenato, A.; Tas, N.; Hubbard, S. S.; Jansson, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is characterized by vast amounts of carbon stored in permafrost and is an important focal point for the study of climate change as increasing temperature may accelerate microbially mediated release of Carbon stored in permafrost into the atmosphere as CO2 and CH4. Yet surprisingly, very little is known about the vulnerability of permafrost and response of microorganisms in the permafrost to their changing environment. This deficiency is largely due to the difficulty in study of largely uncultivated and unknown permafrost microbes. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) in the Arctic, we collected permafrost cores in an effort to isolate resident microbes. The cores were from the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), located at the northern most location on the Alaskan Arctic Coastal Plain near Barrow, AK, and up to 3m in depth. In this location, permafrost starts from 0.5m in depth and is characterized by variable water content and higher pH than surface soils. Enrichments for heterotrophic bacteria were initiated at 4°C and 1°C in the dark in several different media types, under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Positive enrichments were identified by an increase in optical density and cell counts after incubation period ranging from two to four weeks. After serial transfers into fresh media, individual colonies were obtained on agar surface. Several strains were isolated that include Firmicutes such as Bacillus, Clostridium, Sporosarcina, and Paenibacillus species and Iron-reducing Betaproteobacteria such as Rhodoferax species. In addition, methanogenic enrichments continue to grow and produce methane gas at 2°C. In this study, we present the characterization, carbon substrate utilization, pH, temperature and osmotic tolerance, as well as the effect of increasing climate change parameters on the growth rate and respiratory gas production from these permafrost isolates.

  7. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact campaign was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site in Barrow, Alaska. The carbonaceous component was characterized by measuring the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the PM, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine PM fractions (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) PM fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) study used standard Tisch “hi-vol” motors that have a known lifetime of approximately 1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance, and it is suggested that, for future deployment in the Arctic, the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric PM samples from Barrow, Alaska, from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the OC and BC concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer. However, the annual OC concentrations had a very different seasonal pattern with the highest concentrations during the summer, lowest concentrations during the fall, and increased concentrations during the winter and spring (Figure 1).

  8. Offshore baseline for the northern Alaska coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates along sheltered coastlines between Point Barrow and Icy Cape for the time period 1947 to 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  9. Offshore baseline for the northern Alaska coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates along exposed coastlines between the Colville River Delta and Point Barrow for the time period 1947 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  10. WestBeaufort_sheltered_baselines.shp - Offshore baseline for the northern Alaska coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates along sheltered coastlines between the Colville River Delta and Point Barrow for the time period 1947 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  11. Offshore baseline for the northern Alaska coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates along exposed coastlines between Point Barrow and Icy Cape for the time period 1947 to 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  12. Offshore baseline for the northern Alaska coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates along exposed coastlines between the Colville River Delta and Point Barrow for the time period 1947 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  13. Offshore baseline for the northern Alaska coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates along sheltered coastlines between Point Barrow and Icy Cape for the time period 1947 to 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  14. WestBeaufort_sheltered_baselines.shp - Offshore baseline for the northern Alaska coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates along sheltered coastlines between the Colville River Delta and Point Barrow for the time period 1947 to 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  15. Offshore baseline for the northern Alaska coastal region generated to calculate shoreline change rates along exposed coastlines between Point Barrow and Icy Cape for the time period 1947 to 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is an area of strategic economic importance to the United States, is home to remote Native American communities, and...

  16. Barrow Meteoroloigcal Station (BMET) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2004-11-01

    The Barrow meteorology station (BMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors mounted at four different heights on a 40 m tower to obtain profiles of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, and humidity. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility, and precipitation data.

  17. Barrow Arctic Terrestrial Observatory (BATO): An IPY Legacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J.; Hinkel, K. M.; Hollister, R. D.; Oberbauer, S. F.; Nelson, F. E.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Shiklomanov, N. I.; Sturm, M.; Tweedie, C. E.; Webber, P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Barrow, Alaska, has played an important role in the commemoration of the 125th anniversary of the first International Polar Year. Implementation of IPY projects during the Fourth International Polar Year (2007-2009) included a number of IPY approved projects: Thermal State of Permafrost (TSP), SnowNet, the International Tundra Experiment (ITEX), the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM), the Arctic Circumpolar Coastal Observatory Network (ACCO-Net), Back to the Future (1969-1974 IBP Tundra Biome sites) and the Ray-Murdoch Expedition (first Polar Year). Building on results of these and related activities and historical data, the National Science Foundation under its Arctic Observing Network (AON) program, recently funded several long-term projects (estimated duration through 2014): TSP (permafrost temperatures dating back to the 1940s) CALM (seasonal thaw depths dating back to 1962) ITEX (plant phenology starting in 1994) Ultraviolet measurements (since 1990) Other continuing observational projects include snow measurements (SnowNet), coastal erosion, lake dynamics, and bird and small mammal census (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Owl Research Institute). NOAA and DOE support permanent atmospheric observatories. Site and data information are contained on the Barrow Area Information Database (BAID on Google Earth). Collectively we suggest that these and other continuing field observations be designated as the Barrow Arctic Terrestrial Observatory (BATO). Trends in the historical and current data from these AON and several related projects are reported. AON specific data are available through the Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service (CADIS) data portal. The proposed BATO, an IPY legacy, is hosted on and adjacent to the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), a 7466-acre protected research area on land provided by the local owners (Ukpeagvik Iñupiat Corporation) and designated as a Scientific Research District by the regional government (North

  18. Genetics Home Reference: Donnai-Barrow syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... all people with Donnai-Barrow syndrome , the tissue connecting the left and right halves of the brain ( ... Criteria for Links Data Files & API Site Map Customer Support USA.gov Copyright Privacy Accessibility FOIA Viewers & ...

  19. Barrow real-time sea ice mass balance data: ingestion, processing, dissemination and archival of multi-sensor data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, J.; Mahoney, A. R.; Heinrichs, T. A.; Eicken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Sensor data can be highly variable in nature and also varied depending on the physical quantity being observed, sensor hardware and sampling parameters. The sea ice mass balance site (MBS) operated in Barrow by the University of Alaska Fairbanks (http://seaice.alaska.edu/gi/observatories/barrow_sealevel) is a multisensor platform consisting of a thermistor string, air and water temperature sensors, acoustic altimeters above and below the ice and a humidity sensor. Each sensor has a unique specification and configuration. The data from multiple sensors are combined to generate sea ice data products. For example, ice thickness is calculated from the positions of the upper and lower ice surfaces, which are determined using data from downward-looking and upward-looking acoustic altimeters above and below the ice, respectively. As a data clearinghouse, the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) processes real time data from many sources, including the Barrow MBS. Doing so requires a system that is easy to use, yet also offers the flexibility to handle data from multisensor observing platforms. In the case of the Barrow MBS, the metadata system needs to accommodate the addition of new and retirement of old sensors from year to year as well as instrument configuration changes caused by, for example, spring melt or inquisitive polar bears. We also require ease of use for both administrators and end users. Here we present the data and processing steps of using sensor data system powered by the NoSQL storage engine, MongoDB. The system has been developed to ingest, process, disseminate and archive data from the Barrow MBS. Storing sensor data in a generalized format, from many different sources, is a challenging task, especially for traditional SQL databases with a set schema. MongoDB is a NoSQL (not only SQL) database that does not require a fixed schema. There are several advantages using this model over the traditional relational database management system (RDBMS

  20. Snow Conditions Near Barrow in Spring 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, M.; Rigor, I.; Nghiem, S. V.; Sturm, M.; Kurtz, N. T.; Farrell, S. L.; Gleason, E.; Lieb-Lappen, R.; Saiet, E.

    2012-12-01

    Snow has a dual role in the growth and decay of Arctic sea ice. It provides insulation from colder air temperatures during the winter, which hinders sea ice formation. Snow is highly reflective and, as a result, it delays the surface ice melt during the spring. Summer snow melt influences the formation and location of melt ponds on sea ice, which further modifies heat transport into sea ice and the underlying ocean. Identifying snow thickness and extent is of key importance in understanding the surface heat budget, particularly during the early spring when the maximum snowfall has surpassed, and surface melt has not yet occurred. Regarding Arctic atmospheric chemical processes, snow may sustain or terminate halogen chemical recycling and distribution, depending on the state of the snow cover. Therefore, an accurate assessment of the snow cover state in the changing Arctic is important to identify subsequent impacts of snow change on both physical and chemical processes in the Arctic environment. In this study, we assess the springtime snow conditions near Barrow, Alaska using coordinated airborne and in situ measurements taken during the NASA Operation IceBridge and BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) field campaigns in March 2012, and compare these to climatological records. Operation IceBridge was conceived to bridge the gap between satellite retrievals ice thickness by ICESat which ceased operating in 2009 and ICESat-2 which is planned for launch in 2016. As part of the IceBridge mission, snow depth may be estimated by taking the difference between the snow/air surface and the snow/ice interface measured by University of Kansas's snow radar installed on a P-3 Orion and the measurements have an approximate spatial resolution of 40 m along-track and 16 m across-track. The in situ snow depth measurements were measured by an Automatic Snow Depth Probe (Magnaprobe), which has an accuracy of 0.5 cm. Samples were taken every one-to-two meters at two sites

  1. Modeling of Arctic Climate: Fairbanks-Barrow Top of the World Summer School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeev, V. A.; Walsh, J. E.; Sparrow, E. B.

    2009-04-01

    Arctic climate is the result of a complex interplay between the atmosphere, the ocean, sea ice and a terrestrial component in which freezing and thawing are critical to variations over a range of timescales. In view of the delicate balances between these components and their poorly documented sensitivities, it is not surprising that global climate models show the largest disagreement among themselves, and also the strongest greenhouse-induced changes, in the polar regions. Since changes in the Arctic may well have global implications, it is essential that Arctic climate simulations be enhanced in order to reduce the uncertainties in projections of climate change. Given the challenges and opportunities in Arctic modeling, the International Arctic Research Center's (IARC) 2008 summer school at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), was designed to bring the next generation of climate modelers to the Arctic. The two-week summer school brought together a group of 16 graduate students and young scientists, as well as specialists in Arctic climate and climate modeling, for two weeks, the first week in Fairbanks (May 27-31) and the second in Barrow (June 1-6). The young scientists gained a perspective on the key issues in Arctic climate from observational, diagnostic and modeling perspectives and received hands-on experience in the analysis of climate model output or in climate model experimentation at a level consistent with the students' expertise. The summer school consisted of background pedagogical lectures in the mornings, and mini-projects and informal discussions in the afternoons. The mini-projects have been performed in collaboration with lecturers, and utilized existing databases and available models. The second week was spent observing and experiencing Arctic research first-hand in Barrow, Alaska in coordination with the Barrow Arctic Sciences Consortium (BASC). The summer school and IARC are supported by the NSF, NOAA and JAMSTEC.

  2. Experimental constraints on the P/T conditions of high silica andesite storage preceding the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henton, S.; Larsen, J. F.; Traxler, N.

    2010-12-01

    We present new experimental results to constrain the P/T storage conditions of the high silica andesite (HSA) prior to the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Augustine Volcano forms a small island located in Alaska’s Cook Inlet, approximately 180 miles southwest of Anchorage. The 2006 eruption began January 11, 2006, and evolved from an initial phase of explosive activity, through continuous and effusive phases, ending approximately mid-March 2006. Lithologies erupted indicate pervasive hybridization between high- (HSA; 62.2-63.3 wt. % SiO2) and low-silica andesite (LSA; 56.6-58.7 wt% SiO2). This study focuses on experiments using the HSA as starting material to constrain magma storage conditions, based on amphibole stability. Experiments were conducted between 100-160 MPa and 800-900 °C, utilzing H2O saturated conditions and fO2 of Re-ReO. Both lightly crushed and sintered HSA were used as starting powders, seeded respectively with 5 wt. % amphibole and a mix of 5 wt. % amphibole and 20 wt. % plagioclase. Experiments with sintered starting material tended toward a bimodal distribution of experimental phenocrysts and microlites, whilst experiments of the lightly crushed material are more phenocryst rich. Preliminary results indicate that amphibole is stable at conditions of 120-140 MPa and 820-840 °C. These pressures correspond with depths of approximately 4.6-5.4 km, which are consistent with prior magma storage models for Augustine 1986 and 2006 magmas, as well as amphiboles found in other arc andesites (e.g., Redoubt and Soufriere Hills volcanoes). Experimental amphiboles are magnesio-hornblendes, which is in keeping with the natural HSA amphiboles. Experimental and natural hornblendes are similar in composition, with the main difference being a small FeO enrichment (2-3 wt%) and MgO depletion (1-2wt%) in the experimental grains. Further work will provide a more complete assessment of amphibole stability and composition, and will be applied towards

  3. Bowhead whale aerial abundance survey conducted by Alaska Fisheries Science Center, National Marine Mammal Laboratory from 2011-04-19 to 2011-06-11 (NCEI Accession 0133937)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial photographic surveys for bowhead whales were conducted near Point Barrow, Alaska, from 19 April to 6 June in 2011. Approximately 4,594 photographs containing...

  4. H. R. 5740: Barrow Gas Field Transfer Act of 1984. A bill introduced by the Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs, US House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session, May 24 and June 14, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-01-01

    The amended text of H.R. 5740 as it was submitted to the House for consideration delineates the transfer of natural gas rights to the North Slope Borough contained in the Barrow gas fields and the Walakpa discovery site. The conveyance includes support facilities and other interests for the purpose of exploring for and producing natural gas. The Bill specifies privileges and limitations under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Entitled the ''Barrow Gas Field Transfer Act of 1984'', the Bill was submitted to the second session of the 98th Congress.

  5. Alaska's indigenous muskoxen: a history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C. Lent

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Muskoxen (Ovibos moschatus were widespread in northern and interior Alaska in the late Pleistocene but were never a dominant component of large mammal faunas. After the end of the Pleistocene they were even less common. Most skeletal finds have come from the Arctic Coastal Plain and the foothills of the Brooks Range. Archaeological evidence, mainly from the Point Barrow area, suggests that humans sporadically hunted small numbers of muskoxen over about 1500 years from early Birnirk culture to nineteenth century Thule culture. Skeletal remains found near Kivalina represent the most southerly Holocene record for muskoxen in Alaska. Claims that muskoxen survived into the early nineteenth century farther south in the Selawik - Buckland River region are not substantiated. Remains of muskox found by Beechey's party in Eschscholtz Bay in 1826 were almost certainly of Pleistocene age, not recent. Neither the introduction of firearms nor overwintering whalers played a significant role in the extinction of Alaska's muskoxen. Inuit hunters apparently killed the last muskoxen in northwestern Alaska in the late 1850s. Several accounts suggest that remnant herds survived in the eastern Brooks Range into the 1890s. However, there is no physical evidence or independent confirmation of these reports. Oral traditions regarding muskoxen survived among the Nunamiut and the Chandalar Kutchin. With human help, muskoxen have successfully recolonized their former range from the Seward Peninsula north, across the Arctic Slope and east into the northern Yukon Territory.

  6. Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

    2010-02-22

    In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work

  7. Ancestral heaths : reconstructing the barrow landscape in the Central and Southern Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorenbosch, Marieke

    2013-01-01

    Barrows, i.e. burial mounds, are amongst the most important of Europe’s prehistoric monuments. Across Europe, barrows still figure as a prominent element in the landscape. Many barrows in Europe have been excavated, revealing much about what was buried inside these monuments. Little is known, howeve

  8. Apparent horizons in Clifton-Mota-Barrow inhomogeneous universe

    CERN Document Server

    Vitagliano, Vincenzo; Sotiriou, Thomas P; Liberati, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the apparent horizon dynamics in the inhomogeneous Clifton-Mota-Barrow solution of Brans-Dicke theory. This solution models a central matter configuration embedded in a cosmological background. In certain regions of the parameter space we find solutions exhibiting dynamical creation or merging of two horizons.

  9. Aldehydes in Artic Snow at Barrow (AK) during the Barrow 2009 Field Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barret, Manuel; Houdier, Stephan; Gallet, Jean-Charles; Domine, Florent; Beine, Harry; Jacobi, Hans-Werner; Weibring, Petter; Walega, James; Fried, Alan; Richter, Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Aldehydes (RCHO) are key reactive intermediates in hydrocarbon oxidation and in OH cycling. They are also emitted and taken up by the snowpack and a combination of both physical and photochemical processes are likely involved. Since the photolysis of aldehydes is a source of HOx radicals, these exchanges can modify the oxidative capacity of the overlying air. Formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (MeCHO), glyoxal (CHOCHO) and methylglyoxal (MeCOCHO) concentrations were measured in over 250 snow samples collected during the Barrow 2009 campaign between late February and mid April 2009. Both continental and marine snowpacks were studied as well as frost flowers on sea ice. We found that HCHO was the most abundant aldehyde (1 to 9 µg/L), but significant concentrations of dicarbonyls glyoxal and methylglyoxal were also measured for the first time in Arctic snow. Similar concentrations were measured for the continental and marine snowpacks but some frost flowers exhibited HCHO concentrations as high as 150 µg/L. Daily cycles in the surface snow were observed for HCHO and CH3CHO but also for the dicarbonyls and we concluded to a photochemical production of these species from organic precursors. Additional data such as gas phase concentrations for the measured aldehydes and snow physical properties (specific surface area, density …) will be used to discuss on the location of aldehydes in the snow. This is essential to identify and quantify the physical processes that occur during the exchange of trace gases between the snow and the atmosphere.

  10. Sobriety and alcohol use among rural Alaska Native elders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica C. Skewes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although notable health disparities related to alcohol use persist among Alaska Native people living in rural communities, there is a paucity of research examining drinking behaviour in particular segments of this population, including elders. One explanation for this is the distrust of behavioural health research in general and alcohol research in particular following the legacy of the Barrow Alcohol Study, still regarded as a notable example of ethics violations in cross-cultural research. Objective: The present study reports findings from one of the first research studies asking directly about alcohol abuse among rural Alaska Natives (AN since the study in Barrow took place in 1979. Design: We report findings regarding self-reported alcohol use included in an elder needs assessment conducted with 134 Alaska Native elders from 5 rural villages off the road system in Alaska. Data were collected in partnership between academic researchers and community members in accordance with the principles of Community-Based Participatory Research. Results: Findings showed very high rates of sobriety and low rates of alcohol use, contradicting stereotypes of widespread alcohol abuse among AN. Possible explanations and future research directions are discussed. Conclusions: This research represents one step forward in mending academic–community relationships in rural Alaska to further research on alcohol use and related health disparities.

  11. Using TerraSAR-X and hyperspectral airborne data to monitor surface deformation and physical properties of the Barrow permafrost landscape, Alask

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghshenas-Haghighi, M.; Motagh, M.; Heim, B.; Sachs, T.; Kohnert, K.; Streletskiy, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we assess seasonal subsidence/heaving due to thawing/freezing of the permafrost in Barrow (71.3 N, 156.5 W) at the northernmost point of Alaska. The topographic relief in this area is low. Thick Permafrost underlies the entire area, with large ice volumes in its upper layer. With a large collection of field measurements during the past decades at the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), it is an ideal site for permafrost investigation. There are long term systematic geocryological investigations within the Global Terrestrial Network (GTN-P) of the Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) programme. We use 28 TerraSAR-X images, acquired between December 2012 and December 2013 and analyze them using the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) technique to extract time-series of ground surface deformation. We also analyze hyperspectral images acquired by the airborne AISA sensor over Barrow area, within the AIRMETH2013 programme, to assess physical characteristics such as vegetation biomass and density, surface moisture, and water bodies. Finally, we combine the information derived from both InSAR and hyperspectral analysis, with field measurements to investigate the link between physical characteristics of the permafrost and surface displacement.

  12. 50 CFR Table I to Part 36 - Summary Listing the National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska as established by the Alaska Lands Act...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Summary Listing the National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska as established by the Alaska Lands Act, Pub. L. 96-487, December 2, 1980 I Table I to... (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ALASKA NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGES Pt. 36, Table I Table I...

  13. TRB Megalithic Tombs and Long Barrows in Central Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaniszewski, Stanisław

    In general, most Funnel-necked Beaker Culture (TRB) dolmens, passage graves, and long unchambered barrows were roughly oriented along the east-west axis with deviations located within the solar arc and out to the lunar major standstill limits. Though TRB sites are dispersed in North European Plain and southern Scandinavia and their locations are adapted to the local environment, it appears that some similar worldview and calendrical concepts were laid at the roots of their setting and alignment.

  14. Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact Study Final Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrett, Tate [Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The goal of the Barrow Black Carbon Source and Impact (BBCSI) Study was to characterize the concentration and isotopic composition of carbonaceous atmospheric particulate matter (PM) at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site in Barrow, AK. The carbonaceous component was characterized via measurement of the organic and black carbon (OC and BC) components of the total PM. To facilitate complete characterization of the particulate matter, filter-based collections were used, including a medium volume PM2.5 sampler and a high volume PM10 sampler. Thirty-eight fine (PM2.5) and 49 coarse (PM10) particulate matter fractions were collected at weekly and bi-monthly intervals. The PM2.5 sampler operated with minimal maintenance during the 12 month campaign. The PM10 sampler used for the BBCSI used standard Tisch hi-vol motors which have a known lifetime of ~1 month under constant use; this necessitated monthly maintenance and it is suggested that the motors be upgraded to industrial blowers for future deployment in the Arctic. The BBCSI sampling campaign successfully collected and archived 87 ambient atmospheric particulate matter samples from Barrow, AK from July 2012 to June 2013. Preliminary analysis of the organic and black carbon concentrations has been completed. This campaign confirmed known trends of high BC lasting from the winter through to spring haze periods and low BC concentrations in the summer.

  15. Landscape Level Analyses of Vegetation Cover in Northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botting, T.; Hollister, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Many International Tundra Experiment (ITEX) studies have been conducted to identify vegetation changes due to warming. However, knowledge gaps remain. For example, most of these studies are conducted at the plot level, not the landscape level, potentially masking larger scale impacts of climate change. An Arctic Systems Science (ARCSS) grid was established in Atqasuk, Alaska and Barrow, Alaska in the mid 1990's. In 2010, approximately 100 untreated vegetation plots were implemented at each grid site. These vegetation plots are 1 meter squared, spaced 100 meters apart, and span 1 kilometer squared. Each vegetation plot represents 100 square meters along the grid. This project will focus on how vegetation cover has changed at the landscape level, using the point frame method, from 2010 to 2013. Preliminary data analysis indicates that in Atqasuk, graminoids, deciduous shrubs, and evergreen shrubs show increased cover, while little change has occurred with bryophytes, forbs and lichens. In Barrow, graminoids, lichens and forbs have shown an increase in cover, while little change has occurred with bryophytes and deciduous shrubs. At both sites, graminoids represent the greatest increase in cover of all growth forms analyzed. This study will be the foundation for later work, with the purpose of predicting what ARCSS grid vegetation community compositions will be in the future. These expectations will be based on anticipated warming data from ITEX passively warmed vegetation plots. This will be the first time that ITEX vegetation warming research is applied to landscape level research in Barrow and Atqasuk.

  16. Digestible phosphorus levels for barrows from 50 to 80 kg

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Maria Oliveira dos Santos Nieto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study was carried out to evaluate the levels of digestible phosphorus in diets for barrows with a high potential for lean meat deposition from 50 to 80 kg. Eighty barrows, with an initial weight of 47.93±3.43 kg, were distributed in completely randomized blocks, with each group given five levels of digestible phosphorus (1.86, 2.23, 2.61, 2.99, and 3.36 g kg−1. There were eight replicates, and two animals per experimental unit. Phosphorus levels did not significantly influence feed intake, weight gain, or feed conversion ratio. Daily digestible phosphorus intake increased linearly as levels of phosphorus in the diet were increased. Phosphorus levels did not significantly influence muscle depth, loin eye area, backfat thickness, or the percentage and quantity of lean meat in the carcass. A linear increase was observed for feeding cost as the levels of digestible phosphorus in the diet were increased, and the level of 1.86 g kg−1 cost 29.4% less when compared with the level of 2.61 g kg−1. The dry matter, natural matter, the coefficient of the residue, and volatile solids of the waste were not significantly influenced by phosphorus levels. Conversely, it was possible to observe an increasing linear effect for total solids, total phosphorus, and total nitrogen in the waste of animals receiving diets with increased levels of digestible phosphorus. The level of 1.86 g kg−1, which corresponded to a daily intake of 4.77 g−1 of digestible phosphorus, meets the requirements of barrows weighing 50 to 80 kg.

  17. Total Petroleum Systems of the Northwest Shelf, Australia: The Dingo-Mungaroo/Barrow and the Locker-Mungaroo/Barrow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Michele G.

    1999-01-01

    The Northwest Shelf Province (U.S.G.S. #3948) of Australia contains two important hydrocarbon source-rock intervals and numerous high quality reservoir intervals. These are grouped into two petroleum systems, Dingo-Mungaroo/Barrow and Locker-Mungaroo/Barrow, where the Triassic Mungaroo Formation and the Early Cretaceous Barrow Group serve as the major reservoir rocks for the Jurassic Dingo Claystone and Triassic Locker Shale source rocks. The primary source rock, Dingo Claystone, was deposited in restricted marine conditions during the Jurassic subsidence of a regional sub-basin trend. The secondary source rock, Locker Shale, was deposited in terrestrially-influenced, continental seaway conditions during the Early Triassic at the beginning of the breakup of Pangea. These systems share potential reservoir rocks of deep-water, proximal and distal deltaic, marginal marine, and alluvial origins, ranging in age from Late Triassic through Cretaceous. Interformational seals and the regional seal, Muderong Shale, along with structural and stratigraphic traps account for the many types of hydrocarbon accumulations in this province. In 1995, the Northwest Shelf produced 42% of the hydrocarbon liquids in Australia, and in 1996 surpassed the Australian Bass Straits production, with 275,000 barrels per day (bpd) average. This region is the major producing province of Australia. Known reserves as of 1995 are estimated at 11.6 billion of barrels of oil equivalent (BBOE)(Klett and others, 1997) . Although exploration has been conducted since 1955, many types of prospects have not been targeted and major reserves continue to be discovered.

  18. A comparison of slice characteristics and sensory characteristics of bacon from immunologically castrated barrows with bacon from physically castrated barrows, boars, and gilts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, K L; Kyle, J M; Bohrer, B M; Schroeder, A L; Fedler, C A; Prusa, K J; Boler, D D

    2014-12-01

    The objectives were to compare slice characteristics and sensory attributes of bacon from immunologically castrated (IC) barrows with bacon from other sexes using a trained sensory panel. Bacon was obtained for sensory evaluation from 3 experiments. In Exp. 1, trimmed and squared bellies (n=180) of IC barrows, IC barrows fed ractopamine hydrochloride (IC+RAC), physically castrated (PC) barrows, intact males (IM), and gilts were used. Data were analyzed as a general linear mixed model and pen (n=48) served as the experimental unit. Treatment (sex or diet) was a fixed effect in all 3 experiments. In Exp. 2, untrimmed, natural fall bellies (n=96) from IC and PC barrows fed 0 or 30% or a withdrawal distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) program when slaughtered at 5 wk after the second dose (25 wk of age) were used. In Exp. 3, untrimmed, natural fall bellies (n=96) from IC and PC barrows fed the same experimental diets as in experiment 2 but slaughtered at 7 wk after the second dose (27 wk of age) were used. Data from Exp. 2 and 3 were analyzed as a 2×3 factorial arrangement in a randomized complete block design and pen was the experimental unit. Bellies from all 3 experiments were processed using the same protocols. In Exp. 1, IM had the greatest (Pbacon aroma and flavor among all treatments. No differences were detected among the other treatment groups for bacon aroma or flavor. There were no differences in bacon aroma or off-flavor between IC and PC barrows slaughtered at 5 wk after the second dose regardless of DDGS feeding program. Bacon from PC barrows was saltier (Pbacon from IC barrows when slaughtered at 5 wk after the second dose. There were no differences in bacon aroma, off-aroma, bacon flavor, or saltiness between IC and PC barrows slaughtered at 7 wk after the second dose regardless of DDGS feeding program. Total slice area of bacon slices from IC barrows slaughtered at 5 wk after the second dose were less (Pbacon even when feeding differing DDGS

  19. Illegal treatment of barrows with nandrolone ester: effect on growth, histology and residue levels in urine and hair

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, M.J.; Lasaroms, J.J.P.; Bennekom, van E.O.; Meijer, T.; Vinyeta, E.; Klis, van der J.D.; Nielen, M.W.F.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of 17ß-19-nortestosterone (17ßNT) treatment of barrows on residue levels and growth was evaluated. Five barrows were treated three times during the fattening period with 17ßNT phenylpropionate (Nandrosol, nandrolone phenylpropionate 50¿mg/ml,1¿mg/kg body weight). Another five barrows were

  20. Pathways of anaerobic organic matter decomposition in tundra soils from Barrow, Alaska

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herndon, Elizabeth M; Mann, Benjamin F; Roy Chowdhury, Taniya; Yang, Ziming; Wullschleger, Stan D; Graham, David; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    .... To predict releases of CO 2 and CH 4 from tundra soils, it is necessary to identify pathways of soil organic matter decomposition under the anoxic conditions that are prevalent in Arctic ecosystem...

  1. Preliminary Permafrost and Hangar Investigation: Naval Arctic Research Lab., Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    5 1 1 Background It is our understanding that the U.S. Navy possibly will acquire the Finn- ish air cushion vehicle ( ACV ), Tuuli. This project...ability to house the ACV and additional support equipment. CDR Buch requested CRREL to ob- serve and provide expertise regarding any past or possible

  2. AFSC/NMML: Bowhead whale aerial surveys and photography near Barrow, Alaska, from 1979-1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Bowhead whales were documented during their spring migration most years from 1979 to 1992 by biologists from NMML. This documentation consisted of flying aerial...

  3. Contaminants in Steller's Eider (Polysticta stelleri) on Alaskan Breeding Grounds Near Barrow, Alaska, 1999-2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Steller's eiders (Polysticta stelleri), the smallest of the four eider species, spend their entire life cycle in sub-arctic and arctic areas. The Pacific population...

  4. Use of electromyography to detect muscle exhaustion in finishing barrows fed ractopamine HCl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel, J A; Broxterman, R M; McCoy, G M; Craig, J C; Phelps, K J; Burnett, D D; Vaughn, M A; Barstow, T J; O'Quinn, T G; Woodworth, J C; DeRouchey, J M; Rozell, T G; Gonzalez, J M

    2016-06-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of dietary ractopamine HCl (RAC) on muscle fiber characteristics and electromyography (EMG) measures of finishing barrow exhaustion when barrows were subjected to increased levels of activity. Barrows ( = 34; 92 ± 2 kg initial BW) were assigned to 1 of 2 treatments: a conventional swine finishing diet containing 0 mg/kg ractopamine HCl (CON) or a diet formulated to meet the requirements of finishing barrows fed 10 mg/kg RAC (RAC+). After 32 d on feed, barrows were individually moved around a track at 0.79 m/s until subjectively exhausted. Wireless EMG sensors were affixed to the deltoideus (DT), triceps brachii lateral head (TLH), tensor fasciae latae (TFL), and semitendinosus (ST) muscles to measure median power frequency (MdPF) and root mean square (RMS) as indicators of action potential conduction velocity and muscle fiber recruitment, respectively. After harvest, samples of each muscle were collected for fiber type, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and capillary density analysis. Speed was not different ( = 0.82) between treatments, but RAC+ barrows reached subjective exhaustion earlier and covered less distance than CON barrows ( 0.29). There was a treatment × muscle interaction ( = 0.04) for end-point RMS values. The RAC diet did not change end-point RMS values in the DT or TLH ( > 0.37); however, the diet tended to decrease and increase end-point RMS in the ST and TFL, respectively ( fiber type, SDH, or capillary density measures ( > 0.10). Muscles of RAC+ barrows tended to have less type I fibers and more capillaries per fiber ( fibers of RAC+ barrows were larger ( fibers and larger type I, IIA, and IIX fibers ( fibers of the ST also contained less SDH compared with the other muscles ( fibers in the ST, possibly due to fibers being larger and less oxidative in metabolism. Size increases in type I and IIA fibers with no change in oxidative capacity could also contribute to early exhaustion of RAC

  5. The Nitrate Inventory of Unsaturated Soils at the Barrow Environmental Observatory: Current Conditions and Potential Future Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikoop, J. M.; Newman, B. D.; Arendt, C. A.; Andresen, C. G.; Lara, M. J.; Wainwright, H. M.; Throckmorton, H.; Graham, D. E.; Wilson, C. J.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Bolton, W. R.; Wales, N. A.; Rowland, J. C.

    2016-12-01

    Studies conducted in the Barrow Environmental Observatory under the auspices of the United States Department of Energy Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment (NGEE) - Arctic have demonstrated measurable nitrate concentrations ranging from soils. Several factors, however, could lead to drying of soils on different time scales. These include 1) topographic inversion of polygonal terrain associated with ice-wedge degradation, 2) increased connectivity and drainage of polygon troughs, similarly related to the thawing and subsidence of ice-wedges, and 3) near-surface soil drainage associated with wide-spread permafrost thaw and active layer deepening. Using a GIS approach we will estimate the current inventory of nitrate in the NGEE intensive study site using soil moisture data and existing unsaturated zone nitrate concentration data and new concentration data collected in the summer of 2016 from high- and flat-centered polygons and the elevated rims of low-centered polygons. Using this baseline, we will present potential future inventories based on various scenarios of active layer thickening and landscape geomorphic reorganization associated with permafrost thaw. Predicted inventories will be based solely on active layer moisture changes, ignoring for now potential changes associated with mineralization and nitrification of previously frozen old organic matter and changes in vegetation communities. We wish to demonstrate that physical landscape changes alone could have a profound effect on future nitrate availability. Nitrate data from recent NGEE campaigns in the Seward Peninsula of Alaska will also be presented.

  6. To Love—To Live: Barrow and Cart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa McDonald

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available From the residue of meaning, an ensemble of shadows. From the glint of souvenir, pliable impressions. In this paper, we work a poetics of encounter, of being, keeping, homage, of paying homage to fragility, to object and to interspecies—ways are found to engage motion from within and around co-extensive bodies. With the consolation of images, we follow the terse rhythms of routine and street where dwelling is a case of affective dissent. Zones of departure appear through testimony as well as chance, taking their own form. A footfall brings us as observers into quiet spaces which refuse self-estrangement as we travel by way of an unquiet ground. Breath, respiration, aspiration. Precipitation. Sculptures of mist are also the language of lives, of kinship between object, footfall and air. A language of brackets, questions, ellipses. There may be a man, a dog, a barrow. There may be a woman, a cart. Air. How shall this image be made?

  7. Horizontal And Vertical Profiling Of Microbial Communities Across Landscape Features At NGEE Site, Barrow, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, J. K.; Tas, N.; Brodie, E. L.; Graham, D. E.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Torn, M. S.; Wu, Y.; Wullschleger, S. D.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    Low- and high-centered polygons in permafrost-dominated ecosystems have distinct geochemical and hydrological characteristics that are expected to alter microbial processes that govern carbon cycle dynamics in Arctic landscapes. Key questions that must be answered if we are to represent these dynamics and their underlying controls into Earth System Models include: 1) Through which pathways is carbon processed in different areas of these polygons? 2) What regulates the release of C as CO2, or methane, and 3) Which microorganisms are responsible? As part of the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic) project, we collected samples across a transect of polygon features near Barrow, Alaska. The transect included samples from centers, edges and troughs of high-centered and low-centered polygons, including organic and deeper mineral soil layers. In addition, we took a 1.6 m deep core from our field site and sectioned it vertically to determine the microbial composition at different depths from active layer through upper layers of permafrost. Prior to sectioning, the core was CT-scanned to determine the physical heterogeneity throughout the core. Total DNA was extracted from sub-samples and the microbial community composition in the samples was determined by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. The resulting microbial profiles were related to corresponding environmental variables. We found that microbial community composition varied according to location across the polygons. Differences in elevation and moisture content were identified as the primary drivers of the observed changes in microbial composition. Methanogenic archaea were more abundant in the centers of low-centered and wetter polygons than high-centered polygons. These data suggest a potential for increased methane production towards the centers of polygons. By contrast, polygon edges had a greater relative abundance of typically aerobic soil microbes that suggests C loss as CO2 would predominate in these

  8. Barrow, Leibniz and the geometrical proof of the fundamental theorem of the calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauenberg, Michael

    2014-07-01

    In 1693, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz published in the Acta Eruditorum a geometrical proof of the fundamental theorem of the calculus. It is shown that this proof closely resembles Isaac Barrow's proof in Proposition 11, Lecture 10, of his Lectiones Geometricae, published in 1670. This comparison provides evidence that Leibniz gained substantial help from Barrow's book in formulating and presenting his geometrical formulation of this theorem. The analysis herein also supports the work of J. M. Child, who in 1920 studied the early manuscripts of Leibniz and concluded that he had frequently copied his diagrams from Barrow's book, but without acknowledgement. It is also shown that the diagram of Leibniz associated with his 1693 proof has often been reproduced with errors that make some aspects of his text difficult to comprehend.

  9. Monuments on the horizon : the formation of the barrow landscape throughout the 3rd and 2nd millennium BC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bourgeois, Quentin Philippe Jean

    2013-01-01

    Barrows, as burial markers, are ubiquitous throughout North-Western Europe. In some regions dense concentrations of monuments form peculiar configurations such as long alignments while in others they are spread out extensively, dotting vast areas with hundreds of mounds. These vast barrow landscapes

  10. Bowhead (Balaena mysticetus) and beluga (Delphinapterus leucas) whales in the Bering, Chukchi and Beaufort Seas: Annual report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Reproductive activity in the bowhead whale was observed in early May near Pt. Barrow Alaska, indicating that this species may calf and breed during the northward...

  11. Barrows' Integration of Cognitive and Clinical Psychology in PBL Tutor Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, Kareen

    2013-01-01

    Scholars have noted PBL is consistent with John Dewey's educational theories and with constructivist philosophies. This paper explores the similarities between the assumptions within Howard Barrows' principles for the PBL tutor's actions with Dewey's theories that address teacher behaviors and with Carl Rogers's conceptual frameworks that support…

  12. Barrows' Integration of Cognitive and Clinical Psychology in PBL Tutor Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaughan, Kareen

    2013-01-01

    Scholars have noted PBL is consistent with John Dewey's educational theories and with constructivist philosophies. This paper explores the similarities between the assumptions within Howard Barrows' principles for the PBL tutor's actions with Dewey's theories that address teacher behaviors and with Carl Rogers's conceptual frameworks that support…

  13. Alaska Radiometric Ages

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Radiometric Age file is a database of radiometric ages of rocks or minerals sampled from Alaska. The data was collected from professional publications...

  14. The stratigraphic record of prebreakup geodynamics: Evidence from the Barrow Delta, offshore Northwest Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Matthew T.; Jackson, Christopher A.-L.; Bell, Rebecca E.; Magee, Craig; Bastow, Ian D.

    2016-08-01

    The structural and stratigraphic evolution of rift basins and passive margins has been widely studied, with many analyses demonstrating that delta systems can provide important records of postrift geodynamic processes. However, the apparent lack of ancient synbreakup delta systems and the paucity of seismic imaging across continent-ocean boundaries mean that the transition from continental rifting to oceanic spreading remains poorly understood. The Early Cretaceous Barrow Group of the North Carnarvon Basin, offshore NW Australia, was a major deltaic system that formed during the latter stages of continental rifting and represents a rich sedimentary archive, documenting uplift, subsidence, and erosion of the margin. We use a regional database of 2-D and 3-D seismic and well data to constrain the internal architecture of the Barrow Group. Our results highlight three major depocenters: the Exmouth and Barrow subbasins and southern Exmouth Plateau. Overcompaction of pre-Cretaceous sedimentary rocks in the South Carnarvon Basin, and pervasive reworking of Permian and Triassic palynomorphs in the offshore Barrow Group, suggests that the onshore South Carnarvon Basin originally contained a thicker sedimentary succession, which was uplifted and eroded prior to breakup. Backstripping of sedimentary successions encountered in wells in the Exmouth Plateau depocenter indicates that anomalously rapid tectonic subsidence (≤0.24 mm yr-1) accommodated Barrow Group deposition, despite evidence for minimal, contemporaneous upper crustal extension. Our results suggest that classic models of uniform extension cannot account for the observations of uplift and subsidence in the North Carnarvon Basin and may indicate a period of depth-dependent extension or dynamic topography preceding breakup.

  15. Prothrombin time (PT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    PT; Pro-time; Anticoagulant-prothrombin time; Clotting time: protime; INR; International normalized ratio ... PT is measured in seconds. Most of the time, results are given as what is called INR ( ...

  16. Early human occupation of a maritime desert, Barrow Island, North-West Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veth, Peter; Ward, Ingrid; Manne, Tiina; Ulm, Sean; Ditchfield, Kane; Dortch, Joe; Hook, Fiona; Petchey, Fiona; Hogg, Alan; Questiaux, Daniele; Demuro, Martina; Arnold, Lee; Spooner, Nigel; Levchenko, Vladimir; Skippington, Jane; Byrne, Chae; Basgall, Mark; Zeanah, David; Belton, David; Helmholz, Petra; Bajkan, Szilvia; Bailey, Richard; Placzek, Christa; Kendrick, Peter

    2017-07-01

    Archaeological deposits from Boodie Cave on Barrow Island, northwest Australia, reveal some of the oldest evidence for Aboriginal occupation of Australia, as well as illustrating the early use of marine resources by modern peoples outside of Africa. Barrow Island is a large (202 km2) limestone continental island located on the North-West Shelf of Australia, optimally located to sample past use of both the Pleistocene coastline and extensive arid coastal plains. An interdisciplinary team forming the Barrow Island Archaeology Project (BIAP) has addressed questions focusing on the antiquity of occupation of coastal deserts by hunter-gatherers; the use and distribution of marine resources from the coast to the interior; and the productivity of the marine zone with changing sea levels. Boodie Cave is the largest of 20 stratified deposits identified on Barrow Island with 20 m3 of cultural deposits excavated between 2013 and 2015. In this first major synthesis we focus on the dating and sedimentology of Boodie Cave to establish the framework for ongoing analysis of cultural materials. We present new data on these cultural assemblages - including charcoal, faunal remains and lithics - integrated with micromorphology, sedimentary history and dating by four independent laboratories. First occupation occurs between 51.1 and 46.2 ka, overlapping with the earliest dates for occupation of Australia. Marine resources are incorporated into dietary assemblages by 42.5 ka and continue to be transported to the cave through all periods of occupation, despite fluctuating sea levels and dramatic extensions of the coastal plain. The changing quantities of marine fauna through time reflect the varying distance of the cave from the contemporaneous shoreline. The dietary breadth of both arid zone terrestrial fauna and marine species increases after the Last Glacial Maximum and significantly so by the mid-Holocene. The cave is abandoned by 6.8 ka when the island becomes increasingly distant

  17. Lactulose increases equol production and improves liver antioxidant status in barrows treated with Daidzein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weijiang Zheng

    Full Text Available Equol, one of the intestinal microflora metabolites of daidzein, has gained much attention for having greater bioactivity than its precursor (daidzein and daidzin and seeming to be promoted by hydrogen gas. The effects of lactulose on the equol-producing capacity and liver antioxidant status of barrows treated with daidzein were investigated in this study. Male castrated piglets (barrows of Landrace × Duroc, aged 40 days, were randomly divided into the following three groups: control group (C, n = 12, fed an isoflavones-free basic diet, daidzein group (D, n = 12, fed an isoflavones-free basic diet with 50 mg/kg of daidzein supplementation and daidzein+lactulose group (D+L, n = 12, fed an isoflavones-free basic diet with 1% of lactulose and 50 mg/kg of daidzein supplementation. After 20 days, the profile of short-chain fatty acids in the colon digesta showed that lactulose significantly increased the fermented capacity in the gastrointestinal tract of the barrows. First-void urinary equol concentrations were significantly higher in the D+L group than in the D group (3.13 ± 0.93 compared to 2.11 ± 0.82 μg/ml, respectively. Furthermore, fecal equol levels were also significantly higher in the D+L group than in the D group (12.00 ± 2.68 compared to 10.00 ± 2.26 μg/g, respectively. The population of bacteroidetes and the percentage of bacteroidetes to bacteria in feces were higher in the D+L group than in the D group. The DGGE profiles results indicate that lactulose might shift the pathways of hydrogen utilization, and changing the profiles of SRB in feces. Moreover, the D+L group had weak enhancement of T-SOD and CuZn-SOD activities in the livers of barrows treated with daidzein.

  18. Episodic Upwelling of Zooplankton within a Bowhead Whale Feeding Area near Barrow, AK

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    of sea ice, and Winter Water (WW; salty , cold) formed during the freezing of sea ice in the previous fall. Some cooler, fresher water , resulting...whale there and (2) the potential impact of climate change, particularly the ongoing reduction in sea ice and variability in Pacific Water presence...Barrow Canyon and the Beaufort shelf breaks during the summer and early fall in association with the presence of ice cover, water column

  19. Surface and Tower Meteorological Instrumentation at Barrow (METTWR4H) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritsche, MT

    2008-04-01

    The Barrow meteorology station (BMET) uses mainly conventional in situ sensors mounted at four different heights (2m, 10m, 20m and 40m) on a 40 m tower to obtain profiles of wind speed, wind direction, air temperature, dew point and humidity. It also obtains barometric pressure, visibility and precipitation data from sensors at the base of the tower. Additionally, a Chilled Mirror Hygrometer and an Ultrasonic wind speed sensor are located near the 2m level for comparison purposes.

  20. The relative importance of chlorine and bromine radicals in the oxidation of atmospheric mercury at Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Chelsea R.; Shepson, Paul B.; Steffen, Alexandra; Bottenheim, Jan W.; Liao, Jin; Huey, L. Greg; Apel, Eric; Weinheimer, Andy; Hall, Samuel R.; Cantrell, Christopher; Sive, Barkley C.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.; Hornbrook, Rebecca S.

    2012-07-01

    Mercury is a toxic environmental contaminant originating from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) is relatively long lived in the midlatitudes and can be transported long distances in the atmosphere. In the Polar Regions, mercury can have a much shorter lifetime and is known to experience episodic depletions following polar sunrise in concert with ozone depletion events. A series of photochemically initiated reactions involving halogen radicals is believed to be the primary pathway responsible for converting elemental mercury to oxidized forms of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) that are subsequently deposited to snow and ice surfaces. Using field measurements from the Ocean-Atmosphere-Sea Ice-Snowpack (OASIS) 2009 field campaign of GEM, RGM, ozone, and a large suite of both inorganic halogen and volatile organic compounds, we calculated steady state Br and Cl atom concentrations and investigated the contribution of Br, BrO, Cl, ClO, O3, and OH to the observed decay of GEM for five cases of apparent first-order decay. The results of this study indicate that Br and BrO are the dominant oxidizers for Arctic mercury depletion events, with Br having the greatest overall contribution to GEM decay. Ozone is likely the primary factor controlling the relative contribution of Br and BrO, as BrO is a product of the reaction of Br with ozone, and reaction with O3 can be the largest Br atom sink. Cl was not found to be significant in any of the studied events; however, this result is highly dependent on the rate constant, for which there is a large range in the literature. Modeled 48 h back trajectories of the mercury depletion events studied here indicate significant time spent over sea ice-covered regions, where the concentration of halogen radicals is likely higher than those estimated using local-scale chemical mole fractions.

  1. Status of EarthScope's Transportable Array in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, K.; Busby, R. W.; Enders, M.

    2014-12-01

    station in permafrost in Barrow, Alaska, & the hammer mode was used in unconsolidated materials at various locations in central and eastern Alaska. A second drill with more emphasis on downhole hammering will be developed in the Fall 2014. This would allow the same drill/tooling to be deployed and used in a variety of geologic conditions anticipated to be encountered at the reconned sites.

  2. IPY to Mark Expansion of Research Facilities on the North Slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, B. D.; Eicken, H.; Sheehan, G. W.; Glenn, R.

    2004-12-01

    The Barrow Global Climate Change Research Facility will open to researchers on the North Slope of Alaska during the 2007-08 anniversary of the first IPY. Between 1949 and 1980, arctic researchers were very active on the North Slope and in nearby waters largely because of the Naval Arctic Research Laboratory (NARL) at Barrow. NARL provided easy access, laboratories and logistical support. NARL was closed in 1981, but particularly during this past decade, Barrow-based arctic research projects have been back on the upswing. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) Barrow station was founded during the 1970s, and continues as part of NOAA's five station global network for monitoring atmospheric composition. The North Slope Borough's Department of Wildlife Management (DWM) has for the past 20 years conducted its own research. The DWM also served as logistical provider for growing numbers of arctic researchers without other logistical support. In the late 1990s, the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program (ARM: DOE's principal climate change research effort) created a Cloud and Radiation Testbed on the North Slope with atmospheric instrumentation at Barrow and Atqasuk. It is now part of the ARM Climate Research Facility, a National User Facility. In response to growing researcher needs, the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium (BASC) was formed in the late 1990s as a non-profit logistical support and community coordinating organization, and received the endorsement of Ukpeagvik Inupiat Corporation (UIC), NSB and the local community college. BASC provides logistical support to National Science Foundation (NSF) researchers through a cooperative agreement, and to others on a fee for service basis. UIC also dedicated 11 square miles of its land as the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), and charged BASC with management of the BEO. This land that has been used for research for more

  3. Effects of time after a second dose of immunization against GnRF (Improvest) independent of age at slaughter on commercial bacon slicing characteristics of immunologically castrated barrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavárez, M A; Bohrer, B M; Herrick, R T; Mellencamp, M A; Matulis, R J; Ellis, M; Boler, D D; Dilger, A C

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to determine the effects of time after a second dose of anti-GnRF immunization on fresh belly characteristics and slicing yields of immunologically castrated (IC) barrows, physically castrated (PC) barrows and gilts slaughtered at 24 weeks of age. The second dose was staggered so that IC barrows were slaughtered at 4, 6, 8, or 10 weeks after the second dose. Fresh belly characteristics (N=141) were collected at slaughter and bacon was manufactured commercially. The main effects in the model were treatment and the random effects of block and block within replication. Thickness, flop distance, and lipid content increased (L; Pbacon slicing characteristics in IC barrows.

  4. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  5. Alaska geothermal bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.)

    1987-05-01

    The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

  6. The Best of Alaska

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑钧

    2011-01-01

    Nothing awakes Alaska like a whale exploding out of the water or an eagle (鹰) pulling a silver fish from the river. Combine these images with high mountains, brilliant icebergs and wonderful meals and you really do have the best of Alaska!

  7. Invisibility and PT symmetry

    OpenAIRE

    MOSTAFAZADEH, Ali

    2013-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW A 87, 012103 (2013) Invisibility and PT symmetry Ali Mostafazadeh* Department of Mathematics, Koc¸ University, Sarıyer 34450, Istanbul, Turkey (Received 9 July 2012; published 3 January 2013) For a general complex scattering potential defined on a real line, we show that the equations governing invisibility of the potential are invariant under the combined action of parity and time-reversal (PT ) transformation. We determine the PT -symmetric as well as no...

  8. Alaska Problem Resource Manual: Alaska Future Problem Solving Program. Alaska Problem 1985-86.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorsuch, Marjorie, Ed.

    "Alaska's Image in the Lower 48," is the theme selected by a Blue Ribbon panel of state and national leaders who felt that it was important for students to explore the relationship between Alaska's outside image and the effect of that image on the federal programs/policies that impact Alaska. An overview of Alaska is presented first in…

  9. Time variation of the electron mass in the early universe and the Barrow-Magueijo model

    CERN Document Server

    Scóccola, Claudia G; Landau, Susana J; Vucetich, Héctor

    2008-01-01

    We put limits on the time variation of the electron mass in the early universe using observational primordial abundances of D, He4 and Li7, recent data from the Cosmic Microwave Background and the 2dFGRS power spectrum. Furthermore, we use these constraints together with other astronomical and geophysical bounds from the late universe to test Barrow-Magueijo's model for the variation in m_e. From our analysis we obtain -0.615 < G\\omega/c^4 < -0.045 (3\\sigma interval) in disagreement with the result obtained in the original paper.

  10. Warming but not thawing of the cold permafrost in northern Alaska during the past 50 years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Max; C.; Brewer

    2009-01-01

    Climate warming has not resulted in measurable thawing of the cold (-5°C to -10°C) permafrost in northern Alaska during the last half century. The maximum depths of summer thaw at five locations near Barrow, Alaska, in 2005 were within the ranges of the depths obtained at those same locations during the early 1950s. However, there has been a net warming of about 2°C, after a cooling of 0.4°C during 1953-1960, at the upper depths of the permafrost column at two of the locations. Thawing of permafrost from above (increase in active layer thickness) is determined by the summer thawing index for the specific year; any warming, or cooling, of the upper permafrost column results from the cumulative effect of changes in the average annual air temperatures over a period of years, assuming no change in surface conditions. Theoretically, thawing from the base of permafrost should be negligible even in areas of thin (about 100-200 m) permafrost in northern Alaska. The reported shoreline erosion along the northern Alaska coast is a secondary result from changes in the adjacent ocean ice coverage during the fall stormy period, and is not directly because of any "thawing" of the permafrost.

  11. Libraries in Alaska: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/alaska.html Libraries in Alaska To use the sharing features on ... JavaScript. Anchorage University of Alaska Anchorage Alaska Medical Library 3211 Providence Drive Anchorage, AK 99508-8176 907- ...

  12. Building on and Honoring Forty Years of PBL Scholarship from Howard Barrows: A Scientometric, Large-Scale Data, and Visualization-Based Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xian, Hanjun; Madhavan, Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Over the past forty years, Howard Barrows' contributions to PBL research have influenced and guided educational research and practice in a diversity of domains. It is necessary to make visible to all PBL scholars what has been accomplished, what is perceived as significant, and what is the scope of applicability for Barrows' groundbreaking…

  13. Alaska geology revealed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Labay, Keith A.

    2016-11-09

    This map shows the generalized geology of Alaska, which helps us to understand where potential mineral deposits and energy resources might be found, define ecosystems, and ultimately, teach us about the earth history of the State. Rock units are grouped in very broad categories on the basis of age and general rock type. A much more detailed and fully referenced presentation of the geology of Alaska is available in the Geologic Map of Alaska (http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/sim3340). This product represents the simplification of thousands of individual rock units into just 39 broad groups. Even with this generalization, the sheer complexity of Alaskan geology remains evident.

  14. Enigmatic barrows without offerings: Monte Deva (Gijón and Berducedo (Allande, in Asturias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Blas Cortina, Miguel Ángel

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The structural simplicity of two large barrows and their lack of grave goods make enigmatic tomb types, that although part of the megalithic tradition, could be located in the Early Bronze Age (Monte Deva V. Their easy classification as “poor tombs” (large poor tombs? ought to raise the possibility of other interpretations. The barrows, built by poorly nucleated societies in a context of very low population density, and with limited possibilities of exchange, are likely to be more due to a concrete funerary form, whose variations are considered, than to exclusively economic reasons.

    La simplicidad estructural de dos grandes túmulos y la carencia de ofrendas sintetizan modalidades sepulcrales enigmáticas que, si bien instaladas en la tradición megalítica, podrían situarse en el Bronce Antiguo (Monte Deva V. A su cómoda catalogación como “tumbas pobres” (¿grandes tumbas pobres? se le debe oponer la plausibilidad de otras opciones.
    Construidos por sociedades poco nucleadas, en un contexto de baja densidad demográfica y de limitadas posibilidades de intercambio, es probable que se deban más a una precisa normativa funeraria, cuyas variantes son consideradas, que a razones exclusivamente económicas.

  15. Phytomass in southeast Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert R. Mead

    1998-01-01

    Phytomass tables are presented for the southeast Alaska archipelago. Average phytomass for each sampled species of tree, shrub, grass, forb, lichen, and moss in 10 forest and 4 nonforest vegetation types is shown.

  16. Bibliography on Alaska estuaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This bibliography was compiled to assist in working up “profiles” for the estuaries in Alaska. The purpose of the profiles is to list in a narrative form the...

  17. Alaska waterfowl production, 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1964. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  18. Spring staging waterfowl on the Naknek River, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Alaska Peninsula/Becharof National Wildlife Refuge staff conducted a survey of spring staging waterfowl on the Naknek River in the Bristol Bay drainage, Alaska...

  19. Decadal trends in aerosol chemical composition at Barrow, AK: 1976–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Quinn

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol measurements at Barrow, AK during the past 30 years have identified the long range transport of pollution associated with Arctic Haze as well as ocean-derived aerosols of more local origin. Here, we focus on measurements of aerosol chemical composition to assess 1 trends in Arctic Haze aerosol and implications for source regions, 2 the interaction between pollution-derived and ocean-derived aerosols and the resulting impacts on the chemistry of the Arctic boundary layer, and 3 the response of aerosols to a changing climate. Aerosol chemical composition measured at Barrow, AK during the Arctic haze season is compared for the years 1976–1977 and 1997–2008. Based on these two data sets, concentrations of non-sea salt (nss sulfate (SO4= and non-crustal (nc vanadium (V have decreased by about 60% over this 30 year period. Consistency in the ratios of nss SO4=/ncV and nc manganese (Mn/ncV between the two data sets indicates that, although emissions have decreased in the source regions, the source regions have remained the same over this time period. The measurements from 1997–2008 indicate that, during the haze season, the nss SO4= aerosol at Barrow is becoming less neutralized by ammonium (NH4+ yielding an increasing sea salt aerosol chloride (Cl deficit. The expected consequence is an increase in the release of Cl atoms to the atmosphere and a change in the lifetime of volatile organic compounds (VOCs including methane. In addition, summertime concentrations of biogenically-derived methanesulfonate (MSA and nss SO4= are increasing at a rate of 12 and 8% per year, respectively. Further research is required to assess the environmental factors behind the increasing concentrations of biogenic aerosol.

  20. Heathland and the palynology of prehistoric barrows. Reflections on the interrelation between soil formation and pollen infiltration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenman-van Waateringe, W; Spek, Mattheus

    2016-01-01

    In the sandy areas of the Netherlands, heather (Calluna vulgaris) played an important role in the construction of prehistoric barrows, although, as will be shown in this paper, not in all periods as was recently asserted by Doorenbosch (2013). Since the mineralogical composition and the texture of t

  1. Spatial Gradients in Halogen Oxides Across the North Slope of Alaska Indicate That Halogen Activated Airmasses are Spatially Large

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, W. R.; Hoenninger, G. S.; Platt, U.

    2005-12-01

    Reactive halogens are important oxidizers in the polar atmosphere during springtime. They deplete tropospheric ozone, oxidize hydrocarbons, and oxidize gas-phase mercury, causing it to deposit to the snow pack. We want to understand the mechanism by which halides in on snow/ice crystals and/or in aerosol particles are converted to reactive halogen species. This understanding can assist in prediction of mercury deposition and how that deposition depends on environmental variables like sea-ice extent and temperature. This mechanistic knowledge is particularly important in the context of a changing Arctic system. To study halogen activation, we are working in the Studies of the Northern Alaskan Coastal System (SNACS) project and here show results from 2005 including the LEADX experiment. A number of studies have implicated leads (cracks in the sea ice) as a source of halogen activation, but it is unclear if halogens are directly activated on ice surfaces at the lead (e.g. frost flowers) or if the lead is less directly involved. To address the role of leads in halogen activation, we measured bromine monoxide (BrO) using Multiple Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) at Barrow and Atqasuk, Alaska over a four-month period. The locations of these sites, either on the coast near a recurring lead in the case of Barrow, or 100km inland in the case of Atqasuk provides an ability to measure spatial gradients on the 100km length scale. In addition, the Barrow instrument was the first implementation of fully automated two dimensional MAX-DOAS where both elevation and azimuth were scanned. Because the MAX-DOAS method typically detects path-averaged BrO amounts between the instrument and a range of approximately 10km, differences in BrO between viewing azimuths allows us to determine short-length scale BrO gradients. From the 2-D MAX-DOAS observations at Barrow, we find that there are very small if any spatial gradients on the 10km length scale. From the

  2. PT-symmetric strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amore, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.amore@gmail.com [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Díaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico); Fernández, Francisco M., E-mail: fernande@quimica.unlp.edu.ar [INIFTA (UNLP, CCT La Plata-CONICET), División Química Teórica, Diag. 113 y 64 (S/N), Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Garcia, Javier [INIFTA (UNLP, CCT La Plata-CONICET), División Química Teórica, Diag. 113 y 64 (S/N), Sucursal 4, Casilla de Correo 16, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Gutierrez, German [Facultad de Ciencias, CUICBAS, Universidad de Colima, Bernal Díaz del Castillo 340, Colima, Colima (Mexico)

    2014-04-15

    We study both analytically and numerically the spectrum of inhomogeneous strings with PT-symmetric density. We discuss an exactly solvable model of PT-symmetric string which is isospectral to the uniform string; for more general strings, we calculate exactly the sum rules Z(p)≡∑{sub n=1}{sup ∞}1/E{sub n}{sup p}, with p=1,2,… and find explicit expressions which can be used to obtain bounds on the lowest eigenvalue. A detailed numerical calculation is carried out for two non-solvable models depending on a parameter, obtaining precise estimates of the critical values where pair of real eigenvalues become complex. -- Highlights: •PT-symmetric Hamiltonians exhibit real eigenvalues when PT symmetry is unbroken. •We study PT-symmetric strings with complex density. •They exhibit regions of unbroken PT symmetry. •We calculate the critical parameters at the boundaries of those regions. •There are exact real sum rules for some particular complex densities.

  3. Earlier spring snowmelt in northern Alaska as an indicator of climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Robert S.; Dutton, Ellsworth G.; Harris, Joyce M.; Longenecker, David

    2002-05-01

    Predictions of global circulation models (GCMs) that account for increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases and aerosols in the atmosphere show that warming in the Arctic will be amplified in response to the melting of sea ice and snow cover. There is now conclusive evidence that much of the Arctic has warmed in recent decades. Northern Alaska is one region where significant warming has occurred, especially during winter and spring. We investigate how the changing climate of northern Alaska has influenced the annual cycle of snow cover there and in turn, how changes in snow cover perturb the region's surface radiation budget and temperature regime. The focus is on Barrow, Alaska, for which comprehensive data sets exist. A review of earlier studies that documented a trend toward an earlier disappearance of snow in spring is given. Detection and monitoring activities at Barrow are described, and records of snow disappearance from other sites in the Alaskan Arctic are compared. Correlated variations and trends in the date of final snowmelt (melt date) are found by examining several independent time series. Since the mid-1960s the melt date in northern Alaska has advanced by ~8 days. The advance appears to be a consequence of decreased snowfall in winter, followed by warmer spring conditions. These changes in snowfall and temperature are attributed to variations in regional circulation patterns. In recent decades, there has been a higher frequency of northerly airflow during winter that tends to diminish snowfall over northern Alaska. During spring, however, intrusions of warm moist air from the North Pacific have become more common, and these tend to accelerate the ablation of snow on the North Slope of Alaska. One result of an earlier melt date is an increase in the net surface radiation budget. At Barrow, net radiative forcing can exceed 150 W m-2 on a daily basis immediately following the last day of snowmelt, and as a result of an 8-day advance in this event

  4. Available phosphorus levels for 95 to 120 kg barrows genetically selected for lean gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Luís Corrêa Arouca

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With the objective of evaluating available phosphorus (aP levels in diets for barrows selected for lean meat deposition, eighty commercial hybrid pigs with initial weight of 94.05±1.05 kg were used in this experiment. Pigs were allotted in a completely randomized block design, with five treatments (0.092, 0.156, 0.220, 0,284, and 0.348% of aP, eight replicates and two pigs per experimental unit. The average daily weight gain of pigs increased and the feed conversion improved quadratically with increasing aP in the diets up to the estimated levels of 0.21 and 0.20%, respectively. There was no effect of the dietary aP on average daily feed intake. However, aP intake, bone strength and concentration of phosphorus in the bones increased linearly with increasing aP in the diets. The levels of aP did not affect carcass traits; however, the alkaline phosphatase activity was improved and the values of serum inorganic phosphorus increased quadratically up to the estimated levels of 0.26 and 0.27% of aP, respectively. The available phosphorus levels of 0.21, 0.27, and 0.35%, corresponding to daily aP intakes of 6.34, 8.13, and 10.44 g result, respectively, in greatest performance, blood and bone parameters of 95 to 120 kg barrows selected for lean gain.

  5. H07880: NOS Hydrographic Survey , Pt. St. Albans to Boulder Pt., Alaska, 1950-12-31

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has the statutory mandate to collect hydrographic data in support of nautical chart compilation for safe...

  6. PT quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Carl M; DeKieviet, Maarten; Klevansky, S P

    2013-04-28

    PT-symmetric quantum mechanics (PTQM) has become a hot area of research and investigation. Since its beginnings in 1998, there have been over 1000 published papers and more than 15 international conferences entirely devoted to this research topic. Originally, PTQM was studied at a highly mathematical level and the techniques of complex variables, asymptotics, differential equations and perturbation theory were used to understand the subtleties associated with the analytic continuation of eigenvalue problems. However, as experiments on PT-symmetric physical systems have been performed, a simple and beautiful physical picture has emerged, and a PT-symmetric system can be understood as one that has a balanced loss and gain. Furthermore, the PT phase transition can now be understood intuitively without resorting to sophisticated mathematics. Research on PTQM is following two different paths: at a fundamental level, physicists are attempting to understand the underlying mathematical structure of these theories with the long-range objective of applying the techniques of PTQM to understanding some of the outstanding problems in physics today, such as the nature of the Higgs particle, the properties of dark matter, the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, neutrino oscillations and the cosmological constant; at an applied level, new kinds of PT-synthetic materials are being developed, and the PT phase transition is being observed in many physical contexts, such as lasers, optical wave guides, microwave cavities, superconducting wires and electronic circuits. The purpose of this Theme Issue is to acquaint the reader with the latest developments in PTQM. The articles in this volume are written in the style of mini-reviews and address diverse areas of the emerging and exciting new area of PT-symmetric quantum mechanics.

  7. Twelve Years of Interviews with the Inupiat people of Arctic Alaska: Report from a Community Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, W. R.; Hinkel, K. M.; Cuomo, C.

    2015-12-01

    On 20 August 2015, a workshop was held in Barrow, Alaska, which presented the highlights of 12 years of research connecting local indigenous knowledge of landscape processes with scientific research on arctic lakes, tundra changes, and permafrost stability. Seventy-six Iñupiat elders, hunters, and other knowledge-holders from the North Slope villages of Barrow, Atqasuk, Wainwright, Nuiqsut, and Anaktuvuk Pass were interviewed, and over 75 hours of videotaped interviews were produced. The interviews provided information and observations on landforms, lakes, erosion, permafrost degradation and thermokarst, changes in the environment and in animal behavior, human modification of lakes, tundra damage from 4-wheel off-road vehicles, tundra trail expansion, and other phenomena. Community concerns regarding the impact of environmental change on food procurement, animal migration, human travel routes, and the future of subsistence practices were also prominent themes. Following an interview, each videotaped session was logged. Each time an elder pointed to a location on a map and explained a landscape event/observation or told a story, the time-stamp in the video was recorded. Each logged event consisted of a code and a short account of the observation. From these reference sheets, a Geographic Information System (GIS) dataset was created. A logged account for each videotape, with geographic coordinates, event code, and event description is available for each videotape. The goal of the workshop was to report on our findings, thank the community for their support, and collaboratively develop plans for archiving and disseminating this data. A complete video library and searchable, printed and digital issues of the logging dataset for archiving in the communities were also produced. Discussions with administrative personnel at the Tuzzy Library in Barrow and the Inupiat Heritage Center have enabled us to set standards and develop a timeline for turning over the library of

  8. De-convoluting mixed crude oil in Prudhoe Bay Field, North Slope, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K.E.; Scott, Ramos L.; Zumberge, J.E.; Valin, Z.C.; Bird, K.J.

    2008-01-01

    Seventy-four crude oil samples from the Barrow arch on the North Slope of Alaska were studied to assess the relative volumetric contributions from different source rocks to the giant Prudhoe Bay Field. We applied alternating least squares to concentration data (ALS-C) for 46 biomarkers in the range C19-C35 to de-convolute mixtures of oil generated from carbonate rich Triassic Shublik Formation and clay rich Jurassic Kingak Shale and Cretaceous Hue Shale-gamma ray zone (Hue-GRZ) source rocks. ALS-C results for 23 oil samples from the prolific Ivishak Formation reservoir of the Prudhoe Bay Field indicate approximately equal contributions from Shublik Formation and Hue-GRZ source rocks (37% each), less from the Kingak Shale (26%), and little or no contribution from other source rocks. These results differ from published interpretations that most oil in the Prudhoe Bay Field originated from the Shublik Formation source rock. With few exceptions, the relative contribution of oil from the Shublik Formation decreases, while that from the Hue-GRZ increases in reservoirs along the Barrow arch from Point Barrow in the northwest to Point Thomson in the southeast (???250 miles or 400 km). The Shublik contribution also decreases to a lesser degree between fault blocks within the Ivishak pool from west to east across the Prudhoe Bay Field. ALS-C provides a robust means to calculate the relative amounts of two or more oil types in a mixture. Furthermore, ALS-C does not require that pure end member oils be identified prior to analysis or that laboratory mixtures of these oils be prepared to evaluate mixing. ALS-C of biomarkers reliably de-convolutes mixtures because the concentrations of compounds in mixtures vary as linear functions of the amount of each oil type. ALS of biomarker ratios (ALS-R) cannot be used to de-convolute mixtures because compound ratios vary as nonlinear functions of the amount of each oil type.

  9. Barrow's Living Room: How a Tribal College Library Connects Communities across the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Erin

    2015-01-01

    More than just storerooms of information, tribal college libraries are gathering spaces that bring people together. The Tuzzy Consortium Library at IIisagvik College builds community by providing services and programs that reflect the values of Alaska's North Slope Iñupiaq people. The college library collaborates with different organizations to…

  10. Lysine requirement of starting barrows from two genetic groups fed on low crude protein diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Luís Fraga

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available A trial was carried out to determine the lysine requirement for starting barrows fed on ideal protein concept-based diets. Thirty-two pigs from a commercial crossbred genetic group (CCGG, BW=15.9 ± 1.4 kg and 32 pigs from a dam line one (DLGG, BW= 14.8 ± 1.0 kg were used. Pigs were allotted to 4 treatments with diets containing increasing levels of total lysine (0.80, 1.00, 1.20 and 1.40%. Methionine+cystine, threonine and tryptophan were adjusted according to ideal protein profile. Data from performance, plasma urea nitrogen (PUN and carcass composition were analyzed. CCGG showed higher daily feed intake, daily weight gain, PUN and protein:fat ratio in carcass, while DLGG showed higher fat carcass content and nitrogen retention. Fat content and protein:fat ratio in carcass for CCCGG and PUN and crude protein carcass content for DLGG showed quadratic response to increasing total lysine levels. Derivations of the quadratic equations indicated the total lysine requirement for CCGG starting barrows is 1.15% and for DLGG starting barrows is 1.09%.Foi realizado um trabalho com o objetivo de determinar a exigência em lisina para suínos castrados em fase inicial, alimentados com dietas formuladas de acordo com o conceito de proteína ideal. Trinta e dois suínos provenientes de cruzamento comercial (CC, PV = 15,9 kg e 32 suínos provenientes de linhagem materna (LM, PV= 14,8 kg foram alimentados com quatro dietas contendo níveis crescentes de lisina total (0,80; 1,00; 1,20 e 1,40%. Metionina + cistina, triptofano e treonina foram adicionados às dietas para manter constante o padrão de proteína ideal. Foram analisados dados de desempenho, nitrogênio da uréia plasmática (NUP e carcaça. Suínos do grupo CC apresentaram maior consumo diário de ração, ganho diário de peso, NUP e relação proteína: gordura na carcaça, enquanto que os animais do grupo LM apresentaram maiores teores de gordura na carcaça e retenção de nitrogênio. Teor de

  11. Seismology Outreach in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardine, L.; Tape, C.; West, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    Despite residing in a state with 75% of North American earthquakes and three of the top 15 ever recorded, most Alaskans have limited knowledge about the science of earthquakes. To many, earthquakes are just part of everyday life, and to others, they are barely noticed until a large event happens, and often ignored even then. Alaskans are rugged, resilient people with both strong independence and tight community bonds. Rural villages in Alaska, most of which are inaccessible by road, are underrepresented in outreach efforts. Their remote locations and difficulty of access make outreach fiscally challenging. Teacher retention and small student bodies limit exposure to science and hinder student success in college. The arrival of EarthScope's Transportable Array, the 50th anniversary of the Great Alaska Earthquake, targeted projects with large outreach components, and increased community interest in earthquake knowledge have provided opportunities to spread information across Alaska. We have found that performing hands-on demonstrations, identifying seismological relevance toward career opportunities in Alaska (such as natural resource exploration), and engaging residents through place-based experience have increased the public's interest and awareness of our active home.

  12. Phytomass in southwest Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert R. Mead

    2000-01-01

    Phytomass tables are presented for southwest Alaska. The methods used to estimate plant weight and occurrence in the river basin are described and discussed. Average weight is shown for each sampled species of tree, shrub, grass, forb, lichen, and moss in 19 forest and 48 nonforest vegetation types. Species frequency of occurrence and species constancy within the type...

  13. Current Ethnomusicology in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Thomas F.

    The systematic study of Eskimo, Indian, and Aleut musical sound and behavior in Alaska, though conceded to be an important part of white efforts to foster understanding between different cultural groups and to maintain the native cultural heritage, has received little attention from Alaskan educators. Most existing ethnomusical studies lack one or…

  14. Suicide in Northwest Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Robert

    1983-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1979 the Alaskan Native suicide rate (90.9 per 100,000) in Northwest Alaska was more than seven times the national average. Alienation, loss of family, low income, alcohol abuse, high unemployment, and more education were factors related to suicidal behavior. Average age for suicidal behavior was 22.5. (Author/MH)

  15. Venetie, Alaska energy assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Richard Pearson; Baca, Michael J.; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Brainard, James Robert

    2013-07-01

    This report summarizes the Energy Assessment performed for Venetie, Alaska using the principals of an Energy Surety Microgrid (ESM) The report covers a brief overview of the principals of ESM, a site characterization of Venetie, a review of the consequence modeling, some preliminary recommendations, and a basic cost analysis.

  16. Cytochrome P4501A biomarker indication of the timeline of chronic exposure of Barrow's goldeneyes to residual Exxon Valdez oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Daniel; Ballachey, B.E.; Trust, K.A.; Iverson, S.A.; Reed, J.A.; Miles, A.K.; Henderson, J.D.; Woodin, Bruce R.; Stegeman, John J.; McAdie, M.; Mulcahy, D.M.; Wilson, B.W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined hepatic EROD activity, as an indicator of CYP1A induction, in Barrow's goldeneyes captured in areas oiled during the 1989 Exxon Valdez spill and those from nearby unoiled areas. We found that average EROD activity differed between areas during 2005, although the magnitude of the difference was reduced relative to a previous study from 1996/1997, and we found that areas did not differ by 2009. Similarly, we found that the proportion of individuals captured from oiled areas with elevated EROD activity (-2 times unoiled average) declined from 41% in winter 1996/1997 to 10% in 2005 and 15% in 2009. This work adds to a body of literature describing the timelines over which vertebrates were exposed to residual Exxon Valdez oil and indicates that, for Barrow's goldeneyes in Prince William Sound, exposure persisted for many years with evidence of substantially reduced exposure by 2 decades after the spill. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  17. PT symmetry and supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Znojil, M

    2002-01-01

    A re-formulated, non-Hermitian version of the Witten's supersymmetric quantum mechanics is presented. Its use of pseudo-Hermitian (so called PT symmetric) Hamiltonians is reviewed and illustrated via several forms of an innovated supersymmetric partnership between strongly singular ("spiked") harmonic oscillators.

  18. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  19. Effects of immunological castration and distiller's dried grains with solubles on carcass cutability and commercial bacon slicing yields of barrows slaughtered at two time points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavárez, M A; Bohrer, B M; Asmus, M D; Schroeder, A L; Matulis, R J; Boler, D D; Dilger, A C

    2014-07-01

    Male pigs were randomly assigned to a castration method at birth and allotted to 48 pens (28 pigs/pen). Physically castrated (PC) barrows were castrated at 2 d of age; immunologically castrated (IC) barrows were administered Improvest (GnRF analog diphtheria toxoid conjugate; Zoetis, Kalamazoo, MI) at 16 and 20 wk of age. Distiller's dried grains with solubles (DDGS) feeding strategies included either 0% DDGS (control), 30% DDGS (30% DDGS) fed from 6 wk of age to slaughter, or 30% DDGS fed from 6 wk of age to second dose of Improvest and then fed 0% DDGS until slaughter (withdrawal). Four barrows closest to the median pen weight at 4.5 wk after second dose were selected for evaluation; two were randomly selected and slaughtered at 5 wk and the other two at 7 wk after second dose. Data from each slaughter time were analyzed independently as a 2 × 3 factorial design with pen as the experimental unit. At 5 wk after second dose, bone-in lean cutting yields were 2.63% units greater (P Bacon slicing yields (percentage of green weight) were 6.10% units less (P Bacon slicing yields (percentage of green weight) were 4.27% units less (P = 0.05) in IC compared with PC. These data suggested that while bacon slicing yield was reduced in IC barrows fed control and 30% DDGS compared with PC barrow counterparts, withdrawal of DDGS improved bacon slicing yields of IC barrows.

  20. Initial Conceptualization and Application of the Alaska Thermokarst Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, W. R.; Lara, M. J.; Genet, H.; Romanovsky, V. E.; McGuire, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Thermokarst topography forms whenever ice-rich permafrost thaws and the ground subsides due to the volume loss when ground ice transitions to water. The Alaska Thermokarst Model (ATM) is a large-scale, state-and-transition model designed to simulate transitions between landscape units affected by thermokarst disturbance. The ATM uses a frame-based methodology to track transitions and proportion of cohorts within a 1-km2 grid cell. In the arctic tundra environment, the ATM tracks thermokarst-related transitions among wetland tundra, graminoid tundra, shrub tundra, and thermokarst lakes. In the boreal forest environment, the ATM tracks transitions among forested permafrost plateau, thermokarst lakes, collapse scar fens and bogs. The transition from one cohort to another due to thermokarst processes can take place if thaw reaches ice-rich ground layers either due to pulse disturbance (i.e. large precipitation event or fires), or due to gradual active layer deepening that eventually results in penetration of the protective layer. The protective layer buffers the ice-rich soils from the land surface and is critical to determine how susceptible an area is to thermokarst degradation. The rate of terrain transition in our model is determined by a set of rules that are based upon the ice-content of the soil, the drainage efficiency (or the ability of the landscape to store or transport water), the cumulative probability of thermokarst initiation, distance from rivers, lake dynamics (increasing, decreasing, or stable), and other factors. Tundra types are allowed to transition from one type to another (for example, wetland tundra to graminoid tundra) under favorable climatic conditions. In this study, we present our conceptualization and initial simulation results from in the arctic (the Barrow Peninsula) and boreal (the Tanana Flats) regions of Alaska.

  1. Oil and Gas Resources of the Arctic Alaska Petroleum Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseknecht, David W.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    The Arctic Alaska Petroleum Province, encompassing all the lands and adjacent Continental Shelf areas north of the Brooks Range-Herald arch, is one of the most petroleum-productive areas in the United States, having produced about 15 billion bbl of oil. Seven unitized oil fields currently contribute to production, and three additional oil fields have been unitized but are not yet producing. Most known petroleum accumulations involve structural or combination structural-stratigraphic traps related to closure along the Barrow arch, a regional basement high, which has focused regional hydrocarbon migration since Early Cretaceous time. Several oil accumulations in stratigraphic traps have been developed in recent years. In addition to three small gas fields producing for local consumption, more than 20 additional oil and gas discoveries remain undeveloped. This geologically complex region includes prospective strata within passive-margin, rift, and foreland-basin sequences. Oil and gas were generated from multiple source rocks throughout the region. Although some reservoired oils appear to be derived from a single source rock, evidence for significant mixing of hydrocarbons from multiple source rocks indicates a composite petroleum system. Both extensional and contractional tectonic structures provide ample exploration targets, and recent emphasis on stratigraphic traps has demonstrated a significant resource potential in shelf and turbidite sequences of Jurassic through Tertiary age. Recent estimates of the total mean volume of undiscovered resources in the Arctic Alaska Petroleum Province by the U.S. Geological Survey and U.S. Minerals Management Service are more than 50 billion bbl of oil and natural-gas liquids and 227 trillion ft3 of gas, distributed approximately equally between Federal offshore and combined onshore and State offshore areas.

  2. Fat, meat quality and sensory attributes of Large White × Landrace barrows fed with crude glycerine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Belen Linares

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of alternative raw materials like crude glycerine in animal feed to reduce final costs could be of interest as the sector seeks to increase its competitiveness. The aims of the present work were to evaluate the effect of crude glycerine on back-fat thickness and the proximate composition of pork and to examine the effect on pork quality of using growing-finishing feeds with different percentages of crude glycerine added. For this purpose 60 crossbreed (Large White × Landrace barrows were subdivided into three groups according to the crude glycerine concentration administered in feed: C, control diet, no crude glycerine; and G2.5 and G5 with 2.5% and 5% added crude glycerine, respectively. This study evaluated proximate composition, pH, cooking losses, texture, colour coordinates, fatty acid profile, and sensorial analysis. No differences were found in any of the three groups studied (C, G2.5, G5 for measurements performed both before (with ultrasound equipment and after slaughter (millimetre ruler. The proximate composition and the physical-chemical parameters of longissimus dorsi were similar between groups. There were no differences detected (p>0.05 between the three groups as regards the CIELab coordinates, textural profile and sensory attributes. Therefore, 5% crude glycerine to replace corn could be used as an ingredient in pig feed without appreciably affecting the back-fat and meat quality characteristics.

  3. Southeast Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2004-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent southeast Alaska inventory and analysis conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). Southeast Alaska has about 22.9 million acres, of which two-thirds are vegetated. Almost 11 million acres are forest land and about 4 million acres have nonforest...

  4. Characterization of azo dyes on Pt and Pt/polyaniline/dispersed Pt electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, J.; Fernandez, J.; Rio, A.I. del; Bonastre, J. [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, EPS de Alcoy, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, 03801 Alcoy (Spain); Cases, F., E-mail: fjcases@txp.upv.es [Departamento de Ingenieria Textil y Papelera, EPS de Alcoy, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Plaza Ferrandiz y Carbonell s/n, 03801 Alcoy (Spain)

    2012-06-15

    The electrochemical characterization of two organic dyes (amaranth and procion orange MX-2R) has been performed on Pt electrodes and Pt electrodes coated with polyaniline and dispersed Pt. Electrodes with different Pt loads have been synthesized and characterized obtaining that a load of 300 {mu}g cm{sup -2} was the optimum one. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed to observe the distribution and morphology of the Pt nanoparticles. The electroactivity of the electrodes has also been characterized by means of scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). The chemical characterization of Pt dispersed Pani coated Pt electrodes (Pt-Pani-Pt) was performed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The electrochemical characterization of the dyes has been performed by means of cyclic voltammetry. Voltammograms have shown that the presence of the dyes diminishes characteristic Pt oxidation and reduction peaks. However, redox processes due to the dyes, appeared in the voltammograms. The different species responsible of these redox processes were generated in the vicinity of the electrode and were not adsorbed on the electrode surface since after stirring, the different redox processes disappeared. Characterization with different scan rates showed that redox processes of both dyes were controlled by diffusion.

  5. Huygens & Barrow, Newton & Hooke i primi passi dell'analisi matematica e della teoria delle catastrofi, dalle evolventi ai quasicristalli

    CERN Document Server

    Arnol'd, Vladimir Igorevich

    1996-01-01

    Il genio di Newton ha quasi fatto dimenticare i contributi, spesso molto importanti, di altri fisici matematici suoi contemporanei. In questo libro Arnold ricostruisce in maniera inedita le origini della teoria della gravitazione universale e della dimostrazione dell'ellitticità delle orbite dei pianeti, mettendo in luce il ruolo svolto da Barrow, Huyghens e Hooke e chiarendo perché esso sia stato riconosciuto solo negli anni '80 attraverso le teorie contemporanee delle singolarità dei fronti d'onda e delle relazioni che sussistono fra i gruppi di riflessione di Coxeter, il moderno calcolo delle variazioni e la teoria delle simmetrie dei quasicristalli.

  6. Anticipated changes in the emissions of green-house gases and ammonia from pork production due to shifts from fattening of barrows towards fattening of boars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dämmgen, Ulrich; Berk, Andreas; Otten, Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Greenhouse gases and of ammonia emissions from pork production will change when fattening of barrows switches towards to fattening of (intact) boars. The results of an accurate feeding experiment allow for the differentiation of the effects on emissions of gender (differentiating in boars, barrows...... effect of increased numbers of animals produced. The fattening of intact boars as compared to barrows is associated with a reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases and of ammonia per animal. For ammonia, all scenarios result in reduced emissions, most markedly when this shift is combined with increased...... weight gains. To a lesser extent, this also applies to nitric and nitrous oxide emissions. Methane emissions are less affected; increased weight gains result in increased emissions. As the greenhouse gas balance is dominated by methane emissions, the overall emission of greenhouse gases (expressed as CO2...

  7. Nitrogen balance of starting barrow pigs fed on increasing lysine levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Moreira

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of increasing lysine levels on nitrogen balance of pigs fed on low protein diets were evaluated. Four treatments (diets containing lysine levels (0.8, 1.0 1.2 and 1.4% were applied to 12 starting (20.0 ± 1.8 kg barrow pigs. Methionine, threonine and tryptophan were kept constant to the lysine ratio in all diets. Feces and urine were collected during a 5-day period. Nitrogen output in urine (NOU, total nitrogen output (TNO, nitrogen retention (NR, net protein utilization (NPU, biological value or feed protein (BVFP, urine urea nitrogen (UUN, and plasma urea nitrogen (PUN were determined. PUN showed high negative correlations with BVFP (-0.84, NPU (-0.76, and NR (-0.78 and a positive correlation (0.79 to NOU. Lowest nitrogen excretion and the best use of diet protein were obtained with 1.1% total lysine level. PUN is efficient to indicate amino acid for pigs.Foi realizado um experimento para se determinar o efeito de níveis crescentes de lisina sobre o balanço de nitrogênio de suínos, alimentados com rações de baixo teor protéico. Doze suínos machos castrados em fase inicial (20,0 ± 1,8 kg foram distribuídos em 4 tratamentos (dietas com níveis crescentes de lisina total (08, 1,0 1,2 e 1,4%. Os níveis de metionina, treonina e triptofano foram mantidos constantes em relação à lisina. Foram coletadas fezes e urina durante o período de cinco dias. Foram determinados os nitrogênios excretados na urina (NEU, total excretado (NTE, retido (NR, a utilização líquida da proteína (ULP, o valor biológico da proteína dietética (VBPD, o nitrogênio da uréia plasmática (NUP e urinária (NUU. O NUP foi altamente correlacionado com o VBPD (-0,84, ULP (-0,76, NEU (0,79 e NR (-0,78. O melhor aproveitamento da proteína dietética e a menor excreção de nitrogênio foram obtidos com 1,1% de lisina total. O NUP é eficiente para indicar a utilização de aminoácidos pelos suínos.

  8. ALASKA1964_OBS - Alaska 1964 Tsunami Observations at Seaside, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a point shapefile representing observations of inundation and water levels from the Alaska 1964 event obtained by Tom Horning (1997). The geospatial...

  9. ALASKA1964_OBS - Alaska 1964 Tsunami Observations at Seaside, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a point shapefile representing observations of inundation and water levels from the Alaska 1964 event obtained by Tom Horning (1997). The geospatial...

  10. 2005 Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys Lidar: Unalakleet, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report is a summary of a LiDAR data collection over the community of Unalakleet, in the Norton Sound region of Alaska. The original data were collected on...

  11. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. Only those grid cells within 10 kilometers of a gravity data point have gravity values....

  12. Alaska waterfowl production survey, 1968

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the Waterfowl Production and Habitat Survey for Alaska during 1968. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck...

  13. Interior Alaska Bouguer Gravity Anomaly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 1 kilometer Complete Bouguer Anomaly gravity grid of interior Alaska. All grid cells within the rectangular data area (from 61 to 66 degrees North latitude and...

  14. Predator control problems in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — One of the important wildlife management activities in Alaska is that of predator control. This simple statement requires some explanation. In the course of these...

  15. Alaska Geoid Heights (GEOID96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' geoid height grid for Alaska is distributed as a GEOID96 model. The computation used 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data held in the...

  16. Alaska duck production surveys: 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the duck production survey for Alaska during 1990. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck production from the...

  17. Kevadel Alaska talves / Tiiu Ehrenpreis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ehrenpreis, Tiiu

    2007-01-01

    Autori muljeid 22.-25. märtsini Fairbanksis toimunud Alaska Ülikooli ja Ülemaailmse Arktika Uurimise Keskuse (IARC) juhtimisel GLOBE'i programmi uue projekti "Aastaajad ja bioomid" koolitusseminarist

  18. Level III Ecoregions of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Ecoregions denote areas of general similarity in ecosystems and in the type, quality, and quantity of environmental resources. The ecoregions of Alaska are a...

  19. Seabirds - Alaska's most neglected resource

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Our purpose in this paper is to describe the nature of current and potential problems confronting seabirds in Alaska and to identify approaches to management and...

  20. Time Series of Aerosol Column Optical Depth at the Barrow, Alaska, ARM Climate Research Facility for 2008 Fourth Quarter 2009 ARM and Climate Change Prediction Program Metric Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Flynn; AS Koontz; JH Mather

    2009-09-01

    The uncertainties in current estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing are dominated by the effects of aerosols, both in relation to the direct absorption and scattering of radiation by aerosols and also with respect to aerosol-related changes in cloud formation, longevity, and microphysics (See Figure 1; Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Assessment Report 4, 2008). Moreover, the Arctic region in particular is especially sensitive to changes in climate with the magnitude of temperature changes (both observed and predicted) being several times larger than global averages (Kaufman et al. 2009). Recent studies confirm that aerosol-cloud interactions in the arctic generate climatologically significant radiative effects equivalent in magnitude to that of green house gases (Lubin and Vogelmann 2006, 2007). The aerosol optical depth is the most immediate representation of the aerosol direct effect and is also important for consideration of aerosol-cloud interactions, and thus this quantity is essential for studies of aerosol radiative forcing.

  1. Offshore baseline for the sheltered West Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Colville River to Point Barrow) generated to calculate shoreline change rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the sheltered north coast...

  2. Offshore baseline for the exposed West Beaufort Sea, Alaska coastal region (Colville River to Point Barrow) generated to calculate shoreline change rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset includes a reference baseline used by the Digital Shoreline Analysis System (DSAS) to calculate rate-of-change statistics for the exposed north coast of...

  3. Sea ice meiofauna abundance in coastal fast ice off Barrow, Alaska, with a focus on Scolelepis squamata (Polychaeta), July 12, 2005 - April 4, 2006 (NODC Accession 0064869)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The fast ice along the Alaskan coastline forms in November/December and reaches a thickness of 1.5-1.8m by April. Break-up usually occurs between late June and...

  4. An Alaska Soil Carbon Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kristofer; Harden, Jennifer

    2009-05-01

    Database Collaborator's Meeting; Fairbanks, Alaska, 4 March 2009; Soil carbon pools in northern high-latitude regions and their response to climate changes are highly uncertain, and collaboration is required from field scientists and modelers to establish baseline data for carbon cycle studies. The Global Change Program at the U.S. Geological Survey has funded a 2-year effort to establish a soil carbon network and database for Alaska based on collaborations from numerous institutions. To initiate a community effort, a workshop for the development of an Alaska soil carbon database was held at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The database will be a resource for spatial and biogeochemical models of Alaska ecosystems and will serve as a prototype for a nationwide community project: the National Soil Carbon Network (http://www.soilcarb.net). Studies will benefit from the combination of multiple academic and government data sets. This collaborative effort is expected to identify data gaps and uncertainties more comprehensively. Future applications of information contained in the database will identify specific vulnerabilities of soil carbon in Alaska to climate change, disturbance, and vegetation change.

  5. Cosmic-Ray Moisture Probe on North Slope of Alaska Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desilets, Darin [Hydroinnova LLC

    2016-06-15

    In September of 2014 a wide-area snow monitoring device was installed at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Barrow, Alaska Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility site. The device is special in that it uses measurements of cosmic-ray neutrons as a proxy for snow water equivalent (SWE) depth. A unique characteristic of the technology is that it integrates over a wide area (as much as 40 ha), in contrast to conventional ground-based technologies, which essentially give point samples. Conventional point-scale technologies are problematic in the Arctic, both because extreme weather conditions are taxing on equipment, and because point measurements can fail to accurately characterize the average SWE over a larger area, even when excellent precision is obtained. The sensor installed in Barrow is, by far, the northernmost of a constellation of sites that makeup the U.S. COsmic ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS). The sensor is used for SWE measurements in winter and soil moisture measurements in summer. The ability of this type of sensor to operate in the Arctic had not been verified until now. The cosmic-ray sensor was installed on a tripod located approximately 150 m south of the ARM User Facility (Figure 1), and within boundaries of land managed by the ARM Facility. The sensor consists of both “bare” and “moderated” channels, where the moderated channel is the primary output used to calculate SWE. A QDL2100 data logger with pressure sensor was located inside of the User Facility, and a Campbell CS215 temperature and humidity sensor was attached to a rail on the upper deck of the User Facility, to enable near-real-time absolute humidity corrections to the data. The cosmic-ray sensors are connected to the data logger using an armored Cat5e cable that lies on top of the tundra. Data are retrieved hourly via Iridium satellite link.

  6. Heavy metals in seaducks and mussels from Misty Fjords National Monument in southeast Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J.C.; Koehl, P.S.; Derksen, D.V.; Rothe, T.C.; Bunck, C.M.; Moore, John F.

    1995-01-01

    Quartz Hill, in Misty Fjords National Monument near Ketchikan, Alaska, is the site of a proposed molybdenum-producing mine. To provide baseline data for use in post-development comparisons, we analyzed tissues of Barrow's goldeneyes (Bucephala islandica), common mergansers (Mergus merganser), and blue mussels (Mytilus edulis) for seven heavy metals that could potentially be released into the environment as a result of mining operations. Specimens were collected in 1980, 1981, and 1982 from two fjords likely to be used for discharge of tailings from the proposed mine and from two control fjords. Concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, chromium, molybdenum, lead, and zinc were measured in soft tissues of mussels and in kidney, liver, and muscle of birds. The highest mean concentrations of metals found in bird tissues were 55.7 ppm dry weight cadmium in kidneys and 154 ppm dry weight zinc in livers of Barrow's goldeneyes. Concentrations of several metals in blue mussels differed among seasons and locations, but the most significant finding in mussels was a maximum mean cadmium concentration of 9.6 ppm dry weight, a level higher than normally found in undisturbed areas. With the exception of 104 ppm dry weight cadmium in the kidney of one common merganser and 12.7 ppm dry weight lead in the kidney of another, concentrations of other metals in seaduck and mussel tissues were low, consistent with what would be expected for a pre-development environment. Molybdenum was found in low concentrations ( 10 ppm dry weight) in all avian kidney samples and most liver samples, but was not detected in blue mussels.

  7. Distribution and community characteristics of staging shorebirds on the northern coast of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Audrey R.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Powell, Abby N.; Huettmann, Falk; Nigro, Debora A.; Kendall, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Avian studies conducted in the 1970s on Alaska’s Arctic Coastal Plain (ACP) indicated that coastal littoral habitats are important to Arctic-breeding shorebirds for staging prior to fall migration. However, relatively little recent, broad-scale, or quantitative information exists on shorebird use of staging areas in this region. To locate possible shorebird concentration areas in the littoral zone of the ACP, we conducted aerial surveys from the southwest end of Kasegaluk Lagoon on the Chukchi Sea to Demarcation Point on the Beaufort Sea during the summers of 2005–07. These surveys identified persistent within- and between-year concentrations of staging shorebirds at Peard Bay, Point Barrow/Elson Lagoon, Cape Simpson, and Smith Bay to Cape Halkett. Among river deltas in the Beaufort Sea, the Sagavanirktok and Kongakut deltas had large concentrations of staging shorebirds. We also collected data on shorebird community characteristics, staging phenology, and habitat use in 2005 and 2006 by conducting land-based surveys at six camps: Kasegaluk Lagoon, Peard Bay, Point Barrow/Elson Lagoon, Colville Delta, Sagavanirktok Delta, and Okpilak Delta. The shorebird community was more even and diverse (evenness E and Shannon Weiner H’) along the Beaufort Sea compared to the Chukchi Sea and in 2005 versus 2006. Staging phenology varied by species and location and differed for several species from that reported in previous studies. Our results suggest the existence of three foraging habitat guilds among the shorebird species observed in this study: gravel beach, mudflat, and salt marsh/pond edge. A comparison to data collected in the mid-1970s suggests that these foraging associations are conserved through time. Results from this research will be useful to land managers for monitoring the effects of changing environmental conditions and human activity on shorebirds and their habitats in Arctic Alaska.

  8. Sequence stratigraphy of the Kingak Shale (Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous), National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houseknecht, D.W.; Bird, K.J.

    2004-01-01

    Beaufortian strata (Jurassic-Lower Cretaceous) in the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA) are a focus of exploration since the 1994 discovery of the nearby Alpine oil field (>400 MMBO). These strata include the Kingak Shale, a succession of depositional sequences influenced by rift opening of the Arctic Ocean Basin. Interpretation of sequence stratigraphy and depositional facies from a regional two-dimensional seismic grid and well data allows the definition of four sequence sets that each displays unique stratal geometries and thickness trends across NPRA. A Lower to Middle Jurassic sequence set includes numerous transgressive-regressive sequences that collectively built a clastic shelf in north-central NPRA. Along the south-facing, lobate shelf margin, condensed shales in transgressive systems tracts downlap and coalesce into a basinal condensed section that is likely an important hydrocarbon source rock. An Oxfordian-Kimmeridgian sequence set, deposited during pulses of uplift on the Barrow arch, includes multiple transgressive-regressive sequences that locally contain well-winnowed, shoreface sandstones at the base of transgressive systems tracts. These shoreface sandstones and overlying shales, deposited during maximum flooding, form stratigraphic traps that are the main objective of exploration in the Alpine play in NPRA. A Valanginian sequence set includes at least two transgressive-regressive sequences that display relatively distal characteristics, suggesting high relative sea level. An important exception is the presence of a basal transgressive systems tract that locally contains shoreface sandstones of reservoir quality. A Hauterivian sequence set includes two transgressive-regressive sequences that constitute a shelf-margin wedge developed as the result of tectonic uplift along the Barrow arch during rift opening of the Arctic Ocean Basin. This sequence set displays stratal geometries suggesting incision and synsedimentary collapse of the shelf

  9. Investigating the impact of anthropogenic pollution on cloud properties at the North Slope of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maahn, M.; de Boer, G.; Creamean, J.; Wu, W.; McFarquhar, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    Aerosols have a strong potential to influence cloud properties when acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) or ice nucleating particles (INPs). In particular, they can impact the number, size, and phase of cloud particles as well as the cloud lifetime through aerosol indirect and semi-direct effects. These effects are of great importance for the radiation budget in polar regions due to the longwave emissions of mixed-phase clouds. In this study, we investigate how cloud properties such as phase, liquid water content, and droplet effective radius are altered due to aerosols originating from mostly anthropogenic pollution. In situ aircraft observations obtained from June to September 2015 during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME-V) field campaign are used to characterize the aerosol and cloud properties. For this, the Gulfstream-1 aircraft was equipped with a wide range of instruments to sample cloud particles (e.g., Fast Cloud Droplet Probe (FCDP), 2D Stereo Particle Imaging Probe (2DS), High Volume Precipitation Spectrometer (HVPS)), aerosols (e.g., nephelometer, Condensation Particle Counter (CPC), Passive Cavity Aerosol Spectrometer (PCASP)) and trace gases. These in situ measurements are complemented by ground-based remote sensing cloud instruments (cloud radar, radiometer, and lidar) located at the two ARM sites on the North Slope of Alaska (Barrow and Oliktok Point). Additional surface observations at these sites enabled us to examine how meteorological and surface conditions influence the impact of aerosols on cloud properties. Comparisons of data collected at these two sites are of particular interest due to the different characteristics with respect to anthropogenic aerosol background: While Oliktok Point is surrounded by petroleum production facilities, Barrow represents a more pristine environment.

  10. ALASKA1964_RUNUP - Alaska 1964 Tsunami Runup Heights at Seaside, Oregon (alaska1964_runup.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a point shapefile representing tsunami inundation runup heights for the Alaska 1964 event based on observations and associated information obtained...

  11. Alaska Athabascan stellar astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Stellar astronomy is a fundamental component of Alaska Athabascan cultures that facilitates time-reckoning, navigation, weather forecasting, and cosmology. Evidence from the linguistic record suggests that a group of stars corresponding to the Big Dipper is the only widely attested constellation across the Northern Athabascan languages. However, instruction from expert Athabascan consultants shows that the correlation of these names with the Big Dipper is only partial. In Alaska Gwich'in, Ahtna, and Upper Tanana languages the Big Dipper is identified as one part of a much larger circumpolar humanoid constellation that spans more than 133 degrees across the sky. The Big Dipper is identified as a tail, while the other remaining asterisms within the humanoid constellation are named using other body part terms. The concept of a whole-sky humanoid constellation provides a single unifying system for mapping the night sky, and the reliance on body-part metaphors renders the system highly mnemonic. By recognizing one part of the constellation the stargazer is immediately able to identify the remaining parts based on an existing mental map of the human body. The circumpolar position of a whole-sky constellation yields a highly functional system that facilitates both navigation and time-reckoning in the subarctic. Northern Athabascan astronomy is not only much richer than previously described; it also provides evidence for a completely novel and previously undocumented way of conceptualizing the sky---one that is unique to the subarctic and uniquely adapted to northern cultures. The concept of a large humanoid constellation may be widespread across the entire subarctic and have great antiquity. In addition, the use of cognate body part terms describing asterisms within humanoid constellations is similarly found in Navajo, suggesting a common ancestor from which Northern and Southern Athabascan stellar naming strategies derived.

  12. Identification of {sup 166}Pt and {sup 167}Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingham, C.R.; Toth, K.S.; Batchelder, J.C.; Blumenthal, D.J.; Brown, L.T.; Busse, B.C.; Conticchio, L.F.; Davids, C.N.; Davinson, T.; Henderson, D.J.; Irvine, R.J.; Seweryniak, D.; Walters, W.B.; Woods, P.J.; Zimmerman, B.E. [The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)]|[Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States)]|[Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)]|[Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee 37235 (United States)]|[Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331 (United States)]|[University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)]|[Edinburgh University, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ (United Kingdom)

    1996-07-01

    In a series of {sup 78}Kr bombardments of {sup 92}Mo the new isotopes {sup 166}Pt and {sup 167}Pt were identified via their {alpha}-decay properties. The {alpha}-decay energies and half-lives of these two nuclides are as follows. (1) {sup 166}Pt, {ital E}{sub {alpha}} = 7110(15) keV, {ital T}{sub 1/2} = 0.3(1) ms, and (2) {sup 167}Pt, {ital E}{sub {alpha}} = 6988(10) keV, {ital T}{sub 1/2} = 0.7(2) ms. Also, the half-life of {sup 168}Pt, which was previously unknown, was determined to be 2.0(4) ms. In a separate but concurrent experiment involving {sup 78}Kr + {sup 96}Ru reactions, {sup 170}Pt was made and a half-life of 14.7(5) ms was measured for it; the one published value is 6{sub {minus}2}{sup +5} ms. Results for {sup 162{minus}164}Os contained in the same data sets were also analyzed and by using mother-daughter correlations, the {alpha} branches of {sup 162,163,164}Os were established to be near 100{percent}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  13. Satellite View of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 200-meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with darker greens...

  14. 78 FR 53158 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-28

    ... Lion Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Hooper Bay, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 20 N., R. 87 W., Secs. 2 to 6, inclusive; Secs. 8 to 11, inclusive. Containing 4,516.46...

  15. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  16. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (H...

  17. Isoleucine requirement of 80- to 120-kilogram barrows fed corn-soybean meal or corn-blood cell diets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, D W; Southern, L L; Kerr, B J; Bidner, T D

    2005-11-01

    Six experiments were conducted to validate an Ile-deficient diet and determine the Ile requirement of 80- to 120-kg barrows. Experiment 1 had five replications, and Exp. 2 through 6 had four replications per treatment; all pen replicates had four crossbred barrows each (initial BW were 93, 83, 85, 81, 81, and 88 kg, respectively). All dietary additions were on an as-fed basis. In Exp. 1, pigs were fed a corn-soybean meal diet (C-SBM) or a corn-5% blood cell (BC) diet with or without 0.26% supplemental Ile (C-BC or C-BC+Ile) in a 28-d growth assay. On d 14, pigs receiving the C-BC diet were taken off experiment as a result of a severe decrease in ADFI. Growth performance did not differ for pigs fed C-SBM or C-BC + Ile (P = 0.36) over the 28-d experiment. In Exp. 2, pigs were fed the C-BC diet containing 0.24, 0.26, 0.28, 0.30, or 0.32% true ileal digestible (TD) Ile for 7 d in an attempt to estimate the Ile requirement using plasma urea N (PUN) as the response variable. Because of incremental increases in ADFI as TD Ile increased, PUN could not be used to estimate the Ile requirement. In Exp. 3, pigs were fed the C-BC diet containing 0.28, 0.30, 0.32, 0.34, or 0.36% TD Ile. Daily gain, ADFI, and G:F increased linearly (P kilograms of lean increased linearly (P kilograms of lean is not < 0.34% in a C-BC diet, but may be as low as 0.24% in a C-SBM diet.

  18. Study on the preparation of Pt nanocapsules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-fan; Ji, Zhen; Chen, Ke; Liu, Bo-wen; Jia, Cheng-chang; Yang, Shan-wu

    2017-01-01

    Ag@Pt core-shell nanoparticles (Ag@Pt NPs) were prepared by a co-reduction method. Pt nanocapsules with diameters of less than 10 nm were obtained by an electrochemical method. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) scanning was used to cavitate the Ag@Pt NPs, and the morphology, structure, and cavitation conditions were studied. The results indicate that the effective cavitation conditions to obtain Pt nanoparticles from Ag@Pt NPs are a scanning voltage of 0 to 0.8 V and continuous CV scanning over 2 h. This cavitation method is also applicable for the syntheses of Ir, Ru, and Ru-Pt nanocapsules.

  19. Local Community Verification of Coastal Erosion Risks in the Arctic: Insights from Alaska's North Slope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, M.

    2016-12-01

    During his historic trip to Alaska in 2015, U.S. President Barack Obama announced a collaborative effort to update maps of the Arctic region in anticipation of increased maritime access and resource development and to support climate resilience. Included in this effort is development of an Arctic-wide satellite-based digital elevation model (DEM) to provide a baseline to monitor landscape change such as coastal erosion. Focusing in Alaska's North Slope, an objective of this study is to transform emerging Arctic environment spatial data products including the new DEM into information that can support local level planning and decision-making in the face of extreme coastal erosion and related environmental threats. In pursuit of this, in 2016, 4 workshops were held in three North Slope villages highly exposed to coastal erosion. The first workshop with approximately 10 managers in Barrow solicited feedback on an erosion risk database developed in a previous research stage and installed onto the North Slope's planning Web portal. The database includes a physical risk indicator based on factors such as historical erosion and effects of sea ice loss summarized at asset locations. After a demonstration of the database, participants discussed usability aspects such as data reliability. The focus of the mapping workshops in Barrow and two smaller villages Wainwright and Kaktovik was to verify and expand the risk database by interactively mapping erosion observations and community asset impacts. Using coded stickers and paper maps of the shoreline showing USGS erosion rates, a total of 50 participants provided feedback on erosion data accuracy. Approximately 25 of the total 50 participants were elders and hunters who also provided in-depth community risk information. The workshop with managers confirmed physical risk factors used in the risk database, and revealed that the information may be relied upon to support some development decisions and better engage developers about

  20. Alaska Energy Inventory Project: Consolidating Alaska's Energy Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, K.; Clough, J.; Swenson, R.; Crimp, P.; Hanson, D.; Parker, P.

    2007-12-01

    Alaska has considerable energy resources distributed throughout the state including conventional oil, gas, and coal, and unconventional coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass. While much of the known large oil and gas resources are concentrated on the North Slope and in the Cook Inlet regions, the other potential sources of energy are dispersed across a varied landscape from frozen tundra to coastal settings. Despite the presence of these potential energy sources, rural Alaska is mostly dependent upon diesel fuel for both electrical power generation and space heating needs. At considerable cost, large quantities of diesel fuel are transported to more than 150 roadless communities by barge or airplane and stored in large bulk fuel tank farms for winter months when electricity and heat are at peak demands. Recent increases in the price of oil have severely impacted the price of energy throughout Alaska, and especially hard hit are rural communities and remote mines that are off the road system and isolated from integrated electrical power grids. Even though the state has significant conventional gas resources in restricted areas, few communities are located near enough to these resources to directly use natural gas to meet their energy needs. To address this problem, the Alaska Energy Inventory project will (1) inventory and compile all available Alaska energy resource data suitable for electrical power generation and space heating needs including natural gas, coal, coalbed and shalebed methane, gas hydrates, geothermal, wind, hydro, and biomass and (2) identify locations or regions where the most economic energy resource or combination of energy resources can be developed to meet local needs. This data will be accessible through a user-friendly web-based interactive map, based on the Alaska Department of Natural Resources, Land Records Information Section's (LRIS) Alaska Mapper, Google Earth, and Terrago Technologies' Geo

  1. Tularemia in Alaska, 1938 - 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansen Cristina M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tularemia is a serious, potentially life threatening zoonotic disease. The causative agent, Francisella tularensis, is ubiquitous in the Northern hemisphere, including Alaska, where it was first isolated from a rabbit tick (Haemophysalis leporis-palustris in 1938. Since then, F. tularensis has been isolated from wildlife and humans throughout the state. Serologic surveys have found measurable antibodies with prevalence ranging from F. tularensis isolates from Alaska were analyzed using canonical SNPs and a multi-locus variable-number tandem repeats (VNTR analysis (MLVA system. The results show that both F. t. tularensis and F. t. holarctica are present in Alaska and that subtype A.I, the most virulent type, is responsible for most recently reported human clinical cases in the state.

  2. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska`s North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  3. ARM-ACME V: ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements V on the North Slope of Alaska Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biraud, Sebastien C [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Atmospheric temperatures are warming faster in the Arctic than predicted by climate models. The impact of this warming on permafrost degradation is not well understood, but it is projected to increase carbon decomposition and greenhouse gas production (CO2 and/or CH4) by arctic ecosystems. Airborne observations of atmospheric trace gases, aerosols and cloud properties in North Slopes of Alaska (NSA) are improving our understanding of global climate, with the goal of reducing the uncertainty in global and regional climate simulations and projections. From June 1 through September 15, 2015, AAF deployed the G1 research aircraft and flew over the North Slope of Alaska (38 flights, 140 science flight hours), with occasional vertical profiling over Prudhoe Bay, Oliktok point, Barrow, Atqasuk, Ivotuk, and Toolik Lake. The aircraft payload included Picarro and Los Gatos Research (LGR) analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2, CH4, H2O, and CO and N2O mixing ratios, and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, and trace hydrocarbon species). The aircraft payload also include measurements of aerosol properties (number size distribution, total number concentration, absorption, and scattering), cloud properties (droplet and ice size information), atmospheric thermodynamic state, and solar/infrared radiation.

  4. Pt···Pt vs Pt···S contacts between Pt-containing heterobimetallic lantern complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, Frederick G; Fiedler, Stephanie R; Shores, Matthew P; Bacon, Jeffrey W; Golen, James A; Rheingold, Arnold L; Doerrer, Linda H

    2013-12-01

    A trio of Pt-based heterobimetallic lantern complexes of the form [(py)PtM(SAc)4(py)] (M = Co, 1; Ni, 2; Zn, 3) with unusual octahedral coordination of Pt(II) was prepared from a reaction of [PtM(SAc)4] with excess pyridine. These dipyridine lantern complexes could be converted to monopyridine derivatives with gentle heat to give the series [PtM(SAc)4(py)] (M = Co, 4; Ni, 5; Zn, 6). An additional family of the form [PtM(SAc)4(pyNH2)] (M = Co, 7; Ni, 8; Zn, 9) was synthesized from reaction of [PtM(SAc)4(OH2)] or [PtM(SAc)4] with 4-aminopyridine. Dimethylsulfoxide and N,N-dimethylformamide were also determined to react with [PtM(SAc)4] (M = Co, Ni), respectively, to give [PtCo(SAc)4(DMSO)](DMSO), 10, and [PtNi(SAc)4(DMF)](DMF), 11. Structural and magnetic data for these compounds and those for two other previously published families, [PtM(tba)4(OH2)] and [PtM(SAc)4(L)], L = OH2, pyNO2, are used to divide the structures among three distinct categories based on Pt···Pt and Pt···S distances. In general, the weaker donors H2O and pyNO2 seem to favor metallophilicity and antiferromagnetic coupling between 3d metal centers. When Pt···S interactions are favored over Pt···Pt ones, no coupling is observed and the pKa of the pyridine donor correlates with the interlantern S···S distance. UV-vis-NIR electronic and (1)H NMR spectra provide complementary characterization as well.

  5. Premature temporal theta (PT theta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J R; Fino, J J; Hart, L A

    1987-07-01

    A distinctive pattern called premature temporal theta (PT theta) was studied in 436 infants, ranging in age from 24 to 46 weeks. The pattern is seen in early prematurity, maximizes at 29-31 weeks and then diminishes and disappears near term. Usually the pattern is found independently on both temporal areas, but with a right-sided preference. Patients without PT theta or with a significantly low amount had either neurological or non-neurological (medical) conditions. With age there is a tendency for an increase in frequency and a decrease in amplitude. Five different peaks in the amount of this pattern are seen at approximately every month. Unilateral PT theta tends to be seen in older babies, more often on the right side and with an abnormal EEG. An abnormal EEG is usually associated with a delay in both the appearance and disappearance of this wave form. PT theta is also associated mainly with REM or active sleep. A polynomial rather than an exponential or power function best describes these data with changes of age. PT theta may arise from the inferior temporal gyrus and/or especially the transverse gyrus.

  6. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at

  7. Effect of Pt coverage in Pt-deposited Pd nanostructure electrodes on electrochemical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ah-Reum; Lee, Young-Woo; Kwak, Da-Hee; Park, Kyung-Won [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    We have fabricated Pt-deposited Pd electrodes via a two-gun sputtering deposition system by separately operating Pd and Pt target as a function of sputtering time of Pt target. For Pt-deposited Pd electrodes (Pd/Pt-X), Pd were first deposited on the substrates at 20 W for 5min, followed by depositing Pt on the Pd-only electrodes as a function of sputtering time (X=1, 3, 5, 7, and 10min) at 20W on the Pt target. As the sputtering time of Pt target increased, the portion of Pt on the Pd electrodes increased, representing an increased coverage of Pt on the Pd electrodes. The Pd/Pt-7 electrode having an optimized Pt coverage exhibits an excellent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation reaction.

  8. Electron transport in a Pt-CO-Pt nanocontact: Density functional theory calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strange, Mikkel; Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2006-01-01

    We have performed first-principles calculations for the mechanic and electric properties of pure Pt nanocontacts and a Pt contact with a single CO molecule adsorbed. For the pure Pt contacts we see a clear difference between point contacts and short chains in good agreement with experiments. We i...... of the transmission function for the Pt-CO-Pt contact, and show that the conductance is largely determined by the local d band at the Pt apex atoms....

  9. Large CO 2 and CH 4 emissions from polygonal tundra during spring thaw in northern Alaska: Spring Pulse Emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raz-Yaseef, Naama [Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California USA; Torn, Margaret S. [Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California USA; Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley California USA; Wu, Yuxin [Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California USA; Billesbach, Dave P. [Biological Systems Engineering Department, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln Nebraska USA; Liljedahl, Anna K. [Water and Environmental Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks Alaska USA; Kneafsey, Timothy J. [Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley California USA; Romanovsky, Vladimir E. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks, Fairbanks Alaska USA; Cook, David R. [Environmental Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont Illinois USA; Wullschleger, Stan D. [Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge Tennessee USA

    2017-01-10

    The few prethaw observations of tundra carbon fluxes suggest that there may be large spring releases, but little Is lmown about the scale and underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon. To address these questions, we combined ecosystem eddy flux measurements from two towers near Barrow, Alaska, with mechanistic soil-core thawing experiment During a 2week period prior to snowmelt In 2014, large fluxes were measured, reducing net summer uptake of CO2 by 46% and adding 6% to cumulative CH4 emissions. Emission pulses were linked to unique rain-on-snow events enhancing soli cracking. Controlled laboratory experiment revealed that as surface Ice thaws, an immediate, large pulse of trapped gases Is emitted. These results suggest that the Arctic C02 and CH4 spring pulse is a delayed release of biogenic gas production from the previous fall and that the pulse can be large enough to offset a significant fraction of the moderate Arctic tundra carbon sink.

  10. Dental caries in rural Alaska Native children--Alaska, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    In April 2008, the Arctic Investigations Program (AIP) of CDC was informed by the Alaska Department of Health and Social Services (DHSS) of a large number of Alaska Native (AN) children living in a remote region of Alaska who required full mouth dental rehabilitations (FMDRs), including extractions and/or restorations of multiple carious teeth performed under general anesthesia. In this remote region, approximately 400 FMDRs were performed in AN children aged Dental caries can cause pain, which can affect children's normal growth and development. AIP and Alaska DHSS conducted an investigation of dental caries and associated risk factors among children in the remote region. A convenience sample of children aged 4-15 years in five villages (two with fluoridated water and three without) was examined to estimate dental caries prevalence and severity. Risk factor information was obtained by interviewing parents. Among children aged 4-5 years and 12-15 years who were evaluated, 87% and 91%, respectively, had dental caries, compared with 35% and 51% of U.S. children in those age groups. Among children from the Alaska villages, those aged 4-5 years had a mean of 7.3 dental caries, and those aged 12-15 years had a mean of 5.0, compared with 1.6 and 1.8 dental caries in same-aged U.S. children. Of the multiple factors assessed, lack of water fluoridation and soda pop consumption were significantly associated with dental caries severity. Collaborations between tribal, state, and federal agencies to provide effective preventive interventions, such as water fluoridation of villages with suitable water systems and provision of fluoride varnishes, should be encouraged.

  11. New evidence for ice shelf flow across the Alaska and Beaufort margins, Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, Jennifer L.

    The Arctic Ocean may act as a lynchpin for global climate change due to its unique physiography as a mediterranean sea located in polar latitudes. In our modern warming climate, debate over the bounds of natural versus anthropogenically-induced climate variability necessitates a comprehensive understanding of Arctic ice extent and configuration over the last interglacial cycle. Longstanding controversy exists as to the volume, timing, and flow trajectories of ice in the Arctic Ocean during glacial maxima when continental ice sheets mantled circum-arctic landmasses. As a result of the Science Ice Exercise surveys of the Arctic Ocean in 1999, new evidence for ice grounding at depths down to 980 m on the Lomonosov Ridge and 750 m on the Chukchi Borderland indicates the likelihood that large ice shelves flowed into the ocean from both the Barents/Kara Sea and the Canadian Arctic Archipelago or eastern Alaska. Sidescan imagery of ˜14100 km2 of seafloor along the Alaska and Beaufort margins in water depths from 250--2800 m maps a repetitive association of recognizable sub-glacially generated bedforms, ice carved-bathymerry, and ice-marginal turbidite gullies over a 640 km stretch of the margin between Point Barrow and the MacKenzie River delta. Glaciogenic bedforms occur across the surface of a flattened bathymetric bench or 'second shelf break' that is interpreted to have been formed by an ice shelf eroding the continental slope. The glacial geology of surrounding areas suggests that an ice shelf on the Alaska and Beaufort margins likely flowed from the mouths of overdeepened glacial troughs in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago westward and across the Chukchi Borderland due to an obstruction in the central Canadian basin. Evidence for an ice shelf along the Alaska and Beaufort margins supports an expanded interpretation of ice volume and extent during Pleistocene glacial periods. This has far-reaching implications for Arctic climate studies, ocean circulation, sediment

  12. Geologic framework of the Alaska Peninsula, southwest Alaska, and the Alaska Peninsula terrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Detterman, Robert L.; DuBois, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The Alaska Peninsula is composed of the late Paleozoic to Quaternary sedimentary, igneous, and minor metamorphic rocks that record the history of a number of magmatic arcs. These magmatic arcs include an unnamed Late Triassic(?) and Early Jurassic island arc, the early Cenozoic Meshik arc, and the late Cenozoic Aleutian arc. Also found on the Alaska Peninsula is one of the most complete nonmetamorphosed, fossiliferous, marine Jurassic sedimentary sections known. As much as 8,500 m of section of Mesozoic sedimentary rocks record the growth and erosion of the Early Jurassic island arc.

  13. Electrodeposited CoPt and FePt alloys nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cagnon, L. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)]. E-mail: laurent.cagnon@grenoble.cnrs.fr; Dahmane, Y. [Laboratoire Louis Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Laboratoire de Materiaux, Electrochimie et Corrosion, BP 17, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Voiron, J. [Laboratoire Louis Neel, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Pairis, S. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Bacia, M. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Ortega, L. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Benbrahim, N. [Laboratoire de Materiaux, Electrochimie et Corrosion, BP 17, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Kadri, A. [Laboratoire de Materiaux, Electrochimie et Corrosion, BP 17, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2007-03-15

    We have investigated CoPt and FePt alloys with the face centered tetragonal phase L10, which present very large magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Equiatomic CoPt nanowires exhibiting large coercive fields up to 1.1 T have been successfully prepared by electrodeposition into nanopores of commercial and home-made alumina membranes from a very simple electrolyte. The as-deposited material has the FCC structure with soft magnetic properties. An annealing treatment at 700 deg. C is crucial to transform this phase into the L1{sub 0} phase, which presents hard magnetic properties. Nanowires of annealed samples consist of small grains around 20 nm, with their c axes randomly distributed. The coercivity does not depend on the morphology and porosity of the two types of membranes but only on the deposited material elaborated with the appropriate thermal annealing process. Our preliminary results with FePt alloy indicate a more complicated system since the as-deposited material shows no magnetization. Magnetism appears only after annealing at 700-750 deg. C. Coercivity up to 0.85 T has been obtained at room temperature but with inhomogeneous phase composition. To achieve a single hard phase L1{sub 0}, it is essential to get for the as-deposited sample the equiatomic composition and then to employ the suitable annealing parameters (temperature and time) to change the whole FCC phase into the FCT ordered L1{sub 0} phase.

  14. Optical Properties of Boreal Region Biomass Burning Aerosols in Central Alaska and Seasonal Variation of Aerosol Optical Depth at an Arctic Coastal Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Sinyuk, A.; Hyer, E. J.; O'Neill, N. T.; Shaw, G. E.; VandeCastle, J. R.; Chapin, F. S.; Dubovik, O.; hide

    2010-01-01

    Long-term monitoring of aerosol optical properties at a boreal forest AERONET site in interior Alaska was performed from 1994 through 2008 (excluding winter). Large interannual variability was observed, with some years showing near background aerosol optical depth (AOD) levels (burning regions. Single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0); 440 nm) at the boreal forest site ranged from approximately 0.91 to 0.99 with an average of approximately 0.96 for observations in 2004 and 2005. This suggests a significant amount of smoldering combustion of woody fuels and peat/soil layers that would result in relatively low black carbon mass fractions for smoke particles. The fine mode particle volume median radius during the heavy burning years was quite large, averaging approximately 0.17 micron at AOD(440 nm) = 0.1 and increasing to approximately 0.25 micron at AOD(440 nm) = 3.0. This large particle size for biomass burning aerosols results in a greater relative scattering component of extinction and, therefore, also contributes to higher omega (sub 0). Additionally, monitoring at an Arctic Ocean coastal site (Barrow, Alaska) suggested transport of smoke to the Arctic in summer resulting in individual events with much higher AOD than that occurring during typical spring Arctic haze. However, the springtime mean AOD(500 nm) is higher during late March through late May (approximately 0.150) than during summer months (approximately 0.085) at Barrow partly due to very few days with low background AOD levels in spring compared with many days with clean background conditions in summer.

  15. Alaska Dental Health Aide Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Shoffstall-Cone

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. In 1999, An Oral Health Survey of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN Dental Patients found that 79% of 2- to 5-year-olds had a history of tooth decay. The Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium in collaboration with Alaska’s Tribal Health Organizations (THO developed a new and diverse dental workforce model to address AI/AN oral health disparities. Objectives. This paper describes the workforce model and some experience to date of the Dental Health Aide (DHA Initiative that was introduced under the federally sanctioned Community Health Aide Program in Alaska. These new dental team members work with THO dentists and hygienists to provide education, prevention and basic restorative services in a culturally appropriate manner. Results. The DHA Initiative introduced 4 new dental provider types to Alaska: the Primary Dental Health Aide, the Expanded Function Dental Health Aide, the Dental Health Aide Hygienist and the Dental Health Aide Therapist. The scope of practice between the 4 different DHA providers varies vastly along with the required training and education requirements. DHAs are certified, not licensed, providers. Recertification occurs every 2 years and requires the completion of 24 hours of continuing education and continual competency evaluation. Conclusions. Dental Health Aides provide evidence-based prevention programs and dental care that improve access to oral health care and help address well-documented oral health disparities.

  16. Ab-initio study of the coadsorption of Li and H on Pt(001), Pt(110) and Pt(111) surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saad, Farida [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Zemirli, Mourad, E-mail: zemirlimourad@mail.ummto.dz [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria); Benakki, Mouloud; Bouarab, Said [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie Quantique, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Mouloud Mammeri, 15000 Tizi-Ouzou (Algeria)

    2012-02-15

    The coadsorption of Li and H atoms on Pt(001), Pt(110) and Pt(111) surfaces is studied using density functional theory with generalised gradient approximation. In all calculations Li, H and the two topmost layers of the metal were allowed to relax. At coverage of 0.25 mono-layer in a p(2 Multiplication-Sign 2) unit cell, lithium adsorption at the hollow site for the three surfaces is favoured over top and bridge sites. The most favoured adsorption sites for H atom on the Pt(001) and Pt(110) surfaces are the top and bridge sites, while on Pt(111) surface the fcc site appears to be slightly favoured over the hcp site. The coadsorption of Li and atomic hydrogen shows that the interaction between the two adsorbates is stabilising when they are far from each other. The analysis of Li, H and Pt local density of states shows that Li strongly interacts with the Pt surfaces.

  17. Alaska Coal Geology, Resources, and Coalbed Methane Potential

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Estimated Alaska coal resources are largely in Cretaceous and Tertiary rocks distributed in three major provinces. Northern Alaska-Slope, Central Alaska-Nenana, and...

  18. Memorandum of Understanding for the Alaska Landbird Monitoring Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Alaska Bird Observatory, Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Alaska Natural Heritage Program, Bureau of Land...

  19. Annual variation in event-scale precipitation δ2H at Barrow, AK, reflects vapor source region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putman, Annie L.; Feng, Xiahong; Sonder, Leslie J.; Posmentier, Eric S.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, precipitation isotopic variations at Barrow, AK, USA, are linked to conditions at the moisture source region, along the transport path, and at the precipitation site. Seventy precipitation events between January 2009 and March 2013 were analyzed for δ2H and deuterium excess. For each precipitation event, vapor source regions were identified with the hybrid single-particle Lagrangian integrated trajectory (HYSPLIT) air parcel tracking program in back-cast mode. The results show that the vapor source region migrated annually, with the most distal (proximal) and southerly (northerly) vapor source regions occurring during the winter (summer). This may be related to equatorial expansion and poleward contraction of the polar circulation cell and the extent of Arctic sea ice cover. Annual cycles of vapor source region latitude and δ2H in precipitation were in phase; depleted (enriched) δ2H values were associated with winter (summer) and distal (proximal) vapor source regions. Precipitation δ2H responded to variation in vapor source region as reflected by significant correlations between δ2H with the following three parameters: (1) total cooling between lifted condensation level (LCL) and precipitating cloud at Barrow, ΔTcool, (2) meteorological conditions at the evaporation site quantified by 2 m dew point, Td, and (3) whether the vapor transport path crossed the Brooks and/or Alaskan ranges, expressed as a Boolean variable, mtn. These three variables explained 54 % of the variance (pTcool, 3.23 ± 0.83 ‰ °C-1 (pTcool Tcool explained 3 % of the variance in δ2H, Td alone accounted for 43 %, while mtn explained 2 %. For storms with distal vapor sources (ΔTcool > 7°C), ΔTcool explained 22 %, Td explained only 1 %, and mtn explained 18 %. The deuterium excess annual cycle lagged by 2-3 months during the δ2H cycle, so the direct correlation between the two variables is weak. Vapor source region relative humidity with respect to the sea surface

  20. Prehistoric and historic subsistence-settlement patterns on the central Alaska Peninsula, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, is the home of three major historic hunter-gatherer cultures --- the Alutiit, the Central Yup'ik, and the Unangan. Regional questions...

  1. Spring staging waterfowl on the Naknek River, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, March-May 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A survey of spring staging waterfowl on the Naknek River in the Bristol Bay drainage, Alaska Peninsula, Alaska, was conducted from 17 March – 18 May, 2005....

  2. Origin and Availability of Large Cavities for Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica, a Species at Risk Inhabiting the Eastern Canadian Boreal Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Andrée Vaillancourt

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Large secondary-nesting birds such as ducks rely on appropriate cavities for breeding. The main objective of this study was to assess the availability of large cavities and the potential of a managed boreal coniferous landscape to provide nesting trees within the breeding area of the eastern population of Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica, a cavity-nesting species at risk in Canada. Woodpecker surveys were conducted in both conifer and mixed-wood landscapes, and cavities were sought in line transects distributed in unharvested and linear remnant stands of balsam fir (Abies balsamea and black spruce (Picea mariana as well as in cutblocks. No Pileated Woodpeckers (Dryocopus pileatus were detected in the breeding area of Barrow's Goldeneye, but the species was present in the nearby lowland area in which trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides is abundant. Only 10 trees (0.2% of those sampled supported cavities considered suitable for Barrow's Goldeneye in terms of dimensions and canopy openness. Most of the suitable cavities found during this study were nonexcavated apical (chimney cavities in relatively short snags that showed advanced states of decay. A diameter-at-breast-height threshold was determined for each tree species, after which the probability of cavity occurrence was enhanced in terms of potential cavity trees for Barrow's Goldeneye. Remnant linear forest sites had lower potential tree densities than did their unharvested equivalents. Large cavities were thus a rare component in this boreal landscape, suggesting that they may be a limiting factor for this population at risk. Current even-aged forest management that mainly relies on clear-cut practices is likely to further reduce the potential of this landscape to provide trees with suitable cavities.

  3. PT-symmetric quantum theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Carl M.

    2015-07-01

    The average quantum physicist on the street would say that a quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian must be Dirac Hermitian (invariant under combined matrix transposition and complex conjugation) in order to guarantee that the energy eigenvalues are real and that time evolution is unitary. However, the Hamiltonian H = p2 + ix3, which is obviously not Dirac Hermitian, has a positive real discrete spectrum and generates unitary time evolution, and thus it defines a fully consistent and physical quantum theory. Evidently, the axiom of Dirac Hermiticity is too restrictive. While H = p2 + ix3 is not Dirac Hermitian, it is PT symmetric; that is, invariant under combined parity P (space reflection) and time reversal T. The quantum mechanics defined by a PT-symmetric Hamiltonian is a complex generalization of ordinary quantum mechanics. When quantum mechanics is extended into the complex domain, new kinds of theories having strange and remarkable properties emerge. In the past few years, some of these properties have been verified in laboratory experiments. A particularly interesting PT-symmetric Hamiltonian is H = p2 - x4, which contains an upside-down potential. This potential is discussed in detail, and it is explained in intuitive as well as in rigorous terms why the energy levels of this potential are real, positive, and discrete. Applications of PT-symmetry in quantum field theory are also discussed.

  4. Connecting Indigenous Knowledge to Thaw Lake Cycle Research on the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisner, W. R.; Cuomo, C. J.; Hinkel, K. M.; Jones, B. M.; Hurd, J.

    2005-12-01

    Thaw lakes cover about 20% of the Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska. Another 26% is scarred by basins that form when lakes drain, and these drained thaw-lake basins are sites for preferential carbon accumulation as plant biomass. Recent studies in the continuous permafrost zone of Western Siberia suggest that lakes have been expanding in the past several decades in response to regional warming. Anticipated regional warming would likely mobilize sequestered soil organic carbon, resulting in the emission of CO2 and CH4. Our understanding of the processes leading to thaw lake formation, expansion, and drainage in northern Alaska has been limited because models are specific to the flat, young Outer (seaward) Coastal Plain comprising 1/3 of the region. Furthermore, spatial and temporal analysis of lake dynamics is largely restricted to the period since 1948, when aerial photographs first became available across large regions of the Coastal Plain. In order to fill these gaps, we have been interviewing Iñupiaq elders, hunters, and berry pickers from the villages of Atqasuk and Barrow. The objective of these interviews is to obtain accounts of lake formation, expansion and drainage that have occurred within living or oral memory, and extend the record back several generations. To date, we have interviewed fifteen Iñupiat; most of these are people who travel the tundra frequently and have done so for decades. They have first-hand experience of lake drainage, sea cliff and river bank erosion, permafrost degradation, and other landscape changes. Many informants expressed concern that landscape changes are occurring at an increasingly rapid rate. They have identified lakes that have drained, areas where the permafrost is thawing, and places where the sea and river coastline is eroding. We have been able to corroborate reports of lake drainage from our informants with a series of aerial photographs, satellite images, and radiocarbon dates. In many instances, the elders have

  5. Evaluation of the anthropogenic radionuclide concentrations in sediments and fauna collected in the Beaufort Sea and northern Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Efurd, D.W.; Miller, G.G.; Rokop, D.J. [and others

    1997-07-01

    This study was performed to establish a quality controlled data set about the levels of radio nuclide activity in the environment and in selected biota in the U.S. Arctic. Sediment and biota samples were collected by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Biological Service, and the North Slope Borough`s Department of Wildlife Management to determine the impact of anthropogenic radionuclides in the Arctic. The results summarized in this report are derived from samples collected in northwest Alaska with emphasis on species harvested for subsistence in Barrow, Alaska. Samples were analyzed for the anthropogenic radionuclides {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 240}Pu and {sup 241}Am. The naturally occurring radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 212}Pb and {sup 214}Pb were also measured. One goal of this study was to determine the amounts of anthropogenic radionuclides present in the Beaufort Sea. Sediment samples were isotopically fingerprinted to determine the sources of radio nuclide activities. Biota samples of subsistence and ecological value were analyzed to search for evidence of bio-accumulation of radionuclides and to determine the radiation exposures associated with subsistence living in northern Alaska. The anthropogenic radio nuclide content of sediments collected in the Beaufort Sea was predominantly the result of the deposition of global fallout. No other sources of anthropogenic radionuclides could be conclusively identified in the sediments. The anthropogenic radio nuclide concentrations in fish, birds and mammals were very low. Assuming that ingestion of food is an important pathway leading to human contact with radioactive contaminants and given the dietary patterns in coastal Arctic communities, it can be surmised that marine food chains are presently not significantly affected.

  6. Fisheries Education in Alaska. Conference Report. Alaska Sea Grant Report 82-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smoker, William W., Ed.

    This conference was an attempt to have the fishing industry join the state of Alaska in building fisheries education programs. Topics addressed in papers presented at the conference include: (1) fisheries as a part of life in Alaska, addressing participation of Alaska natives in commercial fisheries and national efforts; (2) the international…

  7. 76 FR 270 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program... modification to Alaska's approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF) permit program. The approved..., and be free of any defects or viruses. For additional information about EPA's public docket visit the...

  8. 76 FR 303 - Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-04

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 239 and 258 Alaska: Adequacy of Alaska's Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Permit... proposes to approve Alaska's modification of its approved Municipal Solid Waste Landfill (MSWLF) permit... Domenic Calabro, Office of Air, Waste, and Toxics, U.S. EPA, Region 10, 1200 Sixth Avenue, Suite...

  9. Soil moisture control over autumn season methane flux, Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Sturtevant

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurate estimates of annual budgets of methane (CH4 efflux in arctic regions are severely constrained by the paucity of non-summer measurements. Moreover, the incomplete understanding of the ecosystem-level sensitivity of CH4 emissions to changes in tundra moisture makes prediction of future CH4 release from the Arctic extremely difficult. This study addresses some of these research gaps by presenting an analysis of eddy covariance and chamber measurements of CH4 efflux and supporting environmental variables during the autumn season and associated beginning of soil freeze-up at our large-scale water manipulation site near Barrow, Alaska (the Biocomplexity Experiment. We found that the autumn season CH4 emission is significant (accounting for 21–25% of the average growing season emission, and that this emission is mostly controlled by the fraction of inundated landscape, atmospheric turbulence, and the decline in unfrozen water during the period of soil freezing. Drainage decreased autumn CH4 emission by a factor of 2.4 compared to our flooded treatment. Flooding slowed the soil freezing process which has implications for extending elevated CH4 emissions longer into the winter season.

  10. Geology, reservoir engineering and methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa Gas Field, North Slope, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, R.K.; Allen, W.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Walakpa Gas Field, located near the city of Barrow on Alaska's North Slope, has been proven to be methane-bearing at depths of 2000--2550 feet below sea level. The producing formation is a laterally continuous, south-dipping, Lower Cretaceous shelf sandstone. The updip extent of the reservoir has not been determined by drilling, but probably extends to at least 1900 feet below sea level. Reservoir temperatures in the updip portion of the reservoir may be low enough to allow the presence of in situ methane hydrates. Reservoir net pay however, decreases to the north. Depths to the base of permafrost in the area average 940 feet. Drilling techniques and production configuration in the Walakpa field were designed to minimize formation damage to the reservoir sandstone and to eliminate methane hydrates formed during production. Drilling development of the Walakpa field was a sequential updip and lateral stepout from a previously drilled, structurally lower confirmation well. Reservoir temperature, pressure, and gas chemistry data from the development wells confirm that they have been drilled in the free-methane portion of the reservoir. Future studies in the Walakpa field are planned to determine whether or not a component of the methane production is due to the dissociation of updip in situ hydrates.

  11. Polar bear use of a persistent food subsidy: insights from non-invasive genetic sampling in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Elizabeth; Herreman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Remains of bowhead whales (Balaena mysticetus) harvested by Iñupiat whalers are deposited in bone piles along the coast of Alaska and have become persistent and reliable food sources for polar bears (Ursus maritimus). The importance of bone piles to individuals and the population, the patterns of use, and the number, sex, and age of bears using these resources are poorly understood. We implemented barbed-wire hair snaring to obtain genetic identities from bears using the Point Barrow bone pile in winter 2010–11. Eighty-three percent of genotyped samples produced individual and sex identification. We identified 97 bears from 200 samples. Using genetic mark–recapture techniques, we estimated that 228 bears used the bone pile during November to February, which would represent approximately 15% of the Southern Beaufort Sea polar bear subpopulation, if all bears were from this subpopulation. We found that polar bears of all age and sex classes simultaneously used the bone pile. More males than females used the bone pile, and males predominated in February, likely because 1/3 of adult females would be denning during this period. On average, bears spent 10 days at the bone pile (median  =  5 days); the probability that an individual bear remained at the bone pile from week to week was 63% for females and 45% for males. Most bears in the sample were detected visiting the bone pile once or twice. We found some evidence of matrilineal fidelity to the bone pile, but the group of animals visiting the bone pile did not differ genetically from the Southern Beaufort Sea subpopulation, nor did patterns of relatedness. We demonstrate that bowhead whale bone piles may be an influential food subsidy for polar bears in the Barrow region in autumn and winter for all sex and age classes.

  12. Methods to assess natural and anthropogenic thaw lake drainage on the western Arctic coastal plain of northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Jones, Benjamin M.; Eisner, Wendy R.; Cuomo, Chris J.; Beck, R.A.; Frohn, R.

    2007-01-01

    Thousands of lakes are found on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska and northwestern Canada. Developed atop continuous permafrost, these thaw lakes and associated drained thaw lake basins are the dominant landscape elements and together cover 46% of the 34,570 km2western Arctic Coastal Plain (WACP). Lakes drain by a variety of episodic processes, including coastal erosion, stream meandering, and headward erosion, bank overtopping, and lake coalescence. Comparison of Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) imagery from the mid-1970s to Landsat 7 enhanced thematic mapper (ETM+) imagery from around 2000 shows that 50 lakes completely or partially drained over the approximately 25 year period, indicating landscape stability. The lake-specific drainage mechanism can be inferred in some cases and is partially dependant on geographic settings conducive to active erosion such as riparian and coastal zones. In many cases, however, the cause of drainage is unknown. The availability of high-resolution aerial photographs for the Barrow Peninsula extends the record back to circa 1950; mapping spatial time series illustrates the dynamic nature of lake expansion, coalescence, and drainage. Analysis of these historical images suggests that humans have intentionally or inadvertently triggered lake drainage near the village of Barrow. Efforts to understand landscape processes and identify events have been enhanced by interviewing Iñupiaq elders and others practicing traditional subsistence lifestyles. They can often identify the year and process by which individual lakes drained, thereby providing greater dating precision and accuracy in assessing the causal mechanism. Indigenous knowledge has provided insights into events, landforms, and processes not previously identified or considered.

  13. Temperature Effects on Microbial CH4 and CO2 Production in Permafrost-Affected Soils From the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, D. E.; Roy Chowdhury, T.; Zheng, J.; Moon, J. W.; Yang, Z.; Gu, B.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Warmer Arctic temperatures are increasing the annual soil thaw depth and prolonging the thaw season in Alaskan permafrost zones. This change exposes organic matter buried in the soils and permafrost to microbial degradation and mineralization to form CO2 and CH4. The proportion and fluxes of these greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere control the global feedback on warming. To improve representations of these biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystem models we compared soil properties and microbial activities in core samples of polygonal tundra from the Barrow Environmental Observatory. Measurements of soil water potential through the soil column characterized water binding to the organic and mineral components. This suction combines with temperature to control freezing, gas diffusion and microbial activity. The temperature-dependence of CO2 and CH4 production from anoxic soil incubations at -2, +4 or +8 °C identified a significant lag in methanogenesis relative to CO2 production by anaerobic respiration and fermentation. Changes in the abundance of methanogen signature genes during incubations indicate that microbial population shifts caused by thawing and warmer temperatures drive changes in the mixtures of soil carbon degradation products. Comparisons of samples collected across the microtopographic features of ice-wedge polygons address the impacts of water saturation, iron reduction and organic matter content on CH4 production and oxidation. These combined measurements build process understanding that can be applied across scales to constrain key response factors in models that address Arctic soil warming.

  14. Considerations regarding Barrow Burials and Metal Depositions during the Early Bronze Age in the Carpathian-Danube Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Preda

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The beginning of the Early Bronze Age brought significant changes in the Carpathian-Danube Area, including new burial customs, a different economy and innovative technologies, most of them with eastern steppe origins. Thus, burial barrows appeared in the landscape raised over rectangular grave-pits, sometimes with wood or stone structures containing individuals lying in contracted or supine position with flexed legs, stained with ochre, rarely accompanied by grave-goods like wares, ornaments or weapons made of stone, bone and precious metals. Among the metallurgical innovations, items such as silver hair rings, copper shaft-hole axes and tanged daggers are considered specific to the new era. However, a careful approach of the deposition contexts of these artifacts, as compared with the eastern space, indicates that in some cases the objects were not just adopted, but reinterpreted and involved in different social practices. This paper aims to analyze the manner in which metal pieces were disposed of and to identify the rules governing this behavior.

  15. Effects of a diet containing fusarium toxins on the fertility of gilts and on bulbourethral gland weight in barrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutzwiller, Andreas; Gafner, Jean-Louis; Stoll, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Nine gilts weighing 80 kg at the beginning of the trial were fed a mycotoxin contaminated diet containing 2 mg deoxynivalenol (DON) and 0.4 mg zearalenone (ZON) per kg (Diet M). Their daily weight gain until 103 kg BW was reduced in comparison to the nine control animals fed an uncontaminated diet (Diet C) (763 vs. 912 g; p = 0.02). There was no treatment effect on the age at first observed oestrus. Seven and eight gilts receiving Diet M and C, respectively, became pregnant after being mated once or being again mated three weeks later. The examination of the uteri of gilts slaughtered 35-61 days after mating showed that the exposure to DON and ZON had no effect on the number of foetuses per gilt (p = 0.54), but increased their growth rate (p = 0.003). Thus, low dietary DON and ZON levels had no negative effects on the reproductive parameters examined. The hypothesis that the bulbourethral gland weight of barrows can be used for the bioassay of low dietary ZON levels was rejected since feeding Diet M from 80-103 kg BW did not increase the weight of that accessory sex gland (p = 0.51).

  16. Digestible lysine for 63 to 103 day-old barrows of genetic lines selected for lean deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ianino Fortes

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ninety-six barrows from 63 to 103 days of age were used to evaluate the effects of dietary digestible lysine levels on performance and carcass traits of two genetic lines selected for lean deposition. Pigs with initial body weight of 23.800 ± 1.075 kg were allotted in a completely randomized block design, within a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement (four digestible lysine levels: 0.80, 0.90, 1.00, 1.10%, and two genetic lines, with six replicates and two pigs per experimental unit. There was no interaction between genetic and digestible lysine levels. The digestible lysine levels also did not influence performance or carcass traits of pigs; however, average daily lysine intake increased with increasing digestible lysine level in the experimental diets. Pigs from genetic line B had better carcass traits when compared with those from genetic line A. The level of 0.80% digestible lysine corresponding to a daily intake of 16.60 g digestible lysine meets the nutritional requirement of pigs from both genetic lines evaluated, from 63 to 103 days of age.

  17. Spatial Variability of Barrow-Area Shore-Fast Sea Ice and Its Relationships to Passive Microwave Emissivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslanik, J. A.; Rivas, M. Belmonte; Holmgren, J.; Gasiewski, A. J.; Heinrichs, J. F.; Stroeve, J. C.; Klein, M.; Markus, T.; Perovich, D. K.; Sonntag, J. G.; Tape, K.

    2006-01-01

    Aircraft-acquired passive microwave data, laser radar height observations, RADARSAT synthetic aperture radar imagery, and in situ measurements obtained during the AMSR-Ice03 experiment are used to investigate relationships between microwave emission and ice characteristics over several space scales. The data fusion allows delineation of the shore-fast ice and pack ice in the Barrow area, AK, into several ice classes. Results show good agreement between observed and Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer (PSR)-derived snow depths over relatively smooth ice, with larger differences over ridged and rubbled ice. The PSR results are consistent with the effects on snow depth of the spatial distribution and nature of ice roughness, ridging, and other factors such as ice age. Apparent relationships exist between ice roughness and the degree of depolarization of emission at 10,19, and 37 GHz. This depolarization .would yield overestimates of total ice concentration using polarization-based algorithms, with indications of this seen when the NT-2 algorithm is applied to the PSR data. Other characteristics of the microwave data, such as effects of grounding of sea ice and large contrast between sea ice and adjacent land, are also apparent in the PSR data. Overall, the results further demonstrate the importance of macroscale ice roughness conditions such as ridging and rubbling on snow depth and microwave emissivity.

  18. Results of the Proficiency Test, PT1 and PT2, 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vendramin, Niccolò; Nicolajsen, Nicole; Christophersen, Maj-Britt

    A comparative test of diagnostic procedures was provided by the European Union Reference Laboratory (EURL) for Fish Diseases. The test was divided into proficiency test 1 (PT1) and proficiency test 2 (PT2). The number of National Reference Laboratories (NRLs) participating in PT1 and PT2 was 43...

  19. Oxygen reduction activity of Pt and Pt-alloys in acid electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paulus, Ursula A. [Paul Scherrer Inst., CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Schmidt, Thomas J.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Ross, Philip N. [Material Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2001-07-01

    The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) has been studied on polycrystalline (pc) Pt, Pt{sub 3}Ni and Pt{sub 3}Co bulk alloy electrodes and on carbon supported Pt, PtNi and PtCo alloy catalysts. Base voltammetry measurements as well as complementary Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) and Low Energy Ion Scattering (LEIS) on bulk electrodes and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM)-analysis on the supported catalysts allow an estimation of the surface composition. By using the rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) technique both the kinetic analysis of the ORR and in parallel the detection and quantification of the amount of peroxide produced during the ORR are possible. The activity for the ORR increases in the order Pt < Pt{sub 3}Ni < Pt{sub 3}Co for equally prepared bulk alloys and Pt < Pt{sub 3}Ni {approx} Pt{sub 3}CO < PtCo for the carbon supported catalysts, respectively. It was proposed that the mechanism for the ORR is the same on pure Pt and the PtNi and PtCo alloys. (author)

  20. Forestry timber typing. Tanana demonstration project, Alaska ASVT. [Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, L. A.; Ambrosia, V. G.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of using LANDSAT digital data in conjunction with topographic data to delineate commercial forests by stand size and crown closure in the Tanana River basin of Alaska was tested. A modified clustering approach using two LANDSAT dates to generate an initial forest type classification was then refined with topographic data. To further demonstrate the ability of remotely sensed data in a fire protection planning framework, the timber type data were subsequently integrated with terrain information to generate a fire hazard map of the study area. This map provides valuable assistance in initial attack planning, determining equipment accessibility, and fire growth modeling. The resulting data sets were incorporated into the Alaska Department of Natural Resources geographic information system for subsequent utilization.

  1. Hydrogen Adsorption on Pt, Rh and Pt-Rh Electrodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾梦秋; A.M.Meretskyi

    2005-01-01

    The hydrogen adsorption on Pt-Rh alloys in sulfuric acid aqueous solutions was studied by the method of cathode pulses. Hydrogen adsorption on the electrode with all ratio of alloy components (ωRh = 0-100%) is well described by the Temkin logarithmic isotherm. The surface coverage by adsorbed hydrogen at the same potential is decreased with increasing content of rhodium in the system. A linear dependence of adsorption peak potential on the alloy compositions in the case of weakly bonded adsorbed hydrogen is established. Hydrogen adsorption heat as a function of surface coverage for Pt-Rh-electrodes was obtained. The shape of the current-potential curve and position of the weakly bonded hydrogen adsorption on the potential scale are all related to alloy compositions, thus can serve as the basis for the determination surface composition of allovs.

  2. Surface termination of CePt5/Pt (111 ): The key to chemical inertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praetorius, C.; Zinner, M.; Held, G.; Fauth, K.

    2015-11-01

    The surface termination of CePt5/Pt (111 ) is determined experimentally by LEED-IV. In accordance with recent theoretical predictions, a dense Pt terminated surface is being found. Whereas the CePt5 volume lattice comprises Pt kagome layers, additional Pt atoms occupy the associated hole positions at the surface. This finding provides a natural explanation for the remarkable inertness of the CePt5 intermetallic. Implications of the structural relaxations determined by LEED-IV analysis are discussed with regard to observations by scanning tunneling microscopy and electron spectroscopies.

  3. Alaska's renewable energy potential.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-02-01

    This paper delivers a brief survey of renewable energy technologies applicable to Alaska's climate, latitude, geography, and geology. We first identify Alaska's natural renewable energy resources and which renewable energy technologies would be most productive. e survey the current state of renewable energy technologies and research efforts within the U.S. and, where appropriate, internationally. We also present information on the current state of Alaska's renewable energy assets, incentives, and commercial enterprises. Finally, we escribe places where research efforts at Sandia National Laboratories could assist the state of Alaska with its renewable energy technology investment efforts.

  4. Northern Alaska Landscape/Permafrost GIS Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This data set represents an updated Ecological Subsection Map for Northern Alaska. This update includes permafrost mapping to include the following new layers:...

  5. Multiyear ice transport and small scale sea ice deformation near the Alaska coast measured by air-deployable Ice Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, A. R.; Kasper, J.; Winsor, P.

    2015-12-01

    Highly complex patterns of ice motion and deformation were captured by fifteen satellite-telemetered GPS buoys (known as Ice Trackers) deployed near Barrow, Alaska, in spring 2015. Two pentagonal clusters of buoys were deployed on pack ice by helicopter in the Beaufort Sea between 20 and 80 km offshore. During deployment, ice motion in the study region was effectively zero, but two days later the buoys captured a rapid transport event in which multiyear ice from the Beaufort Sea was flushed into the Chukchi Sea. During this event, westward ice motion began in the Chukchi Sea and propagated eastward. This created new openings in the ice and led to rapid elongation of the clusters as the westernmost buoys accelerated away from their neighbors to the east. The buoys tracked ice velocities of over 1.5 ms-1, with fastest motion occurring closest to the coast indicating strong current shear. Three days later, ice motion reversed and the two clusters became intermingled, rendering divergence calculations based on the area enclosed by clusters invalid. The data show no detectable difference in velocity between first year and multiyear ice floes, but Lagrangian timeseries of SAR imagery centered on each buoy show that first year ice underwent significant small-scale deformation during the event. The five remaining buoys were deployed by local residents on prominent ridges embedded in the landfast ice within 16 km of Barrow in order to track the fate of such features after they detached from the coast. Break-up of the landfast ice took place over a period of several days and, although the buoys each initially followed a similar eastward trajectory around Point Barrow into the Beaufort Sea, they rapidly dispersed over an area more than 50 km across. With rapid environmental and socio-economic change in the Arctic, understanding the complexity of nearshore ice motion is increasingly important for predict future changes in the ice and the tracking ice-related hazards

  6. Studies of surface processes of electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 on Pt(210), Pt(310) and Pt(510)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN; ChunJie; FAN; YouJun; ZHEN; ChunHua; ZHENG; QingWei; SUN; ShiGang

    2007-01-01

    Surface processes of CO2 reduction on Pt(210), Pt(310), and Pt(510) electrodes were studied by cyclic voltammetry. Different surface structures of these platinum single crystal electrodes were obtained by various treatment conditions. The experimental results illustrated that the electrocatalytic activity of Pt single crystal electrodes towards CO2 reduction is decreased in an order of Pt(210)>Pt(310)>Pt(510), i.e., with the decrease of (110) step density on well-defined surfaces. When the surfaces were reconstructed due to oxygen adsorption, the catalytic activity of all the three electrodes has been enhanced to a certain extent. Although the activity order remains unchanged, the electrocatalytic activity has been enhanced more significantly as the density of (110) step sites is more intensive on the Pt single crystal surface. It has revealed that the more open the surface structure is, the more active the Pt single crystal electrode will be, and the easier for the electrode to be transformed into a surface structure that exhibits higher activity under external inductions. However, the relatively ordered surfaces of Pt single crystal electrode are comparatively stable under the same external inductions. The present study has gained knowledge on the interaction between CO2 and Pt single crystal electrode surfaces at a microscopic level, and thrown new insight into understanding the surface processes of electrocatalytic reduction of CO2.

  7. Highly active Pt3Pb and core-shell Pt3Pb-Pt electrocatalysts for formic acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yijin; Qi, Liang; Li, Meng; Diaz, Rosa E; Su, Dong; Adzic, Radoslav R; Stach, Eric; Li, Ju; Murray, Christopher B

    2012-03-27

    Formic acid is a promising chemical fuel for fuel cell applications. However, due to the dominance of the indirect reaction pathway and strong poisoning effects, the development of direct formic acid fuel cells has been impeded by the low activity of existing electrocatalysts at desirable operating voltage. We report the first synthesis of Pt(3)Pb nanocrystals through solution phase synthesis and show they are highly efficient formic acid oxidation electrocatalysts. The activity can be further improved by manipulating the Pt(3)Pb-Pt core-shell structure. Combined experimental and theoretical studies suggest that the high activity from Pt(3)Pb and the Pt-Pb core-shell nanocrystals results from the elimination of CO poisoning and decreased barriers for the dehydrogenation steps. Therefore, the Pt(3)Pb and Pt-Pb core-shell nanocrystals can improve the performance of direct formic acid fuel cells at desired operating voltage to enable their practical application. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  8. PT Symmetry as a Generalization of Hermiticity

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Qing-hai; Zhang, Jie-hong

    2010-01-01

    The Hilbert space in PT-symmetric quantum mechanics is formulated as a linear vector space with a dynamic weight function in the inner product. The most general PT-symmetric matrix Hamiltonians are constructed for 2*2 and 3*3 cases. In the former case, the PT-symmetric Hamiltonian represents the most general matrix Hamiltonian with a real spectrum. In both cases, the Hermitian matrix is shown to be a special case of PT-symmetric matrices. This finding confirms and strengthens the early belief that the PT-symmetric quantum mechanics is a generalization of the conventional Hermitian quantum mechanics.

  9. 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake: a photographic tour of Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoms, Evan E.; Haeussler, Peter J.; Anderson, Rebecca D.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    On March 27, 1964, at 5:36 p.m., a magnitude 9.2 earthquake, the largest recorded earthquake in U.S. history, struck southcentral Alaska (fig. 1). The Great Alaska Earthquake (also known as the Good Friday Earthquake) occurred at a pivotal time in the history of earth science, and helped lead to the acceptance of plate tectonic theory (Cox, 1973; Brocher and others, 2014). All large subduction zone earthquakes are understood through insights learned from the 1964 event, and observations and interpretations of the earthquake have influenced the design of infrastructure and seismic monitoring systems now in place. The earthquake caused extensive damage across the State, and triggered local tsunamis that devastated the Alaskan towns of Whittier, Valdez, and Seward. In Anchorage, the main cause of damage was ground shaking, which lasted approximately 4.5 minutes. Many buildings could not withstand this motion and were damaged or collapsed even though their foundations remained intact. More significantly, ground shaking triggered a number of landslides along coastal and drainage valley bluffs underlain by the Bootlegger Cove Formation, a composite of facies containing variably mixed gravel, sand, silt, and clay which were deposited over much of upper Cook Inlet during the Late Pleistocene (Ulery and others, 1983). Cyclic (or strain) softening of the more sensitive clay facies caused overlying blocks of soil to slide sideways along surfaces dipping by only a few degrees. This guide is the document version of an interactive web map that was created as part of the commemoration events for the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake. It is accessible at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Alaska Science Center website: http://alaska.usgs.gov/announcements/news/1964Earthquake/. The website features a map display with suggested tour stops in Anchorage, historical photographs taken shortly after the earthquake, repeat photography of selected sites, scanned documents

  10. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of Co85Cr15/Pt multilayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pol Hwang; Baohe Li; Tao Yang; Zhonghai Zhai; Fengwu Zhu

    2004-01-01

    The CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers with Pt underlayer were prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. The effects of prepared condition on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were investigated. The results show that the thickness of Pt underlayer has a great effect on the microstructure and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers.When the thickness of Pt underlayer increases, Pt(111) and CoCr(002) peaks of both CoCr/Pt bilayers and (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers increase and the bilayer periodicity of the multilayers is improved. The effective magnetic anisotropy of (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers with Pt underlayer was much larger than that of CoCr/Pt bilayers. The (CoCr/Pt)20 multilayers has a stronger perpendicular magnetic anisotropy than that of CoCr/Pt bilayers. This is ascribed to the interface magnetic anisotropy of the multilayers.

  11. Metabolizable energy requirement for starting barrow pigs (15 to 30 kg fed on the ideal protein concept based diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Cristina de Oliveira

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the metabolizable energy (ME requirement for starting barrow pigs. Forty-three animals, selected for their high lean gain, were allotted in a completely randomized block design, divided in four treatments with five blocks and two animals in each experimental unit. The diet in Treatment 1 consisted of 3,264 kcal of ME/kg containing 0.96% of digestible lysine, 0.55% of digestible methionine+cystine, 0.60% of digestible threonine, and 0.188% of digestible tryptophan reaching the ideal protein pattern. The diets in Treatments 2, 3, and 4 were similar to the diet in Treatment 1; nevertheless, the levels of ME in Treatments 2, 3, and 4 were 2, 4, and 6% higher than those in Treatment 1. The lysine:ME ratio, was mantained the same (2.82 g in all treatments. The daily feed intake (DFI and the feed:gain ratio (F:G were not affected by the levels of ME. There was a linear increase of daily weight gain (DWG and of daily energy intake (DEI. Later, a linear reduction in carcass protein percentage (CPP and a linear increase of fat content and daily fat accretion (DFA occurred. Results suggested that the required ME was of 3,264 kcal/kg or less for improved barrows (15 to 30 kg, of the dam line, fed with diets containing 0.96% of digestible lysine, formulated according to the ideal protein concept.A exigência de energia metabolizável (EM para suínos machos castrados foi determinada no presente experimento. Foram utilizados 43 suínos geneticamente melhorados, distribuídos em delineamento experimental de blocos inteiramente casualizados, com quatro tratamentos, cinco blocos e dois animais por unidade experimental. Tratamento 1 constituiu-se de uma dieta contendo 3.264 kcal de EM/kg contendo 0,96% de lisina digestível, 0,55% de metionina + cistina digestíveis, 0,60% de treonina digestível e 0,188% de triptofano digestível, atendendo ao conceito de proteína ideal. Tratamentos 2, 3 e 4 foram semelhantes à do

  12. PT AND PT/NI "NEEDLE" ELETROCATALYSTS ON CARBON NANOTUBES WITH HIGH ACTIVITY FOR THE ORR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H.

    2011-11-10

    Platinum and platinum/nickel alloy electrocatalysts supported on graphitized (gCNT) or nitrogen doped carbon nanotubes (nCNT) are prepared and characterized. Pt deposition onto carbon nanotubes results in Pt 'needle' formations that are 3.5 nm in diameter and {approx}100 nm in length. Subsequent Ni deposition and heat treatment results in PtNi 'needles' with an increased diameter. All Pt and Pt/Ni materials were tested as electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The Pt and Pt/Ni catalysts showed excellent performance for the ORR, with the heat treated PtNi/gCNT (1.06 mA/cm{sup 2}) and PtNi/nCNT (0.664 mA/cm{sup 2}) showing the highest activity.

  13. 40 CFR 81.302 - Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Brg Valdez-Cordova Election District Wade Hampton Election District AQCR 11 Southeastern Alaska... Borough Valdez-Cordova Election District Wade Hampton Election District AQCR 11 Southeastern Alaska... Island Borough Lake and Peninsula Borough Valdez-Cordova Census Area Wade Hampton Census Area AQCR 11...

  14. South-central Alaska forests: inventory highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sally Campbell; Willem W.S. van Hees; Bert. Mead

    2005-01-01

    This publication presents highlights of a recent south-central Alaska inventory conducted by the Pacific Northwest Research Station Forest Inventory and Analysis Program (USDA Forest Service). South-central Alaska has about 18.5 million acres, of which one-fifth (4 million acres) is forested. Species diversity is greatest in closed and open Sitka spruce forests, spruce...

  15. 77 FR 16314 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00024

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00024 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of Alaska dated 03/13/2012... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  16. 78 FR 39822 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00028

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00028 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for the State of Alaska (FEMA-4122-DR... INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance, U.S. Small Business Administration, 409...

  17. Laser weldability of Pt and Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noolu, N.J. [Center for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada)]. E-mail: nnoolu@mecheng1.uwaterloo.ca; Kerr, H.W. [Center for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Zhou, Y. [Center for Advanced Materials Joining, University of Waterloo, Waterloo (Canada); Xie, J. [Cardiac Rhythm Management Division, Street Jude Medical Inc., Sylmar, CA (United States)

    2005-04-25

    Crack susceptibility of laser spot welds between Pt and Ti alloys was studied by characterizing the surface and the cross-sections of the welds produced at different pulse energies. Increase in laser pulse energy increased the dilution by the Ti alloy, giving rise to the evolution of microstructures with varying Ti contents across the entire fusion zone. Hardness results showed that regions with 66-75% Ti, i.e. consisting of primary Ti{sub 3}Pt and/or Ti{sub 3}Pt + TiPt eutectic, have a hardness higher than 700 Vickers hardness numbers (VHN), while regions with 42-66% Ti, i.e. consisting of primary TiPt, possessed hardness between 400 and 700 VHN. The extent of cracking increased with the increase in pulse energy and the cracked regions consisted of Ti contents between 50 and 75%. Brittle cracking in microstructures consisting of Ti{sub 3}Pt and TiPt phases suggested that one or both of the constituent phases are susceptible to cracking. However, crack arrest in microstructures predominantly consisting of TiPt showed that Ti{sub 3}Pt is the most susceptible phase to cracking in Pt-Ti alloy welds.

  18. Low Pt content direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst: nanophase PtRuNiZr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Whitacre, Jay F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for the preparation of a metallic material having catalytic activity that includes synthesizing a material composition comprising a metal content with a lower Pt content than a binary alloy containing Pt but that displays at least a comparable catalytic activity on a per mole Pt basis as the binary alloy containing Pt; and evaluating a representative sample of the material composition to ensure that the material composition displays a property of at least a comparable catalytic activity on a per mole Pt basis as a representative binary alloy containing Pt. Furthermore, metallic compositions are disclosed that possess substantial resistance to corrosive acids.

  19. Direct Determination of the Ionization Energies of PtC, PtO, and PtO2 with VUVRadiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Citir, Murat; Metz, Ricardo B.; Belau, Leonid; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-07-21

    Photoionization efficiency curves were measured for gas-phase PtC, PtO, and PtO2 using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at the Advanced Light Source. The molecules were prepared by laser ablation of a platinum tube, followed by reaction with CH4 or N2O and supersonic expansion. These measurements providethe first directly measured ionization energy for PtC, IE(PtC) = 9.45 +- 0.05 eV. The direct measurement also gives greatly improved ionization energies for the platinum oxides, IE(PtO) = 10.0 +- 0.1 eV and IE(PtO2) = 11.35 +- 0.05 eV. The ionization energy connects the dissociation energies of the neutral and cation, leading to greatly improved 0 K bond dissociation energies for the neutrals: D0(Pt-C) = 5.95 +- 0.07 eV, D0(Pt-O)= 4.30 +- 0.12 eV, and D0(OPt-O) = 4.41 +- 0.13 eV, as well as enthalpies of formation for the gas-phase molecules Delta H0 f,0(PtC(g)) = 701 +- 7 kJ/mol, Delta H0f,0(PtO(g)) = 396 +- 12 kJ/mol, and Delta H0f,0(PtO2(g)) = 218 +- 11 kJ/mol. Much of the error in previous Knudsen cell measurements of platinum oxide bond dissociation energies is due to the use of thermodynamic second law extrapolations. Third law values calculated using statistical mechanical thermodynamic functions are in much better agreement with values obtained from ionization energies and ion energetics. These experiments demonstrate that laser ablation production with direct VUV ionization measurements is a versatile tool to measure ionization energies and bond dissociation energies for catalytically interesting species such as metal oxides and carbides.

  20. Comparative study of ethanol oxidation at Pt: Based nanoalloys and UPD modified Pt nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripković Amalija V.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The activity of two alloys, Pt3Sn/C and Pt3Ru2/C, was compared with the activity of Pt/C modified with corresponding amounts of SnUPD (≈25 % and RuUPD (≈40 % in oxidation of ethanol. Pt3Sn/C, Pt3Ru2/C and Pt/C catalysts were characterized by XRD. To establish the activity and stability of the catalysts, potentiodynamic, quasi steady-state and chronoamperometric measurements were performed. Both alloys are more active than SnUPD or RuUPD modified Pt/C catalysts. Electronic effect determining dominantly the activity of Pt3Sn/C is the main reason for its higher activity compared to Pt3Ru2/C. Since SnUPD and RuUPD do not provoke any significant modification of electronic environment, both modified Pt/C catalysts are less active than corresponding alloys. More pronounced difference in activity between Pt3Sn/C and SnUPD modified Pt/C than between Pt3Ru2/C and RuUPD modified Pt/C is caused by electronic effect in Pt3Sn/C. High activity of Pt3Sn/C modified with small amount of SnUPD (≈10% can be explained by combining the electronic effect, causing less strongly bonded adsorbate on Pt sites and easier mobility of SnUPD, with enhanced amount of oxygen-containing species on Sn sites resulting finally in reinforcement of bifunctional mechanism.

  1. Electrodeposited Pt and Pt-Sn nanoparticles on Ti as anodes for direct methanol fuel cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hanaa B HASSAN

    2009-01-01

    Electro-oxidation of methanol was studied on titanium supported nanocrystallite Pt and Ptx-Sny catalysts prepared by electrodeposition techniques. Their electro-catalytic activities were studied in 0.5mol/L H2SO4 and compared to those of a smooth Pt, Pt/Pt and Pt-Sn/Pt electrodes. Platinum was deposited on Ti by galvanostatic and potentiostatic techniques. X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) techniques were applied in order to investigate the chemical composition and the phase structure of the modified electrodes. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to characterize the surface morphology and to correlate the results obtained from the two electrochemical deposition methods. Results show that modified Pt/Ti electrodes prepared by the two methods have comparable performance and enhanced catalytic activity towards methanol electro-oxidation compared to Pt/Pt and smooth Pt electrodes. Steady state Tafel plots experiments show a higher rate of methanol oxidation on a Pt/Ti catalyst than that on a smooth Pt. Introduction of a small amount of Sn deposited with Pt improves the catalytic activity and the stability of prepared electrode with time as indicated from the cyclic votlammetry and the chronoamperometric experiments. The effect of variations in the composition for binary catalysts of the type Ptx-Sny/Ti towards the methanol oxidation reaction is reported. Consequently, the Ptx-Sny/Ti (x∶y (8∶1), molar ratio) catalyst is a very promising one for methanol oxidation.

  2. Cultural Implications of Out-of-Phase Weather across northern Alaska after 500 CE: Regional Variability during the Medieval Climate Anomaly and Little Ice Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, O. K.; Alix, C. M.; Bigelow, N. H.; Hoffecker, J. F.

    2014-12-01

    From a global perspective, a diverse mélange of paleoclimate data reveal that Northwest Alaska is partially out of phase with northwest Europe, witnessing cooler periods during the Medieval Climate Anomaly ca. CE 1000 and warmer conditions in the 16th and 17th centuries. The search for climatic forcers in northern Alaska relies on integration of data drawn from tree-rings, lacustrine varves and moraines, diatoms, beach ridges and dunes. At Cape Espenberg, northern Seward Peninsula, a 1500-year reconstruction of settlement, landscape evolution and climatic variability employs >100 14C ages from accreting dunes with shell-laden storm beds, intercalated driftwood and superimposed soils, archaeological sites and marsh peats within swale ponds. Large storms occurred along the Chukchi Sea from Cape Espenberg and Deering (Kotzebue Sound) to Point Barrow prior to 1000 CE, and at decadal intervals during the Little Ice Age (LIA) from 1300 to 1700. Architecural driftwood logs from several excavated houses capped by sand dunes yield several 14C dated floating chronologies covering intervals from 700 to 1700, suggest the identification of cooler intervals 800 to 1000 and intermittently after 1300. Peat aggradation followed isolation from the sea from 500 onward, and was interrupted by two pulses of fresh water, one ca. 1300 and a second ca. 1800, with diatoms suggesting relative aridity during the LIA. The occupation history of Cape Espenberg generally follows dune growth, and may be inversely related to cooler temperatures.

  3. EFFECT OF RICE HULL IN THE DRIED HOTEL FOOD WASTE BASED-DIET ON LIPID CHARACTERISTICS AND MEAT QUALITY OF BARROWS

    OpenAIRE

    I.M. Purnamartha; S. Setiyono; P. Panjono

    2014-01-01

    The study was constructed to observe the effect of rice hull as a fiber sources in the dried hotelfood waste based-diet on fat and cholesterol level of pork. Twenty four heads of two months old ofLandrace x Yorkshire cross barrows were randomly divided into four treatment groups, i.e. without ricehull (R0), 10% rice hull (R1), 20% rice hull (R2), and 30% rice hull (R3). They placed in individualconcrete pen with 1.9 m in length and 0.5 m in width. Feed and water were given as ad libitum.Obser...

  4. High-performance core-shell PdPt@Pt/C catalysts via decorating PdPt alloy cores with Pt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Ni; Liao, Shi-Jun; Liang, Zhen-Xing; Yang, Li-Jun; Wang, Rong-Fang

    A core-shell structured low-Pt catalyst, PdPt@Pt/C, with high performance towards both methanol anodic oxidation and oxygen cathodic reduction, as well as in a single hydrogen/air fuel cell, is prepared by a novel two-step colloidal approach. For the anodic oxidation of methanol, the catalyst shows three times higher activity than commercial Tanaka 50 wt% Pt/C catalyst; furthermore, the ratio of forward current I f to backward current I b is high up to 1.04, whereas for general platinum catalysts the ratio is only ca. 0.70, indicating that this PdPt@Pt/C catalyst has high activity towards methanol anodic oxidation and good tolerance to the intermediates of methanol oxidation. The catalyst is characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The core-shell structure of the catalyst is revealed by XRD and TEM, and is also supported by underpotential deposition of hydrogen (UPDH). The high performance of the PdPt@Pt/C catalyst may make it a promising and competitive low-Pt catalyst for hydrogen fueled polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) applications.

  5. $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric mode-locking

    CERN Document Server

    Longhi, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Parity-time ($\\mathcal{PT}$) symmetry is one of the most important accomplishments in optics over the past decade. Here the concept of $\\mathcal{PT}$ mode-locking of a laser is introduced, in which active phase locking of cavity axial modes is realized by asymmetric mode coupling in a complex time crystal. $\\mathcal{PT}$ mode-locking shows a transition from single to double pulse emission as the $\\mathcal{PT}$ symmetry breaking point is crossed. The transition can show a turbulent behavior, depending on a dimensionless modulation parameter that plays the same role as the Reynolds number in hydrodynamic flows.

  6. Hyperspectral surveying for mineral resources in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Graham, Garth E.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Kelley, Karen D.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Hubbard, Bernard E.

    2016-07-07

    Alaska is a major producer of base and precious metals and has a high potential for additional undiscovered mineral resources. However, discovery is hindered by Alaska’s vast size, remoteness, and rugged terrain. New methods are needed to overcome these obstacles in order to fully evaluate Alaska’s geology and mineral resource potential. Hyperspectral surveying is one method that can be used to rapidly acquire data about the distributions of surficial materials, including different types of bedrock and ground cover. In 2014, the U.S. Geological Survey began the Alaska Hyperspectral Project to assess the applicability of this method in Alaska. The primary study area is a remote part of the eastern Alaska Range where porphyry deposits are exposed. In collaboration with the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the National Park Service, the U.S. Geological Survey is collecting and analyzing hyperspectral data with the goals of enhancing geologic mapping and developing methods to identify and characterize mineral deposits elsewhere in Alaska.

  7. Remarks on the PT-pseudo-norm in PT-symmetric quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duc Tai Trinh [Department of Mathematics, Teacher Training College of Dalat, 29 Yersin, Dalat (Viet Nam)]|[Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Strada Costiera 11, Trieste 34014 (Italy)

    2005-04-22

    This paper presents an underlying analytical relationship between the PT-pseudo-norm associated with the PT-symmetric Hamiltonian H = p{sup 2} + V(q) and the Stokes multiplier of the differential equation corresponding to this Hamiltonian. We show that the sign alternation of the PT-pseudo-norm, which has been observed as a generic feature of the PT-inner product, is essentially controlled by the derivative of a Stokes multiplier with respect to the eigenparameter.

  8. Alaska LandCarbon wetland distribution map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Bruce K.; Pastick, Neal J.

    2017-01-01

    This product provides regional estimates of specific wetland types (bog and fen) in Alaska. Available wetland types mapped by the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) program were re-classed into bog, fen, and other. NWI mapping of wetlands was only done for a portion of the area so a decision tree mapping algorithm was then developed to estimate bog, fen, and other across the state of Alaska using remote sensing and GIS spatial data sets as inputs. This data was used and presented in two chapters on the USGS Alaska LandCarbon Report.

  9. Room-temperature formation of Pt$_3$Si/Pt$_2$Si films on poly-Si substrates

    CERN Document Server

    Dubkov, V P; Chizh, K V; Yuryev, V A

    2016-01-01

    We propose a way of formation of thin bilayer Pt$_3$Si/Pt$_2$Si films at room temperature on poly-Si substrates by Pt magnetron sputtering and wet etching, obtain such film, investigate its structure and phase composition and estimate the thickness of its layers. We verify by direct x-ray photoelectron-spectroscopic measurements our previous observation of the Pt$_2$Si layer formaton between Pt and poly-Si films as a result of Pt magnetron sputtering at room temperature. This layer likely appears due to high enough temperature of Pt ions in the magnetron plasma sufficient for chemical reaction of the silicide film formation on the Si surface. The Pt$_3$Si layer likely forms from the Pt--Pt$_3$Si layer (Pt$_{95}$Si$_5$), which arises under Pt film during the magnetron sputtering, as a result of Pt removal by wet etching.

  10. A comparative study of Pt and Pt-Pd core-shell nanocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Nguyen Viet, E-mail: nguyenviet_long@yahoo.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Posts and Telecommunications Institute of Technology, km 10 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Ha Dong, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh, Linh Trung, Thu Duc, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Department of Molecular and Material Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Ohtaki, Michitaka [Department of Molecular and Material Sciences, Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasugakouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Hien, Tong Duy [Laboratory for Nanotechnology, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh, Linh Trung, Thu Duc, Ho Chi Minh (Viet Nam); Randy, Jalem [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan); Nogami, Masayuki, E-mail: nogami@nitech.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya 466-8555 (Japan)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: > The syntheses of Pt (4-8 nm) and Pt-Pd core-shell nanoparticles (15-25 nm) are showed. > Pt-Pd core-shell catalysts possess catalytic property much better than Pt catalysts. > Pt-Pd core-shell catalysts exhibit fast and highly stable catalytic activity. > Fascinatingly, size effect is not as really important as nanostructuring effect. > Fast, stable, sensitive hydrogen adsorption is very crucial for fuel cells. - Abstract: This comparative study characterizes two types of metallic and core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles prepared with our modified polyol method. These nanoparticles consist of Pt and Pt-Pd core-shell nanocatalysts exhibiting polyhedral morphologies. The controlled syntheses of Pt metallic nanoparticles in the 10-nm regime (4-8 nm) and Pt-Pd bimetallic core-shell nanoparticles in the 30-nm regime (15-25 nm) are presented. To realize our ultimate research goals for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), we thoroughly investigate the dependence of the electrocatalytic properties of the nanoparticles on the structure, size and morphology. Significant differences in the electrocatalysis are also explained in experimental evidences of both Pt and Pt-Pd nanocatalysts. We suggested that the core-shell controlled morphologies and nanostructures of the Pd nanoshell as the Pd atomic monolayers will not only play an important role in producing inexpensive, novel Pt- and Pd-based nanocatalysts but also in designing more efficient Pt- and Pd-based nanocatalysts for practical use in DMFC technology. Our comparative results show that Pt-Pd nanocatalysts with Pd nanoshells exhibited much better electrocatalytic activity and stabilization compared to Pt nanocatalysts. Interestingly, we found that the size effect is not as strong as the nanostructuring effect on the catalytic properties of the researched nanoparticles. A nanostructure effect of the core-shell bimetallic nanoparticles was identified.

  11. AN ANIMAL MODEL OF PLATINUM (PT) HYPERSENSITIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exposure to Pt salts has been associated with occupational asthma. Pt, the most active component and widely used metal in catalytic converters, is released in automobile exhaust and is a proposed diesel fuel additive. Thus, with the potential for widespread environmental distrib...

  12. Using a Neural Network to Determine the Hatch Status of the AERI at the ARM North Slope of Alaska Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwink, AB; Turner, DD

    2012-03-19

    The fore-optics of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) are protected by an automated hatch to prevent precipitation from fouling the instrument's scene mirror (Knuteson et al. 2004). Limit switches connected with the hatch controller provide a signal of the hatch state: open, closed, undetermined (typically associated with the hatch being between fully open or fully closed during the instrument's sky view period), or an error condition. The instrument then records the state of the hatch with the radiance data so that samples taken when the hatch is not open can be removed from any subsequent analysis. However, the hatch controller suffered a multi-year failure for the AERI located at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Central Facility in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2006-February 2008. The failure resulted in misreporting the state of the hatch in the 'hatchOpen' field within the AERI data files. With this error there is no simple solution to translate what was reported back to the correct hatch status, thereby making it difficult for an analysis to determine when the AERI was actually viewing the sky. As only the data collected when the hatch is fully open are scientifically useful, an algorithm was developed to determine whether the hatch was open or closed based on spectral radiance data from the AERI. Determining if the hatch is open or closed in a scene with low clouds is non-trivial, as low opaque clouds may look very similar spectrally as the closed hatch. This algorithm used a backpropagation neural network; these types of neural networks have been used with increasing frequency in atmospheric science applications.

  13. Using a Neural Network to Determine the Hatch Status of the AERI at the ARM North Slope of Alaska Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwink, AB; Turner, DD

    2012-03-19

    The fore-optics of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) are protected by an automated hatch to prevent precipitation from fouling the instrument's scene mirror (Knuteson et al. 2004). Limit switches connected with the hatch controller provide a signal of the hatch state: open, closed, undetermined (typically associated with the hatch being between fully open or fully closed during the instrument's sky view period), or an error condition. The instrument then records the state of the hatch with the radiance data so that samples taken when the hatch is not open can be removed from any subsequent analysis. However, the hatch controller suffered a multi-year failure for the AERI located at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Central Facility in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2006-February 2008. The failure resulted in misreporting the state of the hatch in the 'hatchOpen' field within the AERI data files. With this error there is no simple solution to translate what was reported back to the correct hatch status, thereby making it difficult for an analysis to determine when the AERI was actually viewing the sky. As only the data collected when the hatch is fully open are scientifically useful, an algorithm was developed to determine whether the hatch was open or closed based on spectral radiance data from the AERI. Determining if the hatch is open or closed in a scene with low clouds is non-trivial, as low opaque clouds may look very similar spectrally as the closed hatch. This algorithm used a backpropagation neural network; these types of neural networks have been used with increasing frequency in atmospheric science applications.

  14. Metrology with PT-Symmetric Cavities: Enhanced Sensitivity near the PT-Phase Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhong-Peng; Zhang, Jing; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Peng, Bo; Jing, Hui; Lü, Xin-You; Li, Chun-Wen; Yang, Lan; Nori, Franco; Liu, Yu-Xi

    2016-09-09

    We propose and analyze a new approach based on parity-time (PT) symmetric microcavities with balanced gain and loss to enhance the performance of cavity-assisted metrology. We identify the conditions under which PT-symmetric microcavities allow us to improve sensitivity beyond what is achievable in loss-only systems. We discuss the application of PT-symmetric microcavities to the detection of mechanical motion, and show that the sensitivity is significantly enhanced near the transition point from unbroken- to broken-PT regimes. Our results open a new direction for PT-symmetric physical systems and it may find use in ultrahigh precision metrology and sensing.

  15. The robust PT-symmetric chain

    CERN Document Server

    Joglekar, Yogesh N

    2010-01-01

    We study the properties of a parity- and time-reversal- (PT) symmetric tight-binding chain of size N with position-dependent hopping amplitude. In contrast to the fragile PT-symmetric phase of a chain with constant hopping and imaginary impurity potentials, we show that, under very general conditions, our model is {\\it always} in the PT-symmetric phase. We numerically obtain the energy spectrum and the density of states of such a chain, and show that they are widely tunable. By studying the size-dependence of inverse participation ratios, we show that although the chain is not translationally invariant, most of its eigenstates are extended. Our results indicate that tight-binding models with non-Hermitian PT-symmetric hopping have a robust PT-symmetric phase and rich dynamics.

  16. Geology of the Alaska-Juneau lode system, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenhofel, William Stephens

    1952-01-01

    The Alaska-Juneau lode system for many years was one of the worlds leading gold-producing areas. Total production from the years 1893 to 1946 has amounted to about 94 million dollars, with principal values in contained gold but with some silver and lead values. The principal mine is the Alaska-Juneau mine, from which the lode system takes its name. The lode system is a part of a larger gold-bearing belt, generally referred to as the Juneau gold belt, along the western border of the Coast Range batholith. The rocks of the Alaska-Juneau lode system consist of a monoclinal sequence of steeply northeasterly dipping volcanic, state, and schist rocks, all of which have been metamorphosed by dynamic and thermal processes attendant with the intrusion of the Coast Range batholith. The rocks form a series of belts that trend northwest parallel to the Coast Range. In addition to the Coast Range batholith lying a mile to the east of the lode system, there are numerous smaller intrusives, all of which are sill-like in form and are thus conformable to the regional structure. The bedded rocks are Mesozoic in age; the Coast Range batholith is Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous in age. Some of the smaller intrusives pre-date the batholith, others post-date it. All of the rocks are cut by steeply dipping faults. The Alaska-Juneau lode system is confined exclusively to the footwall portion of the Perseverance slate band. The slate band is composed of black slate and black phyllite with lesser amounts of thin-bedded quartzite. Intrusive into the slate band are many sill-like bodies of rocks generally referred to as meta-gabbro. The gold deposits of the lode system are found both within the slate rocks and the meta-gabbro rocks, and particularly in those places where meta-gabbro bodies interfinger with slate. Thus the ore bodies are found in and near the terminations of meta-gabbro bodies. The ore bodies are quartz stringer-lodes composed of a great number of quartz veins from 6

  17. Seldovia, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Seldovia, Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 1 arc-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly for...

  18. Seward, Alaska 1 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 1 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of .89-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  19. Preliminary integrated geologic map data for Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A GIS database of geologic units and structural features in Alaska, with lithology, age, data structure, and format written and arranged just like the other states.

  20. A conservation program for Alaska's commercial fisheries

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — It is the purpose of this report to show how the present programs of the Alaska Region of the Bureau of Commercial Fisheries relate to problems of the various...

  1. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for estuarine, benthic, and pelagic fish in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of...

  2. Alaska North-South Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Alaska is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 1.1 million terrestrial and marine gravity data...

  3. Alaska East-West Deflections (DEFLEC96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' surface deflection of the vertical grid for Alaska is the DEFLEC96 model. The computation used about 1.1 millionterrestrial and marine gravity data held...

  4. Invertebrate inventory of the Alaska Peninsula

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The composition and distribution of invertebrate species on the Alaska Peninsula is not well known. This pilot project was intended to test methods and to document...

  5. Geology of the Johnson River Area Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation, topography, and geology of the Johnson River area are representative of the entire eastern interior region of Alaska. This area has a vegetational...

  6. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  7. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FISH (Fish Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine, estuarine, anadromous, and freshwater fish species for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector...

  8. Western Alaska ESI: HABITATS (Habitat Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  9. Generalized thermal maturity map of Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of a polygon coverage and associated attribute data derived from the onshore portion of the 1996 "Generalized Thermal Maturity Map of Alaska"...

  10. Aerial Gamma-Ray Surveys in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Data generated by aerial sensing of radiation emanating from the earth's surface in Alaska provides general estimates of the geographic distribution of Uranium,...

  11. OCS Planning Areas Alaska NAD 83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains BOEM Planning Area outlines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The Submerged Lands Act (SLA) boundary, along with the...

  12. Alaska Federal Oil and Gas Historical Leases

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the outlines for historic (i.e., relinquished or inactive) federal oil and gas leases in the Alaska OCS Region through sale 193. They...

  13. Kensington Mine Area Baseline Contaminants Study, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Hardrock mining for gold and other metals is proposed for the Kensington Mine, located on Lynn Canal in Southeast Alaska, approximately 45 miles north of Juneau. The...

  14. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  15. Continental Shelf Boundary - Alaska NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Department of the Interior — This data set contains Continental Shelf Boundaries (CSB) lines in ESRI shapefile format for the BOEM Alaska Region. The CSB defines the seaward limit of federally...

  16. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Pup Count Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains counts of Steller sea lion pups on rookeries in Alaska made between 1961 and 2015. Pup counts are conducted in late June-July. Pups are...

  17. Alaska Steller Sea Lion Food Habits Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains food habits samples, usually scats, collected opportunistically on Steller sea lion rookeries and haulouts in Alaska from 1985 to present....

  18. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  19. Ecological Subsections for Northern Alaska, 2012 update

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This data set represents an updated Ecological Subsection Map for Northern Alaska. This 2012 revision focused on completing the incompletely mapped portion of the...

  20. Wild resource use in Northway, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report describes contemporary and recent historic use of fish and wildlife resources by residents of Northway, Alaska. Northway today consists primarily of an...

  1. Alaska LandCarbon Wetland Distribution Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This product provides regional estimates of specific wetland types (bog and fen) in Alaska. Available wetland types mapped by the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI)...

  2. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: INDEX

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  3. Cross Cultural Scientific Communication in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, K. B.

    2006-12-01

    An example of cross-cultural education is provided by the Aurora Alive curriculum. Aurora Alive communicates science to Alaska Native students through cross-cultural educational products used in Alaska schools for more than a decade, including (1) a CDROM that provides digital graphics, bilingual (English and Athabascan language) narration-over-text and interactive elements that help students visualize scientific concepts, and (2) Teacher's Manuals containing more than 150 hands-on activities aligned to national science standards, and to Alaska Standards for Culturally Responsive Schools. Created by Native Elders and teachers working together with University Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute scientists, Aurora Alive blends Native "ways of knowing" with current "western" research to teach the physics and math of the aurora.

  4. Seward, Alaska 8 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 8-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 8-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  5. Seward, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3 arc-second Seward Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 2.67-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is...

  6. Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Permit Program

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The North Pacific Fishery Management Council adopted the Central Gulf of Alaska Rockfish Program (Rockfish Program) on June 14, 2010, to replace the expiring Pilot...

  7. Problems confronting migratory birds in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We describe in this paper problems affecting the well-being of Alaska's migratory birds in the belief that recognition of these problems is a step towards finding...

  8. Southeast Alaska ESI: SOCECON (Socioeconomic Resource Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains human-use resource data for airports, aquaculture sites, boat ramps, marinas, heliports, and log storage areas in Southeast Alaska. Vector...

  9. Western Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for anadromous fish species in Western Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent species occurrences...

  10. Southeast Alaska ESI: BIRDS (Bird Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for waterfowl in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent locations of foraging and rafting...

  11. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) developed the Alaska Mapping Initiative (AMI) to collaborate with the State and other Federal...

  12. Prince William Sound, Alaska ESI: HYDRO (Hydrology)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set comprises the Environmental Sensitivity Index (ESI) data for Prince William Sound, Alaska. ESI data characterize estuarine environments and wildlife by...

  13. Renewed unrest at Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, John A.

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO),a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has detected unrest at Mount Spurr volcano, located about 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska, at the northeast end of the Aleutian volcanic arc.This activity consists of increased seismicity melting of the summit ice cap, and substantial rates of C02 and H2S emission.The current unrest is centered beneath the volcano's 3374-m-high summit, whose last known eruption was 5000–6000 years ago. Since then, Crater Peak, 2309 m in elevation and 4 km to the south, has been the active vent. Recent eruptions occurred in 1953 and 1992.

  14. Permafrost Soils Database for Northern Alaska 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This database contains soil and permafrost stratigraphy for northern Alaska compiled from numerous project data files and reports. The Access Database has main data...

  15. Alaska Marine Mammal Strandings/Entanglements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database represents a summary of information on stranded marine mammals reported to NMFS throughout the State of Alaska in fulfillment of Title IV of the Marine...

  16. Alaska duck production survey - July 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the duck production survey for Alaska during 1985. The primary purpose of the survey is to provide information on duck production from the...

  17. The outlook for conservation in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes conservation efforts in Alaska. Population growth, outdoor recreation, and proposed National Wildlife Refuges are discussed. The report...

  18. Alaska1(ak1_wpn) Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (10,578 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  19. Alaska1(ak1_iso) Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (72,677 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  20. Gravity Data for Southwestern Alaska #2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1294 records) were compiled by the Alaska Geological Survey and the U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, California. This data base was...

  1. Fish and wildlife research in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Problems, information needs, research facilities, current research, and documents related to long term planning of fish and wildlife research in Alaska. Appendices...

  2. North Slope, Alaska ESI: NESTS (Nest Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for waterfowl, seabirds, gulls and terns for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set...

  3. Notes on game conditions in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a report on game conditions in Alaska. This report covers laws that relate to the game animals, as well as physically attributes and ecology of the...

  4. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (IFSAR) Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Geospatial Program (NGP) developed the Alaska Mapping Initiative (AMI) to collaborate with the State and other Federal...

  5. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHL (Fish Lines)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector lines in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  6. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  7. Alaska Maritime Resources National Wildlife Refuge Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Alaska Marine Resources National Wildlife Refuge, containing the approximately two million nine hundred and eighty thousand acres of the existing refuge specified in...

  8. Western Alaska ESI: INVERT (Invertebrate Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains sensitive biological resource data for marine and estuarine invertebrate species in Western Alaska. Vector polygons in this data set represent...

  9. 2004 Alaska highway invasive plants pilot survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We investigated the distribution and abundance of non-native invasive plants along a section of the Alaska Highway adjacent to Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge, 20...

  10. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  11. Klawock Lagoon, Alaska Benthic Habitats 2011 Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Klawock River on Alaska's Prince of Wales Island drains a 29,061 acre watershed with 132 miles of streambed habitat supporting seven salmon and trout species....

  12. Southeast Alaska ESI: MGT (Management Area Polygons)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains management area data for National Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and areas designated as Critical Habitat in Southeast Alaska. Vector polygons in...

  13. Alaska Yukon : Waterfowl Breeding Population Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Alaska-Yukon was again blessed with a generally widespread, early spring break-up in the interior and on the North Slope with perhaps a more normal spring phenology...

  14. Arctic and Aleutian terns, Amchitka Island, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Baird (1980) has recently reported on the ecology of Arctic terns (Sterna paradisaea) and Aleutian terns (Sterna aleutica) from 4 areas of mainland Alaska. However,...

  15. Alaska gold rush trails study: Preliminary draft

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Preliminary study draft, with maps, of seven gold rush trails in Alaska, to determine suitability for inclusion in the National Scenic Trails system and their...

  16. Seldovia, Alaska 3 arc-second DEM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 3-second Seldovia Alaska Elevation Grid provides bathymetric data in ASCII raster format of 3-second resolution in geographic coordinates. This grid is strictly...

  17. Avian Habitat Data; Seward Peninsula, Alaska, 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data product contains avian habitat data collected on the Seward Peninsula, Alaska, USA, during 21 May – 10 June 2012. We conducted replicated 10-min surveys at...

  18. Southeast Alaska ESI: FISHPT (Fish Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains biological resource data for anadromous fish streams in Southeast Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent locations of fish streams....

  19. ANWR and Alaska Peninsula Gravity Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The gravity station data (1252 records) were compiled by the U.S. Geological Survey and the State of Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys. This...

  20. Geologic Map of Alaska: geologic units

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset consists of a polygon coverage and associated attribute data derived from the 1980 Geologic Map of Alaska compiled by H.M. Beikman and published by the...

  1. Electrochemical study of the Pt and Pt-Ni upon multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Norani Muti; Mumtaz, Asad; Ansari, Muhammad Shahid; Ahmad, Riaz

    2016-11-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells have attracted great interest in the recent development of portable devices. New routes are being developed for synthesizing the catalysts used in the methanol oxidation. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of the Pt and Pt-Ni upon multiwalled carbon nanotubes, synthesized via a new modified route, has been studied. The results showed that Pt-Ni 10% has the comparable current density to the Pt 20%-loading which is nearly 3 times greater than 10% Pt loading. The transfer of the polarization curve of Pt-Ni 10% towards lower polarization region following the catalyst with 20% Pt loading indicates the higher activity of the nano-electro-catalysts in the alkaline media. Also the long term efficiency and activity of the Pt-Ni with 10% loading is nearly reaching the 20% Pt-loading which is almost 10 folds greater than the 10% Pt loading. The study revealed that Ni in Pt-based nanoalloy impart not only an enhanced activity but also better durability of catalyst in direct methanol fuel cell applications.

  2. Magnetic moments in chemically ordered mass-selected CoPt and FePt clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupuis, V., E-mail: Veronique.Dupuis@univ-lyon1.fr [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Khadra, G.; Linas, S.; Hillion, A. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Gragnaniello, L. [Institute of Condensed Matter Physics, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Tamion, A.; Tuaillon-Combes, J.; Bardotti, L.; Tournus, F. [Institut Lumière Matière, UMR5306 Université Lyon 1-CNRS, Université de Lyon, 69622 Villeurbanne cedex (France); Otero, E.; Ohresser, P. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin BP 48, F-91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Rogalev, A.; Wilhelm, F. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2015-06-01

    By combining high photon flux and chemical selectivity, X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) have been used to study the magnetism of CoPt and FePt clusters before and after their transition to the chemically ordered L1{sub 0}-like phase. Compared to the bulk, we find larger magnetic spin and orbital moments of Fe, Co and Pt atoms in nanoalloys. - Highlights: • Study of magnetism on well-defined CoPt and FePt clusters embedded in carbon matrix • X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) at each specific Fe, Co and Pt edges, before and after annealing to induce transition to the chemically L1{sub 0}-like phase. • Quantitative values of the spin and orbital magnetic moments of Co (resp. Fe) and Pt after the chemical ordering transition. • Specific nanoalloy effects.

  3. ELECTROCHEMICAL OXIDATION OF ETHYLENE AT PANI/Pt AND Ag/PANI/Pt MODIFIED ELECTRODES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenys Fernández

    Full Text Available The electrochemical behavior of ethylene on PANI/Pt and Ag/PANI/Pt modified electrodes was investigated in different media. Morphology of the deposits of PANI were observed by SEM analysis, complemented by the EDX techniques to obtain the Ag composition that shows that Ag is deposited in the polymeric matrix which covered the whole platinum surface. The electrodic system comprising Ag/PANI/ Pt electrode exhibited a more important electrocatalytic response for ethylene oxidation in neutral solutions than the PAN/Pt and Pt electrodes at 20 ºC.The results suggest that the oxidation of ethylene on Ag/PANI/Pt electrode is limited by adsorption-controlled reaction while the oxidation at PANI/Pt is mass transport-limited.

  4. Tafsir Kritis Privatisasi Berdasarkan Hermeneutika Gadamerian: Kasus Privatisasi PT Telkom dan PT Indosat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayudia Sokarina

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Privatization Under Critical Meaning by Using Gadamerian Hermeneutics: The Case for Privatization of PT. Telkom And PT. Indosat. The objectives of the study are to search critical meanings of privatisation in PT Telkom and PT Indosat. This research is using an interpretive approach and critical analysis by using Gadamerian hermeneutics. The study finds that there is other reality which shows that the Government views privatisation as a tool to achieve economic rents. Privatisation has failed to enable the distribution of ownership. At the same time, there is exploitation of consumers in the form of higher rates (as in the case of PT Telkomsel. As a result of privatisation of PT Telkom and PT Indosat has failed to provide justice and prosperity for the people and state.

  5. The future of successful aging in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan Lewis

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background. There is a paucity of research on Alaska Natives and their views on whether or not they believe they will age successfully in their home and community. There is limited understanding of aging experiences across generations. Objective. This research explores the concept of successful aging from an urban Alaska Native perspective and explores whether or not they believe they will achieve a healthy older age. Design. A cultural consensus model (CCM approach was used to gain a sense of the cultural understandings of aging among young Alaska Natives aged 50 years and younger. Results. Research findings indicate that aging successfully is making the conscious decision to live a clean and healthy life, abstaining from drugs and alcohol, but some of Alaska Natives do not feel they will age well due to lifestyle factors. Alaska Natives see the inability to age well as primarily due to the decrease in physical activity, lack of availability of subsistence foods and activities, and the difficulty of living a balanced life in urban settings. Conclusions. This research seeks to inform future studies on successful aging that incorporates the experiences and wisdom of Alaska Natives in hopes of developing an awareness of the importance of practicing a healthy lifestyle and developing guidelines to assist others to age well.

  6. Reduction of Pt2+ species in model Pt-CeO2 fuel cell catalysts upon reaction with methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitzel, Armin; Johánek, Viktor; Lykhach, Yaroslava; Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Nataliya; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Matolín, Vladimír; Libuda, Jörg

    2016-11-01

    The stability of atomically dispersed Pt2+ species on the surface of nanostructured CeO2 films during the reaction with methanol has been investigated by means of synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and resonant photoemission spectroscopy. The isolated Pt2+ species were prepared at low Pt concentration in Pt-CeO2 film. Additionally, Pt2+ species coexisting with metallic Pt particles were prepared at high Pt concentration. We found that adsorption of methanol yields similar decomposition products regardless of Pt concentration in Pt-CeO2 films. A small number of oxygen vacancies formed during the methanol decomposition can be replenished in the Pt-CeO2 film with low Pt concentration by diffusion of oxygen from the bulk. In the presence of supported Pt particles, a higher number of oxygen vacancies leads to a partial reduction of the Pt2+ species. The isolated Pt2+ species are reduced under rather strongly reducing conditions only, i.e. during annealing under continuous exposure to methanol. Reduction of isolated Pt2+ species results in the formation of ultra-small Pt particles containing around 25 atoms per particle or less. Such ultra-small Pt particles demonstrate excellent stability against sintering during annealing of Pt-CeO2 film with low Pt concentration under reducing conditions.

  7. Pt/MOx/SiO2, Pt/MOx/TiO2, and Pt/MOx/Al2O3 Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Hongmei Qin; Xiaoshuang Qian; Tao Meng; Yi Lin; Zhen Ma

    2015-01-01

    Conventional supported Pt catalysts have often been prepared by loading Pt onto commercial supports, such as SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and carbon. These catalysts usually have simple metal-support (i.e., Pt-SiO2) interfaces. To tune the catalytic performance of supported Pt catalysts, it is desirable to modify the metal-support interfaces by incorporating an oxide additive into the catalyst formula. Here we prepared three series of metal oxide-modified Pt catalysts (i.e., Pt/MOx/SiO2, Pt/MOx/TiO2, a...

  8. Engineering the Activity and Stability of Pt-Alloy Cathode Fuel-Cell Electrocatalysts by Tuning the Pt-Pt Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escribano, Maria Escudero; Malacrida, Paolo; Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    2014-01-01

    with a thickness of few Pt layers is formed. Accordingly, the effect of alloying Pt is to impose strain onto the Pt overlayer [3,4]. It is likely that this strain would be relaxed by defects [6]. Moreover, the activity of the Pt5Ln catalysts vs. the Pt-Pt distance shows a volcano relationship (Fig. A) [5]. Pt5Ln......One of the main obstacles to the commercialisation of low-temperature fuel cells is the slow kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). In order to decrease the ORR overpotential and reduce the Pt loading we need to develop more active and stable electrocatalysts. A fruitful strategy...... for enhancing the cathode activity is to alloy Pt with transition metals [1-2]. However, alloys of Pt and late transition metals are typically unstable under fuel-cell conditions. Herein, we present experimental and theoretical studies showing the trends in activity and stability of novel cathode catalysts...

  9. 75 FR 3888 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 92 RIN 1018-AW67 Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska During the 2010 Season AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... Wildlife Service, are reopening the public comment period on our proposed rule to establish migratory...

  10. Engineering the Activity and Stability of Pt-Alloy Cathode Fuel-Cell Electrocatalysts by Tuning the Pt-Pt Distance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escribano, Maria Escudero; Malacrida, Paolo; Vej-Hansen, Ulrik Grønbjerg

    2014-01-01

    based on alloys of Pt and lanthanides. Sputter-cleaned, polycrystalline Pt5Gd shows a five-fold increase in ORR activity [3], relative to Pt at 0.9 V in 0.1 M HClO4. The rest of the Pt5Ln (Ln = lanthanide) tested present at least a 3-fold enhancement in activity [4,5]. In all cases, a Pt overlayer...

  11. True ileal digestible tryptophan to lysine ratios in ninety- to one hundred twenty-five-kilogram barrows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, D C; Gaines, A M; Kerr, B J; Allee, G L

    2007-11-01

    Three experiments were conducted to determine the optimal true ileal digestible (TID) Trp:Lys ratio for 90- to 125-kg barrows. Basal diets contained 0.55% TID Lys and were either corn-based (Exp. 1) or corn- and soybean meal-based (Exp. 2 and 3) diets supplemented with crystalline AA. In addition, each experiment contained a corn-soybean meal control diet. The number of pigs per pen progressively increased, with pigs housed in 2 (n = 82; initial and final BW of 88.5 and 113.6 kg, respectively), 7 (n = 210, initial and final BW of 91.2 and 123.3 kg, respectively), or 20 to 22 (n = 759; initial and final BW of 98.8 and 123.4 kg, respectively) pigs per pen for each successive experiment. Pigs in Exp. 1 were fed 6 incremental additions of L-Trp, equating to TID Trp:Lys ratios of 0.109, 0.145, 0.182, 0.218, 0.255, and 0.290. For the 28-d period, there was a quadratic improvement in G:F (P = 0.05) and ADG (P = 0.08) with increasing TID Trp:Lys, characterized by an improvement in performance of pigs fed the basal diet compared with those consuming diets with a 0.145 TID Trp:Lys ratio, with a plateau thereafter as TID Trp:Lys increased. Pigs fed the control diet had less increase in backfat depth than the average of pigs fed the titration diets (1.30 vs. 4.09 mm, respectively; P = 0.02), but pork quality was unaffected by dietary treatment. Pigs in Exp. 2 were fed 4 incremental additions of L-Trp, equating to TID Trp:Lys ratios of 0.130, 0.165, 0.200, and 0.235. Average daily gain and ADFI increased in a linear fashion with increasing TID Trp:Lys for the 29-d trial (P < 0.01), with quadratic improvements in d-29 BW (P = 0.06) and G:F (P = 0.05). Pigs fed the diet containing a TID Trp:Lys ratio of 0.165 had greater d-29 BW, ADG, G:F, and lower serum urea N concentration than pigs fed the basal diet (P < 0.05), but were similar to pigs fed TID Trp:Lys ratios of 0.200 and 0.235 for all criteria measured. In Exp. 3, TID Trp:Lys ratios of 0.13, 0.15, 0.17, 0.19, and 0.21 were

  12. North Slope of Alaska Snow Intensive Operational Period Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verlinde, Johannes [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Bartholomew, Mary Jane [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Cherry, Jessica [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States); Ritsche, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-05-15

    The campaign was motivated by the need to improve the quantification of measurements of ice-phase precipitation in the Arctic and was by the acquisition and deployment of the new X- and Ka/W-band radars. These radars opened up an opportunity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility to obtain spatial estimates of snowfall rates using the polarimetric X-band measurements and dual-frequency measurements (using different combinations of the three wavelengths). However, calculations of X- and Ka-band radar back-scattering of ice crystal aggregates with their complex structure suggest that the commonly used T-matrix approach (Matrosov et al. 2007) for modeling the radar back-scattering underestimates the reflectivity by several decibels, with errors increasing with increasing radar frequency (Botta et al. 2010, 2011). Moreover, the X-band polarimetric measurements and the Ka/W-band measurements are sensitive to the assumed shape of the snow (Botta et al. 2011). One of the five ARM two-dimensional video disdrometers (manufactured by Joanneum Research) were deployed in Barrow at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site from 1 October, 2011 to 31 May, 2012 in an attempt to use the instrument in a novel way. The instrument was originally designed to measure the drop size distribution of rain but it seemed worthwhile to explore its capability to quantify ice precipitation particle size and shape distributions in the cold north for scattering calculations and precipitation estimations. Furthermore, this deployment gave us an opportunity to see how reliable it could be in arctic conditions.

  13. Paleoenvironmental analyses of an organic deposit from an erosional landscape remnant, Arctic Coastal Plain of Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisner, W R; Bockheim, J G; Hinkel, K M; Brown, T A; Nelson, F E; Peterson, K M; Jones, B M

    2005-01-02

    The dominant landscape process on the Arctic Coastal Plain of northern Alaska is the formation and drainage of thaw lakes. Lakes and drained thaw lake basins account for approximately 75% of the modern surface expression of the Barrow Peninsula. The thaw lake cycle usually obliterates lacustrine or peat sediments from previous cycles which could otherwise be used for paleoecological reconstruction of long-term landscape and vegetation changes. Several possible erosional remnants of a former topographic surface that predates the formation of the thaw lakes have been tentatively identified. These remnants are characterized by a higher elevation, a thick organic layer with very high ground ice content in the upper permafrost, and a plant community somewhat atypical of the region. Ten soil cores were collected from one site, and one core was intensively sampled for soil organic carbon content, pollen analysis, and {sup 14}C dating. The lowest level of the organic sediments represents the earliest phase of plant growth and dates to ca. 9000 cal BP. Palynological evidence indicates the presence of mesic shrub tundra (including sedge, birch, willow, and heath vegetation); and microfossil indicators point to wetter eutrophic conditions during this period. Carbon accumulation was rapid due to high net primary productivity in a relatively nutrient-rich environment. These results are interpreted as the local response to ameliorating climate during the early Holocene. The middle Holocene portion of the record contains an unconformity, indicating that between 8200 and 4200 cal BP sediments were eroded from the site, presumably in response to wind activity during a drier period centered around 4500 cal BP. The modern vegetation community of the erosional remnant was established after 4200 cal BP, and peat growth resumed. During the late Holocene, carbon accumulation rates were greatly reduced in response to the combined effects of declining productivity associated with climatic

  14. 100-Meter Resolution Satellite View of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution simulated natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with forests in darker green...

  15. American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... American Indian and Alaska Native Heart Disease and Stroke Facts Heart Disease is the first and stroke ...

  16. Alaska Regional Refuge Inventory and Monitoring Strategic Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Alaska Inventory and Monitoring team (I Message-ID: ). Alaska Region I&M Team members: Anna-Marie Benson , Greta Burkart , McCrea Cobb , Carol Damberg ,...

  17. 100-Meter Resolution Color Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Color Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution color-sliced elevation image of Alaska, with relief shading added to accentuate terrain...

  18. Satellite View of Alaska, with Shaded Relief - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Satellite View of Alaska, with Shaded Relief map layer is a 200- meter-resolution simulated-natural-color image of Alaska. Vegetation is generally green, with...

  19. USFWS Guide Use Areas within Alaska's National Wildlife Refuges (2014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The United States Fish and Wildlife Service, Region 7 (Alaska) has established Guide Use Areas (GUA) within the National Wildlife Refuges in the state of Alaska. The...

  20. Color Alaska Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The color Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The NED is...

  1. Grayscale Alaska Shaded Relief ? 200-Meter Resolution - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The grayscale Alaska shaded relief data were derived from National Elevation Dataset (NED) data, and show the terrain of Alaska at a resolution of 200 meters. The...

  2. Some aspects of the southeast Alaska commercial fisheries: Special report

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This paper ascertains what the USFWS can do to help stem the downward trend of the southeastern Alaska salmon fishery by: reviewing biological aspects of Alaska...

  3. 100-Meter Resolution Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska - Direct Download

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Grayscale Shaded Relief of Alaska map layer is a 100-meter resolution grayscale shaded relief image of Alaska, in an Albers Equal-Area Conic projection. Shaded...

  4. Crater Peak (Mt. Spurr), Alaska: Eruptions of 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Alaska has a number of active and potentially active volcanoes. More than one-half of the population of Alaska lives within 300 km of an active volcano. In the last...

  5. Dynamics of the YSZ-Pt Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; Jacobsen, Torben

    1997-01-01

    Yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-Pt point electrodes were examined by linear potential sweep, potential step and impedance measurements at 1000 degrees C in air. Inductive loops and hysteresis phenomena with long relaxation times were found. Atomic force microscopy showed changes of the interface...... between Pt and YSZ induced by the current passage. These changes involve transport of solid and are slow enough to explain the large time constants. The low frequency capacitance and inductive loop forming an entire circle indicate the presence of gas reservoirs at the YSZ-Pt interface....

  6. Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. Stuart; Trainor, Sarah F.; Cochran, Patricia; Huntington, Henry; Markon, Carl J.; McCammon, Molly; McGuire, A. David; Serreze, Mark; Melillo, J.M.; Richmond, Terese; Yohe, G.W.

    2014-01-01

    Key Messages Arctic summer sea ice is receding faster than previously projected and is expected to virtually disappear before mid-century. This is altering marine ecosystems and leading to greater ship access, offshore development opportunity, and increased community vulnerability to coastal erosion.

  7. Glaciers of North America - Glaciers of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnia, Bruce F.

    2008-01-01

    Glaciers cover about 75,000 km2 of Alaska, about 5 percent of the State. The glaciers are situated on 11 mountain ranges, 1 large island, an island chain, and 1 archipelago and range in elevation from more than 6,000 m to below sea level. Alaska's glaciers extend geographically from the far southeast at lat 55 deg 19'N., long 130 deg 05'W., about 100 kilometers east of Ketchikan, to the far southwest at Kiska Island at lat 52 deg 05'N., long 177 deg 35'E., in the Aleutian Islands, and as far north as lat 69 deg 20'N., long 143 deg 45'W., in the Brooks Range. During the 'Little Ice Age', Alaska's glaciers expanded significantly. The total area and volume of glaciers in Alaska continue to decrease, as they have been doing since the 18th century. Of the 153 1:250,000-scale topographic maps that cover the State of Alaska, 63 sheets show glaciers. Although the number of extant glaciers has never been systematically counted and is thus unknown, the total probably is greater than 100,000. Only about 600 glaciers (about 1 percent) have been officially named by the U.S. Board on Geographic Names (BGN). There are about 60 active and former tidewater glaciers in Alaska. Within the glacierized mountain ranges of southeastern Alaska and western Canada, 205 glaciers (75 percent in Alaska) have a history of surging. In the same region, at least 53 present and 7 former large ice-dammed lakes have produced jokulhlaups (glacier-outburst floods). Ice-capped volcanoes on mainland Alaska and in the Aleutian Islands have a potential for jokulhlaups caused by subglacier volcanic and geothermal activity. Because of the size of the area covered by glaciers and the lack of large-scale maps of the glacierized areas, satellite imagery and other satellite remote-sensing data are the only practical means of monitoring regional changes in the area and volume of Alaska's glaciers in response to short- and long-term changes in the maritime and continental climates of the State. A review of the

  8. PT-Symmetric Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, C M; Milton, K A; Shajesh, K V; Bender, Carl M.; Cavero-Pelaez, Ines; Milton, Kimball A.

    2005-01-01

    The Hamiltonian for quantum electrodynamics becomes non-Hermitian if the unrenormalized electric charge $e$ is taken to be imaginary. However, if one also specifies that the potential $A^\\mu$ in such a theory transforms as a pseudovector rather than a vector, then the Hamiltonian becomes PT symmetric. The resulting non-Hermitian theory of electrodynamics is the analog of a spinless quantum field theory in which a pseudoscalar field $\\phi$ has a cubic self-interaction of the form $i\\phi^3$. The Hamiltonian for this cubic scalar field theory has a positive spectrum, and it has recently been demonstrated that the time evolution of this theory is unitary. The proof of unitarity requires the construction of a new operator called C, which is then used to define an inner product with respect to which the Hamiltonian is self-adjoint. In this paper the corresponding C operator for non-Hermitian quantum electrodynamics is constructed perturbatively. This construction demonstrates the unitarity of the theory. Non-Hermit...

  9. Mesoporous Pt and Pt/Ru alloy electrocatalysts for methanol oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, Esteban A. [Grupo de Celdas de Combustible, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, CNEA. Av. General Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Planes, Gabriel A. [Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Fisicoquimicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Rio Cuarto, Agencia Postal No 3, 5800, Rio Cuarto (Argentina); Williams, Federico J. [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica-Fisica, INQUIMAE CONICET, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Pabellon 2, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Soler-Illia, Galo J.A.A. [Gerencia de Quimica, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, CNEA. Av. General Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Corti, Horacio R. [Grupo de Celdas de Combustible, Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, CNEA. Av. General Paz 1499 (1650), San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Analitica y Quimica-Fisica, INQUIMAE CONICET, Facultad Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Pabellon 2, Ciudad Universitaria, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2011-02-15

    Mesoporous Pt and Pt/Ru catalysts with 2D-hexagonal mesostructure were synthesized using a triblock poly(ethylene oxide)-b-poly(propylene oxide)-b-poly(ethylene oxide) copolymer (Pluronic F127 {sup registered}) template, on a gold support. Large electrochemical surface areas were observed for the catalysts prepared at high overpotentials. Compared to the Pt catalyst, the Pt/Ru alloy containing 3 at% of Ru exhibited lower onset potential and more than three times the limit mass activity for methanol oxidation. This behavior is assigned to the larger pore size of the mesoporous Pt and Pt/Ru catalysts obtained with this template that seems to improve the methanol accessibility to the active sites compared to those obtained using lyotropic liquid crystals. (author)

  10. Field surveying and topographic mapping in Alaska: 1947-83

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Robert C.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's earliest presence in Alaska dates back to 1889. A decade later, topographic mapping became an integral part of the Geological Survey's Alaska program, mostly as reconnaissance-type mapping and special-purpose mapping of specific sites. It was not until after World War II that the Survey's Alaska topographic mapping efforts began to bear fruit.

  11. 24 CFR 598.515 - Alaska and Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Alaska and Hawaii. 598.515 Section 598.515 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued....515 Alaska and Hawaii. A nominated area in Alaska or Hawaii is deemed to satisfy the criteria of...

  12. PT-Symmetry Quantum Electrodynamics--PTQED

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A; Parashar, Prachi; Shajesh, K V; Wagner, Jef

    2007-01-01

    The construction of $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric quantum electrodynamics is reviewed. In particular, the massless version of the theory in 1+1 dimensions (the Schwinger model) is solved. Difficulties with unitarity of the $S$-matrix are discussed.

  13. PT-Symmetric Quantum Field Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A

    2003-01-01

    In the context of the PT-symmetric version of quantum electrodynamics, it is argued that the C operator introduced in order to define a unitary inner product has nothing to do with charge conjugation.

  14. Golden Gate and Pt. Reyes Acoustic Detections

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains detections of acoustic tagged fish from two general locations: Golden Gate (east and west line) and Pt. Reyes. Several Vemco 69khz acoustic...

  15. PT-Symmetric Optomechanically-Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Jing, H; Özdemir, S K; Zhang, J; Lü, X -Y; Peng, B; Yang, L; Nori, F

    2014-01-01

    Optomechanically-induced transparency (OMIT) and the associated slow-light propagation provide the basis for storing photons in nanofabricated phononic devices. Here we study OMIT in parity-time (PT)-symmetric microresonators with a tunable gain-to-loss ratio. This system features a reversed, non-amplifying transparency: inverted-OMIT. When the gain-to-loss ratio is steered, the system exhibits a transition from the PT-symmetric phase to the broken-PT-symmetric phase. We show that by tuning the pump power at fixed gain-to-loss ratio or the gain-to-loss ratio at fixed pump power, one can switch from slow to fast light and vice versa. Moreover, the presence of PT-phase transition results in the reversal of the pump and gain dependence of transmission rates. These features provide new tools for controlling light propagation using optomechanical devices.

  16. Calcium platinum aluminium, CaPtAl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Fon Abi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary X-ray study of CaPtAl has been reported previously by Hulliger [J. Alloys Compd (1993, 196, 225–228] based on X-ray powder diffraction data without structure refinement. With the present single-crystal X-ray study, we confirm the assignment of the TiNiSi type for CaPtAl, in a fully ordered inverse structure. All three atoms of the asymmetric unit have .m. site symmetry. The structure features a ∞3[AlPt] open framework with a fourfold coordination of Pt by Al atoms and vice versa. The Ca atoms are located in the large channels of the structure.

  17. Adsorption of formaldehyde and formyl intermediates on Pt, PtRu-, and PtRuMo-alloy surfaces: A density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahyanto, Wahyu Tri; Shukri, Ganes; Agusta, Mohammad Kemal; Kasai, Hideaki

    2013-02-01

    Stable binding configuration for formaldehyde (H2CO) and formyl (HCO) adsorption on Pt, PtRu, and PtRuMo are studied within the frame of density functional theory (DFT). We address this study to investigate the role of Ru and Mo on the binding characteristic of formaldehyde and formyl adsorption with respect to interaction strength and charge analysis. Several binding conformation on all possible surface adsorption sites are considered in determining the most stable adsorption geometry on three surfaces. Our results show that the presence of Ru in PtRu and Mo in PtRuMo stabilize the formaldehyde and formyl, which are indicated by stronger bond strength. Further electronic structure analysis shows that the addition of Ru in PtRu and Mo in PtRuMo modifies the electronic structure of Pt's surface significantly. The presence of both impurities shifted the derived anti-bonding state - which is originally located below the fermi level in pure Pt surface - to be above the fermi level in PtRu and PtRuMo systems. This fact explains the stronger adsorption found on PtRu & PtRuMo as compared to pure Pt surface.

  18. Superior long-term activity for a Pt-Re alloy compared to Pt in methanol oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Audrey S.; Xie, Kangmin; Monnier, John R.; Chen, Donna A.

    2017-03-01

    Pt-Re bimetallic catalysts have shown enhanced activity compared to pure Pt for reactions involving oxidation, but the origins of this improved activity are not fully understood. Methanol oxidation on a Pt-Re alloy surface and pure Pt foil was studied in a microreactor coupled to an ultrahigh vacuum chamber. For reaction at 60 °C, the Pt-Re alloy surface exhibits superior long-term activity over a 24 h reaction period compared to pure Pt. The initial activity of Pt is 10-15% higher than on Pt-Re; however, the Pt surface gradually loses activity after 10 h online, whereas the activity of Pt-Re does not diminish. Post-reaction XPS shows that more carbon accumulates on the Pt than on Pt-Re, and the improved long-term activity is attributed to a greater ability of Pt-Re to oxidize the carbonaceous intermediates that eventually poison active sites. Both Pt and Pt-Re surfaces have almost no activity for methanol oxidation until a minimum coverage of oxygen is achieved from O2 dissociation. A comparison with methanol oxidation studies on Pt and Pt-Re in a pressure regime that is 150 times lower than in this work demonstrates that more carbon and less oxygen accumulate on the surfaces during reaction at the lower pressures.

  19. The CO/Pt(111) Puzzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FEIBELMAN,PETER J.; HAMMER,B.; NORSHOV,J.K.; WAGNER,F.; SCHEFFLER,M.; STUMPF,R.; DUMESIC,J.; WATWE,R.

    2000-07-12

    Notwithstanding half a dozen theoretical publications, well-converged density-functional calculations, whether based on a local or generalized-gradient exchange-correlation potential, whether all-electron or employing pseudopotentials underestimate CO's preference for low-coordination binding sites on Pt(111) and vicinals to it. For example, they imply that CO should prefer hollow- to atop-site adsorption on Pt(111), in apparent contradiction to a host of low temperature experimental studies.

  20. Scattering properties of PT-symmetric objects

    CERN Document Server

    Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Facao, Margarida; Abouraddy, Ayman F; Bakry, Ahmed; Razvi, Mir A N; Alshahrie, Ahmed; Alù, Andrea; Christodoulides, Demetrios N

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the scattering response of parity-time (PT) symmetric structures. We show that, due to the local flow of energy between gain and loss regions, such systems can deflect light in unusual ways, as a function of the gain/loss contrast. Such structures are highly anisotropic and their scattering patterns can drastically change as a function of the angle of incidence. In addition, we derive a modified optical theorem for PT-symmetric scattering systems, and discuss its ramifications.

  1. Earthquake Hazard and Risk in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black Porto, N.; Nyst, M.

    2014-12-01

    Alaska is one of the most seismically active and tectonically diverse regions in the United States. To examine risk, we have updated the seismic hazard model in Alaska. The current RMS Alaska hazard model is based on the 2007 probabilistic seismic hazard maps for Alaska (Wesson et al., 2007; Boyd et al., 2007). The 2015 RMS model will update several key source parameters, including: extending the earthquake catalog, implementing a new set of crustal faults, updating the subduction zone geometry and reoccurrence rate. First, we extend the earthquake catalog to 2013; decluster the catalog, and compute new background rates. We then create a crustal fault model, based on the Alaska 2012 fault and fold database. This new model increased the number of crustal faults from ten in 2007, to 91 faults in the 2015 model. This includes the addition of: the western Denali, Cook Inlet folds near Anchorage, and thrust faults near Fairbanks. Previously the subduction zone was modeled at a uniform depth. In this update, we model the intraslab as a series of deep stepping events. We also use the best available data, such as Slab 1.0, to update the geometry of the subduction zone. The city of Anchorage represents 80% of the risk exposure in Alaska. In the 2007 model, the hazard in Alaska was dominated by the frequent rate of magnitude 7 to 8 events (Gutenberg-Richter distribution), and large magnitude 8+ events had a low reoccurrence rate (Characteristic) and therefore didn't contribute as highly to the overall risk. We will review these reoccurrence rates, and will present the results and impact to Anchorage. We will compare our hazard update to the 2007 USGS hazard map, and discuss the changes and drivers for these changes. Finally, we will examine the impact model changes have on Alaska earthquake risk. Consider risk metrics include average annual loss, an annualized expected loss level used by insurers to determine the costs of earthquake insurance (and premium levels), and the

  2. Reduction of Pt Usage in Fuel Cell Electrocatalysts Using Carbon Nanotubes and Non-Pt Metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Nakamura; Y. Nagashima; T. Yamazaki; T. Matsumoto; E. Yoo

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The high-priced and limited Pt constitutes a high barrier to commercialization of fuel cells. Pt is essential for the electrode catalyst of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). A reduction in Pt usage is one of the key requirements for the commercialization of fuel cells for use in everyday life, because of its high price and limited availability, and the difficulty of finding suitable substitutes. Non-Pt fuel cell catalysts will decrease the demand for Pt by PEFCs, enabling more Pt to be available for use in other essential products, and make fuel cells more popular[1]. The cheaper Mo2C is known to possess similar catalytic activities and electronic structures to Pt[2]. Carbon black (CB) is widely used as the support for Pt nanoparticles. However, we found that when carbon nanotubes (CNTs) rather than CB are used as the support, the performance is improved, especially below 600 mA/cm2[3,4]. Here, we show that a combination of Mo2C catalyst and carbon nanotubes in the anode provides performance as high as half that of the current PEFCs with Pt catalysts below 600mA/cm2.

  3. Electrocatalysis of fuel cells reaction on Pt and Pt-bimetallic anode catalysts: A selective review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stamenković Vojislav

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we selectively summarize recent progress, primarily from our laboratory, in the development of interrelationships between the kinetics of the fuel cells reactions and the structure/composition of anode catalysts. The focus is placed on two types of metallic surfaces: platinum single crystals and bimetallic surfaces based on Pt. In the first part it was illustrated that the hydcogen reaction is structure sensitive process, with Pt(110 being an order of magnitude more active than either of the atomically "flatter" (100 and (111 surfaces. The hydrogen reaction on Pt(hkl modified by pseudomorphic Pd (submonolayers shows the "volcano-like" behavior, having the maximum rate on Pt(111 modified by 1 ML of Pd. The Pt(111-Pd system is used to demonstrate how the energetics of intermediates formed in the hydrogen reaction is affected by interfacial bonding and energetic constraints produced between pseudomorphic Pd films and the Pt(111 substrate. In the second part it was shown that the oxidation of Ha in the presence of CO occurs concurrently with CO oxidation on Pt and Pt bimetallic surfaces. The Pt-Ru system is used to demonstrate that both the bifunctional effect and the ligand effect contribute to the influence of Ru on the CO oxidation rate and for Hz oxidation process in the presence of CO. The knowledge is then used to create the real-life catalyst with the catalytic activities which are, to the greatest extend possible similar to the tailor-made surface.

  4. Dependence of Magnetic Properties of Co/Pt Multilayers on Deposition Temperature of Pt Buffer Layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiomi, Shigeru; Nishimura, Tomotaka; Kobayashi, Tadashi; Masuda, Morio

    1993-04-01

    A 15-nm-thick Pt buffer layer was deposited on a glass slide at temperature Ts(Ptbuf) ranging from 30 to 300°C by e-gun evaporation. Following the cooling in vacuum to ambient temperature, Co and Pt layers have been alternately deposited on it. Very large perpendicular anisotropy and coercivity have been obtained at Ts(Ptbuf) higher than 200°C. The (111) preferred orientation of the Co/Pt multilayer as well as the Pt buffer layer became more pronounced with elevating Ts(Ptbuf), to which the enhancement of perpendicular anisotropy with elevating Ts(Ptbuf) might be ascribable.

  5. Nanoparticulate CoPt Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barekatain, Yasaman; Hadjipanayis, George; Magnetics bLab Team

    Equiatomic FePt and CoPt alloys are very attractive for application in high density recording media because of the high magnetocrystalline anisotropy K of their fct(L10) structure with values exceeding 2MJ/m3.The aim of this study is to fabricate a nanoparticulate CoPt film consisting of CoPt nanoparticles embedded in a matrix. To obtain this we have used co-sputtering of CoPt with different materials M = BN,C, Cu and SiO2. Our first experiments were done on CoPt films with thickness of 200 nm. The as-sputtered films had the fcc structure and a coercivity of 150 Oe. Annealing at 700 oC for 30 min led to an increase in coercivity to 4 kOe. Optimization studies are under way to find the optimum sputtering conditions to obtain a fully ordered tetragonal structure with the highest value of coercivity which can then be used in the nanoparticulate composites. Work supported by DOE BES- FG02-04ERU4612 DOE DE-FG02-04ERU4612.

  6. PT -symmetric model of immune response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, Carl M.; Ghatak, Ananya; Gianfreda, Mariagiovanna

    2017-01-01

    The study of PT -symmetric physical systems began in 1998 as a complex generalization of conventional quantum mechanics, but beginning in 2007 experiments began to be published in which the predicted PT phase transition was clearly observed in classical rather than in quantum-mechanical systems. This paper examines the classical PT phase transition in dynamical-system models that are moderately accurate representations of antigen-antibody systems. A surprising conclusion that can be drawn from these models is that it might be possible treat a serious disease in which the antigen concentration grows out of bounds (and the host dies) by injecting a small dose of a second (different) antigen. In this case a PT -symmetric analysis shows there are two possible favorable outcomes. In the unbroken-PT -symmetric phase the disease becomes chronic and is no longer lethal, while in the appropriate broken-PT -symmetric phase the concentration of lethal antigen goes to zero and the disease is completely cured.

  7. PT phase transition in multidimensional quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bender, Carl M

    2012-01-01

    Non-Hermitian PT-symmetric quantum-mechanical Hamiltonians generally exhibit a phase transition that separates two parametric regions, (i) a region of unbroken PT symmetry in which the eigenvalues are all real, and (ii) a region of broken PT symmetry in which some of the eigenvalues are complex. This transition has recently been observed experimentally in a variety of physical systems. Until now, theoretical studies of the PT phase transition have generally been limited to one-dimensional models. Here, four nontrivial coupled PT-symmetric Hamiltonians, $H=p^2/2+x^2/2+q^2/2+y^2/2+igx^2y$, $H=p^2/2+x^2/2+q^2/2+y^2+igx^2y$, $H=p^2/2+x^2/2+q^2/2+y^2/2+r^2/2+z^2/2+igxyz$, and $H=p^2/2+x^2/2+q^2/2+y^2+r^2/2+3z^2/2+igxyz$ are examined. Based on extensive numerical studies, this paper conjectures that all four models exhibit a phase transition. The transitions are found to occur at $g\\approx 0.1$, $g\\approx 0.04$, $g\\approx 0.1$, and $g\\approx 0.05$. These results suggest that the PT phase transition is a robust phen...

  8. High pressure CO hydrogenation over bimetallic Pt-Co catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Medford, Andrew James; Studt, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The potential of bimetallic Pt-Co catalysts for production of higher alcohols in high pressure CO hydrogenation has been assessed. Two catalysts (Pt3Co/SiO2 and PtCo/SiO2) were tested, and the existing literature on CO hydrogenation over Pt-Co catalysts was reviewed. It is found that the catalyst...

  9. Modeling of PEM fuel cell Pt/C catalyst degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wu; Fuller, Thomas F.

    Pt/C catalyst degradation remains as one of the primary limitations for practical applications of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Pt catalyst degradation mechanisms with the typically observed Pt nanoparticle growth behaviors have not been completely understood and predicted. In this work, a physics-based Pt/C catalyst degradation model is proposed with a simplified bi-modal particle size distribution. The following catalyst degradation processes were considered: (1) dissolution of Pt and subsequent electrochemical deposition on Pt nanoparticles in cathode; (2) diffusion of Pt ions in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA); and (3) Pt ion chemical reduction in membrane by hydrogen permeating through the membrane from the negative electrode. Catalyst coarsening with Pt nanoparticle growth was clearly demonstrated by Pt mass exchange between small and large particles through Pt dissolution and Pt ion deposition. However, the model is not adequate to predict well the catalyst degradation rates including Pt nanoparticle growth, catalyst surface area loss and cathode Pt mass loss. Additional catalyst degradation processes such as new Pt cluster formation on carbon support and neighboring Pt clusters coarsening was proposed for further simulative investigation.

  10. Amorphous Pt@PdCu/CNT Catalyst for Methanol Electrooxidation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A multi-walled carbon nanotube-supported, Pt decorated nano-sized ... alloy cores (denoted as Pt@PdCu/CNT) catalyst with lower Pt loading is synthesized via a ... The electrochemical activity of the Pt@PdCu/CNT catalyst is tested by cyclic ...

  11. Surface Segregation in Supported Pd-Pt Nanoclusters and Alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Oetelaar, L.C.A.; Nooij, O.W.; Oerlemans, S.; Denier van der Gon, A.W.; Brongersma, H.H.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Roosenbrand, A.G.; van Veen, J.A.R.

    1998-01-01

    Surface segregation processes in Pd-Pt alloys and bimetallic Pd-Pt nanoclusters on alumina and carbon supports (technical catalysts) have been investigated by determining the metal surface composition of these systems by low-energy ion scattering (LEIS). Both Pd-rich (Pd80Pt20) and Pt-rich

  12. The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON): Hands-on Experiential K- 12 Learning in the North

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, K.; Jeffries, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON) was initiated by Martin Jeffries (UAF polar scientist), Delena Norris-Tull (UAF education professor) and Ron Reihl (middle school science teacher, Fairbanks North Star Borough School District). The snow and ice measurement protocols were developed in 1999-2000 at the Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) by Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska scientists and tested by home school teacher/students in winter 2001-2002 in Fairbanks, AK. The project was launched in 2002 with seven sites around the state (PFRR, Fairbanks, Barrow, Mystic Lake, Nome, Shageluk and Wasilla). The project reached its broadest distribution in 2005-2006 with 22 sites. The schools range from urban (Wasilla) to primarily Alaska native villages (Shageluk). They include public schools, charter schools, home schooled students and parents, informal educators and citizen scientists. The grade levels range from upper elementary to high school. Well over a thousand students have participated in ALISON since its inception. Equipment is provided to the observers at each site. Measurements include ice thickness (with a hot wire ice thickness gauge), snow depth and snow temperature (surface and base). Snow samples are taken and snow density derived. Snow variables are used to calculate the conductive heat flux through the ice and snow cover to the atmosphere. All data are available on the Web site. The students and teachers are scientific partners in the study of lake ice processes, contributing to new scientific knowledge and understanding while also learning science by doing science with familiar and abundant materials. Each autumn, scientists visit each location to work with the teachers and students, helping them to set up the study site, showing them how to make the measurements and enter the data into the computer, and discussing snow, ice and polar environmental change. A number of 'veteran' teachers are now setting up the study sites on

  13. Resistive switching in Pt/TiO{sub 2}/Pt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Doo Seok

    2008-08-15

    Recently, the resistive switching behavior in TiO{sub 2} has drawn attention due to its application to resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices. TiO{sub 2} shows characteristic non-volatile resistive switching behavior, i.e. reversible switching between a high resistance state (HRS) and a low resistance state (LRS). Both unipolar resistive switching (URS) and bipolar resistive switching (BRS) are found to be observed in TiO{sub 2} depending on the compliance current for the electroforming. In this thesis the characteristic current-voltage (I-V) hysteresis in three different states of TiO{sub 2}, pristine, URS-activated, and BRS-activated states, was investigated and understood in terms of the migration of oxygen vacancies in TiO{sub 2}. The I-V hysteresis of pristine TiO{sub 2} was found to show volatile behavior. That is, the temporary variation of the resistance took place depending on the applied voltage. However, the I-V hysteresis of URS- and BRS-activated states showed non-volatile resistive switching behavior. Some evidences proving the evolution of oxygen gas during electroforming were obtained from time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy analysis and the variation of the morphology of switching cells induced by the electroforming. On the assumption that a large number of oxygen vacancies are introduced by the electroforming process, the I-V behavior in electroformed switching cells was simulated with varying the distribution of oxygen vacancies in electroformed TiO{sub x} (x Pt/TiO{sub x} interface. The oxygen-related reactions given as a function of the applied voltage affect the distribution of oxygen vacancies in TiO{sub x}, consequently, the Schottky barrier height at the cathode/TiO{sub x} interface is influenced by the oxygen vacancy distribution. Therefore, the BRS behavior including the

  14. 2014 volcanic activity in Alaska: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; Neal, Christina A.; Waythomas, Christopher F.; Schaefer, Janet R.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2017-09-07

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest, and seismic events at 18 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2014. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash eruptions from long-active Cleveland and Shishaldin Volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands, and two eruptive episodes at Pavlof Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. Semisopochnoi and Akutan volcanoes had seismic swarms, both likely the result of magmatic intrusion. The AVO also installed seismometers and infrasound instruments at Mount Cleveland during 2014.

  15. Synthesis of Supported NiPt Bimetallic Nanoparticles, Methods for Controlling the Surface Coverage of Ni Nanoparticles With Pt, Methods Of Making NiPt Multilayer Core-Shell Structures and Application of the Supported Catalysts for CO2 Reforming

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Lidong

    2015-06-25

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for supported Ni/Pt bimetallic nanoparticles, compositions including supported NiPt nanoparticles, methods of making supported NiPt nanoparticles, methods of using supported NiPt nanoparticles, and the like.

  16. Microwave sinthesys and characterization of Pt and Pt-Rh-Sn electrocatalysts for ethanol oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vladislava M.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon supported Pt and Pt-Rh-Sn catalysts were synthesized by microwave-polyol method in ethylene glycol solution and investigated for the ethanol electro-oxidation reaction. The catalysts were characterized in terms of structure, morphology and composition by employing XRD, STM and EDX techniques. STM analysis indicated rather uniform particles and particle size of below 2 nm for both catalysts. XRD analysis of the Pt/C catalyst revealed two phases, one with the main characteristic peaks of face centered cubic crystal structure (fcc of platinum and another related to graphite like structure of carbon support Vulcan XC-72R. However, in XRD pattern of the Pt-Rh-Sn/C catalyst diffraction peaks for Pt, Rh or Sn cannot be resolved, indicating an extremely low crystallinity. The small particle sizes and homogeneous size distributions of both catalysts should be attributed to the advantages of microwave assisted modified polyol process in ethylene glycol solution. Pt-Rh- Sn/C catalyst is highly active for the ethanol oxidation with the onset potential shifted for more than 150 mV to negative values and with currents nearly 5 times higher in comparison to Pt/C catalyst. The stability tests of the catalysts, as studied by the chronoamperometric experiments, reveal that the Pt-Rh-Sn/C catalyst is evidently less poisoned then Pt/C catalyst. The increased activity of Pt-Rh-Sn/C in comparison to Pt/C catalyst is most probably promoted by bifunctional mechanism and the electronic effect of alloyed metals.

  17. Preparation of PtSn/C, PtRu/C, PtRh/C, PtRuRh/C and PtSnRh/C electrocatalysts using an alcohol-reduction process for methanol and ethanol oxidation; Preparacao e caracterizacao de eletrocatalisadores PtRu, PtSn, PtRh, PtRuRh e PtSnRh para oxidacao direta de alcoois em celulas a combustivel tipo PEM utilizando a metodologia da reducao por alcool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Ricardo Rodrigues

    2009-07-01

    In this work, Pt/C, PtRh (90:10), PtRh/C (50:50), PtSn/C (50:50), PtRu (50:50)/C, PtRuRh/C (50:40:10) and PtSnRh/C (50:40:10) were prepared by an alcohol-reduction process with metal loading of 20 wt.% using H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}.6H{sub 2}O (Aldrich), SnCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O (Aldrich),and RhCl{sub 2}.XH{sub 2}O (Aldrich) as metals sources and Vulcan XC72 as support. The electrocatalysts were characterized by EDX, XRD and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electro-oxidation of ethanol was studied by CV, chronoamperomety at room temperature in acid medium and tests at 100 deg C on a single cell of a direct methanol or ethanol fuel cell. The EDX analysis showed that the metal atomic ratios of the obtained electrocatalysts were similar to the nominal atomic ratios used in the preparation. The diffractograms of electrocatalysts prepared showed four peaks at approximately 2{theta} =40 deg, 47 deg, 67 deg and 82 deg, which are associated with the (111), (200), (220) and (311) planes, respectively, of a face cubic-centered (fcc) structure characteristic of platinum and platinum alloys. The average crystallite sizes using the Scherrer equation and the calculated values were in the range of 2-3 nm. For Pt Sn/C and PtSnRh/C two additional peaks were observed at 2 = 34 deg and 52 deg that were identified as a SnO{sub 2} phase. Pt Sn/C (50:50) and PtSnRh/C (50:40:10) electro catalyst showed the best performance for ethanol oxidation at room temperature. For methanol oxidation at room temperature Pt Ru/C, Pt Sn/C and PtRuRh/C electrocatalysts showed the best performance. Tests at 100 deg C on a single cell of a direct ethanol fuel cell PtSnRh/C showed the best performance, for methanol oxidation PtRuRh/C showed the best performance. (author)

  18. Alaska Highway bibliography, 3rd edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prange, Laurie

    . The military need for the Alaska Highway and Canol pipeline declined at the end of World War II. In 1946, Canada officially accepted responsibility for maintaining and developing the Yukon portion of the Alaska Highway. The Alaska Highway affected both First Nations and non-First Nations peoples immediately...... the 1920s and 1930s a small but vocal group of “builders” began to campaign for a highway, either a coastal or inland route, to improve the northwest’s economic base. With the impending threat of war in the late 1930s, there was an increasing awareness by the American and Canadian governments....... The impacts included an increased awareness of the world outside of the Yukon, imported ideas and technology, improved health care, highway transportation, telecommunications, and the development of more mining and tourist-related industries....

  19. Correlation of tertiary formations of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeil, F.S.; Wolfe, J.A.; Miller, D.J.; Hopkins, D.M.

    1961-01-01

    Recent stratigraphic and paleontologic studies have resulted in substantial revision of the age assignments and inter-basin correlations of the Tertiary formations of Alaska as given in both an earlier compilation by P. S. Smith (1939) and a tentative chart prepared for distribution at the First International Symposium on Arctic Geology at Calgary, Alberta (Miller, MacNeil, and Wahrhaftig, 1960). Current work in Alaska by the U. S. Geological Survey and several oil companies is furnishing new information at a rapid rate and further revisions may be expected. The correlation chart (Fig. 1), the first published chart to deal exclusively with the Tertiary of Alaska, had the benefit of a considerable amount of stratigraphic data and fossil collections from some oil companies, but recent surface mapping and drilling by other oil companies in several Tertiary basins undoubtedly must have produced much more information. Nevertheless, the extent of available data justifies the publication of a revised correlation chart at this time.

  20. Pt skin coated hollow Ag-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles with high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Tao; Huang, Jianxing; Lai, Shaobo; Zhang, Size; Fang, Jun; Zhao, Jinbao

    2017-10-01

    The catalytic activity and stability of electrocatalyst is critical for the commercialization of fuel cells, and recent reports reveal the great potential of the hollow structures with Pt skin coat for developing high-powered electrocatalysts due to their highly efficient utilization of the Pt atoms. Here, we provide a novel strategy to prepare the Pt skin coated hollow Ag-Pt structure (Ag-Pt@Pt) of ∼8 nm size at room temperature. As loaded on the graphene, the Ag-Pt@Pt exhibits a remarkable mass activity of 0.864 A/mgPt (at 0.9 V, vs. reversible hydrogen electrode (RHE)) towards oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), which is 5.30 times of the commercial Pt/C catalyst, and the Ag-Pt@Pt also shows a better stability during the ORR catalytic process. The mechanism of this significant enhancement can be attributed to the higher Pt utilization and the unique Pt on Ag-Pt surface structure, which is confirmed by the density functional theory (DFT) calculations and other characterization methods. In conclusion, this original work offers a low-cost and environment-friendly method to prepare a high active electrocatalyst with cheaper price, and this work also discloses the correlation between surface structures and ORR catalytic activity for the hollow structures with Pt skin coat, which can be instructive for designing novel advanced electrocatalysts for fuel cells.

  1. Pt and PtRu catalyst bilayers increase efficiencies for ethanol oxidation in proton exchange membrane electrolysis and fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Rakan M.; Pickup, Peter G.

    2017-10-01

    Polarization curves, product distributions, and reaction stoichiometries have been measured for the oxidation of ethanol at anodes consisting of Pt and PtRu bilayers and a homogeneous mixture of the two catalysts. These anode structures all show synergies between the two catalysts that can be attributed to the oxidation of acetaldehyde produced at the PtRu catalyst by the Pt catalyst. The use of a PtRu layer over a Pt layer produces the strongest effect, with higher currents than a Pt on PtRu bilayer, mixed layer, or either catalyst alone, except for Pt at high potentials. Reaction stoichiometries (average number of electrons transferred per ethanol molecule) were closer to the values for Pt alone for both of the bilayer configurations but much lower for PtRu and mixed anodes. Although Pt alone would provide the highest overall fuel cell efficiency at low power densities, the PtRu on Pt bilayer would provide higher power densities without a significant loss of efficiency. The origin of the synergy between the Pt and PtRu catalysts was elucidated by separation of the total current into the individual components for generation of carbon dioxide and the acetaldehyde and acetic acid byproducts.

  2. Management of Large Predators in Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boertje, R.D.

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Populations of wolves (Canis lupus, brown bears (Ursus arctos, and black bears (Ursus americanus in Alaska are abundant and highly productive. Their long-term future is secure due to abundant habitat and good wildlife management practices. In many areas of Alaska hunting and trapping regulates wolf numbers and keep them "in balance" with moose populations. However, high predation rates by wolves can severely depress prey populations and then hold them at a very low density many years. This is often referred to as a predator pit. Several moose populations in interior Alaska are in predator pits. In some of these areas, high densities of black and brown bears complicate the situation. Bears generally prey on moose calves for only a few weeks after they are born, but in some areas they kill up to 65% of the calves produced. Moose populations faced with high levels of predation by both wolves and bears will not recover without special management actions to reduce the predation rate. Efforts to regulate predator populations outside of normal hunting and trapping seasons are highly controversial. Many people are very strongly opposed to reducing wolf or bear populations to increase moose populations and provide for a higher harvest by humans. Other people that depend on the moose for food and/or recreation strongly support predator management. It is a clash of values that is generates great controversy in Alaska. We provide a brief history of the controversy over predator management in Alaska and make recommendations on how to manage large predators in Alaska.

  3. Climate Drivers of Alaska Summer Stream Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieniek, P.; Bhatt, U. S.; Plumb, E. W.; Thoman, R.; Trammell, E. J.

    2016-12-01

    The temperature of the water in lakes, rivers and streams has wide ranging impacts from local water quality and fish habitats to global climate change. Salmon fisheries in Alaska, a critical source of food in many subsistence communities, are sensitive to large-scale climate variability and river and stream temperatures have also been linked with salmon production in Alaska. Given current and projected climate change, understanding the mechanisms that link the large-scale climate and river and stream temperatures is essential to better understand the changes that may occur with aquatic life in Alaska's waterways on which subsistence users depend. An analysis of Alaska stream temperatures in the context of reanalysis, downscaled, station and other climate data is undertaken in this study to fill that need. Preliminary analysis identified eight stream observation sites with sufficiently long (>15 years) data available for climate-scale analysis in Alaska with one station, Terror Creek in Kodiak, having a 30-year record. Cross-correlation of summer (June-August) water temperatures between the stations are generally high even though they are spread over a large geographic region. Correlation analysis of the Terror Creek summer observations with seasonal sea surface temperatures (SSTs) in the North Pacific broadly resembles the SST anomaly fields typically associated with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). A similar result was found for the remaining stations and in both cases PDO-like correlation patterns also occurred in the preceding spring. These preliminary results demonstrate that there is potential to diagnose the mechanisms that link the large-scale climate system and Alaska stream temperatures.

  4. EFEKTIVITAS IMPLEMENTASI CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPOSIBILITY PT. ABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizkiaji Rikky Djunaedi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were 1 to analyze public perceptions on the effectiveness of the implementation of CSR of PT. A B C; 2 to analyze the implementation of CSR activities by PT. A B C; 3 to formulate strategies to improve the effectiveness of the implementation of CSR of PT. A B C. The method used in this research was descriptive analysis with a survey approach to measure expectations and performance assessment on the CSR implemented programs by the public, and there were respondents 104 respondents involved in this study. This study used the Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA aiming to determine the effectiveness of the programs that have been implemented and to map the relationship between the expectations and the performance of each variable. Furthermore, using a SWOT analysis of the data processing and of the objectives of the program made by CSR is expected to provide recommendations to develop strategies in order to increase the effectiveness of CSR program of ABC Company.Keywords: corporate social responsibility (CSR, mining industry, implementation analysis, IPA, SWOTAbstrakTujuan dari  penelitian ini adalah 1 menganalisis persepsi masyarakat teradap efektivitas implementasi CSR PT. ABC; 2 menganalisis pelaksanaan  kegiatan CSR oleh PT. ABC; 3 merumuskan strategi untuk meningkatkan efektivitas implementasi CSR PT. ABC. Metode yang digunakan dalam penelitian ini adalah analisis deskriptif dengan pendekatan survey untuk mengukur harapan dan penilaian kinerja oleh masyarakat atas program CSR yang diterapkan. Jumlah responden sebanyak 104 orang.  Dalam penelitian ini digunakan Analisis Importance-Performance Analysis (IPA bertujuan untuk mengetahui efektifitas dari program-program yang telah dijalankan serta  memetakan hubungan antara harapan dengan kinerja dari masing-masing variabel. Selanjutnya menggunakan analisis SWOT dari hasil pengolahan data dan dari tujuan program dibuat oleh CSR sehingga dapat memberikan rekomendasi

  5. Consumer willingness to pay a price premium for standing-dead Alaska yellow-cedar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey H. Donovan

    2004-01-01

    Alaska yellow-cedar has declined in Southeast Alaska over the past 100 years, resulting in half a million acres of dead or dying trees. The natural decay resistance of Alaska yellow-cedar means that many of these trees are still merchantable. However, the topography of Southeast Alaska is such that selectively harvesting Alaska yellow-cedar may often require helicopter...

  6. Beach Erosion Control Study, Homer Spit, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    34CSafleWrz OP Wo"D SIU# &CT..Rt 0CIN The m m e X. Figure A3. Summner wind rose Homer Spit, Alaska 3v-fO nIf *A WM*IN I T.C~ ALASKA ffte,.T o.F min s . 247...offshor.. Therefore, wave directions greater than 58 relative to the grid’s x-axis (Figure 38) could not be run. B10 Table B2 Sua ry of Wave Tine-History

  7. Theoretical Study of CO Adsorption on Ni(111), Pt(111) and Pt/Ni(111) Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, G. F.; Castellani, N. J.; Légaré, P.

    CO adsorption on a pseudomorphic Pt overlayer supported by Ni(111) has been studied with the use of extended Huckel calculations. Experimental information on the pure Pt(111) and Ni(111) single crystals was employed to select a consistent parameter set for our bimetallic system. This gives a good description of the chemisorption bond changes between the various systems considered in our study. The CO chemisorption energy on Pt/Ni(111) was found to be lowered in comparison with Pt(111) and Ni(111), in good agreement with experimental data on Pt-rich Pt-Ni surface alloys. This observation could be justified by the electronic changes of the Pt states (valence band broadening and decreasing density at the Fermi level). Indeed, they induce, in comparison with the pure substrates, a repulsion between Pt and CO although the 2π* population of the chemisorbed molecule increases. This points to the necessity of going beyond arguments based on an analysis of the 5σ donation and 2π* backdonation for a complete description of the chemisorption bond.

  8. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions with Pt/C (or Pt/Ru/C)//PBI catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Bandur, Viktor;

    2007-01-01

    The paper is an overview of the results of the investigation on electrochemical promotion of three catalytic reactions: methane oxidation with oxygen, NO reduction with hydrogen at 135 degrees C and Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) at 170 degrees C in the [CH4/O-2(or NO/H-2 or CO/H-2)/Ar//Pt(or Pt...

  9. Cyclic voltammograms for H on Pt(111) and Pt(100) from first principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlberg, Gustav; Jaramillo, Thomas; Skulason, Egill;

    2007-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetry is a fundamental experimental method for characterizing electrochemical surfaces. Despite its wide use, a way to quantitatively and directly relate cyclic voltammetry to ab initio calculations has been lacking. We derive the cyclic voltammogram for H on Pt(111) and Pt(100), based...

  10. Copper dusting effects on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/Pt tri-layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeth Mohanan Parakkat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Cu dusting on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of sputter grown Pt/Co/Pt stack in which the Cu layer is in proximity with that of Co is investigated in this work. We used magneto optic Kerr effect microscopy measurements to study the variation in the reversal mechanisms in films with Co thicknesses below 0.8nm by systematically varying their perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using controlled Cu dusting. Cu dusting was done separately above and below the cobalt layer in order to understand the role of bottom and top Pt layers in magnetization reversal mechanisms of sputtered Pt/Co/Pt stack. The introduction of even 0.3nm thick Cu layer below the cobalt layer drastically affected the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as evident from the nucleation behavior. On the contrary, even a 4nm thick top Cu layer had little effect on the reversal mechanism. These observations along with magnetization data was used to estimate the role of top and bottom Pt in the origin of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as well as magnetization switching mechanism in Pt/Co/Pt thin films. Also, with an increase in the bottom Cu dusting from 0.2 to 0.4nm there was an increase in the number of nucleation sites resulting in the transformation of domain wall patterns from a smooth interface type to a finger like one and finally to maze type.

  11. Copper dusting effects on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/Pt tri-layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakkat, Vineeth Mohanan; Ganesh, K. R.; Anil Kumar, P. S.

    2016-05-01

    The effect of Cu dusting on perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of sputter grown Pt/Co/Pt stack in which the Cu layer is in proximity with that of Co is investigated in this work. We used magneto optic Kerr effect microscopy measurements to study the variation in the reversal mechanisms in films with Co thicknesses below 0.8nm by systematically varying their perpendicular magnetic anisotropy using controlled Cu dusting. Cu dusting was done separately above and below the cobalt layer in order to understand the role of bottom and top Pt layers in magnetization reversal mechanisms of sputtered Pt/Co/Pt stack. The introduction of even 0.3nm thick Cu layer below the cobalt layer drastically affected the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as evident from the nucleation behavior. On the contrary, even a 4nm thick top Cu layer had little effect on the reversal mechanism. These observations along with magnetization data was used to estimate the role of top and bottom Pt in the origin of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy as well as magnetization switching mechanism in Pt/Co/Pt thin films. Also, with an increase in the bottom Cu dusting from 0.2 to 0.4nm there was an increase in the number of nucleation sites resulting in the transformation of domain wall patterns from a smooth interface type to a finger like one and finally to maze type.

  12. Introduction to Special Section: The Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT) Across Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plafker, George; Mooney, Walter D.

    1997-01-01

    This special section of the Journal of Geophysical Research addresses the composition and structural evolution of the lithosphere in northern Alaska. Investigations reported in this section were mainly undertaken as part of the Trans-Alaska Crustal Transect (TACT), an integrated geological and geophysical transect of the entire Alaskan lithosphere along a north-south corridor undertaken from 1984 to 1992 (Figure 1). The onshore segment of the transect approximately follows along the route of the trans-Alaskan pipeline; the offshore segment extends across the continental margin in the Gulf of Alaska to the Pacific plate. The TACT line is unique in that it provides a coordinated onshore/offshore geological and geophysical traverse of the North American plate in Alaska from the active convergent Pacific margin to the passive Arctic margin of the continent.

  13. 2012 Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) Lidar: Whittier, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In support of geologic mapping and hazards evaluation in and near Whittier, Alaska, the Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) acquired, and is making...

  14. ALASKA1964_INUNDATION - Alaska 1964 Estimated Tsunami Inundation Line at Seaside, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a polyline shapefile representing the tsunami inundation line for the Alaska 1964 event based on observations and associated information obtained by...

  15. ALASKA1964_INUNDATION - Alaska 1964 Estimated Tsunami Inundation Line at Seaside, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set is a polyline shapefile representing the tsunami inundation line for the Alaska 1964 event based on observations and associated information obtained by...

  16. 2012 Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) Lidar: Whittier, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In support of geologic mapping and hazards evaluation in and near Whittier, Alaska, the Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (DGGS) acquired, and is...

  17. 78 FR 75321 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-11

    ... Beluga River, Beluga Lake, and the Triumvirate Glacier. (2) Closure: June 1-July 31. (l) Southeast Alaska... islands and adjacent shoreline of western Prince of Wales Island from Point Baker to Cape Chacon, but...

  18. Digital Shaded-Relief Image of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riehle, J.R.; Fleming, Michael D.; Molnia, B.F.; Dover, J.H.; Kelley, J.S.; Miller, M.L.; Nokleberg, W.J.; Plafker, George; Till, A.B.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction One of the most spectacular physiographic images of the conterminous United States, and the first to have been produced digitally, is that by Thelin and Pike (USGS I-2206, 1991). The image is remarkable for its crispness of detail and for the natural appearance of the artificial land surface. Our goal has been to produce a shaded-relief image of Alaska that has the same look and feel as the Thelin and Pike image. The Alaskan image could have been produced at the same scale as its lower 48 counterpart (1:3,500,000). But by insetting the Aleutian Islands into the Gulf of Alaska, we were able to print the Alaska map at a larger scale (1:2,500,000) and about the same physical size as the Thelin and Pike image. Benefits of the 1:2,500,000 scale are (1) greater resolution of topographic features and (2) ease of reference to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) (1987) Alaska Map E and the statewide geologic map (Beikman, 1980), which are both 1:2,500,000 scale. Manually drawn, shaded-relief images of Alaska's land surface have long been available (for example, Department of the Interior, 1909; Raisz, 1948). The topography depicted on these early maps is mainly schematic. Maps showing topographic contours were first available for the entire State in 1953 (USGS, 1:250,000) (J.H. Wittmann, USGS, written commun., 1996). The Alaska Map E was initially released in 1954 in both planimetric (revised in 1973 and 1987) and shaded-relief versions (revised in 1973, 1987, and 1996); topography depicted on the shaded-relief version is based on the 1:250,000-scale USGS topographic maps. Alaska Map E was later modified to include hypsometric tinting by Raven Maps and Images (1989, revised 1993) as copyrighted versions. Other shaded-relief images were produced for The National Geographic Magazine (LaGorce, 1956; 1:3,000,000) or drawn by Harrison (1970; 1:7,500,000) for The National Atlas of the United States. Recently, the State of Alaska digitally produced a shaded-relief image

  19. In situ construction of Ir@Pt/C nanoparticles in the cathode layer of membrane electrode assemblies with ultra-low Pt loading and high Pt exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Dai; Zhang, Lei; Zeng, Xiaoyuan; Tian, Xinlong; Qu, Chong; Nan, Haoxiong; Shu, Ting; Hou, Sanying; Yang, Lijun; Zeng, Jianhuang; Liao, Shijun

    2017-07-01

    A novel membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) with ultra-low Pt loadings and high Pt exposure in the cathode layer is prepared by spraying Ir/C catalyst ink on the membrane surface to form a substrate layer, followed by in situ pulse electrochemical deposition of a Pt shell layer on the Ir core nanoparticles in the substrate layer. It makes the Pt loadings on cathode lower to 0.044 mg/cm2. In our system, the MEA with our novel cathode exhibits excellent performance in a H2/air single fuel cell, which is comparable to that of the MEA prepared with commercial Pt/C catalyst (Johnson Matthey 40% Pt) with Pt loadings of 0.1 mg/cm2. The electrode with core-shell structured catalysts is characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, EDS line-scan, and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Based on the characterization results, it is found that the Pt is highly dispersed on the Ir NPs, and the electronic feature of Pt at shell layer can be tuned by the Ir core particle. Furthermore, the DFT calculation results also reveal the interaction between Pt at shell layer and Ir core. This work may provide a novel pathway to realize low Pt and high Pt utilization in low temperature fuel cells.

  20. Experimental demonstration of PT-symmetric stripe lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Zhiyuan; Lyu, Quan; Li, Meng; Xiao, Shumin; Song, Qinghai

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the coexistence of parity-time (PT) symmetric laser and absorber has gained tremendous research attention. While the PT symmetric absorber has been observed in microwave metamaterials, the experimental demonstration of PT symmetric laser is still absent. Here we experimentally study PT-symmetric laser absorber in stripe waveguide. Using the concept of PT symmetry to exploit the light amplification and absorption, PT-symmetric laser absorbers have been successfully obtained. Different from the single-mode PT symmetric lasers, the PT-symmetric stripe lasers have been experimentally confirmed by comparing the relative wavelength positions and mode spacing under different pumping conditions. When the waveguide is half pumped, the mode spacing is doubled and the lasing wavelengths shift to the center of every two initial lasing modes. All these observations are consistent with the theoretical predictions and confirm the PT-symmetry breaking well.

  1. Electrodeposition and electrocatalytic activity of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticles and thin films on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guojin

    Pt and Pt-based alloy catalysts were synthesized by electrodeposition on HOPG. The nucleation and growth, morphology, composition and crystal structure, and electrocatalytic activity (towards relevant reactions in the frame of PEMFCs and DMFCs) of these model electrodes were systematically investigated. The presence of chlorides inhibits the Pt reduction processes. There is a transition from progressive to instantaneous nucleation with increasing overpotential for the deposition from 1 mM H2PtCl6 electrolytes. The possibility of instantaneous nucleation at large overpotential by using electrolytes with large chloride concentration is advantageous for the growth of small, well dispersed nanoparticles. The electrochemical data were confirmed by AFM and SEM imaging studies. Relatively narrow size distributed nanoparticles can be obtained from the current system. While MOR activity decreases with decreasing particle size, the HER and HOR activity of deposited Pt particles increases with decreasing deposition period. The ORR activity first increases then decreases with increasing deposition time. Interactions between Pt and Ru, or Ni or Co are observed and they form solid solution as verified by XRD. Underpotential deposition occurs for Pt-Ni or Pt-Co co-electrodeposition. Pt-Ru deposition can be described as progressive nucleation at low overpotential and instantaneous nucleation at high overpotentials. Through direct morphological observations, the Pt-Ni or Pt-Co nucleation can be approximately described as progressive. Pt-Ru deposits are superior to Pt towards MOR. The optimum Ru content is about 50 at.%. Pt-Ni and Pt-Co deposits are more active than Pt for ORR. The optimum content is about 30 at.% Ni or 50 at.% Co. Dealloying of Pt-Ru and Pt-Ni or Pt-Co electrodeposit is observed after electrochemical characterization. The extent of dealloying increases with the content of the alloying element.

  2. Surface Chemistry of Aromatic Reactants on Pt- and Mo-Modified Pt Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, Allison M.; Mark, Lesli; Rasmussen, Mathew J.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Medlin, J. Will

    2016-11-01

    Supported catalysts containing an oxophilic metal such as Mo and a noble metal such as Pt have shown promising activity and selectivity for deoxygenation of biomass-derived compounds. Here, we report that PtMo catalysts also promote hydrogenolysis of the model compound benzyl alcohol, while decarbonylation is most prevalent over unmodified Pt. A combination of single crystal surface science studies, density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and vapor phase upgrading experiments using supported catalysts was carried out to better understand the mechanism by which Mo promotes deoxygenation. Molybdenum was deposited in submonolayer quantities on a Pt(111) surface and reduced at high temperature. Temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments using benzyl alcohol as a reactant showed greatly enhanced yields of the deoxygenation product toluene at moderate Mo coverages. To understand how the interaction of the aromatic group with the surface influenced this reactivity, we investigated the adsorption of toluene as a probe molecule. We found that the addition of Mo to Pt(111) resulted in a significant decrease in toluene decomposition. DFT calculations indicated that this decrease was consistent with decreased aromatic adsorption strengths that accompany incorporation of Mo into the Pt subsurface. The weaker aromatic-surface interaction on Pt/Mo surfaces led to a tilted adsorption geometry for benzyl alcohol, which presumably promotes hydrogenolysis to produce toluene instead of decarbonylation to produce benzene and CO. Alumina-supported Pt and PtMo catalysts were also tested for benzyl alcohol deoxygenation. PtMo catalysts had a higher rate of toluene production and lower rates of benzene and benzaldehyde production. Additionally, when benzaldehyde was used as the reactant to measure decarbonylation activity the mass-normalized rate of benzene production was 2.5 times higher on Pt than PtMo. Overall, the results of TPD, DFT, and supported catalyst experiments

  3. 78 FR 39821 - Alaska Disaster #AK-00029

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION Alaska Disaster AK-00029 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the..., Fort Worth, TX 76155. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: A. Escobar, Office of Disaster Assistance,...

  4. Alaska Terrain Corrected Free Air Anomalies (96)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This 2' x 4' gravity anomaly grid for Alaska is NOT the input data set used in development of the GEOID96 model. This gravity grid models the 1.1 million terrestrial...

  5. Ocean Observing System Demonstrated in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoch, G. Carl; Chao, Yi

    2010-05-01

    To demonstrate the utility of an ocean observing and forecasting system with diverse practical applications—such as search and rescue, oil spill response (perhaps relevent to the current Gulf of Mexico oil spill), fisheries, and risk management—a unique field experiment was conducted in Prince William Sound, Alaska, in July and August 2009. The objective was to quantitatively evaluate the performance of numerical models developed for the sound with an array of fixed and mobile observation platforms (Figure 1). Prince William Sound was chosen for the demonstration because of historical efforts to monitor ocean circulation following the 1989 oil spill from the Exxon Valdez tanker. The sound, a highly crenulated embayment of about 10,000 square kilometers at approximately 60°N latitude along the northern coast of the Gulf of Alaska, includes about 6900 kilometers of shoreline, numerous islands and fjords, and an extensive system of tidewater glaciers descending from the highest coastal mountain range in North America. Hinchinbrook Entrance and Montague Strait are the two main deep water connections with the Gulf of Alaska. The economic base of communities in the region is almost entirely resource-dependent. For example, Cordova's economy is based on commercial fishing and Valdez's economy is supported primarily by the trans-Alaska oil pipeline terminal.

  6. Environmental Assessment for North Warning System (Alaska)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-11-10

    providing coverage farther to the north, and thus cannot fulfill the NWS mission, because of ionospheric interference caused by the aurora borealis (the...fish, including boreal smelt, Arctic cod, cisco, char, whitefish, grayling, fourhorn sculpin, Alaska blackfish, and ninespine stickleback, seasonally

  7. Indians, Eskimos and Aleuts of Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Brief descriptions of the historical and cultural background of the Eskimo, Aleut, Athapascan, Tlingit, and Haida Indian groups of Alaska are presented. Further information is given concerning the educational, health, employment, and economic opportunities available to the natives today. A list is included of activities and points of interest in…

  8. 77 FR 33231 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-05

    ... week, to leave a message or question with the BLM. The BLM will reply during normal business hours... Meridian, Alaska T. 8 N., R. 73 W., Secs. 10 and 11. Containing approximately 80 acres. T. 5 N., R. 74 W., Sec. 28. Containing 0.52 acres. Aggregating approximately 80.52 acres. Notice of the decision...

  9. Product Recovery From Hemlock "Pulpwood" From Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas D. Fahey

    1983-01-01

    A total of 363 western hemlock (Tsuga heterophylla (Raf.) Sarg.) logs from Alaska were sawn to compare recovery at a stud mill and at a dimension mill. Recovery at both mills varied by log diameters and by log scaling system. Lumber grade recovery was primarily in Stud grade at the stud mill and in Standard and Construction grade at the dimension...

  10. The reawakening of Alaska's Augustine volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Power, John A.; Nye, Christopher J.; Coombs, Michelle L.; Wessels, Rick L.; Cervelli, Peter F.; Dehn, Jon; Wallace, Kristi L.; Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Doukas, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    Augustine volcano, in south central Alaska, ended a 20-year period of repose on 11 January 2006 with 13 explosive eruptions in 20 days. Explosive activity shifted to a quieter effusion of lava in early February, forming a new summit lava dome and two short, blocky lava flows by late March (Figure 1).

  11. Sociocultural effects of tourism in Hoonah, Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee K. Cerveny

    2007-01-01

    This report examines the growth and development of the tourism industry in Hoonah, Alaska, and its effects on community life and resource use. The report describes the gradual development of tourism in Hoonah and presents resident perceptions of tourism’s effect on the natural and social environment. A multisited ethnographic approach was used featuring indepth, open-...

  12. 75 FR 8329 - Regulations Governing the Conduct of Open Seasons for Alaska Natural Gas Transportation Projects...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... Alaska natural gas transportation projects. TransCanada Alaska Company LLC (TC Alaska) has recently filed... Regulatory Commission, 888 1st Street, NE.--Room 3M-2 A&B, Washington, DC 20426. All interested parties may...

  13. 77 FR 50712 - Information Collection: Southern Alaska Sharing Network and Subsistence Study; Proposed...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... local sharing networks that structure contemporary subsistence-cash economies using research methods... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Information Collection: Southern Alaska Sharing Network and Subsistence... in Alaska, ``Southern Alaska Sharing Network and Subsistence Study.'' DATES: Submit written...

  14. Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge : Annual narrative report : Calendar year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Alaska Maritime NWR (including the Alaska Peninsula Unit, the Aleutian Island Unit, the Chukchi Sea Unit, and the Gulf of Alaska...

  15. Relaxor-PT Single Crystal Piezoelectric Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoning Jiang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Relaxor-PbTiO3 piezoelectric single crystals have been widely used in a broad range of electromechanical devices, including piezoelectric sensors, actuators, and transducers. This paper reviews the unique properties of these single crystals for piezoelectric sensors. Design, fabrication and characterization of various relaxor-PT single crystal piezoelectric sensors and their applications are presented and compared with their piezoelectric ceramic counterparts. Newly applicable fields and future trends of relaxor-PT sensors are also suggested in this review paper.

  16. Ion-irradiation induced chemical ordering of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seetala, Naidu V.; Harrell, J. W.; Lawson, Jeremy; Nikles, David E.; Williams, John R.; Isaacs-Smith, Tamara

    2005-12-01

    We have studied the effect of ion-beam irradiation on reducing the ordering temperature of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles. FePt and FePt(Au14%) 4 nm particles dispersed on a Si-substrate were irradiated by 300 keV Al-ions with a dose of 1 × 1016 ions/cm2 at 43 °C using a water-cooled flange in order to minimize the vacancy migration and voids formation within the collision cascades. Partial chemical ordering has been observed in as-irradiated particles with coercivity of 60-130 Oe. Post-irradiation annealing at 220 °C enhanced chemical ordering in FePt nanoparticles with coercivity of 3500 Oe, magnetic anisotropy of 1.5 × 107 erg/cc, and thermal stability factor of 130. A much higher 375 °C post-irradiation annealing was required in FePtAu, presumably because Au atoms were trapped at Fe/Pt lattice sites at lower temperatures. As the annealing temperature increased, anomalous features in the magnetization reversal curves were observed that disappeared at higher annealing temperatures.

  17. Ion-irradiation induced chemical ordering of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seetala, Naidu V. [Department of Physics, Grambling State University, RWE Jones Drive, Carver Hall 81, Grambling, LA 71245 (United States)]. E-mail: naidusv@gram.edu; Harrell, J.W. [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Lawson, Jeremy [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Nikles, David E. [MINT Center, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Williams, John R. [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara [Department of Physics, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2005-12-15

    We have studied the effect of ion-beam irradiation on reducing the ordering temperature of FePt and FePtAu nanoparticles. FePt and FePt(Au14%) 4 nm particles dispersed on a Si-substrate were irradiated by 300 keV Al-ions with a dose of 1 x 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2} at 43 {sup o}C using a water-cooled flange in order to minimize the vacancy migration and voids formation within the collision cascades. Partial chemical ordering has been observed in as-irradiated particles with coercivity of 60-130 Oe. Post-irradiation annealing at 220 {sup o}C enhanced chemical ordering in FePt nanoparticles with coercivity of 3500 Oe, magnetic anisotropy of 1.5 x 10{sup 7} erg/cc, and thermal stability factor of 130. A much higher 375 {sup o}C post-irradiation annealing was required in FePtAu, presumably because Au atoms were trapped at Fe/Pt lattice sites at lower temperatures. As the annealing temperature increased, anomalous features in the magnetization reversal curves were observed that disappeared at higher annealing temperatures.

  18. Discovery of the Pt-Based Superconductor LaPt5As.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, Masaya; Ishimaru, Manabu; Shibuya, Taizo; Kamihara, Yoichi; Tabata, Chihiro; Amitsuka, Hiroshi; Miura, Akira; Tanaka, Masashi; Takano, Yoshihiko; Kaiju, Hideo; Nishii, Junji

    2016-08-10

    A novel superconductor, LaPt5As, which exhibits a new crystal structure was discovered by high-pressure synthesis using a Kawai-type apparatus. A superconducting transition temperature was observed at 2.6 K. Depending on the sintering pressure, LaPt5As has superconducting and non-superconducting phases with different crystal structures. A sintering pressure of around 10 GPa is effective to form single-phase superconducting LaPt5As. This material has a very unique crystal structure with an extremely long c lattice parameter of over 60 Å and corner-sharing tetrahedrons composed of network-like Pt layers. Density functional theory calculations have suggested that the superconducting current flows through these Pt layers. Also, this unique layered structure characteristic of LaPt5As is thought to play a key role in the emergence of superconductivity. Furthermore, due to a stacking structure which makes up layers, various structural modifications for the LaPt5As family are conceivable. Since such a high-pressure synthesis using a Kawai-type apparatus is not common in the field of materials science, there is large room for further exploration of unknown phases which are induced by high pressure in various materials.

  19. Tailoring Curie temperature and magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineeth Mohanan Parakkat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of perpendicular magnetization and Curie temperature (Tc of Pt/Co/Pt thin films on the thicknesses of Pt seed (Pts and presence of Ta buffer layer has been investigated in this work. Pt and Co thicknesses were varied between 2 to 8 nm and 0.35 to 1.31 nm (across the spin reorientation transition thickness respectively and the Tc was measured using SQUID magnetometer. We have observed a systematic dependence of Tc on the thickness of Pts. For 8nm thickness of Pts the Co layer of 0.35nm showed ferromagnetism with perpendicular anisotropy at room temperature. As the thickness of the Pts was decreased to 2nm, the Tc went down below 250K. XRD data indicated polycrystalline growth of Pts on SiO2. On the contrary Ta buffer layer promoted the growth of Pt(111. As a consequence Ta(5nm/Pt(3nm/Co(0.35nm/Pt(2nm had much higher Tc (above 300K with perpendicular anisotropy when compared to the same stack without the Ta layer. Thus we could tune the ferromagnetic Tc and anisotropy by varying the Pts thickness and also by introducing Ta buffer layer. We attribute these observations to the micro-structural evolution of Pts layer which hosts the Co layer.

  20. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance study of the electrodeposition of Co, Pt and Pt-Co alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.J.; Chaparro, A.M. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, L. [CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2007-06-10

    The electrochemical deposition of Co, Pt and Pt-Co alloy are studied with the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) on a gold substrate. Co is deposited from acidic sulphate bath containing boric acid. Different processes are identified in this bath. Electrodeposition of Co on Au substrate is observed at potentials above redox potential, underpotential deposition, most probably due to formation of a Co-Au alloy. At more cathodic potentials, below -0.5 V, metallic Co is formed. The film is completely dissolved at positive potentials during the anodic scan, probably mediated by Co(OH){sub 2}. The electrodeposition of platinum from acidic PtCl{sub 6}{sup 2-} bath occurs below the thermodynamic potential (0.74 V) with almost 100% efficiency. At potentials negative from 0.0 V the efficiency decreases due to parallel water reduction. The codeposition of Co and Pt is also studied in acidic bath. Here, the decrease of pH due to water reduction on Pt deposits gives rise to precipitation of Co(OH){sub 2}, together with the deposition of metallic Pt and Co. The films contain as major component the Pt{sub 3}Co alloy. (author)

  1. Electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance study of the electrodeposition of Co, Pt and Pt-Co alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, A. J.; Chaparro, A. M.; Daza, L.

    The electrochemical deposition of Co, Pt and Pt-Co alloy are studied with the electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM) on a gold substrate. Co is deposited from acidic sulphate bath containing boric acid. Different processes are identified in this bath. Electrodeposition of Co on Au substrate is observed at potentials above redox potential, underpotential deposition, most probably due to formation of a Co-Au alloy. At more cathodic potentials, below -0.5 V, metallic Co is formed. The film is completely dissolved at positive potentials during the anodic scan, probably mediated by Co(OH) 2. The electrodeposition of platinum from acidic PtCl 6 2- bath occurs below the thermodynamic potential (0.74 V) with almost 100% efficiency. At potentials negative from 0.0 V the efficiency decreases due to parallel water reduction. The codeposition of Co and Pt is also studied in acidic bath. Here, the decrease of pH due to water reduction on Pt deposits gives rise to precipitation of Co(OH) 2, together with the deposition of metallic Pt and Co. The films contain as major component the Pt 3Co alloy.

  2. Mechanisms of current conduction in Pt/BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt resistive switching cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, R.K. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Zhang, T.J., E-mail: tj65zhang@yahoo.com.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang, J.Y.; Wang, J.Z. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang, D.F. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); q-Psi and Department of Physics, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Duan, M.G. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2012-03-30

    The 80-nm-thickness BaTiO{sub 3} (BT) thin film was prepared on the Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate by the RF magnetron sputtering technique. The Pt/BT/Pt/Ti/SiO{sub 2}/Si structure was investigated using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The current-voltage characteristic measurements were performed. The bipolar resistive switching behavior was found in the Pt/BT/Pt cell. The current-voltage curves were well fitted in different voltage regions at the high resistance state (HRS) and the low resistance state (LRS), respectively. The conduction mechanisms are concluded to be Ohmic conduction and Schottky emission at the LRS, while space-charge-limited conduction and Poole-Frenkel emission at the HRS. The electroforming and switching processes were explained in terms of the valence change mechanism, in which oxygen vacancies play a key role in forming conducting paths. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Pt/BaTiO{sub 3}/Pt cell shows the bipolar resistive switching behavior. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The current-voltage curves were well fitted for different conduction mechanisms. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electroforming and switching processes were explained.

  3. Carbon supported nanoparticles Pt Ru (Pt Ru/C electrocatalysts) prepared using electron beam irradiation; Preparacao de nanoparticulas de PtRu suportadas em carbono (eletrocatalisadores PtRu/C) utilizando feixe de eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Dionisio F. da; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Pino, Eddy S.; Linardi, Marcelo; Spinace, Estevam V. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Programa de Celulas a Combustivel], e-mail: espinace@ipen.br, e-mail: dfsilva@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    Carbon-supported Pt Ru (electrocatalysts PtRu/C nanoparticles) were prepared submitting a water/ethylene glycol mixture containing Pt(IV) and Ru(III) ions and the carbon support to electron beam irradiation. The PtRu/C electrocatalysts were characterized by EDX, XRD and cyclic voltammetry and tested for methanol electro-oxidation aiming fuel cell application. The obtained PtRu/C electrocatalysts were more active for methanol electro-oxidation than the commercial PtRu/C ETEK electrocatalyst at ambient temperature. (author)

  4. Resistive random access memory utilizing ferritin protein with Pt nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uenuma, Mutsunori; Kawano, Kentaro; Zheng Bin; Okamoto, Naofumi; Horita, Masahiro; Yoshii, Shigeo; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu, E-mail: uenuma@ms.naist.jp [Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5, Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2011-05-27

    This study reports controlled single conductive paths found in resistive random access memory (ReRAM) formed by embedding Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) in NiO film. Homogeneous Pt NPs produced and placed by ferritin protein produce electric field convergence which leads to controlled conductive path formation. The ReRAM with Pt NPs shows stable switching behavior. A Pt NP density decrease results in an increase of OFF state resistance and decrease of forming voltage, whereas ON resistance was independent of the Pt NP density, which indicates that a single metal NP in a memory cell will achieve low power and stable operation.

  5. Carbon supported nanoparticles Pt Ru (Pt Ru/C electrocatalysts) prepared using electron beam irradiation; Preparacao de nanoparticulas de PtRu suportadas em carbono (eletrocatalisadores PtRu/C) utilizando feixe de eletrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Dionisio F. da; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Pino, Eddy S.; Linardi, Marcelo; Spinace, Estevam V. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Programa de Celulas a Combustivel], e-mail: espinace@ipen.br, e-mail: dfsilva@ipen.br

    2006-07-01

    Carbon-supported Pt Ru (electrocatalysts PtRu/C nanoparticles) were prepared submitting a water/ethylene glycol mixture containing Pt(IV) and Ru(III) ions and the carbon support to electron beam irradiation. The PtRu/C electrocatalysts were characterized by EDX, XRD and cyclic voltammetry and tested for methanol electro-oxidation aiming fuel cell application. The obtained PtRu/C electrocatalysts were more active for methanol electro-oxidation than the commercial PtRu/C ETEK electrocatalyst at ambient temperature. (author)

  6. Multifunctional Pt(II) Reagents: Covalent Modifications of Pt Complexes Enable Diverse Structural Variation and In-Cell Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jonathan D; Haley, Michael M; DeRose, Victoria J

    2016-01-19

    To enhance the functionality of Pt-based reagents, several strategies have been developed that utilize Pt compounds modified with small, reactive handles. This Account encapsulates work done by us and other groups regarding the use of Pt(II) compounds with reactive handles for subsequent elaboration with fluorophores or other functional moieties. Described strategies include the incorporation of substituents for well-known condensation or nucleophilic displacement-type reactions and their use, for example, to tether spectroscopic handles to Pt reagents for in vivo investigation. Other chief uses of displacement-type reactions have included tethering various small molecules exhibiting pharmacological activity directly to Pt, thus adding synergistic effects. Click chemistry-based ligation techniques have also been applied, primarily with azide- and alkyne-appended Pt complexes. Orthogonally reactive click chemistry reactions have proven invaluable when more traditional nucleophilic displacement reactions induce side-reactivity with the Pt center or when systematic functionalization of a larger number of Pt complexes is desired. Additionally, a diverse assortment of Pt-fluorophore conjugates have been tethered via click chemistry conjugation. In addition to providing a convenient synthetic path for diversifying Pt compounds, the use of click-capable Pt complexes has proved a powerful strategy for postbinding covalent modification and detection with fluorescent probes. This strategy bypasses undesirable influences of the fluorophore camouflaged as reactivity due to Pt that may be present when detecting preattached Pt-fluorophore conjugates. Using postbinding strategies, Pt reagent distributions in HeLa and lung carcinoma (NCI-H460) cell cultures were observed with two different azide-modified Pt compounds, a monofunctional Pt(II)-acridine type and a difunctional Pt(II)-neutral complex. In addition, cellular distribution was observed with an alkyne-appended difunctional

  7. Pt Skin Versus Pt Skeleton Structures of Pt3Sc as Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Tobias Peter; Ulrikkeholm, Elisabeth Therese; Hernandez-Fernandez, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    In order for low temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells to become economically viable Pt catalyst loading must be significantly reduced. The cathode of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, where oxygen reduction takes place, is responsible for the main activity loss. The devel...

  8. Pt-Pd nanoelectrocatalyst of ultralow Pt content for the oxidation of formic acid: Towards tuning the reaction pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourov Ghosh; C Retna Raj

    2015-05-01

    Synthesis of highly efficient functional electrocatalyst that favours the electrochemical oxidation of formic acid via CO-free dehydrogenation pathway is required for direct formic acid fuel cells. Traditional catalysts favour the dehydration pathway involving the generation of poisonous CO. Herein we demonstrate the superior electrocatalytic performance of Pt-Pd bimetallic nanoelectrocatalyst of ultralow Pt content and tuning the reaction pathway by controlling the Pt content. Bimetallic nanoparticles of Pt4Pd96, Pt7Pd93 and Pt47Pd53 compositions are synthesized by electrochemical co-deposition method in aqueous solution. The nanoparticles of ultralow Pt content, Pt4Pd96, favour the CO-free dehydrogenation pathway for formic acid oxidation with an onset potential of 0 V (SHE) whereas the Pt47Pd53 nanoparticles favour the dehydration pathway involving the formation of CO at high positive potential. The Pt content of the bimetallic nanoparticles actually controls the oxidation peak potential and catalytic activity. Significant negative shift (∼350 mV) in the oxidation peak potential and remarkable enhancement in the current density (2.6 times) are observed for Pt4Pd96 nanoparticles with respect to Pt47Pd53. The absence of three adjacent Pt and Pd atoms could be the reason for the suppression of CO pathway. The electrochemical impedance measurements indirectly support the CO-free pathway for the formic acid oxidation on Pt4Pd96 nanoparticles.

  9. Pt-Ni and Pt-Co Catalyst Synthesis Route for Fuel Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdosy, Samad A.; Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Valdez, Thomas I.; Kisor, Adam; Narayan, Sri R.

    2013-01-01

    Oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) at the cathode are the rate-limiting step in fuel cell performance. The ORR is 100 times slower than the corresponding hydrogen oxidation at the anode. Speeding up the reaction at the cathode will improve fuel cell efficiency. The cathode material is generally Pt powder painted onto a substrate (e.g., graphite paper). Recent efforts in the fuel cell area have focused on replacing Pt with Pt-X alloys (where X = Co, Ni, Zr, etc.) in order to (a) reduce cost, and (b) increase ORR rates. One of these strategies is to increase ORR rates by reducing the powder size, which would result in an increase in the surface area, thereby facilitating faster reaction rates. In this work, a process has been developed that creates Pt-Ni or Pt-Co alloys that are finely divided (on the nano scale) and provide equivalent performance at lower Pt loadings. Lower Pt loadings will translate to lower cost. Precursor salts of the metals are dissolved in water and mixed. Next, the salt mixtures are dried on a hot plate. Finally, the dried salt mixture is heattreated in a furnace under flowing reducing gas. The catalyst powder is then used to fabricate a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for electrochemical performance testing. The Pt- Co catalyst-based MEA showed comparable performance to an MEA fabri cated using a standard Pt black fuel cell catalyst. The main objective of this program has been to increase the overall efficiencies of fuel cell systems to support power for manned lunar bases. This work may also have an impact on terrestrial programs, possibly to support the effort to develop a carbon-free energy source. This catalyst can be used to fabricate high-efficiency fuel cell units that can be used in space as regenerative fuel cell systems, and terrestrially as primary fuel cells. Terrestrially, this technology will become increasingly important when transition to a hydrogen economy occurs.

  10. Heterobimetallic lantern complexes that couple antiferromagnetically through noncovalent Pt···Pt interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, Frederick G; Fiedler, Stephanie R; Shores, Matthew P; Golen, James A; Rheingold, Arnold L; Doerrer, Linda H

    2013-05-01

    A series of Pt-based heterobimetallic lantern complexes of the form [PtM(SAc)4(OH2)] (M = Co, 1; Ni, 2; Zn, 3) were prepared using a facile, single-step procedure. These hydrated species were reacted with 3-nitropyridine (3-NO2py) to prepare three additional lantern complexes, [PtM(SAc)4(3-NO2py)] (M = Co, 4; Ni, 5; Zn, 6), or alternatively dried in vacuo to the dehydrated species [PtM(SAc)4] (M = Co, 7; Ni, 8; Zn, 9). The Co- and Ni-containing species exhibit Pt-M bonding in solution and the solid state. In the structurally characterized compounds 1-6, the lantern units form dimers in the solid state via a short Pt···Pt metallophilic interaction. Antiferromagnetic coupling between 3d metal ions in the solid state through noncovalent metallophilic interactions was observed for all the paramagnetic lantern complexes prepared, with J-coupling values of -12.7 cm(-1) (1), -50.8 cm(-1) (2), -6.0 cm(-1) (4), and -12.6 cm(-1) (5). The Zn complexes 3 and 6 also form solid-state dimers, indicating that the formation of short Pt···Pt interactions in these complexes is not predicated on the presence of a paramagnetic 3d metal ion. These contacts and the resultant antiferromagnetic coupling are also not unique to heterobimetallic lantern complexes with axially coordinated H2O or the previously reported thiobenzoate supporting ligand.

  11. Decadally resolved quantitative temperature reconstruction spanning 5.6 ka at Kurupa Lake, Arctic Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, B. R.; Kaufman, D. S.; Briner, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Pre-instrumental quantitative temperature records, fundamental for placing recent warming in the context of long-term, natural climate variability, are scarce in Arctic Alaska. New non-destructive high-resolution core scanning methods provide a means of constructing downcore inference models for various paleoclimate signals. Here we use visible reflectance spectroscopy (VIS-RS) to measure organic pigment (chlorophyll derivative) concentration in sediments from Kurupa Lake to quantitatively reconstruct air temperature in the north-central Brooks Range, Alaska during the past 5.6 ka. Kurupa Lake (N 68.35°, W -154.61°) is 29.7 km2, 40 m at maximum depth, and is fed by several tributaries, including meltwater from eight rapidly disappearing cirque glaciers. A 6.2-m-long core composed of finely laminated (sub-mm to 5 cm) coarse-grained clays to medium-grained silts was collected in 2010 from the primary depocenter of Kurupa Lake (depth = 34 m). The age model for the core is based on six radiocarbon ages and a Pu profile to capture the 1963 spike and 1953 onset of Pu deposition from atmospheric weapons testing. The split-core face was scanned with a Konica Minolta CM-2600d spectrometer at 2 mm intervals, corresponding to 1-2 years. The relative absorption band depth at 660-670 nm (RABD660-670) was used to quantify total sedimentary organic pigments (primarily diagenetic products of chlorophyll-a) as a proxy for primary productivity. Gridded temperature data from the NCEP reanalysis dataset were used for this study because regional weather stations in the Brooks Range are scarce and records discontinuous. The gridded data perform well in this area and are highly correlated (r = 0.88) with the instrumental record from Barrow. Mean May-through-October (warm half-year) temperature (5-year smoothed) from NCEP reanalysis data (130 years) correlates with inferred organic pigment content from Kurupa Lake (r = 0.76, p estimate the uncertainty of prediction (RMSEP = 0.8°C); the

  12. Disentangling interface and bulk contributions to the anisotropic magnetoresistance in Pt/Co/Pt sandwiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobs, André; Oepen, Hans Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report on interfacial contributions to the anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) in Co layers sandwiched between Pt. Utilizing the Fuchs-Sondheimer formalism interface contributions can be separated from bulklike AMR. We demonstrate that for all-metal systems interfacial AMR is also present when varying the magnetization within the film plane. This interfacial in-plane AMR is two times smaller than the contribution that arises when the magnetization is varied within the plane perpendicular to the current direction. This finding is in contrast to the spin Hall MR found for ferromagnetic insulator/Pt bilayers revealing the existence of different MR effects at the interfaces of Pt with conducting and insulating ferromagnets.

  13. Pt/MOx/SiO2, Pt/MOx/TiO2, and Pt/MOx/Al2O3 Catalysts for CO Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongmei Qin

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional supported Pt catalysts have often been prepared by loading Pt onto commercial supports, such as SiO2, TiO2, Al2O3, and carbon. These catalysts usually have simple metal-support (i.e., Pt-SiO2 interfaces. To tune the catalytic performance of supported Pt catalysts, it is desirable to modify the metal-support interfaces by incorporating an oxide additive into the catalyst formula. Here we prepared three series of metal oxide-modified Pt catalysts (i.e., Pt/MOx/SiO2, Pt/MOx/TiO2, and Pt/MOx/Al2O3, where M = Al, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ba, La for CO oxidation. Among them, Pt/CoOx/SiO2, Pt/CoOx/TiO2, and Pt/CoOx/Al2O3 showed the highest catalytic activities. Relevant samples were characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, CO temperature-programmed desorption (CO-TPD, O2 temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD, and CO2 temperature-programmed desorption (CO2-TPD.

  14. PT L 3 near edge structure of halogen-bridged mixed-valence pt complexes and pd-pt mixed-metal complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanino, H.; Oyanagi, H.; Yamashita, M.; Kobayashi, K.

    1985-03-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) of halogen-bridged mixed-valence Pt complexes and halogen-bridged Pd-Pt mixed-metal complexes have been measured using synchrotron radiation with a high energy resolution. In Pd-Pt mixed metal complexes, we demonstrate that the degree of the valence is estimated from the intensity of the white line at the Pt L 3 edge. In the mixed-valence complexes, the electron system is proved to be the Peierls insulator with a charge density wave of renormalized d electrons of Pt, where the total valence of Pt IV- and Pt 11 is conserved without excess electrons from ligands or anions.

  15. Pt-graphene electrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshi, Hajime, E-mail: hoshi@ed.tus.ac.jp; Tanaka, Shumpei; Miyoshi, Takashi

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Graphene films with Pt nanoparticles were prepared from commercial graphene. • Pt consumption can be reduced by using Pt-graphene films. • The film showed improved catalytic activity for the reaction I{sub 3}{sup −}/I{sup −}. • The film can be used as the counter electrode of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). • The performance of DSSC was superior to that of the Pt electrode. - Abstract: A simple paste method for fabricating graphene films with Pt nanoparticles was developed. First, graphene pastes with Pt nanoparticles were prepared from commercially available graphene. The resulting films of graphene nanoplatelet aggregates with Pt nanoparticles (Pt-GNA) contained Pt nanoparticles distributed over the entire three-dimensional surface of the GNA. Then, the catalytic activity for the I{sub 3}{sup −}/I{sup −} redox reaction was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry. The GNA electrode exhibited higher activity than a graphene nanoplatelet electrode because of its higher effective surface area. Addition of Pt nanoparticles to the electrodes improved the catalytic activity. In particular, a large Faradaic current for the I{sub 3}{sup −}/I{sup −} reaction was observed for the Pt-GNA electrode. As the counter electrodes of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), their performance was consistent with the cyclic voltammetry results. In particular, the DSSC performance of the Pt-GNA electrode was superior to that of the Pt electrodes commonly used in DSSCs.

  16. Synthesis and composition evolution of bimetallic Pd Pt alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Guoqiang; Shi, Honglan; Xing, Yangchuan

    2007-09-01

    This paper reports a study on the synthesis of Pd-Pt alloy nanoparticles and composition evolution of the alloys. The synthesis involves Pd and Pt acetylacetonate as the metal precursors and trioctylphosphine (TOP) as the solvent. Thermal decomposition of the Pd-TOP complex resulted in Pd nanoparticles, while substitution of Pt in the Pt-TOP complex by Pd allowed formation of the Pd-Pt alloys. It was observed that the Pd-Pt nanoparticles formed at the very beginning in the synthesis process are Pd rich with various nanoparticle sizes ranging from 1.5 to 25 nm in diameter. These nanoparticles averaged out through a digestive ripening process and reached a final size of 3.5 nm in about 10 min. The alloy compositions evolved throughout the synthesis process and only reached the preset Pd to Pt ratio of the precursors in 120 min. It was found that Pt acetylacetonate alone in TOP cannot produce Pt nanoparticles, which was attributed to the formation of a Pt-TOP complex and a strong coordination of Pt to the phosphine. This observation led us to propose an atomic exchange process between the Pt-TOP complex and the Pd atoms at the nanoparticle surface. As a result, the alloy formation process is limited by a substitution and diffusion rate of the Pt atoms at the surface of the alloy nanoparticles.

  17. PT-symmetric quantum electrodynamics and unitarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Kimball A; Abalo, E K; Parashar, Prachi; Pourtolami, Nima; Wagner, J

    2013-04-28

    More than 15 years ago, a new approach to quantum mechanics was suggested, in which Hermiticity of the Hamiltonian was to be replaced by invariance under a discrete symmetry, the product of parity and time-reversal symmetry, PT. It was shown that, if PT is unbroken, energies were, in fact, positive, and unitarity was satisfied. Since quantum mechanics is quantum field theory in one dimension--time--it was natural to extend this idea to higher-dimensional field theory, and in fact an apparently viable version of PT-invariant quantum electrodynamics (QED) was proposed. However, it has proved difficult to establish that the unitarity of the scattering matrix, for example, the Källén spectral representation for the photon propagator, can be maintained in this theory. This has led to questions of whether, in fact, even quantum mechanical systems are consistent with probability conservation when Green's functions are examined, since the latter have to possess physical requirements of analyticity. The status of PT QED will be reviewed in this paper, as well as the general issue of unitarity.

  18. SURFACE PROPERTIES AND CATALYTIC PERFORMANCE OF Pt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salt (AO) layers, have been examined for their low cost, high catalytic activity and high thermal ... of each peak after subtraction of the S-shaped background and fitting to a curve mixed of ..... In addition, for the 0.3 % Pt/LaSrCoO4 and 0.5.

  19. Geothermal energy in Alaska: site data base and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markle, D.

    1979-04-01

    The following are presented: the history of geothermal energy in Alaska; a history of Alaska land ownership; legal and institutional barriers; and economics. Development, the socio-economic and physical data concerning geothermal energy are documented by regions. The six regions presented are those of the present Alaska State Planning Activities and those of the Federal Land Use Commission. Site data summaries of the one hundred and four separate geothermal spring locations are presented by these regions. (MHR)

  20. Adhesion and bonding of Pt/Ni and Pt/Co overlayers: Density functional calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabeza, Gabriela F.; Castellani, Norberto J.; Légaré, Pierre

    2006-04-01

    The electronic and energetic properties of bimetallic surfaces Pt/Ni(111) and Pt/Co(111) are examined using the FP-LAPW (Full-PotentialLinearized Augmented Plane Wave) method by means of spin-polarized and non-polarized calculations. We present both the results of the shifts in the d-band centers when one metal (Pt) is pseudomorfically deposited on another with smaller lattice constant (Ni, Co) and those corresponding to the surface and adhesion energies. The surface is modeled by a seven layer slab separated in z direction by a vacuum region of six substrate layers. The results obtained for pure Ni, Co and Pt surfaces are presented in order to compare with experimental and theoretical data reported in the literature

  1. Domain wall pinning on strain relaxation defects in FePt(001)/Pt thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attane, J. P.; Samson, Y.; Marty, A.; Halley, D.; Beigne, C.

    2001-08-06

    Thin FePt (001) films, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Pt(001), exhibit a very large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (K{sub u}=5 x 10{sup 6}Jm{sup -3}) and a 100% magnetic remanence in perpendicular field. The lattice misfit between FePt and Pt (1.5%) relaxes through the pileup of a/6 <112> partial dislocations along {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes, leading to the formation of microtwins. Atomic force microscopy images demonstrate that this process induces a spontaneous rectangular nanostructuration of the sample, while magnetic force microscopy shows that the microtwins act as pinning sites for the magnetic walls. This leads to square magnetic domains and explains the large coercivity associated with the domain wall propagation. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Domain wall pinning on strain relaxation defects in FePt(001)/Pt thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attané, J. P.; Samson, Y.; Marty, A.; Halley, D.; Beigné, C.

    2001-08-01

    Thin FePt (001) films, grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on Pt(001), exhibit a very large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (Ku=5×106J m-3) and a 100% magnetic remanence in perpendicular field. The lattice misfit between FePt and Pt (1.5%) relaxes through the pileup of a/6 partial dislocations along {111} planes, leading to the formation of microtwins. Atomic force microscopy images demonstrate that this process induces a spontaneous rectangular nanostructuration of the sample, while magnetic force microscopy shows that the microtwins act as pinning sites for the magnetic walls. This leads to square magnetic domains and explains the large coercivity associated with the domain wall propagation.

  3. Selective oxidation of methylamine over zirconia supported Pt-Ru, Pt and Ru catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aiying Song; Gongxuan Lu

    2015-01-01

    Pt–Ru, Pt and Ru catalysts supported on zirconia were prepared by impregnation method and were tested in se-lective oxidation of methylamine (MA) in aqueous media. Among three catalysts, Ru/ZrO2 was more active than Pt/ZrO2 while Pt–Ru/ZrO2 demonstrated the best catalytic activity due to the fact that Pt addition efficiently pro-moted the dispersion of active species in bimetallic catalyst. Therefore, the~100%TOC conversion and N2 selec-tivity were achieved over Pt–Ru/ZrO2, Pt/ZrO2 and Ru/ZrO2 catalysts at 190, 220 and 250 °C, respectively.

  4. Ánodos de Pt-Ru y Pt-Ir para Celdas de Combustible Alimentadas con Metano y Propano Directo Pt-Ru and Pt-Ir Anodes for Direct Methane and Propane Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibian A Hoyos

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo se evalúa el efecto de la temperatura en el desempeño de celdas de combustible de membrana de intercambio protónico alimentadas con metano y propano, utilizando oxígeno como alimentación en el cátodo. Para la oxidación de los combustibles en los ánodos, se probaron cinco catalizadores soportados en carbón: Pt, Pt85Ru15, Pt50Ru50, Pt90Ir10 y Pt50Ir50. Como catalizador en el cátodo se usó platino puro soportado en carbón. El desempeño de las celdas de combustible fue evaluado mediante curvas de polarización obtenidas a partir de los datos corriente-potencial. Los resultados indican que la oxidación de metano se ve favorecida a altas temperaturas sobre los catalizadores Pt90/Ir10, Pt50/Ir50 y Pt50/Ru50. A bajas temperaturas los mejores catalizadores resultaron ser Pt y Pt85/Ru15. La mezcla bimetálica Pt85/Ru15 fue la que presentó mejor desempeño para llevar a cabo la oxidación de propano a 30 °C.In this paper, the effect of temperature in the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells feed with methane and propane, using oxygen as feed to the cathode, is presented. For the fuel oxidation in the anodes, five carbon supported catalysts were tested: Pt, Pt85/Ru15, Pt50/Ru50, Pt90/Ir10, and Pt50/Ir50. Carbon-supported pure platinum was used as catalysts in the cathode side. The performance of the fuel cells was evaluated by polarization curves obtained from the current-potential data. Results indicate that methane oxidation is favoured at high temperatures on the Pt90/Ir10, Pt50/Ir50 and Pt50/Ru50 catalysts. At low temperatures the best catalysts were Pt and Pt85/Ru15. The Pt85/Ru15 bimetallic mixture showed the best performance to carry out propane oxidation at 30 °C.

  5. Rapid thermal annealing of FePt and FePt/Cu thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombacher, Christoph

    2011-01-10

    Chemically ordered FePt is one of the most promising materials to reach the ultimate limitations in storage density of future magnetic recording devices due to its high uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy and a corrosion resistance superior to rare-earth based magnets. In this study, FePt and FePt/Cu bilayers have been sputter deposited at room temperature onto thermally oxidized silicon wafers, glass substrates and self-assembled arrays of spherical SiO{sub 2} particles with diameters down to 10 nm. Millisecond flash lamp annealing, as well as conventional rapid thermal annealing was employed to induce the phase transformation from the chemically disordered A1 phase into the chemically ordered L1{sub 0} phase. The influence of the annealing temperature, annealing time and the film thickness on the ordering transformation and (001) texture evolution of FePt films with near equiatomic composition was studied. Whereas flash lamp annealed FePt films exhibit a polycrystalline morphology with high chemical L1{sub 0} order, rapid thermal annealing can lead to the formation of chemically ordered FePt films with (001) texture on amorphous SiO{sub 2}/Si substrates. The resultant high perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and large coercivities up to 40 kOe are demonstrated. Simultaneously to the ordering transformation, rapid thermal annealing to temperatures exceeding 600 C leads to a break up of the continuous FePt film into separated islands. This dewetting behavior was utilized to create regular arrays of FePt nanostructures on SiO{sub 2} particle templates with periods down to 50 nm. The addition of Cu improves the (001) texture formation and chemical ordering for annealing temperatures T{sub a} {<=}600 C. In addition, the magnetic anisotropy and the coercivity of the ternary FePtCu alloy can be effectively tailored by adjusting the Cu content. The prospects of FePtCu based exchange spring media, as well as the magnetic properties of FePtCu nanostructures fabricated

  6. Irreversible modification of magnetic properties of Pt/Co/Pt ultrathin films by femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kisielewski, J., E-mail: jankis@uwb.edu.pl [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Laboratory of Magnetism, University of Białystok, Lipowa 41, 15-424 Białystok (Poland); Dobrogowski, W.; Kurant, Z.; Stupakiewicz, A.; Tekielak, M.; Maziewski, A. [Laboratory of Magnetism, University of Białystok, Lipowa 41, 15-424 Białystok (Poland); Kirilyuk, A.; Kimel, A.; Rasing, Th. [Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Baczewski, L. T.; Wawro, A. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Balin, K.; Szade, J. [A. Chełkowski Institute of Physics, University of Silesia, Uniwersytecka 4, 40-007 Katowice (Poland)

    2014-02-07

    Annealing ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films with single femtosecond laser pulses leads to irreversible spin-reorientation transitions and an amplification of the magneto-optical Kerr rotation. The effect was studied as a function of the Co thickness and the pulse fluence, revealing two-dimensional diagrams of magnetic properties. While increasing the fluence, the creation of two branches of the out-of-plane magnetization state was found.

  7. Atomic Aggregation Processes in the Early Stages of Pt/Pt(111) Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Guo-Ce; ZHU Xiao-Bin; WANG Wei

    2000-01-01

    The atomic aggregation processes in the early stages of Pt/Pt(111) growth are studied by using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. Our results show that the average neighbor coordination number of the atoms in a cluster is a function of temperature, agreeing well with the experiment observations of scanning tunneling microscopy. The influence of diffusion barriers of various atomic processes on the morphology of islands is also studied. Different morphologies of the islands (dendritic, fractal, or compact islands) are found.

  8. SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF CINNAMALDEHYDE WITH Pt AND Pt-Fe CATALYSTS: EFFECTS OF THE SUPPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.B. da Silva

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Low-temperature reduced TiO2-supported Pt and Pt-Fe catalysts are much more active and selective for the liquid–phase hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde to unsaturated cinnamyl alcohol than the corresponding carbon-supported catalysts. High-temperature reduced catalysts, where the SMSI effect should be present, are almost inactive for this reaction. There is at present no definitive explanation for this effect but an electronic metal-support interaction is most probably involved.

  9. Long-term observations of Alaska Coastal Current in the northern Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabeno, Phyllis J.; Bell, Shaun; Cheng, Wei; Danielson, Seth; Kachel, Nancy B.; Mordy, Calvin W.

    2016-10-01

    The Alaska Coastal Current is a continuous, well-defined system extending for ~1700 km along the coast of Alaska from Seward, Alaska to Samalga Pass in the Aleutian Islands. The currents in this region are examined using data collected at >20 mooring sites and from >400 satellite-tracked drifters. While not continuous, the mooring data span a 30 year period (1984-2014). Using current meter data collected at a dozen mooring sites spread over four lines (Seward, Gore Point, Kennedy and Stevenson Entrances, and the exit to Shelikof Strait) total transport was calculated. Transport was significantly correlated with alongshore winds, although the correlation at the Seward Line was weak. The largest mean transport in the Alaska Coastal Current occurred at Gore Point (1.4×106 m3 s-1 in winter and 0.6×106 m3 s-1 in summer), with the transport at the exit to Shelikof Strait (1.3×106 m3 s-1 in winter and 0.6×106 m3 s-1 in summer) only slightly less. The transport was modified at the Seward Line in late summer and fall by frontal undulations associated with strong river discharge that enters onto the shelf at that time of year. The interaction of the Alaska Coastal Current and tidal currents with shallow banks in the vicinity of Kodiak Archipeligo and in Kennedy-Stevenson Entrance results in mixing and prolonged primary production throughout the summer.

  10. Dry etching of single crystal PMN-PT piezoelectric material.

    OpenAIRE

    Agnus, Joël; Alexandru Ivan, Ioan; Queste, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    International audience; During the last decade, the applications of PMN-PT spread significantly. Unlike PZT, the appropriate microtechnologies for PMN-PT Piezo-MEMS aren't fully documented in the literature. This paper deals with the PMN-PT etching by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) technique, also known as DRIE. The paper quantitatively presents the etching parameters of PMN-PT by the Ar/C4F8 gas combination and reports some related useful experience.

  11. Nonlinear waves in $\\cal PT$-symmetric systems

    OpenAIRE

    Konotop, Vladimir V.; Yang, Jianke; Zezyulin, Dmitry A.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress on nonlinear properties of parity-time ($\\cal PT$-) symmetric systems is comprehensively reviewed in this article. $\\cal PT$ symmetry started out in non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, where complex potentials obeying $\\cal PT$ symmetry could exhibit all-real spectra. This concept later spread out to optics, Bose-Einstein condensates, electronic circuits, and many other physical fields, where a judicious balancing of gain and loss constitutes a $\\cal PT$-symmetric system. The nat...

  12. Alaska Landscape Conservation Cooperative Boundaries, Feb 2013 update.

    Data.gov (United States)

    Arctic Landscape Conservation Cooperative — This dataset depicts the terrestrial boundaries of the Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCC) within Alaska. Those LCCs are: Aleutian and Bering Sea Islands,...

  13. AOOS\\: Implementing an Ocean Observing System in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCammon, M.; Schoch, C.; Johnson, M.

    2006-12-01

    The Alaska Ocean Observing System (AOOS) is the regional association developing a regional integrated coastal and ocean observing system - as part of the national Integrated Ocean Observing System - for the large marine ecosystems of Alaska. These span the Gulf of Alaska, the Bering Sea and Aleutian Island regions, and the Arctic Ocean, Beaufort and Chukchi seas. Planning and implementation efforts have been underway for three years. Challenges include Alaska's remoteness, harsh weather, lack of infrastructure including transportation, power, and communications, and most especially, its length of coastline. Two key efforts will be highlighted: the Prince William Sound pilot project and the Data, Modeling and Analysis Group, and their scientific and management contributions.

  14. Modification of Pt/Co/Pt film properties by ion irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avchaciov, K. A.; Ren, W.; Djurabekova, F.; Nordlund, K.; Sveklo, I.; Maziewski, A.

    2015-09-01

    We studied the structural modifications of a Pt/Co/Pt trilayer epitaxial film under Ga+ 30-keV ion irradiation by means of classical molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. The semiclassical tight-binding second-moment approximation potential was adjusted to reproduce the enthalpies of formation, the lattice constants, and the order-disorder transition temperatures for Co-Pt alloys. We found that during irradiation, the sandwich-type Pt(fcc)/Co(hcp)/Pt(fcc) film structure underwent a transition to the new solid solution α -Co /Pt (fcc ) phase. Our analysis of the short-range order indicates the formation, within a nanosecond time scale, of a homogeneous chemically disordered solution. The longer time-scale simulations employing a Monte Carlo algorithm demonstrated that the transition from the disordered phase to the ordered L 10 and L 12 phases was also possible but not significant for the changes in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) observed experimentally. The strain analysis showed that the Co layer was under tensile strain in the lateral direction at the fluences of 1.5 ×1014-3.5 ×1014ionscm -2 ; this range of fluences corresponds to the appearance of PMA. This strain was induced in the initially relaxed hcp Co layer due to its partial transformation to the fcc phase and to the influence of atomic layers with larger lattice constants at upper/lower interfaces.

  15. Alternative alloys for platinum jewelry? New structures in Pt-Hf and Pt-Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Erin; Corbitt, Jacqueline; Hart, Gus

    2008-10-01

    The only known intermetallic structure with an 8:1 stoichiometry is that of Pt8Ti. It is intriguing that an ordered compound would occur at such low concentrations of the minority atom. But this structure occurs in about a dozen binary intermetallic systems. The formation of an ordered structure can significantly enhance the performance of the material, particularly the hardness. Pt- and Pd-rich ordered structures have been experimentally studied in the systems Pt/Pd-X where X is Ti, V, Cr, Zr, Nb, M, Hf, Ta, and W. We took a broader look at 80 Pt/Pd rich alloys to find new candidates for the 8:1 structure and have found about 20. In order to verify our predictions, we used the cluster expansion to find the stable structures. We first applied the cluster expansion to Pt-Hf and Pt-Mo because these two candidates are the most likely to form the 8:1 structure. These new candidates can have applications in the jewelry and catalysis industries.

  16. The Mechanism of Direct Formic Acid Fuel Cell Using Pd, Pt and Pt-Ru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Nobuyuki; Liu, Yan; Mitsushima, Shigenori; Ota, Ken-Ichiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuyuki; Ogawa, Naoya; Kon, Norihiro; Eguchi, Mika

    The electro-oxidation of formic acid, 2-propanol and methanol on Pd black, Pd/C, Pt-Ru/C and Pt/C has been investigated to clear the reaction mechanism. It was suggested that the formic acid is dehydrogenated on Pd surface and the hydrogen is occluded in the Pd lattice. Thus obtained hydrogen acts like pure hydrogen supplied from the outside and the cell performance of the direct formic acid fuel cell showed as high as that of a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell. 2-propanol did not show such dehydrogenation reaction on Pd catalyst. Platinum and Pt-Ru accelerated the oxidation of C-OH of 2-propanol and methanol. Slow scan voltammogram (SSV) and chronoamperometry measurements showed that the activity of formic acid oxidation increased in the following order: Pd black > Pd 30wt.%/C > Pt50wt.%/C > 27wt.%Pt-13wt.%Ru/C. A large oxidation current for formic acid was found at a low overpotential on the palladium electrocatalysts. These results indicate that formic acid is mainly oxidized through a dehydrogenation reaction. For the oxidation of 2-propanol and methanol, palladium was not effective, and 27wt.%Pt-13wt.%Ru/C showed the best oxidation activity.

  17. An evaluation of Pt sulfite acid (PSA) as precursor for supported Pt catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regalbuto, J.R.; Ansel, O.; Miller, J.T. (BP Res. Cntr.); (UIC)

    2010-11-12

    As a catalyst precursor, platinum sulfite acid (PSA) is easy to use and not relatively expensive, and is a potentially attractive precursor for many types of supported catalysts. The ultimate usefulness for many catalyst applications will depend on the extent that Pt can be dispersed and sulfur eliminated. To our knowledge, there exists no detailed characterization in the catalysis literature of PSA and the nanoparticulate Pt phases derived from it during catalyst pretreatment. To this end a series of supports including alumina, silica, magnesia, niobia, titania, magnesia and carbon were contacted with PSA solutions and subsequently analyzed with extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to characterize the Pt species formed upon impregnation, calcination, and reduction. While all catalysts show retention of some S, reasonably small particle sizes with relatively little Pt-S can in some instances be produced using PSA. The amount of retained sulfur appears to decrease with decreasing surface acidity, although even the most acidic supports (niobia and silica) display some storage of S even while only Pt-O bands are observed after calcination or reoxidation. More sulfur was eliminated by high temperature calcinations followed by reduction in hydrogen, at the expense of increasing Pt particle size.

  18. Germanene termination of Ge2Pt crystals on Ge(110)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bampoulis, Pantelis; Zhang, Lijie; Safaei, A.; van Gastel, Raoul; Poelsema, Bene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the growth of Pt on Ge(1 1 0) using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. The deposition of several monolayers of Pt on Ge(1 1 0) followed by annealing at 1100 K results in the formation of 3D metallic Pt-Ge nanocrystals. The outermost layer of these crystals exhibits

  19. Synthesis and characterization of Au@Pt nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Dan; WU Gang; XU Boqing

    2005-01-01

    Aucore-Ptshell (Au@Pt) nanoparticles were synthesized at room temperature by reducing K2PtCl6 with hydrogen in the solution containing Au colloids and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). The particles obtained were characterized with UV-Vis, TEM and XPS techniques. UV-Vis spectra show that the surface plasmon absorption feature of Au colloids is significantly reduced with increasing the amount of reduced Pt. TEM images that the metals are found always appear as spherical nanoparticles and their sizes grow apparently due to the reduction of PtCl62- ions, indicating that Pt is deposited from solution onto Au particle surface and forms a Pt-layer with uniform thickness. In the XPS spectra, the signals of Au metal decrease due to the reductive deposition of Pt on the surface of the Au colloids. UV-Vis and XPS data are consistent in showing that when the amount of Pt in the AuPt colloids is increased to reach an overall atomic ratio of Pt/Au=2, the Pt deposits form a shell covering completely the surface of Au particles, demonstrating the core-shell structure of the synthesized AuPt particles.

  20. Structure dependence of Pt surface activated ammonia oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santen, R A van; Offermans, W K [Schuit Institute of Catalysis, Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry and Catalysis, Department of Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Eindhoven University of Technology, PO Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Ricart, J M; Novell-Leruth, G [Department of Chemical Physics and Inorganic Chemistry, University Rovira I Virgili, C/ Marcel.lI Domingo s/n, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Perez-RamIrez, J [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) and Catalan, Institution for Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Avinguda Paisos Catalans 16, 43007, Tarragona (Spain)], E-mail: r.a.v.santen@tue.nl

    2008-06-01

    Computational advances that enable the prediction of the structures and the energies of surface reaction intermediates are providing essential information to the formulation of theories of surface chemical reactivity. In this contribution this is illustrated for the activation of ammonia by coadsorbed oxygen and hydroxyl on the Pt(111), Pt(100), and Pt(211) surfaces.

  1. Multi-scale Evidence of Large CO2 and CH4 Emissions from Permafrost During Spring Thaw in Northern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz Yaseef, N.; Torn, M. S.; Billesbach, D. P.; Wu, Y.; Kneafsey, T. J.; Romanovsky, V. E.; Cook, D. R.; Commane, R.; Henderson, J.; Miller, C. E.; Wullschleger, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic warming will amplify climate change especially if thawing tundra emits increasingly greater amounts of CO2 and CH4 due to rising temperatures in the coming decades. However, uncertainties about flux rates and sources limit the prediction of these feedbacks. The few observations of tundra carbon fluxes during snowmelt suggest that there may be large releases during spring thaw, but little is known about the underlying mechanisms and whether emissions of greenhouse gases are widespread enough to influence atmospheric concentrations. To address this question we employed a multi-scale approach, including ecosystem-scale measurements, a mechanistic soil-core thawing experiment, and airborne observations of atmospheric carbon concentrations. We show that fluxes during the 2-week period of snow and surface-ice melt in 2014 near Barrow, Alaska, reduced the net snow-free season uptake of CO2 by 46% and added 6% to the CH4 emissions. A controlled laboratory experiment revealed that when frozen permafrost was exposed to warming temperatures, it released an immediate, large pulse of CO2 and CH4 that had been trapped under the surface ice. While the Alaskan North Slope was undergoing snowmelt, changes in the concentrations of CO2 and CH4 measured by aircraft were correlated to fluxes of CO2 and CH4 measured by eddy-covariance. Airborne measurements from the aircraft reflected local observations, and confirmed that the pulse had influence on regional atmospheric concentrations. This research suggests that the Arctic carbon spring pulse is a result of a delayed release of biogenic production in fall, and that this pulse is widespread and large enough to offset a significant fraction of the moderate Arctic tundra carbon sink.

  2. Magnetic Properties and Nanostructures of FePtCu:C Thin Films with FePt Underlayers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Ling-Fang; YAN Ming-Lang

    2007-01-01

    Magnetic properties and nanostructures of FePtCu:C thin films with FePt underlayers (ULs) are studied. The effect of FePt ULs on the orientation and magnetic properties of the thin films are investigated by adjusting FePt UL thicknesses from 2nm to 14nm. X-ray diffraction (XRD) scans reveal that the orientation of the films is dependent on FePt UL thickness. For a 5-nm FePtCu:C nanocomposite thin film with a 2-nm FePt UL, the coercivity is 6.5 KOe, the correlation length is 59nm, the desired face-centred-tetragonal (fct) ordered structure [L10 phase] is formed and the c axis normal to the film plane [(001) texture] is obtained. These results indicate that the better orientation and magnetic properties of the films can be tuned by decreasing the thickness of the FePt UL.

  3. Concave Pd-Pt Core-Shell Nanocrystals with Ultrathin Pt Shell Feature and Enhanced Catalytic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Bu, Lingzheng; Jiang, Kezhu; Guo, Shaojun; Huang, Xiaoqing

    2016-02-10

    One-pot creation of unique concave Pd-Pt core-shell polyhedra has been developed for the first time using an efficient approach. Due to the concave feature and ultrathin Pt shell, the created Pd-Pt core-shell polyhedra exhibit enhanced catalytic performance in both the electrooxidation of methanol and hydrogenation of nitrobenzene, as compared with commercial Pt black and Pd black catalysts. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Insights on the SO2 Poisoning of Pt3Co/VC and Pt/VC Fuel Cell Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    stripping voltammetry and underpotential deposition (upd) of copper adatoms. Then the performance of PEMFC cathodes employing 30wt.% Pt3Co/VC and 50wt.% Pt/VC...atoms (Pt and Cu atomic radii are 0.139 and 0.128nm, respectively [15]) makes copper underpotential deposition a perfect tool for evaluating the plat...the surface area of Pt3Co/VC catalyst is rigorously characterized by hydrogen adsorption,CO stripping voltammetry and under potential deposition (upd

  5. The Alaska North Slope spill analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, Leslie [Pearson Consulting LLC (United States)], email: pearson.consulting@mac.com; Robertson, Tim L.; DeCola, Elise [Nuka Research and Planning Group, LLC (United States)], email: timrobertson@nukaresearch.com, email: elise@nukaresearch.com; Rosen, Ira [Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation (United States)], email: ira.rosen@alaska.gov

    2011-07-01

    This paper reports Alaska North Slope crude oil spills, provides information to help operators identify risks and presents recommendations for future risk reduction and mitigation measures that may reduce the frequency and severity of future spills from piping infrastructure integrity loss. The North Slope spills analysis project was conducted during 2010 by compiling available spill data, and analyzing the cause of past spills in wells and associated piping, flowlines, process centers with their associated piping and above ground storage tanks, and crude oil transmission pipelines. An expert panel, established to provide independent review of this analysis and the presented data, identified seven recommendations on measures, programs, and practices to monitor and address common causes of failures while considering information provided from regulators and operators. These recommendations must be evaluated by the State of Alaska which will consider implementation options to move forward. Based on the study observations, future analyses may show changes to some of the observed trends.

  6. Alaska Highway bibliography, 3rd edition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prange, Laurie

    Since the early 20th century various schemes were considered for the construction of roads, trails or railways 71 to link the Yukon, northern British Columbia and Alaska to the “outside.” These schemes were motivated by economic interests, including mining, lumber and tourism concerns. During the....... The impacts included an increased awareness of the world outside of the Yukon, imported ideas and technology, improved health care, highway transportation, telecommunications, and the development of more mining and tourist-related industries....... land route to Alaska for defence purposes. The military was not interested in developing or planning a highway for the civilian needs of the future. The chosen route ran from Edmonton to Whitehorse, then on to Fairbanks. The U.S. Army and U.S. Public Roads Administration (PRA) roughed out a “pioneer...

  7. EarthScope's Transportable Array in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, R. W.; Woodward, R.; Hafner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2003, EarthScope has been installing a network of seismometers, known as the Transportable Array-across the continental United States and southern Canada. The station deployments will be completed in the Conterminous US in the fall of 2013. Beginning in October, 2013, and continuing for 5 years, EarthScope's Transportable Array plans to create a grid of seismic sensors in approximately 300 locations In Alaska and Western Canada. The proposed station grid is 85 km, and target locations will supplement or enhance existing seismic stations operating in Alaska. When possible, they will also be co-located with existing GPS stations constructed by the Plate Boundary Observatory. We review the siting plans for stations, the progress towards reconnaissance and permitting, and detail the engineering concept of the stations. In order to be able to determine the required site conditions and descriptions of installation methods to the permitting agencies, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has been supporting exploratory work on seismic station design, sensor emplacement and communication concepts appropriate for the challenging high-latitude environment that is proposed for deployment. IRIS has installed several experimental stations to evaluate different sensor emplacement schemes both in Alaska and the lower-48 U.S. The goal of these tests is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint and the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, and permafrost underlies much of the region. IRIS has experimented with different portable drills and drilling techniques to create shallow holes (1-5M) in permafrost and rock outcrops. Seasonal changes can affect the performance of seismometers in different

  8. Southwest Alaska Regional Geothermal Energy Projec

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holdmann, Gwen [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States)

    2015-04-30

    Drilling and temperature logging campaigns between the late 1970's and early 1980’s measured temperatures at Pilgrim Hot Springs in excess of 90°C. Between 2010 and 2014 the University of Alaska used a variety of methods including geophysical surveys, remote sensing techniques, heat budget modeling, and additional drilling to better understand the resource and estimate the available geothermal energy.

  9. Tracking glaciers with the Alaska seismic network

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, M. E.

    2015-12-01

    More than 40 years ago it was known that calving glaciers in Alaska created unmistakable seismic signals that could be recorded tens and hundreds of kilometers away. Their long monochromatic signals invited studies that foreshadowed the more recent surge in glacier seismology. Beyond a handful of targeted studies, these signals have remained a seismic novelty. No systematic attempt has been made to catalog and track glacier seismicity across the years. Recent advances in understanding glacier sources, combined with the climate significance of tidewater glaciers, have renewed calls for comprehensive tracking of glacier seismicity in coastal Alaska. The Alaska Earthquake Center has included glacier events in its production earthquake catalog for decades. Until recently, these were best thought of as bycatch—accidental finds in the process of tracking earthquakes. Processing improvements a decade ago, combined with network improvements in the past five years, have turned this into a rich data stream capturing hundreds of events per year across 600 km of the coastal mountain range. Though the source of these signals is generally found to be iceberg calving, there are vast differences in behavior between different glacier termini. Some glaciers have strong peaks in activity during the spring, while others peak in the late summer or fall. These patterns are consistent over years pointing to fundamental differences in calving behavior. In several cases, changes in seismic activity correspond to specific process changes observed through other means at particular glacier. These observations demonstrate that the current network is providing a faithful record of the dynamic behavior of several glaciers in coastal Alaska. With this as a starting point, we examine what is possible (and not possible) going forward with dedicated detection schemes.

  10. The Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) FTS: Results From the 2012/13 Alaska Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    kurosu, T. P.; Miller, C. E.; Dinardo, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) is an aircraft-based Earth Venture 1 mission to study the carbon balance of the Alaskan Arctic ecosystem, with a particular focus on carbon release from melting permafrost. Operating from its base in Fairbanks, AK, the CARVE aircraft covers a range of principle flight paths in the Alaskan interior, the Yukon River valley, and northern Alaska coast around Barrow and Dead Horse. Flight paths are chosen to maximize ecosystem variability and and cover burn-recovery/regrowth sequences. CARVE observations cover the Arctic Spring/Summer/Fall seasons, with multiple flights per season and principle flight paths. Science operations started in 05/2012 and are currently envisaged to continue until 2015. The CARVE suite of instruments includes flask measurements and in situ gas analyzers for CO2, CH4 and CO observations, an active/passive L-band radar for surface conditions (freeze/thaw state), and a three-band polarizing Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS) for column measurements of CO2, CH4, CO, and interfering species (e.g., H2O). The FTS covers the spectral regions of 4,200-4,900 cm-1 (CH4, CO), 5,800-6,400 cm-1 (CO2), and 12,900-13,200 cm-1 (O2), with a spectral resolution of 0.2 cm-1. Aircraft-based FTS science observations in Alaska have been performed since 23-05-2012. First-version data products from all CARVE instruments derived from observations during the 2012 campaign were publicly released earlier in 2013. The FTS has performed well during flight conditions, particularly with respect to vibration damping. Outstanding challenges include the need for improved spectral and radiometric calibration, as well as compensating for low signal-to-noise spectra acquired under Alaskan flight conditions. We present results from FTS column observations of CO2, CH4, and CO, observed during the 2012 and 2013 campaigns, including preliminary comparisons of CARVE FTS measurements with satellite observations of CO2

  11. One-Step Synthesis of Pt/Graphene Composites from Pt Acid Dissolved Ethanol via Microwave Plasma Spray Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Eun Hee; Chang, Hankwon; Kim, Sun Kyung; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Park, Su-Ryeon; Lee, Chong Min; Jang, Hee Dong

    2016-09-01

    Pt nanoparticles-laden graphene (Pt/GR) composites were synthesized in the gas phase from a mixture of ethanol and Pt precursor by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. The morphology of Pt/GR composites has the shape of wrinkled sheets of paper, while Pt nanoparticles (Pt NPs) that are less than 2.6 nm in the mean diameter are uniformly well deposited on the surface of GR sheets stacked in only three layers. The Pt/GR composite prepared with 20 wt% of Pt had the highest specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of up to 402 m2 g-1 and 77 m2 g-1 (Pt), respectively. In addition, the composite showed superior electrocatalytic activity compared with commercial Pt-carbon black. The excellent electrocatalytic activity was attributed to the high specific surface area and electrochemical surface area of the Pt/GR composite directly produced by microwave plasma spray pyrolysis. Thus, it is clearly expected that the Pt/GR composite is a promising material for DMFC catalysts.

  12. Surface enrichment of Pt in Ga2O3 films grown on liquid Pt/Ga alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabau, Mathias; Krick Calderón, Sandra; Rietzler, Florian; Niedermaier, Inga; Taccardi, Nicola; Wasserscheid, Peter; Maier, Florian; Steinrück, Hans-Peter; Papp, Christian

    2016-09-01

    The formation of surface Ga2O3 films on liquid samples of Ga, and Pt-Ga alloys with 0.7 and 1.8 at.% Pt was examined using near-ambient pressure (NAP) X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Thickness, composition and growth of the oxide films were deduced as a function of temperature and Pt content of the alloys, in ultra-high vacuum and at oxygen pressures of 3 × 10- 7, 3 × 10- 3 and 1 mbar. We examined oxide layers up to a thickness of 37 Å. Different growth modes were found for oxidation at low and high pressures. The formed Ga2O3 oxide films showed an increased Pt content, while the pristine GaPt alloy showed a surface depletion of Pt at the examined temperatures. Upon growth of Ga2O3 on Pt/Ga alloys a linear increase of Pt content was observed, due to the incorporation of 3.6 at.% Pt in the Ga2O3. The Pt content in Ga2O3, at the examined temperatures and bulk Pt concentrations is found to be independent of pressure, temperature and the nominal Pt content of the metallic alloy.

  13. Asymmetric magnetic bubble expansion under in-plane field in Pt/Co/Pt : Effect of interface engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavrijsen, R.; Hartmann, D. M. F.; van den Brink, Ton; Yin, Y.; Barcones, B.; Duine, R. A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304830127; Verheijen, M. A.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the impact of growth conditions on the asymmetric magnetic bubble expansion under an in-plane field in ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films. Specifically, using sputter deposition, we vary the Ar pressure during the growth of the top Pt layer. This induces a large change in the interfacial structure

  14. Asymmetric magnetic bubble expansion under in-plane field in Pt/Co/Pt : Effect of interface engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lavrijsen, R.; Hartmann, D. M. F.; van den Brink, Ton; Yin, Y.; Barcones, B.; Duine, R. A.; Verheijen, M. A.; Swagten, H. J. M.; Koopmans, B.

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the impact of growth conditions on the asymmetric magnetic bubble expansion under an in-plane field in ultrathin Pt/Co/Pt films. Specifically, using sputter deposition, we vary the Ar pressure during the growth of the top Pt layer. This induces a large change in the interfacial structure

  15. Bedrock geologic map of the northern Alaska Peninsula area, southwestern Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Blodgett, Robert B.; Blome, Charles D.; Mohadjer, Solmaz; Preller, Cindi C.; Klimasauskas, Edward P.; Gamble, Bruce M.; Coonrad, Warren L.

    2017-03-03

    The northern Alaska Peninsula is a region of transition from the classic magmatic arc geology of the Alaska Peninsula to a Proterozoic and early Paleozoic carbonate platform and then to the poorly understood, tectonically complex sedimentary basins of southwestern Alaska. Physiographically, the region ranges from the high glaciated mountains of the Alaska-Aleutian Range to the coastal lowlands of Cook Inlet on the east and Bristol Bay on the southwest. The lower Ahklun Mountains and finger lakes on the west side of the map area show strong effects from glaciation. Structurally, a number of major faults cut the map area. Most important of these are the Bruin Bay Fault that parallels the coast of Cook Inlet, the Lake Clark Fault that cuts diagonally northeast to southwest across the eastern part of the map area, and the presently active Holitna Fault to the northwest that cuts surficial deposits.Distinctive rock packages assigned to three provinces are overlain by younger sedimentary rocks and intruded by widely dispersed latest Cretaceous and (or) early Tertiary granitic rocks. Much of the east half of the map area lies in the Alaska-Aleutian Range province; the Jurassic to Tertiary Alaska-Aleutian Range batholith and derivative Jurassic sedimentary rocks form the core of this province, which is intruded and overlain by the Aleutian magmatic arc. The Lime Hills province, the carbonate platform, occurs in the north-central part of the map area. The Paleozoic and Mesozoic Ahklun Mountains province in the western part of the map area includes abundant chert, argillite, and graywacke and lesser limestone, basalt, and tectonic mélange. The Kuskokwim Group, an Upper Cretaceous turbidite sequence, is extensively exposed and bounds all three provinces in the west-central part of the map area.

  16. Developing Gyrfalcon surveys and monitoring for Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Mark R.; Schempf, Philip F.; Booms, Travis L.

    2011-01-01

    We developed methods to monitor the status of Gyrfalcons in Alaska. Results of surveys and monitoring will be informative for resource managers and will be useful for studying potential changes in ecological communities of the high latitudes. We estimated that the probability of detecting a Gyrfalcon at an occupied nest site was between 64% and 87% depending on observer experience and aircraft type (fixed-wing or helicopter). The probability of detection is an important factor for estimating occupancy of nesting areas, and occupancy can be used as a metric for monitoring species' status. We conclude that surveys of nesting habitat to monitor occupancy during the breeding season are practical because of the high probability of seeing a Gyrfalcon from aircraft. Aerial surveys are effective for searching sample plots or index areas in the expanse of the Alaskan terrain. Furthermore, several species of cliff-nesting birds can be surveyed concurrently from aircraft. Occupancy estimation also can be applied using data from other field search methods (e.g., from boats) that have proven useful in Alaska. We believe a coordinated broad-scale, inter-agency, collaborative approach is necessary in Alaska. Monitoring can be facilitated by collating and archiving each set of results in a secure universal repository to allow for statewide meta-analysis.

  17. Sustainable Energy Solutions for Rural Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Riley [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Brutkoski, Donna [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Farnsworth, David [Regulatory Assistance Project, Montpelier, VT (United States); Larsen, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-04-22

    The state of Alaska recognizes the challenges these rural communities face and provides financial support via the Power Cost Equalization (PCE) program. The PCE subsidizes the electricity prices paid by customers of these high-cost utilities. The PCE program is designed to spread the benefits of Alaska’s natural resources more evenly throughout the state. Yet even with this subsidy, electricity is still much more expensive for these rural customers. And beyond the PCE, other forms of assistance to rural utilities are becoming scarce given the state’s current fiscal environment. Nearly 90 percent of Alaska’s unrestricted budget funds in recent years have been tied to oil royalties—a sector experiencing significant declines in production and oil prices. Consequently, as Alaska looks to tighten budgets, the challenge of lowering rural utility costs, while encouraging self-sufficiency, has become more urgent.This study examines reliability, capital and strategic planning, management, workforce development, governance, financial performance and system efficiency in the various communities visited by the research team. Using those attributes, a tier system was developed to categorize rural Alaska utilities into Leading and Innovating Systems (Tier I), Advanced Diesel Systems (Tier II), Basic Systems (Tier III), and Underperforming Systems (Tier IV). The tier approach is not meant to label specific utilities, but rather to provide a general set of benchmarks and guideposts for improvement.

  18. The geochemical atlas of Alaska, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gregory K.; Yager, Douglas B.; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; Granitto, Matthew; Denning, Paul D.; Wang, Bronwen; Werdon, Melanie B.

    2016-06-21

    A rich legacy of geochemical data produced since the early 1960s covers the great expanse of Alaska; careful treatment of such data may provide significant and revealing geochemical maps that may be used for landscape geochemistry, mineral resource exploration, and geoenvironmental investigations over large areas. To maximize the spatial density and extent of data coverage for statewide mapping of element distributions, we compiled and integrated analyses of more than 175,000 sediment and soil samples from three major, separate sources: the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program, and the Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys geochemical databases. Various types of heterogeneity and deficiencies in these data presented major challenges to our development of coherently integrated datasets for modeling and mapping of element distributions. Researchers from many different organizations and disparate scientific studies collected samples that were analyzed using highly variable methods throughout a time period of more than 50 years, during which many changes in analytical techniques were developed and applied. Despite these challenges, the U.S. Geological Survey has produced a new systematically integrated compilation of sediment and soil geochemical data with an average sample site density of approximately 1 locality per 10 square kilometers (km2) for the entire State of Alaska, although density varies considerably among different areas. From that compilation, we have modeled and mapped the distributions of 68 elements, thus creating an updated geochemical atlas for the State.

  19. Bryophytes from Tuxedni Wilderness area, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, W.B.; Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.

    2002-01-01

    The bryoflora of two small maritime islands, Chisik and Duck Island (2,302 ha), comprising Tuxedni Wilderness in western lower Cook Inlet, Alaska, was examined to determine species composition in an area where no previous collections had been reported. The field study was conducted from sites selected to represent the totality of environmental variation within Tuxedni Wilderness. Data were analyzed using published reports to compare the bryophyte distribution patterns at three levels, the Northern Hemisphere, North America, and Alaska. A total of 286 bryophytes were identified: 230 mosses and 56 liverworts. Bryum miniatum, Dichodontium olympicum, and Orthotrichum pollens are new to Alaska. The annotated list of species for Tuxedni Wilderness expands the known range for many species and fills distribution gaps within Hulte??n's Central Pacific Coast district. Compared with bryophyte distribution in the Northern Hemisphere, the bryoflora of Tuxedni Wilderness primarily includes taxa of boreal (61%), montane (13%), temperate (11%), arctic-alpine (7%), cosmopolitan (7%), distribution; 4% of the total moss flora are North America endemics. A brief summary of the botanical exploration of the general area is provided, as is a description of the bryophytes present in the vegetation and habitat types of Chisik and Duck Islands.

  20. Pt Ru/C electrocatalysts prepared using electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Dionisio Furtunato da; Oliveira Neto, Almir; Pino, Eddy Segura; Brandalise, Michele; Linardi, Marcelo; Spinace, Estevam Vitorio [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: espinace@ipen.br

    2007-10-15

    Pt Ru/C electrocatalysts (carbon-supported Pt Ru nanoparticles) were prepared submitting water/ethylene glycol mixtures containing Pt(IV) and Ru(III) ions and the carbon support to electron beam irradiation. The electrocatalysts were characterized by energy dispersive X ray analysis (EDX), X ray diffraction (XRD) and cyclic voltammetry and tested for methanol electro-oxidation aiming fuel cell application. The obtained Pt Ru/C electrocatalysts showed superior performance for methanol electro-oxidation at room temperature compared to commercial Pt Ru/C electrocatalyst. (author)

  1. Half-Lantern Pt(II and Pt(III Complexes. New Cyclometalated Platinum Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Sicilia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The divalent complex [{Pt(bzq(μ-L}2] (1 [Hbzq = benzo[h]quinolone, HL = CF3C4H2N2SH: 4-(trifluoromethylpyrimidine-2-thiol] was obtained from equimolar amounts of [Pt(bzq(NCMe2]ClO4 and 4-(trifluoromethylpyrimidine-2-thiol with an excess of NEt3. The presence of a low intensity absorption band at 486 nm (CH2Cl2, assignable to a metal-metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition (1MMLCT [dσ*(Pt2→π*(bzq], is indicative of the existence of two platinum centers located in close proximity because the rigidity of the half-lantern structure allows the preservation of these interactions in solution. Compound 1 undergoes two-electron oxidation upon treatment with halogens X2 (X2: Cl2, Br2 or I2 to give the corresponding dihalodiplatinum (III complexes [{Pt(bzq(μ-LX}2] (L = CF3C4H2N2S-κN,S; X: Cl 2, Br 3, I 4. Complexes 2–4 were also obtained by reaction of 1 with HX (molar ratio 1:2, 10% excess of HX in THF with yields of about 80% and compound 2 was also obtained by reaction of [{Pt(bzq(μ-Cl}2] with HL (4-(trifluoromethylpyrimidine-2-thiol in molar ratio 1:2 in THF, although in small yield. The X-ray structures of 2 and 3 confirmed the half-lantern structure and the anti configuration of the molecules. Both of them show Pt–Pt distances (2.61188(15 Å 2, 2.61767(16 Å 3 in the low range of those observed in Pt2(III,IIIX2 half-lantern complexes.

  2. The Shublik Formation and adjacent strata in northeastern Alaska description, minor elements, depositional environments and diagenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourtelot, Harry Allison; Tailleur, Irvin L.

    1971-01-01

    The Shublik Formation (Middle and Late Triassic) is widespread in the surface and subsurface of northern Alaska. Four stratigraphic sections along about 70 miles of the front of the northeastern Brooks Range east of the Canning giver were examined and sampled in detail in 1968. These sections and six-step spectrographic and carbon analyses of the samples combined with other data to provide a preliminary local description of the highly organic unit and of the paleoenvironments. Thicknesses measured between the overlying Kingak Shale of Jurassic age and the underlying Sadlerochit Formation of Permian and Triassic age range from 400 to more than 800 feet but the 400 feet, obtained from the most completely exposed section, may be closer to the real thickness across the region. The sections consist of organic-rich, phosphatic, and fossiliferous muddy, silty, or carbonate rocks. The general sequence consists, from the bottom up, of a lower unit of phosphatic siltstone, a middle unit of phosphatic carbonate rocks, and an upper unit of shale and carbonate rocks near the Canning River and shale, carbonate rocks, and sandstone to the east. Although previously designated a basal member of the Kingak Shale (Jurassic), the upper unit is here included with the Shublik on the basis of its regional lithologic relation. The minor element compositions of the samples of the Shublik Formation are consistent with their carbonaceous and phosphatic natures in that relatively large amounts of copper, molybdenum, nickel, vanadium and rare earths are present. The predominantly sandy rocks of the underlying Sadlerochit Formation (Permian and Triassic) have low contents of most minor elements. The compositions of samples of Kingak Shale have a wide range not readily explicable by the nature of the rock: an efflorescent sulfate salt contains 1,500 ppm nickel and 1,500 ppm zinc and large amounts of other metals derived from weathering of pyrite and leaching of local shale. The only recorded

  3. Direct determination of the ionization energies of PtC, PtO, and PtO2 with VUV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citir, Murat; Metz, Ricardo B; Belau, Leonid; Ahmed, Musahid

    2008-10-02

    Photoionization efficiency curves were measured for gas-phase PtC, PtO, and PtO2 using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation at the Advanced Light Source. The molecules were prepared by laser ablation of a platinum tube, followed by reaction with CH4 or N2O and supersonic expansion. These measurements provide the first directly measured ionization energy for PtC, IE(PtC) = 9.45 +/- 0.05 eV. The direct measurement also gives greatly improved ionization energies for the platinum oxides, IE(PtO) = 10.0 +/- 0.1 eV and IE(PtO2) = 11.35 +/- 0.05 eV. The ionization energy connects the dissociation energies of the neutral and cation, leading to greatly improved 0 K bond dissociation energies for the neutrals: D0(Pt-C) = 5.95 +/- 0.07 eV, D0(Pt-O) = 4.30 +/- 0.12 eV, and D0(OPt-O) = 4.41 +/- 0.13 eV, as well as enthalpies of formation for the gas-phase molecules DeltaH(0)(f,0)(PtC(g)) = 701 +/- 7 kJ/mol, DeltaH(0)(f,0)(PtO(g)) = 396 +/- 12 kJ/mol, and DeltaH(0)(f,0)(PtO2(g)) = 218 +/- 11 kJ/mol. Much of the error in previous Knudsen cell measurements of platinum oxide bond dissociation energies is due to the use of thermodynamic second law extrapolations. Third law values calculated using statistical mechanical thermodynamic functions are in much better agreement with values obtained from ionization energies and ion energetics. These experiments demonstrate that laser ablation production with direct VUV ionization measurements is a versatile tool to measure ionization energies and bond dissociation energies for catalytically interesting species such as metal oxides and carbides.

  4. Evaluasi Sistem Informasi Penjualan PT SPNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderes Gui

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze problems that occur in information systems sales PT SPNS. It also serves to control the management and control of applications running well so it can produce accurate information for decision making. The method used is book study method and field study. Study was done by reading library books, scientific papers and other sources, while the field study was done by observation, interviews, and questionnaires. The result of the evaluation is derived from the respective strengths and weaknesses - each control. Weaknesses are found, the findings presented in the form of a matrix that contains the findings and recommendations as a matter of risk remedial action. Conclusions obtained from the audit for security control, operations, limitations, input and output is good enough because it can satisfy and support the sales activities of PT SPNS.

  5. Revisiting the Optical PT-Symmetric Dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Delfino Huerta Morales

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Optics has proved a fertile ground for the experimental simulation of quantum mechanics. Most recently, optical realizations of PT -symmetric quantum mechanics have been shown, both theoretically and experimentally, opening the door to international efforts aiming at the design of practical optical devices exploiting this symmetry. Here, we focus on the optical PT -symmetric dimer, a two-waveguide coupler where the materials show symmetric effective gain and loss, and provide a review of the linear and nonlinear optical realizations from a symmetry-based point of view. We go beyond a simple review of the literature and show that the dimer is just the smallest of a class of planar N-waveguide couplers that are the optical realization of the Lorentz group in 2 + 1 dimensions. Furthermore, we provide a formulation to describe light propagation through waveguide couplers described by non-Hermitian mode coupling matrices based on a non-Hermitian generalization of the Ehrenfest theorem.

  6. Revisiting the optical $PT$-symmetric dimer

    CERN Document Server

    Morales, J D Huerta; López-Aguayo, S; Rodríguez-Lara, B M

    2016-01-01

    Optics has proved a fertile ground for the experimental simulation of quantum mechanics. Most recently, optical realizations of $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric quantum mechanics have been shown, both theoretically and experimentally, opening the door to international efforts aiming at the design of practical optical devices exploiting this symmetry. Here, we focus on the optical $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric dimer, a two-waveguide coupler were the materials show symmetric effective gain and loss, and provide a review of the linear and nonlinear optical realizations from a symmetry based point of view. We go beyond a simple review of the literature and show that the dimer is just the smallest of a class of planar $N$-waveguide couplers that are the optical realization of Lorentz group in 2+1 dimensions. Furthermore, we provide a formulation to describe light propagation through waveguide couplers described by non-Hermitian mode coupling matrices based on a non-Hermitian generalization of Ehrenfest theorem.

  7. MANFAAT DATA WAREHOUSE PADA PT ABC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evaristus Didik Madyatmadja

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to analyze the current system to find out problems faced by the company and propose alternative solutions and generate information needed by management by designing a data warehouse according to the information needs of PT ABC. This research implements analysis and design of data warehouse by Ralph Kimball and Ross cited by Connolly and Begg, known as Nine-Step Methodology. The result obtained is a data warehouse application that may present a multidimensional historical data that can assist the management in decisions. Designing data warehouse at PT ABC makes concise the enterprise data and can be viewed from several dimensions. It helps users analyze data for strategic decision quickly and accurately.

  8. High Activity of Hexagonal Ag/Pt Nanoshell Catalyst for Oxygen Electroreduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Chien-Liang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hexagonal Ag/Pt nanoshells were prepared by using a hexagonal Ag nanoplate as the displacement template and by introducing Pt ions. The prepared Ag/Pt nanoshells played the role of an electrocatalyst in an oxygen reduction process. Compared to spherical Pt and Ag/Pt nanoparticles, the hexagonal Ag/Pt nanoshells showed higher activity for oxygen electroreduction.

  9. Relaxor-PT Single Crystal Piezoelectric Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoning Jiang; Jinwook Kim; Kyugrim Kim

    2014-01-01

    Relaxor-PbTiO3 piezoelectric single crystals have been widely used in a broad range of electromechanical devices, including piezoelectric sensors, actuators, and transducers. This paper reviews the unique properties of these single crystals for piezoelectric sensors. Design, fabrication and characterization of various relaxor-PT single crystal piezoelectric sensors and their applications are presented and compared with their piezoelectric ceramic counterparts. Newly applicable fields and futu...

  10. Adhesion of metal on metal. The Pt on Co case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, P.; Castellani, N. J.; Cabeza, G. F.

    2002-01-01

    The adhesion of Pt overlayers in pseudomorphic epitaxy on hcp Co(0 0 0 1) and fcc Co(1 0 0) was investigated with first-principles calculations. This was compared to the adhesion of the Pt surface layers on Pt(1 1 1) and Pt(1 0 0). We show that adhesion can be analyzed by taking into account the interplay between the chemical and structural properties at the interface. The free Pt planes with the bulk Pt-Pt distance are submitted to tensile stress which can be relaxed by 6.6% and 9.1% contraction for the (1 1 1) and (1 0 0) symmetries respectively. This results in equilibrium interatomic distances which are not far from that of the Co substrate. Consequently the stress energy in a pseudomorphic Pt monolayer on a Co substrate is lower than the stress energy of pure Pt(1 1 1) or Pt(1 0 0) surfaces. However, this is at the expense of the Pt chemical reactivity towards the Co substrate. This is in agreement with the general dependence between chemical reactivity and stress of a metal surface.

  11. Spin Hall effects in mesoscopic Pt films with high resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Chuan; Luo, Yongming; Zhou, Chao; Cai, Yunjiao; Jia, Mengwen; Chen, Shuhan; Wu, Yizheng; Ji, Yi

    2016-10-01

    The energy efficiency of the spin Hall effects (SHE) can be enhanced if the electrical conductivity is decreased without sacrificing the spin Hall conductivity. The resistivity of Pt films can be increased to 150-300 µΩ · cm by mesoscopic lateral confinement, thereby decreasing the conductivity. The SHE and inverse spin Hall effects (ISHE) in these mesoscopic Pt films are explored at 10 K by using the nonlocal spin injection/detection method. All relevant physical quantities are determined in situ on the same substrate, and a quantitative approach is developed to characterize all processes effectively. Extensive measurements with various Pt thickness values reveal an upper limit for the Pt spin diffusion length: {λ\\text{pt}}   ⩽  0.8 nm. The average product of {λ\\text{pt}} and the Pt spin Hall angle {α\\text{H}} is substantial: {α\\text{H}}{λ\\text{pt}}   =  (0.142  ±  0.040) nm for 4 nm thick Pt, though a gradual decrease is observed at larger Pt thickness. The results suggest enhanced spin Hall effects in resistive mesoscopic Pt films.

  12. Fabrication of monometallic (Co, Pd, Pt, Au) and bimetallic (Pt/Au, Au/Pt) thin films with hierarchical architectures as electrocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Cuicui; Zhang, Jintao; Ma, Houyi

    2010-05-01

    Co thin films with novel hierarchical structures were controllably fabricated by simple electrochemical deposition in the absence of hard and soft templates, which were used as sacrificial templates to further prepare noble metal (Pd, Pt, Au) hierarchical micro/nanostructures via metal exchange reactions. SEM characterization demonstrated that the resulting noble metal thin films displayed hierarchical architectures. The as-prepared noble metal thin films could be directly used as the anode catalysts for the electro-oxidation of formic acid. Moreover, bimetallic catalysts (Pt/Au, Au/Pt) fabricated based on the monometallic Au, Pt micro/nanostructures exhibited the higher catalytic activity compared to the previous monometallic catalysts.

  13. XAS and XMCD studies of magnetic properties modifications of Pt/Co/Au and Pt/Co/Pt trilayers induced by Ga⁺ ions irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazalski, Piotr; Sveklo, Iosif; Kurant, Zbigniew; Ollefs, Katharina; Rogalev, Andrei; Wilhelm, Fabrice; Fassbender, Juergen; Baczewski, Lech Tomasz; Wawro, Andrzej; Maziewski, Andrzej

    2015-05-01

    Magnetic and magneto-optical properties of Pt/Co/Au and Pt/Co/Pt trilayers subjected to 30 keV Ga(+) ion irradiation are compared. In two-dimensional maps of these properties as a function of cobalt thickness and ion fluence, two branches with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) for Pt/Co/Pt trilayers are well distinguished. The replacement of the Pt capping layer with Au results in the two branches still being visible but the in-plane anisotropy for the low-fluence branch is suppressed whereas the high-fluence branch displays PMA. The X-ray absorption spectra and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) spectra are discussed and compared with non-irradiated reference samples. The changes of their shapes and peak amplitude, particularly for the high-fluence branch, are related to the modifications of the local environment of Co(Pt) atoms and the etching effects induced by ion irradiation. Additionally, in irradiated trilayers the XMCD measurements at the Pt L2,3-edge reveal an increase of the magnetic moment induced in Pt atoms.

  14. Nonlinear waves in $\\cal PT$-symmetric systems

    CERN Document Server

    Konotop, Vladimir V; Zezyulin, Dmitry A

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress on nonlinear properties of parity-time ($\\cal PT$-) symmetric systems is comprehensively reviewed in this article. $\\cal PT$ symmetry started out in non-Hermitian quantum mechanics, where complex potentials obeying $\\cal PT$ symmetry could exhibit all-real spectra. This concept later spread out to optics, Bose-Einstein condensates, electronic circuits, and many other physical fields, where a judicious balancing of gain and loss constitutes a $\\cal PT$-symmetric system. The natural inclusion of nonlinearity into these $\\cal PT$ systems then gave rise to a wide array of new phenomena which have no counterparts in traditional dissipative systems. Examples include the existence of continuous families of nonlinear modes and integrals of motion, stabilization of nonlinear modes above $\\cal PT$-symmetry phase transition, symmetry breaking of nonlinear modes, distinctive soliton dynamics, and many others. In this article, nonlinear $\\cal PT$-symmetric systems arising from various physical disciplines ...

  15. Tunable Architecture of Rhombic Dodecahedral Pt-Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becknell, Nigel; Son, Yoonkook; Kim, Dohyung; Li, Dongguo; Yu, Yi; Niu, Zhiqiang; Lei, Teng; Sneed, Brian T.; More, Karren L.; Markovic, Nenad M.; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Yang, Peidong

    2017-08-30

    Platinum-based alloys are known to demonstrate advanced properties in electrochemical reactions that are relevant for proton exchange membrane fuel cells and electrolyzers. Further development of Pt alloy electrocatalysts relies on the design of architectures with highly active surfaces and optimized utilization of the expensive elpment, Pt. Here, we show that the three-dimensional Pt anisotropy of Pt-Ni rhombic dodecahedra can be tuned by controlling the ratio between Pt and Ni precursors such that either a completely hollow nanoframe or a new architecture, the excavated nanoframe, can be obtained. The excavated nanoframe showed similar to 10 times higher specific and similar to 6 times higher mass activity for the oxygen reduction reaction than Pt/C, and twice the mass activity of the hollow nanoframe. The high activity is attributed to enhanced Ni content in the near-surface region and the extended two-dimensional sheet structure within the nanoframe that minimizes the number of buried Pt sites.

  16. Highly durable graphene nanoplatelets supported Pt nanocatalysts for oxygen reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yuyan; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Chongmin; Nie, Zimin; Liu, Jun; Lin, Yuehe [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Wang, Yong [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); The Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States)

    2010-08-01

    We report graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs), which exhibit the advantages of both single-layer graphene and highly graphitic carbon, as a durable alternative support material for Pt nanoparticles for oxygen reduction in fuel cells. Pt nanoparticles are deposited on poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-coated GNP, and characterized with transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectra, and electrochemical tests. Pt/GNP exhibits greatly enhanced electrochemical durability (2-3 times that of Pt/CNT and commercial Etek Pt/C). These are attributed to the intrinsic high graphitization degree of GNP and the enhanced Pt-carbon interaction in Pt/GNP. If considering that GNP can be easily mass produced from graphite, GNP is a promising, low-cost, and durable electrocatalyst support for oxygen reduction in fuel cells. (author)

  17. Alaska Seismic Network Upgrade and Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandru, J. M.; Hansen, R. A.; Estes, S. A.; Fowler, M.

    2009-12-01

    AEIC (Alaska Earthquake Information Center) has begun the task of upgrading the older regional seismic monitoring sites that have been in place for a number of years. Many of the original sites (some dating to the 1960's) are still single component analog technology. This was a very reasonable and ultra low power reliable system for its day. However with the advanced needs of today's research community, AEIC has begun upgrading to Broadband and Strong Motion Seismometers, 24 bit digitizers and high-speed two-way communications, while still trying to maintain the utmost reliability and maintaining low power consumption. Many sites have been upgraded or will be upgraded from single component to triaxial broad bands and triaxial accerometers. This provided much greater dynamic range over the older antiquated technology. The challenge is compounded by rapidly changing digital technology. Digitizersand data communications based on analog phone lines utilizing 9600 baud modems and RS232 are becoming increasingly difficult to maintain and increasingly expensive compared to current methods that use Ethernet, TCP/IP and UDP connections. Gaining a reliable Internet connection can be as easy as calling up an ISP and having a DSL connection installed or may require installing our own satellite uplink, where other options don't exist. LANs are accomplished with a variety of communications devices such as spread spectrum 900 MHz radios or VHF radios for long troublesome shots. WANs are accomplished with a much wider variety of equipment. Traditional analog phone lines are being used in some instances, however 56K lines are much more desirable. Cellular data links have become a convenient option in semiurban environments where digital cellular coverage is available. Alaska is slightly behind the curve on cellular technology due to its low population density and vast unpopulated areas but has emerged into this new technology in the last few years. Partnerships with organizations

  18. PT-Symmetric Quantum Electrodynamics and Unitarity

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, Kimball A; Parashar, Prachi; Pourtolami, Nima; Wagner, J

    2012-01-01

    More than 15 years ago, a new approach to quantum mechanics was suggested, in which Hermiticity of the Hamiltonian was to be replaced by invariance under a discrete symmetry, the product of parity and time-reversal symmetry, $\\mathcal{PT}$. It was shown that if $\\mathcal{PT}$ is unbroken, energies were, in fact, positive, and unitarity was satisifed. Since quantum mechanics is quantum field theory in 1 dimension, time, it was natural to extend this idea to higher-dimensional field theory, and in fact an apparently viable version of $\\mathcal{PT}$-invariant quantum electrodynamics was proposed. However, it has proved difficult to establish that the unitarity of the scattering matrix, for example, the K\\"all\\'en spectral representation for the photon propagator, can be maintained in this theory. This has led to questions of whether, in fact, even quantum mechanical systems are consistent with probability conservation when Green's functions are examined, since the latter have to possess physical requirements of ...

  19. Density functional theory studies of the adsorption of ethylene and oxygen on Pt(111) and Pt3Sn(111)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Watwe, R.M.; Cortright, R.D.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2001-01-01

    of pi -bonded ethylene, di-sigma -bonded ethylene, and ethylidyne species are weaker on Pt3Sn(111) than on Pt(111) by 21, 31, and 50 kJ/mol, respectively. Hence, the electronic effect of Sn on the adsorption of ethylene depends on the type of adsorption site, with adsorption on three-fold site weakened......Density functional theory, employing periodic slab calculations, was used to investigate the interactions of ethylene and oxygen with Pt(111) and Pt3Sn(111). The predicted energetics and structures of adsorbed species on Pt(111) are in good agreement with experimental data. The binding energies...

  20. Pt skin on AuCu intermetallic substrate: a strategy to maximize Pt utilization for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gongwei; Huang, Bing; Xiao, Li; Ren, Zhandong; Chen, Hao; Wang, Deli; Abruña, Héctor D; Lu, Juntao; Zhuang, Lin

    2014-07-09

    The dependence on Pt catalysts has been a major issue of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Strategies to maximize the Pt utilization in catalysts include two main approaches: to put Pt atoms only at the catalyst surface and to further enhance the surface-specific catalytic activity (SA) of Pt. Thus far there has been no practical design that combines these two features into one single catalyst. Here we report a combined computational and experimental study on the design and implementation of Pt-skin catalysts with significantly improved SA toward the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Through screening, using density functional theory (DFT) calculations, a Pt-skin structure on AuCu(111) substrate, consisting of 1.5 monolayers of Pt, is found to have an appropriately weakened oxygen affinity, in comparison to that on Pt(111), which would be ideal for ORR catalysis. Such a structure is then realized by substituting the Cu atoms in three surface layers of AuCu intermetallic nanoparticles (AuCu iNPs) with Pt. The resulting Pt-skinned catalyst (denoted as Pt(S)AuCu iNPs) has been characterized in depth using synchrotron XRD, XPS, HRTEM, and HAADF-STEM/EDX, such that the Pt-skin structure is unambiguously identified. The thickness of the Pt skin was determined to be less than two atomic layers. Finally the catalytic activity of Pt(S)AuCu iNPs toward the ORR was measured via rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry through which it was established that the SA was more than 2 times that of a commercial Pt/C catalyst. Taking into account the ultralow Pt loading in Pt(S)AuCu iNPs, the mass-specific catalytic activity (MA) was determined to be 0.56 A/mg(Pt)@0.9 V, a value that is well beyond the DOE 2017 target for ORR catalysts (0.44 A/mg(Pt)@0.9 V). These findings provide a strategic design and a realizable approach to high-performance and Pt-efficient catalysts for fuel cells.