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Sample records for psychrotrophic bacterium shewanella

  1. Description of Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov., a Novel Psychrotrophic Bacterium from James Ross Island, Antarctica.

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    Kosina, Marcel; Švec, Pavel; Černohlávková, Jitka; Barták, Miloš; Snopková, Kateřina; De Vos, Paul; Sedláček, Ivo

    2016-07-01

    During the microbiological research performed within the scope of activities of Czech expeditions based at the Johann Gregor Mendel Station at James Ross Island, Antarctica, two psychrotrophic gram-stain negative non-fluorescent strains CCM 8506T and CCM 8507 from soil were extensively characterized using genotypic and phenotypic methods. Initial characterization using ribotyping with HindIII restriction endonuclease and phenotyping implies that both isolates belong to a single Pseudomonas species. Sequencing of rrs, rpoB, rpoD and glnA genes of strain CCM 8506(T) confirmed affiliation of investigated strains within the genus Pseudomonas. Further investigation using automated ribotyping with EcoRI (RiboPrinter(®) Microbial Characterisation System), whole-cell protein profiling using the Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer system, extensive biochemical testing and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments confirmed that both investigated strains are members of a single taxon which is clearly separated from all hitherto described Pseudomonas spp. Based on all findings, we describe a novel species Pseudomonas gregormendelii sp. nov. with the type strain CCM 8506(T) (=LMG 28632T).

  2. Lactococcus piscium: a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium with bioprotective or spoilage activity in food-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraoui, T; Leroi, F; Björkroth, J; Pilet, M F

    2016-10-01

    The genus Lactococcus comprises 12 species, some known for decades and others more recently described. Lactococcus piscium, isolated in 1990 from rainbow trout, is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium, probably disregarded because most of the strains are unable to grow at 30°C. During the last 10 years, this species has been isolated from a large variety of food: meat, seafood and vegetables, mostly packed under vacuum (VP) or modified atmosphere (MAP) and stored at chilled temperature. Recently, culture-independent techniques used for characterization of microbial ecosystems have highlighted the importance of Lc. piscium in food. Its role in food spoilage varies according to the strain and the food matrix. However, most studies have indicated that Lc. piscium spoils meat, whereas it does not degrade the sensory properties of seafood. Lactococcus piscium strains have a large antimicrobial spectrum, including Gram-positive and negative bacteria. In various seafoods, some strains have a protective effect against spoilage and can extend the sensory shelf-life of the products. They can also inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenes, by a cell-to-cell contact-dependent. This article reviews the physiological and genomic characteristics of Lc. piscium and discusses its spoilage or protective activities in food.

  3. Multilocus sequence typing of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum, a Psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium causing spoilage of packaged perishable foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahkila, Riitta; Johansson, Per; Säde, Elina; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2015-04-01

    Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium (LAB) that causes spoilage of a variety of modified-atmosphere-packaged (MAP) cold-stored food products. During the past 10 years, this spoilage organism has been increasingly reported in MAP meat and vegetable products in northern Europe. In the present study, the population structure within 252 L. gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum strains was determined based on a novel multilocus sequence-typing (MLST) scheme employing seven housekeeping genes. These strains had been isolated from meat and vegetable sources over a time span of 15 years, and all 68 previously detected pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) genotypes were represented. A total of 46 sequence types (STs) were identified, with a majority of the strains (>60%) belonging to three major STs, which were grouped into three clonal complexes (CCs) and 17 singletons by Global Optimal eBURST (goeBURST). The results by Bayesian analysis of population structure (BAPS) mostly correlated with the grouping by goeBURST. Admixture analysis by BAPS indicated a very low level of exchange of genetic material between the subpopulations. Niche specificity was observed within the subpopulations: CC1 and BAPS cluster 1 consisted mostly of strains from a variety of MAP meats, whereas vegetable strains grouped together with strains from MAP poultry within CC2 and BAPS cluster 2. The MLST scheme presented in this study provides a shareable and continuously growing sequence database enabling global comparison of strains associated with spoilage cases. This will further advance our understanding of the microbial ecology of this industrially important LAB. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Isolation and characterization of the dcw cluster from the piezophilic deep-sea bacterium Shewanella violacea.

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    Ishii, Akihiro; Nakasone, Kaoru; Sato, Takako; Wachi, Masaaki; Sugai, Motoyuki; Nagai, Kazuo; Kato, Chiaki

    2002-08-01

    The dcw cluster of genes involved in cell division and cell wall synthesis from the piezophilic deep-sea bacterium Shewanella violacea was isolated and characterized. It comprises 15 open reading frames, of which the organization is mraZ-mraW-ftsL-ftsI-murE-murF-mraY-murD-ftsW-murG-murC-ftsQ-ftsA-ftsZ-envA, in that order. To analyze transcription upstream from the ftsZ gene, Northern blot and primer extension analyses were performed. The results showed that gene expression is not pressure dependent. Western blot analysis showed that the FtsZ protein is equally expressed under several pressure conditions in the range of atmospheric (0.1 MPa) to high (50 MPa) pressures. Using immunofluorescence microscopy, the FtsZ ring was observed in the center of cells at pressure conditions of 0.1 to 50 MPa. These results imply that the FtsZ protein function is not affected by elevated pressure in this piezophilic bacterium.

  5. Cold adaptation of the mononuclear molybdoenzyme periplasmic nitrate reductase from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Philippa J.L. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Codd, Rachel, E-mail: rachel.codd@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of New South Wales, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cold-adapted phenotype of NapA from the Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protein homology model of NapA from S. gelidimarina and mesophilic homologue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six amino acid residues identified as lead candidates governing NapA cold adaptation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Molecular-level understanding of designing cool-temperature in situ oxyanion sensors. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite is catalysed in bacteria by periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) which describes a system of variable protein subunits encoded by the nap operon. Nitrate reduction occurs in the NapA subunit, which contains a bis-molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide (Mo-MGD) cofactor and one [4Fe-4S] iron-sulfur cluster. The activity of periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) isolated as native protein from the cold-adapted (psychrophilic) Antarctic bacterium Shewanella gelidimarina (Nap{sub Sgel}) and middle-temperature adapted (mesophilic) Shewanella putrefaciens (Nap{sub Sput}) was examined at varied temperature. Irreversible deactivation of Nap{sub Sgel} and Nap{sub Sput} occurred at 54.5 and 65 Degree-Sign C, respectively. When Nap{sub Sgel} was preincubated at 21-70 Degree-Sign C for 30 min, the room-temperature nitrate reductase activity was maximal and invariant between 21 and 54 Degree-Sign C, which suggested that Nap{sub Sgel} was poised for optimal catalysis at modest temperatures and, unlike Nap{sub Sput}, did not benefit from thermally-induced refolding. At 20 Degree-Sign C, Nap{sub Sgel} reduced selenate at 16% of the rate of nitrate reduction. Nap{sub Sput} did not reduce selenate. Sequence alignment showed 46 amino acid residue substitutions in Nap{sub Sgel} that were conserved in NapA from mesophilic Shewanella, Rhodobacter and Escherichia species and could be associated with the Nap{sub Sgel} cold-adapted phenotype. Protein homology modeling of Nap{sub Sgel} using a

  6. Isolation and characteristics of one marine psychrotrophic cellulase-generating bacterium Ar/w/b/75°/10/5 from Chuckchi Sea, Arctic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾胤新; 陈波

    2002-01-01

    Microorganisms living in polar zones play an important part as the potential source of organic activity materials with low temperature characteristics in the biotechnological applications. A psychrotrophic bacterium (strain Ar/w/b/75°/10/5), producing cellulase at low temperatures during late-exponential and early-stationary phases of cell growth, was isolated from sea ice-covered surface water in Chuckchi Sea, Arctic. This bacterium, with rod cells, was Gram-negative, slightly halophilic. Colony growing on agar plate was in black. Optimum growth temperature was 15℃. No cell growth was observed at 35℃ or above. Optimum salt concentration for cell growth was between 2 and 3 % of sodium chloride in media. Maximal cellulase activity was detected at a temperature of 35℃ and pH8. Cellulase was irreversibly inactivated when incubated at 55℃ within 30 min. Enzyme can be kept stable at the temperature no higher than 25℃. Of special interest was that this bacterium produced various extracellular enzymes including cellulase, amylase, agar hydrolase and protease, at low or moderate temperature conditions, which is certainly of it potential value for applications.

  7. Hsp90 Is Essential under Heat Stress in the Bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

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    Flora Ambre Honoré

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hsp90 chaperone is essential in eukaryotes and activates a large array of client proteins. In contrast, its role is still elusive in bacteria, and only a few Hsp90 bacterial clients are known. Here, we found that Hsp90 is essential in the model bacterium Shewanella oneidensis under heat stress. A genetic screen for Hsp90 client proteins identified TilS, an essential protein involved in tRNA maturation. Overexpression of TilS rescued the growth defect of the hsp90 deletion strain under heat stress. In vivo, the activity and the amount of TilS were significantly reduced in the absence of Hsp90 at high temperature. Furthermore, we showed that Hsp90 interacts with TilS, and Hsp90 prevents TilS aggregation in vitro at high temperature. Together, our results indicate that TilS is a client of Hsp90 in S. oneidensis. Therefore, our study links the essentiality of bacterial Hsp90 at high temperature with the identification of a client.

  8. A serine hydroxymethyltransferase from marine bacterium Shewanella algae: Isolation, purification, characterization and l-serine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wei; Xia, Bingzhao; Liu, Ziduo

    2013-10-01

    Currently, l-serine is mainly produced by enzymatic conversion, in which serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT) is the key enzyme, suggesting the importance of searching for a SHMT with high activity. Shewanella algae, a methanol-utilizing marine bacterium showing high SHMT activity, was selected based on screening bacterial strains and comparison of the activities of SHMTs. A glyA was isolated from the S. algae through thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR) and it encoded a 417 amino acid polypeptide. The SaSHMT, encoded by the glyA, showed the optimal activity at 50°C and pH 7.0, and retained over 45% of its maximal activity after incubation at 40°C for 3h. The enzyme showed better stability under alkaline environment (pH 6.5-9.0) than Hyphomicrobium methylovorum GM2's SHMT (pH 6.0-7.5). The SaSHMT can produce 77.76mM of l-serine by enzymatic conversion, with the molecular conversion rate in catalyzing glycine to l-serine being 1.41-fold higher than that of Escherichia coli. Therefore, the SaSHMT has the potential for industrial applications due to its tolerance of alkaline environment and a relatively high enzymatic conversion rate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  9. Screening and optimization of EPA-producing antarctic psychrophilic bacterium Shewanella sp.NJ136

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Botao; Miao Jinlai; Ma Jinhai; Zheng Zhou; Wang Guodong; Wang Quanfu; Li Guangyou; Liu Wanshun

    2007-01-01

    Two hundred strains of bacteria from Antarctic sea ice were collected and screened for their ability of producing eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA, 20:5ω3)by means of Gas Chromatography/Mass Spetrometry (GC/MS). Eight strains of bacteria containing EPA were investigated, among which the outstanding one was recorded as NJl36. This bacterium was identified as Shewanella by the biochemical characteristics and 16S rRNA sequence. Response surface methodology(RSM)was applied to optimize the medium ingredients. A 24full factorial central composite design(FFCCD)was employed to determine the maximum EPA production at optimum levels of pH, NaCl, glucose and yeast extract. The predicted optimal combination of media constituents for maximum 14.02 mg/g(about 1.7-fold increase)EPA production were determined as 30.15‰(m/v)NaCl, 9.98g/L glucose, 4.42g/L yeast extract and pH 6.08. The actual experimental results were in agreement with the prediction.

  10. Photocatalytic properties of zinc sulfide nanocrystals biofabricated by metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiang [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Ma, Xiao-Bo [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Yuan, Hang [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering, Institute of Technical Biology & Agriculture Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liu, Peng-Cheng; Lei, Yu-Bin; Xu, Hui [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Du, Dao-Lin, E-mail: ddl@ujs.edu.cn [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Sun, Jian-Fan [School of The Environment and Safety Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, Yu-Jie, E-mail: yujief@hit.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Urban Water Resource and Environment, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • S. oneidensis MR-1 biofabricated ZnS nanocrystals using artificial wastewater. • ZnS nanocrystals were 5 nm in diameter and aggregated extracellularly. • ZnS had good catalytic activity in the degradation of RHB under UV irradiation. • Photogenerated holes mainly contributed to the degradation of RhB. - Abstract: Accumulation and utilization of heavy metals from wastewater by biological treatment system has aroused great interest. In the present study, a metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was used to explore the biofabrication of ZnS nanocrystals from the artificial wastewater. The biogenic H{sub 2}S produced via the reduction of thiosulfate precipitated the Zn(II) as sulfide extracellularly. Characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) confirmed the precipitates as ZnS nanocrystals. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals appeared spherical in shape with an average diameter of 5 nm and mainly aggregated in the medium and cell surface of S. oneidensis MR-1. UV–vis DRS spectra showed ZnS nanoparticles appeared a strong absorption below 360 nm. Thus, the photocatalytic activity of ZnS was evaluated by the photodegradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under UV irradiation. The biogenic ZnS nanocrystals showed a high level of photodegradation efficiency to RhB coupled with a significant blue-shift of maximum adsorption peak. A detailed analysis indicated the photogenerated holes, rather than hydroxyl radicals, contributed to the photocatalytic decolorization of RhB. This approach of coupling biosynthesis of nanoparticles with heavy metal removal may offer a potential avenue for efficient bioremediation of heavy metal wastewater.

  11. Purification and characterization of an extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase produced by psychrotrophic bacterium Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1.

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    Ji, Xiuling; Chen, Guiyuan; Zhang, Qi; Lin, Lianbing; Wei, Yunlin

    2015-06-01

    An extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase from the psychrotrophic Yersinia enterocolitica strain KM1 was purified 26-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme was active over a broad range spanning 0-60 °C with an optimum activity at 37 °C, and it was found to be alkaline-preferring with an optimum activity at pH 9.0. The molecular weight was estimated to be 34.3 KDa and monomeric. The lipase could be activated by Ca(2+) and low concentration (10%) of ethanol, dimethyl sulphoxide, methanol, and acetonitrile, whereas it was strongly inhibited by Zn(2+), Cu(2+), SDS, EDTA, and PMSF. Using p-nitrophenyl butyrate as a substrate at 37 °C, the Km and Vmax of the enzyme were found to be 16.58 mM and 5.24 × 10(5)  μM · min(-1), respectively. This extracellular cold-adapted alkaline lipase may be a good candidate for detergents and biocatalysts at low temperature.

  12. Multiple approaches towards decolorization and reuse of a textile dye (VB-B) by a marine bacterium Shewanella decolorationis

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    SatheeshBabu, S.; Mohandass, C.; VijayRaj, A.S.; Rajasabapathy, R.; Dhale, M.A.

        1    Author version: Water Air Soil Pollut., vol.224(4); 2013; 1500 Multiple approaches towards decolorization and reuse of a textile dye (VB-B) by a marine bacterium Shewanella decolorationis S. Satheesh Babu, C.Mohandass*, A.S.Vijay Raj, R... in the ratio of 19:1 and the spots were visualized under UV chamber. 2.9 Statistical analysis Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA with turkey scheffe alpha multiple comparison test. Readings were considered significant when P was <0.05 by using Predicted...

  13. capA, a cspA-like gene that encodes a cold acclimation protein in the psychrotrophic bacterium Arthrobacter globiformis SI55.

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    Berger, F; Normand, P; Potier, P

    1997-09-01

    By use of Arthrobacter globiformis SI55, a psychrotrophic bacterium capable of growth between -5 and +32 degrees C, we cloned and sequenced capA, a gene homologous to cspA encoding the major cold shock protein in Escherichia coli. The deduced protein sequence has a high level of identity with the sequences of other CspA-related proteins from various sources, and no particular residue or domain that could be specific to cold-adapted microorganisms emerged. We show that CapA was produced very rapidly following cold shock, but unlike its mesophilic counterparts, it was still expressed during prolonged growth at low temperature. Its synthesis is regulated at the translational level, and we showed that growth resumption following a temperature downshift correlated with CapA expression. Transient inhibitions in protein synthesis during the first stages of the cold shock response severely impaired the subsequent acclimation of A. globiformis SI55 to low temperature and delayed CapA expression. The cold shock response in A. globiformis SI55 is an adaptative process in which CapA may play a crucial role. We suggest that low-temperature acclimation is conditioned mainly by the ability of cells to restore an active translational machinery after cold shock in a process that may be different from that present in mesophiles.

  14. Environmental adaptation: genomic analysis of the piezotolerant and psychrotolerant deep-sea iron reducing bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

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    Fengping Wang

    Full Text Available Shewanella species are widespread in various environments. Here, the genome sequence of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3, a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant iron reducing bacterium from deep-sea sediment was determined with related functional analysis to study its environmental adaptation mechanisms. The genome of WP3 consists of 5,396,476 base pairs (bp with 4,944 open reading frames (ORFs. It possesses numerous genes or gene clusters which help it to cope with extreme living conditions such as genes for two sets of flagellum systems, structural RNA modification, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA biosynthesis and osmolyte transport and synthesis. And WP3 contains 55 open reading frames encoding putative c-type cytochromes which are substantial to its wide environmental adaptation ability. The mtr-omc gene cluster involved in the insoluble metal reduction in the Shewanella genus was identified and compared. The two sets of flagellum systems were found to be differentially regulated under low temperature and high pressure; the lateral flagellum system was found essential for its motility and living at low temperature.

  15. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

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    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, T. J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-05-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37°C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18°C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37°C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  16. Metal Reduction and Iron Biomineralization by a Psychrotolerant Fe(III)-Reducing Bacterium, Shewanella sp. Strain PV-4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Yul; Gao, Haichun; Vali, Hojatollah; Kennedy, David W.; Yang, Zamin; Gao, Weimin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Stapleton, Raymond D.; Moon, Ji-Won; Phelps, Tommy J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-09-01

    A marine psychrotolerant, dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, from the microbial mat at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean has been further characterized, with emphases on metal reduction and iron biomineralization. The strain is able to reduce metals such as Fe(III), Co(III), Cr(VI), Mn(IV), and U(VI) as electron acceptors while using lactate, formate, pyruvate, or hydrogen as an electron donor. Growth during iron reduction occurred over the pH range of 7.0 to 8.9, a sodium chloride range of 0.05 to 5%, and a temperature range of 0 to 37 C, with an optimum growth temperature of 18 C. Unlike mesophilic dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, which produce mostly superparamagnetic magnetite (<35 nm), this psychrotolerant bacterium produces well-formed single-domain magnetite (>35 nm) at temperatures from 18 to 37 C. The genome size of this strain is about 4.5 Mb. Strain PV-4 is sensitive to a variety of commonly used antibiotics except ampicillin and can acquire exogenous DNA (plasmid pCM157) through conjugation.

  17. Exploring the roles of DNA methylation in the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bendall, Matthew L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Luong, Khai [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wetmore, Kelly M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Blow, Matthew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Korlach, Jonas [Pacific Biosciences, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Deutschbauer, Adam [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Malmstrom, Rex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-30

    We performed whole genome analyses of DNA methylation in Shewanella 17 oneidensis MR-1 to examine its possible role in regulating gene expression and 18 other cellular processes. Single-Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing 19 revealed extensive methylation of adenine (N6mA) throughout the 20 genome. These methylated bases were located in five sequence motifs, 21 including three novel targets for Type I restriction/modification enzymes. The 22 sequence motifs targeted by putative methyltranferases were determined via 23 SMRT sequencing of gene knockout mutants. In addition, we found S. 24 oneidensis MR-1 cultures grown under various culture conditions displayed 25 different DNA methylation patterns. However, the small number of differentially 26 methylated sites could not be directly linked to the much larger number of 27 differentially expressed genes in these conditions, suggesting DNA methylation is 28 not a major regulator of gene expression in S. oneidensis MR-1. The enrichment 29 of methylated GATC motifs in the origin of replication indicate DNA methylation 30 may regulate genome replication in a manner similar to that seen in Escherichia 31 coli. Furthermore, comparative analyses suggest that many 32 Gammaproteobacteria, including all members of the Shewanellaceae family, may 33 also utilize DNA methylation to regulate genome replication.

  18. New type of outer membrane vesicle produced by the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella vesiculosa M7T: implications for DNA content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cruz, Carla; Carrión, Ornella; Delgado, Lidia; Martinez, Gemma; López-Iglesias, Carmen; Mercade, Elena

    2013-03-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) from Gram-negative bacteria are known to be involved in lateral DNA transfer, but the presence of DNA in these vesicles has remained difficult to explain. An ultrastructural study of the Antarctic psychrotolerant bacterium Shewanella vesiculosa M7(T) has revealed that this Gram-negative bacterium naturally releases conventional one-bilayer OMVs through a process in which the outer membrane is exfoliated and only the periplasm is entrapped, together with a more complex type of OMV, previously undescribed, which on formation drag along inner membrane and cytoplasmic content and can therefore also entrap DNA. These vesicles, with a double-bilayer structure and containing electron-dense material, were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) after high-pressure freezing and freeze-substitution (HPF-FS), and their DNA content was fluorometrically quantified as 1.8 ± 0.24 ng DNA/μg OMV protein. The new double-bilayer OMVs were estimated by cryo-TEM to represent 0.1% of total vesicles. The presence of DNA inside the vesicles was confirmed by gold DNA immunolabeling with a specific monoclonal IgM against double-stranded DNA. In addition, a proteomic study of purified membrane vesicles confirmed the presence of plasma membrane and cytoplasmic proteins in OMVs from this strain. Our data demonstrate the existence of a previously unobserved type of double-bilayer OMV in the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella vesiculosa M7(T) that can incorporate DNA, for which we propose the name outer-inner membrane vesicle (O-IMV).

  19. Decolorization of textile azo dye and Congo red by an isolated strain of the dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Chen, Tingting; Lin, Rong; Zhang, Xia; Ni, Chao; Sun, Dongzhe

    2014-03-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis BC01 (SXM) was isolated from sediment collected off Xiamen, China and was identified based on the phylogenetic tree of 16S rRNA sequences and the gyrB gene. This strain showed high activity in the decolorization of textile azo dyes, especially methyl orange, reactive red 198, and recalcitrant dye Congo red, decolorizing at rates of 96.2, 93.0, and 87.5%, respectively. SXM had the best performance for the specific decolorization rate (SDR) of azo dyes compared to Proteus hauseri ZMd44 and Aeromonas hydrophila NIU01 strains and had an SDR similar to Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 in Congo red decolorization. Luria-Bertani medium was the optimal culture medium for SXM, as it reached a density of 4.69 g-DCW L(-1) at 16 h. A mediator (manganese) significantly enhanced the biodegradation and flocculation of Congo red. Further analysis with UV-VIS, Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy, and Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry demonstrated that Congo red was cleaved at the azo bond, producing 4,4'-diamino-1,1'-biphenyl and 1,2'-diamino naphthalene 4-sulfonic acid. Finally, SEM results revealed that nanowires exist between the bacteria, indicating that SXM degradation of the azo dyes was coupled with electron transfer through the nanowires. The purpose of this work is to explore the utilization of a novel, dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacterium in the treatment of wastewater containing azo dyes.

  20. A putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400: cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trindade, Inês B.; Fonseca, Bruno M. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal); Matias, Pedro M. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal); Instituto de Biologia Experimental e Tecnológica (iBET), Apartado 12, 2780-901 Oeiras (Portugal); Louro, Ricardo O.; Moe, Elin, E-mail: elinmoe@itqb.unl.pt [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Avenida da República (EAN), 2780-157 Oeiras (Portugal)

    2016-08-09

    The gene encoding a putative siderophore-interacting protein from the marine bacterium S. frigidimarina was successfully cloned, followed by expression and purification of the gene product. Optimized crystals diffracted to 1.35 Å resolution and preliminary crystallographic analysis is promising with respect to structure determination and increased insight into the poorly understood molecular mechanisms underlying iron acquisition. Siderophore-binding proteins (SIPs) perform a key role in iron acquisition in multiple organisms. In the genome of the marine bacterium Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB 400, the gene tagged as SFRI-RS12295 encodes a protein from this family. Here, the cloning, expression, purification and crystallization of this protein are reported, together with its preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis to 1.35 Å resolution. The SIP crystals belonged to the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 48.04, b = 78.31, c = 67.71 Å, α = 90, β = 99.94, γ = 90°, and are predicted to contain two molecules per asymmetric unit. Structure determination by molecular replacement and the use of previously determined ∼2 Å resolution SIP structures with ∼30% sequence identity as templates are ongoing.

  1. Gene cloning and sequence analysis of the cold-adapted chaperones DnaK and DnaJ from deep-sea psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM9913

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. SM9913 is a phychrotrophic bacterium isolated from the deep-sea sediment. The genes encoding chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of P. sp. SM9913 were cloned by normal PCR and TAIL-PCR (GenBank accession Nos DQ640312, DQ504163). The chaperones DnaJ and DnaK from the strain SM9913 contain such conserved domains as those of many other bacteria, and show some cold-adapted characteristics in their structures when compared with those from psychro-, meso-and themophilic bacteria. It is indicated that chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of P. sp. SM9913 may be adapted to low temperature in deep-sea and function well in assisting folding, assembling and translocation of proteins at low temperature. This research lays a foundation for the further study on the cold-adapted mechanism of chaperones DnaJ and DnaK of cold-adapted microorganisms.

  2. Interaction of the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 with phytopathogens in cold soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hennessy, Rosanna Catherine; Olsson, Stefan; Stougaard, Peter

    is disease suppressive owing to the presence of diverse antimicrobial microorganisms. Using culture-based approaches, the psychrotroph Pseudomonas fluorescens In5 was previously isolated from the soil microbiome. The aim of this study is to unravel key biocontrol traits underpinning the antagonistic activity...... of this cold-active bacterium against phytopathogens. Method: A combination of different technologies including genomics, transcriptomics and metabolomics are being used to explore the interaction of the psychrotroph P. fluorescens In5 in dual-culture with diverse plant pathogens. To date, molecular genetics...

  3. High-resolution structure of a type IV pilin from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorgel, Manuela; Ulstrup, Jakob; Bøggild, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    . Interestingly, our PilBac1 crystal structure reveals two unusual features compared to other type IVa pilins: an unusual position of the disulfide bridge and a straight α-helical section, which usually exhibits a pronounced kink. This straight helix leads to a distinct packing in a filament model of PilBac1...... based on an EM model of a Neisseria pilus. Conclusions In this study we have described the first structure of a pilin from Shewanella oneidensis. The structure possesses features of the common type IV pilin core, but also exhibits significant variations in the α-helical part and the D-region...

  4. Experimental study on reduction of U (Ⅵ) by an anaerobic bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens: Application to sandstone-hosted interlayer oxidation-zone type uranium deposits, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIN Maozhong; XU Huifang; L. L. Barton; PENG Xinjian; YIN Lin; WANG Rucheng

    2005-01-01

    An experimental study on reduction of U (Ⅵ) by anaerobic bacteria, Shewane//a putrefaciens, is first reported here in China. The experimental conditions were: 35℃ and pH =7.0-7.4, corresponding to a physicochemical environments in which the sandstone-hosted interlayer oxidation-zone type uranium deposit formed in Northwest China's Xinjiang. Bacteria adopted in the present experiment, Shewanella putrefaciens, occur extensively in natural environment. Our study shows that nano-crystal precipitates of uraninite quickly occurred on the surface of the cells within one week. It was found that the pitchblende was characterized by a random arrangement of uraninite nanocrystals (2-4 nm) in it, significantly different from natural pitchblende in which uraninite nanocrystals are arranged in order. Finally, a possible mechanism of uranium biomineralization by microorganisms in the deposits is discussed. Our investigation may supply a technical train of thoughts for bioremediation of nuclear-contaminated water environments and for underground dissolving extraction of the sandstone-hosted uranium ores.

  5. 南极嗜冷杆菌脂肪酶的原核可溶性表达优化及酶学性能表征%Optimized soluble expression and characterization of a cold-adapted lipase from psychrotrophic bacterium in Escherichia coli

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘弘忍; 王亮亮; 何琦阳; 王飞; 李迅

    2016-01-01

    Lipase is any enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of lipids, and is the subclass of the esterases. Given its ex⁃cellent functions, lipase plays an indispensable role in many industrial areas such as food processing and biodiesel prepa⁃ration. In this paper, in order to effectively improve the ulilization of lipase from microbes, a psychrophilic lipase gene from antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium, Psychrobacter sp. 7195 ( Lip7195) was cloned into the commercial plasmid pTrc99a by the methods of polymerase chain reaction ( PCR) and DNA restriction enzyme digestion as well as ligation. The recombinant lipase was chemically induced in the presence of isopropyl β⁃D⁃Thiogalactoside ( IPTG) and heterolo⁃gously expressed in Escherichia coli. The proportion of the soluble recombinant lipase was significantly enhanced by a se⁃ries of modifications at various levels including optimizing codon usage, incorporating polycationic amino acid tags. The engineered recombinant lipase showed the maximum activities at 40℃ and pH 9.0. The specific activity was determined as 10.9 U/mg. The thermal stability assay exhibited that Lip7195 was fairly thermally stable at the temperatures ranging from 30 to 40℃, and at the pH values from 8.0 to 10.0. The recombinant Lip7195 was chemically activated in the pres⁃ence of metal ion Co2+ under the assay conditions. The results indicate that these modifications can effectively decrease the formation of inclusion body in the protein biosynthesis process in E. coli. Apart from the decrease in the inclusion body of the desired protein, the biochemical property and catalytic ability of recombinant Lip7195 can be intactly main⁃tained after the relevant modifications.%脂肪酶广泛应用于食品加工、生物柴油制备等领域。为了有效提高微生物脂肪酶的可利用度,将来源于南极嗜冷杆菌属( antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium, Psychrobacter sp�7195)的嗜冷脂肪酶( Lip7195)在大肠杆

  6. Hydrolytic potential of a psychrotrophic Pseudomonas isolated from refrigerated raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula F. Corrêa

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The production of extracellular hydrolases by a psychrotrophic bacterium isolated from refrigerated raw milk, and identified as a Pseudomonas sp. belonging to the Pseudomonas jenssenii group, was studied. This bacterium produced proteolytic and lipolytic enzymes in all media investigated (skim milk, cheese whey, casein broth, and tryptone soy broth. High levels of α-glucosidase were produced in skim milk broth. Hydrolytic enzymes detected in skim milk broth are of particular concern, indicating that these enzymes could be produced by Pseudomonas sp. during the cold storage of raw milk, contributing to the spoilage problem in milk and dairy products.

  7. 极地适冷菌Pseudoalteromonas sp.QI-1产适冷蛋白酶发酵条件的优化%Optimization of cold-active protease production by polar psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp.QI-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国英; 林学政; 王能飞; 朱启忠

    2011-01-01

    The culture conditions of polar psychrotrophic bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. QI-1 were optimized for the production of cold-active protease. The optimum fermentation conditions were determined as follows: optimal temperatures for growth and enzyme production were both at 5 ℃, inoculation volume was 1% ,and liquid volume was 10% at pH 5. Culture medium for protease production of strain QI-1 was also studied. Results showed that nitrogen source and carbon source preferred by protease production were bran and sodium acetate. 2% NaC1,10 mmol/L Mg2+ ,0.5% Tween-80 and 0.75% casein were suitable for the enzyme production. The orthogonal experiment design showed that the optimum medium (per liter) consisted of 5 g bran,2.5 g yeast extract,3 g casein,3 g MgCl2 ·6H20 and 1.5 g KCl. Under the optimum condition, the protease activity was up to 166. 20 U/mL and the yield of protease increased about 56%.%对极地适冷菌Pseudoalteromonas sp.QI-1产适冷蛋白酶的发酵条件进行优化.结果表明:菌株QI-1的最适生长和产酶温度均为5℃;最佳接种量为1%;发酵培养基的最适初始pH和最佳装样量分别为5和10%;盐度为2%时对菌株的生长和产酶最为有利;麸皮和醋酸钠分别为最佳N源和C源;添加0.75%酪蛋白时菌株QI-1胞外蛋白酶的活性最高;10 mmol/L Mg2+和0.5%Tween-80有利于产酶.正交试验结果表明:菌株Pseudoalteromonas sp.QI-1产蛋白酶较佳培养基配方(g/L)为麸皮5,酵母粉2.5,酪蛋白3,MgCl2·6H2O3,KCl 1.5;发酵液比酶活为166.20 U/mL,较优化前提高了约56%.

  8. Case report and literature review of carbapenem resistant shewanella putrefaciens isolated from ascitic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baruah, Frincy Khandelwal; Grover, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Shewanella species are Gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacilli with the major phenotypic characteristic of production of large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Shewanella putrefaciens, primarily considered to be an environmental bacterium, is infrequently recovered from clinical specimens. Herein, we report a case of ascitic fluid infection with carbapenem resistant Shewanella putrefaciens in a patient with underlying liver disorder requiring repeated ascitic fluid tapping. Proper antibiotic therapy helped in complete recovery of the patient.

  9. Case Report and Literature Review of Carbapenem Resistant Shewanella Putrefaciens Isolated from Ascitic Fluid

    OpenAIRE

    Baruah, Frincy Khandelwal; Grover, Rajesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella species are Gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacilli with the major phenotypic characteristic of production of large amounts of hydrogen sulfide. Shewanella putrefaciens, primarily considered to be an environmental bacterium, is infrequently recovered from clinical specimens. Herein, we report a case of ascitic fluid infection with carbapenem resistant Shewanella putrefaciens in a patient with underlying liver disorder requiring repeated ascitic fluid tappi...

  10. Cerebellar abscess and meningitis, caused by Shewanella putrefaciens and Klebsiella pneumoniae, associated with chronic otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gurdal; Aydin, Kemalettin; Bektas, Devrim; Caylan, Rahmet; Caylan, Refik; Koksal, Iftihar

    2007-11-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a facultatively anaerobic, non-motile, Gram-negative, non-fermentative bacterium. It is found in various environments and has been isolated worldwide. S. putrefaciens is a rare cause of brain abscesses and meningitis. This is a case report of a cerebellar abscess and meningitis caused by Shewanella putrefaciens and Klebsiella pneumoniae in a river trap fisherman.

  11. 南极低温降解菌Shewanella sp. NJ49羟化酶分离纯化及最适产酶条件研究%Separation and purification of hydroxylase from Antarctic psychrophilic bacteriumShewanella sp. NJ49 and optimum conditions for its enzyme production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘芳明; 王以斌; 曲长凤; 梁强; 郑洲; 缪锦来; 肖天

    2016-01-01

    Hydroxylase is a key enzyme with respect to bacteria during hydrocarbon degradation. In this paper, we investigate the Antarctic psychrophilic bacteriumShewanella sp. NJ49. To obtain a single component of hydroxy-lase, we separated and purified hydroxylase from NJ49 in a series of steps, i.e., ammonium sulfate precipitation, ultrafiltration concentration, and column chromatography with Sephadex G-75 as the column media. In addition, we studied the relationships between the activity of NJ49 hydroxylase and environmental factors such as temperature, pH, surfactant, and salinity. We found that purified hydroxylase comprised subunitsα,β, andγ, with estimated molecular masses of 56, 45, and 36 kD, respectively. The optimum conditions for producing NJ49 hydroxylase were a temperature of 15℃, a pH of 7.2, and a salinity of 55‰. Different types of surfactants had different effects on enzyme activity. Although individual amphoteric, cationic, and nonionic surfactants did not inhibit enzyme activity, a mixture of anionic and nonionic surfactants, as well as a mixture of cationic and nonionic surfactants, improved the activity of the hydroxylase.%羟化酶是细菌降解烷烃的关键酶,本文以南极低温降解菌Shewanella sp. NJ49为研究对象,通过硫酸铵沉淀、超滤浓缩及葡聚糖凝胶Sephadex G-75柱层析方法,分离纯化NJ49的羟化酶,获得了单一羟化酶组分,研究了温度、pH、表面活性剂和盐度等环境因素对 NJ49羟化酶酶活活性影响。结果表明,羟化酶组分由α、β、γ三个亚基组成,分子质量分别为56,45和36 kD。NJ49最适产酶条件为:温度15℃、pH7.2、盐度55;不同类型表面活性剂对酶的活性影响效应不一,两性离子表面活性剂、阳离子表面活性剂、非离子表面活性剂对酶活没有作用,阴离子表面活性剂+非离子表面活性剂混和剂和阳离子表面活性剂+非离子表面活性剂混和剂能提高羟化酶的活性。

  12. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analysis of Meat-Spoilage-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus piscium MKFS47

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Johansson, Per; Laine, Pia; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Sonck, Matti; Rahkila, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Elina; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2015-01-01

    Lactococcus piscium is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium and is known to be one of the predominant species within spoilage microbial communities in cold-stored packaged foods, particularly in meat products...

  13. Biogenic Formation of As-S Nanotubes by Diverse Shewanella Strains▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Myung, Nosang V.; Fredrickson, James K.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2009-01-01

    Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 was previously shown to produce novel, photoactive, As-S nanotubes via the reduction of As(V) and S2O32− under anaerobic conditions. To determine if this ability was unique to this bacterium, 10 different Shewanella strains, including Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, Shewanella alga BrY, Shewanella amazonensis SB2B, Shewanella denitrificans OS217, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, S. putrefaciens IR-1, S. putrefaciens SP200, and S. putrefaciens W3-6-1, were examined for production of As-S nanotubes under standardized conditions. Of the 10 strains examined, three formed As-S nanotubes like those of strain HN-41. While Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 and S. putrefaciens CN-32 rapidly formed As-S precipitates in 7 days, strains S. alga BrY and S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced As(V) at a much lower rate and formed yellow As-S after 30 days. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy analyses showed that the morphological and chemical properties of As-S formed by strains S. putrefaciens CN-32, S. alga BrY, and S. oneidensis MR-1 were similar to those previously determined for Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 As-S nanotubes. These studies indicated that the formation of As-S nanotubes is widespread among Shewanella strains and is closely related to bacterial growth and the reduction rate of As(V) and thiosulfate. PMID:19717628

  14. Biogenic formation of As-S nanotubes by diverse Shewanella strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Myung, Nosang V; Fredrickson, James K; Sadowsky, Michael J; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2009-11-01

    Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 was previously shown to produce novel, photoactive, As-S nanotubes via the reduction of As(V) and S(2)O(3)(2-) under anaerobic conditions. To determine if this ability was unique to this bacterium, 10 different Shewanella strains, including Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, Shewanella alga BrY, Shewanella amazonensis SB2B, Shewanella denitrificans OS217, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, S. putrefaciens IR-1, S. putrefaciens SP200, and S. putrefaciens W3-6-1, were examined for production of As-S nanotubes under standardized conditions. Of the 10 strains examined, three formed As-S nanotubes like those of strain HN-41. While Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 and S. putrefaciens CN-32 rapidly formed As-S precipitates in 7 days, strains S. alga BrY and S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced As(V) at a much lower rate and formed yellow As-S after 30 days. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy analyses showed that the morphological and chemical properties of As-S formed by strains S. putrefaciens CN-32, S. alga BrY, and S. oneidensis MR-1 were similar to those previously determined for Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 As-S nanotubes. These studies indicated that the formation of As-S nanotubes is widespread among Shewanella strains and is closely related to bacterial growth and the reduction rate of As(V) and thiosulfate.

  15. Biogenic formation of As-S nanotubes by diverse Shewanella strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Min-Gyu; Myung, Nosang V.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Sadowsky, Michael J.; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2009-11-01

    Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 was previously shown to produce novel, photoactive, As-S nanotubes via the reduction of As(V) and S2O3 2* under anaerobic conditions. To determine if this ability was unique to this bacterium, 10 different Shewanella strains, including Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, Shewanella sp. strain PV-4, Shewanella alga BrY, Shewanella amazonensis SB2B, Shewanella denitrificans OS217, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, S. putrefaciens IR-1, S. putrefaciens SP200, and S. putrefaciens W3-6-1, were examined for production of As-S nanotubes under standardized conditions. Of the 10 strains examined, three formed As-S nanotubes like those of strain HN-41. While Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 and S.putrefaciens CN-32 rapidly formed As-S precipitates in 7 days, strains S. alga BrY and S. oneidensis MR-1 reduced As(V) at a much lower rate and formed yellow As-S after 30 days. Electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy analyses showed that the morphological and chemical properties of As-S formed by strains S. putrefaciens CN-32, S. alga BrY, and S. oneidensis MR-1 were similar to those previously determined for Shewanella sp. strain HN-41 As-S nanotubes. These studies indicated that the formation of As-S nanotubes is widespread among Shewanella strains and is closely related to bacterial growth and the reduction rate of As(V) and thiosulfate.

  16. Psychrotrophic bacteria in milk: How much do we really know?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Gislene B.; Favarin, Luciana; Luchese, Rosa H.; McIntosh, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of psychrotrophic bacteria in raw milk is studied worldwide due to the difficulties associated with controlling their growth during cold storage and the consequent negative effects upon fluid milk or dairy products. Among the psychrotrophic bacteria, the genus Pseudomonas (represented primarily by P. fluorescens) has been highlighted as the cause of numerous defects in dairy products. In light of its perceived predominance, this species has frequently been chosen as a model organism to assess the effects of psychrotrophic bacteria on milk or to evaluate the efficacy of control measures. However, recent findings derived from the application of molecular biological techniques have exposed a number of deficiencies in our knowledge of the biology of milk-associated psychrotrophs. Furthermore, it has been revealed that microbe to microbe communication plays a significant role in determining both the identities and the extent to which different groups of microbes develop during cold storage. The application of molecular identification methods has exposed errors in the classification of members of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from cold stored milk and has stimulated a reevaluation of the presumed status of P. fluorescens as the predominant milk-associated psychrotrophic species. This article presents a succinct review of data from studies on psychrotrophic bacteria in milk, some of which contest established theories in relation to the microbiology of cold stored raw milk, and poses the question: how much do we really know? PMID:26273245

  17. Psychrotrophic bacteria in milk: How much do we really know?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gislene B. de Oliveira

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of psychrotrophic bacteria in raw milk is studied worldwide due to the difficulties associated with controlling their growth during cold storage and the consequent negative effects upon fluid milk or dairy products. Among the psychrotrophic bacteria, the genus Pseudomonas (represented primarily by P. fluorescens has been highlighted as the cause of numerous defects in dairy products. In light of its perceived predominance, this species has frequently been chosen as a model organism to assess the effects of psychrotrophic bacteria on milk or to evaluate the efficacy of control measures. However, recent findings derived from the application of molecular biological techniques have exposed a number of deficiencies in our knowledge of the biology of milk-associated psychrotrophs. Furthermore, it has been revealed that microbe to microbe communication plays a significant role in determining both the identities and the extent to which different groups of microbes develop during cold storage. The application of molecular identification methods has exposed errors in the classification of members of the genus Pseudomonas isolated from cold stored milk and has stimulated a reevaluation of the presumed status of P. fluorescens as the predominant milk-associated psychrotrophic species. This article presents a succinct review of data from studies on psychrotrophic bacteria in milk, some of which contest established theories in relation to the microbiology of cold stored raw milk, and poses the question: how much do we really know?

  18. Psychrotrophic metal tolerant bacteria for mobilisation of metals in Antarctic waters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gonsalves, M.J.B.D.

    Cold tolerant psychrotrophic bacteria abound in the Antarctic waters. While Antarctic krills are known to concentrate heavy metals at ppm levels, psychrotrophic bacteria from Antarctic fresh and marine waters have been reported to tolerate them...

  19. Shewanella putrefaciens infective endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, Jonathan; Chernev, Ivan; Gomez, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes infection in humans. In the last few decades a growing number of cases have been described. The following report outlines the case of a 40-year-old immunocompetent white man with S. putrefaciens infective endocarditis. This is the first known case of infective endocarditis due to an apparently monomicrobial S. putrefaciens infection, and the second known case of S. putrefaciens-related infective endocarditis worldwide. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Shewanella putrefaciens infective endocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Constant

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens rarely causes infection in humans. In the last few decades a growing number of cases have been described. The following report outlines the case of a 40-year- old immunocompetent white man with S. putrefaciens infective endocarditis. This is the first known case of infective endocarditis due to an apparently monomicrobial S. putrefaciens infection, and the second known case of S. putrefaciens-related infective endocarditis worldwide.

  1. Studies of iron-uptake mechanisms in two bacterial species of the shewanella genus adapted to middle-range (Shewanella putrefaciens) or antarctic (Shewanella gelidimarina) temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pakchung, Amalie A H; Soe, Cho Z; Codd, Rachel

    2008-10-01

    Iron(III)-uptake mechanisms in bacteria indigenous to the Antarctic, which is the most Fe-deficient continent on Earth, have not been extensively studied. The cold-adapted, Antarctic bacterium, Shewanella gelidimarina, does not produce detectable levels of the siderophore, putrebactin, in the supernatant of Fe(III)-deprived cultures. This is distinct from the putrebactin-producing bacterium from the same genus, Shewanella putrefaciens, which is adapted to middle-range temperatures. The production of putrebactin by S. putrefaciens is optimal, when the pH value of the medium is 7.0. According to the strong positive response from whole cells in the Chrome Azurol S (CAS) agar diffusion assay, Shewanella gelidimarina appears to produce cell-associated siderophores. In the RP-HPLC trace of an Fe(III)-loaded extract from the cell-associated components of S. gelidimarina cultured in media with [Fe(III)] ca. 0 microM, a peak appears at [MeCN] ca. 77%, which decreases in intensity in a parallel experiment in which [Fe(III)] ca. 5 microM, and is barely detectable in Fe(III)-replete media ([Fe(III)] ca. 20 microM). The Fe(III)-dependence of this peak suggests that the attendant species, which is significantly more hydrophobic than putrebactin (RP-HPLC elution: [MeCN] ca. 14%), is associated with Fe(III)-management in S. gelidimarina. This study highlights the diversity in Fe(III)-uptake mechanisms in Shewanella species adapted to different environmental and thermal niches.

  2. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chubar, N.; Visser, T.; Avramut, C.; de Waard, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Mn(II) by viable and inactivated cells of Shewanella putrefaciens, a non-pathogenic, facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium characterised as a Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reducer, was studied under aerobic conditions, as a function of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During

  3. Removal of U(VI) from aqueous solutions using Shewanella sp. RCRI7, isolated from Qurugoel Lake in Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdehvand, Adib Zaheri; Keshtkar, Alireza; Fatemi, Faezeh [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School; Tarhiz, Vahideh; Hejazi, Mohammad Saeid [Tabriz Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Molecular Medicine Research Center

    2017-04-01

    Isolation, genotypic and phenotypic characterization of an aqueous bacterium, Shewanella sp RCRI7, from Qurugoel Lake in Iran and uranium removal from aqueous solutions using the isolate is described. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and phylogenetic tree, strain RCRI7{sup T} falls into genus Shewanella. Closely related type strains include Shewanella xiamenensis S4{sup T} KJ542801, Shewanella profunda DSM15900{sup T} FR733713, Shewanella putrefaciens LMG 26268{sup T} X81623 and Shewanella oneidensis MR-1{sup T} AE014299. Anaerobic incubation of the bacteria in the presence of U(VI) led to uranium removal from the solution and formation of a black precipitate. Analysis of the precipitate using UV-vis confirmed the reduction of U(VI) to U(IV). The effects of pH, temperature, U(VI) concentration and cell density on uranium removal were elucidated. The maximum uranium removal was 97%. As a conclusion, the findings revealed the ability of the local strain RCRI7 for U(VI) bioreduction as an effective bacterium for uranium immobilization.

  4. Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens: clinical and microbiological characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, H M; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Bruun, B

    2005-05-01

    The occurrence of the two Shewanella species found in clinical specimens, Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens, correlates with the temperature and salinity of seawater. This means that Shewanella infections occur in warm climates or during especially warm summers in temperate climates. The infections described most commonly involve ears, skin and soft tissue, with or without bacteraemia. Primary bacteraemia with a fulminant course is also seen in immunocompromised patients. Important differential characteristics between the two species include the ability of S. algae to produce mucoid colonies with beta-haemolysis on sheep blood agar, to grow at 42 degrees C and in NaCl 6% w/v, and to reduce nitrite, and an inability to produce acid from maltose, all of which are in contrast to the characteristics of S. putrefaciens. Automated identification systems fail to differentiate between S. algae and S. putrefaciens, as S. algae is not included in the databases of these systems. Presumably for this reason, most Shewanella infections reported during recent years have been attributed to S. putrefaciens. However, when extensive phenotypic characterisation is performed, most human infections are seen to be caused by S. algae. As the two species seem to have different pathogenic potential for humans, correct identification is important, and this is possible in routine clinical microbiology laboratories.

  5. Shewanella loihica sp. nov., isolated from iron-rich microbial mats in the Pacific Ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Haichun; Obraztova, Anna; Stewart, Nathan; Popa, Radu; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Tiedje, James M.; Nealson, Kenneth; Zhou, Jizhong

    2006-08-28

    A novel marine bacterial strain, PV-4T, isolated from a microbial mat located at a hydrothermal vent of Loihi Seamount in the Pacific Ocean, has been characterized. This micro-organism is orange in color, Gram-negative, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic and psychrotolerant (temperature range, 0-42 C). No growth was observed with nitrate, nitrite, DMSO or thiosulfate as the electron acceptor and lactate as the electron donor. The major fatty acid detected in strain PV-4T was iso-C15 : 0. Strain PV-4T had ubiquinones consisting mainly of Q-7 and Q-8, and possessed menaquinone MK-7. The DNA G+C content of the strain was 53.8 mol% and the genome size was about 4.5 Mbp. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA gene sequences placed PV-4T within the genus Shewanella. PV-4T exhibited 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity levels of 99.6 and 97.5 %, respectively, with respect to the type strains of Shewanella aquimarina and Shewanella marisflavi. DNA from strain PV-4T showed low mean levels of relatedness to the DNAs of S. aquimarina (50.5%) and S. marisflavi (8.5%). On the basis of phylogenetic and phenotypic characteristics, the bacterium was classified in the genus Shewanella within a distinct novel species, for which the name Shewanella loihica sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is PV-4T (=ATCC BAA-1088T=DSM 17748T).

  6. Psychrotrophic ~Iydrolytic Bacteria from Antarctica &,Other I. Low Temperature Habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V. Ramana

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Samples of water, soil,llake sediments and blue-green algal mats from Antarctica were'processed for enumeration, isolation and screening of psychrotrophic hydrolytic bacteria. Amylolytic bacteria were preponderant (75 per cent in the blue-green algal htat samples. Protease, lipase, an1ylase and urerse producing/bacteria were also isolated from the samples. ,Biochemical characteristics indicated that the isolates ;mainly comprised Pseudomonas and Bacillus species. Proteases and lipases of antarctic bacterial strains preferably hydrolysed denatured protein substrate and water soluble monomeric synthetic lipid substrates, respectively.

  7. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cyclin...

  8. Shewanella putrefaciens bacteraemia associated with terminal ileitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yiallouros, Panagiotis; Mavri, Antonia; Attilakos, Achilleas; Moustaki, Maria; Leontsini, Fani; Karpathios, Themistocles

    2013-08-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens has a wide geographical distribution, including sea- and fresh water, fish and soil, but it is an unusual pathogen in humans. A previously healthy boy without known immunodeficiency presented with fever, abdominal pain and diarrhoea, and a mass in the right lower quadrant. Terminal ileitis was confirmed by MRI and Shewanella putrefaciens was isolated from two separate blood cultures. This is the first report of terminal ileitis associated with Shewanella putrefaciens septicaemia.

  9. Physiological and Growth Characteristics of Shewanella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    282–287. 29. Dawood B. 1998. Corrosion-enhancing potential of Shewanella putrefaciens isolated from industrial cooling waters. J Appl Microbiol. 84...AFCEC-CX-TY-TR-2016-0016 PHYSIOLOGICAL AND GROWTH CHARACTERISTICS OF SHEWANELLA SPECIES Karen Farrington, D. Matthew Eby, Susan Sizemore...Technical Report 01 March 2012 - 01 March 2014 Physiological and growth characteristics of Shewanella species FA4819-11-C-0003 Karen Farrington (1

  10. Biochemical and Pathogenic Properties of Shewanella alga and Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khashe, Shideh; Janda, J. Michael

    1998-01-01

    We characterized 49 strains of Shewanella spp. from clinical (n = 31) and nonhuman (n = 18) sources. Most Shewanella alga organisms (Gilardi biovar 2; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC] biotype 2) originated from clinical material (92%), failed to produce acid from carbohydrates other than d-ribose, and were biochemically and enzymatically fairly homogeneous. In contrast, Shewanella putrefaciens organisms (Gilardi biovars 1 and 3; CDC biotype 1) were more often associated with nonhuman sources (70%), were able to utilize a number of sugars (sucrose, l-arabinose, and maltose), and were found to exhibit wider variations in biochemical characteristics; three biotypes within S. putrefaciens were detected. Notable differences between the two species in enzymatic activity, determined with the API-ZYM system (bioMérieux, Hazelwood, Mo.), and cellular fatty acid profiles, determined by the MIDI system (Microbial ID Inc., Newark, Del.), were also detected. Pathogenicity studies of mice indicate that S. alga appears to be the more virulent species, possibly due to the production of a hemolytic substance. PMID:9508312

  11. Detection of carotenoids in psychrotrophic bacteria by spectroscopic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti Kushwaha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The combination of Raman and Infrared spectroscopic signatures were used to find the different vibrational modes of individual carotenoid as their spectral fingerprint. Both have been previously demonstrated to be highly useful methodology for the identification and/or typing of microorganisms. In this study, we set out to evaluate whether these technologies could be applied to detect the presence of carotenoids in psychrotrophic bacterial isolates. FTIR and Raman spectra of four psychrotrophic bacteria viz. Kocuria rosea, K. turfanensis, Sanguibacter suarezii and Planococcus maritimus were examined during the investigation. FTIR spectra bands at 1653-1661cm-1 in different samples were assigned as part of chlorophyll, 1424-1426 cm-1 as -C-H- (CH2 bending vibration from methylene of carotenoids or lycopene, 1366-1367 cm-1 band as the -ionone ring of β-carotene due to the C-H, (–CH3 symmetrical bending. Interestingly, Raman spectra revealed intense Raman bands in the range of 1511-1530, 1153-1159 and 1003-1010 cm-1 representing bacterial carotenoids. We hypothesize the biosynthesis of carotenoid as adaptive strategy to cope up inhospitable cold environments of Leh and Ladakh. The strong, scattering bands by different isolates attributable to ν(C=C phase stretching, ν(C-C and δ(C-CH3 methyl components systems, which could be probably membrane-associated C50 carotenoids. Their high intensities are due to resonance enhancement. It can be concluded that Raman spectroscopy is a sensitive and convenient detection tool for typing of the bacterial biomarkers with less time consumption.

  12. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    TIEDJE, JAMES M; KONSTANTINIDIS, KOSTAS; WORDEN, MARK

    2014-01-08

    The aim of the work reported is to study Shewanella population genomics, and to understand the evolution, ecophysiology, and speciation of Shewanella. The tasks supporting this aim are: to study genetic and ecophysiological bases defining the core and diversification of Shewanella species; to determine gene content patterns along redox gradients; and to Investigate the evolutionary processes, patterns and mechanisms of Shewanella.

  13. Towards Environmental Systems Biology of Shewanella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Romine, Margaret F.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Auchutung, Jennifer M.; Driscoll, Michael E.; Gardner, Timothy S.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Osterman, Andrei L.; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Reed, Jennifer L.; Rodionov, Dmitry; Rodrigues, Jorge L.M.; Saffarini, Daad; Serres, Margrethe H.; Spormann, Alfred M.; Zhulin, Igor B.; Tiedje, James M.

    2008-07-07

    Abstract: Shewanella are known for versatility in their electron accepting capacities, which allow them to couple decomposition of organic matter to reduction of the variety of terminal electron acceptors encountered in the stratified environments they inhabit. Due to their diverse metabolic capabilities, shewanellae play important roles in carbon cycling and have considerable potential for remediation of contaminated environments and use in microbial fuel cells. Systems-level analysis of the model species, S. oneidensis MR-1, and other members of this genus have provided significant insights into the signal transduction proteins, regulators, and metabolic and respiratory subsystems governing the remarkable versatility of the shewanellae.

  14. Psychrotrophic clostridia causing spoilage in cooked meat and poultry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinowski, R M; Tompkin, R B

    1999-07-01

    Certain types of commercially produced noncured turkey breast and roast beef are precooked in situ, stored at 4 degrees C or below, and typically given use by dates of greater than 50 days. While of rare, sporadic occurrence, an unpleasant spoilage characterized by strong H2S odor and gas production has been observed in these products. This spoilage is due to the growth of psychrotrophic anaerobic sporeformers. Isolates from roast beef resemble Clostridium laramie while isolates from uncured turkey have been designated C. ctm for cooked turkey meat. The turkey breast isolates were characterized by temperature growth ranges, carbohydrate fermentations, and other biochemical reactions. Growth of all isolates was inhibited in broth media by 3.0% NaCl, 100 ppm nitrite, 2.0% sodium lactate, or 0.2% sodium diacetate. Inoculated studies were performed with three isolates in cooked turkey product. All three isolates grew and spoiled product at 10 and 3.3 degrees C, and one isolate grew at 0.5 and -3 degrees C. Some differences in growth were observed with the lactate and diacetate treatments in turkey meat among the three isolates. One isolate appeared to utilize the lactate, two were inhibited. Overall, 0.1% diacetate consistently delayed growth, although to different degrees, for all isolates.

  15. Insights on nitrate respiration by Shewanella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengping eWang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanellae are well known for their ability to utilize a number of electron acceptors and are therefore considered to have important roles in element cycling in the environment, such as nitrogen cycling through dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonia (DNRA and denitrification. Possessing two periplasmic nitrate reductase systems (NAP-α and NAP-β is a special trait of the Shewanella genus, and both enzymes are likely to provide selective advantage to the host. This review relates the current knowledge and aspects of the nitrate respiration system of Shewanella. Specifically, the potential physiological functions and regulation mechanisms of the duo-NAP system are discussed in addition to the evolution of anaerobic respiration systems of Shewanella.

  16. [Selective-differential nutrient medium "Shewanella IRHLS agar" for isolation of Shewanella genus bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivolodsky, E P

    2015-01-01

    Development of a selective-differential nutrient medium for isolation of Shewanella genus bacteria. 73 strains of Shewanella bacteria (S. algae--3, S. baltica--26, S. putrefaciens--44) and 80 strains of 22 other bacteria genera were used. Shewanella species were identified by methods and criteria proposed by Nozue H. et al., 1992; Khashe S. et al., 1998. Nutrient media "Shewanella IRHLS Agar" for shewanella isolation was developed. Medium selective factors: irgazan DP-300 (I). 0.14-0.2 g/l and rifampicin (R) 0.0005-0.001 g/l. Shevanella colonies were detected by the production of hydrogen sulfide (H), lipase presence (L), lack of sorbitol fermentation (S). The medium suppressed the growth of hydrogen sulfide producers (Salmonella, Proteus) and blocked hydrogen sulfide production by Citrobacter. Growth of Escherichia, Enterobacter, Klebsiella, Shigella, Staphylococcus, Bacillus was also suppressed, Analytical sensitivity of the medium was 1-2 CFU/ml for Shewanella and Stenotrophomonas, Aerombnas, Serratia genera bacteria. 72 strains of Shewanella were isolated from water of Neva river in this medium, 91.7 ± 3.2% of those produced H2S. 1 strain of S. algae was isolated from clinical material. The developed media allows to use it in a complex for Stenotrophomo- nas sp., Aeromonas sp., Serratia sp., Citrobactersp. and Shewanella bacteria isolation.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a novel violacein-like pigment producing psychrotrophic bacterial species Janthinobacterium svalbardensis sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrožič Avguštin, Jerneja; Žgur Bertok, Darja; Kostanjšek, Rok; Avguštin, Gorazd

    2013-04-01

    A bacterial strain designated JA-1, related to Janthinobacterium lividum, was isolated from glacier ice samples from the island Spitsbergen in the Arctic. The strain was tested for phenotypic traits and the most prominent appeared to be the dark red brown to black pigmentation different from the violet pigment of Janthinobacterium, Chromobacterium and Iodobacter. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequences and DNA-DNA hybridization tests showed that strain JA-1 belongs to the genus Janthinobacterium but represents a novel lineage distinct from the two known species of this genus, J. lividum and Janthinobacterium agaricidamnosum. The DNA G + C content of strain JA-1 was determined to be 62.3 mol %. The isolate is a psychrotrophic Gram negative bacterium, rod-shaped with rounded ends, containing intracellular inclusions and one polar flagellum. On the basis of the presented results strain JA-1 is proposed as the type strain of a novel species of the genus Janthinobacterium, for which the name Janthinobacterium svalbardensis sp. nov. is proposed (JA-1(T) = DSM 25734, ZIM B637).

  18. Extracellular cold active lipase from the psychrotrophic Halomonas sp. BRI 8 isolated from the Antarctic sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipra Vijay Jadhav

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An extracellular cold active lipase-producing psychrotrophic bacterium (BRI 8 was isolated from the Antarctic sea water sample. The 16s rRNA sequence study revealed that the isolate belongs to the genus Halomonas (929 bp. The present paper reports optimization of fermentation conditions for production of lipase (EC 3.1.1.3 from Halomonas sp. BRI 8. Highest lipase production was observed in the medium containing olive oil and peptone. The optimum pH and temperature for enzyme catalysis were 7.0 and 10°C respectively. The enzyme was relatively more stable in acidic pH range and retained 50% activity when incubated at 30°C for 1 h. The enzyme was stable in various organic solvents and showed more than 100% activity in presence of isoamyl alcohol. Significant enzyme activity was also observed in the presence of metal ions and detergents. The molecular mass of partially purified lipase was found to be around 66 kD.

  19. Identification and biotechnological potential of psychrotrophic marine isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swanandi Pote

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Importance of microbial metabolites in food, detergent, pharmaceutical, nutraceutical and cosmetic industries has now been widely established. To fulfill the requirement of these industries, psychrophilic/psychrotrophic marine microbes are being explored. These microbes help in the production of metabolites that are active and stable at extreme physiological conditions. In correlation with this scenario, the present study reports identification of 14 bacterial isolates (BRI 32- BRI 45 from marine water samples (out of which 4 are Antarctic with emphasis on their biotechnologically important characters. Materials and Methods: Bacterial isolates were identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Growth of the isolates under different physiological conditions of temperature (10°C to 45°C, pH (3-10 and concentration of NaCl (0-20% was studied. Further, the isolates were examined for their ability to produce i polyunsaturated fatty acids, ii industrially important enzymes and their potential to produce bio-surfactant. Results: 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis revealed that the isolates belonged to Halomonas, Brevibacillus, Kocuria and Oceanobacillus genera. Our results indicated that the isolates could grow over a wide range of physiological conditions of pH (3-10, temperature (10-45°C and NaCl concentration. Eight out of 14 isolates showed the presence of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids. BRI 34 was found to produce significant amounts of eicosapentaenoic acid (39.66%. Most of the isolates exhibited the ability to produce 3 or 4 enzymes. Only BRI 35 showed potential for biosurfactant production.

  20. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jizhong; He, Zhili

    2014-04-08

    As a part of the Shewanella Federation project, we have used integrated genomic, proteomic and computational technologies to study various aspects of energy metabolism of two Shewanella strains from a systems-level perspective.

  1. Integrated genome-based studies of Shewanella ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segre Daniel; Beg Qasim

    2012-02-14

    This project was a component of the Shewanella Federation and, as such, contributed to the overall goal of applying the genomic tools to better understand eco-physiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of Shewanella genus. Our role at Boston University was to perform bioreactor and high throughput gene expression microarrays, and combine dynamic flux balance modeling with experimentally obtained transcriptional and gene expression datasets from different growth conditions. In the first part of project, we designed the S. oneidensis microarray probes for Affymetrix Inc. (based in California), then we identified the pathways of carbon utilization in the metal-reducing marine bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, using our newly designed high-density oligonucleotide Affymetrix microarray on Shewanella cells grown with various carbon sources. Next, using a combination of experimental and computational approaches, we built algorithm and methods to integrate the transcriptional and metabolic regulatory networks of S. oneidensis. Specifically, we combined mRNA microarray and metabolite measurements with statistical inference and dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA) to study the transcriptional response of S. oneidensis MR-1 as it passes through exponential, stationary, and transition phases. By measuring time-dependent mRNA expression levels during batch growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 under two radically different nutrient compositions (minimal lactate and nutritionally rich LB medium), we obtain detailed snapshots of the regulatory strategies used by this bacterium to cope with gradually changing nutrient availability. In addition to traditional clustering, which provides a first indication of major regulatory trends and transcription factors activities, we developed and implemented a new computational approach for Dynamic Detection of Transcriptional Triggers (D2T2). This new method allows us to infer a putative topology of transcriptional dependencies

  2. Recovery of Elemental Palladium by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akasaka, S.; Xia, X.; Sawada, K.; Enokida, Y.; Yamamoto, I.; Ohnuki, T.

    2006-12-01

    Microbial reduction of metals plays an important role in environmental behavior and provides a technique for the recovery of metals from industrial wastewater. Recently, demand for platinum group metals (PGMs) increases by their catalytic properties. The extreme rarity of PGMs have led to a growing interest in their recovery. Palladium, one of PGMs, has different oxidation states of Pd(II) and Pd(0). The oxidized form of Pd(II) is soluble, while the reduced form of Pd(0) is insoluble. In this study, microbial reduction of palladium by Fe(III)- reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaceins was conducted. This bacterium is known to be capable of reducing metals, such as Mn(IV), U(VI), or Tc(VII) with organic C or H2 as an electron donor. In order to investigate the potential of S. putrefaciens to reduce Pd(II) in solution, resting cells or heat-killed cells were suspended under anaerobic conditions with lactate or H2 as an electron donor. The cells of S. putrefaciens (NBRC3908) were grown in aerobic medium, harvested by centrifugation, and then washed with 25 mmol/dm3 HEPES and 100 mmol/dm3 NaCl (HEPES-NaCl) solution (pH 7.0). The heat-killed cells were autoclaved for 20 min at 121 degrees C. The cell suspension (21.5 mg in dry weight) was resuspended in the HEPES-NaCl solution which contained 1.0 mmol/dm3 Na2PdCl4 (Wako Pure chemical Industries, Ltd). The suspensions were bubbled with N2 for 15 min before 10 mmol/dm3 lactate or 4.8 v/v% H2 was added. The suspensions were then incubated at 30 degrees C. Redox potential (Eh) and pH of the solutions were measured in an inert glove box with Ar gas. Concentration of Pd(II) was measured by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES). Deposited Pd and cells were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) with Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). Approximately 86% of Pd(II) of the initial concentration was removed from solution by the resting cells within 24 h when

  3. Organoarsenical Biotransformations by Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Rosen, Barry P

    2016-08-02

    Microbes play a critical role in the global arsenic biogeocycle. Most studies have focused on redox cycling of inorganic arsenic in bacteria and archaea. The parallel cycles of organoarsenical biotransformations are less well characterized. Here we describe organoarsenical biotransformations in the environmental microbe Shewanella putrefaciens. Under aerobic growth conditions, S. putrefaciens reduced the herbicide MSMA (methylarsenate or MAs(V)) to methylarsenite (MAs(III)). Even though it does not contain an arsI gene, which encodes the ArsI C-As lyase, S. putrefaciens demethylated MAs(III) to As(III). It cleaved the C-As bond in aromatic arsenicals such as the trivalent forms of the antimicrobial agents roxarsone (Rox(III)), nitarsone (Nit(III)) and phenylarsenite (PhAs(III)), which have been used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. S. putrefaciens thiolated methylated arsenicals, converting MAs(V) into the more toxic metabolite monomethyl monothioarsenate (MMMTAs(V)), and transformed dimethylarsenate (DMAs(V)) into dimethylmonothioarsenate (DMMTAs(V)). It also reduced the nitro groups of Nit(V), forming p-aminophenyl arsenate (p-arsanilic acid or p-AsA(V)), and Rox(III), forming 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzylarsonate (3A4HBzAs(V)). Elucidation of organoarsenical biotransformations by S. putrefaciens provides a holistic appreciation of how these environmental pollutants are degraded.

  4. Psychrotrophic bacteria and their negative effects on milk and dairy products quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimun Zamberlin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The characteristics of bacterial populations in raw milk at the time of processing has a significant influence on shelf-life, organoleptic quality, spoilage and yields of raw milk, processed milk as well as on the other dairy products. Unfortunately, cold and extended storage of raw milk, as a common practice in dairy sector today, favour the growth of psychrotrophic bacteria. Therefore, their count in the refrigerated milk is more than the ideal limit of 10 % of the mesophilic count. Psychrotrophic bacteria are generally able to form extracellular or intracellular thermo-resistant enzymes (proteases, lipases, phospolipases which can contribute to milk and dairy products spoilage. In addition, besides exhibiting spoilage features, some species belonging to the psychrotrops are considered as emerging pathogens that carry innate resistance to antibiotics or produce toxins. In sense of quality, psychrotrophic bacteria have become major problem for today’s dairy industry as leading cause in spoilage of cold-storage milk and dairy products. This review article focuses on the impact of psychrotrops on quality problems associated with raw milk as well as on th final dairy products. Means of controlling the dominant psychrotrophic species responsible for undesirable activities in milk and dairy products were also discussed.

  5. Isolation of Shewanella algae from rectal swabs of patients with bloody diarrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Nath

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae is an emerging bacteria rarely implicated as a human pathogen. It was infrequently recovered from clinical specimens probably because of inadequate processing of non-fermenting oxidase-positive gram-negative bacilli. We report here isolation of S. algae in pure culture and mixed with E. coli from two cases of acute gastroenteritis with bloody mucous containing diarrhea occurring at the same time. As this organism is not a normal flora of the gut, the possible source of infection may be fish contaminated with the organism. Whether this bacterium can be considered an enteric pathogen needs to be evaluated. The cases were clinically diagnosed as acute bacillary dysentery. The bacterium was identified by 16S r-RNA gene sequence analysis.

  6. Shewanella putrefaciens, a major microbial species related to tetrodotoxin (TTX)-accumulation of puffer fish Lagocephalus lunaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auawithoothij, W; Noomhorm, A

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the major micro-organisms, which were isolated from internal organs, related to tetrodotoxin (TTX)-accumulation of puffer fish Lagocephalus lunaris. Puffer fish Lagocephalus lunaris around Chang Island in the Gulf of Thailand were collected to examine TTX-accumulation and microbial load in internal organs. The nine predominant micro-organisms isolated from the internal organs were determined TTX and studied in relation to the TTX-accumulation of the puffer fish. Shewanella putrefaciens, a predominant bacterium and related to the TTX-accumulation of the puffer fish, was examined growth and TTX-production after culture in modified Zobell medium. The results revealed that the average TTX-accumulation of the puffer fish directly varied to the bacterium load periodically, year-round. Furthermore, it coincided with the growth and the TTX-production of the bacterium, which grew slowly but produced high TTX at low temperature. Shewanella putrefaciens was a major bacterium relating to TTX-accumulation of puffer fish L. lunaris. It resulted in high TTX-accumulation of the puffer fish at low temperatures of seawater. Temperature affected growth and TTX-production of S. putrefaciens that resulted in TTX accumulated in puffer fish L. lunaris. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Applied Microbiology © 2012 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Role of outer membrane c-type cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cell production, accumulation and detachment during respiration on hematite

    Science.gov (United States)

    The iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has the capacity to contribute to iron cycling over the long term by respiring on crystalline iron oxides such as hematite when poorly crystalline phases are depleted. The ability of outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC of MR-1 to bind to an...

  8. Shewanella strain isolated from black powder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutterbach, Marcia T.S.; Contador, Luciana S.; Oliveira, Ana Lucia C.; Galvao, Mariana M. [National Institute of Technology (INT), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pimenta, Gutemberg S. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Black powder is a term frequently used to refer to residues formed by various types of iron sulfides mixed with contaminants eventually present in the natural gas flow. According to some researchers, the occurrence of black powder in gas pipelines, besides its chemical corrosion origin, can be directly related to the sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) metabolism in this environment. A black powder sample was inoculated in a Post gate E medium modified with the addition of thioglycolate. The resulting positive culture was kept in the laboratory for four years until its use. A dilution technique was then performed aiming to isolate an SRB strain. The bacterial strain isolated and identified through DNA sequencing was not an SRB but rather a Shewanella sp. Compared to the sulfate-reducing bacteria group-traditionally considered the foremost responsible for microbially-influenced corrosion (MIC) - Shewanella is a facultative anaerobe and has a versatile metabolism. Shewanella is able to reduce ferric iron and sulfite, oxidize hydrogen gas, and produce hydrogen sulfide; therefore, these bacteria can be responsible for MIC and pit formation. The isolated Shewanella was used in a corrosion experiment, and the corrosion products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, identifying iron sulfides, iron oxides, and sulfur. Our results indicate that the strain isolated, S. putrefaciens, plays a key role in corrosion problems in gas pipelines. (author)

  9. Shewanella putrefaciens, a rare cause of osteomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Russell M; Dux, Katherine

    2013-09-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a Gram-negative bacillus with a distinguishable characteristic of hydrogen sulfide production and routinely found in a marine environment. This organism has been cultured as a pathogen in a small number of soft tissue infections, but has rarely been the causative agent in osteomyelitis. This case report details calcaneal osteomyelitis due to S putrefaciens in a 77-year-old male with bilateral heel ulcerations and peripheral vascular disease.

  10. Shewanella algae infection after surgical treatment of Haglund's heel and rupture of the Achilles tendon.] [Article in Danish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Malene

    2014-01-01

    of the Achilles tendon, which was treated surgically as well. The post-operative healing process proved to be protracted with a number of surgical wound revisions being necessary. A microbiology culture showed the presence of S. algae and after proper antibiotic treatment the patient recovered quickly.......This is a case report of soft tissue infection with the marine bacterium Shewanella algae that is rare in Denmark. The patient was a 43-year-old male and he was treated surgically for Haglund's heel, a bony protrusion at the calcaneus. After clinical healing the patient suffered a rupture...

  11. Occurrence of Shewanella algae in Danish coastal water and effects of water temperature and culture conditions on its survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Bundvad, Anemone; Melchiorsen, Jette;

    1999-01-01

    The marine bacterium Shewanella algae, which was identified as the cause of human cases of bacteremia and ear infections in Denmark in the summers of 1994 and 1995, was detected in seawater only during the months (July, August, September, and October) when the water temperature was above 13 degrees...... in 100% survival over a period of 1 to 2 months. The cold protection offered by this transition (starvation) probably explains the ability of the organism to persist in Danish seawater despite very low (0 to 1 degrees C) winter water temperatures. The culturable counts of samples kept at 2 degrees C...

  12. [Non necrotizing bacterial cellulitis and bacteriemia due to Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, T; Rovery, C; Bourhaba, K; Singeorzan, S; Heim, M; Crétel, E

    2009-09-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a Gram negative opportunistic pathogen which causes skin and soft tissue infections and bacteriemia in immunocompromized patients. We report a 86-year-old man, who presented with an infectious cellulitis of the leg associated with Shewanella putrefaciens bacteriemia. This patient was treated by mycophenolate mofetil for a bullous pemphigoid resistant to corticotherapy.

  13. Shewanella algae Peritonitis in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, Malini; Goh, Bak Leong; Lim, Christopher; NorFadhlina, Zakaria; Fairol, Ibrahim

    Patients with peritonitis present with abdominal pain, diarrhea, fever, and turbid peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluid. Shewanella algae peritonitis has not yet been reported in PD patients in the literature. We present the first 2 cases of Shewanella algae peritonitis in PD patients. Mupirocin cream is applied on the exit site as prophylactic antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis.

  14. Polyphasic Taxonomy of the GenusShewanellaand Description ofShewanellaoneidensis sp. nov.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkateswaran, K.

    1999-01-01

    The genus Shewanella has been studied since 1931 with regard to a variety of topics of relevance to both applied and environmental microbiology. Recent years have seen the introduction of a large number of new Shewanella-like isolates, necessitating a coordinated review of the genus. In this work, the phylogenetic relationships among known shewanellae were examined using a battery of morphological, physiological, molecular and chemotaxonomic characterizations. This polyphasic taxonomy takes into account all available phenotypic and genotypic data and integrates them into a consensus classification. Based on information generated from this study and obtained from the literature, a scheme for the identification of Shewanella species has been compiled. Key phenotypic characteristics were sulfur reduction and halophilicity. Fatty acid and quinone profiling were used to impart an additional layer of information. Molecular characterizations employing small-subunit 16S rDNA sequences were at the limits of resolution for the differentiation of species in some cases. As a result, DNA--DNA hybridization and sequence analyses of a more rapidly evolving molecule (gyrB gene) were performed. Species-specific PCR probes were designed for the gyrB gene and used for the rapid screening of closely related strains. With this polyphasic approach, in addition to the ten described Shewanella species, two new species, Shewanella oneidensis and 'Shewanella pealeana', were recognized; Shewanella oneidensis sp. nov. is described here for the first time.

  15. Spoilage potential of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) species: Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum and Lactococcus piscium, on sweet bell pepper (SBP) simulation medium under different gas compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Nyambi, Clarice; Zhang, Bao-Yu; Papastergiadis, Antonios; De Meulenaer, Bruno; Devlieghere, Frank

    2014-05-16

    Sweet bell peppers are a significant constituent of retail, chilled-stored and packaged food products like fresh salads, marinades and ready-to-eat (RTE) meals. Previously, through general screening of the Belgian market and by means of source tracking analysis in a plant manufacturing minimally processed, vegetable salads the susceptibility of fresh-cut sweet bell peppers to lactic acid bacterium (LAB) contamination was substantiated. The determination of the metabolic profiles of Leuconostoc gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum and Lactococcus piscium, two major psychrotrophic, spoilage-related LAB species, on sweet bell pepper (SBP) simulation medium under different packaging conditions - 1.) vacuum: 100% N2, 2.) air: 21% O2, 79% N2, 3.) MAP1: 30% CO2, 70% N2 and 4.) MAP2: 50% O2, 50% CO2 - facilitated a better understanding of the spoilage potential of these microbes as well as the presumptive contribution of O2 in the spectrum of produced volatile organic compounds (VOCs) associated with poor organoleptic properties of food products. Generally, none of the applied gas compositions inhibited the growth of the 4 L. gelidum subsp. gasicomitatum isolates, however the presence of O2 resulted in buttery off-odors by inducing primarily the accumulation of diacetyl and pungent "vinegar" smell due to acetic acid. The 3 tested isolates of L. piscium varied greatly among their growth dynamics and inhibition at MAP2. They exhibited either weak spoilage profile or very offensive metabolism confirming significant intraspecies diversity.

  16. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 –a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment. PMID:27100323

  17. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-Induced Fe(III) Reduction Facilitates Roxarsone Transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guowei; Ke, Zhengchen; Liang, Tengfang; Liu, Li; Wang, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Although microbial activity and associated iron (oxy)hydroxides are known in general to affect the environmental dynamics of 4-hydroxy-3-nitrobenzenearsonic acid (roxarsone), the mechanistic understanding of the underlying biophysico-chemical processes remains unclear due to limited experimental information. We studied how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 -a widely distributed metal-reducing bacterium, in the presence of dissolved Fe(III), affects roxarsone transformations and biogeochemical cycling in a model aqueous system. The results showed that the MR-1 strain was able to anaerobically use roxarsone as a terminal electron acceptor and to convert it to a single product, 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzene arsonic acid (AHBAA). The presence of Fe(III) stimulated roxarsone transformation via MR-1-induced Fe(III) reduction, whereby the resulting Fe(II) acted as an efficient reductant for roxarsone transformation. In addition, the subsequent secondary Fe(III)/Fe(II) mineralization created conditions for adsorption of organoarsenic compounds to the yielded precipitates and thereby led to arsenic immobilization. The study provided direct evidence of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1-induced direct and Fe(II)-associated roxarsone transformation. Quantitative estimations revealed a candidate mechanism for the early-stage environmental dynamics of roxarsone in nature, which is essential for understanding the environmental dynamics of roxarsone and successful risk assessment.

  18. Biodegradation of Variable-Chain-Length Alkanes at Low Temperatures by a Psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Whyte, Lyle G; Hawari, Jalal; Zhou, Edward; Bourbonnière, Luc; Inniss, William E.; Charles W Greer

    1998-01-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5°C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C10 to C21 alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substi...

  19. Mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria from meat and their spoilage potential in vitro and in beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolini, Danilo; Russo, Federica; Nasi, Antonella; Ferranti, Pasquale; Villani, Francesco

    2009-04-01

    Mesophilic and psychrotrophic populations from refrigerated meat were identified in this study, and the spoilage potential of microbial isolates in packaged beef was evaluated by analyzing the release of volatile organic compounds (VOC) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Fifty mesophilic and twenty-nine psychrotrophic isolates were analyzed by random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR, and representative strains were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Carnobacterium maltaromaticum and C. divergens were the species most frequently found in both mesophilic and psychrotrophic populations. Acinetobacter baumannii, Buttiauxella spp. and Serratia spp. were identified among the mesophilic isolates, while Pseudomonas spp. were commonly identified among the psychrotrophs. The isolates were further characterized for their growth at different temperatures and their proteolytic activity in vitro on meat proteins extracts at 7 degrees C. Selected proteolytic strains of Serratia proteamaculans, Pseudomonas fragi, and C. maltaromaticum were used to examine their spoilage potential in situ. Single strains of these species and mixtures of these strains were used to contaminate beef chops that were packed and stored at 7 degrees C. At time intervals up to 1 month, viable counts were determined, and VOC were identified by GC/MS. Generally, the VOC concentrations went to increase during the storage of the contaminated meats, and the profiles of the analyzed meat changed dramatically depending on the contaminating microbial species. About 100 volatiles were identified in the different contaminated samples. Among the detected volatiles, some specific molecules were identified only when the meat was contaminated by a specific microbial species. Compounds such as 2-ethyl-1-hexanol, 2-buten-1-ol, 2-hexyl-1-octanol, 2-nonanone, and 2-ethylhexanal were detectable only for C. maltaromaticum, which also produced the highest number of aldehydes, lactones, and sulfur compounds. The

  20. Microbial production and characterization of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles by Shewanella sp. HN-41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji-Hoon; Roh, Yul; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2008-09-01

    A facultative dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella sp. strain HN-41, was used to produce magnetite nanoparticles from a precursor, poorly crystalline ironoxyhydroxide akaganeite (beta-FeOOH), by reducing Fe(III). The diameter of the biogenic magnetite nanoparticles ranged from 26 nm to 38 nm, characterized by dynamic light scattering spectrophotometry. The magnetite nanoparticles consisted of mostly uniformly shaped spheres, which were identified by electron microscopy. The magnetometry revealed the superparamagnetic property of the magnetic nanoparticles. The atomic structure of the biogenic magnetite, which was determined by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis, showed similar atomic structural parameters, such as atomic distances and coordinations, to typical magnetite mineral.

  1. Interaction between in vivo bioluminescence and extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella woodyi via charge and discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaochun; Zhao, Feng; You, Lexing; Wu, Xuee; Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Ranran; Jiang, Yanxia; Sun, Shigang

    2017-01-18

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) and bioluminescence are both important for microbial growth and metabolism, but the mechanism of interaction between EET and bioluminescence is poorly understood. Herein, we demonstrate an exclusively respiratory luminous bacterium, Shewanella woodyi, which possesses EET ability and electron communication at the interface of S. woodyi and solid substrates via charge and discharge methods. Using an electro-chemiluminescence apparatus, our results confirmed that the FMN/FMNH2 content and the redox status of cytochrome c conjointly regulated the bioluminescence intensity when the potential of an indium-tin oxide electrode was changed. More importantly, this work revealed that there is an interaction between the redox reaction of single cells and bioluminescence of group communication via the EET pathway.

  2. Invariability of Central Metabolic Flux Distribution in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Under Environmental or Genetic Perturbations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie; Martin, Hector Garcia; Deutschbauer, Adam; Feng, Xueyang; Huang, Rick; Llora, Xavier; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-04-21

    An environmentally important bacterium with versatile respiration, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, displayed significantly different growth rates under three culture conditions: minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 3 hrs), salt stressed minimal medium (doubling time {approx} 6 hrs), and minimal medium with amino acid supplementation (doubling time {approx}1.5 hrs). {sup 13}C-based metabolic flux analysis indicated that fluxes of central metabolic reactions remained relatively constant under the three growth conditions, which is in stark contrast to the reported significant changes in the transcript and metabolite profiles under various growth conditions. Furthermore, ten transposon mutants of S. oneidensis MR-1 were randomly chosen from a transposon library and their flux distributions through central metabolic pathways were revealed to be identical, even though such mutational processes altered the secondary metabolism, for example, glycine and C1 (5,10-Me-THF) metabolism.

  3. Dosage-Dependent Proteome Response of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to Chromate Insult

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, Melissa R.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Chourey, Karuna; Brown, Steven D.; Hettich, Robert L.; Thompson, Dorothea K.

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic bacterium originally isolated from a freshwater lake. S. oneidensis MR-1 has the ability to reduce toxic metal ions [e.g., Cr(VI) and U(VI)] found in industrial and governmental waste sites. Cells were grown and exposed to three different metal concentrations in order to probe the dosage response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to Cr(VI) in the form of chromate. Protein fractions were digested with trypsin and analyzed with a multidimensional HPLC-NanoESIMS/MS protocol. The goal of this work is to identify protein components of pathways/mechanisms responsible for both detoxification and reduction of chromate.

  4. Effect of lactic acid concentration on growth on meat of Gram-negative psychrotrophs from a meatworks.

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, C O; Newton, K G

    1982-01-01

    The inhibitory effect of the lactic acid in meat on gram-negative psychrotrophs appears to be due mainly to the decrease in pH, not to action of the undissociated acid. Species of Pseudomonas were essentially unaffected by the pH of normal meat. Other gram-negative psychrotrophs isolated from a meatworks included a large number of strains which would not grow on meat of normal pH at chill temperatures. Raising either the pH or the incubation temperature allowed many of the pH-sensitive strain...

  5. Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with lower leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, H.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    of infection. Both patients survived; however, one of them had extensive myonecrosis, while the other patient had an uncomplicated course. The strains were initially believed to be Shewanella putrefaciens on the basis of key characteristics and results of the API 20NE identification system (bioMerieux, Marcy l......The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source......'Etoile, France), but further genetic and physiological analyses identified them as Shewanella alga....

  6. Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with lower leg ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Domínguez, H.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source of infec......The first Danish cases of Shewanella alga bacteremia in two patients with chronic lower leg ulcers are reported. Both patients were admitted to the hospital during the same month of a very warm summer and had been exposed to the same marine environment, thereby suggesting the same source......'Etoile, France), but further genetic and physiological analyses identified them as Shewanella alga....

  7. [Soft tissue infection associated with bacteremia caused by Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzic, N; Héry-Arnaud, G; Jaffuel, S; Garo, B; Payan, C; Garré, M

    2012-06-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is rarely involved in human infectious disease. We report here a case of soft tissue infection with bacteremia on a patient with risk factors (liver cirrhosis, diabetes mellitus). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Production of Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles by Shewanella Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, Saad M.; White, Alan R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several species of the bacterial genus Shewanella are well-known dissimilatory reducers of manganese under anaerobic conditions. In fact, Shewanella oneidensis is one of the most well studied of all metal-reducing bacteria. In the current study, a number of Shewanella strains were tested for manganese-oxidizing capacity under aerobic conditions. All were able to oxidize Mn(II) and to produce solid dark brown manganese oxides. Shewanella loihica strain PV-4 was the strongest oxidizer, producing oxides at a rate of 20.3 mg/liter/day and oxidizing Mn(II) concentrations of up to 9 mM. In contrast, S. oneidensis MR-1 was the weakest oxidizer tested, producing oxides at 4.4 mg/liter/day and oxidizing up to 4 mM Mn(II). Analysis of products from the strongest oxidizers, i.e., S. loihica PV-4 and Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32, revealed finely grained, nanosize, poorly crystalline oxide particles with identical Mn oxidation states of 3.86. The biogenic manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced within 2 days by all of the Shewanella strains when culture conditions were made anoxic and an appropriate nutrient (lactate) was added. While Shewanella species were detected previously as part of manganese-oxidizing consortia in natural environments, the current study has clearly shown manganese-reducing Shewanella species bacteria that are able to oxidize manganese in aerobic cultures. IMPORTANCE Members of the genus Shewanella are well known as dissimilatory manganese-reducing bacteria. This study shows that a number of species from Shewanella are also capable of manganese oxidation under aerobic conditions. Characterization of the products of the two most efficient oxidizers, S. loihica and S. putrefaciens, revealed finely grained, nanosize oxide particles. With a change in culture conditions, the manganese oxide products could be subsequently reduced by the same bacteria. The ability of Shewanella species both to oxidize and to reduce manganese indicates

  9. Emerging infections: Shewanella - A series of five cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Kanchan Sharma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Shewanella spp. are unusual cause of disease in humans; however, reports of Shewanella infections have been increasing. Shewanella is a ubiquitous organism that has been isolated from many foods, sewage, and both from fresh and salt water. Earlier it was named as Pseudomonas putrefaciens or Shewanella putrefaciens. There are several reports describing this organism causing human infections such as cellulitis, abscesses, bacteremia, wound infection, etc. It is oxidase and catalase-positive non-fermenter gram-negative rod that produces hydrogen sulfide. Aims : The study was conducted to identify Shewanella spp., which was wrongly reported as Pseudomonas spp. Materials and Methods : Clinical samples were cultured as per standard clinical laboratory procedure. We tested the non-lactose-fermenting colonies for oxidase positivity. Oxidase-positive colony was inoculated in triple sugar iron slant (TSI to know the hydrogen sulfide production. Hydrogen sulfide positive colonies were further tested for citrate, urease, indole, and amino acid decarboxylation and acid and gas production from sugars. Results : Five isolates identified as Pseudomonas spp. during preliminary testing were proved to be Shewanella spp. on further testing. Conclusions : It will help in better understanding the epidemiology, pathogenesis and risk factors associated with these and prevention of the rare pathogenic organisms.

  10. Shewanella algae: a rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananth, Aditi L; Nassiri, Naiem; Pamoukian, Vicken N

    2014-06-01

    The genus Shewanella consists of motile, gram-negative, facultative anaerobes found in marine environments. Shewanella putrefaciens and Shewanella algae are the two species with documented pathogenicity in human beings. Most documented cases of S. algae infection worldwide have been reported in the context of bacteremia, cellulitis, and acute exacerbations of chronic otitis media in predisposed individuals. We report a rare case of necrotizing soft tissue infection by S. algae in an immunocompetent individual. The infection followed exposure to S. algae in contaminated water in New York City, New York. We reviewed the English-language literature on similar cases of soft tissue infection using PubMed. Search terms included "Shewanella algae" and "Shewanella putrefaciens" in conjunction with "necrotizing" and "infection." Cognizant that this search method may not have yielded early (pre-1985) reports about Shewanella because of changes in classification and nomenclature, we also searched for "Pseudomonas putrefaciens." After prompt surgical debridement and culture-directed antibiotic therapy, the patient recovered from his infection without the need for re-intervention. This case may reflect the geographic spread and emergence of S. algae infection in the United States. Clinicians should be aware of the virulence of S. algae and potential for the rapid clinical deterioration of persons it infects even among immunocompetent individuals.

  11. Shewanella hafniensis sp. nov. and Shewanella morhuae sp. nov., isolated from marine fish of the Baltic Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Satomi, M.; Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Gram, Lone

    2006-01-01

    within the genus Shewanella. Group 1 strains showed greatest sequence similarity to Shewanella putrefaciens ATCC 8071T (99{middle dot}0 %) and with S. baltica NCTC 10375T (98{middle dot}3 %). However, gyrB gene sequence analysis showed these isolates to share only 90{middle dot}0 % sequence similarity......Two novel species belonging to the genus Shewanella are described on the basis of their phenotypic characteristics, phylogenetic analyses of 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences and levels of DNA-DNA hybridization. A total of 47 strains belonging to two novel Gram-negative, psychrotolerant, H2S......-producing bacterial species were isolated from marine fish (cod and flounder) caught from the Baltic Sea off Denmark. The phenotypic characteristics of strains belonging to group 1 (14 strains) indicated that these represented a non-sucrose-assimilating variant of Shewanella baltica with a DNA G+C content of 47...

  12. Electroanalysis of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumyantseva, V V; Shebanova, A S; Chalenko, Ya M; Voeikova, T A; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V; Debabov, V G

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical parameters of bacterial cells Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were investigated. For registration of the direct electron transfer between S. oneidensis MR-1 and electrode, bacterial cells were pretreated with didodecyldimethylammonium bromide (DDAB), a synthetic membrane-like substance of polycationic nature that exhibits membrane-loosening properties. Such pretreatment of S. oneidensis MR-1 allowed increasing the efficiency of extracellular electron transfer by the proteobacterium due to better availability of electroactive proteins for registration of electron transfer processes. The electroanalysis of bacterial cells S. oneidensis MR-1 under anaerobic conditions allows registering redox-active proteins and biomolecules in the range of potentials of-0.40,-0.16, and-0 V, which corresponds to flavohemoproteins, quinone derivatives, and c-type cytochromes of the external membrane of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells.

  13. Palmar Soft Tissue Infection From Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, James M; Truelove, Elizabeth; Sabatino, Matthew; Peters, Stephen; Kessler, Michael

    2017-08-25

    Shewanella putrefaciens, a gram-negative bacillus, ubiquitous in marine environments, is an opportunistic agent reported to cause rare human infection, most commonly in patients who are immunocompromised or who have a preexisting soft tissue defect. We present an immunocompetent, 40-year-old woman with a soft tissue infection of the left palm caused by S. putrefaciens. The patient's infection was complicated by the presence of retained foreign bodies, seashell fragments, from a traumatic fall. Following appropriate evaluation and surgical treatment, our patient experienced a successful outcome with no recurrence of infection or deficit in the affected hand. This case report complements the growing literature regarding morbidity attributed to S. putrefaciens infection. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Psychrotrophic Pseudomonas mandelii CBS-1 produces high levels of poly-β-hydroxybutyrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongpeng; Jiang, Yuji; Wang, Xinfeng; Yang, Jingjing; Gao, Yuan; Zi, Xiaoli; Zhang, Xia; Gao, Haofeng; Hu, Nan

    2013-01-01

    A novel facultative psychrotroph (strain CBS-1), which accumulates poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), was isolated from soil samples taken from Changbai Mountain, China. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA sequence data and Biolog analysis identified strain CBS-1 as Pseudomonas mandelii. Transmission electron micrographs revealed abundant electron-transparent intracellular granules. (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis revealed that the granules were composed of PHB. P. mandelii CBS-1 grew optimally at 20°C. When cultured aerobically for 48 h with sucrose as the sole carbon source, strain CBS-1 yielded a maximum cell density of 29.3 g/L cell dry weight and synthesized 22.3 g/L of PHB. The ability of strain CBS-1 to grow at a low temperature and rapidly synthesize high levels of PHB may reduce the costs of industrial PHB production.

  15. Production of acylated homoserine lactones by psychrotrophic members of the Enterobacteriaceae isolated from foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Christensen, A.B.; Flodgaard, Lars

    1999-01-01

    Bacteria are able to communicate and gene regulation can be mediated through the production of acylated homoserine lactone (AHL) signal molecules. These signals play important roles in several pathogenic and symbiotic bacteria. The following study was undertaken to investigate whether AHLs...... are produced by bacteria found in food at temperatures and NaCl conditions commercially used for food preservation and storage. A minimum of 116 of 154 psychrotrophic Enterobacteriaceae strains isolated from cold-smoked salmon or vacuum-packed chilled meat produced AHLs. Analysis by thin-layer chromatography...... of indigenous Enterobacteriaceae reached 106 CFU/g. This level of Enterobacteriaceae is often found in lightly preserved foods, and AHL-mediated gene regulation may play a role in bacteria associated with food spoilage or food toxicity...

  16. Molecular Dynamics of the Shewanella oneidensis Response to Chromate Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Steven D [ORNL; Thompson, Melissa R [ORNL; Verberkmoes, Nathan C [ORNL; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Shah, Manesh B [ORNL; Zhou, Jizhong [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Thompson, Dorothea K [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Temporal genomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyses were performed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to an acute chromate shock. The complex dynamics of cellular processes demand the integration of methodologies that describe biological systems at the levels of regulation, gene and protein expression, and metabolite production. Genomic microarray analysis of the transcriptome dynamics of midexponential phase cells subjected to 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) at exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min revealed 910 genes that were differentially expressed at one or more time points. Strongly induced genes included those encoding components of a TonB1 iron transport system (tonB1-exbB1-exbD1), hemin ATP-binding cassette transporters (hmuTUV), TonB-dependent receptors as well as sulfate transporters (cysP, cysW-2, and cysA-2), and enzymes involved in assimilative sulfur metabolism (cysC, cysN, cysD, cysH, cysI, and cysJ). Transcript levels for genes with annotated functions in DNA repair (lexA, recX, recA, recN, dinP, and umuD), cellular detoxification (so1756, so3585, and so3586), and two-component signal transduction systems (so2426) were also significantly upregulated (p < 0.05) in Cr(VI)-exposed cells relative to untreated cells. By contrast, genes with functions linked to energy metabolism, particularly electron transport (e.g. so0902-03-04, mtrA, omcA, and omcB), showed dramatic temporal alterations in expression with the majority exhibiting repression. Differential proteomics based on multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS was used to complement the transcriptome data, resulting in comparable induction and repression patterns for a subset of corresponding proteins. In total, expression of 2,370 proteins were confidently verified with 624 (26%) of these annotated as hypothetical or conserved hypothetical proteins. The initial response of S. oneidensis to chromate shock appears to

  17. Reconstruction of Extracellular Respiratory Pathways for Iron(III Reduction in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan eCoursolle

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 is a facultative anaerobic bacterium capable of respiring a multitude of electron acceptors, many of which require the Mtr respiratory pathway. The core Mtr respiratory pathway includes a periplasmic c-type cytochrome (MtrA, an integral outer membrane β-barrel protein (MtrB and an outer membrane-anchored c-type cytochrome (MtrC. Together, these components facilitate transfer of electrons from the c-type cytochrome CymA in the cytoplasmic membrane to electron acceptors at and beyond the outer membrane. The genes encoding these core proteins have paralogs in the S. oneidensis genome (mtrB and mtrA each have four while mtrC has three and some of the paralogs of mtrC and mtrA are able to form functional Mtr complexes. We demonstrate that of the additional three mtrB paralogs found in the S. oneidensis genome, only MtrE can replace MtrB to form a functional respiratory pathway to soluble iron(III citrate. We also evaluate which mtrC / mtrA paralog pairs (a total of 12 combinations are able to form functional complexes with endogenous levels of mtrB paralog expression. Finally, we reconstruct all possible functional Mtr complexes and test them in a S. oneidensis mutant strain where all paralogs have been eliminated from the genome. We find that each combination tested with the exception of MtrA / MtrE / OmcA is able to reduce iron(III citrate at a level significantly above background. The results presented here have implications towards the evolution of anaerobic extracellular respiration in Shewanella and for future studies looking to increase the rates of substrate reduction for water treatment, bioremediation, or electricity production.

  18. Comparison of adhesion of the food spoilage bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens to stainless steel and silver surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm, Mette; Hilbert, Lisbeth Rischel; Møller, Per;

    2002-01-01

    (new silver, tarnished silver and sulphide treated silver) was compared to adhesion to stainless steel (AISI 316). Numbers of attached bacteria (cfu cm-2) were estimated using the Malthus indirect conductance method. A lower number of attached bacteria were measured on new silver surfaces compared...... to stainless steel for samples taken after 24 hours. However this was not significant (P > 0.05). The numbers of attached bacteria were consistently lower when tarnished silver surfaces were compared to stainless steel and some, but not all, experiments showed statistically significant. A difference of more...... than one log unit in bacterial numbers on the two types of materials was observed, but for most samples the difference was within one log unit. Treating new silver with sulphide to try to reproduce a tarnished silver surface did not result in a similar lowering of adhering cells when compared to steel...

  19. Anaerobic electron acceptor chemotaxis in Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealson, K. H.; Moser, D. P.; Saffarini, D. A.

    1995-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1 can grow either aerobically or anaerobically at the expense of many different electron acceptors and is often found in abundance at redox interfaces in nature. Such redox interfaces are often characterized by very strong gradients of electron acceptors resulting from rapid microbial metabolism. The coincidence of S. putrefaciens abundance with environmental gradients prompted an examination of the ability of MR-1 to sense and respond to electron acceptor gradients in the laboratory. In these experiments, taxis to the majority of the electron acceptors that S. putrefaciens utilizes for anaerobic growth was seen. All anaerobic electron acceptor taxis was eliminated by the presence of oxygen, nitrate, nitrite, elemental sulfur, or dimethyl sulfoxide, even though taxis to the latter was very weak and nitrate and nitrite respiration was normal in the presence of dimethyl sulfoxide. Studies with respiratory mutants of MR-1 revealed that several electron acceptors that could not be used for anaerobic growth nevertheless elicited normal anaerobic taxis. Mutant M56, which was unable to respire nitrite, showed normal taxis to nitrite, as well as the inhibition of taxis to other electron acceptors by nitrite. These results indicate that electron acceptor taxis in S. putrefaciens does not conform to the paradigm established for Escherichia coli and several other bacteria. Carbon chemo-taxis was also unusual in this organism: of all carbon compounds tested, the only positive response observed was to formate under anaerobic conditions.

  20. An outbreak of Shewanella putrefaciens group in wild eels Anguilla anguilla L. favoured by hypoxic aquatic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteve, C; Merchán, R; Alcaide, E

    2017-07-01

    Microbiological analyses were conducted on wild eels from the L'Albufera Lake (Spain). A total of 174 individuals were collected in two surveys (i.e. year 2008 and autumn-winter 2014) among those caught by local fishermen into the lagoon. The prevalence of Shewanella putrefaciens group was 1.7% in 2008 and rose above 32% in 2014. It was due to an outbreak of shewanellosis that presented a morbidity rate of 64%. S. putrefaciens group strains were isolated as pure cultures from the sick eels that showed white ulcers surrounded by a reddish inflammation, damage of the mouth, extensive skin discoloration, exophthalmia, ascites and bad odour. The S. putrefaciens group was recovered from freshwater samples taken at the L'Albufera system, along autumn-winter 2015. Its counts significantly increased in freshwater parallel to hypoxia and temperature rising. Shewanellae strains were identified as S. putrefaciens and S. xiamenensis by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These isolates recovered from sick eels or freshwater were virulent for European eel by IP challenge (LD50 10(6)  CFU g(-1) body weight). They also caused 30-38% cumulative mortality, in European eels challenged by a 2-h bath (10(7)  CFU mL(-1) ). These results suggest that shewanellosis could be transmitted through water highlighting the fact that hypoxic conditions increase this bacterium levels in water. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. In Situ Analysis of a Silver Nanoparticle-Precipitating Shewanella Biofilm by Surface Enhanced Confocal Raman Microscopy.

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    Gal Schkolnik

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is an electroactive bacterium, capable of reducing extracellular insoluble electron acceptors, making it important for both nutrient cycling in nature and microbial electrochemical technologies, such as microbial fuel cells and microbial electrosynthesis. When allowed to anaerobically colonize an Ag/AgCl solid interface, S. oneidensis has precipitated silver nanoparticles (AgNp, thus providing the means for a surface enhanced confocal Raman microscopy (SECRaM investigation of its biofilm. The result is the in-situ chemical mapping of the biofilm as it developed over time, where the distribution of cytochromes, reduced and oxidized flavins, polysaccharides and phosphate in the undisturbed biofilm is monitored. Utilizing AgNp bio-produced by the bacteria colonizing the Ag/AgCl interface, we could perform SECRaM while avoiding the use of a patterned or roughened support or the introduction of noble metal salts and reducing agents. This new method will allow a spatially and temporally resolved chemical investigation not only of Shewanella biofilms at an insoluble electron acceptor, but also of other noble metal nanoparticle-precipitating bacteria in laboratory cultures or in complex microbial communities in their natural habitats.

  2. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei L. Osterman, Ph.D.

    2012-12-17

    Integration of bioinformatics and experimental techniques was applied to mapping and characterization of the key components (pathways, enzymes, transporters, regulators) of the core metabolic machinery in Shewanella oneidensis and related species with main focus was on metabolic and regulatory pathways involved in utilization of various carbon and energy sources. Among the main accomplishments reflected in ten joint publications with other participants of Shewanella Federation are: (i) A systems-level reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization pathways in the genus of Shewanella (19 species). This analysis yielded reconstruction of 18 sugar utilization pathways including 10 novel pathway variants and prediction of > 60 novel protein families of enzymes, transporters and regulators involved in these pathways. Selected functional predictions were verified by focused biochemical and genetic experiments. Observed growth phenotypes were consistent with bioinformatic predictions providing strong validation of the technology and (ii) Global genomic reconstruction of transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Of those, 45 regulons were inferred directly from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in other species. Selected regulatory predictions were experimentally tested. Integration of this analysis with microarray data revealed overall consistency and provided additional layer of interactions between regulons. All the results were captured in the new database RegPrecise, which is a joint development with the LBNL team. A more detailed analysis of the individual subsystems, pathways and regulons in Shewanella spp included bioinfiormatics-based prediction and experimental characterization of: (i) N-Acetylglucosamine catabolic pathway; (ii)Lactate utilization machinery; (iii) Novel Nrt

  3. Functional Analysis of Shewanella, a cross genome comparison.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serres, Margrethe H.

    2009-05-15

    The bacterial genus Shewanella includes a group of highly versatile organisms that have successfully adapted to life in many environments ranging from aquatic (fresh and marine) to sedimentary (lake and marine sediments, subsurface sediments, sea vent). A unique respiratory capability of the Shewanellas, initially observed for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, is the ability to use metals and metalloids, including radioactive compounds, as electron acceptors. Members of the Shewanella genus have also been shown to degrade environmental pollutants i.e. halogenated compounds, making this group highly applicable for the DOE mission. S. oneidensis MR-1 has in addition been found to utilize a diverse set of nutrients and to have a large set of genes dedicated to regulation and to sensing of the environment. The sequencing of the S. oneidensis MR-1 genome facilitated experimental and bioinformatics analyses by a group of collaborating researchers, the Shewanella Federation. Through the joint effort and with support from Department of Energy S. oneidensis MR-1 has become a model organism of study. Our work has been a functional analysis of S. oneidensis MR-1, both by itself and as part of a comparative study. We have improved the annotation of gene products, assigned metabolic functions, and analyzed protein families present in S. oneidensis MR-1. The data has been applied to analysis of experimental data (i.e. gene expression, proteome) generated for S. oneidensis MR-1. Further, this work has formed the basis for a comparative study of over 20 members of the Shewanella genus. The species and strains selected for genome sequencing represented an evolutionary gradient of DNA relatedness, ranging from close to intermediate, and to distant. The organisms selected have also adapted to a variety of ecological niches. Through our work we have been able to detect and interpret genome similarities and differences between members of the genus. We have in this way contributed to the

  4. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    This project had as its goals the understanding of the ecophysiology of the genus Shewanella using various genomics approaches. As opposed to other programs involving Shewanella, this one branched out into the various areas in which Shewanella cells are active, and included both basic and applied studies. All of the work was, to some extent, related to the ability of the bacteria to accomplish electron exchange between the cell and solid state electron acceptors and/or electron donors, a process we call Extracellular Electron Transport, or EET. The major accomplishments related to several different areas: Basic Science Studies: 1. Genetics and genomics of nitrate reduction, resulting in elucidation of atypical nitrate reduction systems in Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1)[2]. 2. Influence of bacterial strain and growth conditions on iron reduction, showing that rates of reduction, extents of reduction, and the formation of secondary minerals were different for different strains of Shewanella [3,4,9]. 3. Comparative genomics as a tool for comparing metabolic capacities of different Shewanella strains, and for predicting growth and metabolism [6,10,15]. In these studies, collaboration with ORNL, PNNL, and 4. Basic studies of electron transport in strain MR-1, both to poised electrodes, and via conductive nanowires [12,13]. This included the first accurate measurements of electrical energy generation by a single cell during electrode growth [12], and the demonstration of electrical conductivity along the length of bacterial nanowires [13]. 5. Impact of surface charge and electron flow on cell movement, cell attachment, cell growth, and biofilm formation [7.18]. The demonstration that interaction with solid state electron acceptors resulted in increased motility [7] led to the description of a phenomenon called electrokinesis. The importance of this for biofilm formation and for electron flow was hypothesized by Nealson & Finkel [18], and is now under study in several

  5. Optimization of nonribosomal peptides production by a psychrotrophic fungus: Trichoderma velutinum ACR-P1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Richa; Singh, Varun P; Singh, Deepika; Yusuf, Farnaz; Kumar, Anil; Vishwakarma, Ram A; Chaubey, Asha

    2016-11-01

    Trichoderma is an anamorphic filamentous fungal genus with immense potential for production of small valuable secondary metabolites with indispensable biological activities. Microbial dynamics of a psychrotrophic strain Trichoderma velutinum ACR-P1, isolated from unexplored niches of the Shiwalik region, bestowed with rich biodiversity of microflora, was investigated for production of nonribosomal peptides (NRPs) by metabolite profiling by intact-cell mass spectrometry (ICMS) employing matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer. Being the first report on NRPs production by T. velutinum, studies on optimization of growth conditions by Response Surface Methodology (RSM) for production of NRPs by ACR-P1 was carried out strategically. Multifold enhancement in the yield of NRPs belonging to subfamily SF4 with medium chain of amino acid residues having m/z 1437.9, 1453.9, and 1452.0 at pH 5.9 at 20 °C and of subfamily SF1 with long-chain amino acid residues having m/z 1770.2, 1784.2, 1800.1, 1802.1, and 1815.1 was achieved at pH 7.0 at 25 °C. Complexities of natural mixtures were thus considerably reduced under respective optimized culture conditions accelerating the production of novel microbial natural products by saving time and resources.

  6. Characterization of a cloned subtilisin-like serine proteinase from a psychrotrophic Vibrio species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnórsdottir, Jóhanna; Smáradóttir, Rúna B; Magnússon, Olafur Th; Thorbjarnardóttir, Sigrídur H; Eggertsson, Gudmundur; Kristjánsson, Magnús M

    2002-11-01

    The gene encoding a subtilisin-like serine proteinase in the psychrotrophic Vibrio sp. PA44 has been successfully cloned, sequenced and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene is 1593 basepairs and encodes a precursor protein of 530 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular mass of 55.7 kDa. The enzyme is isolated, however, as an active 40.6-kDa proteinase, without a 139 amino acid residue N-terminal prosequence. Under mild conditions the enzyme undergoes a further autocatalytic cleavage to give a 29.7-kDa proteinase that retains full enzymatic activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of the enzyme has high homology to proteinases of the proteinase K family of subtilisin-like proteinases. With respect to the enzyme characteristics compared in this study the properties of the wild-type and recombinant proteinases are the same. Sequence analysis revealed that especially with respect to the thermophilic homologues, aqualysin I from Thermus aquaticus and a proteinase from Thermus strain Rt41A, the cold-adapted Vibrio-proteinase has a higher content of polar/uncharged amino acids, as well as aspartate residues. The thermophilic enzymes had a higher content of arginines, and relatively higher number of hydrophobic amino acids and a higher aliphatic index. These factors may contribute to the adaptation of these proteinases to different temperature conditions.

  7. Bioprospecting of plant growth promoting psychrotrophic Bacilli from the cold desert of north western Indian Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The plant growth promoting psychrotrophic Bacilli were investigated from different sites in north western Indian Himalayas. A total of 247 morphotypes were obtained from different soil and water samples and were grouped into 43 clusters based on 16S rDNA-RFLP analysis with three restriction endonucleases. Sequencing of representative isolates has revealed that these 43 Bacilli belonged to different species of 11 genera viz., Desemzia, Exiguobacterium, Jeotgalicoccus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Planococcus, Pontibacillus, Sinobaca, Sporosarcina, Staphylococcus and Virgibacillus. With an aim to develop microbial inoculants that can perform efficiently at low temperatures, all representative isolates were screened for different plant growth promoting traits at low temperatures (5-15 degrees C). Among the strains, variations were observed for production (%) of indole-3-acetic acid (20), ammonia (19), siderophores (11), gibberellic acid (4) and hydrogen cyanide (2); solubilisation (%) of zinc (14), phosphate (13) and potassium (7); 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity (6%) and biocontrol activity (4%) against Rhizoctonia solani and Macrophomina phaseolina. Among all the strains, Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus muralis, Desemzia incerta, Paenibacillus tylopili and Sporosarcina globispora were found to be potent candidates to be developed as inoculants as they exhibited multiple PGP traits at low temperature.

  8. Cultivation conditions and properties of extracellular crude lipase from the psychrotrophic fungus Penicillium chrysogenum 9'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bancerz, R; Ginalska, G; Fiedurek, J; Gromada, A

    2005-06-01

    Among 97 fungal strains isolated from soil collected in the arctic tundra (Spitsbergen), Penicillium chrysogenum 9' was found to be the best lipase producer. The maximum lipase activity was 68 units mL(-1) culture medium on the fifth day of incubation at pH 6.0 and 20 degrees C. Therefore, P. chrysogenum 9' was classified as a psychrotrophic microorganism. The non-specific extracellular lipase showed a maximum activity at 30 degrees C and pH 5.0 for natural oils or at pH 7.0 for synthetic substrates. Tributyrin was found to be the best substrate for lipase, among those tested. The Km and Vmax were calculated to be 2.33 mM and 22.1 units mL(-1), respectively, with tributyrin as substrate. The enzyme was inhibited more by EDTA than by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride and was reactivated by Ca2+. The P. chrysogenum 9' lipase was very stable in the presence of hexane and 1,4-dioxane at a concentration of 50%, whereas it was unstable in presence of xylene.

  9. Microbiological Hazards Assessment of Psychrotrophic Microflora in Bovine Carcasses Slaughtered in North West Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silviu Vida

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Gram negative bacteria have the greatest capacity to spoil the meat if kept under aerobic conditions, therefor the members of the genera Pseudomonas, Acinetobater, Psychrobacter and Moraxella, will form the dominant microflora. The purpose of this study was to assess the contamination level with psychrotropic microflora of bovine carcasses in order to prove how the results could be used to improve the slaughter process. The research was carried out between January-December 2015, in two slaughterhouses from North West Romania.  The research material was represented by 144 meat samples (slaughterhouse A, n=72, slaughterhouse B, n=72. Weekly, 3 samples were collected from refrigerated carcasses, and examined for total psychrotrophic counts (TPC, Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas, Aeromonas and Yersinia. From statistical processing of recorded data was established that mean log TPC from the surface of refrigerated carcasses has presented different values, ranged between 3.70±0.20 log CFU/cm2 and 6.90±0.43 log CFU/cm2. Initial surface microflora of bovine carcasses was represented by germs from the following genera: Staphylococcus, Micrococcus, Aeromonas, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Yersinia, Serratia, Hafnia, Proteus and Escherichia. Microbiological hazard assessment reveals the key role of psychotropic microorganisms in the spoilage of meat, if the monitoring system of the slaughtering process is not functioning properly.

  10. [A rare cause of pneumonia: Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdu, Bülent; Durdu, Yasemin; Güleç, Nuray; Islim, Filiz; Biçer, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, non-fermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. Although it is accepted as saprophytic, different clinical syndromes, most commonly skin or soft tissue infections, have been associated with S.putrefaciens, mainly in immunocompromised cases and patients with underlying diseases. However, pneumonia cases due to S.putrefaciens are quite limited in the literature. In this report, a case of pneumonia caused by S.putrefaciens was presented. A 43-year-old female patient was admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, cough, sputum and weakness. The patient has had brochiectasis since childhood and has used periodical antibiotic therapies due to pneumoniae episodes. She was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological and laboratory findings, and empirical antibiotic treatment with ciprofloxacin and ceftazidime combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of sputum yielded abundant leucocytes and gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown in the sputum culture was identified as S.putrefaciens by conventional methods and API 20 NE (BioMerieux, France) system. The isolate was found susceptible to ceftriaxone, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, piperacillin-tazobactam, cephoperazon-sulbactam, imipenem, amikacin, gentamicin and trimethoprime-sulphametoxazole; whereas resistant to ampicillin, amoxycillin-clavulanate, cefazolin and cefuroxime, by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. According to the antibiogram results, the therapy was changed to ceftriaxone (1 x 2 g, intravenous). The patient was discharged with complete cure after 14 days of therapy. In conclusion, S.putrefaciens should be considered in patients with predisposing factors as an unusual cause of pneumonia and the characteristics such as H2S production and sensitivity to third generation cephalosporins and penicillins should be used

  11. A case report of intracranial infection caused by Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Mengxi; Wang, Dali; Wang, Jing; Xiao, Xiaoguang; Han, Lixia; Zhang, Fenghua

    2015-04-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is as yet reputed to be a rare conditional pathogen. In recent years, some clinical infections caused by Shewanella putrefaciens came into view, and it was possible for the bacteria to be isolated from blood, pus, urine, sputum, and wound secretions, etc. A transferred patient who suffered from intracranial infection after operation of cerebral hemorrhage was admitted in the First Affiliated Hospital of Dalian Medical University. To ascertain the cause, we assessed her blood, cerebrospinal fluid and sputum specimen, and succeeded in isolating one strain of bacteria from her cerebrospinal fluid. To circumvent the potential problem, further detection by Dade Behring Microscan WalkAway 96SI system and drug sensitivity identification plate was performed. Corresponding results indicated that the bacteria were certain pseudomonas with high drug resistance, only sensitive to ticarcillin/clavulanic acid and Imipenem. Eventually by 16S rDNA amplification assay, a new technique to identify pathogens genome, Shewanella putrefaciens infection was confirmed with 99 % coincidence rate. This is the first time in our hospital that Shewanella putrefaciens in the cerebrospinal fluid specimen was detected. When considering the increase of opportunistic infection, it is noteworthy to pay more attention to such situations in clinical diagnoses.

  12. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Echophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margrethe H. Serres

    2012-06-29

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a motile, facultative {gamma}-Proteobacterium with remarkable respiratory versatility; it can utilize a range of organic and inorganic compounds as terminal electronacceptors for anaerobic metabolism. The ability to effectively reduce nitrate, S0, polyvalent metals andradionuclides has established MR-1 as an important model dissimilatory metal-reducing microorganism for genome-based investigations of biogeochemical transformation of metals and radionuclides that are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites nationwide. Metal-reducing bacteria such as Shewanella also have a highly developed capacity for extracellular transfer of respiratory electrons to solid phase Fe and Mn oxides as well as directly to anode surfaces in microbial fuel cells. More broadly, Shewanellae are recognized free-living microorganisms and members of microbial communities involved in the decomposition of organic matter and the cycling of elements in aquatic and sedimentary systems. To function and compete in environments that are subject to spatial and temporal environmental change, Shewanella must be able to sense and respond to such changes and therefore require relatively robust sensing and regulation systems. The overall goal of this project is to apply the tools of genomics, leveraging the availability of genome sequence for 18 additional strains of Shewanella, to better understand the ecophysiology and speciation of respiratory-versatile members of this important genus. To understand these systems we propose to use genome-based approaches to investigate Shewanella as a system of integrated networks; first describing key cellular subsystems - those involved in signal transduction, regulation, and metabolism - then building towards understanding the function of whole cells and, eventually, cells within populations. As a general approach, this project will employ complimentary "top-down" - bioinformatics-based genome functional predictions, high

  13. Pressure effects on the chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenases of the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the atmospheric pressure-adapted Shewanella oneidensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamajima, Yuki; Nagae, Takayuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Imai, Takeo; Kato, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    The chimeric 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase enzymes were constructed from the deep-sea piezophilic Shewanella benthica and the shallow water Shewanella oneidensis genes. The properties of the enzymatic activities under pressure conditions indicated that the central region, which contained the active center and the dimer forming domains, was shown to be the most important region for pressure tolerance in the deep-sea enzyme.

  14. The outer membrane cytochromes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are lipoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, C R; Myers, J M

    2004-01-01

    To determine if the outer membrane (OM) cytochromes OmcA and OmcB of the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are lipoproteins, and to assess cell surface exposure of the cytochromes by radioiodination. In anaerobic MR-1 cells grown with (3)H-palmitoleic acid, both OmcA and OmcB were radiolabelled. The identities of these bands were confirmed by the absence of each radiolabelled band in the respective mutants lacking individual OM cytochromes. Radioiodination of cell surface proteins in anaerobic cells resulted in (125)I-labelled OmcA. The identity of this band was confirmed by its absence in an OmcA-minus mutant. A ubiquitous radioiodinated band that migrates similarly to OmcB precluded the ability to determine the potential cell surface exposure of OmcB by this method. Both OmcA and OmcB are lipoproteins, and OmcA is cell surface exposed. The lipoprotein modification of these OM cytochromes could be important for their localization or incorporation into the OM. The cell surface exposure of OmcA could allow it to directly transfer electrons to extracellular electron acceptors (e.g. manganese oxides) and is consistent with its in vivo role.

  15. The regulatory role of ferric uptake regulator (Fur during anaerobic respiration of Shewanella piezotolerans WP3.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Wei Yang

    Full Text Available Ferric uptake regulator (Fur is a global regulator that controls bacterial iron homeostasis. In this study, a fur deletion mutant of the deep-sea bacterium Shewanella piezotolerans WP3 was constructed. Physiological studies revealed that the growth rate of this mutant under aerobic conditions was only slightly lower than that of wild type (WT, but severe growth defects were observed under anaerobic conditions when different electron acceptors (EAs were provided. Comparative transcriptomic analysis demonstrated that Fur is involved not only in classical iron homeostasis but also in anaerobic respiration. Fur exerted pleiotropic effects on the regulation of anaerobic respiration by controlling anaerobic electron transport, the heme biosynthesis system, and the cytochrome c maturation system. Biochemical assays demonstrated that levels of c-type cytochromes were lower in the fur mutant, consistent with the transcriptional profiling. Transcriptomic analysis and electrophoretic mobility shift assays revealed a primary regulation network for Fur in WP3. These results suggest that Fur may act as a sensor for anoxic conditions to trigger and influence the anaerobic respiratory system.

  16. Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Membrane Protein Expression in Response to Electron Acceptor Availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giometti, Carol S.; Khare, Tripti; Verberkmoes, Nathan; O' Loughlin, Ed; Lindberg, Carl; Thompson, Melissa; Hettich, Robert

    2006-04-05

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a gram negative metal-reducing bacterium, can utilize a large number of electron acceptors. In the natural environment, S. oneidensis utilizes insoluble metal oxides as well as soluble terminal electron acceptors. The purpose of this ERSP project is to identify differentially expressed proteins associated with the membranes of S. oneidensis MR-1 cells grown with different electron acceptors, including insoluble metal oxides. We hypothesize that through the use of surface labeling, subcellular fractionation, and a combination of proteome analysis tools, proteins involved in the reduction of different terminal electron acceptors will be elucidated. We are comparing the protein profiles from cells grown with the soluble electron acceptors oxygen and fumarate and with those from cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides goethite, ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite. Comparison of the cell surface proteins isolated from cells grown with oxygen or anaerobically with fumarate revealed an increase in the abundance of over 25 proteins in anaerobic cells, including agglutination protein and flagellin proteins along with the several hypothetical proteins. In addition, the surface protein composition of cells grown with the insoluble iron oxides varies considerably from the protein composition observed with either soluble electron acceptor as well as between the different insoluble acceptors.

  17. Effect of zinc oxide film morphologies on the formation of Shewanella putrefaciens biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yue; Sun, Tong; Zhang, Zhibing; Zhang, Zhenyu J; Li, Jian-Rong

    2017-02-09

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) films were prepared on aluminum substrate by a hydrothermal method to investigate the effect of their surface characteristics, including morphology and hydrophobicity, on the corresponding antibiofilm performance. The surface characteristics of the prepared ZnO films were examined by a comprehensive range of methodologies, suggesting that films of distinctive surface morphologies were successfully formed. Subsequently, their antibiofilm activities, using Shewanella putrefaciens as a model bacterium, were assessed. Surface measurements confirmed that the ZnO films equipped with a nanoscopic needlelike surface feature are more hydrophobic than those possessing densely packed microflakes. The reduced number of live cells and presence of biofilm, confirmed by optical and electron microscopy results, suggest that the former films possess an excellent antibiofilm performance. It is believed that the engineered nanoscopic needle feature might penetrate the cell membrane when they are in contact, allowing the effective substance of ZnO antibacterial ingredients to diffuse into the embedded bacteria. Furthermore, such surface characteristics might perturb the integrity of the cell membrane causing the intracellular substance is leaked from the cells. As such, the combinatorial effects of nanoscopic feature resulted in an inhibited growth of S. putrefaciens biofilm on ZnO film.

  18. Extracellular biosynthesis of copper sulfide nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a photothermal agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan-Qing; Tian, Li-Jiao; Wang, Yu-Cai; Li, Dao-Bo; Li, Pan-Pan; Zhang, Xing; Yu, Han-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a minimally invasive and effective cancer treatment method and has a great potential for innovating the conventional chemotherapy approaches. Copper sulfide (CuS) exhibits photostability, low cost, and high absorption in near infrared region, and is recognized as an ideal candidate for PTT. However, CuS, as a photothermal agent, is usually synthesized with traditional chemical approaches, which require high temperature, additional stabilization and hydrophilic modification. Herein, we report, for the first time, the preparation of CuS nanoparticles as a photothermal agent by a dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella. oneidensis MR-1. The prepared nanoparticles are homogenously shaped, hydrophilic, small-sized (∼5nm) and highly stable. Furthermore, the biosynthesized CuS nanoparticles display a high photothermal conversion efficiency of 27.2% because of their strong absorption at 1100nm. The CuS nanoparticles could be effectively used as a PTT agent under the irradiation of 1064nm. This work provides a simple, eco-friendly and cost-effective approach for fabricating PTT agents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Brennan

    Full Text Available The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA, the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  20. Reduced heme levels underlie the exponential growth defect of the Shewanella oneidensis hfq mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Christopher M; Mazzucca, Nicholas Q; Mezoian, Taylor; Hunt, Taylor M; Keane, Meaghan L; Leonard, Jessica N; Scola, Shelby E; Beer, Emma N; Perdue, Sarah; Pellock, Brett J

    2014-01-01

    The RNA chaperone Hfq fulfills important roles in small regulatory RNA (sRNA) function in many bacteria. Loss of Hfq in the dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1 results in slow exponential phase growth and a reduced terminal cell density at stationary phase. We have found that the exponential phase growth defect of the hfq mutant in LB is the result of reduced heme levels. Both heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant can be completely restored by supplementing LB medium with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), the first committed intermediate synthesized during heme synthesis. Increasing expression of gtrA, which encodes the enzyme that catalyzes the first step in heme biosynthesis, also restores heme levels and exponential phase growth of the hfq mutant. Taken together, our data indicate that reduced heme levels are responsible for the exponential growth defect of the S. oneidensis hfq mutant in LB medium and suggest that the S. oneidensis hfq mutant is deficient in heme production at the 5-ALA synthesis step.

  1. Promotion of iron oxide reduction and extracellular electron transfer in Shewanella oneidensis by DMSO.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Cheng

    Full Text Available The dissimilatory metal reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, known for its capacity of reducing iron and manganese oxides, has great environmental impacts. The iron oxides reducing process is affected by the coexistence of alternative electron acceptors in the environment, while investigation into it is limited so far. In this work, the impact of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO, a ubiquitous chemical in marine environment, on the reduction of hydrous ferric oxide (HFO by S. oneidensis MR-1 was investigated. Results show that DMSO promoted HFO reduction by both wild type and ΔdmsE, but had no effect on the HFO reduction by ΔdmsB, indicating that such a promotion was dependent on the DMSO respiration. With the DMSO dosing, the levels of extracellular flavins and omcA expression were significantly increased in WT and further increased in ΔdmsE. Bioelectrochemical analysis show that DMSO also promoted the extracellular electron transfer of WT and ΔdmsE. These results demonstrate that DMSO could stimulate the HFO reduction through metabolic and genetic regulation in S. oneidensis MR-1, rather than compete for electrons with HFO. This may provide a potential respiratory pathway to enhance the microbial electron flows for environmental and engineering applications.

  2. Biodegradation of variable-chain-length alkanes at low temperatures by a psychrotrophic Rhodococcus sp.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whyte, L.G.; Hawari, J.; Zhou, E.; Bourbonniere, L.; Greer, C.W. [NRC-Biotechnology Research Inst., Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Inniss, W.E. [Univ. of Waterloo, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Biology

    1998-07-01

    The psychrotroph Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 was examined for its ability to degrade individual n-alkanes and diesel fuel at low temperatures, and its alkane catabolic pathway was investigated by biochemical and genetic techniques. At 0 and 5 C, Q15 mineralized the short-chain alkanes dodecane and hexadecane to a greater extent than that observed for the long-chain alkanes octacosane and dotriacontane. Q15 utilized a broad range of aliphatics (C{sub 10} to C{sub 21} alkanes, branched alkanes, and a substituted cyclohexane) present in diesel fuel at 5 C. Mineralization of hexadecane at 5 C was significantly greater in both hydrocarbon-contaminated and pristine soil microcosms seeded with Q15 cells than in uninoculated control soil microcosms. The detection of hexadecane and dodecane metabolic intermediates (1-hexadecanol and 2-hexadecanol and 1-do-decanol and 2-dodecanone, respectively) by solid-phase microextraction-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and the utilization of potential metabolic intermediates indicated that Q15 oxidizes alkanes by both the terminal oxidation pathway and the subterminal oxidation pathway. Genetic characterization by PCR and nucleotide sequence analysis indicated that Q15 possesses an aliphatic aldehyde dehydrogenase gene highly homologous to the Rhodococcus erythropolis thcA gene. Rhodococcus sp. strain Q15 possessed two large plasmids of approximately 90 and 115 kb (shown to mediate Cd resistance) which were not required for alkane mineralization, although the 90-kb plasmid enhanced mineralization of some alkanes and growth on diesel oil at both 5 and 25 C.

  3. The Role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Outer Surface Structures in Extracellular Electron Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    bacteria such as Shewanella putrefaciens sp200, Geobacter metallireducens, and G. sulfurreducens [14 – 17]. In several of these bacteria, target- ing of c...Full Paper The Role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Outer Surface Structures in Extracellular Electron Transfer Rachida A. Bouhenni,a, f Gary J. Vora,b...metal reducer Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) depends on the activity of a predicted type IV prepilin

  4. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III) Oxide Reduction by Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Rosso, Kevin M.; Clarke, Tomas A.; Richardson, David J.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2012-01-01

    In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III)] (oxy)(hydr)oxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III) oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 and related strains of metal-reducing Shewanella have evolved machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway) for transferring electrons from the inner-membrane, through the periplasm and across the outer-membrane to the surface of extracellular Fe(III) oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC, and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt) that belongs to the NapC/NrfH family of quinol dehydrogenases. It is proposed that CymA oxidizes the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to MtrA either directly or indirectly through other periplasmic proteins. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons through the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. MtrC and OmcA are the outer-membrane decaheme c-Cyts that are translocated across the outer-membrane by the bacterial type II secretion system. Functioning as terminal reductases, MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III) oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals via their solvent-exposed hemes. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III) oxides. Because of their extracellular location and broad redox potentials, MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III). In addition to Fe(III) oxides, Mtr pathway is also involved in reduction of

  5. Genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization pathways in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Overbeek Ross

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbohydrates are a primary source of carbon and energy for many bacteria. Accurate projection of known carbohydrate catabolic pathways across diverse bacteria with complete genomes constitutes a substantial challenge due to frequent variations in components of these pathways. To address a practically and fundamentally important challenge of reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization machinery in any microorganism directly from its genomic sequence, we combined a subsystems-based comparative genomic approach with experimental validation of selected bioinformatic predictions by a combination of biochemical, genetic and physiological experiments. Results We applied this integrated approach to systematically map carbohydrate utilization pathways in 19 genomes from the Shewanella genus. The obtained genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization includes ~170 protein families (mostly metabolic enzymes, transporters and transcriptional regulators spanning 17 distinct pathways with a mosaic distribution across Shewanella species providing insights into their ecophysiology and adaptive evolution. Phenotypic assays revealed a remarkable consistency between predicted and observed phenotype, an ability to utilize an individual sugar as a sole source of carbon and energy, over the entire matrix of tested strains and sugars. Comparison of the reconstructed catabolic pathways with E. coli identified multiple differences that are manifested at various levels, from the presence or absence of certain sugar catabolic pathways, nonorthologous gene replacements and alternative biochemical routes to a different organization of transcription regulatory networks. Conclusions The reconstructed sugar catabolome in Shewanella spp includes 62 novel isofunctional families of enzymes, transporters, and regulators. In addition to improving our knowledge of genomics and functional organization of carbohydrate utilization in Shewanella, this study led to a

  6. Characterization of lead nanoparticles formed by Shewanella sp. KR-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Liang; Yen, Jui-Hung

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial strain KR-12 was isolated from river sediment in northeast Taiwan. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that it belongs to the genus Shewanella. The strain can accumulate lead (Pb) and form Pb nanoparticles (PbNPs) on exposure to Pb(NO3)2 and sodium formate in HEPES buffer. On transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the KR-12-formed PbNPs were spherical in shape and ranged from 3 to 8 nm. The PbNPs formed a line or curved pattern on bacteria. In addition, one or more pilus-like structures elongated from the bacteria. In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and other bacteria could not form PbNPs pattern or pilus-like structure under the same conditions. High-resolution TEM combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated that these PbNPs primarily contained Pb and had an amorphous structure. This is the first report of the biosynthesis of PbNPs by a Shewanella species.

  7. Characterization of lead nanoparticles formed by Shewanella sp. KR-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Chien-Liang; Yen, Jui-Hung, E-mail: sonny@ntu.edu.tw [National Taiwan University, Department of Agricultural Chemistry (China)

    2016-01-15

    The bacterial strain KR-12 was isolated from river sediment in northeast Taiwan. 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that it belongs to the genus Shewanella. The strain can accumulate lead (Pb) and form Pb nanoparticles (PbNPs) on exposure to Pb(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} and sodium formate in HEPES buffer. On transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the KR-12-formed PbNPs were spherical in shape and ranged from 3 to 8 nm. The PbNPs formed a line or curved pattern on bacteria. In addition, one or more pilus-like structures elongated from the bacteria. In contrast, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and other bacteria could not form PbNPs pattern or pilus-like structure under the same conditions. High-resolution TEM combined with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy demonstrated that these PbNPs primarily contained Pb and had an amorphous structure. This is the first report of the biosynthesis of PbNPs by a Shewanella species.

  8. INTEGRATED GENOME-BASED STUDIES OF SHEWANELLA ECOPHYSIOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NEALSON, KENNETH H.

    2013-10-15

    This project had as its goals the understanding of the ecophysiology of the genus Shewanella using various genomics approaches. As opposed to other programs involving Shewanella, this one branched out into the various areas in which Shewanella cells are active, and included both basic and applied studies. All of the work was, to some extent, related to the ability of the bacteria to accomplish electron exchange between the cell and solid state electron acceptors and/or electron donors, a process we call Extracellular Electron Transport, or EET. The major accomplishments related to several different areas: Basic Science Studies: 1. Genetics and genomics of nitrate reduction, resulting in elucidation of atypical nitrate reduction systems in Shewanella oneidensis (MR-1)[2]. 2. Influence of bacterial strain and growth conditions on iron reduction, showing that rates of reduction, extents of reduction, and the formation of secondary minerals were different for different strains of Shewanella [3,4,9]. 3. Comparative genomics as a tool for comparing metabolic capacities of different Shewanella strains, and for predicting growth and metabolism [6,10,15]. In these studies, collaboration with ORNL, PNNL, and 4. Basic studies of electron transport in strain MR-1, both to poised electrodes, and via conductive nanowires [12,13]. This included the first accurate measurements of electrical energy generation by a single cell during electrode growth [12], and the demonstration of electrical conductivity along the length of bacterial nanowires [13]. 5. Impact of surface charge and electron flow on cell movement, cell attachment, cell growth, and biofilm formation [7.18]. The demonstration that interaction with solid state electron acceptors resulted in increased motility [7] led to the description of a phenomenon called electrokinesis. The importance of this for biofilm formation and for electron flow was hypothesized by Nealson & Finkel [18], and is now under study in several

  9. Spores from mesophilic Bacillus cereus strains germinate better and grow faster in simulated gastro-intestinal conditions than spores from psychrotrophic strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L M; Dufrenne, J B; Zwietering, M H; Leusden, F M van

    2006-01-01

    The species Bacillus cereus, known for its ability to cause food borne disease, consists of a large variety of strains. An important property for discrimination of strains is their growth temperature range. Psychrotrophic strains can grow well at refrigerator temperatures but grow at 37 degrees C wi

  10. Spores from mesophilic Bacillus cereus strains germinate better and grow faster in simulated gastro-intestinal conditions than spores from psychrotrophic strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijnands, L.M.; Dufrenne, J.B.; Zwietering, M.H.; Leusden, van F.M.

    2006-01-01

    The species Bacillus cereus, known for its ability to cause food borne disease, consists of a large variety of strains. An important property for discrimination of strains is their growth temperature range. Psychrotrophic strains can grow well at refrigerator temperatures but grow at 37 °C with diff

  11. Differentiation of Shewanella putrefaciens and Shewanella alga on the basis of whole-cell protein profiles, ribotyping, phenotypic characterization, and 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Jørgensen, K.; Christensen, H.

    1997-01-01

    Seventy-six presumed Shewanella putrefaciens isolates from fish, oil drillings, and clinical specimens, the type strain of Shewanella putrefaciens (ATCC 8071), the type strain of Shewanella alga (IAM 14159), and the type strain of Shewanella hanedai (ATCC 33224) were compared by several typing...... defined species S. alga (U. Simidu et at., Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 40:331-336, 1990). Fifty-two typically psychrotolerant strains formed the other, more heterogeneous major cluster, with 43 to 47 mol% G + C. The type strain of S. putrefaciens was included in this group. The two groups were confirmed...... by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. It is concluded that the isolates must be considered two different species, S. alga and S. putrefaciens, and that most mesophilic isolates formerly identified as S. putrefaciens belong to S. alga. The ecological role and potential pathogenicity of S. alga can...

  12. [Isolation and characterization of Shewanella spp. from patients of food poisoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Lu; Wang, Duo-Chun; Zhan, Sheng-Wei; Zheng, Jin-Xiu; Liu, Yan; Tao, Yong; Shi, Zhi-Feng; Hao, Min; Yu, Li; Kan, Biao

    2009-08-01

    To identify the isolates of Shewanella spp. from specimens of food poisoning based on biological and biochemical analysis. Strains were obtained from the investigation on two food poisoning episodes in September and October, 2007 in Ma'anshan city, Anhui province. In accordance with the national standard protocol (GB/T 4789), all specimens were enriched and isolated on selective medium, and the suspected strains were identified by the VITEK-32 and API20E systems. For Shewanella spp. identified by the biochemical system, more characteristics were analyzed using auxiliary biochemical, growth, hemolytic and drug-resistance tests. DNAs of Shewanella spp. were extracted, 16S rDNA was PCR amplified and sequenced with universal 16S rDNA primers. Phylogenetic tree was constructed with MEGA 4.0. After enrichment, all specimens were inoculated to selective medium and Shewanella spp. strains were isolated from 8 samples with single colony on both TCBS and BP media. The characteristics of growth in the Triple Sugar Iron (TSI) agar appeared to have had hydrogen sulfide production but no gas production or positive oxidase. No Shewanella spp. strain was detected in WS, SS and EMB media. The 8 strains were identified as Shewanella algae (S. algae) or Shewanella putrefaciens (S. putrefaciens) by VITEK-32, as S. putrefaciens by API20E system. No other enteropathogenic bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Proteus vulgaris or Staphylococcus aureus, were detected from those 8 samples. From 16S rDNA phylogenetic trees, 7 out of 8 Shewanella spp. were identified as S. algae, 1 as S. putrefaciens. Strains of Shewanella spp. were isolated from samples of the food poisoning episodes, providing a possible clue to investigate the role of Shewanella spp. on food poisoning.

  13. 'Trade-off' in Antarctic bacteria: limnetic psychrotrophs concede multiple enzyme expressions for multiple metal resistance

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    January 2007 C211 Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2006 Abstract The present study examines the metal and antibiotic resistant bacteria in ice and water from lakes east and west of the Indian base camp (Maitri) in Antarctica. The isolates from western...) Effects of cadmium and lead on growth, respiration and enzyme activity of the marine bacterium Pseudomonas marina. Chemo- sphere 17: 597–607 De Flora S, Bennicelli C, Bagnasco M (1994) Genotoxicity of mercury compounds: a review. Mut Res 317: 57–79 De...

  14. Treatment of fresh poultry carcases with emulsions of glycerol monocaprate (monocaprin) to reduce contamination with Campylobacter and psychrotrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormar, H; Hilmarsson, H; Thrainsson, J H; Georgsson, F; Gunnarsson, E; Dadadottir, S

    2011-02-01

    1. A previous study has shown that emulsions of monocaprin in citrate lactate buffer at pH 4·1-4·3 are highly active in killing Campylobacter in water, where they reduce viable bacterial counts by more than 6 log(10) colony forming units (cfu) in 1 min at a concentration of 1·25 mM (0·03%). 2. The present study was carried out to evaluate whether monocaprin emulsions could be used to kill Campylobacter on raw poultry. 3. It was shown that immersion of naturally contaminated chicken legs in 20 mM (0·5%) monocaprin emulsion at pH 4·1 for 1 min at 20°C reduced the number of Campylobacter by 2·0 to 2·7 log(10) cfu. Pre-chill dipping of whole carcases into 20 mM monocaprin emulsion in the slaughterhouse also caused a significant reduction in Campylobacter contamination. 4. Immersion in monocaprin emulsions at pH 4·1 was also assessed as a means to reduce the number of psychrotrophic spoilage bacteria. There were lower psychrotrophic bacteria counts on treated chicken parts than on untreated controls after storage at 3°C for up to 14 d. 5. Immersion in emulsions of monocaprin, which is a natural lipid classified as GRAS, may be a feasible method to reduce the number of Campylobacter and spoilage bacteria on raw poultry. This method could reduce the risk of human exposure to Campylobacter, and at the same time increase the shelf-life of poultry products.

  15. c-Type cytochrome-dependent formation of U(IV nanoparticles by Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Marshall

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Modern approaches for bioremediation of radionuclide contaminated environments are based on the ability of microorganisms to effectively catalyze changes in the oxidation states of metals that in turn influence their solubility. Although microbial metal reduction has been identified as an effective means for immobilizing highly-soluble uranium(VI complexes in situ, the biomolecular mechanisms of U(VI reduction are not well understood. Here, we show that c-type cytochromes of a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, are essential for the reduction of U(VI and formation of extracellular UO(2 nanoparticles. In particular, the outer membrane (OM decaheme cytochrome MtrC (metal reduction, previously implicated in Mn(IV and Fe(III reduction, directly transferred electrons to U(VI. Additionally, deletions of mtrC and/or omcA significantly affected the in vivo U(VI reduction rate relative to wild-type MR-1. Similar to the wild-type, the mutants accumulated UO(2 nanoparticles extracellularly to high densities in association with an extracellular polymeric substance (EPS. In wild-type cells, this UO(2-EPS matrix exhibited glycocalyx-like properties and contained multiple elements of the OM, polysaccharide, and heme-containing proteins. Using a novel combination of methods including synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy and high-resolution immune-electron microscopy, we demonstrate a close association of the extracellular UO(2 nanoparticles with MtrC and OmcA (outer membrane cytochrome. This is the first study to our knowledge to directly localize the OM-associated cytochromes with EPS, which contains biogenic UO(2 nanoparticles. In the environment, such association of UO(2 nanoparticles with biopolymers may exert a strong influence on subsequent behavior including susceptibility to oxidation by O(2 or transport in soils and sediments.

  16. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubar, Natalia; Visser, Tom; Avramut, Cristina; de Waard, Helen

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Mn(II) by viable and inactivated cells of Shewanella putrefaciens, a non-pathogenic, facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium characterised as a Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reducer, was studied under aerobic conditions, as a function of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During a short contact time (3-24 h), the adsorptive behaviour of live and dead bacteria toward Mn(II) was sufficiently similar, an observation that was reflected in the studies on adsorption kinetics at various metal loadings, effects of pH, bacteria density, isotherms and drifting of pH during adsorption. Continuing the experiment for an additional 2-30 days demonstrated that the Mn(II) sorption by suspensions of viable and autoclaved cells differed significantly from one another. The sorption to dead cells was characterised by a rapid equilibration and was described by an isotherm. In contrast, the sorption (uptake) to live bacteria exhibited a complex time-dependent uptake. This uptake began as adsorption and ion exchange processes followed by bioprecipitation, and it was accompanied by the formation of polymeric sugars (EPS) and the release of dissolved organic substances. FTIR, EXAFS/XANES and XPS demonstrated that manganese(II) phosphate was the main precipitate formed in 125 ml batches, which is the first evidence of the ability of microbes to synthesise manganese phosphates. XPS and XANES spectra did not detect Mn(II) oxidation. Although the release of protein-like compounds by the viable bacteria increased in the presence of Mn2+ (and, by contrast, the release of carbohydrates did not change), electrochemical analyses did not indicate any aqueous complexation of Mn(II) by the organic ligands.

  17. Investigation of the structure and function of a Shewanella oneidensis arsenical-resistance family transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaobing; Postis, Vincent L G; Rahman, Moazur; Wright, Gareth S A; Roach, Peter C J; Deacon, Sarah E; Ingram, Jean C; Henderson, Peter J F; Findlay, John B C; Phillips, Simon E V; McPherson, Michael J; Baldwin, Stephen A

    2008-12-01

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is an abundant element and most organisms possess transport systems involved in its detoxification. One such family of arsenite transporters, the ACR3 family, is widespread in fungi and bacteria. To gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism of arsenic transport, we report here the expression and characterization of a family member, So_ACR3, from the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Surprisingly, expression of this transporter in the arsenic-hypersensitive Escherichia coli strain AW3110 conferred resistance to arsenate, but not to arsenite. Purification of a C-terminally His-tagged form of the protein allowed the binding of putative permeants to be directly tested: arsenate but not arsenite quenched its intrinsic fluorescence in a concentration-dependent fashion. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed that the purified protein was predominantly alpha-helical. A mutant bearing a single cysteine residue at position 3 retained the ability to confer arsenate resistance, and was accessible to membrane impermeant thiol reagents in intact cells. In conjunction with successful C-terminal tagging with oligohistidine, this finding is consistent with the experimentally-determined topology of the homologous human apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter, namely 7 transmembrane helices and a periplasmic N-terminus, although the presence of additional transmembrane segments cannot be excluded. Mutation to alanine of the conserved residue proline 190, in the fourth putative transmembrane region, abrogated the ability of the transporter to confer arsenic resistance, but did not prevent arsenate binding. An apparently increased thermal stability is consistent with the mutant being unable to undergo the conformational transitions required for permeant translocation.

  18. Sorption and precipitation of Mn2+ by viable and autoclaved Shewanella putrefaciens: Effect of contact time

    KAUST Repository

    Chubar, Natalia

    2013-01-01

    The sorption of Mn(II) by viable and inactivated cells of Shewanella putrefaciens, a non-pathogenic, facultative anaerobic, gram-negative bacterium characterised as a Mn(IV) and Fe(III) reducer, was studied under aerobic conditions, as a function of pH, bacterial density and metal loading. During a short contact time (3-24h), the adsorptive behaviour of live and dead bacteria toward Mn(II) was sufficiently similar, an observation that was reflected in the studies on adsorption kinetics at various metal loadings, effects of pH, bacteria density, isotherms and drifting of pH during adsorption. Continuing the experiment for an additional 2-30days demonstrated that the Mn(II) sorption by suspensions of viable and autoclaved cells differed significantly from one another. The sorption to dead cells was characterised by a rapid equilibration and was described by an isotherm. In contrast, the sorption (uptake) to live bacteria exhibited a complex time-dependent uptake. This uptake began as adsorption and ion exchange processes followed by bioprecipitation, and it was accompanied by the formation of polymeric sugars (EPS) and the release of dissolved organic substances. FTIR, EXAFS/XANES and XPS demonstrated that manganese(II) phosphate was the main precipitate formed in 125ml batches, which is the first evidence of the ability of microbes to synthesise manganese phosphates. XPS and XANES spectra did not detect Mn(II) oxidation. Although the release of protein-like compounds by the viable bacteria increased in the presence of Mn2+ (and, by contrast, the release of carbohydrates did not change), electrochemical analyses did not indicate any aqueous complexation of Mn(II) by the organic ligands. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Homogeneity of Danish environmental and clinical isolates of Shewanella algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Holt, H.M.; Gerner-Smidt, P.;

    2000-01-01

    Danish isolates of Shewanella algae constituted by whole-cell protein profiling a very homogeneous group, and no clear distinction was seen between strains from the marine environment and strains of clinical origin. Although variation between all strains was observed by ribotyping and random...... amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, no clonal relationship between infective strains was found. From several patients, clonally identical strains of S. algae were reisolated up to 8 months after the primary isolation, indicating that the same strain may be able to maintain the infection....

  20. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended...... (modified Robbins device) (reaching 10(2) CFU/cm(2)) than in a batch system (reaching 10(7) CFU/cm(2)), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were...

  1. Homogeneity of Danish environmental and clinical isolates of Shewanella algae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Holt, H.M.; Gerner-Smidt, P.

    2000-01-01

    Danish isolates of Shewanella algae constituted by whole-cell protein profiling a very homogeneous group, and no clear distinction was seen between strains from the marine environment and strains of clinical origin. Although variation between all strains was observed by ribotyping and random...... amplified polymorphic DNA analysis, no clonal relationship between infective strains was found. From several patients, clonally identical strains of S. algae were reisolated up to 8 months after the primary isolation, indicating that the same strain may be able to maintain the infection....

  2. Enhanced biotransformation of nitrobenzene by the synergies of Shewanella species and mediator-functionalized polyurethane foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Lu, Hong; Zhou, Yan; Song, Yang; Liu, Guangfei; Feng, Yujie

    2013-05-15

    The performance and mechanism of anaerobic treatment of nitrobenzene using the combination of Shewanella species and anthraquinone-2-sulfonate-modified polyurethane foam (Shewanella/AQS-PUF) were investigated. The results showed that Shewanella/AQS-PUF significantly accelerated nitrobenzene bio-reduction (95.6%) and aniline formation (94.3%) with nitrobenzene removal rate up to 0.13 mM h(-1). Moreover, there were synergistic effects between Shewanella species and AQS-PUF on promoting nitrobenzene biotransformation with 5-fold increase in first-order rate constant compared to that without AQS-PUF. During this process, AQS-PUF could induce Shewanella species to secrete more flavins (0.335 μM) as redox mediator for nitrobenzene bio-reduction. Meanwhile, it was also found that the bound EPS of Shewanella species could act as biocatalyst for nitrobenzene reduction and the addition of flavins enhanced its catalytic activity. This indicated that the EPS of Shewanella species was not only involved in direct bio-reduction of nitrobenzene, but also interacted with secreted flavins to mediate nitrobenzene bio-reduction.

  3. Isolation of Shewanella putrefaciens in an elderly man with subacute intestinal obstruction & appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Arif Maqsood; Noorulamin, Muhammad; Arif, Shazia

    2017-01-01

    Shewanella is Gram-negative motile bacillus, non fermentative and facultative anaerobe. Its natural habitat is all forms of water and soil, but has also been isolated from fish, dairy products, oils, and carcasses. Often found with microflora of the marine environment. Bacterial infections with Shewanella spp. are rare. The exposure to the marine environment, sea and diary food are considered as a risk factor for Shewanella spp. infection. Clinical infections seen are otitis, soft tissue infection, bacteremia, ear infection, eye infection, infective arthritis, osteomyelitis, infective endocarditis and peritonitis.

  4. Isolation of Shewanella putrefaciens in an elderly man with subacute intestinal obstruction & appendicitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif Maqsood Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella is Gram-negative motile bacillus, non fermentative and facultative anaerobe. Its natural habitat is all forms of water and soil, but has also been isolated from fish, dairy products, oils, and carcasses. Often found with microflora of the marine environment. Bacterial infections with Shewanella spp. are rare. The exposure to the marine environment, sea and diary food are considered as a risk factor for Shewanella spp. infection. Clinical infections seen are otitis, soft tissue infection, bacteremia, ear infection, eye infection, infective arthritis, osteomyelitis, infective endocarditis and peritonitis.

  5. Comparisons of Shewanella strains based on genome annotations, modeling and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ong, Wai Kit; Vu, Trang; Lovendahl, Klaus N.; Llull, Jenna; Serres, Margaret; Romine, Margaret F.; Reed, Jennifer L.

    2014-01-01

    Shewanella is a genus of facultatively anaerobic, Gram-negative bacteria that have highly adaptable metabolism which allows them to thrive in diverse environments. This quality makes them attractive target bacteria for research in bioremediation and microbial fuel cell applications. Constraint-based modeling is a useful tool for helping researchers gain insights into the metabolic capabilities of these bacteria. However, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is the only strain with a genome-scale metabolic model constructed out of the 22 sequenced Shewanella strains.

  6. A Rare Case of Pneumonia Caused by Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Rajshree; Abraham, Albin; Thomas, Johnson; Zhi, Wanqing; Ahmed, Shadab; Verley, Janice

    2012-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, nonfermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. In some very rare cases Shewanella putrefaciens can be a human pathogen. It can produce a wide variety of clinical syndromes including bacteremia as well as skin and soft tissue infections. However, pneumonia due to S. putrefaciens is rare; there are a total of 4 reported cases in the literature. We present a case of 63-year-old male who was presented to emergency room status after cardiac arrest, fell into sea water face down. On the second day of hospitalization, he was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Empirical antibiotic treatment with vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of endotracheal aspirate yielded gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown from endotracheal aspirate culture was identified as S. putrefaciens by Biomerieux API 20 NE technique. On review of the literature and according to culture and sensitivity results, therapy in our patient was changed to cefepime. Patient's pneumonia improved with treatment with cefepime. We believe that our patient developed pneumonia evidently caused by S. putrefaciens, after near drowning in sea water. The pneumonia resolved after treatment with cefepime.

  7. A Rare Case of Pneumonia Caused by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajshree Patel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella putrefaciens is a gram-negative, nonfermentative, oxidase positive, motile bacillus that produces hydrogen sulphide. It is found widely in the nature especially in marine environments. In some very rare cases Shewanella putrefaciens can be a human pathogen. It can produce a wide variety of clinical syndromes including bacteremia as well as skin and soft tissue infections. However, pneumonia due to S. putrefaciens is rare; there are a total of 4 reported cases in the literature. We present a case of 63-year-old male who was presented to emergency room status after cardiac arrest, fell into sea water face down. On the second day of hospitalization, he was diagnosed to have pneumonia based on the clinical, radiological, and laboratory findings. Empirical antibiotic treatment with vancomycin and piperacillin/tazobactam combination was initiated. Gram-stained smear of endotracheal aspirate yielded gram-negative bacteria, and the isolate grown from endotracheal aspirate culture was identified as S. putrefaciens by Biomerieux API 20 NE technique. On review of the literature and according to culture and sensitivity results, therapy in our patient was changed to cefepime. Patient’s pneumonia improved with treatment with cefepime. We believe that our patient developed pneumonia evidently caused by S. putrefaciens, after near drowning in sea water. The pneumonia resolved after treatment with cefepime.

  8. Survival of Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 to GPa pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazael, Rachael; Foglia, Fabrizia; Leighs, James; Appleby-Thomas, Gareth; Daniel, Isabelle; Eakins, Daniel; Meersman, Filip; McMillian, Paul

    2013-06-01

    Most life on Earth is thought to occupy near-surface environments under relatively mild conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salinity etc. That view is changing following discovery of extremophile organisms that prefer environments based on high or low T, extreme chemistries, or very high pressures. Over the past three decades, geomicrobiologists have discovered an extensive subsurface biosphere, that may account for between 1/10 to 1/3 of Earth's living biomass. We subjected samples of Shewanella oneidensis to several pressure cycles to examine its survival to static high pressures to above 1.5 GPa. Shewanella forms part of a genus that contains several piezophile species like S. violacea and S. benthica. We have obtained growth curves for populations recovered from high P conditions and cultured in the laboratory, before being subjected to even higher pressures. We have also carried out dynamic shock experiments using a specially designed cell to maintain high-P, low-T conditions during shock-recovery experiments and observe colony formation among the survivors. Colony counts, shape and growth curves allow us to compare the static vs dynamic pressure resistance of wild type vs pressure-adapted strains. Leverhulme

  9. Enhancement of survival and electricity production in an engineered bacterium by light-driven proton pumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ethan T; Baron, Daniel B; Naranjo, Belén; Bond, Daniel R; Schmidt-Dannert, Claudia; Gralnick, Jeffrey A

    2010-07-01

    Microorganisms can use complex photosystems or light-dependent proton pumps to generate membrane potential and/or reduce electron carriers to support growth. The discovery that proteorhodopsin is a light-dependent proton pump that can be expressed readily in recombinant bacteria enables development of new strategies to probe microbial physiology and to engineer microbes with new light-driven properties. Here, we describe functional expression of proteorhodopsin and light-induced changes in membrane potential in the bacterium Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. We report that there were significant increases in electrical current generation during illumination of electrochemical chambers containing S. oneidensis expressing proteorhodopsin. We present evidence that an engineered strain is able to consume lactate at an increased rate when it is illuminated, which is consistent with the hypothesis that proteorhodopsin activity enhances lactate uptake by increasing the proton motive force. Our results demonstrate that there is coupling of a light-driven process to electricity generation in a nonphotosynthetic engineered bacterium. Expression of proteorhodopsin also preserved the viability of the bacterium under nutrient-limited conditions, providing evidence that fulfillment of basic energy needs of organisms may explain the widespread distribution of proteorhodopsin in marine environments.

  10. Identification of regulatory sequences and expression analysis of OmpR gene under different stress conditions in the antarctic bacterium Psychrobacter sp. G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Weizhi; Lin, Xuezheng; Che, Shuai

    2013-03-01

    An OmpR gene, named OmpR503, was cloned from the Antarctic psychrotrophic bacterium Psychrobacter sp. G according to its genomic draft. The deduced amino acid sequences of OmpR503 were highly conserved with other known protein members of OmpR family. qRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression of OmpR503 gene was significantly enhanced by high salinity (90, 120). The expression of OmpR503 gene was also significantly increased at low temperature (0, 10 °C), whereas depressed at high temperature (30 °C). When the strain was subjected to combined stress (0 °C with a salinity of 90), the expression of OmpR503 gene was increased significantly, which was up to 3.0-fold. In Antarctica, freezing tolerance of psychrotrophic bacteria is often accompanied by tolerance to osmotic stress caused by a lack of free water, thus the cold inducibility of OmpR503 gene might help the strain adapt to the harsh environment more efficiently.

  11. Psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria associated with production batch recalls and sporadic cases of early spoilage in Belgium between 2010 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Taminiau, Bernard; Huys, Geert; Nezer, Carine; Daube, Georges; Devlieghere, Frank

    2014-11-17

    Between 2010 and 2014 several spoilage cases in Belgium occurring in retail foodstuffs prior to the end of shelf-life have been reported to our laboratory. Overall, seven cases involved strictly psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) contamination in packaged and chilled-stored food products. The products derived either from recalls of entire production batches or as specimens of sporadic spoilage manifestations. Some of these samples were returned to the manufacturing companies by consumers who observed the alterations after purchasing the products. The products covered a wide range of foodstuffs (i.e. meat, dairy, vegetable, egg products and composite food) and denoted different spoilage defects. However, the microbiota determined by means of 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing analysis underpin few LAB genera (i.e. Leuconostoc, Lactobacillus, Weissella and Lactococcus), which are frequently encountered nowadays as specific spoilage organisms (SSO) albeit overlooked by mesophilic enumeration methods due to their strictly psychrotrophic character. The present study confirms the spreading of psychrotrophic LAB in Belgian food processing environments leading to unexpected spoilage, corroborating their spoilage dynamics and prevalence in all kinds of packaged and refrigerated foodstuffs in Northern Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Psychrotrophic members of Leuconostoc gasicomitatum, Leuconostoc gelidum and Lactococcus piscium dominate at the end of shelf-life in packaged and chilled-stored food products in Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Snauwaert, Cindy; De Vos, Paul; Huys, Geert; Devlieghere, Frank

    2014-05-01

    Previously, a considerable underestimation (+0.5-3.2 log CFU/g) on the contamination levels of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) was observed for 33 retail, packaged food products stored at chilling temperature when the mesophilic enumeration technique was implemented as reference shelf-life parameter. In the present study, the microbial diversity of the dominant psychrotrophic LAB recovered after incubation of plates at 22 °C for 5 days was determined using a polyphasic taxonomic approach. A total of 212 LAB isolates were identified using a combination of rep-PCR fingerprinting, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and pheS gene sequencing. Leuconostoc gasicomitatum, Leuconostoc gelidum, Leuconostoc spp., Lactococcus piscium and Lactobacillus algidus proved to be the most competent and predominant species that may go undetected by the widely applied mesophilic enumeration protocols (ISO 4833:2003 and ISO 15214:1998). This study has assessed the interspecific variation among potential spoilage LAB, and highlights the significance of implementing a reference shelf-life parameter based on the enumeration of the total psychrotrophic bacterial load for industrial microbiological routine analyses.

  13. Shewanella oneidensis: a new and efficient System for Expression and Maturation of heterologous [Fe-Fe] Hydrogenase from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sybirna Kateryna

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eukaryotic green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, produces H2 under anaerobic conditions, in a reaction catalysed by a [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase HydA1. For further biochemical and biophysical studies a suitable expression system of this enzyme should be found to overcome its weak expression in the host organism. Two heterologous expression systems used up to now have several advantages. However they are not free from some drawbacks. In this work we use bacterium Shewanella oneidensis as a new and efficient system for expression and maturation of HydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Results Based on codon usage bias and hydrogenase maturation ability, the bacterium S. oneidensis, which possesses putative [Fe-Fe] and [Ni-Fe] hydrogenase operons, was selected as the best potential host for C. reinhardtii [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase expression. Hydrogen formation by S. oneidensis strain AS52 (ΔhydAΔhyaB transformed with a plasmid bearing CrHydA1 and grown in the presence of six different substrates for anaerobic respiration was determined. A significant increase in hydrogen evolution was observed for cells grown in the presence of trimethylamine oxide, dimethylsulfoxide and disodium thiosulfate, showing that the system of S. oneidensis is efficient for heterologous expression of algal [Fe-Fe] hydrogenase. Conclusion In the present work a new efficient system for heterologous expression and maturation of C. reinhardtii hydrogenase has been developed. HydA1 of C. reinhardtii was purified and shown to contain 6 Fe atoms/molecule of protein, as expected. Using DMSO, TMAO or thiosulfate as substrates for anaerobic respiration during the cell growth, 0.4 – 0.5 mg l-1(OD600 = 1 of catalytically active HydA1 was obtained with hydrogen evolution rate of ~700 μmol H2 mg-1 min-1.

  14. SHEWANELLA AND PHOTOBACTERIUM IN OYSTERS AND SEAWATER FROM THE DELAWARE BAY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewanella algae, S. putrefaciens, and Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae are indigenous marine bacteria and human pathogens causing cellulitis, necrotizing fasciitis, abscesses, septicemia, and death. Infections are rare and are most often associated with the immunocompromized host. A study ...

  15. Understanding the role of multiheme cytochromes in iron(III) reduction and arsenic mobilization by Shewanella sp. ANA-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, C.; Duenas, R.; Saltikov, C.

    2006-12-01

    The reduction of Fe (III) to Fe (II) and of arsenate (As (V)) to arsenite (As (III)) by Fe (III) reducing and As (V) respiring prokaryotes such as the bacterium Shewanella sp. ANA-3 may contribute to arsenic mobilization in aquifers contaminated with arsenic, specifically in places such as Bangladesh. Under oxic conditions As (V) predominates and is often adsorbed onto mineral surfaces such as amorphous ferrihydrite. However, under anoxic conditions As (III) predominates, sorbs to fewer minerals, and has a greater hydrologic mobility compared to As (V). The genetic mechanism underlying arsenic release from subsurface material most likely involves a combination of respiratory gene clusters (e.g. mtr/omc and arr). In this study, we are investigating the genetic pathways underlying arsenic mobilization. We have generated various mutations in the mtr/omc gene cluster, which encodes several outermembrane decaheme c-type cytochromes. Deletions in one mtr/omc gene did not eliminate iron reduction. However, strains carrying multiple gene deletions were greatly impaired in iron reduction abilities. Work is currently underway to generate combinations of iron reduction and arsenate reduction single and double mutants that will be used to investigate microbial mobilization of arsenic in flow-through columns containing As (V)-HFO coated sand. This work will address the importance of arsenate reduction and iron reduction in the mobilization of arsenic.

  16. Effects of electron transfer mediators on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Edward J

    2008-09-15

    Electron transfer mediators (ETMs) such as low-molecular-mass quinones (e.g., juglone and lawsone) and humic substances are believed to play a role in many redox reactions involved in contaminant transformations and the biogeochemical cycling of many redox-active elements (e.g., Fe and Mn) in aquatic and terrestrial environments. This study examines the effects of a series of compounds representing major classes of natural and synthetic organic ETMs, including low-molecular-mass quinones, humic substances, phenazines, phenoxazines, phenothiazines, and indigo derivatives, on the bioreduction of lepidocrocite (gamma-FeOOH) by the dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. Although S. putrefaciens CN32 was able to reduce lepidocrocite in the absence of exogenous ETMs, the addition of exogenous ETMs enhanced the bioreduction of lepidocrocite. In general, the rate of Fe(II) production correlated well with the reduction potentials of the ETMs. The addition of humic acids or unfractionated natural organic matter at concentrations of 10 mg organic CL(-1) resulted in, at best, a minimal enhancement of lepidocrocite bioreduction. This observation suggests that electron shuttling by humic substances is not likely to play a major role in Fe(lll) bioreduction in oligotrophic environments such as subsurface sediments with low organic C contents.

  17. Magnetite as a precursor for green rust through the hydrogenotrophic activity of the iron-reducing bacteria Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etique, M; Jorand, F P A; Ruby, C

    2016-05-01

    Magnetite (Fe(II) Fe(III) 2 O4 ) is often considered as a stable end product of the bioreduction of Fe(III) minerals (e.g., ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, hematite) or of the biological oxidation of Fe(II) compounds (e.g., siderite), with green rust (GR) as a mixed Fe(II) -Fe(III) hydroxide intermediate. Until now, the biotic transformation of magnetite to GR has not been evidenced. In this study, we investigated the capability of an iron-reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens, to reduce magnetite at circumneutral pH in the presence of dihydrogen as sole inorganic electron donor. During incubation, GR and/or siderite (Fe(II) CO3 ) formation occurred as secondary iron minerals, resulting from the precipitation of Fe(II) species produced via the bacterial reduction of Fe(III) species present in magnetite. Taking into account the exact nature of the secondary iron minerals and the electron donor source is necessary to understand the exergonic character of the biotic transformation of magnetite to GR, which had been considered to date as thermodynamically unfavorable at circumneutral pH. This finding reinforces the hypothesis that GR would be the cornerstone of the microbial transformations of iron-bearing minerals in the anoxic biogeochemical cycle of iron and opens up new possibilities for the interpretation of the evolution of Earth's history and for the understanding of biocorrosion processes in the field of applied science. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Intracellular precipitation of Pb by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 during the reductive dissolution of Pb-jarosite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeaton, Christina M; Fryer, Brian J; Weisener, Christopher G

    2009-11-01

    Jarosites (MFe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6)) are precipitated in the Zn industry to remove impurities during the extraction process and contain metals such as Pb and Ag. Jarosite wastes are often confined to capped tailings ponds, thereby creating potential for anaerobic reductive dissolution by microbial populations. This study demonstrates the reductive dissolution of synthetic Pb-jarosite (PbFe(6)(SO(4))(4)(OH)(12)) by a subsurface dissimilatory Fe reducing bacterium (Shewanella putrefaciens CN32) using batch experiments under anaerobic circumneutral conditions. Solution chemistry, pH, Eh, and cell viability were monitored over time and illustrated the reduction of released structural Fe(III) from the Pb-jarosite to Fe(II). Inoculated samples containing Pb-jarosite also demonstrated decreased cellular viability coinciding with increased Pb concentrations. SEM images showed progressive nucleation of electron dense nanoparticles on the surface of bacteria, identified by TEM/EDS as intracellular crystalline precipitates enriched in Pb and P. The intracellular precipitation of Pb by S. putrefaciens CN32 observed in this study provides potential new insight into the biogeochemical cycling of Pb in reducing environments.

  19. Sequence and Genetic Characterization of etrA, an fnr Analog that Regulates Anaerobic Respiration in Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Nelson, Kenneth H.

    1993-01-01

    An electron transport regulatory gene, etrA, has been isolated and characterized from the obligate respiratory bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens MR-l. The deduced amino acid sequence of etrA (EtrA) shows a high degree of identity to both the Fnr of Escherichia coli (73.6%) and the analogous protein (ANR) of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (50.8%). The four active cysteine residues of Fnr are conserved in EtrA, and the amino acid sequence of the DNA-binding domains of the two proteins are identical. Further, S.putrefaciens etrA is able to complement an fnr mutant of E.coli. In contrast to fnr, there is no recognizable Fnr box upstream of the etrA sequence. Gene replacement etr.A mutants of MR-1 were deficient in growth on nitrite, thiosulfate, sulfite, trimethylamine-N-oxide, dimethyl sulfoxide, Fe(III), and fumarate, suggesting that EtrA is involved in the regulation of the corresponding reductase genes. However, the mutants were all positive for reduction of and growth on nitrate and Mn(IV), indicating that EtrA is not involved in the regulation of these two systems. Southern blots of S.putrefaciens DNA with use of etrA as a probe revealed the expected etrA bands and a second set of hybridization signals whose genetic and functional properties remain to be determined.

  20. Use of an Electrochemical Split Cell Technique to Evaluate the Influence of Shewanella oneidensis Activities on Corrosion of Carbon Steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert Bertram; Sadek, Anwar; Rodriguez, Alvaro; Iannuzzi, Mariano; Giai, Carla; Senko, John M; Monty, Chelsea N

    2016-01-01

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) is a complex problem that affects various industries. Several techniques have been developed to monitor corrosion and elucidate corrosion mechanisms, including microbiological processes that induce metal deterioration. We used zero resistance ammetry (ZRA) in a split chamber configuration to evaluate the effects of the facultatively anaerobic Fe(III) reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 on the corrosion of UNS G10180 carbon steel. We show that activities of S. oneidensis inhibit corrosion of steel with which that organism has direct contact. However, when a carbon steel coupon in contact with S. oneidensis was electrically connected to a second coupon that was free of biofilm (in separate chambers of the split chamber assembly), ZRA-based measurements indicated that current moved from the S. oneidensis-containing chamber to the cell-free chamber. This electron transfer enhanced the O2 reduction reaction on the coupon deployed in the cell free chamber, and consequently, enhanced oxidation and corrosion of that electrode. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism for MIC in cases where metal surfaces are heterogeneously covered by biofilms.

  1. Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel cell by a newly isolated Shewanella marisflavi EP1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jiexun [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China). Hefei National Lab. for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences; State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources; Sun, Baolin [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Hefei (China). Hefei National Lab. for Physical Sciences at Microscale and School of Life Sciences; Zhang, Xiaobo [Zhejiang Univ., Hangzhou (China). Coll. of Life Sciences; State Oceanic Administration, Xiamen (China). Key Lab. of Marine Biogenetic Resources

    2010-01-15

    Increasing the ionic strength of the electrolyte in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) can remarkably increase power output due to the reduction of internal resistance. However, only a few bacterial strains are capable of producing electricity at a very high ionic strength. In this report, we demonstrate a newly isolated strain EP1, belonging to Shewanella marisflavi based on polyphasic analysis, which could reduce Fe(III) and generate power at a high ionic strength of up to 1,488 mM (8% NaCl) using lactate as the electron donor. Using this bacterium, a measured maximum power density of 3.6 mW/m{sup 2} was achieved at an ionic strength of 291 mM. The maximum power density was increased by 167% to 9.6 mW/m{sup 2} when ionic strength was increased to 1,146 mM. However, further increasing the ionic strength to 1,488 mM resulted in a decrease in power density to 5.2 mW/m{sup 2}. Quantification of the internal resistance distribution revealed that electrolyte resistance was greatly reduced from 1,178 to 50 {omega} when ionic strength increased from 291 to 1,488 mM. These results indicate that isolation of specific bacterial strains can effectively improve power generation in some MFC applications. (orig.)

  2. Properties of a subtilisin-like proteinase from a psychrotrophic Vibrio species comparison with proteinase K and aqualysin I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsson, M M; Magnússon, O T; Gudmundsson, H M; Alfredsson, G A; Matsuzawa, H

    1999-03-01

    An extracellular serine proteinase purified from cultures of a psychrotrophic Vibrio species (strain PA-44) belongs to the proteinase K family of the superfamily of subtilisin-like proteinases. The enzyme is secreted as a 47-kDa protein, but under mild heat treatment (30 min at 40 degrees C) undergoes autoproteolytic cleavage on the carboxyl-side of the molecule to give a proteinase with a molecular mass of about 36 kDa that apparently shares most of the enzymatic characteristics and the stability of the 47-kDa protein. In this study, selected enzymatic properties of the Vibrio proteinase were compared with those of the related proteinases, proteinase K and aqualysin I, as representative mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes, respectively. The catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) for the amidase activity of the cold-adapted enzyme against succinyl-AAPF-p-nitroanilide was significantly higher than that of its mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, especially when compared with aqualysin I. The stability of the Vibrio proteinase, both towards heat and denaturants, was found to be significantly lower than of either proteinase K or aqualysin I. One or more disulfide bonds in the psychrotrophic proteinase are important for the integrity of the active enzyme structure, as disulfide cleavage, either by reduction with dithiothreitol or by sulfitolysis, led to a loss in its activity. Under the same conditions, aqualysin I was also partially inactivated by dithiothreitol, but the activity of proteinase K was unaffected. The disulfides of either proteinase K or aqualysin I were not reactive towards sulfitolysis, except under denaturing conditions, while all disulfides of the Vibrio proteinase reacted in absence of a denaturant. The reactivity of the disulfides of the proteins as a function of denaturant concentration followed the order: Vibrio proteinase > proteinase K > aqualysin I. The same order of reactivity was also observed for the inactivation of the enzymes by H2O2

  3. Mechanism(s) of Electricity Production by Shewanella and other Microbes: Understanding and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    Zhou. 2009. Reduction of nitrate in Shewanella oneidensis depends on atypical NAP and NRF systems with NapB as a preferred electron transport protein...the activities of microbes acting as catalysts on the cathodes of MFC systems. During this time, we published over *** reviewed papers, presented...Production and Metal Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Wild Type and Mutants. Applied and Environmental Microbiology 73:7003-7012. 8. El

  4. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos, William D.; McDonough, J.; Senko, John M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice; Kelly, Shelly D.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2008-10-15

    The reduction of uranium(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was studied to examine the effects of bioreduction kinetics and background electrolyte on the physical properties and reactivity to re-oxidation of the biogenic uraninite, UO2(s). Bioreduction experiments were conducted with uranyl acetate as the electron acceptor and sodium lactate as the electron donor under resting cell conditions in a 30 mM NaHCO3 buffer, and in a PIPES-buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW). MR-1 was cultured in batch mode in a defined minimal medium with a specified air-to-medium volume ratio such that electron acceptor (O2) limiting conditions were reached just when cells were harvested for subsequent experiments. The rate of U(VI) bioreduction was manipulated by varying the cell density and the incubation temperature (1.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 20 _C or 2.0 _ 108 cell ml_1 at 37 _C) to generate U(IV) solids at ‘‘fast” and ‘‘slow” rates in the two different buffers. The presence of Ca in PBAGW buffer altered U(VI) speciation and solubility, and significantly decreased U(VI) bioreduction kinetics. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to measure uraninite particle size distributions produced under the four different conditions. The most common primary particle size was 2.9–3.0 nm regardless of U(VI) bioreduction rate or background electrolyte. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was also used to estimate uraninite particle size and was consistent with TEM results. The reactivity of the biogenic uraninite products with dissolved oxygen was tested, and neither U(VI) bioreduction rate nor background electrolyte had any statistical effect on oxidation rates. With MR-1, uraninite particle size was not controlled by the bioreduction rate of U(VI) or the background electrolyte. These results for MR-1, where U(VI) bioreduction rate had no discernible effect on uraninite particle size or oxidation rate, contrast with our recent research with

  5. Characterization of uraninite nanoparticles produced by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, William D.; McDonough, Jeffrey T.; Senko, John M.; Zhang, Gengxin; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Gorby, Yuri; Kemner, Kenneth M.

    2008-10-01

    The reduction of uranium(VI) by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was studied to examine the effects of bioreduction kinetics and background electrolyte on the physical properties and reactivity to re-oxidation of the biogenic uraninite, UO 2(s). Bioreduction experiments were conducted with uranyl acetate as the electron acceptor and sodium lactate as the electron donor under resting cell conditions in a 30 mM NaHCO 3 buffer, and in a PIPES-buffered artificial groundwater (PBAGW). MR-1 was cultured in batch mode in a defined minimal medium with a specified air-to-medium volume ratio such that electron acceptor (O 2) limiting conditions were reached just when cells were harvested for subsequent experiments. The rate of U(VI) bioreduction was manipulated by varying the cell density and the incubation temperature (1.0 × 10 8 cell ml -1 at 20 °C or 2.0 × 10 8 cell ml -1 at 37 °C) to generate U(IV) solids at "fast" and "slow" rates in the two different buffers. The presence of Ca in PBAGW buffer altered U(VI) speciation and solubility, and significantly decreased U(VI) bioreduction kinetics. High resolution transmission electron microscopy was used to measure uraninite particle size distributions produced under the four different conditions. The most common primary particle size was 2.9-3.0 nm regardless of U(VI) bioreduction rate or background electrolyte. Extended X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy was also used to estimate uraninite particle size and was consistent with TEM results. The reactivity of the biogenic uraninite products with dissolved oxygen was tested, and neither U(VI) bioreduction rate nor background electrolyte had any statistical effect on oxidation rates. With MR-1, uraninite particle size was not controlled by the bioreduction rate of U(VI) or the background electrolyte. These results for MR-1, where U(VI) bioreduction rate had no discernible effect on uraninite particle size or oxidation rate, contrast with our recent research with

  6. Molecular characterization of Shewanella and Aeromonas isolates associated with spoilage of Common carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaz-Hidalgo, Roxana; Agüeria, Daniela; Latif-Eugenín, Fadua; Yeannes, Maria I; Figueras, Maria J

    2015-01-01

    Storage in ice is a common way of preserving commercial fish species but some microorganisms can still contaminate and participate in the spoilage of the product; therefore, identification of potential harmful microbes is important. Thirteen colonies were isolated from common carp (Cyprinus carpio) that had been stored in ice, whose phenotypic identification revealed that they belonged to the genera Aeromonas (n = 5) and Shewanella (n = 8). Molecular genotyping with ERIC-PCR showed clonality only among two of the five Aeromonas isolates and for two groups (n = 3; n = 2) of the eight Shewanella isolates. Sequencing the rpoD gene showed that four Aeromonas isolates belonged to the species Aeromonas salmonicida and one to A. sobria. Of the eight Shewanella, seven isolates cluster with Shewanella putrefaciens and one with Shewanella profunda in the 16S rRNA phylogenetic tree. However, analysis of the gyrB gene showed that these eight isolates could constitute a new species closely related to S. baltica. The Shewanella and A. salmonicida isolates produce off-odours and reduce trimethylamine oxide, indicating that they might contribute to the spoilage of the fish. © FEMS 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. The genus Shewanella: from the briny depths below to human pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, J Michael; Abbott, Sharon L

    2014-11-01

    The genus Shewanella is currently composed of more than 50 species that inhabit a range of marine environs and ecosystems. Several members of this genus, including S. oneidensis, have been identified that could potentially play key roles in environmental processes such as bioremediation of toxic elements and heavy metals and serving as microbial fuel cells. In contrast to this beneficial role, shewanellae are increasingly being implicated as human pathogens in persons exposed through occupational or recreational activities to marine niches containing shewanellae. Documented illnesses linked to Shewanella include skin and soft tissue infections, bacteremia, and otitis media. At present, it is unclear exactly how many Shewanella species are truly bona fide human pathogens. Recent advances in the taxonomy and phylogenetic relatedness of members of this genus, however, support the concept that most human infections are caused by a single species, S. algae. Some phylogenetic data further suggest that some current members of the genus are not true Shewanella species sensu stricto. The current review summarizes our present knowledge of the distribution, epidemiology, disease spectrum, and identification of microbial species focusing on a clinical perspective.

  8. Outbreak of Shewanella algae and Shewanella putrefaciens infections caused by a shared measuring cup in a general surgery unit in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hyang Soon; Kum, Kyung Ah; Kim, Eui-Chong; Lee, Hoan-Jong; Choe, Kang Won; Oh, Myoung Don

    2008-08-01

    To control an outbreak of Shewanella algae and S. putrefaciens infections by identifying the risk factors for infection and transmission. Matched case-control study. A university-affiliated tertiary acute care hospital in Seoul, Republic of Korea, with approximately 1,600 beds. From June 20, 2003, to January 16, 2004, a total of 31 case patients with Shewanella colonization or infection and 62 control patients were enrolled in the study. Requirement to use single-use measuring cups and standard precautions (including hand washing before and after patient care and use of gloves). S. algae or S. putrefaciens was isolated from blood, for 9 (29.0%) of 31 patients who acquired one of the organisms; from bile, for 8 (25.8%), and from ascitic fluid, for 8 (25.8%). The attack rate of this outbreak was 5.8% (31 patients infected or colonized, of 534 potentially exposed on ward A) and the pathogenicity of the two species together was 77.4% (24 patients infected, of 31 who acquired the pathogens). The estimated incubation period for Shewanella acquisition was 3-49 days. Using logistic analysis, we identified the following risk factors: presence of external drainage catheters in the hepatobiliary system (odds ratio [OR], 20; P Shewanella isolate was recovered from the surface of a shared measuring cup, and 12 isolates of S. algae showed the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern. This Shewanella outbreak had a single-source origin and spread by contact transmission via a contaminated measuring cup. Shewanella species are emerging as potentially serious human pathogens in hospitals and could be included in hospital infection surveillance systems.

  9. [Osteomyelitis due to Shewanella putrefaciens: case report and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinetti-Ortiz, Katia; Bocanegra-Jesús, Alejandra; Gómez de la Torre-Del Carpio, Andrea

    2016-11-29

    Shewanella putrefaciens is a Gram-negative bacillus and marine pathogen that rarely causes disease in humans. We report a case of osteomyelitis by this organism in a 48-year-old male patient, who presented with pain and erythema of the right foot that was initially diagnosed as cellulitis and did not revert despite treatment. He was transferred to Lima where osteomyelitis was diagnosed and started on empirical treatment with partial regression. A biopsy and culture of the compromised area found S. putrefaciens. The infection was treated according to the antibiotic sensitivity profile of the pathogen. S. putrefaciens infection represents a rare opportunistic infection of devitalized or exposed areas of the body. It is associated with residence in coastal areas and commonly affects the skin and soft tissues. Exceptional cases of osteomyelitis have been reported, but this is the first that involves the metatarsal bones.

  10. Shewanella putrefaciens, a rare cause of splenic abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basir, Norwani; Yong, Alice Moi Ling; Chong, Vui Heng

    2012-04-01

    Splenic abscess is uncommon and is still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Gram-negative bacilli are the most commonly isolated organisms, followed by Gram-positive cocci. However, the predominant organisms found depend on the geographic location. Shewanella putrefaciens is a Gram-negative non-fermentative oxidative bacillus found in the environment. Infection usually manifests with a number of clinical syndromes, most commonly as skin or soft tissue infections, typically in patients whose immune system is compromised. Intra-abdominal abscess is extremely rare. We report a case of a 22-year-old female who presented with S. putrefaciens splenic abscesses as the first manifestation of diabetes mellitus, which was successfully managed with a course of antibiotic therapy. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Recurrent Ochrobactrum anthropi and Shewanella putrefaciens bloodstream infection complicating hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrishrimal, Kumarpal

    2012-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are common in hemodialysis, especially when the access is a catheter. These infections are more commonly gram-positive bacteria or gram-negative bacilli and on some occasions, fungi. Ochrobactrum anthropi and Shewanella putrefaciens are ubiquitous hydrophilic gram-negative bacilli. There have been three cases of O. anthropi BSI reported in hemodialysis patients (one from the United States and two from Vienna) and two cases of S. putrefaciens BSI in hemodialysis patients (one from the United States and the other from Japan). There have been few more cases reported of infections with these bacteria in peritoneal dialysis, especially outside the United States. We present a novel case of a patient with both recurrent O. anthropi and S. putrefaciens BSI complicating hemodialysis. There have been no reports in the literature of such a case. We also discuss the microbiology, clinical features, and the challenging aspects of treatment of such infections.

  12. Complete genome sequence of Shewanella putrefaciens. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidelberg, John F.

    2001-04-01

    Seventy percent of the costs for genome sequencing Shewanella putrefaciens (oneidensis) were requested. These funds were expected to allow completion of the low-pass (5-fold) random sequencing and complete closure and annotation of the 200 kbp plasmid. Because of cost reduction that occurred during the period of this grant, these goals have been far exceeded. Currently, the S. putrefaciens genome is very nearly completely closed, even though the genome was significantly larger than expected and extremely repetitive. The entire genome sequence has been made BLAST searchable on the TIGR web page, and an extensive effort has been made to make data and analyses available to all researchers working on S. putrefaciens (oneidensis).

  13. Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation on food processing surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, M.; Johansen, C.

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended...... in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25 degreesC and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 10(8) CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system...... (modified Robbins device) (reaching 10(2) CFU/cm(2)) than in a batch system (reaching 10(7) CFU/cm(2)), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were...

  14. Cold active hydrolytic enzymes production by psychrotrophic Bacilli isolated from three sub-glacial lakes of NW Indian Himalayas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Ajar Nath; Sachan, Shashwati Ghosh; Verma, Priyanka; Kaushik, Rajeev; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2016-03-01

    The diversity of culturable, cold-active enzymes producing Bacilli was investigated from three sub-glacial lakes of north western Indian Himalayas. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) using three restriction enzymes Alu I, Msp I, and Hae III led to the clustering of 136 Bacilli into 26, 23, and 22 clusters at 75% similarity index from Chandratal Lake, Dashair Lake, and Pangong Lake, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing led to the identification of 35 Bacilli that could be grouped in seven families viz.: Bacillaceae (48%), Staphylococcaceae (14%), Bacillales incertae sedis (13%), Planococcaceae (12%), Paenibacillaceae (9%), Sporolactobacillaceae (3%), and Carnobacteriaceae (1%), which included twelve different genera Bacillus, Desemzia, Exiguobacterium, Jeotgalicoccus, Lysinibacillus, Paenibacillus, Planococcus, Pontibacillus, Sinobaca, Sporosarcina, Staphylococcus, and Virgibacillus. Based on their optimal temperature for growth, 35 Bacilli were grouped as psychrophilic (11 strains), psychrotrophic (17 strains), or psychrotolerant (7 strains), respectively. The representative isolates from each cluster were screened for cold-active enzyme activities. Amylase, β-glucosidase, pectinase, and protease activities at 4 °C were detected in more than 80% of the strains while approximately 40, 31, 23, 14, 11, and 9% of strains possessed cellulase, xylanase, β-galactosidase, laccase, chitinase, and lipase activity, respectively. Among 35 Bacilli, Bacillus amyloliquefaciens, Bacillus marisflavi, Exiguobacterium indicum, Paenibacillus terrae, Pontibacillus sp., Sporosarcina globispora, and Sporosarcina psychrophila were efficient producers of different cold-active enzymes. These cold-adapted Bacilli could play an important role in industrial and agricultural processes.

  15. Lactococcus lactis - a diploid bacterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Ole; Hansen, Flemming G.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    In contrast to higher eukaryotes, bacteria are haploid, i.e. they store their genetic information in a single chromosome, which is then duplicated during the cell cycle. If the growth rate is sufficiently low, the bacterium is born with only a single copy of the chromosome, which gets duplicated...... before the bacterium divides. Fast-growing bacteria have overlapping rounds of replication, and can contain DNA corresponding to more than four genome equivalents. However, the terminus region of the chromosome is still present in just one copy after division, and is not duplicated until right before...... the next division. Thus, the regions of the chromosome that are the last to be replicated are haploid even in fast-growing bacteria. In contrast to this general rule for bacteria, we found that Lactococcus lactis, a bacterium which has been exploited for thousands of years for the production of fermented...

  16. Hazard Analysis and Control of Psychrotrophic Bacterias and Heat Resistant Enzymes in Raw Milk and Dairy Products%乳和乳制品中嗜冷菌及其耐热酶的危害与控制研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王娇; 张筠; 刘术明; 刘文丽

    2015-01-01

    嗜冷菌是乳低温贮藏中的主要腐败菌,嗜冷菌及其代谢酶的存在直接影响原料乳的质量,阐述了嗜冷菌及其耐热酶类对乳及乳制品的危害,并通过分析嗜冷菌的适冷机理和影响酶活的因素,探讨控制嗜冷菌及其代谢酶的方法,以保障原料乳质量。%Psychrotrophic bacteria is the primary putrefying bacteria in low-temperature storage raw milk , Psychrotrophic bacteria and the thermostable enzymes they made have enormous implications on raw milk ,in this article,the perniciousness Psychrotrophic bacteria and the thermostable enzymes they made to milk and dairy products are introduced,by analyze the mechanism how Psychrotrophic bacteria can live in low temperature and the factors that influence the enzymes' activities ,investigate the methods to control Psychrotrophic bacteria and the enzymes they produce to guarantee the quality of raw milk.

  17. Single Bacterium Detection Using Sers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonchukov, S. A.; Baikova, T. V.; Alushin, M. V.; Svistunova, T. S.; Minaeva, S. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    This work is devoted to the study of a single Staphylococcus aureus bacterium detection using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and resonant Raman spectroscopy (RS). It was shown that SERS allows increasing sensitivity of predominantly low frequency lines connected with the vibrations of Amide, Proteins and DNA. At the same time the lines of carotenoids inherent to this kind of bacterium are well-detected due to the resonance Raman scattering mechanism. The reproducibility and stability of Raman spectra strongly depend on the characteristics of nanostructured substrate, and molecular structure and size of the tested biological object.

  18. Molecular Underpinnings of Fe(III Oxide Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang eShi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of O2 and other electron acceptors, the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 can use ferric [Fe(III] (oxy(hydroxide minerals as the terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. At circumneutral pH and in the absence of strong complexing ligands, Fe(III oxides are relatively insoluble and thus are external to the bacterial cells. S. oneidensis MR-1 has evolved the machinery (i.e., metal-reducing or Mtr pathway for transferring electrons across the entire cell envelope to the surface of extracellular Fe(III oxides. The protein components identified to date for the Mtr pathway include CymA, MtrA, MtrB, MtrC and OmcA. CymA is an inner-membrane tetraheme c-type cytochrome (c-Cyt that is proposed to oxidize the quinol in the inner-membrane and transfers the released electrons to redox proteins in the periplasm. Although the periplasmic proteins receiving electrons from CymA during Fe(III oxidation have not been identified, they are believed to relay the electrons to MtrA. A decaheme c-Cyt, MtrA is thought to be embedded in the trans outer-membrane and porin-like protein MtrB. Together, MtrAB deliver the electrons across the outer-membrane to the MtrC and OmcA on the outmost bacterial surface. Functioning as terminal reductases, the outer membrane and decaheme c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA can bind the surface of Fe(III oxides and transfer electrons directly to these minerals. To increase their reaction rates, MtrC and OmcA can use the flavins secreted by S. oneidensis MR-1 cells as diffusible co-factors for reduction of Fe(III oxides. MtrC and OmcA can also serve as the terminal reductases for soluble forms of Fe(III. Although our understanding of the Mtr pathway is still far from complete, it is the best characterized microbial pathway used for extracellular electron exchange. Characterizations of the Mtr pathway have made significant contributions to the molecular understanding of microbial reduction of Fe(III oxides.

  19. Zinc and Arsenic Immobilization and Magnetite Formation Upon Maghemite Reduction by Shewanella putrefaciens ATCC 8071

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismasu, C.; Ona-Nguema, G.; Bonnin, D.; Menguy, N.; Brown, G. E.

    2007-12-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of ferric iron oxides is recognized as an important component of the iron biogeochemical cycle, causing the dissolution of iron oxide minerals and the possible formation of Fe(II)-bearing minerals such as magnetite, green rusts, siderite, etc. These mineralogical transformations affect the mobility of surface- associated toxic metal(loid)s, which may be released into solution, adsorbed, or incorporated into newly formed minerals. Maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) is an iron oxide mineral that is found in certain tropical soils and as isolated deposits in more temperate regions. In these settings, maghemite may play an important role in the biogeochemical cycling of iron and of surface-associated trace metal(loids). However, the reduction of maghemite by iron-respiring bacteria, the impact of reductive dissolution on the release of associated contaminants, and the nature of biogenic Fe(II)-containing reaction products are not well documented. In the present study, we incubated samples of pure maghemite and As(V)- and Zn-adsorbed maghemite with an iron reducing bacterium, Shewanella putrefaciens strain ATCC 8071, in a batch system under anoxic conditions. As a result of Fe(III) bioreduction, all mineral suspensions turned from brown to black during the first hour of incubation, indicating the onset of magnetite formation. The presence of this mineral was confirmed by transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy at room temperature, which showed the formation of an almost stoichiometric magnetite. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy images indicate that the parent maghemite and the biogenic magnetite particles are octahedral in shape and of similar size (5 to 20 nm). The presence of 50 mg/L adsorbed Zn(II) did not affect the initial rate of iron reduction with respect to the Zn-free maghemite sample (0.62 mM Fe(II)/h and 0.66 mM Fe(II)/h, respectively). However, adsorption of 50 and 100 mg/L As(V) on maghemite decreased the initial iron reduction rate

  20. Molecular Dynamics of the Shewanella oneidensis Response toChromate Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, S.D.; Thompson, M.R.; VerBerkmoes, N.C.; Chourey, K.; Shah, M.; Zhou, J.-Z.; Hettich, R.L.; Thompson, D.K.

    2007-09-21

    Temporal genomic profiling and whole-cell proteomic analyseswere performed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of themetal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to an acute chromateshock. The complex dynamics of cellular processes demand the integrationof methodologies that describe biological systems at the levels ofregulation, gene and protein expression, and metabolite production.Genomic microarray analysis of the transcriptome dynamics ofmidexponential phase cells subjected to 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4)at exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min revealed 910 genesthat were differentially expressed at one or more time points. Stronglyinduced genes included those encoding components of a TonB1 irontransport system (tonB1-exbB1-exbD1), hemin ATP-binding cassettetransporters (hmuTUV), TonB-dependent receptors as well as sulfatetransporters (cysP, cysW-2, and cysA-2), and enzymes involved inassimilative sulfur metabolism (cysC, cysN, cysD, cysH, cysI, and cysJ).Transcript levels for genes with annotated functions in DNA repair (lexA,recX, recA, recN, dinP, and umuD), cellular detoxification (so1756,so3585, and so3586), and two-component signal transduction systems(so2426) were also significantly up-regulated (p<0.05) inCr(VI)-exposed cells relative to untreated cells. By contrast, genes withfunctions linked to energy metabolism, particularly electron transport(e.g. so0902-03-04, mtrA, omcA, and omcB), showed dramatic temporalalterations in expression with the majority exhibiting repression.Differential proteomics based on multidimensional HPLC-MS/MS was used tocomplement the transcriptome data, resulting in comparable induction andrepression patterns for a subset of corresponding proteins. In total,expression of 2,370 proteins were confidently verified with 624 (26percent) of these annotated as hypothetical or conserved hypotheticalproteins. The initial response of S. oneidensis to chromate shock appearsto require a combination of

  1. Probing surface structures of Shewanella spp. by microelectrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dague, E.; Duval, J.F.L.; Jorand, R.; Thomas, F.; Gaboriaud, F.

    2006-01-01

    Long-range electrostatic forces substantially influence bacterial interactions and bacterial adhesion during the preliminary steps of biofilm formation. The strength of these forces depends strongly on the structure of the bacterium surfaces investigated. The latter may be addressed from appropriate

  2. A Genome-Scale Model of Shewanella piezotolerans Simulates Mechanisms of Metabolic Diversity and Energy Conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufault-Thompson, Keith; Jian, Huahua; Cheng, Ruixue; Li, Jiefu; Wang, Fengping; Zhang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    Shewanella piezotolerans strain WP3 belongs to the group 1 branch of the Shewanella genus and is a piezotolerant and psychrotolerant species isolated from the deep sea. In this study, a genome-scale model was constructed for WP3 using a combination of genome annotation, ortholog mapping, and physiological verification. The metabolic reconstruction contained 806 genes, 653 metabolites, and 922 reactions, including central metabolic functions that represented nonhomologous replacements between the group 1 and group 2 Shewanella species. Metabolic simulations with the WP3 model demonstrated consistency with existing knowledge about the physiology of the organism. A comparison of model simulations with experimental measurements verified the predicted growth profiles under increasing concentrations of carbon sources. The WP3 model was applied to study mechanisms of anaerobic respiration through investigating energy conservation, redox balancing, and the generation of proton motive force. Despite being an obligate respiratory organism, WP3 was predicted to use substrate-level phosphorylation as the primary source of energy conservation under anaerobic conditions, a trait previously identified in other Shewanella species. Further investigation of the ATP synthase activity revealed a positive correlation between the availability of reducing equivalents in the cell and the directionality of the ATP synthase reaction flux. Comparison of the WP3 model with an existing model of a group 2 species, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, revealed that the WP3 model demonstrated greater flexibility in ATP production under the anaerobic conditions. Such flexibility could be advantageous to WP3 for its adaptation to fluctuating availability of organic carbon sources in the deep sea. IMPORTANCE The well-studied nature of the metabolic diversity of Shewanella bacteria makes species from this genus a promising platform for investigating the evolution of carbon metabolism and energy conservation

  3. Probing Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 using a Nanoelectrode Platform and Single-Cell Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    nanowires The capability of bacteria, such as Shewanella and Geobacter ,to transfer electrons from metabolism of organic sources to electrodes without...filamentous pili growth from Shewanella and Geobacter cells report a third mechanism for extracellular electron transfer through biological nanowires (12

  4. Metabolic Flux Analysis of Shewanella spp. Reveals Evolutionary Robustness in Central Carbon Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Martin, Hector Garcia; Dehal, Paramvir S.; Deutschbauer, Adam; Llora, Xavier; Meadows, Adam; Arkin, Adam; Keasling, Jay D.

    2009-08-19

    Shewanella spp. are a group of facultative anaerobic bacteria widely distributed in marine and fresh-water environments. In this study, we profiled the central metabolic fluxes of eight recently sequenced Shewanella species grown under the same condition in minimal med-ium with [3-13C] lactate. Although the tested Shewanella species had slightly different growth rates (0.23-0.29 h31) and produced different amounts of acetate and pyruvate during early exponential growth (pseudo-steady state), the relative intracellular metabolic flux distributions were remarkably similar. This result indicates that Shewanella species share similar regulation in regard to central carbon metabolic fluxes under steady growth conditions: the maintenance of metabolic robustness is not only evident in a single species under genetic perturbations (Fischer and Sauer, 2005; Nat Genet 37(6):636-640), but also observed through evolutionary related microbial species. This remarkable conservation of relative flux profiles through phylogenetic differences prompts us to introduce the concept of metabotype as an alternative scheme to classify microbial fluxomics. On the other hand, Shewanella spp. display flexibility in the relative flux profiles when switching their metabolism from consuming lactate to consuming pyruvate and acetate.

  5. Effects of sodium citrate plus sodium diacetate and buffered vinegar on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and psychrotrophic bacteria in brine-injected beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponrajan, Amudhan; Harrison, Mark A; Segers, Jacob R; Lowe, Bradley K; McKeith, Russell O; Pringle, T Dean; Martino, Karina G; Mulligan, Jake H; Stelzleni, Alexander M

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the effects of sodium citrate plus sodium diacetate or buffered vinegar on Escherichia coli O157:H7 and psychrotrophic bacteria when incorporated in brine solutions for injected beef. Two experiments were conducted in which 30 top rounds and 30 top sirloins were injected (110%) to contain (i) 0.5% sodium chloride and 0.4% sodium tripolyphosphate as the control (CNT); (ii) CNT with a 1% solution of 80% sodium citrate plus 20% sodium diacetate (SC + D); or (iii) CNT with 2% buffered vinegar (VIN) in the final product. For the E. coli challenge, muscles were surface inoculated to target 6 log CFU/cm(2). After injection and 10 days of storage in a vacuum package (4°C), one half of each muscle was sampled raw and the other half was cooked to an internal temperature of 60°C with a 12-min hold. For raw samples, a significant reduction of 0.6 and 1.0 log CFU/g of E. coli O157:H7 was observed in both SC + D- and VIN-injected top rounds and sirloins, respectively. All cooked samples were E. coli O157:H7 negative. For psychrotrophic analysis, subprimals were injected and vacuum packaged for 10 days at 0 ± 1°C. After 10 days of storage, steaks were fabricated and placed in aerobic display (4 ± 1°C) for 1, 7, 14, and 21 days. Psychrotrophic organism growth was restricted in SC + D and VIN samples when compared with CNT on all days except day 1. Sodium citrate plus sodium diacetate or buffered vinegar may improve the safety and shelf life of multineedle brine-injected beef.

  6. Cytometric patterns reveal growth states of Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzer, Susanne; Winter, Gudrun; Jäger, Kathrin; Hübschmann, Thomas; Hause, Gerd; Syrowatka, Frank; Harms, Hauke; Tárnok, Attila; Müller, Susann

    2015-05-01

    Bacterial growth is often difficult to estimate beyond classical cultivation approaches. Low cell numbers, particles or coloured and dense media may disturb reliable growth assessment. Further difficulties appear when cells are attached to surfaces and detachment is incomplete. Therefore, flow cytometry was tested and used for analysis of bacterial growth on the single-cell level. Shewanella putrefaciens was cultivated as a model organism in planktonic or biofilm culture. Materials of smooth and rough surfaces were used for biofilm cultivation. Both aerobic and anaerobic as well as feast and famine conditions were applied. Visualization of growth was also done using Environmental Scanning and Phase Contrast Microscopy. Bioinformatic tools were applied for data interpretation. Cytometric proliferation patterns based on distributions of DNA contents per cell corresponded distinctly to the various lifestyles, electron acceptors and substrates tested. Therefore, cell cycling profiles of S. putrefaciens were found to mirror growth conditions. The cytometric patterns were consistently detectable with exception of some biofilm types whose resolution remained challenging. Corresponding heat maps proved to be useful for clear visualization of growth behaviour under all tested conditions. Therefore, flow cytometry in combination with bioinformatic tools proved to be powerful means to determine various growth states of S. putrefaciens, even in constrained environments. The approach is universal and will also be applicable for other bacterial species. © 2014 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Ventilator-associated pneumonia due to Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Calvin; Baroso, Genelyn; Tan, Paul

    2010-06-15

    The first reported U.S. case of ventilator-associated pneumonia evidently caused by Shewanella putrefaciens is described. A 39-year-old man with severe head trauma was found face down and unresponsive in a river after a watercraft accident. After being resuscitated and transferred to the intensive care unit, the patient received treatment for a subarachnoid hemorrhage and spinal injuries. The patient was also found to have decreased breath sounds bilaterally. On hospital day 7, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed due to acute febrile illness and thick pulmonary secretions. The patient was treated empirically with i.v. vancomycin and cefepime. The culture results suggested pneumonia due to methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The vancomycin and cefepime were replaced with nafcillin, after which the pneumonia resolved. The patient continued to be febrile, with leukocytosis on hospital day 14. A subsequent bronchoalveolar lavage culture performed that day revealed the presence of S. putrefaciens. According to the culture and susceptibility results, S. putrefaciens was resistant to ampicillin-sulbactam and exhibited sensitivity to cefepime, piperacillin, piperacillin-tazobactam, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, and meropenem. The patient received a 14-day course of cefepime, eliminating any further sign of the pathogen. Over the next two months, the patient's condition continued to improve, and he was eventually discharged to a rehabilitation facility. A 39-year-old man developed ventilator-associated pneumonia evidently caused by S. putrefaciens. The pneumonia resolved after treatment with cefepime.

  8. Shewanella putrefaciens – a new opportunistic pathogen of freshwater fish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paździor Ewa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, Shewanella putrefaciens, commonly known as a halophilic bacteria, has been associated with serious health disorders in freshwater fish. Therefore, it has been described as a new aetiological agent of the disease, named shewanellosis. S. putrefaciens is a heterogeneous group of microorganisms, belonging to the Alteromonadaceae family. Based on different criteria, three biovars and biogroups as well as four genomic groups have been distinguished. The first infections of S. putrefaciens in fish were reported in rabbitfish (Siganus rivulatus and European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.. Outbreaks in farmed fish were reported in Poland for the first time in 2004. The disease causes skin disorders and haemorrhages in internal organs. It should be noted that S. putrefaciens could also be associated with different infections in humans, such as skin and tissue infections, bacteraemia, otitis. Investigations on pathogenic mechanisms of S. putrefaciens infections are very limited. Enzymatic activity, cytotoxin secretion, adhesion ability, lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and the presence of siderophores are potential virulence factors of S. putrefaciens. Antimicrobial resistance of S. putrefaciens is different and depends on the isolates. In general, these bacteria are sensitive to antimicrobial drugs commonly used in aquaculture.

  9. Siderophore-Mediated Iron Sequestering by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gram, Lone

    1994-01-01

    The iron-sequestering abilities of 51 strains of Shewanella putrefaciens isolated from different sources (fish, water, and warm-blooded animals) were assessed. Thirty strains (60%) produced siderophores in heat-sterilized fish juice as determined by the chrome-azurol-S assay. All cultures were negative for the catechol-type siderophore, whereas 24 of the 30 siderophore-producing strains tested positive in the Csáky test, indicating the production of siderophores of the hydroxamate type. Siderophore-producing S. putrefaciens could to some degree cross-feed on the siderophores of other S. putrefaciens strains and on compounds produced by an Aeromonas salmonicida strain under iron-limited conditions. The siderophores of S. putrefaciens were not sufficiently strong to inhibit growth of other bacteria under iron-restricted conditions. However, siderophore-producing Pseudomonas bacteria were always inhibitory to S. putrefaciens under iron-limited conditions. Growth of siderophore-producing strains under iron-limited conditions induced the formation of one major new outer membrane protein of approximately 72 kDa. Two outer membrane proteins of approximately 53 and 23 kDa were not seen when iron was restricted. Images PMID:16349298

  10. Integrated Genome-Based Studies of Shewanella Ecophysiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spormann, Alfred

    2011-07-12

    We have constructed in-frame deletions of 7 of the 10 PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We are currently in the process of characterizing the deletion mutants under a wide range of growth conditions. In addition to characterizing growth, we will also examine the biofilm formation of the deletion mutants. In addition to the genetic analyses of the mutants, we are also interested in comparing the activities of the various PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins. Proteins containing PAS, GGDEF and EAL amino acid sequence motifs may play an important role in regulating c-di-GMP signaling in response to environmental conditions. A genetic and biochemical analysis into the roles of these proteins is underway. PDE activity was observed for several PAS-GGDEF-EAL proteins. One of these proteins, SO0427, also demonstrates possible DGC activity in vitro. Currently, we are studying the growth, motility and biofilm formation characteristics of deletion mutants, as well as the activity of the purified proteins.

  11. Physiology and enzymology involved in denitrification by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, B.; Nealson, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to N2O was investigated in batch cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1, MR-4, and MR-7. All three strains reduced nitrate to nitrite to N2O, and this reduction was coupled to growth, whereas ammonium accumulation was very low (0 to 1 micromol liter-1). All S. putrefaciens isolates were also capable of reducing nitrate aerobically; under anaerobic conditions, nitrite levels were three- to sixfold higher than those found under oxic conditions. Nitrate reductase activities (31 to 60 micromol of nitrite min-1 mg of protein-1) detected in intact cells of S. putrefaciens were equal to or higher than those seen in Escherichia coli LE 392. Km values for nitrate reduction ranged from 12 mM for MR-1 to 1.3 mM for MR-4 with benzyl viologen as an artifical electron donor. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities in cell-free preparations were demonstrated in native gels by using reduced benzyl viologen. Detergent treatment of crude and membrane extracts suggested that the nitrate reductases of MR-1 and MR-4 are membrane bound. When the nitrate reductase in MR-1 was partially purified, three subunits (90, 70, and 55 kDa) were detected in denaturing gels. The nitrite reductase of MR-1 is also membrane bound and appeared as a 60-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after partial purification.

  12. Physiology and enzymology involved in denitrification by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, B.; Nealson, K. H.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrate reduction to N2O was investigated in batch cultures of Shewanella putrefaciens MR-1, MR-4, and MR-7. All three strains reduced nitrate to nitrite to N2O, and this reduction was coupled to growth, whereas ammonium accumulation was very low (0 to 1 micromol liter-1). All S. putrefaciens isolates were also capable of reducing nitrate aerobically; under anaerobic conditions, nitrite levels were three- to sixfold higher than those found under oxic conditions. Nitrate reductase activities (31 to 60 micromol of nitrite min-1 mg of protein-1) detected in intact cells of S. putrefaciens were equal to or higher than those seen in Escherichia coli LE 392. Km values for nitrate reduction ranged from 12 mM for MR-1 to 1.3 mM for MR-4 with benzyl viologen as an artifical electron donor. Nitrate and nitrite reductase activities in cell-free preparations were demonstrated in native gels by using reduced benzyl viologen. Detergent treatment of crude and membrane extracts suggested that the nitrate reductases of MR-1 and MR-4 are membrane bound. When the nitrate reductase in MR-1 was partially purified, three subunits (90, 70, and 55 kDa) were detected in denaturing gels. The nitrite reductase of MR-1 is also membrane bound and appeared as a 60-kDa band in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels after partial purification.

  13. Electrochemical Catalysis of Inorganic Complex K4[Fe(CN)6] by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Zhiyong; Wu, Ranran; Xiao, Yong

    to the redox proteins localized to the outer-membrane, for example, the MtrC, MtrB,MtrA and CymA2. Here we investigate its electrochemical properties towards redox inorganic redox compounds. It shows strong electrocatalysis toward electrochemical oxidation of K4[Fe(CN)6]. As a redox molecule, K4[Fe(CN)6] gives...... on the selectivity and electrocatalysis mechanisms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 are under investigation. The ability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to catalyze redox action of inorganic metal complex compounds will provide an insight on metal cycles in nature....... disappearance of the cathodic peak and strengthen of the anodic peak, which is a typical catalysis feature of electrochemical oxidation. Further experiments show that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 does not give such electrocatalysis to redox compounds such as Ru[(NH3)6]Cl3 and Resorufin. Systematic study...

  14. Bacteremia and empyema caused by Shewanella algae in a trauma patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob-Kokura, Susan; Chan, Claire Y; Kaplan, Lewis

    2014-01-01

    To describe the first reported case of bacteremia and empyema caused by Shewanella algae and summarize the existing literature on Shewanella human infection. A 25-year-old healthy male was shot through the chest into the abdomen and fled into an adjacent body of seawater. He underwent surgical repair of his injuries, including pleural decortication. Leukocytosis, bandemia, and copious yellow bronchorrhea led to cultures; piperacillin/tazobactam and vancomycin were started for broad-spectrum empiric management based on the local intensive care unit antibiogram. Blood and pleural fluid cultures revealed S algae. Sputum cultures grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus and Haemophilus influenzae. He was successfully managed with an empiric and then tailored antibiotic regimen. Shewanella algae is a rare Gram-negative bacillus that has infrequently been reported to cause infection. It is found predominantly in men. Shewanella algae infections span bacteremia to necrotizing soft tissue infection and are associated with injury and seawater exposure. Shewanella is susceptible to the majority of third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins, aminoglycosides, chloramphenicol, erythromycin, aztreonam, and fluoroquinolones, but are less predictably susceptible to tetracycline and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and carbapenem agents. Shewanella infection is associated with medical comorbidities, in particular, renal failure and cardiovascular disease. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of bacteremia and empyema caused by S algae. Such a case involving a young healthy individual should encourage health care providers to be aware of the potential infections caused by unusual pathogens, and to employ appropriate empiric antibiotic therapy based on reported sensitivity profiles. Based on available susceptibilities, we recommend using a third or fourth-generation cephalosporin as first-line pharmacologic management with regimen de-escalation based on culture

  15. Shewanella algae en un paciente con diarrea crónica. Primer caso en Costa Rica

    OpenAIRE

    Erick Molina- Guevara; Sofía Ureña- Romero; Alcira Ramírez-Salas; Gletty Oropeza-Barrios

    2009-01-01

    Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, vecino de Pavas-San José, con historia de diarrea crónica. En el coprocultivo se identificó Shewanella algae. Casos de infección en humanos por esta bacteria son raros y se han encontrado, predominantemente localizadas, en piel, oídos y tejidos blandos con o sin bacteremia, en la mayoría de los cuales existe el antecedente de contacto con ambientes marinos. Shewanella algae es sensible a aminoglicósidos, carbapenemes, eritromicina y quinolonas, pe...

  16. Characterization of the periplasmic redox network that sustains the versatile anaerobic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica N. Alves

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The versatile anaerobic metabolism of the Gram-negative bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (SOMR-1 relies on a multitude of redox proteins found in its periplasm. Most are multiheme cytochromes that carry electrons to terminal reductases of insoluble electron acceptors located at the cell surface, or bona fide terminal reductases of soluble electron acceptors. In this study, the interaction network of several multiheme cytochromes was explored by a combination of NMR spectroscopy, activity assays followed by UV-visible spectroscopy and comparison of surface electrostatic potentials. From these data the small tetraheme cytochrome (STC emerges as the main periplasmic redox shuttle in SOMR-1. It accepts electrons from CymA and distributes them to a number of terminal oxidoreductases involved in the respiration of various compounds. STC is also involved in the electron transfer pathway to reduce nitrite by interaction with the octaheme tetrathionate reductase (OTR, but not with cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR. In the main pathway leading the metal respiration STC pairs with flavocytochrome c (FccA, the other major periplasmic cytochrome, which provides redundancy in this important pathway. The data reveals that the two proteins compete for the binding site at the surface of MtrA, the decaheme cytochrome inserted on the periplasmic side of the MtrCAB-OmcA outer-membrane complex. However, this is not observed for the MtrA homologues. Indeed, neither STC nor FccA interact with MtrD, the best replacement for MtrA, and only STC is able to interact with the decaheme cytochrome DmsE of the outer-membrane complex DmsEFABGH. Overall, these results shown that STC plays a central role in the anaerobic respiratory metabolism of SOMR-1. Nonetheless, the trans-periplasmic electron transfer chain is functionally resilient as a consequence of redundancies that arise from the presence of alternative pathways that bypass/compete with STC.

  17. Effect of Electron Donor and Solution Chemistry on Products of Dissimilatory Reduction of Technetium by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildung, R. E.; Gorby, Y. A.; Krupka, K. M.; Hess, N. J.; Li, S. W.; Plymale, A. E.; McKinley, J. P.; Fredrickson, J. K.

    2000-01-01

    To help provide a fundamental basis for use of microbial dissimilatory reduction processes in separating or immobilizing 99Tc in waste or groundwaters, the effects of electron donor and the presence of the bicarbonate ion on the rate and extent of pertechnetate ion [Tc(VII)O4−] enzymatic reduction by the subsurface metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 were determined, and the forms of aqueous and solid-phase reduction products were evaluated through a combination of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and thermodynamic calculations. When H2 served as the electron donor, dissolved Tc(VII) was rapidly reduced to amorphous Tc(IV) hydrous oxide, which was largely associated with the cell in unbuffered 0.85% NaCl and with extracellular particulates (0.2 to 0.001 μm) in bicarbonate buffer. Cell-associated Tc was present principally in the periplasm and outside the outer membrane. The reduction rate was much lower when lactate was the electron donor, with extracellular Tc(IV) hydrous oxide the dominant solid-phase reduction product, but in bicarbonate systems much less Tc(IV) was associated directly with the cell and solid-phase Tc(IV) carbonate may have been present. In the presence of carbonate, soluble (<0.001 μm) electronegative, Tc(IV) carbonate complexes were also formed that exceeded Tc(VII)O4− in electrophoretic mobility. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the dominant reduced Tc species identified in the experiments would be stable over a range of Eh and pH conditions typical of natural waters. Thus, carbonate complexes may represent an important pathway for Tc transport in anaerobic subsurface environments, where it has generally been assumed that Tc mobility is controlled by low-solubility Tc(IV) hydrous oxide and adsorptive, aqueous Tc(IV) hydrolysis products. PMID:10831424

  18. Antibiotic multiresistance analysis of mesophilic and psychrotrophic Pseudomonas spp. isolated from goat and lamb slaughterhouse surfaces throughout the meat production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavilla Lerma, Leyre; Benomar, Nabil; Casado Muñoz, María del Carmen; Gálvez, Antonio; Abriouel, Hikmate

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phenotypic and genotypic antibiotic resistance profiles of pseudomonads isolated from surfaces of a goat and lamb slaughterhouse, which were representative of areas that are possible sources of meat contamination. Mesophilic (85 isolates) and psychrotrophic (37 isolates) pseudomonads identified at the species level generally were resistant to sulfamethoxazole, erythromycin, amoxicillin, ampicillin, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim, rifampin, and ceftazidime (especially mesophiles), as well as colistin and tetracycline (especially psychrotrophes). However, they generally were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, imipenem, and kanamycin regardless of species identity. Worryingly, in the present study, we found multidrug resistance (MDR) to up to 13 antibiotics, which was related to intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms. Furthermore, a link between various antimicrobial resistance genes was shown for beta-lactams and tetracycline, trimethoprim, and sulfonamides. The distribution and resistome-based analysis of MDR pseudomonads in different slaughterhouse zones indicated that the main sources of the identical or related pseudomonad strains were the animals (feet and wool) and the slaughterhouse environment, being disseminated from the beginning, or entrance environment, to the environment of the finished meat products. Those facts must be taken into consideration to avoid cross-contamination with the subsequent flow of mobile resistance determinants throughout all slaughterhouse zones and then to humans and the environment by the application of adequate practices of hygiene and disinfection measures, including those for animal wool and feet and also the entrance environment.

  19. Knock-out of SO1377 gene, which encodes the member of a conserved hypothetical bacterial protein family COG2268, results in alteration of iron metabolism, increased spontaneous mutation and hydrogen peroxide sensitivity in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klingeman Dawn M

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative, gram-negative bacterium capable of coupling the oxidation of organic carbon to a wide range of electron acceptors such as oxygen, nitrate and metals, and has potential for bioremediation of heavy metal contaminated sites. The complete 5-Mb genome of S. oneidensis MR-1 was sequenced and standard sequence-comparison methods revealed approximately 42% of the MR-1 genome encodes proteins of unknown function. Defining the functions of hypothetical proteins is a great challenge and may need a systems approach. In this study, by using integrated approaches including whole genomic microarray and proteomics, we examined knockout effects of the gene encoding SO1377 (gi24372955, a member of the conserved, hypothetical, bacterial protein family COG2268 (Clusters of Orthologous Group in bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, under various physiological conditions. Results Compared with the wild-type strain, growth assays showed that the deletion mutant had a decreased growth rate when cultured aerobically, but not affected under anaerobic conditions. Whole-genome expression (RNA and protein profiles revealed numerous gene and protein expression changes relative to the wild-type control, including some involved in iron metabolism, oxidative damage protection and respiratory electron transfer, e. g. complex IV of the respiration chain. Although total intracellular iron levels remained unchanged, whole-cell electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR demonstrated that the level of free iron in mutant cells was 3 times less than that of the wild-type strain. Siderophore excretion in the mutant also decreased in iron-depleted medium. The mutant was more sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and gave rise to 100 times more colonies resistant to gentamicin or kanamycin. Conclusion Our results showed that the knock-out of SO1377 gene had pleiotropic effects and suggested that SO1377 may play a role in iron

  20. Shewanella putrefaciens Adhesion and Biofilm Formation on Food Processing Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagge, Dorthe; Hjelm, Mette; Johansen, Charlotte; Huber, Ingrid; Gram, Lone

    2001-01-01

    Laboratory model systems were developed for studying Shewanella putrefaciens adhesion and biofilm formation under batch and flow conditions. S. putrefaciens plays a major role in food spoilage and may cause microbially induced corrosion on steel surfaces. S. putrefaciens bacteria suspended in buffer adhered readily to stainless steel surfaces. Maximum numbers of adherent bacteria per square centimeter were reached in 8 h at 25°C and reflected the cell density in suspension. Numbers of adhering bacteria from a suspension containing 108 CFU/ml were much lower in a laminar flow system (modified Robbins device) (reaching 102 CFU/cm2) than in a batch system (reaching 107 CFU/cm2), and maximum numbers were reached after 24 h. When nutrients were supplied, S. putrefaciens grew in biofilms with layers of bacteria. The rate of biofilm formation and the thickness of the film were not dependent on the availability of carbohydrate (lactate or glucose) or on iron starvation. The number of S. putrefaciens bacteria on the surface was partly influenced by the presence of other bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) which reduced the numbers of S. putrefaciens bacteria in the biofilm. Numbers of bacteria on the surface must be quantified to evaluate the influence of environmental factors on adhesion and biofilm formation. We used a combination of fluorescence microscopy (4′,6′-diamidino-2-phenylindole staining and in situ hybridization, for mixed-culture studies), ultrasonic removal of bacteria from surfaces, and indirect conductometry and found this combination sufficient to quantify bacteria on surfaces. PMID:11319118

  1. Total mesophilic counts underestimate in many cases the contamination levels of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in chilled-stored food products at the end of their shelf-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothakos, Vasileios; Samapundo, Simbarashe; Devlieghere, Frank

    2012-12-01

    The major objective of this study was to determine the role of psychrotrophic lactic acid bacteria (LAB) in spoilage-associated phenomena at the end of the shelf-life of 86 various packaged (air, vacuum, modified-atmosphere) chilled-stored retail food products. The current microbiological standards, which are largely based on the total viable mesophilic counts lack discriminatory capacity to detect psychrotrophic LAB. A comparison between the total viable counts on plates incubated at 30 °C (representing the mesophiles) and at 22 °C (indicating the psychrotrophs) for 86 food samples covering a wide range - ready-to-eat vegetable salads, fresh raw meat, cooked meat products and composite food - showed that a consistent underestimation of the microbial load occurs when the total aerobic mesophilic counts are used as a shelf-life parameter. In 38% of the samples, the psychrotrophic counts had significantly higher values (+0.5-3 log CFU/g) than the corresponding total aerobic mesophilic counts. A total of 154 lactic acid bacteria, which were unable to proliferate at 30 °C were isolated. In addition, a further 43 with a poor recovery at this temperature were also isolated. This study highlights the potential fallacy of the total aerobic mesophilic count as a reference shelf-life parameter for chilled food products as it can often underestimate the contamination levels at the end of the shelf-life.

  2. Shewanella algae Bacteremia in an End-stage Renal Disease Patient: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tomoaki; Chikumi, Hiroki; Morishita, Shota; Hamada, Shintaro; Hoi, Shotaro; Iyama, Takuji; Fukui, Takeaki; Matono, Tomomitsu; Fukuda, Satoko; Munemura, Chishio; Isomoto, Hajime

    2017-01-01

    A 71-year-old man was admitted because of nausea and abdominal pain. He was receiving an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent for anemia and dysregulated iron metabolism due to stage G5 chronic kidney disease. He had a history of raw fish intake and was diagnosed with infectious enterocolitis, which worsened and led to septic shock. Shewanella putrefaciens grew in the blood culture, but Shewanella algae was identified in a 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. We herein report a case of S. algae bacteremia believed to have been transmitted orally. We also reviewed previous case reports on Shewanella infection in end-stage renal disease patients.

  3. Recombinant engineering of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 c-type cytochromes in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewanella oneidensis is known to respire with extracellular solid metal oxides (i.e., iron, manganese, uranium) as a terminal electron acceptor. It has become the focus of intensive research not only due to its important bioremediation features, but also as a potential organism for biological elec...

  4. A rare cause of wound infection after an open fracture: Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinja, Aditya; Singh, Jagwant; Davis, Nwaka; Urwin, Gillian

    2013-02-15

    An elderly gentleman presented with an open fracture of the calcaneum and ankle, following a boating accident. Despite treatment with repeated surgical debridement, delayed closure, prolonged antibiotics and strict adherence to national guidelines on the management of open fractures, he developed a wound infection with a rare organism, Shewanella putrefaciens, that appears to be increasing in prevalence.

  5. Decolorization of azo dyes by marine Shewanella strains under saline conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guangfei; Zhou, Jiti; Meng, Xianming; Fu, Shiang Q; Wang, Jing; Jin, Ruofei; Lv, Hong

    2013-05-01

    Azo dye decolorization was studied with Shewanella strains under saline conditions. Growing cells of Shewanella algae and Shewanella marisflavi isolated from marine environments demonstrated better azo dye decolorization capacities than the other three strains from non-saline sources. Cell suspensions of S. algae and S. marisflavi could decolorize single or mixed azo dyes with different structures. Decolorization kinetics were described with Michaelis-Menton equation, which indicated better decolorization performance of S. algae over S. marisflavi. Lactate and formate were identified as efficient electron donors for amaranth decolorization by the two strains. S. algae and S. marisflavi could decolorize amaranth at up to 100 g L(-1) NaCl or Na2SO4. However, extremely low concentration of NaNO3 exerted strong inhibition on decolorization. Both strains could remove the color and COD of textile effluent during sequential anaerobic-aerobic incubation. Lower concentrations of NaCl (20-30 g L(-1)) stimulated the activities of azoreductase, laccase, and NADH-DCIP reductase. The decolorization intermediates were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Decolorization metabolites of amaranth were less toxic than original dye. These findings improved our knowledge of azo-dye-decolorizing Shewanella species and provided efficient candidates for the treatment of dye-polluted saline wastewaters.

  6. Current trends of human infections and antibiotic resistance of the genus Shewanella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, K; Bekal, S; Usongo, V; Touati, A

    2017-08-01

    Shewanella spp. are commonly known as environmental bacteria and are most frequently isolated from aquatic areas. Currently, diseases syndromes and multidrug resistance have increasingly been reported in the genus Shewanella. Some species are associated with various infections, such as skin and soft tissue infections, as well as bacteremia. Generally, these bacteria are opportunistic and mostly affect people with an impaired immune system. This genus is also a probable vehicle and progenitor of antibiotic resistance genes. In fact, several resistance genes and mobile genetic elements have been identified in some resistant species isolated from environmental or clinical settings. These genes confer resistance to different antibiotic classes, including those used in therapies such as β-lactams and quinolones, and are generally located on the chromosome. Recently, a multidrug-resistant (MDR) plasmid harboring several drug resistance genes associated with transposons and integrons has been identified in Shewanella xiamenensis. These antibiotic resistance genes can circulate in the environment and contribute to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. This review describes different aspects of Shewanella, focusing on the infections caused by this genus, as well as their role in the propagation of antibiotic resistance via mobile genetic elements.

  7. Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov., a novel metal-reducing facultative anaerobe from Amazonian shelf muds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran, K.; Dollhopf, M. E.; Aller, R.; Stackebrandt, E.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    A new bacterial species belonging to the genus Shewanella is described on the basis of phenotypic characterization and sequence analysis of its 16S rRNA-encoding and gyrase B (gyrB) genes. This organism, isolated from shallow-water marine sediments derived from the Amazon River delta, is a Gram-negative, motile, polarly flagellated, facultatively anaerobic, rod-shaped eubacterium and has a G&C content of 51.7 mol%. Strain SB2BT is exceptionally active in the anaerobic reduction of iron, manganese and sulfur compounds. SB2BT grows optimally at 35 degrees C, with 1-3% NaCl and over a pH range of 7-8. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequence revealed a clear affiliation between strain SB2BT and members of the gamma subclass of the class Proteobacteria. High similarity values were found with certain members of the genus Shewanella, especially with Shewanella putrefaciens, and this was supported by cellular fatty acid profiles and phenotypic characterization. DNA-DNA hybridization between strain SB2BT and its phylogenetically closest relatives revealed low similarity values (24.6-42.7%) which indicated species status for strain SB2BT. That SB2BT represents a distinct bacterial species within the genus Shewanella is also supported by gyrB sequence analysis. Considering the source of the isolate, the name Shewanella amazonensis sp. nov. is proposed and strain SB2BT (= ATCC 700329T) is designated as the type strain.

  8. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovaleva Galina

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. Results To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. Multiple variations in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR, numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. PsrA for fatty acid degradation and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp. Conclusions We tentatively defined the first reference collection of ~100 transcriptional regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The resulting regulatory network contains ~600 regulated genes per genome that are mostly involved in metabolism of carbohydrates, amino acids, fatty acids, vitamins, metals, and stress responses. Several reconstructed regulons including NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism were experimentally validated in S

  9. Unsaturated macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid siderophores produced by Shewanella putrefaciens using precursor-directed biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Cho Z; Codd, Rachel

    2014-04-18

    To acquire iron essential for growth, the bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens produces the macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid putrebactin (pbH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 373.2) as its native siderophore. The assembly of pbH2 requires endogenous 1,4-diaminobutane (DB), which is produced from the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC)-catalyzed decarboxylation of l-ornithine. In this work, levels of endogenous DB were attenuated in S. putrefaciens cultures by augmenting the medium with the ODC inhibitor 1,4-diamino-2-butanone (DBO). The presence in the medium of DBO together with alternative exogenous non-native diamine substrates, (15)N2-1,4-diaminobutane ((15)N2-DB) or 1,4-diamino-2(E)-butene (E-DBE), resulted in the respective biosynthesis of (15)N-labeled pbH2 ((15)N4-pbH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 377.2, m/zobs 377.2) or the unsaturated pbH2 variant, named here: E,E-putrebactene (E,E-pbeH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 369.2, m/zobs 369.2). In the latter system, remaining endogenous DB resulted in the parallel biosynthesis of the monounsaturated DB-E-DBE hybrid, E-putrebactene (E-pbxH2; [M + H(+)](+), m/zcalc 371.2, m/zobs 371.2). These are the first identified unsaturated macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid siderophores. LC-MS measurements showed 1:1 complexes formed between Fe(III) and pbH2 ([Fe(pb)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 426.1, m/zobs 426.2), (15)N4-pbH2 ([Fe((15)N4-pb)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 430.1, m/zobs 430.1), E,E-pbeH2 ([Fe(E,E-pbe)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 422.1, m/zobs 422.0), or E-pbxH2 ([Fe(E-pbx)](+); [M](+), m/zcalc 424.1, m/zobs 424.2). The order of the gain in siderophore-mediated Fe(III) solubility, as defined by the difference in retention time between the free ligand and the Fe(III)-loaded complex, was pbH2 (ΔtR = 8.77 min) > E-pbxH2 (ΔtR = 6.95 min) > E,E-pbeH2 (ΔtR = 6.16 min), which suggests one possible reason why nature has selected for saturated rather than unsaturated siderophores as Fe(III) solubilization agents. The potential to conduct multiple types of ex situ chemical

  10. Human infection with Shewanella putrefaciens and S. algae: report of 16 cases in Martinique and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignier, Nicolas; Barreau, Morgane; Olive, Claude; Baubion, Emilie; Théodose, Rafaelle; Hochedez, Patrick; Cabié, André

    2013-07-01

    Shewanella spp. are saprophytic bacteria that are part of the marine microflora in warm climates and are rarely pathogenic. However, Shewanella spp. infections are being increasingly reported, and there has been no comprehensive review of the literature describing these infections. This article reports 16 cases of Shewanella spp. infections in Martinique since 1997 and reviews another 239 cases reported in the literature since 1973. Patients experienced soft tissue infections, ear infection, or abdominal and biliary tract infections. A skin or mucosal portal of entry was found for 53% of the patients and exposure to the marine environment was reported for 44%; 79% of patients had an underlying condition. Bacteriema were frequent (28%). Most (87%) patients recovered, although ear infections can become chronic. Death occurred in 13% of the patients. Most Shewanella spp. isolates are susceptible to cefotaxime (95%), piperacillin and tazobactam (98%), gentamicin (99%), and ciprofloxacin (94%).

  11. Transcription factors FabR and FadR regulate both aerobic and anaerobic pathways for unsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qixia eLuo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As genes for type II fatty acid synthesis are essential to the growth of Escherichia coli, its sole (anaerobic pathway has significant potential as a target for novel antibacterial drug, and has been extensively studied. Despite this, we still know surprisingly little about fatty acid synthesis in bacteria because this anaerobic pathway in fact is not widely distributed. In this study, we show a novel model of unsaturated fatty acid (UFA synthesis in Shewanella, emerging human pathogens in addition to well-known metal reducers. We identify both anaerobic and aerobic UFA biosynthesis pathways in the representative species, S. oneidensis. Uniquely, the bacterium also contains two regulators FabR and FadR, whose counterparts in other bacteria control the anaerobic pathway. However, we show that in S. oneidensis these two regulators are involved in regulation of both pathways, in either direct or indirect manner. Overall, our results indicate that the UFA biosynthesis and its regulation are far more complex than previously expected, and S. oneidensis serves as a good research model for further work.

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of the blaOXA-436- and blaNDM-1-Harboring Shewanella putrefaciens SA70 Isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Robert F; D'Souza, Alaric W; Wallace, Meghan A; Shupe, Angela; Patel, Sanket; Gul, Danish; Kwon, Jennie H; Andleeb, Saadia; Burnham, C A; Dantas, Gautam

    2017-07-20

    We sequenced a carbapenem-resistant Shewanella putrefaciens isolate cultured from the sink handle of a Pakistan hospital room. Assembly annotation indicates that the isolate has a chromosomal blaOXA-436 carbapenemase and a plasmid-borne blaNDM-1 gene. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a Shewanella species harboring blaNDM. Copyright © 2017 Potter et al.

  13. Bound Flavin-Cytochrome Model of Extracellular Electron Transfer in Shewanella oneidensis: Analysis by Free Energy Molecular (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2017-0192 BOUND FLAVIN−CYTOCHROME MODEL OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS: ANALYSIS BY FREE...23 June 2016 Interim 11 January 2013- 10 October 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE BOUND FLAVIN−CYTOCHROME MODEL OF EXTRACELLULAR ELECTRON TRANSFER IN...Flavins are known to enhance extracellular electron transfer (EET) in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 bacteria, which reduce electron acceptors through outer

  14. Identification of Shewanella baltica as the most important H2S-producing species during iced storage of danish marine fish

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Birte Fonnesbech; Venkateswaran, K.; Satomi, M.

    2005-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens has been considered the main spoilage bacteria of low-temperature stored marine seafood. However, psychrotropic Shewanella have been reclassified during recent years, and the purpose of the present study was to determine whether any of the new Shewanella species...... are important in fish spoilage. More than 500 H2S-producing strains were isolated from iced stored marine fish (cod, plaice, and flounder) caught in the Baltic Sea during winter or summer time. All strains were identified as Shewanella species by phenotypic tests. Different Shewanella species were present...... on newly caught fish. During the warm summer months the mesophilic human pathogenic S. algae dominated the H2S-producing bacterial population. After iced storage, a shift in the Shewanella species was found, and most of the H2S-producing strains were identified as S. baltica. The 16S rRNA gene sequence...

  15. Effect of antioxidants on thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, psychrotrophic bacteria and functional properties of mechanically deboned chicken meat irradiated with Cobalto-60 and electron beam sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito, Poliana de Paula; Azevedo, Heliana de; Roque, Claudio Vitor; Pomarico Neto, Walter, E-mail: hgomes@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: pbrito@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: cvroque@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: abrusqui@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (LAPOC/CNEN-MG), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Laboratorio de Pocos de Caldas; Mourao, Gerson Barreto; Orlando, Eduardo Adilson; Miyagusku, Luciana, E-mail: marciamh@ital.sp.gov.br, E-mail: eduardo.orlando@ital.sp.gov.br [Instituto de Tecnologia dos Alimentos (ITAL), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Samples of MDCM with skin were divided into three groups: control (without antioxidants), Antioxidant 1 (Sodium Polyphosphate and Sodium Ascorbate and Antioxidant 2 (Rosemary Extract and α-Tocopherol. The three batches of samples were divided into nine groups: no antioxidant and non-irradiated (C), with antioxidant A1 and non-irradiated (A1), with antioxidant A2 and non-irradiated (A2) without antioxidant and irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (Co), with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Cobalt 60 source (A1Co) with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Cobalt-60 source (A2Co) with antioxidant A1 irradiated in Electron beam (A1Eb) and with antioxidant A2 irradiated in Electron beam (A2Eb). The samples was conditioned in a transparent, low density frozen overnight at a temperature of -18 ± 1 deg C in a chamber, and irradiated in this state with a dose of 3.0 kGy, used two sources of radiation: Cobalt-60 (3.1 kGy/h) and electron beam (7.86 kGy/s). After this process, the samples were evaluated during the refrigeration period (2 ± 1 deg C) for 11 days for the following analysis: total psychrotrophic bacteria count and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and the analysis of functional properties were performed after the irradiation process. The use of the combination of rosemary antioxidant and α-tocopherol were able to significantly decrease TBARS values caused by the irradiation of samples in MDCM cobalt-60 sources and electron beam, and show a synergetic effect to processing with ionizing radiation to reduce of psychrotrophic bacteria count. The use of irradiation processing of MDCM did not negatively affect the functional properties studied. (author)

  16. Correlation between the optimal growth pressures of four Shewanella species and the stabilities of their cytochromes c 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanari, Misa; Wakai, Satoshi; Ishida, Manabu; Kato, Chiaki; Sambongi, Yoshihiro

    2014-05-01

    Shewanella species live widely in deep-sea and shallow-water areas, and thus grow piezophilically and piezosensitively. Piezophilic and psychrophilic Shewanella benthica cytochrome c 5 (SB cytc 5) was the most stable against guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl) and thermal denaturation, followed by less piezophilic but still psychrophilic Shewanella violacea cytochrome c 5 (SV cytc 5). These two were followed, as to stability level, by piezosensitive and mesophilic Shewanella amazonensis cytochrome c 5 (SA cytc 5), and piezosensitive and psychrophilic Shewanella livingstonensis cytochrome c 5 (SL cytc 5). The midpoint GdnHCl concentrations of SB cytc 5, SV cytc 5, SL cytc 5, and SA cytc 5 correlated with the optimal growth pressures of the species, the correlation coefficient value being 0.93. A similar trend was observed for thermal denaturation. Therefore, the stability of each cytochrome c 5 is related directly to its host's optimal growth pressure. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Lys-37, Ala-41, and Leu-50 conserved in piezosensitive SL cytc 5 and SA cytc 5 are ancestors of the corresponding residues in piezophilic SB cytc 5 and SV cytc 5, Gln, Thr, and Lys, respectively, which might have been introduced during evolution on adaption to environmental pressure. The monomeric Shewanella cytochromes c 5 are suitable tools for examining protein stability with regard to the optimal growth pressures of the source species.

  17. Oxygen promotes biofilm formation of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 through a diguanylate cyclase and an adhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chao; Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Yin, Hao; Song, Xiang-Ning; Li, Wen-Wei; Zhou, Xian-Xuan; Zhao, Li-Ping; Tian, Li-Jiao; Han, Jun-Cheng; Yu, Han-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Although oxygen has been reported to regulate biofilm formation by several Shewanella species, the exact regulatory mechanism mostly remains unclear. Here, we identify a direct oxygen-sensing diguanylate cyclase (DosD) and reveal its regulatory role in biofilm formation by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 under aerobic conditions. In vitro and in vivo analyses revealed that the activity of DosD culminates to synthesis of cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) in the presence of oxygen. DosD regulates the transcription of bpfA operon which encodes seven proteins including a large repetitive adhesin BpfA and its cognate type I secretion system (TISS). Regulation of DosD in aerobic biofilms is heavily dependent on an adhesin BpfA and the TISS. This study offers an insight into the molecular mechanism of oxygen-stimulated biofilm formation by S. putrefaciens CN32.

  18. Shewanella putrefaciens keratitis in the lamellar bed 6 years after LASIK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hee-Jung S; Tuli, Sonal S; Downer, Donald M; Gohari, A Reza; Shah, Milan

    2007-10-01

    To present a case of infectious keratitis occurring 6 years after LASIK due to the rare human pathogen Shewanella putrefaciens. A 58-year-old man presented with redness and pain in the right eye 6 years following LASIK retreatment. Examination revealed a corneal infiltrate at the flap interface. Corneal scraping of stroma beneath the flap was submitted for histopathologic and microbiologic evaluation. An infiltrate located at the LASIK flap interface originated from an epithelial defect at the flap-corneal junction. Corneal stroma cultures demonstrated Shewanella putrefaciens. The infection resolved with antibiotic treatment. LASIK-related complications, such as infections, can occur many years following the procedure. The potential space created under the LASIK flap may predispose patients to infection by opportunistic organisms.

  19. Shewanella algae en un paciente con diarrea crónica. Primer caso en Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Molina- Guevara

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, vecino de Pavas-San José, con historia de diarrea crónica. En el coprocultivo se identificó Shewanella algae. Casos de infección en humanos por esta bacteria son raros y se han encontrado, predominantemente localizadas, en piel, oídos y tejidos blandos con o sin bacteremia, en la mayoría de los cuales existe el antecedente de contacto con ambientes marinos. Shewanella algae es sensible a aminoglicósidos, carbapenemes, eritromicina y quinolonas, pero resistente a penicilinas. La sensibilidad a ampicilina y cefalosporinas es variable. Nuestro paciente fue tratado con cefalexina y tuvo una respuesta satisfactoria al mismo, con cese de los síntomas. De acuerdo con nuestro conocimiento este el primer caso documentado, en Costa Rica, de infección gastrointestinal por esta bacteria.

  20. The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  1. Cell adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to iron oxide minerals: Effect of different single crystal faces

    OpenAIRE

    Hochella Michael F; Bank Tracy L; Neal Andrew L; Rosso Kevin M

    2005-01-01

    The results of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that near-surface molecular structure of iron oxide minerals influences adhesion of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria are presented. These experiments involved the measurement, using atomic force microscopy, of interaction forces generated between Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells and single crystal growth faces of iron oxide minerals. Significantly different adhesive force was measured between cells and the (001) face of hematite,...

  2. Structural and spectroscopic studies on the porin-cytochrome complex from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    OpenAIRE

    Lawes, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    The"outer"membrane,"hetero!trimeric"multi!heme"cytochrome"complex"MtrCAB,"enables"the" process"of"dissimilatory"metal"reduction"(DMR)"in"Shewanella(oneidensis." "" The"properties"of" the"decaheme"protein"MtrA"as"well"as"a" truncated"version"of" this"protein" were" investigated" using" analytical" ultracentrifugation" (AUC)," small" angle" X!ray" scattering" (SAXS)" and" spectropotentiometric" techniques." MtrA" and" a" truncated"N!terminal" MtrA" construct"containing" the" f...

  3. Comparative genomic reconstruction of transcriptional networks controlling central metabolism in the Shewanella genus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Novichkov, Pavel; Stavrovskaya, Elena D.; Rodionova, Irina A.; Li, Xiaoqing; Kazanov, Marat D.; Ravcheev, Dmitry A.; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Kazakov, Alexey E.; Kovaleva, Galina Y.; Permina, Elizabeth A.; Laikova, Olga N.; Overbeek, Ross; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Arkin, Adam P.; Dubchak, Inna; Osterman, Andrei L.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2011-06-15

    Genome-scale prediction of gene regulation and reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria is one of the critical tasks of modern genomics. Despite the growing number of genome-scale gene expression studies, our abilities to convert the results of these studies into accurate regulatory annotations and to project them from model to other organisms are extremely limited. The comparative genomics approaches and computational identification of regulatory sites are useful for the in silico reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks in bacteria. The Shewanella genus is comprised of metabolically versatile gamma-proteobacteria, whose lifestyles and natural environments are substantially different from Escherichia coli and other model bacterial species. To explore conservation and variations in the Shewanella transcriptional networks we analyzed the repertoire of transcription factors and performed genomics-based reconstruction and comparative analysis of regulons in 16 Shewanella genomes. The inferred regulatory network includes 82 transcription factors and their DNA binding sites, 8 riboswitches and 6 translational attenuators. Forty five regulons were newly inferred from the genome context analysis, whereas others were propagated from previously characterized regulons in the Enterobacteria and Pseudomonas spp.. However, even orthologous regulators with conserved DNA-binding motifs may control substantially different gene sets, revealing striking differences in regulatory strategies between the Shewanella spp. and E. coli. Multiple examples of regulatory network rewiring include regulon contraction and expansion (as in the case of PdhR, HexR, FadR), and numerous cases of recruiting non-orthologous regulators to control equivalent pathways (e.g. NagR for N-acetylglucosamine catabolism and PsrA for fatty acid degradation) and, conversely, orthologous regulators to control distinct pathways (e.g. TyrR, ArgR, Crp).

  4. Characterization of the Shewanella oneidensis Fur gene: roles in iron and acid tolerance response

    OpenAIRE

    Wu Liyou; Luo Feng; Harris Daniel P; Yang Yunfeng; Parsons Andrea B; Palumbo Anthony V; Zhou Jizhong

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Iron homeostasis is a key metabolism for most organisms. In many bacterial species, coordinate regulation of iron homeostasis depends on the protein product of a Fur gene. Fur also plays roles in virulence, acid tolerance, redox-stress responses, flagella chemotaxis and metabolic pathways. Results We conducted physiological and transcriptomic studies to characterize Fur in Shewanella oneidensis, with regard to its roles in iron and acid tolerance response. A S. oneidensisf...

  5. Contribution of extracellular polymeric substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms to U(VI) immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, Bulbul; Kennedy, David W; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J; Fredrickson, Jim K; Isern, Nancy G; Majors, Paul D; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) to U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells with minimal EPS, we show that (i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contribute significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; (ii) bEPS can be considered a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at lower initial U(VI) concentrations; and (iii) the U(VI) reduction efficiency is dependent upon the initial U(VI) concentration and decreases at lower concentrations. To quantify the relative contributions of sorption and reduction to U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(VI). We found that, when reduced, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated the reactivity of laEPS, while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, possibly facilitated U(VI) reduction.

  6. Contribution of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 Biofilms to U(VI) Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Bin; Ahmed, B.; Kennedy, David W.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Majors, Paul D.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2011-06-05

    The goal of this study was to quantify the contribution of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in U(VI) immobilization by Shewanella sp. HRCR-1. Through comparison of U(VI) immobilization using cells with bound EPS (bEPS) and cells without EPS, we showed that i) bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms contributed significantly to U(VI) immobilization, especially at low initial U(VI) concentrations, through both sorption and reduction; ii) bEPS could be considered as a functional extension of the cells for U(VI) immobilization and they likely play more important roles at initial U(VI) concentrations; and iii) U(VI) reduction efficiency was found to be dependent upon initial U(VI) concentration and the efficiency decreased at lower concentrations. To quantify relative contribution of sorption and reduction in U(VI) immobilization by EPS fractions, we isolated loosely associated EPS (laEPS) and bEPS from Shewanella sp. HRCR-1 biofilms grown in a hollow fiber membrane biofilm reactor and tested their reactivity with U(V). We found that, when in reduced form, the isolated cell-free EPS fractions could reduce U(VI). Polysaccharides in the EPS likely contributed to U(VI) sorption and dominated reactivity of laEPS while redox active components (e.g., outer membrane c-type cytochromes), especially in bEPS, might facilitate U(VI) reduction.

  7. Shewanella spp. genomic evolution for a cold marine lifestyle and in-situ explosive biodegradation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Shen Zhao

    Full Text Available Shewanella halifaxensis and Shewanella sediminis were among a few aquatic gamma-proteobacteria that were psychrophiles and the first anaerobic bacteria that degraded hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX. Although many mesophilic or psychrophilic strains of Shewanella and gamma-proteobacteria were sequenced for their genomes, the genomic evolution pathways for temperature adaptation were poorly understood. On the other hand, the genes responsible for anaerobic RDX mineralization pathways remain unknown. To determine the unique genomic properties of bacteria responsible for both cold-adaptation and RDX degradation, the genomes of S. halifaxensis and S. sediminis were sequenced and compared with 108 other gamma-proteobacteria including Shewanella that differ in temperature and Na+ requirements, as well as RDX degradation capability. Results showed that for coping with marine environments their genomes had extensively exchanged with deep sea bacterial genomes. Many genes for Na+-dependent nutrient transporters were recruited to use the high Na+ content as an energy source. For coping with low temperatures, these two strains as well as other psychrophilic strains of Shewanella and gamma-proteobacteria were found to decrease their genome G+C content and proteome alanine, proline and arginine content (p-value <0.01 to increase protein structural flexibility. Compared to poorer RDX-degrading strains, S. halifaxensis and S. sediminis have more number of genes for cytochromes and other enzymes related to RDX metabolic pathways. Experimentally, one cytochrome was found induced in S. halifaxensis by RDX when the chemical was the sole terminal electron acceptor. The isolated protein degraded RDX by mono-denitration and was identified as a multiheme 52 kDa cytochrome using a proteomic approach. The present analyses provided the first insight into divergent genomic evolution of bacterial strains for adaptation to the specific cold marine conditions and

  8. Interaction between common antibiotics and a Shewanella strain isolated from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal activated sludge system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hang; Yang, Yongkui; Ge, Yanhui; Zhao, Lin; Long, Sha; Zhang, Ruochun

    2016-12-01

    With increasing production and consumption, more antibiotics are discharged into wastewater treatment plants and generally cannot be sufficiently removed. Because of the complexities of biological treatment processes, the fates of antibiotics and their effects on microorganisms, particularly those involved in the phosphorus removal system, are still unclear. Here, a Shewanella strain was isolated from an enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) system and was found to have the ability to remove phosphorus (P) and chemical oxygen demand (CODcr). Antibiotics affected the Shewanella strain through metabolism of the three main intracellular polymers, altering the ability of the strain to remove P and CODcr. These effects varied with the structure and concentration of the antibiotics. The Shewanella strain removed cefalexin and amoxicillin by degradation or adsorption, producing 2-hydroxy-3-phenyl pyrazine from cefalexin. This study enabled the recognition of the effect and removal of antibiotics during wastewater treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The Microbiota of Freshwater Fish and Freshwater Niches Contain Omega-3 Fatty Acid-Producing Shewanella Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, Frank E; McGraw, Joseph E; Jensen, Brittany J; Bishop, Sydney S; Lokken, James P; Dorff, Kellen J; Ripley, Michael P; Munro, James B

    2015-10-23

    Approximately 30 years ago, it was discovered that free-living bacteria isolated from cold ocean depths could produce polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) such as eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (20:5n-3) or docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (22:6n-3), two PUFA essential for human health. Numerous laboratories have also discovered that EPA- and/or DHA-producing bacteria, many of them members of the Shewanella genus, could be isolated from the intestinal tracts of omega-3 fatty acid-rich marine fish. If bacteria contribute omega-3 fatty acids to the host fish in general or if they assist some bacterial species in adaptation to cold, then cold freshwater fish or habitats should also harbor these producers. Thus, we undertook a study to see if these niches also contained omega-3 fatty acid producers. We were successful in isolating and characterizing unique EPA-producing strains of Shewanella from three strictly freshwater native fish species, i.e., lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis), lean lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush), and walleye (Sander vitreus), and from two other freshwater nonnative fish, i.e., coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) and seeforellen brown trout (Salmo trutta). We were also able to isolate four unique free-living strains of EPA-producing Shewanella from freshwater habitats. Phylogenetic and phenotypic analyses suggest that one producer is clearly a member of the Shewanella morhuae species and another is sister to members of the marine PUFA-producing Shewanella baltica species. However, the remaining isolates have more ambiguous relationships, sharing a common ancestor with non-PUFA-producing Shewanella putrefaciens isolates rather than marine S. baltica isolates despite having a phenotype more consistent with S. baltica strains. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Isolation and study of a psychrotrophic bacterium producing protease from Antarctica%一株产蛋白酶南极耐冷细菌的筛选及研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾胤新; 蔡明宏; 陈波; 何剑锋

    2001-01-01

    从南极中山站地区分离到1株产胞外酸性蛋白酶的革兰氏阴性杆菌.该菌能在7℃、20℃及30℃生长并产酶;其最适生长温度在20℃左右,不耐盐.碳源物质中,葡萄糖对菌株的生长有利,但对蛋白酶的生成影响不大;氮源物质中,蛋白胨对菌株的生长及蛋白酶的生成效果最好,而(NH4)2SO4则是效果最好的无机氮源.该菌所产胞外蛋白酶占其蛋白酶总量的83.2%,蛋白酶反应的最适温度为40℃,最适pH为5;酶活力在35℃以下保持稳定.直接以酪蛋白液为培养基、在20℃条件下对该菌进行摇瓶培养,6d后菌液浓度及产酶量皆到达高值并基本保持稳定;而以LB培养基(Luria-Bertani培养基)在相同条件下培养该菌,3d后菌液浓度即到达高值并基本保持稳定,酶活力则在2d后到达高值.

  11. IDENTIFICATION OF THE BACTERIUM TOMATO STEM CANKER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goner A. Shaker

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseased tomato samples were collected from green house was evaluated for isolation, pathogenicity and biochemical tests. The symptoms of the infected tomato plants were as sudden wilting after curled on leaves and necrotic streak regions developed at the crown and base of the stem and the cavities deepen and expand up and down, brown discoloration and necrosis occurring on xylem and phloem vasculer. All of ages of tomato plant were susceptible to bacteria when the weather condition favorable and immediately, seen collapse symptom on tomato plant at once fail and die. The bacterium was isolated from diseased plant in all regions on nutrient Agar; a yellow bacterium was isolated from infected tomato plant in green houses and fields in Abu-Ghraib, Rashiedia and Qanat Al-Geiaysh nurseries in Baghdad provinces of Iraq. The bacterium was found gram positive, rod-shaped, non-motile and capable an aerobic growth and based on the morphological and biochemical characteristics revealed that this bacterium belongs to: Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. (smith pathogenicity and hypersensitivity of the bacterium Cmm showed the disease index were 18.33, 6.66, 16.66, 5, 0% for tomato seedlings were inoculated treatments as the wounding roots, without wounding roots, crown of the stem, petiole and control respectively.

  12. Electrochemical gating of tricarboxylic acid cycle in electricity-producing bacterial cells of Shewanella.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoichi Matsuda

    Full Text Available Energy-conversion systems mediated by bacterial metabolism have recently attracted much attention, and therefore, demands for tuning of bacterial metabolism are increasing. It is widely recognized that intracellular redox atmosphere which is generally tuned by dissolved oxygen concentration or by appropriate selection of an electron acceptor for respiration is one of the important factors determining the bacterial metabolism. In general, electrochemical approaches are valuable for regulation of redox-active objects. However, the intracellular redox conditions are extremely difficult to control electrochemically because of the presence of insulative phospholipid bilayer membranes. In the present work, the limitation can be overcome by use of the bacterial genus Shewanella, which consists of species that are able to respire via cytochromes abundantly expressed in their outer-membrane with solid-state electron acceptors, including anodes. The electrochemical characterization and the gene expression analysis revealed that the activity of tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle in Shewanella cells can be reversibly gated simply by changing the anode potential. Importantly, our present results for Shewanella cells cultured in an electrochemical system under poised potential conditions showed the opposite relationship between the current and electron acceptor energy level, and indicate that this unique behavior originates from deactivation of the TCA cycle in the (over-oxidative region. Our result obtained in this study is the first demonstration of the electrochemical gating of TCA cycle of living cells. And we believe that our findings will contribute to a deeper understanding of redox-dependent regulation systems in living cells, in which the intracellular redox atmosphere is a critical factor determining the regulation of various metabolic and genetic processes.

  13. Quorum sensing signals affect spoilage of refrigerated large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) by Shewanella baltica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Junli; Zhao, Aifei; Feng, Lifang; Gao, Haichun

    2016-01-18

    In this work we investigated the specific spoilage organism (SSO) of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea) stored at 4°C and role of quorum sensing (QS) system of SSO isolated from the spoiled fish. According to microbial count and 16S rRNA gene of the isolated pure strains, Shewanella, mainly Shewanella baltica and Shewanella putrefaciens, was predominant genera at the end of shelf-life of P. crocea. Among Shewanella isolates, S.baltica02 was demonstrated as SSO in spoilage potential characteristics by inoculation into sterile fish juice using sensory and chemical analyses. Autoinducer 2 and two cyclic dipeptides (DKPs) including cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) and cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Phe), no any AHLs, were detected in cell-free S. baltica culture. Interestingly, S.baltica02 had the highest QS activity among three spoilers of S. baltica. The production of biofilm, trimethylamines (TMA) and putrescine in these spoilers significantly increased in the presence of cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu), rather than cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Phe) and 4,5-dihydroxy-2,3-pentanedione (the AI-2 precursor, DPD). In accordance with the effect of signal molecules on the spoilage phenotype, exposure to exogenous cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) was also showed to up-regulate the transcription levels of luxR, torA and ODC, and no effect of luxS indicated that S. baltica could sense cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu). In the fish homogenate, exogenous cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) shortened lag phase durations and enhanced growth rates of the dominant bacteria, H2S producing bacteria, under refrigerated storage, while exogenous DPD retarded growth of competing bacteria, such as Enterobacteriaceae. Meanwhile, cyclo-(l-Pro-l-Leu) also promoted the accumulation of metabolites on the spoilage process of homogenate. S.baltica02 luxS mutant preliminarily proved that AI-2 might not play a signaling role in the spoilage. The present study suggested that the spoilage potential of S. baltica in P. crocea might be regulated by DKP-based quorum sensing.

  14. Changes in cell morphology of Listeria monocytogenesnes and Shewanella putrefaciens resulting from the action of protamine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Charlotte; Gill, T.; Gram, Lone

    1996-01-01

    Protamine, which is an antibacterial basic peptide, was shown to alter the cell morphology of Listeria monocytogenes and Shewanella putrefaciens. Atomic force microscopy revealed that protamine smoothed the surface of cells, formed holes in the cell envelope, and caused fusion of S. putrefaciens...... cells. Immunoelectron microscopy of protamine-treated cells of both L. monocytogenes and S. putrefaciens showed great damage to the cell wall and condensation of the cytoplasm. Respiration of the cells was decreased due to treatment with sublethal concentrations of protamine, probably due to leakage...

  15. Structure prediction and functional analyses of a thermostable lipase obtained from Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Faez Iqbal; Nizami, Bilal; Anwer, Razique; Gu, Ke-Ren; Bisetty, Krishna; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2017-08-01

    Previous experimental studies on thermostable lipase from Shewanella putrefaciens suggested the maximum activity at higher temperatures, but with little information on its conformational profile. In this study, the three-dimensional structure of lipase was predicted and a 60 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out at temperatures ranging from 300 to 400 K to better understand its thermostable nature at the molecular level. MD simulations were performed in order to predict the optimal activity of thermostable lipase. The results suggested strong conformational temperature dependence. The thermostable lipase maintained its bio-active conformation at 350 K during the 60 ns MD simulations.

  16. Role of Menaquinones in Fe(III) Reduction by Membrane Fractions of Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffarini, Daad A.; Blumerman, Seth L.; Mansoorabadi, Karen J.

    2002-01-01

    Two Tn5-generated mutants of Shewanella putrefaciens with insertions in menD and menB were isolated and analyzed. Both mutants were deficient in the use of several terminal electron acceptors, including Fe(III). This deficiency was overcome by the addition of menaquinone (vitamin K2). Isolated membrane fractions from both mutants were unable to reduce Fe(III) in the absence of added menaquinone when formate was used as the electron donor. These results indicate that menaquinones are essential components for the reduction of Fe(III) by both whole cells and purified membrane fractions when formate or lactate is used as the electron donor. PMID:11790756

  17. Final Summary of "Interdisciplinary Study of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1's Metabolism & Metal Reduction"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolker, Eugene

    2007-06-26

    Our project focused primarily on analysis of different types of data produced by global high-throughput technologies, data integration of gene annotation, and gene and protein expression information, as well as on getting a better functional annotation of Shewanella genes. Specifically, four of our numerous major activities and achievements include the development of: statistical models for identification and expression proteomics, superior to currently available approaches (including our own earlier ones); approaches to improve gene annotations on the whole-organism scale; standards for annotation, transcriptomics and proteomics approaches; and generalized approaches for data integration of gene annotation, gene and protein expression information.

  18. Genome Sequence and Transcriptome Analysis of Meat-Spoilage-Associated Lactic Acid Bacterium Lactococcus piscium MKFS47.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreevskaya, Margarita; Johansson, Per; Laine, Pia; Smolander, Olli-Pekka; Sonck, Matti; Rahkila, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Elina; Paulin, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Björkroth, Johanna

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus piscium is a psychrotrophic lactic acid bacterium and is known to be one of the predominant species within spoilage microbial communities in cold-stored packaged foods, particularly in meat products. Its presence in such products has been associated with the formation of buttery and sour off-odors. Nevertheless, the spoilage potential of L. piscium varies dramatically depending on the strain and growth conditions. Additional knowledge about the genome is required to explain such variation, understand its phylogeny, and study gene functions. Here, we present the complete and annotated genomic sequence of L. piscium MKFS47, combined with a time course analysis of the glucose catabolism-based transcriptome. In addition, a comparative analysis of gene contents was done for L. piscium MKFS47 and 29 other lactococci, revealing three distinct clades within the genus. The genome of L. piscium MKFS47 consists of one chromosome, carrying 2,289 genes, and two plasmids. A wide range of carbohydrates was predicted to be fermented, and growth on glycerol was observed. Both carbohydrate and glycerol catabolic pathways were significantly upregulated in the course of time as a result of glucose exhaustion. At the same time, differential expression of the pyruvate utilization pathways, implicated in the formation of spoilage substances, switched the metabolism toward a heterofermentative mode. In agreement with data from previous inoculation studies, L. piscium MKFS47 was identified as an efficient producer of buttery-odor compounds under aerobic conditions. Finally, genes and pathways that may contribute to increased survival in meat environments were considered. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Multi-heme Cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: Structures, functions and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M.; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N.

    2014-11-05

    Multi-heme cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometers. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-heme cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-heme cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward there are opportunities to engage multi-heme cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-heme cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-heme cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies.

  20. Combined genomics and experimental analyses of respiratory characteristics of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Dongru; Wei, Hehong; Tu, Qichao; Yang, Yunfeng; Xie, Ming; Chen, Jingrong; Pinkerton, Mark H; Liang, Yili; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-09-01

    It has previously been shown that the Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 strain produces remarkably high current in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and can form magnetite at 0°C. To explore the underlying mechanisms, we developed a genetic manipulation method by deleting the restriction-modification system genes of the SGI1 (Salmonella genome island 1)-like prophage and analyzed the key genes involved in bacterial respiration. W3-18-1 has less respiratory flexibility than the well-characterized S. oneidensis MR-1 strain, as it possesses fewer cytochrome c genes and lacks the ability to oxidize sulfite or reduce dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and timethylamine oxide (TMAO). W3-18-1 lacks the hydrogen-producing Fe-only hydrogenase, and the hydrogen-oxidizing Ni-Fe hydrogenase genes were split into two separate clusters. Two periplasmic nitrate reductases (NapDAGHB and NapDABC) were functionally redundant in anaerobic growth of W3-18-1 with nitrate as the electron acceptor, though napDABC was not regulated by Crp. Moreover, nitrate respiration started earlier in W3-18-1 than in MR-1 (with NapDAGHB only) under microoxic conditions. These results indicate that Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 is well adapted to habitats with higher oxygen levels. Taken together, the results of this study provide valuable insights into bacterial genome evolution.

  1. Antibiotic resistance of Shewanella putrefaciens isolated from shellfish collected from the West Sea in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Ho; Shin, YuJin; Jeon, HanEul; Choi, Jae-Ho; Jeong, SuYeon; So, Jae-Seong

    2013-11-15

    In this study, we isolated and characterized Shewanella putrefaciens from shellfish harvested from the West Sea in Korea. For the initial isolation of S. putrefaciens, LB agar plates supplemented with ferrous sulfate and sodium thiosulfate were inoculated with shellfish homogenates, incubated for 24h, and then black colonies were selected. Gram-negative and catalase-positive colonies were subsequently confirmed by PCR assays and API 20E kit test system. The Shewanella-specific 16S rRNA and gyrB genes were used to design S. putrefaciens-specific PCR primers. From 6 species of shellfish tested, 24 S. putrefaciens strains were isolated. These 24 isolates had the following profiles of resistance against 16 antibiotics: all the isolates were resistant to cephalothin and vancomycin and 95.8% were resistant to ampicillin. Here, we report the isolation of S. putrefaciens from shellfish and our results point to a new possible route for exposing healthy individuals to S. putrefaciens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Proteomic assessment of the role of N-acyl homoserine lactone in Shewanella putrefaciens spoilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Caili; Zhu, Suqin; Jatt, Abdul-Nabi; Pan, Yurong; Zeng, Mingyong

    2017-08-21

    Shewanella spp. are the common spoilage organisms found in aquatic food products stored at low temperature and their spoilage mechanism has been reported to be mediated by quorum sensing (QS). However, the specifically expressed proteins responding to N-acyl homoserine-lactone (AHLs) were seldom reported. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of different AHL signal molecules on Shewanella putrefaciens Z4 isolated from refrigerated turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) at the proteome level. The results revealed that exogenous AHLs were utilized as QS signal molecules by S. putrefaciens Z4, and AHLs were not degraded by intracellular or extracellular enzymes secreted by S. putrefaciens Z4. Twenty-three differently expressed spots upon the addition of AHLs were selected and identified by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The results indicated that proteins involving in growth and metabolism (i.e., citrate synthase, succinate semialdehyde dehydrogenase), environment adaptation and regulators (i.e., polysaccharide deacetylases, transaldolase) were down-regulated upon three kinds of AHLs (C4-HSL, C6-HSL, and O-C6-HSL), whereas the abundance of stress response protein and DNA ligase were elevated by the addition of exogenous AHLs. Moreover, the effects of exogenous C6-HSL and O-C6-HSLwere prominent. These results provide evidence that AHL-based QS signal molecules affected some important metabolic properties of S. putrefaciens. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Changes in Carbon Electrode Morphology Affect Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David V. P. Sanchez

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The formation of biofilm-electrodes is crucial for microbial fuel cell current production because optimal performance is often associated with thick biofilms. However, the influence of the electrode structure and morphology on biofilm formation is only beginning to be investigated. This study provides insight on how changing the electrode morphology affects current production of a pure culture of anode-respiring bacteria. Specifically, an analysis of the effects of carbon fiber electrodes with drastically different morphologies on biofilm formation and anode respiration by a pure culture (Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were examined. Results showed that carbon nanofiber mats had ~10 fold higher current than plain carbon microfiber paper and that the increase was not due to an increase in electrode surface area, conductivity, or the size of the constituent material. Cyclic voltammograms reveal that electron transfer from the carbon nanofiber mats was biofilm-based suggesting that decreasing the diameter of the constituent carbon material from a few microns to a few hundred nanometers is beneficial for electricity production solely because the electrode surface creates a more relevant mesh for biofilm formation by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

  4. [Zero-valent iron-enhanced azoreduction by the Shewanella decolorationis S12].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Chen, Xing-Juan; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guo-Ping; Xu, Mei-Ying

    2013-07-01

    Characteristics and optimal reaction conditions of anaerobic azoreduction by the Shewanella decolorationis S12 in the presence of zero-valent iron (ZVI) were evaluated in this study. The results showed that the presence of ZVI significantly enhanced the decolorization rate of azo dye. In the presence of 20 mmol x L(-1) ZVI, the decolorization rate of 1 mmol x L(-1) amaranth reached up to 100% by the Shewanella decolorationis S12 after 30 h incubation, which was significantly higher than 23.16% and 94.66% in the pure strain S12 and pure ZVI treatment systems, respectively. When 20 mmol x L(-1) of sodium formate was added in the medium, ZVI still improved the decolorization rate of amaranth by 20.54%. In addition, the presence of ZVI significantly increased the azo dye treatment amount in the ZVI plus S12 system. In the system with ZVI, 1 mmol x L(-1) amaranth was completely reduced 11 times in fed-batch process within 276 h, while the dye could only be completely reduced 3 times in the system without ZVI. The optimal pH and the Fe(0) dose for the ZVI plus S12 system was 9.0 and 60 mmol c L(-1), respectively. The microscale ZVI was more suitable for the decolorization than those with larger size and the nanoscale ZVI. This study may provide some useful information for improving the biodegradation of azo dye in the treatment system with ZVI.

  5. The octahaem SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha; Romine, Margie; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors including thiosulfate, polysulfide and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyses six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones but was independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octahaem c cytochrome with an atypical haem binding site. The sulfite reductase of S. oneidensis MR-1 does not appear to be a sirohaem enzyme, but represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The gene that encodes SirA is located within a 10-gene locus that is predicted to encode a component of a specialized haem lyase, a menaquinone oxidase and copper transport proteins. This locus was identified in the genomes of several Shewanella species and appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

  6. Zymomonas mobilis: a bacterium for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baratti, J.C.; Bu' Lock, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Zymomonas mobilis is a facultative anaerobic gram negative bacterium first isolated in tropical countries from alcoholic beverages like the African palm wine, the Mexican pulque and also as a contaminant of cider (cider sickness) or beer in the European countries. It is one of the few facultative anaerobic bacteria degrading glucose by the Entner-Doudoroff pathway usually found in strictly aerobic microorganisms. Some work was devoted to this bacterium in the 50s and 60s and was reviewed by Swings and De Ley in their classical paper published in 1977. During the 70s there was very little work on the bacterium until 1979 and the first report by the Australian group of P.L. Rogers on the great potentialities of Z. mobilis for ethanol production. At that time the petroleum crisis had led the developed countries to search for alternative fuel from renewable resources. The Australian group clearly demonstrated the advantages of the bacterium compared to the yeasts traditionally used for the alcoholic fermentation. As a result, there was a considerable burst in the Zymomonas literature which started from nearly zero in the late 70s to attain 70 papers published in the field in 1984. In this article, papers published from 1982 to 1986 are reviewed.

  7. Roles of UndA and MtrC of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 in iron reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Chen, Jingrong; Qiu, Dongru; Zhou, Jizhong

    2013-11-25

    The completion of genome sequencing in a number of Shewanella species, which are most renowned for their metal reduction capacity, offers a basis for comparative studies. Previous work in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has indicated that some genes within a cluster (mtrBAC-omcA-mtrFED) were involved in iron reduction. To explore new features of iron reduction pathways, we experimentally analyzed Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 since its gene cluster is considerably different from that of MR-1 in that the gene cluster encodes only four ORFs. Among the gene cluster, two genes (mtrC and undA) were shown to encode c-type cytochromes. The ΔmtrC deletion mutant revealed significant deficiencies in reducing metals of Fe2O3, α-FeO(OH), β-FeO(OH), ferric citrate, Mn(IV) and Co(III), but not organic compounds. In contrast, no deficiency of metal reduction was observed in the ΔundA deletion mutant. Nonetheless, undA deletion resulted in progressively slower iron reduction in the absence of mtrC and fitness loss under the iron-using condition, which was indicative of a functional role of UndA in iron reduction. These results provide physiological and biochemical evidences that UndA and MtrC of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 are involved in iron reduction.

  8. Surface chemistry and acid-base activity of Shewanella putrefaciens: Cell wall charging and metal binding to bacterial cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, Jacqueline Wilhelmien

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the surface chemistry of live microorganisms, pH stat experiments are combined with analyses of the time-dependent changes in solution chemistry using suspensions of live cells of Shewanella putrefaciens. The results of this study illustrate the complex response of the live

  9. Differential arsenic mobilization from As-bearing ferrihydrite by iron-respiring Shewanella strains with different arsenic-reducing activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shenghua; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Donghun; Kanaly, Robert A; Kim, Min-Gyu; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2013-08-06

    Arsenic immobilization and release in the environment is significantly influenced by bacterial oxidation and reduction of arsenic and arsenic-bearing minerals. In this study, we tested three iron-reducing bacteria, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella sp. HN-41, and Shewanella putrefaciens 200, which have diverse arsenate-reducing activities with regard to reduction of an As-bearing ferrihydrite slurry. In the cultures of S. oneidensis MR-1 and Shewanella sp. HN-41, which are not capable of respiratory reduction of As(V) to As(III), arsenic was maintained predominantly in its pentavalent form, existing in particulate poorly crystalline As-bearing ferrihydrite and formed small quantities of a stable ferrous arsenate [Fe3(AsO4)2] precipitate. However, in the culture of the As(V) reducer, S. putrefaciens 200, As(V) was reduced to As(III) and a small fraction of As-bearing ferrihydrite was transformed into ribbon-shaped siderite that subsequently re-released arsenic into the liquid phase. Our results indicated that release of arsenic and formation of diverse secondary nanoscale Fe-As minerals are specifically closely related to the arsenic-reducing abilities of different bacteria. Therefore, bacterial arsenic reduction appears to significantly influence As mobilization in soils, minerals, and other Fe-rich environments.

  10. Surface chemistry and acid-base activity of Shewanella putrefaciens : Cell wall charging and metal binding to bacterial cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claessens, J.W.

    2006-01-01

    To gain insight into the surface chemistry of live microorganisms, pH stat experiments are combined with analyses of the time-dependent changes in solution chemistry using suspensions of live cells of Shewanella putrefaciens. The results of this study illustrate the complex response of the live

  11. Interaction between fish spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas sp and Shewanella putrefaciens in fish extracts and on fish tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between fish spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas sp. and Shewanella putrefaciens, was investigated using fish extract and fish tissue as model systems. Isolates of Pseudomonas that produced iron chelators, siderophores, inhibited growth of S. putrefaciens in a fish-extract-agar diffusion...

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of an Extensively Drug-Resistant Shewanella xiamenensis Strain Isolated from Algerian Hospital Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, Khadidja; Touati, Abdelaziz; Bekal, Sadjia

    2016-11-10

    In this study, we present the first complete genome of an extensively drug-resistant strain of Shewanella xiamenensis, collected from hospital effluents in Algeria. This genome includes the chromosome and a large new plasmid harboring several drug-resistance genes. Copyright © 2016 Yousfi et al.

  13. Analysis of raw milk quality at reception and during cold storage: combined effects of somatic cell counts and psychrotrophic bacteria on lipolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gargouri, Ahmed; Hamed, Houda; Elfeki, Abdelfettah

    2013-09-01

    The objective of the article was to analyze the influence of psychrotrophic bacteria counts (PBCs) and somatic cell counts (SCCs) on the extent of lipolysis in bulk samples of cow's milk at reception and during cold storage. Samples of milk were analyzed on the day of sampling and subsequently during cold storage. The acidity, fat, density, chloride content, electrical conductivity (EC), bulk milk SCCs (BMSCC), and PBC values were analyzed on the day of sampling and the levels of acidity, EC, SCC, and PBC were analyzed during cold storage at 4 °C for 72 h. The SCC value 869 × 10(3) mL(-1) was higher than the recommended threshold. Lipolysis level at sampling day was related more closely with SCC than with PBC. There was no significant correlation between milk acidity and PBC among others parameters, while the milk mean density was only significant (P < 0.01) correlated with the fat content. The EC and chloride content were consistently correlated (P < 0.001) with BMSCC that allowed them to be used as indicators of mammary gland infection. The milk acidity, EC, PBC, and lipolysis levels increased in relation to the storage time at 4 °C. The lipolysis level during storage was in closer relation to the SCC, but not relation to the PBC. Effects of SCC and PBC on lipolysis decreased throughout the chilling period. It was concluded that initial lipolysis level and intrinsic milk lipoprotein lipase appear more effective than SCC and PBC on the development of lipolysis during storage.

  14. Mechanisms of Electron Transfer in Two Decaheme Cytochromes from a Metal-Reducing Bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wigginton, Nicholas S.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2007-11-08

    Single-molecule current-voltage (I–V) spectra were collected using a scanning tunneling microscope for two decaheme c-type cytochromes, OmcA and MtrC, which are outer-membrane proteins from the dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis. Although the two cytochromes are similar in heme count, charge-carrying amino-acid content, and molecular mass, their I–V spectra are significantly different. The I–V spectra for OmcA show smoothly varying symmetric exponential behavior. These spectra are well fit by a coherent tunneling model that is based on a simple square barrier description of the tunneling junction. In contrast, the I–V spectra for MtrC have pronounced breaks in slope in the positive tip bias range. Two large peaks in the normalized differential conductance spectra of MtrC were fit to a tunneling model that accounts for the possibility of transient population of empty states stabilized by vibrational relaxation. Reorganization energies deduced for the two features are similar to those normally assigned to metal centers in other metalloproteins. Work function measurements of the cytochrome films were used to convert the energies of these two spectral features to the normal hydrogen electrode scale for comparison with the midpoint potential measured using protein film voltammetry, which showed good correspondence. We conclude that MtrC mediates tunneling current by heme orbital participation. The difference in tunneling behavior between OmcA and MtrC suggests distinct physiological functions for the two cytochromes; in contrast to OmcA, MtrC appears to be tuned to a specific operating potential.

  15. Cloning,Expression and Identification of Sulfotransferase from S. piezotolerans WP3%Shewanella piezotolerans WP3中sulfotransferase基因的克隆表达与活性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韦海澜; 李艳霞; 李升康

    2013-01-01

      Shewanella piezotolerans WP3分离自西太平洋1914 m的深海沉积物中,是一株革兰氏阴性,耐冷、耐压且兼性厌氧的杆状细菌.初步研究证明海洋细菌中含有磺基转移酶(sulfotransferase,ST)活性.本实验中构建了WP3两个磺基转移酶基因的原核表达载体,在E. coli中表达并纯化了重组ST,通过底物的化学反应,证明两个重组磺基转移酶均具有转磺酶活性.研究结果为后续实验的WP3胞外寡糖的离体硫酸化修饰工作奠定了基础.%S.piezotolerans WP3 is psychrotolerant and piezotolerant deep sea bacterium with a broad pressure optimum,extending from atmospheric pressure to about 20 MPa. The sulfotransferase(ST)of the bacterium is studied in this paper. Two genes,Swp1579 and Swp 4147,encoding the STs were cloned by PCR method. The gene Swp 1579 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 849 bp,encoding a 526 aa putative ST protein, while the ORF of Swp 4147 consists of 1707 bp, encoding 568aa WP3 arylsulfate sulfotransferase. The 900bp and 1700 bp PCR product is obtained and ligated to the pQE30 vector and pQE70 vector,respectively. Utilizing the IPTG treatment,the cloned ST genes was expressed in Escherichia coli M15. The enzymatic activity assays of recombination proteins showed both had ST activities.

  16. Kinetics of biofilm formation and desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes in single and dual species biofilms with Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans or Shewanella baltica on food-grade stainless steel surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshvar Alavi, Hessam Edin; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of static biofilm formation (100% RH, 15 °C, 48-72 h) and desiccation survival (43% RH, 15 °C, 21 days) of Listeria monocytogenes, in dual species biofilms with the common spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans and Shewanella baltica, on the surface of food grade stainless steel. The Gram-negative bacteria reduced the maximum biofilm population of L. monocytogenes in dual species biofilms and increased its inactivation during desiccation. However, due to the higher desiccation resistance of Listeria relative to P. fluorescens and S. baltica, the pathogen survived in greater final numbers. In contrast, S. proteamaculans outcompeted the pathogen during the biofilm formation and exhibited similar desiccation survival, causing the N21 days of Serratia to be ca 3 Log10(CFU cm(-2)) greater than that of Listeria in the dual species biofilm. Microscopy revealed biofilm morphologies with variable amounts of exopolymeric substance and the presence of separate microcolonies. Under these simulated food plant conditions, the fate of L. monocytogenes during formation of mixed biofilms and desiccation depended on the implicit characteristics of the co-cultured bacterium.

  17. Synthetic and Evolutionary Construction of a Chlorate-Reducing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Iain C; Melnyk, Ryan A; Youngblut, Matthew D; Carlson, Hans K; Iavarone, Anthony T; Coates, John D

    2015-05-19

    Despite evidence for the prevalence of horizontal gene transfer of respiratory genes, little is known about how pathways functionally integrate within new hosts. One example of a mobile respiratory metabolism is bacterial chlorate reduction, which is frequently encoded on composite transposons. This implies that the essential components of the metabolism are encoded on these mobile elements. To test this, we heterologously expressed genes for chlorate reduction from Shewanella algae ACDC in the non-chlorate-reducing Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. The construct that ultimately endowed robust growth on chlorate included cld, a cytochrome c gene, clrABDC, and two genes of unknown function. Although strain MR-1 was unable to grow on chlorate after initial insertion of these genes into the chromosome, 11 derived strains capable of chlorate respiration were obtained through adaptive evolution. Genome resequencing indicated that all of the evolved chlorate-reducing strains replicated a large genomic region containing chlorate reduction genes. Contraction in copy number and loss of the ability to reduce chlorate were also observed, indicating that this phenomenon was extremely dynamic. Although most strains contained more than six copies of the replicated region, a single strain with less duplication also grew rapidly. This strain contained three additional mutations that we hypothesized compensated for the low copy number. We remade the mutations combinatorially in the unevolved strain and determined that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) upstream of cld enabled growth on chlorate and was epistatic to a second base pair change in the NarP binding sequence between narQP and nrfA that enhanced growth. The ability of chlorate reduction composite transposons to form functional metabolisms after transfer to a new host is an important part of their propagation. To study this phenomenon, we engineered Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 into a chlorate reducer. We defined a set of

  18. Synthesis and Structure-Activity Correlation Studies of Metal Complexes of α-N-heterocyclic Carboxaldehyde Thiosemicarbazones in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintell Tillison

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available This investigation involved the synthesis of metal complexes to test the hypothesis that structural changes and metal coordination in pyridine thiosemicarbazones affect cell growth and cell proliferation in vitro. Thiosemicarbazones are well known to possess antitumor, antiviral, antibacterial, antimalarial, and other activities. Extensive research has been carried out on aliphatic, aromatic, heterocyclic and other types of thiosemicarbazones and their metal complexes. Due to the pronounced reactivity exhibited by metal complexes of heterocyclic thiosemicarbazones, synthesis and structural characterization of di-2-pyridylketone 4N-phenyl thiosemicarbazone and diphenyl tin (Sn and platinum (Pt complexes were undertaken. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a metal ion-reducing bacterium, was used as a model organism to explore the biological activity under aerobic conditions. A comparision of the cytotoxic potential of selected ligand and metal-complex thiosemicarbazones on cell growth in wild type MR-1 and mutant DSP-010 Shewanella oneidensis strains at various concentrations (0, 5, 10, 15, 20 or 25 ppm was performed. The wild type (MR-1 grown in the presence of increasing concentrations of Sn- thiosemicarbazone complexes was comparatively more sensitive (mean cell number = 4.8 X 108 + 4.3 X 107 SD than the DSP-010, a spontaneous rifampicillin derivative of the parent strain (mean cell number = 5.6 x 108 + 6.4 X 107 SD under comparable aerobic conditions (p=0.0004. No differences were observed in the sensitivity of the wild and mutant types when exposed to various concentrations of diphenyl Pt- thiosemicarbazone complex (p= 0.425 or the thiosemicarbazone ligand (p=0.313. Growth of MR-1 in the presence of diphenyl Sn- thiosemicarbazone was significantly different among treatment groups (p=0.012. MR-1 cell numbers were significantly higher at 5ppm than at 10 to 20ppm (p = 0.05. The mean number of DSP-010 variant strain cells also differed among diphenyl Sn

  19. Electron transfer mechanism in Shewanella loihica PV-4 biofilms formed at graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anand; Zhang, Xiaoming; Pastorella, Gabriele; Connolly, Jack O; Barry, Niamh; Woolley, Robert; Krishnamurthy, Satheesh; Marsili, Enrico

    2012-10-01

    Electron transfer mechanisms in Shewanella loihica PV-4 viable biofilms formed at graphite electrodes were investigated in potentiostat-controlled electrochemical cells poised at oxidative potentials (0.2V vs. Ag/AgCl). Chronoamperometry (CA) showed a repeatable biofilm growth of S. loihica PV-4 on graphite electrode. CA, cyclic voltammetry (CV) and its first derivative shows that both direct electron transfer (DET) mediated electron transfer (MET) mechanism contributes to the overall anodic (oxidation) current. The maximum anodic current density recorded on graphite was 90 μA cm(-2). Fluorescence emission spectra shows increased concentration of quinone derivatives and riboflavin in the cell-free supernatant as the biofilm grows. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) show accumulation of riboflavin at the graphite interface, with the increase in incubation period. This is the first study to observe a gradual shift from DET to MET mechanism in viable S. loihica PV-4 biofilms.

  20. Microbial-enzymatic-hybrid biological fuel cell with optimized growth conditions for Shewanella oneidensis DSP-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Jared N; Luckarift, Heather R; Sizemore, Susan R; Farrington, Karen E; Lau, Carolin; Johnson, Glenn R; Atanassov, Plamen

    2013-07-10

    In this work we present a biological fuel cell fabricated by combining a Shewanella oneidensis microbial anode and a laccase-modified air-breathing cathode. This concept is devised as an extension to traditional biochemical methods by incorporating diverse biological catalysts with the aim of powering small devices. In preparing the biological fuel cell anode, novel hierarchical-structured architectures and biofilm configurations were investigated. A method for creating an artificial biofilm based on encapsulating microorganisms in a porous, thin film of silica was compared with S. oneidensis biofilms that were allowed to colonize naturally. Results indicate comparable current and power densities for artificial and natural biofilm formations, based on growth characteristics. As a result, this work describes methods for creating controllable and reproducible bio-anodes and demonstrates the versatility of hybrid biological fuel cells.

  1. Biogenic FeS accelerates reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ying-Chao; Li, Wen-Wei; Chen, Chang-Bin; Li, Chen-Xuan; Zeng, Raymond; Lau, Tai-Chu; Huang, Tian-Yin

    2016-12-01

    Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) widely exist in the subsurface environment and are involved in various contaminant degradation and element geochemical cycling processes. Recent studies suggest that DMRB can biosynthesize metal nanoparticles during metal reduction, but it is unclear yet how such biogenic nanomaterials would affect their decontamination behaviors. In this study, we found that the dechlorination rates of carbon tetrachloride (CT) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 was significantly increased by 8 times with the formation of biogenic ferrous sulfide (FeS) nanoparticles. The pasteurized biogenic FeS enabled 5 times faster dechlorination than abiotic FeS that had larger sizes and irregular structure, confirming a significant contribution of the biogenic FeS to CT bioreduction resulting from its good dispersion and relatively high dechlorination activity. This study highlights a potentially important role of biosynthesized nanoparticles in environmental bioremediation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Interfacial electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens enhanced by nanoflaky nickel oxide array in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Li, Chang Ming

    2014-11-01

    A uniform nanoflaky nickel oxide (NiO) array is constructed on carbon cloth via optimized conditions, and further employed as an anode in Shewanella putrefaciens (S. putrefaciens) microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Results indicate that the NiO nanoflakes/carbon cloth anode significantly improves the MFC performance in comparison to the unmodified carbon cloth, delivering about three times higher power density. This attributes to an enhanced interfacial electron transfer rate between bacteria cell and nanoflaky NiO array-modified carbon fiber and improved adhesion of bacteria cells on the modified carbon fiber for more active reaction centers. Considering the facile synthesis process, low cost and long discharging lifetime, this NiO/carbon cloth anode could be very promising to be applied for high performance, large scale MFCs.

  3. MOLECULAR CLONING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NOVEL THERMOSTABLE LIPASE FROM SHEWANELLA PUTREFACIENS AND USING ENZYMATIC BIODIESEL PRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahri Akbas

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A novel thermostable lipase from Shewanella putrefaciens was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, characterized and used in biodiesel production. Enzyme characterization was carried out by enzyme assay, SDS-PAGE and other biochemical reactions. The recombinant lipase was found to have a molecular mass of 29 kDa and exhibited lipase activity when Tween 80 was used as the substrate. The purified enzyme showed maximum activity at pH 5.0 and at 80°C. The recombinant lipase was used for the transesterification of canola oil and waste oil. The enzyme retains 50% of its activity at 90°C for 30 minutes. It is also able to retain 20% of its activity even at 100 °C for 20 minutes. These properties of the obtained new recombinant thermostable lipase make it promising as a biocatalyst for industrial processes.

  4. Bioreduction of nitrobenzene, natural organic matter, and hematite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Fubo; Burgos, William D; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2010-01-01

    We examined the reduction of nitrobenzene by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 in the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and hematite. Bioreduction experiments were conducted with combinations and varied concentrations of nitrobenzene, soil humic acid, Georgetown NOM, hematite, and CN32. Abiotic experiments were conducted to quantify nitrobenzene reduction by biogenic Fe(II) and by bioreduced NOMs. We show that S. putrefaciens CN32 can directly reduce nitrobenzene. Both NOMs enhanced nitrobenzene reduction and the degree of enhancement depended on properties of the NOMs (aromaticity, organic radical content). Hematite enhanced nitrobenzene reduction by indirect reaction with biogenic-Fe(II), however, enhancement was dependent on the availability of excess electron donor. Under electron donor-limiting conditions, reducing equivalents diverted to hematite were not all transferred to nitrobenzene. In systems that contained both NOM and hematite we conclude that NOM-mediated reduction of nitrobenzene was more important than Fe(II)-mediated reduction.

  5. Electron transfer and biofilm formation of Shewanella putrefaciens as function of anode potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Martínez, Alessandro A; Harnisch, Falk; Kuhlicke, Ute; Neu, Thomas R; Schröder, Uwe

    2013-10-01

    Shewanellaceae are among the most widely studied electroactive microorganisms. In this report, we studied the influence of the applied electrode potential on the anodic current production of Shewanella putrefaciens NCTC 10695 under anoxic conditions. Furthermore, we used cyclic voltammetry (CV) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) to investigate the microbial electron transfer and biofilm formation. It is shown that the chronoamperometric current density is increasing with increasing electrode potential from 3 μA cm(-2) at -0.1 V up to -12 μA cm(-2) at +0.4 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), which is accompanied by an increasing amount of biomass deposited on the electrode. By means of cyclic voltammetry we demonstrate that direct electron transfer (DET) is dominating and the planktonic cells play only a minor role. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved

  6. Enzymatic exploration of catalase from a nanoparticle producing and biodecolorizing algae Shewanella xiamenensis BC01.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, I-Son; Xu, Fangxin; Zhang, Xia; Ye, Chiming

    2015-05-01

    Shewanella xiamenensis (SXM) was found to produce nanoparticles (NPs) under aerobic condition. The oxidoreductase enzymatic activities including of catalase, manganese peroxidase, laccase, NADH dehydrogenase, flavin reductase, azoreductase and Fe reductase are first investigated. Catalase showed the greatest enzymatic activity among all oxidoreductases in SXM, which with strong activities in multiple substrates of ABTS, guaiacol and 2,6-DMP. The optimum temperature, pH, concentrations of H2O2 and 2,6-DMP for this enzyme were found to be 65 °C, pH 4.0, 128.7 mM and 10 mM, respectively. Finally, from the kinetic parameters and structure simulation of catalase, implied that SXM would potentially apply in bioremediation, microbe fuel cells (MFCs) and nano-biotechnology based on its distinguished enzymatic system.

  7. Extracellular polymeric substances act as transient media in extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Yong; Zhang, Jingdong; Ulstrup, Jens

    without extracting EPS or cells collected from log stage or early-steady stage cultures with little EPS. Therefore, microbial cells are believed in contact directly with each other or electrode. Such attempt apparently ignored the role of EPS in microbial EET, even though many components of EPS......It is well known that microorganism is surrounded by extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) which include polysaccharides, proteins, glycoproteins, nucleic acids, phospholipids, and humic acids. However, previous studies on microbial extracellular electron transfer (EET) are conducted on cells......, such as DNA, humic acids and some proteins, are electrochemically active or semiconductive. Herein, we report experimental evidences of EPS role on EET for Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Atomic force microscopy clearly showed that the cell surface was cleaned and few EPS could be observed on MR-1 after...

  8. Characterizing the snorkeling respiration and growth of Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonggang; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping; Xu, Meiying

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrochemical snorkel (MES) reactor is a simplified bioreactor based on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and has been suggested to be a promising approach to solve many environmental problems. However, the microbial processes in MES reactors have not yet been characterized. This study shows that Shewanella decolorationis S12 can use the conductive snorkel as direct electron acceptor for respiration and growth. Similar with current-generating biofilms, cellular viability in MES biofilms decreased with the distance from snorkel. MES reactors showed more rapid cell growth and substrate consumption than MFCs. Although the biomass density of MES biofilm was higher than that of anode biofilms, the current-generating capacity and electrochemical activity of MES biofilm were lower, which could be attributed to the lower cytochrome c expression in MES biofilm caused by the higher redox potential of MES. These microbiological and electrochemical properties are essential for the further development of MES reactors.

  9. Cell adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to iron oxide minerals: Effect of different single crystal faces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hochella Michael F

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of experiments designed to test the hypothesis that near-surface molecular structure of iron oxide minerals influences adhesion of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria are presented. These experiments involved the measurement, using atomic force microscopy, of interaction forces generated between Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells and single crystal growth faces of iron oxide minerals. Significantly different adhesive force was measured between cells and the (001 face of hematite, and the (100 and (111 faces of magnetite. A role for electrostatic interactions is apparent. The trend in relative forces of adhesion generated at the mineral surfaces is in agreement with predicted ferric site densities published previously. These results suggest that near-surface structure does indeed influence initial cell attachment to iron oxide surfaces; whether this is mediated via specific cell surface-mineral surface interactions or by more general interfacial phenomena remains untested.

  10. Biodegradation of textile azo dye by Shewanella decolorationis S12 under microaerophilic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meiying; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guoping

    2007-09-01

    The complete biodegradation of azo dye, Fast Acid Red GR, was observed under microaerophilic conditions by Shewanella decolorationis S12. Although the highest decolorizing rate was measured under anaerobic condition and the highest biomass was obtained under aerobic condition, a further biodegradation of decolorizing products can only be achieved under microaerophilic conditions. Under microaerophilic conditions, S. decolorationis S12 could use a range of carbon sources for azo dye decolorization, including lactate, formate, glucose and sucrose, with lactate being the optimal carbon source. Sulfonated aromatic amines were not detected during the biotransformation of Fast Acid Red GR, while H(2)S formed. The decolorizing products, aniline, 1,4-diaminobenzene and 1-amino-2-naphthol, were followed by complete biodegradation through catechol and 4-aminobenzoic acid based on the analysis results of GC-MS and HPLC.

  11. Characterization of cytochrome mutants for pellicle formation in Shewanella onedensis MR-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Yi-li; HE Zhi-li; GAO Hai-chun; QIU Guan-zhou; ZHOU Ji-zhong; LIU Xue-duan

    2009-01-01

    Biofilm systems are effective for biosorption of metal ions. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe, is a natural pellicle-like biofilm former. The mechanisms of pellicle formation by S. oneidensis MR-1 have not yet been understood. 17 S. oneidensis MR-1 deletion mutants, including 12 c-type cytochromes were generated and tested if they were involved in pellicle formation. The results show that △SO4666, △SO1777, △SO1782, △SO2361 and △SO2363 have varying deficiency in pellicle formation. The deletion mutant △SO4666 cannot form a pellicle under non-shake conditions, suggesting that it may play an important role in pellicle formation by S. oneidensis MR-1. Overall, these data suggest a very complex picture of aerobic respiration by S. oneidensis MR-1.

  12. 低温污水中耐冷微生物的筛选及多样性分析%Diversity of Psychrotrophs from Low-temperature Sewage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾美英; 谢玉清; 唐琦勇; 张志东; 房世杰; 包慧芳; 茆军

    2009-01-01

    采用4种分离培养基对新疆乌鲁木齐市污水处理厂低温污水中的耐冷微生物进行分离筛选,共获得各种耐冷微生物154株,其中丝状真菌12株,酵母46株,放线菌6株,细菌90株.并对部分菌株的耐受性和产酶特性进行了研究,获得了耐4%NaCl的菌株44株,耐0.2%苯酚的16株,耐0.5%SDS的33株,具有淀粉酶活性的菌株40株,蛋白酶活性的30株,脂酶活性的27株.对其中60株细菌进行16S rRNA基因测序,序列比对分析表明,其分属13个属,其中菌株39与不动杆菌属中的标准菌株Acinetobacter lwoffii(DSM2403)同源性最近,为96.6%,极有可能为新种.证明低温污水中存在着丰富的耐冷微生物及种属多样性,且具有较好的耐受性及产酶特性,预示着低温污水可能是重要潜在的微生物资源库.%Psychrotrophs were isolated by using four media from low-temperature sewage of sewage treatment plant in Urumqi, Xinjiang. Totally, 154 strains were obtained including 12 filamentous fungi, 46 yeasts, 6 actinomycetes and 90 bacteria. The results of tolerance tests of the isolates to salt, phenol and SDS, and enzyme producing characters of amylase, proteinase and esterase were shown. Then 60 bacterial strains were chosen for 16S rRNA gene sequencing and analysis. The blasting results showed that the strains were assigned to 13 recognized genera , and the Strain 39 exhibited 96.6% similarity to Acinetobacter Iwof-fii(DSM2403), indicating that it might be a novel species. These results suggested that there were a lot of psychrotrophs and rich bacterial diversity in low-temperature sewage. In addition, which maybe an important and potential library of microbial resources.

  13. Towards electrosynthesis in shewanella: energetics of reversing the mtr pathway for reductive metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel E Ross

    Full Text Available Bioelectrochemical systems rely on microorganisms to link complex oxidation/reduction reactions to electrodes. For example, in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, an electron transfer conduit consisting of cytochromes and structural proteins, known as the Mtr respiratory pathway, catalyzes electron flow from cytoplasmic oxidative reactions to electrodes. Reversing this electron flow to drive microbial reductive metabolism offers a possible route for electrosynthesis of high value fuels and chemicals. We examined electron flow from electrodes into Shewanella to determine the feasibility of this process, the molecular components of reductive electron flow, and what driving forces were required. Addition of fumarate to a film of S. oneidensis adhering to a graphite electrode poised at -0.36 V versus standard hydrogen electrode (SHE immediately led to electron uptake, while a mutant lacking the periplasmic fumarate reductase FccA was unable to utilize electrodes for fumarate reduction. Deletion of the gene encoding the outer membrane cytochrome-anchoring protein MtrB eliminated 88% of fumarate reduction. A mutant lacking the periplasmic cytochrome MtrA demonstrated more severe defects. Surprisingly, disruption of menC, which prevents menaquinone biosynthesis, eliminated 85% of electron flux. Deletion of the gene encoding the quinone-linked cytochrome CymA had a similar negative effect, which showed that electrons primarily flowed from outer membrane cytochromes into the quinone pool, and back to periplasmic FccA. Soluble redox mediators only partially restored electron transfer in mutants, suggesting that soluble shuttles could not replace periplasmic protein-protein interactions. This work demonstrates that the Mtr pathway can power reductive reactions, shows this conduit is functionally reversible, and provides new evidence for distinct CymA:MtrA and CymA:FccA respiratory units.

  14. Multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1: structures, functions and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Marian; Rosso, Kevin M; Blumberger, Jochen; Butt, Julea N

    2015-01-06

    Multi-haem cytochromes are employed by a range of microorganisms to transport electrons over distances of up to tens of nanometres. Perhaps the most spectacular utilization of these proteins is in the reduction of extracellular solid substrates, including electrodes and insoluble mineral oxides of Fe(III) and Mn(III/IV), by species of Shewanella and Geobacter. However, multi-haem cytochromes are found in numerous and phylogenetically diverse prokaryotes where they participate in electron transfer and redox catalysis that contributes to biogeochemical cycling of N, S and Fe on the global scale. These properties of multi-haem cytochromes have attracted much interest and contributed to advances in bioenergy applications and bioremediation of contaminated soils. Looking forward, there are opportunities to engage multi-haem cytochromes for biological photovoltaic cells, microbial electrosynthesis and developing bespoke molecular devices. As a consequence, it is timely to review our present understanding of these proteins and we do this here with a focus on the multitude of functionally diverse multi-haem cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. We draw on findings from experimental and computational approaches which ideally complement each other in the study of these systems: computational methods can interpret experimentally determined properties in terms of molecular structure to cast light on the relation between structure and function. We show how this synergy has contributed to our understanding of multi-haem cytochromes and can be expected to continue to do so for greater insight into natural processes and their informed exploitation in biotechnologies. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Growth of the facultative anaerobe Shewanella putrefaciens by elemental sulfur reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, D. P.; Nealson, K. H.

    1996-01-01

    The growth of bacteria by dissimilatory elemental sulfur reduction is generally associated with obligate anaerobes and thermophiles in particular. Here we describe the sulfur-dependent growth of the facultatively anaerobic mesophile Shewanella putrefaciens. Six of nine representative S. putrefaciens isolates from a variety of environments proved able to grow by sulfur reduction, and strain MR-1 was chosen for further study. Growth was monitored in a minimal medium (usually with 0.05% Casamino Acids added as a growth stimulant) containing 30 mM lactate and limiting concentrations of elemental sulfur. When mechanisms were provided for the removal of the metabolic end product, H2S, measurable growth was obtained at sulfur concentrations of from 2 to 30 mM. Initial doubling times were ca. 1.5 h and substrate independent over the range of sulfur concentrations tested. In the cultures with the highest sulfur concentrations, cell numbers increased by greater than 400-fold after 48 h, reaching a maximum density of 6.8 x 10(8) cells ml-1. Yields were determined as total cell carbon and ranged from 1.7 to 5.9 g of C mol of S(0) consumed-1 in the presence of the amino acid supplement and from 0.9 to 3.4 g of C mol of S(0-1) in its absence. Several lines of evidence indicate that cell-to-sulfur contact is not required for growth. Approaches for the culture of sulfur-metabolizing bacteria and potential ecological implications of sulfur reduction in Shewanella-like heterotrophs are discussed.

  16. Effects of aqueous complexation on reductive precipitation of uranium by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Northup Abraham

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available We have examined the effects of aqueous complexation on rates of dissimilatory reductive precipitation of uranium by Shewanella putrefaciens. Uranium(VI was supplied as sole terminal electron acceptor to Shewanella putrefaciens (strain 200R in defined laboratory media under strictly anaerobic conditions. Media were amended with different multidentate organic acids, and experiments were performed at different U(VI and ligand concentrations. Organic acids used as complexing agents were oxalic, malonic, succinic, glutaric, adipic, pimelic, maleic, citric, and nitrilotriacetic acids, tiron, EDTA, and Aldrich humic acid. Reductive precipitation of U(VI, resulting in removal of insoluble amorphous UO2 from solution, was measured as a function of time by determination of total dissolved U. Reductive precipitation was measured, rather than net U(VI reduction to U(IV, to assess overall U removal rates from solution, which may be used to gauge the influence of chelation on microbial U mineralization. Initial linear rates of U reductive precipitation were found to correlate with stability constants of 1:1 aqueous U(VI:ligand and U(IV:ligand complexes. In the presence of strongly complexing ligands (e.g., NTA, Tiron, EDTA, UO2 precipitation did not occur. Our results are consistent with ligand-retarded precipitation of UO2, which is analogous to ligand-assisted solid phase dissolution but in reverse: ligand exchange with the U4+ aquo cation acts as a rate-limiting reaction moderating coordination of water molecules with U4+, which is a necessary step in UO2 precipitation. Ligand exchange kinetics governing dissociation rates of ligands from U(VI-organic complexes may also influence overall UO2 production rates, although the magnitude of this effect is unclear relative to the effects of U(IV-organic complexation. Our results indicate that natural microbial-aqueous systems containing abundant organic matter can inhibit the formation of biogenic amorphous UO2.

  17. Shewanella algae en un paciente con diarrea crónica. Primer caso en Costa Rica Shewanella Algae in a Patient with Chronic Diarrhea. First Case in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erick Molina- Guevara

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de un paciente masculino, vecino de Pavas-San José, con historia de diarrea crónica. En el coprocultivo se identificó Shewanella algae. Casos de infección en humanos por esta bacteria son raros y se han encontrado, predominantemente localizadas, en piel, oídos y tejidos blandos con o sin bacteremia, en la mayoría de los cuales existe el antecedente de contacto con ambientes marinos. Shewanella algae es sensible a aminoglicósidos, carbapenemes, eritromicina y quinolonas, pero resistente a penicilinas. La sensibilidad a ampicilina y cefalosporinas es variable. Nuestro paciente fue tratado con cefalexina y tuvo una respuesta satisfactoria al mismo, con cese de los síntomas. De acuerdo con nuestro conocimiento este el primer caso documentado, en Costa Rica, de infección gastrointestinal por esta bacteria.We report herein the case of a male patient, from Pavas, San Jose, with chronic diarrhea whose stool culture grew Shewanella algae. Infections caused by this micro-organism are infrequent and most commonly involve ears, skin and soft tissue, with or without bacteremia and are usually linked to ocean contact in warm climate countries. Shewanella algae is sensitive to aminoglycosides, carbapenems, erythromycin and quinolones, but resistant to penicillin. Sensitivity to amplicilin and cephalosporins is variable. Our patient was treated with cefalexin, with satisfactory results. To our knowledge, this is the first documented case in Costa Rica of gastrointestinal infection caused by this microorganism.

  18. Case Report: Disseminated Shewanella algae Infection with Meningoencephalitis in a Traveler Secondary to Marine Injury in Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brulliard, Caroline; Traversier, Nicolas; Allyn, Jérôme; Schaeffer, Christopher; Bouchet, Bruno; Allou, Nicolas

    2017-06-12

    Marine microorganisms such as Shewanella spp., Vibrio spp., and Aeromonas spp. can cause sepsis secondary to a wound infection in the context of swimming. These microorganisms are most often susceptible to fluoroquinolones. Here, we report a unique case of Shewanella algae bacteremia associated with meningoencephalitis and disseminated via hematogenous spread secondary to a skin injury. The patient suffered the injury while swimming in saline water during a cruise holiday in Madagascar, and she was initially treated with amoxicillin. The neurological evolution was unsatisfactory. Better knowledge of such infections (and especially of the context in which they occur), as well as greater familiarity with the susceptibility profile of different marine microorganisms would have allowed health professionals to provide presumptive microbiological diagnosis and effective treatment earlier.

  19. 咪唑乙烟酸降解菌的分离、鉴定及降解特性研究%Isolation, identification and characterization of a Shewanella hafniensis strain capable of degrading imazethapyr

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈玉洁; 束长龙; 刘新刚; 梅向东; 张浩; 宋福平; 张杰

    2011-01-01

    One strain of imazethapyr-degradable bacterium named PI4 was isolated from the sludge of imazethapyr production plant by high pressure enrichment method. Classification was determined by analysis of morphological, physiological and biochemical characters and sequencing of 16S rDNA for P14 strain. P14 strain was identified as Shewanella hafniensis. Degradation performance was investigated preliminary, in the mineral salt medium with imazethapyr as sole carbon source. The optimal parameters for PI4 strain to degrade imazethapyr up to 92% within 3 d were at 30 ℃ ,pH 6.0, inoculated by 7% ,and at 100 mg/L imazethapyr. After other carbon source added,the degradation ratio of PI4 to imazethapyr was decreased. It's found that sodium citrate was not likely to affect the degradation ratio compared with other carbon sources.%采用高压富集方法,从生产咪唑乙烟酸农药厂排污口污泥中分离得到1株咪唑乙烟酸高效降解菌P14,根据菌株形态、生理生化特性及16S rDNA分析,鉴定该菌株为哈夫尼希瓦氏菌Shewanella hafniensis.初步研究了其在不同条件下对咪唑乙烟酸的降解性能.结果表明:在以咪唑乙烟酸为唯一碳源的无机盐培养基中,当咪唑乙烟酸初始质量浓度为100 mg/L、培养温度为30℃、pH值6.0、接种量7%时,菌株P14对咪唑乙烟酸的降解效果最佳,3d内的降解率可达92%,因而可以此作为菌株P14降解咪唑乙烟酸的最佳条件.外加不同碳源时,P14菌株对咪唑乙烟酸的降解率呈现不同程度下降,其中柠檬酸钠对P14菌株降解效果影响较小.

  20. Extracellular electron transfer mechanism in Shewanella loihica PV- 4 biofilms formed at indium tin oxide and graphite electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Electroactive biofilms are capable of extracellular electron transfer to insoluble metal oxides and electrodes; such biofilms are relevant to biogeochemistry, bioremediation, and bioelectricity production. We investigated the extracellular electron transfer mechanisms in Shewanella loihica PV-4 viable biofilms grown at indium tin oxide (ITO) and graphite electrodes in potentiostat-controlled electrochemical cells poised at 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Chronoamperometry and confocal microscopy showed hi...

  1. Comparative study on dihydrofolate reductases from Shewanella species living in deep-sea and ambient atmospheric-pressure environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Chiho; Ohmae, Eiji; Tate, Shin-ichi; Gekko, Kunihiko; Nakasone, Kaoru; Kato, Chiaki

    2011-03-01

    To examine whether dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) from deep-sea bacteria has undergone molecular evolution to adapt to high-pressure environments, we cloned eight DHFRs from Shewanella species living in deep-sea and ambient atmospheric-pressure environments, and subsequently purified six proteins to compare their structures, stabilities, and functions. The DHFRs showed 74-90% identity in primary structure to DHFR from S. violacea, but only 55% identity to DHFR from Escherichia coli (ecDHFR). Far-ultraviolet circular dichroism and fluorescence spectra suggested that the secondary and tertiary structures of these DHFRs were similar. In addition, no significant differences were found in structural stability as monitored by urea-induced unfolding and the kinetic parameters, K(m) and k(cat); although the DHFRs from Shewanella species were less stable and more active (2- to 4-fold increases in k(cat)/K(m)) than ecDHFR. Interestingly, the pressure effects on enzyme activity revealed that DHFRs from ambient-atmospheric species are not necessarily incompatible with high pressure, and DHFRs from deep-sea species are not necessarily tolerant of high pressure. These results suggest that the DHFR molecule itself has not evolved to adapt to high-pressure environments, but rather, those Shewanella species with enzymes capable of retaining functional activity under high pressure migrated into the deep-sea.

  2. Swimming Efficiency of Bacterium Escherichia Coli

    CERN Document Server

    Chattopadhyay, S; Wu, X L; Yeung, C; Chattopadhyay, Suddhashil; Moldovan, Radu; Yeung, Chuck

    2005-01-01

    We use in vivo measurements of swimming bacteria in an optical trap to determine fundamental properties of bacterial propulsion. In particular, we determine the propulsion matrix, which relates the angular velocity of the flagellum to the torques and forces propelling the bacterium. From the propulsion matrix dynamical properties such as forces, torques, swimming speed and power can be obtained from measurements of the angular velocity of the motor. We find significant heterogeneities among different individuals even though all bacteria started from a single colony. The propulsive efficiency, defined as the ratio of the propulsive power output to the rotary power input provided by the motors, is found to be 0.2%.

  3. Isolation of a Bacterium Strain Degraded Agar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    One in 58 strains of bacteria isolated from the compost showed clear colonies after a few days of growth on the plates containing medium made of only agar and water.Water suspension contained only agar (2 and 8g·L -1 ) with two controls (normal saline,LB medium) was inoculated with the bacterium BR5-1 to see whether there was an increasement of the alive bacteria concentration after 48 h of the growth.The results showed that there was a significant rising of the alive bacteria concentration in the agar susp...

  4. Influence of Arsenic on the Reduction of Lepidocrocite and Hydroxycarbonate Green Rust 1 Into Ferrous-Carbonate Hydroxide by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona-Nguema, G.; Morin, G.; Wang, Y.; Juillot, F.; Abdelmoula, M.; Ruby, C.; Guyot, F.; Calas, G.; Brown, G.

    2007-12-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens, an iron-respiring bacterium, is capable of reducing As(V) to As(III) when HAs(V)O42- is the sole electron acceptor, or when it is adsorbed on the surface of lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), a common well-crystallized hydromorphic soil mineral. Cultures in which lepidocrocite was used as the sole electron acceptor (i.e., pure lepidocrocite and As(III)-adsorbed lepidocrocite) led to the formation of biogenic hydroxycarbonate green rust 1 (GR1) prior to precipitation of ferrous-carbonate hydroxide (FCH). However, the presence of As(III) slowed down the biotransformation of hydroxycarbonate GR1 into FCH, leading to the co-occurrence of both phases after 22-month of aging. In contrast, when the electron acceptor was As(V)- bearing lepidocrocite, XRD analysis revealed FCH to be the dominant reaction product; no green rust formation was observed in this case. Arsenic K-edge XANES spectroscopy indicated that all As(V) (K-edge(max) = 11875.0eV) was reduced to As(III) (K-edge(max) = 11871.3eV), suggesting the presence of As(III) either on the surface of FCH, and/or in another ferrous-containing solid phase. Mössbauer analysis of the 22-month aged biogenic sample obtained from the bioreduction of As(III)-adsorbed lepidocrocite revealed the presence of FCH (80%) and GR (20%). In contrast, Mössbauer spectra of white biogenic solid phases resulting from the bioreduction of As(V)-adsorbed lepidocrocite and of pure lepidocrocite were characterized by ferrous iron doublets. These spectra indicate that the white biogenic sample without arsenic contains 100% Fe(II) assigned to FCH, while the white biogenic As(III)-Fe(II)-containing reaction products consists of 87% FCH and of 13% of another ferrous phase, probably an As(III)-Fe(II)-containing compound. These results show for the first time bacterial reduction of stoichiometric hydroxycarbonate green rust 1.

  5. Biodegradation of heavy oils by halophilic bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixia Hao; Anhuai Lu

    2009-01-01

    A halophilic bacterial strain TM-1 was isolated from the reservoir of the Shengli oil field in East China. Strain TM-1, which was found to be able to degrade crude oils, is a gram-positive non-motile bacterium with a coccus shape that can grow at temperatures of up to 58 ℃ and in 18% NaCl solution. Depending on the culture conditions, the organism may occur in tetrads. In addition, strain TM-1 pro-duced acid from glucose without gas formation and was catalase-negative. Furthermore, strain TM-I was found to be a facultative aer-obe capable of growth under anaerobic conditions. Moreover, it produced butylated hydroxytoluene, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid-bis ester and dibutyl phthalate and could use different organic substrates. Laboratory studies indicated that strain TM-1 affected different heavy oils by degrading various components and by changing the chemical properties of the oils. In addition, growth of the bacterium in heavy oils resulted in the loss of aromatic hydrocarbons, resins and asphaltenes, and enrichment with light hydrocarbons and an overall redistribution of these hydrocarbons.

  6. Screening of A Psychrotolerant Bacterium of Planococcus sp. Y Producing Low Temperature Lactose and Preliminary Study on Its Enzyme Activity%用于低乳糖牛奶生产的乳糖酶添加剂候选菌株筛选及粗酶性质研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荷; 张博; 张敏文; 顾取良

    2011-01-01

    在低乳糖牛奶加工过程中需要高活性的低温乳糖酶作为添加剂.为此,从采集土样中分离纯化获得1株低乳糖奶加工过程中需要的高乳糖酶活性候选菌株,应用形态学和分子生物学方法,初步鉴定该菌株为动球菌属(Planococcus sp.),命名为Planococcussp.Y.研究表明,该菌株是1株低温菌株,其最适生长温度为25℃,最佳生长pH值为7.0,所产酶为胞内酶,粗酶液的最适酸碱度和温度分别为pH7.0和25℃.%High activity of cold-adapted low lactase as an additive is necessary in processing low lactose milk. The psychrotrophic and bacterium strain was isolated from surficial soils. A strain capable of producing psychrotrophic a lactase was identified as a Planococcus sp. Y according to the morphological and molecular characteristics. The optimal conditions for the growth of the strain were examined. The optimal temperature and pH value for growth were 25℃ and 7.0,respectively. Study on the activity of the lactase showed that the optimal temperature and pH for the activity of the crude enzyme was 25℃ and 7.0,respectively. The lactase from Planococcus sp. Y was located intracellularly. This will provide a foundation for producing low lactose milk in future.

  7. Comparative Genomics Analysis and Phenotypic Characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: Anaerobic Respiration, Bacterial Microcompartments, and Lateral Flagella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, D.; Tu, Q.; He, Zhili; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Respiratory versatility and psychrophily are the hallmarks of Shewanella. The ability to utilize a wide range of electron acceptors for respiration is due to the large number of c-type cytochrome genes present in the genome of Shewanella strains. More recently the dissimilatory metal reduction of Shewanella species has been extensively and intensively studied for potential applications in the bioremediation of radioactive wastes of groundwater and subsurface environments. Multiple Shewanella genome sequences are now available in the public databases (Fredrickson et al., 2008). Most of the sequenced Shewanella strains were isolated from marine environments and this genus was believed to be of marine origin (Hau and Gralnick, 2007). However, the well-characterized model strain, S. oneidensis MR-1, was isolated from the freshwater lake sediment of Lake Oneida, New York (Myers and Nealson, 1988) and similar bacteria have also been isolated from other freshwater environments (Venkateswaran et al., 1999). Here we comparatively analyzed the genome sequence and physiological characteristics of S. putrefaciens W3-18-1 and S. oneidensis MR-1, isolated from the marine and freshwater lake sediments, respectively. The anaerobic respirations, carbon source utilization, and cell motility have been experimentally investigated. Large scale horizontal gene transfers have been revealed and the genetic divergence between these two strains was considered to be critical to the bacterial adaptation to specific habitats, freshwater or marine sediments.

  8. Identification of a small tetraheme cytochrome c and a flavocytochrome c as two of the principal soluble cytochromes c in Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapin, A. I.; Vandenberghe, I.; Nealson, K. H.; Scott, J. H.; Meyer, T. E.; Cusanovich, M. A.; Harada, E.; Kaizu, T.; Akutsu, H.; Leys, D.; hide

    2001-01-01

    Two abundant, low-redox-potential cytochromes c were purified from the facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis strain MR1 grown anaerobically with fumarate. The small cytochrome was completely sequenced, and the genes coding for both proteins were cloned and sequenced. The small cytochrome c contains 91 residues and four heme binding sites. It is most similar to the cytochromes c from Shewanella frigidimarina (formerly Shewanella putrefaciens) NCIMB400 and the unclassified bacterial strain H1R (64 and 55% identity, respectively). The amount of the small tetraheme cytochrome is regulated by anaerobiosis, but not by fumarate. The larger of the two low-potential cytochromes contains tetraheme and flavin domains and is regulated by anaerobiosis and by fumarate and thus most nearly corresponds to the flavocytochrome c-fumarate reductase previously characterized from S. frigidimarina to which it is 59% identical. However, the genetic context of the cytochrome genes is not the same for the two Shewanella species, and they are not located in multicistronic operons. The small cytochrome c and the cytochrome domain of the flavocytochrome c are also homologous, showing 34% identity. Structural comparison shows that the Shewanella tetraheme cytochromes are not related to the Desulfovibrio cytochromes c(3) but define a new folding motif for small multiheme cytochromes c.

  9. Genome-level homology and phylogeny of Shewanella (Gammaproteobacteria: lteromonadales: Shewanellaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dikow Rebecca B

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The explosion in availability of whole genome data provides the opportunity to build phylogenetic hypotheses based on these data as well as the ability to learn more about the genomes themselves. The biological history of genes and genomes can be investigated based on the taxomonic history provided by the phylogeny. A phylogenetic hypothesis based on complete genome data is presented for the genus Shewanella (Gammaproteobacteria: Alteromonadales: Shewanellaceae. Nineteen taxa from Shewanella (16 species and 3 additional strains of one species as well as three outgroup species representing the genera Aeromonas (Gammaproteobacteria: Aeromonadales: Aeromonadaceae, Alteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria: Alteromonadales: Alteromonadaceae and Colwellia (Gammaproteobacteria: Alteromonadales: Colwelliaceae are included for a total of 22 taxa. Results Putatively homologous regions were found across unannotated genomes and tested with a phylogenetic analysis. Two genome-wide data-sets are considered, one including only those genomic regions for which all taxa are represented, which included 3,361,015 aligned nucleotide base-pairs (bp and a second that additionally includes those regions present in only subsets of taxa, which totaled 12,456,624 aligned bp. Alignment columns in these large data-sets were then randomly sampled to create smaller data-sets. After the phylogenetic hypothesis was generated, genome annotations were projected onto the DNA sequence alignment to compare the historical hypothesis generated by the phylogeny with the functional hypothesis posited by annotation. Conclusions Individual phylogenetic analyses of the 243 locally co-linear genome regions all failed to recover the genome topology, but the smaller data-sets that were random samplings of the large concatenated alignments all produced the genome topology. It is shown that there is not a single orthologous copy of 16S rRNA across the taxon sampling included in this

  10. Contagem, isolamento e caracterização de bactérias psicrotróficas contaminantes de leite cru refrigerado Counting, isolation and characterization of psychrotrophic bacteria from refrigerated raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Froeder Arcuri

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Com os objetivos de quantificar, isolar e caracterizar bactérias psicrotróficas contaminantes de leite cru refrigerado, produzido na região da Zona da Mata de Minas Gerais e Sudeste do Rio de Janeiro, foram analisadas amostras de leite coletadas de 20 tanques coletivos e 23 tanques individuais. As contagens de bactérias psicrotróficas nas amostras de leite para os dois tipos de tanques de refrigeração variaram entre 10² e 10(7 Unidades Formadoras de Colônias (UFC ml-1, porém, um maior número de tanques coletivos apresentou contagens acima de 1 x 10(5 UFC ml-1. Foi verificada a predominância de bactérias psicrotróficas gram-negativas (81,2%, que foram identificadas pelos sistemas API 20E e API 20NE nos gêneros: Aeromonas, Alcaligenes, Acinetobacter, Burkholderia,Chryseomonas, Enterobacter, Ewingella, Klebsiella, Hafnia, Methylobacterium, Moraxella, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Serratia, Sphingomonas e Yersinia. As bactérias gram-positivas (18,8% foram identificadas com API 50 CH, API Coryne e API Staph, nos gêneros: Bacillus, Brevibacterium, Cellum/Microbacterium, Kurthia e Staphylococcus. Os sistemas API utilizados não identificaram todos os isolados bacterianos. Pseudomonas foi o gênero mais isolado e P. fluorescens foi a espécie predominante. A maioria dos isolados bacterianos apresentou atividade proteolítica e/ou lipolítica a temperaturas de refrigeração de 4°C, 7°C e 10°C, evidenciando seu alto potencial de deterioração do leite e dos produtos lácteos. Os resultados ressaltam que maior atenção deve ser dada aos procedimentos que impeçam a contaminação do leite por esses microrganismos.This study aimed to quantify, isolate and characterize psychrotrophic bacteria from refrigerated raw milk produced at the ‘Mata’ Region of Minas Gerais State and Southeast of Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Raw milk samples, were collected at the farms, from 20 collective refrigerated tanks and 23 individual refrigerated tanks

  11. 长春南湖水耐冷菌的筛选及其产酶特性%Screening and Properties of Enzyme Production of Psychrotrophs from Nanhu Lake of Changchun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄继国; 杨柳; 王玉; 朱婧; 丛伟

    2011-01-01

    The samples from the South Lake at a low temperature were taken and diluted onto coated tablet for concentration inoculation. A total of 35 cold-adapted-strains were isolated, which contained 14 bacteria and 21 fungi. The colony morphology and physiological and biochemical results show that the psychrotrophic bacteria belong to Lactobacilus, Saccharococcus, Staphyloccus, Actinomyces and the fungi belong to molds and yeast.Some of them can produce hydrolases including oxidase, catalase, amylase and gelatinase, and some of psychrotrophs can make nitrate reduction, nitrite reduction and so on.%采用低温环境下的南湖湖水为样品,稀释后涂布平板进行富集培养,并进行细菌菌落形态及生理生化性质测定.实验共培养出耐冷菌35株,包括细菌14株,真菌21株.其中细菌分属于乳杆菌属、葡萄球菌属、糖球菌属、放线菌属;真菌分属于霉菌和酵母菌.分离的菌种能产生多种大分子物质水解酶类,包括氧化酶、接触酶、淀粉水解酶、明胶酶等,并且大多数菌种具有硝酸盐还原作用阳性,还有一些耐冷菌具有亚硝酸盐还原作用阳性、反硝化作用阳性等.

  12. 原料乳嗜冷菌分泌热稳定性酶类检测方法的研究进展%Advancement on Rapid Detection Method for Psychrotrophic Heat Stable Extracellular Enzymes from Raw Milk

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄丽; 赵玉娟; 李盛钰

    2015-01-01

    嗜冷菌是导致原料乳以及乳制品腐败的主要微生物类群。巴氏杀菌或超高温瞬时(UHT)灭菌后,几乎除去了全部的嗜冷菌,但细菌分泌的热稳定的蛋白酶和脂肪酶却并未完全钝化,进一步影响原料乳风味以及质地。测定原料奶中热稳定蛋白酶和脂肪酶的活性是控制嗜冷菌污染原料奶的前提。本文综述了原料乳中嗜冷菌分泌的热稳定性酶类的快速检测技术,比较了这些方法的优缺点,并对此领域的技术发展方向进行了展望。%Psychrotrophic microorganisms play a leading role in spoilage of raw milk and milk products. Pasteurized and ultra high temperature sterilization is usually used to kill psychrophile, but they are unable to remove the heat stable protease and lipase produced by the psychrophile, ifnally to affect the lfavor and texture of dairy products. Detecting the activities of heat stable protease and lipase is the base of controlling contamination of psychrophile. The present study summarizes and discusses some rapid detection methods of psychrotrophic heat stable extracellular enzymes in raw milk. The advantages and disadvantages in industrial application are also compared, and the development rapid, sensitive, and meaningful directions of those techniques in this ifeld are discussed.

  13. Fluctuation-Enhanced Sensing of Bacterium Odors

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Hung-Chih; King, Maria D; Kwan, Chiman

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to explore the possibility to detect and identify bacteria by sensing their odor via fluctuation-enhanced sensing with commercial Taguchi sensors. The fluctuations of the electrical resistance during exposure to different bacterial odors, Escherichia coli and anthrax-surrogate Bacillus subtilis, have been measured and analyzed. In the present study, the simplest method, the measurement and analysis of power density spectra was used. The sensors were run in the normal heated and the sampling-and-hold working modes, respectively. The results indicate that Taguchi sensors used in these fluctuation-enhanced modes are effective tools of bacterium detection and identification even when they are utilizing only the power density spectrum of the stochastic sensor signal.

  14. Diffusion of magnetotactic bacterium in rotating magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebers, A., E-mail: aceb@tesla.sal.l [Department of Physics, University of Latvia, Zellu 8, Ri-bar ga, LV-1002 (Latvia)

    2011-02-15

    Swimming trajectory of a magnetotactic bacterium in a rotating magnetic field is a circle. Random reversals of the direction of the bacterium motion induces a random walk of the curvature center of the trajectory. In assumption of the distribution of the switching events according to the Poisson process the diffusion coefficient is calculated in dependence on the frequency of the rotating field and the characteristic time between the switching events. It is confirmed by the numerical simulation of the random walk of the bacterium in the rotating magnetic field. - Research highlights: Random switching of the flagella leads to diffusion of a bacterium in the field. Mean square displacement of the curvature center is proportional to time. Diffusion coefficient depends on the period of a rotating field. At zero frequency diffusion coefficient is the same as for a tumbling bacterium.

  15. The chemical formula of a magnetotactic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naresh, Mohit; Das, Sayoni; Mishra, Prashant; Mittal, Aditya

    2012-05-01

    Elucidation of the chemical logic of life is one of the grand challenges in biology, and essential to the progress of the upcoming field of synthetic biology. Treatment of microbial cells explicitly as a "chemical" species in controlled reaction (growth) environments has allowed fascinating discoveries of elemental formulae of a few species that have guided the modern views on compositions of a living cell. Application of mass and energy balances on living cells has proved to be useful in modeling of bioengineering systems, particularly in deriving optimized media compositions for growing microorganisms to maximize yields of desired bio-derived products by regulating intra-cellular metabolic networks. In this work, application of elemental mass balance during growth of Magnetospirillum gryphiswaldense in bioreactors has resulted in the discovery of the chemical formula of the magnetotactic bacterium. By developing a stoichiometric equation characterizing the formation of a magnetotactic bacterial cell, coupled with rigorous experimental measurements and robust calculations, we report the elemental formula of M. gryphiswaldense cell as CH(2.06)O(0.13)N(0.28)Fe(1.74×10(-3)). Remarkably, we find that iron metabolism during growth of this magnetotactic bacterium is much more correlated individually with carbon and nitrogen, compared to carbon and nitrogen with each other, indicating that iron serves more as a nutrient during bacterial growth rather than just a mineral. Magnetotactic bacteria have not only invoked some interest in the field of astrobiology for the last two decades, but are also prokaryotes having the unique ability of synthesizing membrane bound intracellular organelles. Our findings on these unique prokaryotes are a strong addition to the limited repertoire, of elemental compositions of living cells, aimed at exploring the chemical logic of life.

  16. Electrochemical interrogations of the Mtr cytochromes from Shewanella: opening a potential window.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firer-Sherwood, Mackenzie; Pulcu, Gökçe Su; Elliott, Sean J

    2008-08-01

    The multi-heme cytochromes from Shewanella oneidensis associated with the dissimilatory metal reduction (DMR) pathway have been investigated using the technique of protein film voltammetry (PFV). Using PFV, we have interrogated each of the multi-heme cytochromes (MtrA, STC, and solubilized versions of the membrane-bound proteins CymA, OmcA, and MtrC) under identical conditions for the first time. Each cytochrome reveals a broad envelope of voltammetric response, indicative of multiple redox cofactors that span a range of potential of approximately 300 mV. Our studies show that, when considered as an aggregate pathway, the multiple hemes of the DMR cytochromes provide a "window" of operating potential for electron transfer to occur from the cellular interior to the exterior spanning values of -250 to 0 mV (at circumneutral values of pH). Similarly, each cytochrome supports interfacial electron transfer at rates on the order of 200 s(-1). These data are taken together to suggest a model of electron transport where a wide window of potential allows for charge transfer from the cellular interior to the exterior to support bioenergetics.

  17. Addressing Shewanella oneidensis "cytochromome": the first step towards high-throughput expression of cytochromes c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Londer, Yuri Y; Giuliani, Sarah E; Peppler, Terese; Collart, Frank R

    2008-11-01

    Integrated studies that address proteins structure and function in the new era of systems biology and genomics often require the application of high-throughput approaches for parallel production of many different purified proteins from the same organism. Cytochromes c-electron transfer proteins carrying one or more hemes covalently bound to the polypeptide chain-are essential in most organisms. However, they are one of the most recalcitrant classes of proteins with respect to heterologous expression because post-translational incorporation of hemes is required for proper folding and stability. We have addressed this challenge by designing two families of vectors (total of 6 vectors) suitable for ligation-independent cloning and developing a pipeline for expression and solubility analysis of cytochromes c. This system has been validated by expression analysis of thirty genes from Shewanella oneidensis coding for cytochromes c or cytochromes c-type domains predicted to have 1-4 hemes. Out of 30 targets, 26 (87%) were obtained in soluble form in one or more vectors. This work establishes a methodology for high-throughput expression of this class of proteins and provides a clone resource for the microbiological and functional genomics research communities.

  18. Unique organizational and functional features of the cytochrome c maturation system in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Jin

    Full Text Available Shewanella are renowned for their ability to respire on a wide range of electron acceptors, which has been partially accredited to the presence of a large number of the c-type cytochromes. In the model species S. oneidensis MR-1, at least 41 genes encode c-type cytochromes that are predicted to be intact, thereby likely functional. Previously, in-frame deletion mutants for 36 of these genes were obtained and characterized. In this study, first we completed the construction of an entire set of c-type cytochrome mutants utilizing a newly developed att-based mutagenesis approach, which is more effective and efficient than the approach used previously by circumventing the conventional cloning. Second, we investigated the cytochrome c maturation (Ccm system in S. oneidensis. There are two loci predicted to encode components of the Ccm system, SO0259-SO0269 and SO0476-SO0478. The former is proven essential for cytochrome c maturation whereas the latter is dispensable. Unlike the single operon organization observed in other γ-proteobacteria, genes at the SO0259-SO0269 locus are uniquely organized into four operons, ccmABCDE, scyA, SO0265, and ccmFGH-SO0269. Functional analysis revealed that the SO0265 gene rather than the scyA and SO0269 genes are relevant to cytochrome c maturation.

  19. Involvement of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 LuxS in Biofilm Development and Sulfur Metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Learman, Deric R.; Yi, Haakrho; Brown, Steven D.; Martin, Stanton L.; Geesey, Gill G.; Stevens, Ann M.; Hochella, Michael F.

    2009-01-05

    The role of LuxS in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 has been examined by transcriptomic profiling, biochemical, and physiological experiments. The results indicate that a mutation in luxS alters biofilm development, not by altering quorum-sensing abilities but by disrupting the activated methyl cycle (AMC). The S. oneidensis wild type can produce a luminescence response in the AI-2 reporter strain Vibrio harveyi MM32. This luminescence response is abolished upon the deletion of luxS. The deletion of luxS also alters biofilm formations in static and flowthrough conditions. Genetic complementation restores the mutant biofilm defect, but the addition of synthetic AI-2 has no effect. These results suggest that AI-2 is not used as a quorum-sensing signal to regulate biofilm development in S. oneidensis. Growth on various sulfur sources was examined because of the involvement of LuxS in the AMC. A mutation in luxS produced a reduced ability to grow with methionine as the sole sulfur source. Methionine is a key metabolite used in the AMC to produce a methyl source in the cell and to recycle homocysteine. These data suggest that LuxS is important to metabolizing methionine and the AMC in S. oneidensis.

  20. Interference activity of a minimal Type I CRISPR-Cas system from Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Brenzinger, Susanne; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Plagens, André; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai; Randau, Lennart

    2015-10-15

    Type I CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems exist in bacterial and archaeal organisms and provide immunity against foreign DNA. The Cas protein content of the DNA interference complexes (termed Cascade) varies between different CRISPR-Cas subtypes. A minimal variant of the Type I-F system was identified in proteobacterial species including Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. This variant lacks a large subunit (Csy1), Csy2 and Csy3 and contains two unclassified cas genes. The genome of S. putrefaciens CN-32 contains only five Cas proteins (Cas1, Cas3, Cas6f, Cas1821 and Cas1822) and a single CRISPR array with 81 spacers. RNA-Seq analyses revealed the transcription of this array and the maturation of crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs). Interference assays based on plasmid conjugation demonstrated that this CRISPR-Cas system is active in vivo and that activity is dependent on the recognition of the dinucleotide GG PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence and crRNA abundance. The deletion of cas1821 and cas1822 reduced the cellular crRNA pool. Recombinant Cas1821 was shown to form helical filaments bound to RNA molecules, which suggests its role as the Cascade backbone protein. A Cascade complex was isolated which contained multiple Cas1821 copies, Cas1822, Cas6f and mature crRNAs.

  1. Simultaneous microbial reduction of vanadium (V) and chromium (VI) by Shewanella loihica PV-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangyu; Zhang, Baogang; Li, Shuang; Yang, Meng; Yin, Changcheng

    2017-03-01

    Toxic vanadium (V) and chromium (VI) often co-exist in wastewater from vanadium ore smelting and their reductions by bacterial strain Shewanella loihica PV-4 is realized simultaneously. After 27-d operation, 71.3% of V(V) and 91.2% of Cr(VI) were removed respectively, with citrate as organic carbon source. Enhancement of Cr(VI) bioreduction was observed with the suppressed V(V) reduction. V(IV) and Cr(III), the main reduction products, precipitated inside the organisms and attached on cell surfaces. Both membrane components containing cytochrome c and cytoplasmic fractions containing soluble proteins as well as NADH may contribute to these microbial reductions. Most Cr(VI) were reduced extracellularly and V(V) tended to be reduced through intracellular process, as revealed by mapping the microbial surface and a line scan across the cell, performed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. This study provides an efficient alternative for controlling combined pollution caused by these two metals based on microbial technology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng; McCue, Lee Ann; Parsons, Andrea B.; Feng, Sheng; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-10-26

    It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. In this study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of the γ-proteobacterium S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. In addition, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and demonstrated its expression experimentally. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. This work delineates an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other γ-proteobacteria.

  3. The tricarboxylic acid cycle in Shewanella oneidensis is independent of Fur and RyhB control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng [ORNL; McCue, Lee Ann [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Parsons, Andrea [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Feng, Sheng [Duke University; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma

    2010-01-01

    Background: It is well established in E. coli and Vibrio cholerae that strains harboring mutations in the ferric uptake regulator gene (fur) are unable to utilize tricarboxylic acid (TCA) compounds, due to the down-regulation of key TCA cycle enzymes, such as AcnA and SdhABCD. This down-regulation is mediated by a Fur-regulated small regulatory RNA named RyhB. It is unclear in the g-proteobacterium S. oneidensis whether TCA is also regulated by Fur and RyhB. Results: In the present study, we showed that a fur deletion mutant of S. oneidensis could utilize TCA compounds. Consistently, expression of the TCA cycle genes acnA and sdhA was not down-regulated in the mutant. To explore this observation further, we identified a ryhB gene in Shewanella species and experimentally demonstrated the gene expression. Further experiments suggested that RyhB was up-regulated in fur mutant, but that AcnA and SdhA were not controlled by RyhB. Conclusions: These cumulative results delineate an important difference of the Fur-RyhB regulatory cycle between S. oneidensis and other g-proteobacteria. This work represents a step forward for understanding the unique regulation in S. oneidensis.

  4. The novel Shewanella putrefaciens-infecting bacteriophage Spp001: genome sequence and lytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Feng; Li, Meng; Lin, Hong; Wang, Jingxue; Cao, Limin; Khan, Muhammad Naseem

    2014-06-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens has been identified as a specific spoilage organism commonly found in chilled fresh fish, which contributes to the spoilage of fish products. Limiting S. putrefaciens growth can extend the shelf-life of chilled fish. Endolysins, which are lytic enzymes produced by bacteriophages, have been considered an alternative to control bacterial growth, and have been useful in various applications, including food preservation. We report here, for the first time, the complete genome sequence of a novel phage Spp001, which lyses S. putrefaciens Sp225. The Spp001 genome comprises a 54,789-bp DNA molecule with 67 open reading frames and an average total G + C content of 49.42 %. In silico analysis revealed that the Spp001 open reading frames encode various putative functional proteins, including an endolysin (ORF 62); however, no sequence for genes encoding the holin polypeptides, which work in concert with endolysins, was identified. To examine further the lytic activity of Spp001, we analyzed the lytic enzyme-containing fraction from phages released at the end of the phage lytic cycle in S. putrefaciens, using diffusion and turbidimetric assays. The results show that the partially purified extract contained endolysin, as indicated by a high hydrolytic activity towards bacterial peptidoglycan decrease in the OD590 value by 0.160 in 15 min. The results will allow further investigation of the purification of natural Spp001 endolysin, the extension of Spp001 host range, and the applications of the phage-encoded enzymes.

  5. Specificity of motor components in the dual flagellar system of Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubendorfer, Sebastian; Held, Susanne; Windel, Natalie; Paulick, Anja; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai M

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial flagellar motors are intricate nanomachines in which the stator units and rotor component FliM may be dynamically exchanged during function. Similar to other bacterial species, the gammaproteobacterium Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32 possesses a complete secondary flagellar system along with a corresponding stator unit. Expression of the secondary system occurs during planktonic growth in complex media and leads to the formation of a subpopulation with one or more additional flagella at random positions in addition to the primary polar system. We used physiological and phenotypic characterizations of defined mutants in concert with fluorescent microscopy on labelled components of the two different systems, the stator proteins PomB and MotB, the rotor components FliM(1) and FliM(2), and the auxiliary motor components MotX and MotY, to determine localization, function and dynamics of the proteins in the flagellar motors. The results demonstrate that the polar flagellum is driven by a Na(+)-dependent FliM(1)/PomAB/MotX/MotY flagellar motor while the secondary system is rotated by a H(+)-dependent FliM(2)/MotAB motor. The components were highly specific for their corresponding motor and are unlikely to be extensively swapped or shared between the two flagellar systems under planktonic conditions. The results have implications for both specificity and dynamics of flagellar motor components. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Iron phase transformations resulting from the respiration of Shewanella putrefaciens on a mixed mineral phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyanov, M I; O' Loughlin, E J; Kemner, K M, E-mail: mboyanov@anl.go [Molecular Environmental Science Group Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-11-15

    The initial Fe(III) minerals and the secondary mineralization products of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 grown in the presence of dissolved phosphate and a commercial Fe(III) oxide, nominally nanoparticulate lepidocrocite, were determined using XRD and XAFS. The starting material was transformed by the bacteria from a reddish brown, rust colour mineral to a dark green phase over 90 days. Acid extraction of the bioreduced solids with 0.75 M HCl recovered 83% of the total iron as Fe(II), leaving a solid, acid-resistant phase. The latter was identified as nanoparticulate hematite by EXAFS. Subsequently, the starting Fe(III) phase was determined to be a mixture of 60% lepidocrocite, 26% ferrihydrite, and 14% hematite, using linear combination EXAFS analysis. For the acid-extractable phase, XANES and EXAFS indicated a predominantly Fe(II) valence state and a spectrum consistent with a mixture of brucite-type minerals(e.g., green rust or ferrous hydroxide) and siderite. The observed transformations suggest that in this mixed-mineral system, lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite are readily reducible to green rust and siderite, whereas hematite is less amenable to bacterial reduction. This study also demonstrates the utility of XAFS spectroscopy in the quantitative characterization of dissimilatory metal transformations, particularly in complex systems such as nanoparticulate minerals in hydrated mineral-bacteria assemblages.

  7. [A new pathogen of gibel carp Carassius auratus gibelio-Shewanella putrefaciens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lei; Zhang, Xiaojun; Bi, Keran

    2012-05-04

    We studied a novel disease occurred among cultured Carassius auratus gibelio at a farm located in Yancheng City, Jiangsu Province. The dominant bacteria were isolated from diseased fish. The pure culture of the isolated strain was analyzed using conventional physiological and biochemical tests, together with 16S rDNA gene sequencing. An experimental infection of Carassius auratus gibelio with the isolated strain was performed to fulfill the Koch postulates. K-B method was used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. The causal agent of the disease was finally proved to be one species of bacteria that was identified as Shewanella putrefaciens. Experimental infection with S. putrefaciens resulted in the same gross signs as naturally infected fish and the same bacteria were recovered in a pure culture from freshly dead fish. The LD50 of S. putrefacien was calculated as 2.1 x 10(3) cfu/g. The result of drug sensitivity test showed that S. putrefaciens was sensitive to Pipemidic acid, Nalidixic acid, Fluperacid, Enoxacin, Florfenicol, Rifampicin, Minocycline, Fleroxacin, Enrofloxacin, Ceftriaxone, Cefalexin, Ceftazidine, Roxithromycin and Levofloxacin. This is the first report on a new pathogen of Carassius auratus gibelio, revealing that S. putrefaciens as a potential new pathogen may pose a threat to the culture of Carassius auratus gibelio.

  8. Reduction of Fe(III) colloids by Shewanella putrefaciens: A kinetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve; Behrends, Thilo; van Cappellen, Philippe; Hyacinthe, Christelle; Röling, Wilfred F. M.

    2006-12-01

    A kinetic model for the microbial reduction of Fe(III) oxyhydroxide colloids in the presence of excess electron donor is presented. The model assumes a two-step mechanism: (1) attachment of Fe(III) colloids to the cell surface and (2) reduction of Fe(III) centers at the surface of attached colloids. The validity of the model is tested using Shewanella putrefaciens and nanohematite as model dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria and Fe(III) colloidal particles, respectively. Attachment of nanohematite to the bacteria is formally described by a Langmuir isotherm. Initial iron reduction rates are shown to correlate linearly with the relative coverage of the cell surface by nanohematite particles, hence supporting a direct electron transfer from membrane-bound reductases to mineral particles attached to the cells. Using internally consistent parameter values for the maximum attachment capacity of Fe(III) colloids to the cells, Mmax, the attachment constant, KP, and the first-order Fe(III) reduction rate constant, k, the model reproduces the initial reduction rates of a variety of fine-grained Fe(III) oxyhydroxides by S. putrefaciens. The model explains the observed dependency of the apparent Fe(III) half-saturation constant, Km∗, on the solid to cell ratio, and it predicts that initial iron reduction rates exhibit saturation with respect to both the cell density and the abundance of the Fe(III) oxyhydroxide substrate.

  9. Iron phase transformations resulting from the respiration of Shewanella putrefaciens on a mixed mineral phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyanov, M. I.; O'Loughlin, E. J.; Kemner, K. M.

    2009-11-01

    The initial Fe(III) minerals and the secondary mineralization products of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 grown in the presence of dissolved phosphate and a commercial Fe(III) oxide, nominally nanoparticulate lepidocrocite, were determined using XRD and XAFS. The starting material was transformed by the bacteria from a reddish brown, rust colour mineral to a dark green phase over 90 days. Acid extraction of the bioreduced solids with 0.75 M HCl recovered 83% of the total iron as Fe(II), leaving a solid, acid-resistant phase. The latter was identified as nanoparticulate hematite by EXAFS. Subsequently, the starting Fe(III) phase was determined to be a mixture of 60% lepidocrocite, 26% ferrihydrite, and 14% hematite, using linear combination EXAFS analysis. For the acid-extractable phase, XANES and EXAFS indicated a predominantly Fe(II) valence state and a spectrum consistent with a mixture of brucite-type minerals(e.g., green rust or ferrous hydroxide) and siderite. The observed transformations suggest that in this mixed-mineral system, lepidocrocite and ferrihydrite are readily reducible to green rust and siderite, whereas hematite is less amenable to bacterial reduction. This study also demonstrates the utility of XAFS spectroscopy in the quantitative characterization of dissimilatory metal transformations, particularly in complex systems such as nanoparticulate minerals in hydrated mineral-bacteria assemblages.

  10. Exogenous electron shuttle-mediated extracellular electron transfer of Shewanella putrefaciens 200: electrochemical parameters and thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yundang; Liu, Tongxu; Li, Xiaomin; Li, Fangbai

    2014-08-19

    Despite the importance of exogenous electron shuttles (ESs) in extracellular electron transfer (EET), a lack of understanding of the key properties of ESs is a concern given their different influences on EET processes. Here, the ES-mediated EET capacity of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 (SP200) was evaluated by examining the electricity generated in a microbial fuel cell. The results indicated that all the ESs substantially accelerated the current generation compared to only SP200. The current and polarization parameters were linearly correlated with both the standard redox potential (E(ES)(0)) and the electron accepting capacity (EAC) of the ESs. A thermodynamic analysis of the electron transfer from the electron donor to the electrode suggested that the EET from c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts) to ESs is a crucial step causing the differences in EET capacities among various ESs. Based on the derived equations, both E(ES)(0) and EAC can quantitatively determine potential losses (ΔE) that reflect the potential loss of the ES-mediated EET. In situ spectral kinetic analysis of ES reduction by c-Cyts in a living SP200 suspension was first investigated with the E(ES), E(c-Cyt), and ΔE values being calculated. This study can provide a comprehensive understanding of the role of ESs in EET.

  11. Reductive dissolution of Tl(I)-jarosite by Shewanella putrefaciens: providing new insights into Tl biogeochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeaton, Christina M; Walshe, Gillian E; Fryer, Brian J; Weisener, Christopher G

    2012-10-16

    Thallium (Tl) is emerging as a metal of concern in countries such as China due to its release during the natural weathering of Tl-bearing ore deposits and mining activities. Despite the high toxicity of Tl, few studies have examined the reductive dissolution of Tl mineral phases by microbial populations. In this study we examined the dissolution of synthetic Tl(I)-jarosite, (H(3)O)(0.29)Tl(0.71)Fe(2.74)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(5.22)(H(2)O)(0.78), by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 using batch experiments under anaerobic circumneutral conditions. Fe(II) concentrations were measured over time and showed Fe(II) production (4.6 mM) in inoculated samples by 893 h not seen in mineral and dead cell controls. Release of aqueous Tl was enhanced in inoculated samples whereby maximum concentrations in inoculated and cell-free samples reached 3.2 and 2.1 mM, respectively, by termination of the experiment. Complementary batch Tl/S. putrefaciens sorption experiments were conducted under experimentally relevant pH (5 and 6.3) at a Tl concentration of 35 μM and did not show significant Tl accumulation by either live or dead cells. Therefore, in contrast to many metals such as Pb and Cd, S. putrefaciens does not represent a sink for Tl in the environment and Tl is readily released from Tl-jarosite during both abiotic and biotic dissolution.

  12. Interference activity of a minimal Type I CRISPR–Cas system from Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwarakanath, Srivatsa; Brenzinger, Susanne; Gleditzsch, Daniel; Plagens, André; Klingl, Andreas; Thormann, Kai; Randau, Lennart

    2015-01-01

    Type I CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)–Cas (CRISPR-associated) systems exist in bacterial and archaeal organisms and provide immunity against foreign DNA. The Cas protein content of the DNA interference complexes (termed Cascade) varies between different CRISPR-Cas subtypes. A minimal variant of the Type I-F system was identified in proteobacterial species including Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. This variant lacks a large subunit (Csy1), Csy2 and Csy3 and contains two unclassified cas genes. The genome of S. putrefaciens CN-32 contains only five Cas proteins (Cas1, Cas3, Cas6f, Cas1821 and Cas1822) and a single CRISPR array with 81 spacers. RNA-Seq analyses revealed the transcription of this array and the maturation of crRNAs (CRISPR RNAs). Interference assays based on plasmid conjugation demonstrated that this CRISPR-Cas system is active in vivo and that activity is dependent on the recognition of the dinucleotide GG PAM (Protospacer Adjacent Motif) sequence and crRNA abundance. The deletion of cas1821 and cas1822 reduced the cellular crRNA pool. Recombinant Cas1821 was shown to form helical filaments bound to RNA molecules, which suggests its role as the Cascade backbone protein. A Cascade complex was isolated which contained multiple Cas1821 copies, Cas1822, Cas6f and mature crRNAs. PMID:26350210

  13. Riboflavin-mediated RDX transformation in the presence of Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 and lepidocrocite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sungjun; Lee, Yoonhwa; Kwon, Man Jae; Lee, Woojin

    2014-06-15

    The potential of riboflavin for the reductive degradation of a cyclic nitramine, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX), was investigated in the presence of lepidocrocite and/or Shewanella putrefaciens CN32. RDX reduction by CN32 alone or CN32 with lepidocrocite was insignificant, while 110 μM RDX was completely reduced by CN32 with riboflavin in 78 h. The transformation products identified included nitroso metabolites, formaldehyde, and ammonium, indicating the ring cleavage of RDX. UV and visible light analysis revealed that riboflavin was microbially reduced by CN32, and that the reduced riboflavin was linked to the complete degradation of RDX. In the presence of both CN32 and lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), 100 μM-riboflavin increased the rate and extent of Fe(II) production as well as RDX reduction. An abiotic study also showed that Fe(II)-riboflavin complex, and Fe(II) adsorbed on lepidocrocite, reduced RDX by 48% and 21%, respectively. The findings in this study suggest that riboflavin-mediated RDX degradation pathways in subsurface environments are diverse and complex. However, riboflavin, either from bacteria or exogenous sources, can significantly increase RDX degradation. This will provide a sustainable clean-up option for explosive-contaminated subsurface environments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Iron(III)-bearing clay minerals enhance bioreduction of nitrobenzene by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Fubo; Liu, Yan; Griffin, Aron M; Gorski, Christopher A; Burgos, William D

    2015-02-03

    Iron-bearing clay minerals are ubiquitous in the environment, and the clay-Fe(II)/Fe(III) redox couple plays important roles in abiotic reduction of several classes of environmental contaminants. We investigated the role of Fe-bearing clay minerals on the bioreduction of nitrobenzene. In experiments with Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 and excess electron donor, we found that the Fe-bearing clay minerals montmorillonite SWy-2 and nontronite NAu-2 enhanced nitrobenzene bioreduction. On short time scales (<50 h), nitrobenzene reduction was primarily biologically driven, but at later time points, nitrobenzene reduction by biologically formed structural Fe(II) in the clay minerals became increasingly important. We found that chemically reduced (dithionite) iron-bearing clay minerals reduced nitrobenzene more rapidly than biologically reduced iron-bearing clay minerals despite the minerals having similar structural Fe(II) concentrations. We also found that chemically reduced NAu-2 reduced nitrobenzene faster as compared to chemically reduced SWy-2. The different reactivity of SWy-2 versus NAu-2 toward nitrobenzene was caused by different forms of structural clay-Fe(II) in the clay minerals and different reduction potentials (Eh) of the clay minerals. Because most contaminated aquifers become reduced via biological activity, the reactivity of biogenic clay-Fe(II) toward reducible contaminants is particularly important.

  15. Phenotypical and genotypical characterization of Shewanella putrefaciens strains isolated from diseased freshwater fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pękala, A; Kozińska, A; Paździor, E; Głowacka, H

    2015-03-01

    Between 2007 and 2012, a variety of disease outbreaks most often characterized by skin disorders were observed among different species of freshwater fish in Poland. In most cases, the clinical signs included focally necrotized gills, necrotic skin lesions or ulcers. Internally, haemorrhages, oedematous kidney and abnormal spleen enlargement were generally noted. The disorders were accompanied by increased mortality. Most of the problems concerned cultured common carp Cyprinus carpio L. and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum). Fish have been examined from a number of these farms, and additionally, the wild and ornamental fish with similar clinical signs of diseases were also tested. Bacteria were isolated consistently from lesions and internal organs. They had characteristic orange-pigmented colonies which grew in pure culture or constituted 55-95% of total bacterial flora. One hundred and eighteen isolates were collected and biochemically identified as Shewanella putrefaciens group, and this was confirmed by sequencing. Challenge tests confirmed the pathogenicity of these bacteria. This is the first report characterizing and describing S. putrefaciens as a pathogen of different species of freshwater fish in Europe. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Outer membrane cytochromes/flavin interactions in Shewanella spp.-A molecular perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babanova, Sofia; Matanovic, Ivana; Cornejo, Jose; Bretschger, Orianna; Nealson, Kenneth; Atanassov, Plamen

    2017-05-31

    Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is intrinsically associated with the core phenomena of energy harvesting/energy conversion in natural ecosystems and biotechnology applications. However, the mechanisms associated with EET are complex and involve molecular interactions that take place at the "bionano interface" where biotic/abiotic interactions are usually explored. This work provides molecular perspective on the electron transfer mechanism(s) employed by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Molecular docking simulations were used to explain the interfacial relationships between two outer-membrane cytochromes (OMC) OmcA and MtrC and riboflavin (RF) and flavin mononucleotide (FMN), respectively. OMC-flavin interactions were analyzed by studying the electrostatic potential, the hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties, and the van der Waals surface of the OMC proteins. As a result, it was proposed that the interactions between flavins and OMCs are based on geometrical recognition event. The possible docking positions of RF and FMN to OmcA and MtrC were also shown.

  17. Energy generation coupled to azoreduction by membranous vesicles from Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yi-Guo; Guo, Jun; Sun, Guo-Ping

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that Shewanella decolorationis S12 can grow on the azo compound amaranth as the sole electron acceptor. Thus, to explore the mechanism of energy generation in this metabolism, membranous vesicles (MVs) were prepared and the mechanism of energy generation investigated. The membrane, which was fragmentized during preparation, automatically formed vesicles ranging from 37.5-112.5 nm in diameter under electron micrograph observation. Energy was conserved when coupling the azoreduction by the MVs of an azo compound or Fe(III) as the sole electron acceptor with H2, formate, or lactate as the electron donor. The amaranth reduction by the vesicles was found to be inhibited by specific respiratory inhibitors, including Cu(2+) ions, dicumarol, stigmatellin, and metyrapone, indicating that the azoreduction was indeed a respiration reaction. This finding was further confirmed by the fact that the ATP synthesis was repressed by the ATPase inhibitor N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD). Therefore, this study offers solid evidence of a mechanism of microbial dissimilatory azoreduction on a subcell level.

  18. Genome-scale metabolic network validation of Shewanella oneidensis using transposon insertion frequency analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Yang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Transposon mutagenesis, in combination with parallel sequencing, is becoming a powerful tool for en-masse mutant analysis. A probability generating function was used to explain observed miniHimar transposon insertion patterns, and gene essentiality calls were made by transposon insertion frequency analysis (TIFA. TIFA incorporated the observed genome and sequence motif bias of the miniHimar transposon. The gene essentiality calls were compared to: 1 previous genome-wide direct gene-essentiality assignments; and, 2 flux balance analysis (FBA predictions from an existing genome-scale metabolic model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. A three-way comparison between FBA, TIFA, and the direct essentiality calls was made to validate the TIFA approach. The refinement in the interpretation of observed transposon insertions demonstrated that genes without insertions are not necessarily essential, and that genes that contain insertions are not always nonessential. The TIFA calls were in reasonable agreement with direct essentiality calls for S. oneidensis, but agreed more closely with E. coli essentiality calls for orthologs. The TIFA gene essentiality calls were in good agreement with the MR-1 FBA essentiality predictions, and the agreement between TIFA and FBA predictions was substantially better than between the FBA and the direct gene essentiality predictions.

  19. The Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Fluxome under Various OxygenConditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Yinjie J.; Hwang, Judy S.; Wemmer, David E.; Keasling, Jay D.

    2006-03-17

    The central metabolic fluxes of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1were examined under carbon-limited (aerobic) and oxygen-limited(micro-aerobic) chemostat conditions using 13C labeled lactate as thesole carbon source. The carbon labeling patterns of key amino acids inbiomass were probed using both GC-MS and 13C-NMR. Based on the genomeannotation, a metabolic pathway model was constructed to quantify thecentral metabolic flux distributions. The model showed that thetricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle is the major carbon metabolism route underboth conditions. The Entner-Doudoroff and pentose phosphate pathways weremainly utilized for biomass synthesis (flux below 5 percent of thelactate uptake rate). The anapleurotic reactions (pyruvate to malate andoxaloacetate to phosphoenolpyruvate) and the glyoxylate shunt wereactive. Under carbon-limited conditions, a substantial amount of carbonwas oxidized via the highly reversible serine metabolic pathway. Fluxesthrough the TCA cycle were less whereas acetate production was more underoxygen limitation than under carbon limitation. Although fluxdistributions under aerobic, micro-aerobic, and shake-flask cultureconditions were dramatically different, the relative flux ratios of thecentral metabolic reactions did not vary significantly. Hence, S.oneidensis metabolism appears to be quite robust to environmentalchanges. Our study also demonstrates the merit of coupling GC-MS with 13CNMR for metabolic flux analysis to reduce the use of 13C labeledsubstrates and to obtain more accurate flux values.

  20. Identification and analysis of the Shewanella oneidensis major oxygen-independent coproporphyrinogen III oxidase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sheboul, Suhaila; Saffarini, Daad

    2011-12-01

    Shewanella oneidenesis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that can use a large number of electron acceptors including metal oxides. During anaerobic respiration, S. oneidensis MR-1 synthesizes a large number of c cytochromes that give the organism its characteristic orange color. Using a modified mariner transposon, a number of S. oneidensis mutants deficient in anaerobic respiration were generated. One mutant, BG163, exhibited reduced pigmentation and was deficient in c cytochromes normally synthesized under anaerobic condition. The deficiencies in BG163 were due to insertional inactivation of hemN1, which exhibits a high degree of similarity to genes encoding anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidases that are involved in heme biosynthesis. The ability of BG163 to synthesize c cytochromes under anaerobic conditions, and to grow anaerobically with different electron acceptors was restored by the introduction of hemN1 on a plasmid. Complementation of the mutant was also achieved by the addition of hemin to the growth medium. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains three putative anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidase genes. The protein encoded by hemN1 appears to be the major enzyme that is involved in anaerobic heme synthesis of S. oneidensis. The other two putative anaerobic coproporphyrinogen III oxidase genes may play a minor role in this process.

  1. Exoprotein production correlates with morphotype changes of nonmotile Shewanella oneidensis mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Miaomiao; Wu, Lin; Xia, Yu; Chen, Haijiang; Luo, Qixia; Sun, Linlin; Gao, Haichun

    2013-04-01

    We report a previously undescribed mechanism for the rugose morphotype in Shewanella oneidensis, a research model for investigating redox transformations of environmental contaminants. Bacteria may form smooth or rugose colonies on agar plates. In general, conversion from the smooth to rugose colony morphotype is attributed to increased production of exopolysaccharide (EPS). In this work, we discovered that aflagellate S. oneidensis mutants grew into rugose colonies, whereas those with nonfunctional flagellar filaments remained smooth. EPS production was not altered in either case, but mutants with the rugose morphotype showed significantly reduced exoprotein secretion. The idea that exoproteins at a reduced level correlate with rugosity gained support from smooth suppressor strains of an aflagellate rugose fliD (encoding the capping protein) mutant, which restored the exoprotein level to the levels of the wild-type and mutant strains with a smooth morphotype. Further analyses revealed that SO1072 (a putative GlcNAc-binding protein) was one of the highly upregulated exoproteins in these suppressor strains. Most intriguingly, this study identified a compensatory mechanism of SO1072 to flagellins possibly mediated by bis-(3'-5')-cyclic dimeric GMP.

  2. Oxidation state of chromium associated with cell surfaces of Shewanella oneidensis during chromate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Andrew L.; Lowe, Kristine; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Little, Brenda J

    2002-12-30

    Employing electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we demonstrate that in both aerobic and anaerobic culture Shewanella oneidensis cells are capable of chromate reduction. No Cr(VI) or Cr(V) species were identified at the cell surfaces in Cr 2p{sub 3/}ore photoelectron spectra. More chromium was associated with cell surfaces recovered from anaerobic medium than aerobic. Multiplet-splitting models derived for Cr(III) and Cr(IV) were employed to determine contributions from each ion to Cr 2p{sub 3/2} photopeaks collected from the various cell treatments. Whilst in all cases Cr(III) was the major ion associated with cell surfaces, a significant contribution was identified due to Cr(IV) in anaerobically grown cells. The Cr(IV) contribution was far less when cells were grown aerobically. Moreover, when anaerobically grown cells were exposed to oxygen very little re-oxidation of Cr-precipitates occurred, the precipitates were again identified as a mixture of Cr(III) and Cr(IV). A positive relationship was observed between amounts of chromium and phosphorous associated with cell surfaces resulting from the various treatments, suggesting the precipitates included Cr(III)-phosphate. The fact that Cr(IV) remained associated with precipitates following re-oxidation suggests that under anaerobic conditions the intermediate ion is afforded sufficient stability to be incorporated within the precipitate matrix and thus conferred a degree of protection from oxidation.

  3. Dynamics in the Dual Fuel Flagellar Motor of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenzinger, Susanne; Thormann, Kai M

    2017-01-01

    The stator is an eminent component of the flagellar motor and determines a number of the motor's properties, such as the rotation-energizing coupling ion (H(+) or Na(+)) or the torque that can be generated. The stator consists of several units located in the cytoplasmic membrane surrounding the flagellar drive shaft. Studies on flagellar motors of several bacterial species have provided evidence that the number as well as the retention time of stators coupled to the motor is highly dynamic and depends on the environmental conditions. Notably, numerous species possess more than a single distinct set of stators. It is likely that the presence of different stator units enables these bacteria to adjust the flagellar motor properties and function to meet the environmental requirements. One of these species is Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 that is equipped with a single polar flagellum and two stator units, the Na(+)-dependent PomAB and the H(+)-dependent MotAB. Here, we describe a method to determine stator dynamics by fluorescence microscopy, demonstrating how bacteria can change the composition of an intricate molecular machine according to environmental conditions.

  4. Reduction and partial degradation mechanisms of naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye amaranth by Shewanella decolorationis S12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yiguo; Guo, Jun; Xu, Zhicheng; Mo, Cuiyun; Xu, Meiying; Sun, Guoping

    2007-06-01

    Reduction and biodegradation mechanisms of naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye amaranth using a newly isolated Shewanella decolorationis strain S12 were investigated. Under anaerobic conditions, amaranth was reduced by strain S12, and a stoichiometric amount of two reduction products RP-1 and RP-2 were generated. UV/visible spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated that RP-1 and RP-2 were 1-aminenaphthylene -4-sulfonic acid and 1-aminenaphthylene-2-hydroxy-3, 6-disulfonic acid. The result strongly supports a mechanism of azo dye reduction by the process via the reductive cleavage of the azo bond to form corresponding aromatic amines. The result of HPLC analyses revealed that these aromatic amines were not able to be mineralized by strain S12 under anaerobic conditions. But after re-aeration of the decolorized culture, RP-2 was mineralized completely by this microorganism, but the consumption of RP-1 was not observed. Ames test showed that amaranth had mutagenic but no cytotoxic potential. The mutagenic potential was relieved after the anaerobic treatment with strain S12 as the mutagenic effect of the two reduction products from amaranth was not detected by Ames test. Thus, the ability of strain S12 to reduce and partially mineralize the naphthylaminesulfonic azo dye efficiently was demonstrated, which can potentially be used to biodegrade and detoxify wastewater containing azo dyes using an alternating anaerobic/aerobic treatment procedure.

  5. Metabolic Characteristics of a Glucose-Utilizing Shewanella oneidensis Strain Grown under Electrode-Respiring Conditions.

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    Gen Nakagawa

    Full Text Available In bioelectrochemical systems, the electrode potential is an important parameter affecting the electron flow between electrodes and microbes and microbial metabolic activities. Here, we investigated the metabolic characteristics of a glucose-utilizing strain of engineered Shewanella oneidensis under electrode-respiring conditions in electrochemical reactors for gaining insight into how metabolic pathways in electrochemically active bacteria are affected by the electrode potential. When an electrochemical reactor was operated with its working electrode poised at +0.4 V (vs. an Ag/AgCl reference electrode, the engineered S. oneidensis strain, carrying a plasmid encoding a sugar permease and glucose kinase of Escherichia coli, generated current by oxidizing glucose to acetate and produced D-lactate as an intermediate metabolite. However, D-lactate accumulation was not observed when the engineered strain was grown with a working electrode poised at 0 V. We also found that transcription of genes involved in pyruvate and D-lactate metabolisms was upregulated at a high electrode potential compared with their transcription at a low electrode potential. These results suggest that the carbon catabolic pathway of S. oneidensis can be modified by controlling the potential of a working electrode in an electrochemical bioreactor.

  6. Investigating different mechanisms for biogenic selenite transformations: Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearce, C.I.; Pattrick, R.A.D.; Law, N.; Charnock, J.M.; Coker, V.S.; Fellowes, J.W.; Oremland, R.S.; Lloyd, J.R.

    2009-01-01

    The metal-reducing bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens, Shewanella oneidensis and Veillonella atypica, use different mechanisms to transform toxic, bioavailable sodium selenite to less toxic, non-mobile elemental selenium and then to selenide in anaerobic environments, offering the potential for in situ and ex situ bioremediation of contaminated soils, sediments, industrial effluents, and agricultural drainage waters. The products of these reductive transformations depend on both the organism involved and the reduction conditions employed, in terms of electron donor and exogenous extracellular redox mediator. The intermediary phase involves the precipitation of elemental selenium nanospheres and the potential role of proteins in the formation of these structures is discussed. The bionanomineral phases produced during these transformations, including both elemental selenium nanospheres and metal selenide nanoparticles, have catalytic, semiconducting and light-emitting properties, which may have unique applications in the realm of nanophotonics. This research offers the potential to combine remediation of contaminants with the development of environmentally friendly manufacturing pathways for novel bionanominerals. ?? 2009 Taylor & Francis.

  7. The role of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer surface structures in extracellular electron transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouhenni, Rachida; Vora, Gary J.; Biffinger, Justin C.; Shirodkar, Sheetal; Brockman, K. L.; Ray, Ricky; Wu, Peter; Johnson, Brandy J.; Biddle, E. M.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fitzgerald, Lisa A.; Little, Brenda; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Ringeisen, Bradley R.; Saffarini, Daad

    2010-04-20

    Shewanella oneidensis is a facultative anaerobe that uses more than 14 different terminal electron acceptors for respiration. These include metal oxides and hydroxyoxides, and toxic metals such as uranium and chromium. Mutants deficient in metal reduction were isolated using the mariner transposon derivative, minihimar RB1. These included mutants with transposon insertions in the prepilin peptidase and type II secretion system genes. All mutants were deficient in Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction, and exhibited slow growth when DMSO was used as the electron acceptor. The genome sequence of S. oneidensis contains one prepilin peptidase gene, pilD. A similar prepilin peptidase that may function in the processing of type II secretion prepilins was not found. Single and multiple chromosomal deletions of four putative type IV pilin genes did not affect Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction. These results indicate that PilD in S. oneidensis is responsible for processing both type IV and type II secretion prepilin proteins. Type IV pili do not appear to be required for Fe(III) and Mn(IV) reduction.

  8. Time course transcriptome changes in Shewanella algae in response to salt stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuping Fu

    Full Text Available Shewanella algae, which produces tetrodotoxin and exists in various seafoods, can cause human diseases, such as spondylodiscitis and bloody diarrhea. In the present study, we focused on the temporal, dynamic process in salt-stressed S. algae by monitoring the gene transcript levels at different time points after high salt exposure. Transcript changes in amino acid metabolism, carbohydrate metabolism, energy metabolism, membrane transport, regulatory functions, and cellular signaling were found to be important for the high salt response in S. algae. The most common strategies used by bacteria to survive and grow in high salt environments, such as Na+ efflux, K+ uptake, glutamate transport and biosynthesis, and the accumulation of compatible solutes, were also observed in S. algae. In particular, genes involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis and DNA repair were highly and steadily up-regulated, accompanied by rapid and instantaneous enhancement of the transcription of large- and small-ribosome subunits, which suggested that the structural changes in the cell wall and some stressful responses occurred in S. algae. Furthermore, the transcription of genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle and the glycolytic pathway was decreased, whereas the transcription of genes involved in anaerobic respiration was increased. These results, demonstrating the multi-pathway reactions of S. algae in response to salt stress, increase our understanding of the microbial stress response mechanisms.

  9. Endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide and its regulation in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genfu eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions across all domains of life. In this study, mechanisms of endogenous H2S generation in Shewanella oneidensis were investigated. As a research model with highly diverse anaerobic respiratory pathways, the microorganism is able to produce H2S by respiring on a variety of sulfur-containing compounds with SirACD and PsrABC enzymatic complexes, as well as through cysteine degradation with three enzymes, MdeA, SO_1095, and SseA. We showed that the SirACD and PsrABC complexes, which are predominantly, if not exclusively, responsible for H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species, do not interplay with each other. Strikingly, a screen for regulators controlling endogenous H2S generation by transposon mutagenesis identified global regulator Crp to be essential to all H2S-generating processes. In contrast, Fnr and Arc, two other global regulators that have a role in respiration, are dispensable in regulating H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species. Interestingly, Arc is involved in the H2S generation through cysteine degradation by repressing expression of the mdeA gene. We further showed that expression of the sirA and psrABC operons is subjected to direct regulation of Crp, but the mechanisms underlying the requirement of Crp for H2S generation through cysteine degradation remain elusive.

  10. EFFECT OF TIME AND TEMPERATURE OF REFRIGERATION IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF PSYCHROTROPHIC MICRORGANISMS IN COOLED RAW MILK COLLECTED IN THE MACROREGION OF GOIÂNIA – GO EFEITO DO TEMPO E DA TEMPERATURA DE REFRIGERAÇÃO NO DESENVOLVIMENTO DE MICRORGANISMOS PSICROTRÓFICOS EM LEITE CRU REFRIGERADO COLETADO NA MACRORREGIÃO DE GOIÂNIA – GO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Nonato de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    The objective of the research were evaluated the effect of storage time and of refrigeration temperature under the counting of psychrotrophics microrganisms and proteolytics psychrotrophics in refrigerated raw milk samples. In the period of August the September of 2005 34 refrigerated raw milk samples were collected of refrigeration tanks, being 29 individuals and five collectives. Milk was proceeding from bovine flocks. For the collection of the samples followed a route determined for the industry located in the macroregion of Goiânia – GO, Brazil. For the microbiological evaluation was carried the standard plate count method of psychrotrophics microrganisms and proteolytics psychrotrophics. For the determination and quantification of the glycomacropeptide (GMP were adopted methodology proposal in Brazil (1991. The counting of psychrotrophics microrganisms and proteolytics psychrotrophics increased with the storage time of refrigerated bovine milk. Were observed the inadequate tanks were observed e presence of GMP for the High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC was not evidenced.

    KEY WORDS: Proteolysis, Pseudomonas spp, raw milk.
    O objetivo da pesquisa foi avaliar o efeito do tempo de estocagem e da temperatura de refrigeração sob a contagem de microrganismos psicrotróficos e psicrotróficos proteolíticos em amostras de leite cru refrigerado. No período de agosto a setembro de 2005 coletaram-se 34 amostras de leite cru refrigerado de tanques de expansão, sendo 29 individuais e cinco coletivos. Para a coleta das amostras seguiu-se uma rota determinada pela indústria localizada na macrorregião de Goiânia, GO. Para a avaliação microbiológica, foi realizada a contagem-padrão em placas de microrganismos psicrotróficos e psicrotróficos proteolíticos. Para a determinação e quantificação do caseinomacropeptídeo (CMP, adotou-se a metodologia proposta em BRASIL (1991. A contagem de

  11. Role of Outer Membrane C-Type Cytochromes MtrC and OmcA in Shewanella Oneidensis MR-1 Cell Production, Accumulation, and Detachment During Respiration on Hematite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Andrew C.; Peterson, L.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Culley, David E.; Romine, Margaret F.; Geesey, Gill G.

    2012-07-01

    Solid phase iron oxides are considered to be important terminal electron acceptors for microbial respiration in many anoxic environments. Besides the knowledge that cells attach to and reduce these substrates, other aspects of surface-associated cell behavior and the related cell surface components that influence cell-mineral interactions are not well understood. In the present study, wild-type cells of the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 formed thin biofilms one-to-two cell layers in thickness when respiring on natural specular hematite under flow conditions similar to those which exist in aquatic sediments and subsurface environments. The distribution of cells within the biofilm indicated that direct contact was not required for electron transfer from cells to the mineral surface. Detached biomass in the form of single cells represented >99% of the surface-associated wild-type cell production from respiration on hematite over the biofilm life cycle. A mutant deficient in the outer membrane c35 type cytochrome OmcA, while still able to respire and replicate on hematite, established a lower steady-state cell density on the mineral surface than that of the wild-type strain. A mutant deficient in MtrC, another outer membrane c-type cytochrome, and a mutant deficient in both cytochromes were unable to reduce sufficient amounts of hematite to support detectable growth on the mineral surface. When considered in the context of previous work, the results support a growing body of evidence that the relative importance of OmcA and MtrC to cell respiration and replication depends on the form of iron oxide available as terminal electron acceptor.

  12. A mechanistic study of TiO2 nanoparticle toxicity on Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 with UV-containing simulated solar irradiation: Bacterial growth, riboflavin secretion, and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tian A; Meyer, Ben M; Christenson, Ky G; Klaper, Rebecca D; Haynes, Christy L

    2017-02-01

    Toxicity of nanomaterials to ecological systems has recently emerged as an important field of research, and thus, many researchers are exploring the mechanisms of how nanoparticles impact organisms. Herein, we probe the mechanisms of bacteria-nanoparticle interaction by investigating how TiO2 nanoparticles impact a model organism, the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. In addition to examining the effect of TiO2 exposure, the effect of synergistic simulated solar irradiation containing UV was explored in this study, as TiO2 nanoparticles are known photocatalysts. The data reveal that TiO2 nanoparticles cause an inhibition of S. oneidensis growth at high dosage without compromising cell viability, yet co-exposure of nanoparticles and illumination does not increase the adverse effects on bacterial growth relative to TiO2 alone. Measurements of intracellular reactive oxygen species and riboflavin secretion, on the same nanoparticle-exposed bacteria, reveal that TiO2 nanoparticles have no effect on these cell functions, but application of UV-containing illumination with TiO2 nanoparticles has an impact on the level of riboflavin outside bacterial cells. Finally, gene expression studies were employed to explore how cells respond to TiO2 nanoparticles and illumination, and these results were correlated with cell growth and cell function assessment. Together these data suggest a minimal impact of TiO2 NPs and simulated solar irradiation containing UV on S. oneidensis MR-1, and the minimal impact could be accounted for by the nutrient-rich medium used in this work. These measurements demonstrate a comprehensive scheme combining various analytical tools to enable a mechanistic understanding of nanoparticle-cell interactions and to evaluate the potential adverse effects of nanoparticles beyond viability/growth considerations.

  13. Conserved synteny at the protein family level reveals genes underlying Shewanella species cold tolerance and predicts their novel phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpinets, Tatiana V.; Obraztsova, Anna; Wang, Yanbing; Schmoyer, Denise D.; Kora, Guruprasad; Park, Byung H.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Romine, Margaret F.; Land, Miriam L.; Kothe, Terence B.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Uberbacher, Edward

    2010-03-01

    Bacteria of the genus Shewanella can thrive in different environments and demonstrate significant variability in their metabolic and ecophysiological capabilities including cold and salt tolerance. Genomic characteristics underlying this variability across species are largely unknown. In this study we address the problem by a comparison of the physiological, metabolic and genomic characteristics of 19 sequenced Shewanella species. We have employed two novel approaches based on association of a phenotypic trait with the number of the trait-specific protein families (Pfam domains) and on the conservation of synteny (order in the genome) of the trait-related genes. Our first approach is top-down and involves experimental evaluation and quantification of the species’ cold tolerance followed by identification of the correlated Pfam domains and genes with a conserved synteny. The second, a bottom-up approach, predicts novel phenotypes of the species by calculating profiles of each Pfam domain among their genomes and following pair-wise correlation of the profiles and their network clustering. Using the first approach we find a link between cold and salt tolerance of the species and the presence in the genome of a Na+/H+ antiporter gene cluster. Other cold tolerance related genes includes peptidases, chemotaxis sensory transducer proteins, a cysteine exporter, and helicases. Using the bottom-up approach we found several novel phenotypes in the newly sequenced Shewanella species, including degradation of aromatic compounds by an aerobic hybrid pathway in S. woodyi, degradation of ethanolamine by S. benthica, and propanediol degradation by S. putrefaciens CN32 and S. sp. W3-18-1.

  14. Fnr (EtrA acts as a fine-tuning regulator of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

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    Gralnick Jeffrey A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background EtrA in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a model organism for study of adaptation to varied redox niches, shares 73.6% and 50.8% amino acid sequence identity with the oxygen-sensing regulators Fnr in E. coli and Anr in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively; however, its regulatory role of anaerobic metabolism in Shewanella spp. is complex and not well understood. Results The expression of the nap genes, nrfA, cymA and hcp was significantly reduced in etrA deletion mutant EtrA7-1; however, limited anaerobic growth and nitrate reduction occurred, suggesting that multiple regulators control nitrate reduction in this strain. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and fumarate reductase gene expression was down-regulated at least 2-fold in the mutant, which, showed lower or no reduction of these electron acceptors when compared to the wild type, suggesting both respiratory pathways are under EtrA control. Transcript analysis further suggested a role of EtrA in prophage activation and down-regulation of genes implicated in aerobic metabolism. Conclusion In contrast to previous studies that attributed a minor regulatory role to EtrA in Shewanella spp., this study demonstrates that EtrA acts as a global transcriptional regulator and, in conjunction with other regulators, fine-tunes the expression of genes involved in anaerobic metabolism in S. oneidensis strain MR-1. Transcriptomic and sequence analyses of the genes differentially expressed showed that those mostly affected by the mutation belonged to the "Energy metabolism" category, while stress-related genes were indirectly regulated in the mutant possibly as a result of a secondary perturbation (e.g. oxidative stress, starvation. We also conclude based on sequence, physiological and expression analyses that this regulator is more appropriately termed Fnr and recommend this descriptor be used in future publications.

  15. FlrA Represses Transcription of the Biofilm-Associated bpfA Operon in Shewanella putrefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Wu, Chao; Wu, Jia-Yi; Jia, Hui-Ling; Wang, Ming-Yu; Wang, Huan-Yu; Zou, Si-Min; Sun, Rui-Rui; Jia, Rong; Xiao, Ya-Zhong

    2017-02-15

    Manipulation of biofilm formation in Shewanella is beneficial for application to industrial and environmental biotechnology. BpfA is an adhesin largely responsible for biofilm formation in many Shewanella species. However, the mechanism underlying BpfA production and the resulting biofilm remains vaguely understood. We previously described the finding that BpfA expression is enhanced by DosD, an oxygen-stimulated diguanylate cyclase, under aerobic growth. In the present work, we identify FlrA as a critical transcription regulator of the bpfA operon in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 by transposon mutagenesis. FlrA acted as a repressor of the operon promoter by binding to two boxes overlapping the -10 and -35 sites recognized by σ(70) DosD regulation of the expression of the bpfA operon was mediated by FlrA, and cyclic diguanylic acid (c-di-GMP) abolished FlrA binding to the operon promoter. We also demonstrate that FlhG, an accessory protein for flagellum synthesis, antagonized FlrA repression of the expression of the bpfA operon. Collectively, this work demonstrates that FlrA acts as a central mediator in the signaling pathway from c-di-GMP to BpfA-associated biofilm formation in S. putrefaciens CN32. Motility and biofilm are mutually exclusive lifestyles, shifts between which are under the strict regulation of bacteria attempting to adapt to the fluctuation of diverse environmental conditions. The FlrA protein in many bacteria is known to control motility as a master regulator of flagellum synthesis. This work elucidates its effect on biofilm formation by controlling the expression of the adhesin BpfA in S. putrefaciens CN32 in response to c-di-GMP. Therefore, FlrA plays a dual role in controlling motility and biofilm formation in S. putrefaciens CN32. The cooccurrence of flrA, bpfA, and the FlrA box in the promoter region of the bpfA operon in diverse Shewanella strains suggests that bpfA is a common mechanism that controls biofilm formation in this bacterial

  16. The cymA Gene, Encoding a Tetraheme c-Type Cytochrome, Is Required for Arsenate Respiration in Shewanella Species▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Julie N.; Saltikov, Chad W.

    2007-01-01

    In Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, utilization of arsenate as a terminal electron acceptor is conferred by a two-gene operon, arrAB, which lacks a gene encoding a membrane-anchoring subunit for the soluble ArrAB protein complex. Analysis of the genome sequence of Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32 showed that it also contained the same arrAB operon with 100% nucleotide identity. Here, we report that CN-32 respires arsenate and that this metabolism is dependent on arrA and an additional gene encoding a membrane-associated tetraheme c-type cytochrome, cymA. Deletion of cymA in ANA-3 also eliminated growth on and reduction of arsenate. The ΔcymA strains of CN-32 and ANA-3 negatively affected the reduction of Fe(III) and Mn(IV) but not growth on nitrate. Unlike the CN-32 ΔcymA strain, growth on fumarate was absent in the ΔcymA strain of ANA-3. Both homologous and heterologous complementation of cymA in trans restored growth on arsenate in ΔcymA strains of both CN-32 and ANA-3. Transcription patterns of cymA showed that it was induced under anaerobic conditions in the presence of fumarate and arsenate. Nitrate-grown cells exhibited the greatest level of cymA expression in both wild-type strains. Lastly, site-directed mutagenesis of the first Cys to Ser in each of the four CXXCH c-heme binding motifs of the CN-32 CymA nearly eliminated growth on and reduction of arsenate. Together, these results indicate that the biochemical mechanism of arsenate respiration and reduction requires the interactions of ArrAB with a membrane-associated tetraheme cytochrome, which in the non-arsenate-respiring Shewanella species Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1, has pleiotropic effects on Fe(III), Mn(IV), dimethyl sulfoxide, nitrate, nitrite, and fumarate respiration. PMID:17209025

  17. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2007-01-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer ...

  18. Real-Time Gene Expression Profiling of Live Shewanella Oneidensis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

    2009-03-30

    The overall objective of this proposal is to make real-time observations of gene expression in live Shewanella oneidensis cells with high sensitivity and high throughput. Gene expression, a central process to all life, is stochastic because most genes often exist in one or two copies per cell. Although the central dogma of molecular biology has been proven beyond doubt, due to insufficient sensitivity, stochastic protein production has not been visualized in real time in an individual cell at the single-molecule level. We report the first direct observation of single protein molecules as they are generated, one at a time in a single live E. coli cell, yielding quantitative information about gene expression [Science 2006; 311: 1600-1603]. We demonstrated a general strategy for live-cell single-molecule measurements: detection by localization. It is difficult to detect single fluorescence protein molecules inside cytoplasm - their fluorescence is spread by fast diffusion to the entire cell and overwhelmed by the strong autofluorescence. We achieved single-molecule sensitivity by immobilizing the fluorescence protein on the cell membrane, where the diffusion is much slowed. We learned that under the repressed condition protein molecules are produced in bursts, with each burst originating from a stochastically-transcribed single messenger RNA molecule, and that protein copy numbers in the bursts follow a geometric distribution. We also simultaneously published a paper reporting a different method using β-glactosidase as a reporter [Nature 440, 358 (2006)]. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, inaccessible by previous proteomic techniques. Both papers allowed quantification of protein expression with unprecedented sensitivity and received overwhelming acclaim from the scientific community. The Nature paper has been identified as one of the most-cited papers in the past year [http://esi-topics.com/]. We have also an analytical framework describing the

  19. A comparison of molecular biology mechanism of Shewanella putrefaciens between fresh and terrestrial sewage wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiajie Xu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Municipal and industrial wastewater is often discharged into the environment without appropriate treatment, especially in developing countries. As a result, many rivers and oceans are contaminated. It is urgent to control and administer treatments to these contaminated rivers and oceans. However, most mechanisms of bacterial colonization in contaminated rivers and oceans were unknown, especially in sewage outlets. We found Shewanella putrefaciens to be the primary bacteria in the terrestrial sewage wastewater outlets around Ningbo City, China. Therefore, in this study, we applied a combination of differential proteomics, metabolomics, and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR techniques to identify bacteria intracellular metabolites. We found S. putrefaciens had 12 different proteins differentially expressed in freshwater culture than when grown in wastewater, referring to the formation of biological membranes (Omp35, OmpW, energy metabolism (SOD, deoxyribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase, fatty acid metabolism (beta-ketoacyl synthase, secondary metabolism, TCA cycle, lysine degradation (2-oxoglutarate reductase, and propionic acid metabolism (succinyl coenzyme A synthetase. The sequences of these 12 differentially expressed proteins were aligned with sequences downloaded from NCBI. There are also 27 differentially concentrated metabolites detected by NMR, including alcohols (ethanol, isopropanol, amines (dimethylamine, ethanolamine, amino acids (alanine, leucine, amine compounds (bilinerurine, nucleic acid compounds (nucleosides, inosines, organic acids (formate, acetate. Formate and ethanolamine show significant difference between the two environments and are possibly involved in energy metabolism, glycerophospholipid and ether lipids metabolism to provide energy supply and material basis for engraftment in sewage. Because understanding S. putrefaciens’s biological mechanism of colonization (protein, gene express and metabolites in

  20. A Comparison of Molecular Biology Mechanism of Shewanella putrefaciens between Fresh and Terrestrial Sewage Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jiajie; He, Weina; Wang, Zhonghua; Zhang, Dijun; Sun, Jing; Zhou, Jun; Li, Yanyan; Su, Xiurong

    2016-01-01

    Municipal and industrial wastewater is often discharged into the environment without appropriate treatment, especially in developing countries. As a result, many rivers and oceans are contaminated. It is urgent to control and administer treatments to these contaminated rivers and oceans. However, most mechanisms of bacterial colonization in contaminated rivers and oceans were unknown, especially in sewage outlets. We found Shewanella putrefaciens to be the primary bacteria in the terrestrial sewage wastewater outlets around Ningbo City, China. Therefore, in this study, we applied a combination of differential proteomics, metabolomics, and real-time fluorescent quantitative PCR techniques to identify bacteria intracellular metabolites. We found S. putrefaciens had 12 different proteins differentially expressed in freshwater culture than when grown in wastewater, referring to the formation of biological membranes (Omp35, OmpW), energy metabolism (SOD, deoxyribose-phosphate pyrophosphokinase), fatty acid metabolism (beta-ketoacyl synthase), secondary metabolism, TCA cycle, lysine degradation (2-oxoglutarate reductase), and propionic acid metabolism (succinyl coenzyme A synthetase). The sequences of these 12 differentially expressed proteins were aligned with sequences downloaded from NCBI. There are also 27 differentially concentrated metabolites detected by NMR, including alcohols (ethanol, isopropanol), amines (dimethylamine, ethanolamine), amino acids (alanine, leucine), amine compounds (bilinerurine), nucleic acid compounds (nucleosides, inosines), and organic acids (formate, acetate). Formate and ethanolamine show significant difference between the two environments and are possibly involved in energy metabolism, glycerophospholipid and ether lipids metabolism to provide energy supply, and material basis for engraftment in sewage. Because understanding S. putrefaciens's biological mechanism of colonization (protein, gene express, and metabolites) in terrestrial

  1. The Effect of the Presence and Density of Shewanella oneidensis on Nuclear Magnetic Relaxation Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, K.; Halsey, J.

    2011-12-01

    A recent interest in the use of non-invasive geophysical methods to detect the presence of and measure the growth of microbes in the subsurface has arisen due to the potential use of such methods to monitor the progress of bioremediation. Previous research to this end has focused on electrical measurements, such as complex resistivity, which are sensitive to the presence of microbes but can be difficult to interpret. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), an emerging near-surface geophysical method, is sensitive to the presence and physiochemical environment of hydrogen. Typically, NMR measurements in geophysics are used to detect hydrogen in water or hydrocarbons and to determine its pore environment; however, NMR imaging measurements have shown that NMR can also detect hydrogen in microbes. Geophysical NMR measurements thus have the potential to directly detect microbes in geologic material or indirectly detect the way in which the presence of microbes alters the physical and chemical properties of a water-saturated geologic material. This laboratory-scale study was designed to explore the effect of the presence and density of microbes on NMR relaxation measurements. Measurements were collected on microbial slurries and microbes in porous media both during microbial growth and on samples with known microbial density. Shewanella oneidensis was used as a representative environmental microbe in this study. The research shows that low field NMR measurements are sensitive to the presence and density of microbes and provides fundamental information required to determine if low-field NMR measurements can be used to monitor microbial growth during bioremediation.

  2. CRP Regulates D-Lactate Oxidation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuya Kasai

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a heterotrophic facultative anaerobe that respires using various organic and inorganic compounds. This organism has served as a model to study bacterial metabolic and regulatory systems that facilitate their survival in redox-stratified environments. The expression of many anaerobic respiratory genes in MR-1, including those for the reduction of fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and metal oxides, is regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP. However, relatively little is known about how this organism regulates the expression of catabolic enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of organic compounds, including lactate. Here, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms for the lldP (SO_1522 and dld (SO_1521 genes, which encode putative lactate permease and D-lactate dehydrogenase, respectively, and demonstrate that CRP regulates their expression in MR-1. We found that a crp-deletion mutant of MR-1 (Δcrp showed impaired growth on D-lactate. Complementary expression of dld in Δcrp restored the ability to grow on D-lactate, indicating that the deficient growth of Δcrp on D-lactate is attributable to decreased expression of dld. In vivo transcription and in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal that CRP positively regulates the expression of the lldP and dld genes by directly binding to an upstream region of lldP. Taken together, these results indicate that CRP is a global transcriptional regulator that coordinately regulates the expression of catabolic and respiratory pathways in MR-1, including D-lactate dehydrogenase and anaerobic terminal reductases.

  3. CRP Regulates D-Lactate Oxidation in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Takuya; Kouzuma, Atsushi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a heterotrophic facultative anaerobe that respires using various organic and inorganic compounds. This organism has served as a model to study bacterial metabolic and regulatory systems that facilitate their survival in redox-stratified environments. The expression of many anaerobic respiratory genes in MR-1, including those for the reduction of fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and metal oxides, is regulated by cyclic AMP receptor protein (CRP). However, relatively little is known about how this organism regulates the expression of catabolic enzymes catalyzing the oxidation of organic compounds, including lactate. Here, we investigated transcriptional mechanisms for the lldP (SO_1522) and dld (SO_1521) genes, which encode putative lactate permease and D-lactate dehydrogenase, respectively, and demonstrate that CRP regulates their expression in MR-1. We found that a crp-deletion mutant of MR-1 (Δcrp) showed impaired growth on D-lactate. Complementary expression of dld in Δcrp restored the ability to grow on D-lactate, indicating that the deficient growth of Δcrp on D-lactate is attributable to decreased expression of dld. In vivo transcription and in vitro electrophoretic mobility shift assays reveal that CRP positively regulates the expression of the lldP and dld genes by directly binding to an upstream region of lldP. Taken together, these results indicate that CRP is a global transcriptional regulator that coordinately regulates the expression of catabolic and respiratory pathways in MR-1, including D-lactate dehydrogenase and anaerobic terminal reductases.

  4. Snapshot of iron response in Shewanella oneidensis by gene network reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Harris, Daniel P.; Luo, Feng; Xiong, Wenlu; Joachimiak, Marcin; Wu, Liyou; Dehal, Paramvir; Jacobsen, Janet; Yang, Zamin; Palumbo, Anthony V.; Arkin, Adam P.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2008-10-09

    Background: Iron homeostasis of Shewanella oneidensis, a gamma-proteobacterium possessing high iron content, is regulated by a global transcription factor Fur. However, knowledge is incomplete about other biological pathways that respond to changes in iron concentration, as well as details of the responses. In this work, we integrate physiological, transcriptomics and genetic approaches to delineate the iron response of S. oneidensis. Results: We show that the iron response in S. oneidensis is a rapid process. Temporal gene expression profiles were examined for iron depletion and repletion, and a gene co-expression network was reconstructed. Modules of iron acquisition systems, anaerobic energy metabolism and protein degradation were the most noteworthy in the gene network. Bioinformatics analyses suggested that genes in each of the modules might be regulated by DNA-binding proteins Fur, CRP and RpoH, respectively. Closer inspection of these modules revealed a transcriptional regulator (SO2426) involved in iron acquisition and ten transcriptional factors involved in anaerobic energy metabolism. Selected genes in the network were analyzed by genetic studies. Disruption of genes encoding a putative alcaligin biosynthesis protein (SO3032) and a gene previously implicated in protein degradation (SO2017) led to severe growth deficiency under iron depletion conditions. Disruption of a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) caused deficiency in both anaerobic iron reduction and growth with thiosulfate or TMAO as an electronic acceptor, suggesting that SO1415 is required for specific branches of anaerobic energy metabolism pathways. Conclusions: Using a reconstructed gene network, we identified major biological pathways that were differentially expressed during iron depletion and repletion. Genetic studies not only demonstrated the importance of iron acquisition and protein degradation for iron depletion, but also characterized a novel transcriptional factor (SO1415) with a

  5. Investigations of Structure and Metabolism within Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Biofilms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mclean, Jeffrey S.; Majors, Paul D.; Reardon, Catherine L.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2008-07-01

    Biofilms are known to possess spatially and temporally varying metabolite concentration profiles at the macroscopic and microscopic scales. This results in varying growth environments within that may ultimately drive species diversity, determine biofilm structure and also the spatial arrangement of the community members. Using noninvasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) microscopic imaging/spectroscopy and confocal imaging, we investigated anaerobic reduction kinetics, structural variation, and the stratification of metabolism within live biofilms of the facultative anaerobic dissimilatory metal-reducing Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Biofilms were pregrown using a defined minimal media in a homebuilt constant depth film fermenter and subsequently transferred to an in-magnet sample chamber under laminar flow for NMR measurements. The sample was subjected to various, rapidly switched substrate/ anaerobic electron acceptor combinations (fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide, and nitrate electron acceptors). Localized NMR spectroscopy was used to non-invasively monitored the spectra of hydrogen-containing metabolites at high temporal resolution (4.5 min) under oxygen-limited conditions. Anaerobic reduction was immediately observed upon switching feed solutions indicate that no gene induction (transcriptional response) was needed for MR-1 to switch between fumarate, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and nitrate electron acceptors. In parallel experiments, confocal microscopy was used with constitutively expressed fluorescent reporters to independently investigate structural changes in response to the availability of electron acceptor and also the outcome of metabolic competition under oxygen-limited conditions. A clearer understanding of the metabolic diversity and plasticity of the biofilm mode of growth as well as how this possibly translates to the environmental fitness is made possible through the use of non-invasive and non-destructive techniques such as described here.

  6. Deletion of degQ gene enhances outer membrane vesicle production of Shewanella oneidensis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Yoshihiro; Mohanadas, Thivagaran; Kitamura, Kosei; Nunogami, Shota; Yajima, Reiki; Taya, Masahito

    2017-04-01

    Shewanella oneidensis is a Gram-negative facultative anaerobe that can use a wide variety of terminal electron acceptors for anaerobic respiration. In this study, S. oneidensis degQ gene, encoding a putative periplasmic serine protease, was cloned and expressed. The activity of purified DegQ was inhibited by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, a typical serine protease-specific inhibitor, indicating that DegQ is a serine protease. In-frame deletion and subsequent complementation of the degQ were carried out to examine the effect of envelope stress on the production of outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Analysis of periplasmic proteins from the resulting S. oneidensis strain showed that deletion of degQ induced protein accumulation and resulted in a significant decrease in protease activity within the periplasmic space. OMVs from the wild-type and mutant strains were purified and observed by transmission electron microscopy. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the OMVs showed a prominent band at ~37 kDa. Nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis identified three outer membrane porins (SO3896, SO1821, and SO3545) as dominant components of the band, suggesting that these proteins could be used as indices for comparing OMV production by S. oneidensis strains. Quantitative evaluation showed that degQ-deficient cells had a fivefold increase in OMV production compared with wild-type cells. Thus, the increased OMV production following the deletion of DegQ in S. oneidensis may be responsible for the increase in envelope stress.

  7. Experimental evolution of aging in a bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stearns Stephen C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aging refers to a decline in reproduction and survival with increasing age. According to evolutionary theory, aging evolves because selection late in life is weak and mutations exist whose deleterious effects manifest only late in life. Whether the assumptions behind this theory are fulfilled in all organisms, and whether all organisms age, has not been clear. We tested the generality of this theory by experimental evolution with Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium whose asymmetric division allows mother and daughter to be distinguished. Results We evolved three populations for 2000 generations in the laboratory under conditions where selection was strong early in life, but very weak later in life. All populations evolved faster growth rates, mostly by decreasing the age at first division. Evolutionary changes in aging were inconsistent. The predominant response was the unexpected evolution of slower aging, revealing the limits of theoretical predictions if mutations have unanticipated phenotypic effects. However, we also observed the spread of a mutation causing earlier aging of mothers whose negative effect was reset in the daughters. Conclusion Our results confirm that late-acting deleterious mutations do occur in bacteria and that they can invade populations when selection late in life is weak. They suggest that very few organisms – perhaps none- can avoid the accumulation of such mutations over evolutionary time, and thus that aging is probably a fundamental property of all cellular organisms.

  8. Time-course analysis of the Shewanella amazonensis SB2B proteome in response to sodium chloride shock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parnell, John J.; Callister, Stephen J.; Rompato, Giovanni; Nicora, Carrie D.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Williamson, Ashley; Pfrender, Michael E.

    2011-06-29

    Organisms in the genus Shewanella have become models for response to environmental stress. One of the most important environmental stresses is change in osmolarity. In this study, we experimentally determine the response mechanisms of Shewanella amazonensis SB2B during osmotic stress. Osmotic stress in SB2B was induced through exposure to NaCl, and the time-course proteomics response was measured using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Protein trends were qualitatively compared to gene expression trends and to phenotypic characterization. Osmotic stress affects motility, and has also been associated with a change in the membrane fatty acid composition (due to induction of branched chain amino acid degradation pathways); however, we show this is not the case for SB2B. Although proteins and genes involved with branched chain amino acid degradation are induced, fatty acid degradation pathways are not induced and no change in the fatty acid profile occurs in SB2B as a result of osmotic shock. The most extensive response of SB2B over the time course of acclimation to high salt involves an orchestrated sequence of events comprising increased expression of signal transduction associated with motility and restricted cell division and DNA replication. After SB2B has switched to increased branched chain amino acid degradation, motility, and cellular replication proteins return to pre-perturbed levels.

  9. Shewanella putrefaciens produces an Fe(III)-solubilizing organic ligand during anaerobic respiration on insoluble Fe(III) oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taillefert, Martial; Beckler, Jordon S; Carey, Elizabeth; Burns, Justin L; Fennessey, Christine M; DiChristina, Thomas J

    2007-11-01

    The mechanism of Fe(III) reduction was investigated using voltammetric techniques in anaerobic incubations of Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 supplemented with Fe(III) citrate or a suite of Fe(III) oxides as terminal electron acceptor. Results indicate that organic complexes of Fe(III) are produced during the reduction of Fe(III) at rates that correlate with the reactivity of the Fe(III) phase and bacterial cell density. Anaerobic Fe(III) solubilization activity is detected with either Fe(III) oxides or Fe(III) citrate, suggesting that the organic ligand produced is strong enough to destabilize Fe(III) from soluble or solid Fe(III) substrates. Results also demonstrate that Fe(III) oxide dissolution is not controlled by the intrinsic chemical reactivity of the Fe(III) oxides. Instead, the chemical reaction between the endogenous organic ligand is only affected by the number of reactive surface sites available to S. putrefaciens. This report describes the first application of voltammetric techniques to demonstrate production of soluble organic-Fe(III) complexes by any Fe(III)-reducing microorganism and is the first report of a Fe(III)-solubilizing ligand generated by a metal-reducing member of the genus Shewanella.

  10. Impact of a static magnetic field on the electricity production of Shewanella-inoculated microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Liu, Xian-Wei; Cai, Pei-Jie; Sun, Min; Xiao, Xiang; Wang, Yun-Kun; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Dong, Fang; Yu, Han-Qing

    2011-06-15

    The electricity production of Shewanella-inoculated microbial fuel cells (MFCs) under magnetic field (MF) exposure was investigated in different reactor systems. The persistency of the MF effect and the influences of MF intensity and direction on MFC performance were also studied. Application of a 100-mT static MF to the MFCs improved electricity production considerably, with an increase in the maximum voltage by 20-27% in both single- and two-chamber MFCs, while a more conspicuous improvement in the electricity generation was observed in a three-electrode cell. The MF effects were found to be immediate and reversible, and adverse effects seemed to occur when the MF was suddenly removed. The medium components analysis demonstrated that the application of MF led to an enhanced bioelectrochemical activity of Shewanella, and no significant promotion in mediator secretion was found. The improvement in the electricity production of MFCs under MF was mainly attributed to the enhanced bioelectrochemical activity, possibly through the oxidative stress mechanism. An accelerated cell growth under MF might also contribute to the enhanced substrate degradation and power generation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Confirmation of the Expression of a Large Set of Conserved Hypothetical Proteins in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Smith, Richard D.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2006-08-01

    High-throughput “omic” technologies have allowed for a relatively rapid, yet comprehensive analysis of the global expression patterns within an organism in response to perturbations. In the current study, tryptic peptides were identified with high confidence from capillary liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of 26 chemostat cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under various conditions. Using at least one distinctive and a total of two total peptide identifications per protein, we detected the expression of 758 conserved hypothetical proteins. This included 359 such proteins previously described (Kolker et al, 2005) with an additional 399 reported herein for the first time. The latter 399 proteins ranged from 5.3 to 208.3 kDa, with 44 being of 100 amino acid residues or less. Using a combination of information including peptide detection in cells grown under specific culture conditions and predictive algorithms such as PSORT and PSORT-B, possible/plausible functions are proposed for some conserved hypothetical proteins. Such proteins were found not only to be expressed, but 19 were only expressed under certain culturing conditions, thereby providing insight into potential functions. These findings also impact the genomic annotation for S. oneidensis MR-1 by confirming that these genes code for expressed proteins. Our results indicate that 399 proteins can now be upgraded from “conserved hypothetical protein” to “expressed protein in Shewanella,” 19 of which appeared to be expressed under specific culture conditions.

  12. THE ROLE OF 4-HYDROXYPHENYLPYRUVATE DIOXYGENASE IN ENHANCEMENT OF SOLID-PHASE ELECTRON TRANSFER BY SHEWANELLA ONEIDENSIS MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, C; Amy Ekechukwu, A

    2007-06-01

    While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane-associated c-type cytochromes and redox active electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. In this study, we determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione (2-(2-chloro-4-methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates, with which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide, were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E{sup o}{prime}) of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on this work, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in Shewanella oneidensis.

  13. Formation of manganese phosphate and manganese carbonate during long-term sorption of Mn2+ by viable Shewanella putrefaciens: effects of contact time and temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chubar, N.; Avramut, C.; Visser, T.

    The influence of temperature (5, 10, 22 and 30 C) on the long-term (30 days) sorption of Mn2+ by viable Shewanella putrefaciens was studied by FTIR and EXAFS. The additional Mn-removal capacity of these bacteria was found to result from the surface precipitation of Mn-containing inorganic phases.

  14. Investigation of the substrate specificity of the proton coupled peptide transporter PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Hald, Helle

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian proton coupled transporter (POT) hPepT1 has been studied intensively due to its role in nutrient and drug absorption in the small intestine. In the absence of a crystal structure of hPepT1, the available structures of bacterial POTs, among which PepTSo from Shewanella oneidensis has...

  15. Taxonomic characterization of the cellulose-degrading bacterium NCIB 10462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, C.; Ringleberg, D.; Scott, T.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Phelps, T. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The gram negative cellulase-producing bacterium NCIB 10462 has been previously named Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. or var. cellulosa. Since there is renewed interest in cellulose-degrading bacteria for use in bioconversion of cellulose to chemical feed stocks and fuels, we re-examined the characteristics of this microorganism to determine its proper taxonomic characterization and to further define it`s true metabolic potential. Metabolic and physical characterization of NCIB 10462 revealed that this was an alkalophilic, non-fermentative, gram negative, oxidase positive, motile, cellulose-degrading bacterium. The aerobic substrate utilization profile of this bacterium was found to have few characteristics consistent with a classification of P. fluorescens with a very low probability match with the genus Sphingomonas. Total lipid analysis did not reveal that any sphingolipid bases are produced by this bacterium. NCIB 10462 was found to grow best aerobically but also grows well in complex media under reducing conditions. NCIB 10462 grew slowly under full anaerobic conditions on complex media but growth on cellulosic media was found only under aerobic conditions. Total fatty acid analysis (MIDI) of NCIB 10462 failed to group this bacterium with a known pseudomonas species. However, fatty acid analysis of the bacteria when grown at temperatures below 37{degrees}C suggest that the organism is a pseudomonad. Since a predominant characteristic of this bacterium is it`s ability to degrade cellulose, we suggest it be called Pseudomonas cellulosa.

  16. 天山冻土中嗜冷酵母菌生物多样性%Diversity of Psychrotrophic Yeast from Permafrost Soil at the Terminus of a Glacier in the Tianshan Mountains

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜远丽; 郑晓吉; 史学伟; 倪永清

    2012-01-01

    采用麦芽浸膏富集平板涂布天山冻土中可培养酵母菌,通过麦芽浸膏分离培养基筛选菌株.采用酵母菌常规生理生化实验、最适生长温度、最适pH对分离菌株的生理学进行研究.以NL1和NL4为PCR扩增引物,通过26S rRNA基因D1/D2区序列同源性分析,初步确定酵母菌株的系统进化地位.分离筛选到4株嗜低温酵母菌,分属于隐球酵母(Cystofilobasidium infirmominiatum)、掷孢酵母(Sporobolomyces patagonicus)、棒孢酵母(Clavispora lusitaniae)和毕赤酵母(Pichia kluyveri).%The objective of this study was to investigate the diversity of culturable yeast strains from permafrost soils at the terminus of a glacier in the Tianshan Mountains was investigated. Isolation and molecular phylogenetic analysis were performed in order to expand our knowledge on diversity of psychrotrophic and psychrophilic yeast. In addition, efforts focused on screening for psychrophilic yeast. Psychrophilic yeast strains were detected on YEPG plates, respectively. Identity and genetic diversity of strains isolated was determined by 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 by the forward primers NL1 and the reverse NL4. The physiological tests were carried out to determine the phonotypic differences between strains showing high similarity of 26S rRNA gene sequences. In all,4 yeast stains was isolated by 26S rRNA gene D1/D2 and internal transcribed spacers of 4 genera (Cryptococcus ,Sporobolomyces ,Clavispora,Pichia). The results enrich our knowledge on the differences of psychrotrophic yeast diversity between the glacier under study and other worldwide cold habitats are also discussed.

  17. Pangenome Evolution in the Marine Bacterium Alteromonas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Mario; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco

    2016-06-03

    We have examined a collection of the free-living marine bacterium Alteromonas genomes with cores diverging in average nucleotide identities ranging from 99.98% to 73.35%, i.e., from microbes that can be considered members of a natural clone (like in a clinical epidemiological outbreak) to borderline genus level. The genomes were largely syntenic allowing a precise delimitation of the core and flexible regions in each. The core was 1.4 Mb (ca. 30% of the typical strain genome size). Recombination rates along the core were high among strains belonging to the same species (37.7-83.7% of all nucleotide polymorphisms) but they decreased sharply between species (18.9-5.1%). Regarding the flexible genome, its main expansion occurred within the boundaries of the species, i.e., strains of the same species already have a large and diverse flexible genome. Flexible regions occupy mostly fixed genomic locations. Four large genomic islands are involved in the synthesis of strain-specific glycosydic receptors that we have called glycotypes. These genomic regions are exchanged by homologous recombination within and between species and there is evidence for their import from distant taxonomic units (other genera within the family). In addition, several hotspots for integration of gene cassettes by illegitimate recombination are distributed throughout the genome. They code for features that give each clone specific properties to interact with their ecological niche and must flow fast throughout the whole genus as they are found, with nearly identical sequences, in different species. Models for the generation of this genomic diversity involving phage predation are discussed.

  18. Utilization of DNA as a Sole Source of Phosphorus, Carbon, and Energy by Shewanella spp.: Ecological and Physiological Implications for Dissimilatory Metal Reduction▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Ammons, Christine; Culley, David E.; Li, Shu-Mei W.; McLean, Jeff S.; Romine, Margaret F.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2008-01-01

    The solubility of orthophosphate (PO43−) in iron-rich sediments can be exceedingly low, limiting the bioavailability of this essential nutrient to microbial populations that catalyze critical biogeochemical reactions. Here we demonstrate that dissolved extracellular DNA can serve as a sole source of phosphorus, as well as carbon and energy, for metal-reducing bacteria of the genus Shewanella. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, Shewanella putrefaciens CN32, and Shewanella sp. strain W3-18-1 all grew with DNA but displayed different growth rates. W3-18-1 exhibited the highest growth rate with DNA. While strain W3-18-1 displayed Ca2+-independent DNA utilization, both CN32 and MR-1 required millimolar concentrations of Ca2+ for growth with DNA. For S. oneidensis MR-1, the utilization of DNA as a sole source of phosphorus is linked to the activities of extracellular phosphatase(s) and a Ca2+-dependent nuclease(s), which are regulated by phosphorus availability. Mass spectrometry analysis of the extracellular proteome of MR-1 identified one putative endonuclease (SO1844), a predicted UshA (bifunctional UDP-sugar hydrolase/5′ nucleotidase), a predicted PhoX (calcium-activated alkaline phosphatase), and a predicted CpdB (bifunctional 2′,3′ cyclic nucleotide 2′ phosphodiesterase/3′ nucleotidase), all of which could play important roles in the extracellular degradation of DNA under phosphorus-limiting conditions. Overall, the results of this study suggest that the ability to use exogenous DNA as the sole source of phosphorus is widespread among the shewanellae, and perhaps among all prokaryotes, and may be especially important for nutrient cycling in metal-reducing environments. PMID:18156329

  19. Phylogenetic Analysis of Shewanella Strains by DNA Relatedness Derived from Whole Genome Microarray DNA-DNA Hybridization and Comparison with Other Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Liyou; Yi, T. Y.; Van Nostrand, Joy; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17

    Phylogenetic analyses were done for the Shewanella strains isolated from Baltic Sea (38 strains), US DOE Hanford Uranium bioremediation site [Hanford Reach of the Columbia River (HRCR), 11 strains], Pacific Ocean and Hawaiian sediments (8 strains), and strains from other resources (16 strains) with three out group strains, Rhodopseudomonas palustris, Clostridium cellulolyticum, and Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus X514, using DNA relatedness derived from WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridizations, sequence similarities of 16S rRNA gene and gyrB gene, and sequence similarities of 6 loci of Shewanella genome selected from a shared gene list of the Shewanella strains with whole genome sequenced based on the average nucleotide identity of them (ANI). The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA and gyrB gene sequences, and DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations of the tested Shewanella strains share exactly the same sub-clusters with very few exceptions, in which the strains were basically grouped by species. However, the phylogenetic analysis based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations dramatically increased the differentiation resolution at species and strains level within Shewanella genus. When the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WCGA hybridizations was compared to the tree based on the combined sequences of the selected functional genes (6 loci), we found that the resolutions of both methods are similar, but the clustering of the tree based on DNA relatedness derived from WMGA hybridizations was clearer. These results indicate that WCGA-based DNA-DNA hybridization is an idea alternative of conventional DNA-DNA hybridization methods and it is superior to the phylogenetics methods based on sequence similarities of single genes. Detailed analysis is being performed for the re-classification of the strains examined.

  20. Arsenite sequestration by nanosized ferrous minerals after bioreduction of arsenic-sorbed lepidocrocite by Shewanella putrefaciens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ona-Nguema, G.; Morin, G.; Wang, Y.; Juillot, F.; Abdelmoula, M.; Ruby, C.; Guyot, F.; Calas, G.; Brown, G.

    2008-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used in combination with high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, and Mössbauer spectroscopy to obtain detailed information on arsenic and iron speciation in the products of anaerobic reduction of pure and As(V)- or As(III)-adsorbed lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH) by Shewanella putrefaciens ATCC 12099. We found that this strain is capable of using both Fe(III) in lepidocrocite and As(V) in solution or adsorbed on lepidocrocite surfaces as electron acceptors. Bioreduction of lepidocrocite in the absence of arsenic resulted in the formation of hydroxycarbonate green rust 1 [FeII4FeIII2(OH)12CO3: GR1(CO3)], which completely converted into ferrous- carbonate hydroxide (FeII2(OH)2CO3: FCH). Bioreduction of As(III)-adsorbed lepidocrocite also led to the formation of GR1(CO3) prior to formation of FCH, but the presence of As(III) slows down this transformation, leading to the co-occurrence of both phases. At the end of this experiment, As(III) was found to be adsorbed on the surfaces of GR1(CO3) and FCH. Bioreduction of As(V)-bearing lepidocrocite led directly to the formation of FCH in association with nanometer-sized particles of a minor As-rich Fe(OH)2 phase, with no evidence for green rust formation. At the end of this experiment, As(V) was fully converted to As(III) and dominantly sorbed at the surface of the Fe(OH)2 nanoparticles as oligomers binding to the edges of Fe(OH)6 octahedra in the octahedral layers of Fe(OH)2. These multinuclear As(III) surface complexes are characterized by As-As pairs at a distance of 3.32 ± 0.02 Å and by As-Fe pairs at a distance of 3.50 ± 0.02 Å and represent a new form of As(III) surface complexes. Chemical analyses show that the majority of As(III) produced in the experiments with As present is associated with iron-bearing hydroxycarbonate or hydroxide solids, reinforcing the idea that, at least under some circumstances, bacterial reduction can promote As

  1. Growth Inhibition and Stimulation of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by Surfactants and Calcium Polysulfide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Kathryn L.; Tilton, Fred A.; Jansik, Danielle P.; Ergas, Sarina J.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Miracle, Ann L.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2012-06-14

    Foam delivery technology (FDT) uses surfactant based foam to immobilize subsurface contaminants in situ. Where traditional approaches are impractical, FDT has the potential to overcome many of the technical challenges facing the remediation of contaminated deep vadose zone environments. However, little is known about the effects these reactive chemicals may have on microorganisms inhabiting the contaminated subsurface. In addition, there are currently no standard assays to assess microbial responses to subsurface remedial treatments while these agents are under development. The objective of this study was to develop a rapid laboratory assay to assess the potential growth inhibition and/or stimulation of microorganisms following exposure to candidate FDT components. Calcium polysulfide (CPS) and several surfactants (i.e. sodium laureth sulfate (SLES), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cocamidopropyl betaine (CAPB) and NINOL40-CO) have diverse chemistries and are candidate components of FDT. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultures were exposed to a range of concentrations of these chemicals to determine the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) and the growth and viability potential of these components. Concentrations of SDS higher than 700 {micro}M were toxic to S. oneidensis MR-1 growth over the course of four days of exposure. The relative acute toxicity order for these compounds was SDS>>CPS>>NINOL40-CO>SLES-CAPB. Dose dependent growth decreases (20 to 100 mM) were observed in the CAPB and SLES treated cultures and both CPS and NINOL 40-CO were toxic at all concentrations tested (1.45 to 7.25 mM CPS). Both SLES (20 to 100 mM) and SDS at lower concentrations (20 to 500 {micro}M) were stimulatory to S. oneidensis MR-1 indicating a capacity to be used as a carbon source. These studies also identified potentially key component characteristics, such as precipitate formation and oxygen availability, which may prove valuable in assessing the response of subsurface

  2. Surface complexation of neptunium (V) onto whole cells and cell componets of Shewanella alga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Donald Timothy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deo, Randhir P [ASU; Rittmann, Bruce E [ASU; Songkasiri, Warinthorn [UNAFFILIATED

    2008-01-01

    We systematically quantified surface complexation of neptunium(V) onto whole cells of Shewanella alga strain BrY and onto cell wall and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of S. alga. We first performed acid and base titrations and used the mathematical model FITEQL with constant-capacitance surface-complexation to determine the concentrations and deprotonation constants of specific surface functional groups. Deprotonation constants most likely corresponded to a carboxyl site associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 2.4), a carboxyl group not associated with amino acids (pK{sub a} {approx} 5), a phosphoryl site (pK{sub a} {approx} 7.2), and an amine site (pK{sub a} > 10). We then carried out batch sorption experiments with Np(V) and each of the S. alga components at different pHs. Results show that solution pH influenced the speciation of Np(V) and each of the surface functional groups. We used the speciation sub-model of the biogeochemical model CCBATCH to compute the stability constants for Np(V) complexation to each surface functional group. The stability constants were similar for each functional group on S. alga bacterial whole cells, cell walls, and EPS, and they explain the complicated sorption patterns when they are combined with the aqueous-phase speciation of Np(V). For pH < 8, NpO{sub 2}{sup +} was the dominant form of Np(V), and its log K values for the low-pK{sub a} carboxyl, other carboxyl, and phosphoryl groups were 1.75, 1.75, and 2.5 to 3.1, respectively. For pH greater than 8, the key surface ligand was amine >XNH3+, which complexed with NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-}. The log K for NpO{sub 2}(CO{sub 3}){sub 3}{sup 5-} complexed onto the amine groups was 3.1 to 3.6. All of the log K values are similar to those of Np(V) complexes with aqueous carboxyl and N-containing carboxyl ligands. These results point towards the important role of surface complexation in defining key actinide-microbiological interactions in the subsurface.

  3. Characterization and application of monoclonal antibodies against Shewanella marisflavi, a novel pathogen of Apostichopus japonicus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qiang; JING Hongli; LI Hua; WANG Yinan; XU Dehai

    2011-01-01

    Shewanella marisflavi strain AP629 was certified as a novel pathogen of the sea cucumber Apostichopusjaponicus.In this study,four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) (3C1,3D9,2F2,2A8) against strain AP629 were developed by immunizing Balb/C mice.3C1 and 3D9 recognized S.marisflavi only,showing no cross reactivity to other gram-negative bacteria.However,2F2 and 2A8 showed cross reactivity to all tested bacteria.Indirect immunofluorescence,and immunogold electron microscopy,showed the binding antigens of 3C1 and 3D9 were located at the secretion on the surface of strain AP629.The binding antigens of 2F2 and 2A8 were noted on the membrane of the cells.MAbs 3C1 and 3D9 recognized the lipopolysaccharide fraction of strain AP629,and 2F2 and 2A8 recognized in western-blotting protein antigens with molecular weights of 113 and 128 kDa respectively.MAbs 3Ci and 3D9 have the potential for use in pathogen diagnosis,epidemiology and studies on the mechanism of how S.marisflavi infects A.japonicus.Immunohistochemistry with 3C1 or 3D9 identified strain AP629 in the body wall of infected A.japonicus.In the adult sea cucumbers that were infected via body wall injection,positive signals were observed at the site of skin ulceration,and at the connective tissue of the non-ulcerated body wall.In addition,some large blue-stained cells aggregated at the connective tissue colonized by large numbers of bacteria.In juveniles infected via immersion infection,positive signals were observed at the cuticle of the body wall only.Our results suggest that 3C1 and 3D9 could be used in various immunological assays to study the invasion mechanism of strain AP629 in A.japonicus,the law of bacterial colonization,proliferation in different tissues ofA.japonicus,and correlation between secretion on the surface of strain AP629 and its pathogenesis to A.japonicus.

  4. Transcriptome and Proteome Dynamics of the Cellular Response of Shewanella oneidensis to Chromium Stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, D.K.

    2005-04-18

    The overall goal of this DOE NABIR project is to characterize the molecular basis and regulation of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] stress response and reduction by Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Temporal genomic profiling and mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis were employed to characterize the dynamic molecular response of S. oneidensis MR-1 to both acute and chronic Cr(VI) exposure. The acute stress response of aerobic, mid-exponential phase cells shocked to a final concentration of 1 mM potassium chromate (K2CrO4) was examined at post-exposure time intervals of 5, 30, 60, and 90 min relative to untreated cells. The transcriptome of mid-exponential cultures was also analyzed 30 min after shock doses of 0.3, 0.5, or 1 mM K{sub 2}CrO{sub 4}. The tonB1-exbB1-exbD1 genes comprising the TonB1 iron transport system were some of the most highly induced coding sequences (CDSs) after 90 min (up to {approx}240 fold), followed by other genes involved in heme transport, sulfate transport, and sulfur assimilation pathways. In addition, transcript levels for CDSs with annotated functions in DNA repair (dinP, recX, recA, recN) and detoxification processes (so3585, so3586) were substantially increased in Cr(VI)-exposed cells compared to untreated cells. By contrast, genes predicted to encode hydrogenases (HydA, HydB), oxidoreductases (SO0902-03-04, SO1911), iron-sulfur cluster binding proteins (SO4404), decaheme cytochrome c proteins (MtrA, OmcA, OmcB), and a number of LysR or TetR family transcriptional regulators were some of the most highly repressed CDSs following the 90-min shock period. Transcriptome profiles generated from MR-1 cells adapted to 0.3 mM Cr(VI) differed significantly from those characterizing cells exposed to acute Cr(VI) stress without adaptation. Parallel proteomic characterization of soluble protein and membrane protein fractions extracted from Cr(VI)-shocked and Cr(VI)-adapted MR-1 cells was performed using multidimensional HPLC-ESI-MS/MS (both

  5. Purification and Characterization of [NiFe]-Hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Heald, Steve M.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Herve; Squier, Thomas C.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2011-08-02

    The γ-proteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase) that was implicated in both H2 production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase were cloned into a protein expression vector. The resulting plasmid was transformed into a MR-1 mutant deficient in H2 formation. Expression of MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase in trans restored the mutant’s ability to produce H2 at 37% of that for wild type. Following expression, MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase was purified to near homogeneity. The purified MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase could couple H2 oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII) and methyl viologen directly. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase-mediated Tc(VII) but not methyl viologen reductions. Under the conditions tested, Tc(VII) reduction was complete in Tris buffer but not in HEPES buffer. The reduced Tc(IV) was soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc(IV) precipitates formed in HEPES buffer were packed with crystallites. Although X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy measurements confirmed that the reduction products found in both buffers were Tc(IV), extended X-ray adsorption fine-structure measurements revealed that these products were very different. While the product in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O2•nH2O. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H2ase is a bidirectional enzyme that catalyzes both H2 formation and oxidation as well as Tc(VII) reduction directly by coupling H2 oxidation.

  6. Purification and characterization of the [NiFe]-hydrogenase of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Belchik, Sara M; Plymale, Andrew E; Heald, Steve; Dohnalkova, Alice C; Sybirna, Kateryna; Bottin, Hervé; Squier, Thomas C; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K

    2011-08-15

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 possesses a periplasmic [NiFe]-hydrogenase (MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase) that has been implicated in H(2) production and oxidation as well as technetium [Tc(VII)] reduction. To characterize the roles of MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase in these proposed reactions, the genes encoding both subunits of MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase were cloned and then expressed in an MR-1 mutant without hyaB and hydA genes. Expression of recombinant MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase in trans restored the mutant's ability to produce H(2) at 37% of that for the wild type. Following purification, MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase coupled H(2) oxidation to reduction of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) and methyl viologen. Change of the buffers used affected MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase-mediated reduction of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) but not methyl viologen. Under the conditions tested, all Tc(VII)O(4)(-) used was reduced in Tris buffer, while in HEPES buffer, only 20% of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) was reduced. The reduced products were soluble in Tris buffer but insoluble in HEPES buffer. Transmission electron microscopy analysis revealed that Tc precipitates reduced in HEPES buffer were aggregates of crystallites with diameters of ∼5 nm. Measurements with X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy revealed that the reduction products were a mixture of Tc(IV) and Tc(V) in Tris buffer but only Tc(IV) in HEPES buffer. Measurements with extended X-ray adsorption fine structure showed that while the Tc bonding environment in Tris buffer could not be determined, the Tc(IV) product in HEPES buffer was very similar to Tc(IV)O(2)·nH(2)O, which was also the product of Tc(VII)O(4)(-) reduction by MR-1 cells. These results shows for the first time that MR-1 [NiFe]-H(2)ase catalyzes Tc(VII)O(4)(-) reduction directly by coupling to H(2) oxidation.

  7. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  8. The role of multihaem cytochromes in the respiration of nitrite in Escherichia coli and Fe(III) in Shewanella oneidensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Thomas A; Holley, Tracey; Hartshorne, Robert S; Fredrickson, Jim K; Zachara, John M; Shi, Liang; Richardson, David J

    2008-10-01

    The periplasmic nitrite reductase system from Escherichia coli and the extracellular Fe(III) reductase system from Shewanella oneidensis contain multihaem c-type cytochromes as electron carriers and terminal reductases. The position and orientation of the haem cofactors in multihaem cytochromes from different bacteria often show significant conservation despite different arrangements of the polypeptide chain. We propose that the decahaem cytochromes of the iron reductase system MtrA, MtrC and OmcA comprise pentahaem 'modules' similar to the electron donor protein, NrfB, from E. coli. To demonstrate this, we have isolated and characterized the N-terminal pentahaem module of MtrA by preparing a truncated form containing five covalently attached haems. UV-visible spectroscopy indicated that all five haems were low-spin, consistent with the presence of bis-His ligand co-ordination as found in full-length MtrA.

  9. Isolation and Characterization of a Shewanella Phage–Host System from the Gut of the Tunicate, Ciona intestinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany Leigh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Outnumbering all other biological entities on earth, bacteriophages (phages play critical roles in structuring microbial communities through bacterial infection and subsequent lysis, as well as through horizontal gene transfer. While numerous studies have examined the effects of phages on free-living bacterial cells, much less is known regarding the role of phage infection in host-associated biofilms, which help to stabilize adherent microbial communities. Here we report the cultivation and characterization of a novel strain of Shewanella fidelis from the gut of the marine tunicate Ciona intestinalis, inducible prophages from the S. fidelis genome, and a strain-specific lytic phage recovered from surrounding seawater. In vitro biofilm assays demonstrated that lytic phage infection affects biofilm formation in a process likely influenced by the accumulation and integration of the extracellular DNA released during cell lysis, similar to the mechanism that has been previously shown for prophage induction.

  10. Interaction between fish spoilage bacteria Pseudomonas sp and Shewanella putrefaciens in fish extracts and on fish tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1996-01-01

    The interaction between fish spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas sp. and Shewanella putrefaciens, was investigated using fish extract and fish tissue as model systems. Isolates of Pseudomonas that produced iron chelators, siderophores, inhibited growth of S. putrefaciens in a fish-extract-agar diffusion...... assay but no, or only weak, antagonistic activity was seen when the medium was supplemented with iran. Sterile- filtered supernatant fluid from a siderophore-producing Pseudomonas grown in fish extract was inhibitory to S. putrefaciens if the number of Pseudomonas was above 10(8) cfu ml(-1). In contrast......, supernatant fluids from siderophore- negative Pseudomonas isolates did not inhibit growth of S. putrefaciens. The inhibitory effect was, except for one strain of Pseudomonas, not seen in supernatant fluids from iron- enriched cultures of Pseudomonas sp. Finally, siderophore- producing Pseudomonas sp. lowered...

  11. Antibiotic and heavy metal resistance in Shewanella putrefaciens strains isolated from shellfishes collected from West Sea, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Chang-Ho; So, Jae-Seong

    2016-11-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic resistance patterns and distribution of heavy-metal resistance in Shewanella putrefaciens strains isolated from shellfishes collected from West Sea; and to determine the relationship, if any, between antibiotic and heavy-metal resistance in these strains. Among the 15 strains isolated, two strains, SY1 and SY2, showed heavy-metal resistance in addition to high resistance to seven antibiotics: cephalothin, gentamicin, erythromycin, vancomycin, ampicillin, rifampicin, and streptomycin. We conclude that heavy-metal contamination imposes long-term, widespread, and recalcitrant selection pressure, which potentially contributes to the maintenance and spread of antibiotic resistance factors in bacteria. Moreover, this fact holds both environmental and clinical importance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Constraint-based model of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 metabolism: a tool for data analysis and hypothesis generation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy E Pinchuk

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanellae are gram-negative facultatively anaerobic metal-reducing bacteria commonly found in chemically (i.e., redox stratified environments. Occupying such niches requires the ability to rapidly acclimate to changes in electron donor/acceptor type and availability; hence, the ability to compete and thrive in such environments must ultimately be reflected in the organization and utilization of electron transfer networks, as well as central and peripheral carbon metabolism. To understand how Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 utilizes its resources, the metabolic network was reconstructed. The resulting network consists of 774 reactions, 783 genes, and 634 unique metabolites and contains biosynthesis pathways for all cell constituents. Using constraint-based modeling, we investigated aerobic growth of S. oneidensis MR-1 on numerous carbon sources. To achieve this, we (i used experimental data to formulate a biomass equation and estimate cellular ATP requirements, (ii developed an approach to identify cycles (such as futile cycles and circulations, (iii classified how reaction usage affects cellular growth, (iv predicted cellular biomass yields on different carbon sources and compared model predictions to experimental measurements, and (v used experimental results to refine metabolic fluxes for growth on lactate. The results revealed that aerobic lactate-grown cells of S. oneidensis MR-1 used less efficient enzymes to couple electron transport to proton motive force generation, and possibly operated at least one futile cycle involving malic enzymes. Several examples are provided whereby model predictions were validated by experimental data, in particular the role of serine hydroxymethyltransferase and glycine cleavage system in the metabolism of one-carbon units, and growth on different sources of carbon and energy. This work illustrates how integration of computational and experimental efforts facilitates the understanding of microbial metabolism at a

  13. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in esterified form) as carbon

  14. Genome of a mosquito-killing bacterium decoded

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Researchers with the CAS Wuhan Institute of Virology (WHIOV) recently completed the genome sequencing of a mosquitocidal bacterium Bacillus shaericus C3-41. The feat, first of its kind in China, is expected to further promote the bio-control studies of mosquitoes.

  15. Antagonistic bioactivity of an endophytic bacterium H-6

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2010-09-13

    Sep 13, 2010 ... 2Yichun University, Yichun, Jiangxi 336000, People's Republic of China. Accepted 5 ... Mountain, China. ... endophytic bacteria is a way of controlling plant diseases ... the endophytic bacterium strain H-6 was identified through ... liquid medium at 28°C for 3 - 5 days with constant shaking. ..... interactions.

  16. The physiology of the filamentous bacterium Microthrix parvicella

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slijkhuis, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the physiology of Microthrix parvicella. This filamentous bacterium often causes poor settleability of activated sludge in oxidation ditches supplied with domestic sewage. The organism was found to utilize only long chain fatty acids (preferably in

  17. Antibody recognition force microscopy shows that outer membrane cytochromes OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lower, Brian H; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Shi, Liang; Wildling, Linda; Gruber, Hermann J; Wigginton, Nicholas S; Reardon, Catherine L; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E; Droubay, Timothy C; Boily, Jean-François; Lower, Steven K

    2009-05-01

    Antibody recognition force microscopy showed that OmcA and MtrC are expressed on the exterior surface of living Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cells when Fe(III), including solid-phase hematite (Fe(2)O(3)), was the terminal electron acceptor. OmcA was localized to the interface between the cell and mineral. MtrC displayed a more uniform distribution across the cell surface. Both cytochromes were associated with an extracellular polymeric substance.

  18. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Philippa J.L. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKinzie, Audra A. [School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Codd, Rachel, E-mail: rachel.codd@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. {yields} Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. {yields} Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  19. The surface properties of Shewanella putrefaciens 200 and S. oneidensis MR-1: the effect of pH and terminal electron acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yoko; Dale, Jason R

    2013-04-08

    We investigated the surface characteristics of two strains of Shewanella sp., S. oneidensis MR-1 and S. putrefaciens 200, that were grown under aerobic conditions as well as under anaerobic conditions with trimethylamine oxide (TMAO) as the electron acceptor. The investigation focused on the experimental determination of electrophoretic mobility (EPM) under a range of pH and ionic strength, as well as by subsequent modeling in which Shewanella cells were considered to be soft particles with water- and ion-permeable outermost layers. The soft layer of p200 is significantly more highly charged (i.e., more negative) than that of MR-1. The effect of electron acceptor on the soft particle characteristics of Shewanella sp. is complex. The fixed charge density, which is a measure of the deionized and deprotonated functional groups in the soft layer polymers, is slightly greater (i.e., more negative) for aerobically grown p200 than for p200 grown with TMAO. On the other hand, the fixed charge density of aerobically grown MR1 is slightly less than that of p200 grown with TMAO. The effect of pH on the soft particle characteristics is also complex, and does not exhibit a clear pH-dependent trend. The Shewanella surface characteristics were attributed to the nature of the outermost soft layer, the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) in case of p200 and lypopolysaccharides (LPS) in case of MR1 which generally lacks EPS. The growth conditions (i.e., aerobic vs. anaerobic TMAO) have an influence on the soft layer characteristics of Shewanella sp. cells. Meanwhile, the clear pH dependency of the mechanical and morphological characteristics of EPS and LPS layers, observed in previous studies through atomic force microscopy, adhesion tests and spectroscopies, cannot be corroborated by the electrohydrodynamics-based soft particle characteristics which does not exhibited a clear pH dependency in this study. While the electrohydrodynamics-based soft-particle model is a useful tool

  20. Discovery of bla(OXA-199, a chromosome-based bla(OXA-48-like variant, in Shewanella xiamenensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Zong

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: bla(OXA-48 is a globally emerging carbapenemase-encoding gene. The progenitor of bla(OXA-48 appears to be a Shewanella species. The presence of the bla(OXA-48-like gene was investigated for two Shewanella xiamenensis strains. METHODS: Strain WCJ25 was recovered from post-surgical abdominal drainages, while S4 was the type strain of S. xiamenensis. Species identification for WCJ25 was established by sequencing the 16S rDNA and gyrB genes. PCR was used to screen the bla(OXA-48-like genes and to obtain their complete sequences. A phylogenetic tree of the bla(OXA-48-like genes was constructed. The genetic context of the bla(OXA-48-like gene in strain WCJ25 was investigated by inverse PCR using self-ligated AseI- or RsaI-restricted WCJ25 DNA fragments as template, while that in strain S4 was determined by PCR mapping using that in WCJ25 as template. RESULTS: A new bla(OXA-48 variant, designated bla(OXA-48b, with four silent nucleotide differences from the bla(OXA-48 (designated bla(OXA-48a found in the Enterobacteriaceae was identified in strain S4. Strain WCJ25 had a new bla(OXA-48-like variant, bla(OXA-199, with five nucleotide differences from bla(OXA-48a and bla(OXA-48b. The OXA-199 protein has three amino acid substitutions (H37Y, V44A and D153G compared with OXA-48. Both bla(OXA-48b and bla(OXA-199 were found adjacent to genes encoding a peptidase (indicated as orf, a protein of unknown function (sprT, an endonuclease I (endA, and a ribosomal RNA methyl transferase (rsmE upstream and to transcriptional regulator gene lysR and an acetyl-CoA carboxylase-encoding gene downstream. In addition, the insertion sequence ISShes2 was found inserted downstream of bla(OXA-199 but not of bla(OXA-48b. The 26 bp sequences upstream and 63 bp downstream of bla(OXA-48a, bla(OXA-48b and bla(OXA-199 were identical. CONCLUSIONS: bla(OXA-48a, bla(OXA-48b and bla(OXA-199 might have a common origin, suggesting that the bla(OXA-48a gene found in the

  1. Rock Phosphate Solubilization Mechanisms of One Fungus and One Bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Qi-mei; ZHAO Xiao-rong; ZHAO Zi-juan; LI Bao-guo

    2002-01-01

    Many microorganisms can dissolve the insoluble phosphates like apatite. However, the mechanisms are still not clear. This study was an attempt to investigate the mechanisms of rock phosphate solubilization by an Aspergillus 2TCiF2 and an Arthrobacter1TCRi7. The results indicated that the fungus produced a large amount of organic acids, mainly oxalic acid. The total quantity of the organic acids produced by the fungus was 550 times higher than that by the bacterium. Different organic acids had completely different capacities to solubilize the rock. Oxalic acid and citric acid had stronger capacity to dissolve the rock than malic acid, tartaric acid, lactic acid, acetic acid, malonic acid and succinic acid. The fungus solubilized the rock through excreting both proton and organic acids. The rock solubilization of the bacterium depended on only proton.

  2. A Streamlined Strategy for Biohydrogen Production with an Alkaliphilic Bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elias, Dwayne A [ORNL; Wall, Judy D. [University of Missouri; Mormile, Dr. Melanie R. [Missouri University of Science and Technology; Begemann, Matthew B [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Biofuels are anticipated to enable a shift from fossil fuels for renewable transportation and manufacturing fuels, with biohydrogen considered attractive since it could offer the largest reduction of global carbon budgets. Currently, biohydrogen production remains inefficient and heavily fossil fuel-dependent. However, bacteria using alkali-treated biomass could streamline biofuel production while reducing costs and fossil fuel needs. An alkaliphilic bacterium, Halanaerobium strain sapolanicus, is described that is capable of biohydrogen production at levels rivaling neutrophilic strains, but at pH 11 and hypersaline conditions. H. sapolanicus ferments a variety of 5- and 6- carbon sugars derived from hemicellulose and cellulose including cellobiose, and forms the end products hydrogen and acetate. Further, it can also produce biohydrogen from switchgrass and straw pretreated at temperatures far lower than any previously reported and in solutions compatible with growth. Hence, this bacterium can potentially increase the efficiency and efficacy of biohydrogen production from renewable biomass resources.

  3. Adhesion and Survival Tools of the Bacterium Deinococcus geothermalis

    OpenAIRE

    Liedert, Christina

    2014-01-01

    The known natural habitats of Deinococcus geothermalis are geothermal springs and deep ocean subsurfaces. The bacterium has also found its way to manmade environments, including paper machines and drinking water distribution systems, from which it is very difficult to remove due to its resistance towards industrial washing procedures, dehydration and even high doses of ionizing radiation. D. geothermalis attaches tightly on industrial, even microbially repellent, surfaces initiating slim...

  4. Biosorption of heavy metals by a marine bacterium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyer, Anita [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India); Mody, Kalpana [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India)]. E-mail: khmody@csmcri.org; Jha, Bhavanath [Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute, Bhavnagar 364002, Gujarat (India)

    2005-03-01

    Heavy metal chelation property of exopolysaccharide produced by Enterobacter cloaceae, a marine bacterium, isolated from the West Coast of India, is reported in this paper. The exopolysaccharide demonstrated excellent chelating properties with respect to cadmium (65%) followed by copper (20%) and cobalt (8%) at 100 mg/l heavy metal concentration. However, it could not chelate mercury. A comparative study of the percentage biosorption of the above mentioned metals is presented here.

  5. The Photosynthetic Reaction Center from the Purple Bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deisenhofer, Johann; Michel, Hartmut

    1989-09-01

    The history and methods of membrane protein crystallization are described. The solution of the structure of the photosynthetic reaction center from the bacterium Rhodopseudomonas viridis is described, and the structure of this membrane protein complex is correlated with its function as a light-driven electron pump across the photosynthetic membrane. Conclusions about the structure of the photosystem II reaction center from plants are drawn, and aspects of membrane protein structure are discussed.

  6. Initiation of chromosomal replication in predatory bacterium Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukasz Makowski

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus is a small Gram-negative predatory bacterium that attacks other Gram-negative bacteria, including many animal, human, and plant pathogens. This bacterium exhibits a peculiar biphasic life cycle during which two different types of cells are produced: non-replicating highly motile cells (the free-living phase and replicating cells (the intracellular-growth phase. The process of chromosomal replication in B. bacteriovorus must therefore be temporally and spatially regulated to ensure that it is coordinated with cell differentiation and cell cycle progression. Recently, B. bacteriovorus has received considerable research interest due to its intriguing life cycle and great potential as a prospective antimicrobial agent. Although we know that chromosomal replication in bacteria is mainly regulated at the initiation step, no data exists about this process in B. bacteriovorus. We report the first characterization of key elements of initiation of chromosomal replication – DnaA protein and oriC region from the predatory bacterium, B. bacteriovorus. In vitro studies using different approaches demonstrate that the B. bacteriovorus oriC (BdoriC is specifically bound and unwound by the DnaA protein. Sequence comparison of the DnaA-binding sites enabled us to propose a consensus sequence for the B. bacteriovorus DnaA box (5’-NN(A/TTCCACA-3’. Surprisingly, in vitro analysis revealed that BdoriC is also bound and unwound by the host DnaA proteins (relatively distantly related from B. bacteriovorus. We compared the architecture of the DnaA–oriC complexes (orisomes in homologous (oriC and DnaA from B. bacteriovorus and heterologous (BdoriC and DnaA from prey, E. coli or P. aeruginosa systems. This work provides important new entry points toward improving our understanding of the initiation of chromosomal replication in this predatory bacterium.

  7. Growth of a Strictly Anaerobic Bacterium on Furfural (2-Furaldehyde)

    OpenAIRE

    Brune, Gerhard; Schoberth, Siegfried M.; Sahm, Hermann

    1983-01-01

    A strictly anaerobic bacterium was isolated from a continuous fermentor culture which converted the organic constituents of sulfite evaporator condensate to methane and carbon dioxide. Furfural is one of the major components of this condensate. This furfural isolate could degrade furfural as the sole source of carbon and energy in a defined mineral-vitamin-sulfate medium. Acetic acid was the major fermentation product. This organism could also use ethanol, lactate, pyruvate, or fumarate and c...

  8. Milk contamination in different points of the dairy process. ii mesophilic, psychrotrophic and proteolytic microorganisms/ Contaminação do leite em diferentes pontos da produção leiteira: ii microrganismos mesófilos, psicrotróficos e proteolíticos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Vieira Gusmão

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Psychrotrophics microorganisms are able to multiply under refrigeration temperatures. They can produce heat-resistant extracellular enzymes that cause organoleptic and structural changes in milk and dairy products. With the objective of determining the frequency of microorganisms in the dairy process, four farms were evaluated in Londrina city – Brazil and different points were assessed. Mesophilic (48hs at 35oC, psychrotrophic (25hs at 21oC and proteolytic (72hs at 22oC microorganisms were researched, and the proteolytic predominant microflora were determined by using the Gram stain technique. The main psychrotrophic contamination points were the residual water on milk cans, on bulk tank and bad cleaned teats, and milk cans and teats were the most important sources of proteolytics. Gram negative bacilli represented 69% of the microorganisms in the refrigerated milk that means 45% of the total proteolytics microorganisms in the dairy process. Gram negative bacilli is most frequent on bad cleaned teats, teatcups, residual water in milk cans and bulk tank. The psychrotroph count in the refrigerated milk was more than the mesophilic count, showing that that psychrotrophics are the best indicatator for refrigerated milk contamination. The psycrotrophics count at all points assessed were greater than the ideal limit (10% of the mesophilic count. Thus as refrigeration at 4oC is not sufficient to control the multiplication of the psycrotrophics group, good practices should be associated to avoid or control milk contamination by psycrotrophics.Os psicrotróficos são microrganismos que têm capacidade de multiplicação em temperaturas de refrigeração. Produzem enzimas termorresistentes como proteases e lipases que promovem alterações organolépticas no leite e comprometem a produção de derivados. Com o objetivo de determinar a freqüência desses microrganismos a produção do leite, foram estudadas 04 propriedades da região de Londrina, PR

  9. Photoreduction of Shewanella oneidensis Extracellular Cytochromes by Organic Chromophores and Dye-Sensitized TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Emma V; Lockwood, Colin W J; White, Gaye F; Hwang, Ee Taek; Sakai, Tsubasa; Gross, Manuela A; Richardson, David J; Clarke, Thomas A; Jeuken, Lars J C; Reisner, Erwin; Butt, Julea N

    2016-12-14

    The transfer of photoenergized electrons from extracellular photosensitizers across a bacterial cell envelope to drive intracellular chemical transformations represents an attractive way to harness nature's catalytic machinery for solar-assisted chemical synthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1), trans-outer-membrane electron transfer is performed by the extracellular cytochromes MtrC and OmcA acting together with the outer-membrane-spanning porin⋅cytochrome complex (MtrAB). Here we demonstrate photoreduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and the MtrCAB complex by soluble photosensitizers: namely, eosin Y, fluorescein, proflavine, flavin, and adenine dinucleotide, as well as by riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide, two compounds secreted by MR-1. We show photoreduction of MtrC and OmcA adsorbed on Ru(II) -dye-sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles and that these protein-coated particles perform photocatalytic reduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and MtrCAB. These findings provide a framework for informed development of strategies for using the outer-membrane-associated cytochromes of MR-1 for solar-driven microbial synthesis in natural and engineered bacteria. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  10. Analysis of the BarA/UvrY two-component system in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

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    Lucas Binnenkade

    Full Text Available The BarA/UvrY two-component system is well conserved in species of the γ-proteobacteria and regulates numerous processes predominantly by controlling the expression of a subset of noncoding small RNAs. In this study, we identified and characterized the BarA/UvrY two-component system in the gammaproteobacterium Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. Functional interaction of sensor kinase BarA and the cognate response regulator UvrY was indicated by in vitro phosphotransfer studies. The expression of two predicted small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs, CsrB1 and CsrB2, was dependent on UvrY. Transcriptomic analysis by microarrays revealed that UvrY is a global regulator and directly or indirectly affects transcript levels of more than 200 genes in S. oneidensis. Among these are genes encoding key enzymes of central carbon metabolism such as ackA, aceAB, and pflAB. As predicted of a signal transduction pathway that controls aspects of central metabolism, mutants lacking UvrY reach a significantly higher OD than the wild type during aerobic growth on N-acetylglucosamine (NAG while under anaerobic conditions the mutant grew more slowly. A shorter lag phase occurred with lactate as carbon source. In contrast, significant growth phenotypes were absent in complex medium. Based on these studies we hypothesize that, in S. oneidensis MR-1, the global BarA/UvrY/Csr regulatory pathway is involved in central carbon metabolism processes.

  11. Fate of Fe and Cd upon microbial reduction of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenchen; Yi, Xiaoyun; Dang, Zhi; Yu, Hui; Zeng, Tao; Wei, Chaohai; Feng, Chunhua

    2016-02-01

    Polyferric sulphate has been widely used for emergent control on incidental release of heavy metals such as Cd to surface water, causing precipitation of Cd-loaded polyferric flocs to the sediment. To date, little is known about whether the dissolution of the flocs in the presence of dissimilatory iron reducing bacteria (DIRB) can occur and how the dissolution influences the fate of Fe and Cd in the sediment. Here, we demonstrated that Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, as representative DIRB, has the ability to reduce the flocs, resulting in the release of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+) to the solution. Batch experiment results showed that the concentrations of Fe(2+) and Cd(2+)reached the maximum values at 48 h and then decreased over the remaining incubation time. The characterizations on the solid phase by the scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technologies revealed the formation of iron minerals such as goethite and magnetite as a consequence of microbial Fe(III) reduction. The newly formed iron minerals played a significant role in re-immobilizing Cd by sorption. These results imply that microbial reduction of polyferric flocs is an important contributor to the transport and transformation of metals in the sediment-water interface.

  12. The Role of 4-Hydroxyphenylpyruvate Dioxygenase in Enhancement of Solid-Phase Electron Transfer by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turick, Charles E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Beliaev, Alex S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zakrajsek, Brian A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Reardon, Catherine L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lowy, Daniel A. [Nova Research Inc., Alexandria, VA (United States); Poppy, Tara E. [Univ. of South Carolina, Aiken, SC (United States); Maloney, Andrea [Winthrop Univ., Rock Hill, SC (United States); Ekechukwu, Amy A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2009-05-01

    ABSTRACT - While mechanistic details of dissimilatory metal reduction are far from being understood, it is postulated that the electron transfer to solid metal oxides is mediated by outer membrane associated c-type cytochromes and electron shuttling compounds. This study focuses on the production of homogensitate in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an intermediate of the tyrosine degradation pathway, which is a precursor of a redox cycling metabolite, pyomelanin. We determined that two enzymes involved in this pathway, 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxygenase (4HPPD) and homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase are responsible for homogentisate production and oxidation, respectively. Inhibition of 4-HPPD activity with the specific inhibitor sulcotrione ([2-(2- chloro- 4- methane sulfonylbenzoyl)-1,3-cyclohexanedione), and deletion of melA, a gene encoding 4-HPPD, resulted in no pyomelanin production by S. oneidensis MR-1. Conversely, deletion of hmgA, which encodes the putative homogentisate 1,2-dioxygenase, resulted in pyomelanin overproduction. The efficiency and rates at which MR-1 reduces hydrous ferric oxide were directly linked to the ability of mutant strains to produce pyomelanin. Electrochemical studies with whole cells demonstrated that pyomelanin substantially increases the formal potential (E°') of S. oneidensis MR-1. Based on our findings, environmental production of pyomelanin likely contributes to an increased solid-phase metal reduction capacity in S. oneidensis MR-1.

  13. The Shewanella algae strain YM8 produces volatiles with strong inhibition activity against Aspergillus pathogens and aflatoxins

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    Andong eGong

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aflatoxigenic Aspergillus fungi and associated aflatoxins are ubiquitous in the production and storage of food/feed commodities. Controlling these pests is a challenge. In this study, the Shewanella algae strain YM8 was found to produce volatiles that have strong antifungal activity against Aspergillus pathogens. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry profiling revealed 15 volatile organic compounds (VOCs emitted from YM8, of which dimethyl trisulfide was the most abundant. We obtained authentic reference standards for six of the VOCs; these all significantly reduced mycelial growth and conidial germination in Aspergillus; dimethyl trisulfide and 2,4-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl-phenol showed the strongest inhibitory activity. YM8 completely inhibited Aspergillus growth and aflatoxin biosynthesis in maize and peanut samples stored at different water activity levels, and scanning electron microscopy revealed severely damaged conidia and a complete lack of mycelium development and conidiogenesis. YM8 also completely inhibited the growth of eight other agronomically important species of phytopathogenic fungi: A. parasiticus, A. niger, Alternaria alternate, Botrytis cinerea, Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum, Monilinia fructicola, and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This study demonstrates the susceptibility of Aspergillus and other fungi to VOCs from marine bacteria and indicates a new strategy for effectively controlling these pathogens and the associated mycotoxin production in the field and during storage.

  14. The role of FlhF and HubP as polar landmark proteins in Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossmann, Florian; Brenzinger, Susanne; Knauer, Carina; Dörrich, Anja K; Bubendorfer, Sebastian; Ruppert, Ulrike; Bange, Gert; Thormann, Kai M

    2015-11-01

    Spatiotemporal regulation of cell polarity plays a role in many fundamental processes in bacteria and often relies on 'landmark' proteins which recruit the corresponding clients to their designated position. Here, we explored the localization of two multi-protein complexes, the polar flagellar motor and the chemotaxis array, in Shewanella putrefaciens CN-32. We demonstrate that polar positioning of the flagellar system, but not of the chemotaxis system, depends on the GTPase FlhF. In contrast, the chemotaxis array is recruited by a transmembrane protein which we identified as the functional ortholog of Vibrio cholerae HubP. Mediated by its periplasmic N-terminal LysM domain, SpHubP exhibits an FlhF-independent localization pattern during cell cycle similar to its Vibrio counterpart and also has a role in proper chromosome segregation. In addition, while not affecting flagellar positioning, SpHubP is crucial for normal flagellar function and is involved in type IV pili-mediated twitching motility. We hypothesize that a group of HubP/FimV homologs, characterized by a rather conserved N-terminal periplasmic section required for polar targeting and a highly variable acidic cytoplasmic part, primarily mediating recruitment of client proteins, serves as polar markers in various bacterial species with respect to different cellular functions. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Simultaneous release of Fe and As during the reductive dissolution of Pb-As jarosite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeaton, Christina M; Walshe, Gillian E; Smith, Adrian M L; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A; Dubbin, William E; Wright, Kate; Beale, Andrew M; Fryer, Brian J; Weisener, Christopher G

    2012-12-04

    Jarosites are produced during metallurgical processing, on oxidized sulfide deposits, and in acid mine drainage environments. Despite the environmental relevance of jarosites, few studies have examined their biogeochemical stability. This study demonstrates the simultaneous reduction of structural Fe(III) and aqueous As(V) during the dissolution of synthetic Pb-As jarosite (PbFe(3)(SO(4),AsO(4))(2)(OH)(6)) by Shewanella putrefaciens using batch experiments under anaerobic circumneutral conditions. Fe(III) reduction occurred immediately in inoculated samples while As(V) reduction was observed after 72 h. XANES spectra showed As(III) (14.7%) in the solid phase at 168 h coincident with decreased aqueous As(V). At 336 h, XANES spectra and aqueous speciation analysis demonstrated 20.2% and 3.0% of total As was present as As(III) in the solid and aqueous phase, respectively. In contrast, 12.4% of total Fe was present as aqueous Fe(II) and was below the detection limits of XANES in the solid phase. TEM-EDS analysis at 336 h showed secondary precipitates enriched in Fe and O with minor amounts of As and Pb. Based on experimental data and thermodynamic modeling, we suggest that structural Fe(III) reduction was thermodynamically driven while aqueous As(V) reduction was triggered by detoxification induced to offset the high As(V) (328 μM) concentrations released during dissolution.

  16. Dietary probiotic supplementation (Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11) modulates gut microbiota and promotes growth and condition in Senegalese sole larviculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Carmen; Moreno-Ventas, Xabier; Tapia-Paniagua, Silvana; Rodríguez, Covadonga; Moriñigo, Miguel A; de La Banda, Inés García

    2014-02-01

    Probiotic supplementation in fish aquaculture has significantly increased in the last decade due to its beneficial effect on fish performance. Probiotic use at early stages of fish development may contribute to better face metamorphosis and weaning stress. In the present work, we studied the influence of Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 supplementation on growth, body composition and gut microbiota in Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis) during larval and weaning development. S. putrefaciens Pdp11 was incorporated using Artemia as live vector (2.5 × 10⁷ cfu mL⁻¹) and supplied to sole specimens in a co-feeding regime (10-86 DAH) by triplicate. Probiotic addition promoted early metamorphosis and a significantly higher growth in length at 24 DAH larvae. S. putrefaciens Pdp11 also modulated gut microbiota and significantly increased protein content and DHA/EPA ratios in sole fry (90 DAH). This nutritional enhancement is considered especially important after weaning, where significantly higher growth in length and weight was observed in probiotic fish. Moreover, a less heterogeneous fish size in length was detected since metamorphosis till the end of weaning, being of interest for sole aquaculture production. After weaning, fish showed significantly higher growth (length and weight) and less variable lengths in fish when supplemented with probiotics. Both the enhancement of nutritional condition and the decrease in size variability associated with probiotic addition are highly interesting for sole aquaculture production.

  17. Multiscale dynamics of the cell envelope of Shewanella putrefaciens as a response to pH change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboriaud, Fabien; Dague, Etienne; Bailet, Sidney; Jorand, Frédéric; Duval, Jérôme; Thomas, Fabien

    2006-10-01

    The bacterial surface properties of gram-negative Shewanella putrefaciens were characterized by microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH), adhesion to polystyrene dishes, and electrophoresis at different values of pH and ionic strength. The bacterial adhesion to these two apolar substrates shows significant variations according to pH and ionic strength. Such behavior could be partly explained by electrostatic repulsions between bacteria and the solid or liquid interface. However, a similar trend was also observed at rather high ionic strength where electrostatic interactions are supposed to be screened. The nanomechanical properties at pH 4 and 10 and at high ionic strength were investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The indentation curves revealed the presence of a polymeric external layer that swells and softens up with increasing pH. This suggests a concomitant increase of the water permeability and so did of the hydrophilicity of the bacterial surface. Such evolution of the bacterial envelope in response to changes in pH brings new insight to the pH dependence in the bacterial adhesion tests. It especially demonstrates the necessity to consider the hydrophobic/hydrophilic surface properties of bacteria as not univocal for the various experimental conditions investigated.

  18. First recording of Shewanella putrefaciens in cultured Oreochromis niloticus and its identification by 16Sr RNA in Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal I. El-Barbary

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A survey to determine the pathogenic bacterial strains of an important commercial capture fish, Oreochromis niloticus in an Egyptian fish farm was conducted. One strain presumptively identified as Shewanella putrefaciens was isolated from the fish and identified by a biochemical test, API20NE system and 16S rRNA gene. Intraperitoneal (I.P challenge by S. putrefaciens revealed its pathogenicity with 50% mortality. The infected fish showed skin hemorrhage, fin rot and shallow necrotizing ulcers on the skin with congestion and enlargement of the liver, spleen and kidneys. The antibiogram of S. putrefaciens revealed its sensitivity to ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin, nalidixic acid, streptomycin, gentamycin, oxytetracyclin and sulfamethoxazole. Complete resistance to cephazolin and fusidic acid was recorded. Histological changes in the liver of infected O. niloticus included hepatocyte degeneration, fatty vacuolation in liver cells, Kupffer cell increase, hemolysis with infiltration in blood vessels, deposition of hemosiderin associated with the liver blood vessels and necrosis hepatocytes in the fatty liver tissue. The results concluded that the S. putrefaciens should be considered as an opportunistic pathogen for fish, which had caused fish infections, diseases with septicemia and mortality in O. niloticus.

  19. Effects of Shewanella putrefaciens on innate immunity and cytokine expression profile upon high stocking density of gilthead seabream specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, Héctor; Morcillo, Patricia; Meseguer, José; Cuesta, Alberto; Esteban, M Ángeles

    2016-04-01

    High stocking density increases the number of emerging diseases triggering economic losses worldwide. Probiotics provide an effective and natural solution for preventing some diseases through an improvement of innate immune system among others. In the present work dietary administration of the probiotic Shewanella putrefaciens (known as Pdp11) was evaluated under stress by high stocking density after 2 and 4 weeks of administration to gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) specimens. Results showed an increase in cellular peroxidase and respiratory burst activity as well as a modulation of cytokine profile when Pdp11 was administered to fish reared at high stocking density. Overall, our results showed how Pdp11 is not only able to improve to some extent the cellular and humoral immunity but also to increase the gene expression profile of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as il1b or il6 in response to high stocking density in gilthead seabream. These findings may support the potential use of this probiotic as functional feed against stress in fish farms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Shewanella putrefaciens in cultured tilapia detected by a new calcein-loop-mediated isothermal amplification (Ca-LAMP) method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suebsing, Rungkarn; Kampeera, Jantana; Sirithammajak, Sarawut; Pradeep, Padmaja Jayaprasad; Jitrakorn, Sarocha; Arunrut, Narong; Sangsuriya, Pakkakul; Saksmerprome, Vanvimon; Senapin, Saengchan; Withyachumnarnkul, Boonsirm; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika

    2015-12-09

    Shewanella putrefaciens is being increasingly isolated from a wide variety of sources and is pathogenic to many marine and freshwater fish. For better control of this pathogen, there is a need for the development of simple and inexpensive but highly specific, sensitive, and rapid detection methods suitable for application in field laboratories. Our colorogenic loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay combined with calcein (Ca-LAMP) for unaided visual confirmation of LAMP amplicons is a simple method for fish pathogen detection in cultured tilapia. Here, we describe the detection of S. putrefaciens using the same platform. As before, the method gave positive results (orange to green color change) in 45 min at 63°C with sensitivity 100 times higher than that of a conventional PCR assay, with no cross-amplification of other known fish bacterial pathogens tested. Using the assay with 389 samples of gonads, fertilized eggs, and fry of farmed Nile and red tilapia Oreochromis spp., 35% of samples were positive for S. putrefaciens. The highest prevalence was found in samples of gonads (55%) and fertilized eggs (55%) from adult breeding stocks, indicating that S. putrefaciens could be passed on easily to fry used for stocking production ponds. Tissue tropism assays revealed that the spleen showed the highest colonization by S. putrefaciens in naturally infected tilapia and that it would be the most suitable organ for screening and monitoring fish stocks for presence of the bacteria.

  1. Effects on intestinal microbiota and immune genes of Solea senegalensis after suspension of the administration of Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Sara; Tapia-Paniagua, Silvana Teresa; Moriñigo, Jesús Miguel; Lobo, Carmen; García de la Banda, Inés; Balebona, María Del Carmen; Moriñigo, Miguel Ángel

    2016-11-01

    The interaction host-intestinal microbiota is essential for the immunological homeostasis of the host. Probiotics, prebiotics and synbiotics are promising tools for the manipulation of the intestinal microbiota towards beneficial effects to the host. The objective of this study was to evaluate the modulation effect on the intestinal microbiota and the transcription of genes involved in the immune response in head kidney of Solea senegalensis after administration of diet supplemented with the prebiotic alginate and the probiotic Shewanella putrefaciens Pdp11 CECT 7627 (SpPdp11). The results showed higher adaptability to dietary changes in the intestinal microbiota of fish fed diet with alginate and SpPdp11 together compared to those fish that received an alginate-supplemented diet. The alginate-supplemented diet produced up-regulation of genes encoding proteins involved in immunological responses, such as complement, lysozyme G and transferrin, and oxidative stress, such as NADPH oxidase and glutation peroxidase. On the other hand, the administration of alginate combined with SpPdp11 resulted in a significant increase of the transcription of genes encoding for glutation peroxidase and HSP70, indicating a potential protective effect of SpPdp11 against oxidative stress. In addition, these effects were maintained after the suspension of the probiotic treatment. The relationship between the modulation of the intestinal microbiota and the expression of genes with protective effect against the oxidative stress was demonstrated by the Principal Components Analysis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Changes of membrane fatty acids and proteins of Shewanella putrefaciens treated with cinnamon oil and gamma irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Fei; Gao, Fei; Wei, Qianqian; Liu, Lin

    2017-01-01

    In order to detect the antimicrobial mechanism of combined treatment of cinnamon oil and gamma irradiation (GI), the membrane fatty acids and proteins characteristics of Shewanella putrefaciens (S. putrefaciens) treated with cinnamon oil and GI, and the distribution of cinnamon oil in S. putrefaciens were observed in this study. The membrane lipid profile of S. putrefaciens was notably damaged by treatments of cinnamon oil and the combination of cinnamon oil and GI, with significantly fatty acids decrease in C14:0, C16:0, C16:1, C17:1, C18:1 (p putrefaciens obviously. It was transformed into cinnamyl alcohol in the nutrient broth with the action of S. putrefaciens. This indicated that the antimicrobial action of cinnamon oil mainly happened on the membrane of S. putrefaciens. Cinnamon oil could act on the membrane of S. putrefaciens with the damage of fatty acids and proteins, and GI would increase the destructive capability of cinnamon oil on the membrane fatty acids and proteins of S. putrefaciens.

  3. Development and application of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for detecting live Shewanella putrefaciens in preserved fish sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenghua; Ying, Qi; Su, Xiurong; Li, Taiwu

    2012-04-01

    Given that live Shewanella putrefaciens is one of the major causes of spoilage for aquatic products even in chill storage, the rapid and accurate detection process is the first priority. In the present study, a novel reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) detecting assay was developed by targeting internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence between 16S and 23S rRNA. At the same time, a new procaryotic mRNA isolation strategy was also established by introducing a polyA tail to RNA during cDNA synthesis step. Under the optimal reaction time (60 min) and temperature (64.1 °C), S. putrefaciens could be specially identified from a variety of other tested bacteria by RT-LAMP. The sensitivity analysis showed that RT-LAMP could be identified as lower as 5.4 copies per reaction, which is over 200-fold higher than that of standard PCR (1.08 × 10³ copies per reaction). The method could be effectively identified S. putrefaciens in artificially contaminated or spoilaged fish samples with dose-dependent manners. To our knowledge, this is the first report using RT-LAMP assay to detect live S. putrefaciens in fish. The study provided a rapid and accurate detection method for live bacteria in aquatic food and established a new procaryotic mRNA isolation strategy at the same time, which will be useful for food preservation. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Physiological and transcriptional approaches reveal connection between nitrogen and manganese cycles in Shewanella algae C6G3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigle, Axel; Bonin, Patricia; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Méjean, Vincent; Michotey, Valérie

    2017-01-01

    To explain anaerobic nitrite/nitrate production at the expense of ammonium mediated by manganese oxide (Mn(IV)) in sediment, nitrate and manganese respirations were investigated in a strain (Shewanella algae C6G3) presenting these features. In contrast to S. oneidensis MR-1, a biotic transitory nitrite accumulation at the expense of ammonium was observed in S. algae during anaerobic growth with Mn(IV) under condition of limiting electron acceptor, concomitantly, with a higher electron donor stoichiometry than expected. This low and reproducible transitory accumulation is the result of production and consumption since the strain is able to dissimilative reduce nitrate into ammonium. Nitrite production in Mn(IV) condition is strengthened by comparative expression of the nitrate/nitrite reductase genes (napA, nrfA, nrfA-2), and rates of the nitrate/nitrite reductase activities under Mn(IV), nitrate or fumarate conditions. Compared with S. oneidensis MR-1, S. algae contains additional genes that encode nitrate and nitrite reductases (napA-α and nrfA-2) and an Outer Membrane Cytochrome (OMC)(mtrH). Different patterns of expression of the OMC genes (omcA, mtrF, mtrH and mtrC) were observed depending on the electron acceptor and growth phase. Only gene mtrF-2 (SO1659 homolog) was specifically expressed under the Mn(IV) condition. Nitrate and Mn(IV) respirations seem connected at the physiological and transcriptional levels. PMID:28317859

  5. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  6. Photoreduction of Shewanella oneidensis Extracellular Cytochromes by Organic Chromophores and Dye‐Sensitized TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, Emma V.; Lockwood, Colin W. J.; White, Gaye F.; Hwang, Ee Taek; Sakai, Tsubasa; Gross, Manuela A.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The transfer of photoenergized electrons from extracellular photosensitizers across a bacterial cell envelope to drive intracellular chemical transformations represents an attractive way to harness nature's catalytic machinery for solar‐assisted chemical synthesis. In Shewanella oneidensis MR‐1 (MR‐1), trans‐outer‐membrane electron transfer is performed by the extracellular cytochromes MtrC and OmcA acting together with the outer‐membrane‐spanning porin⋅cytochrome complex (MtrAB). Here we demonstrate photoreduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and the MtrCAB complex by soluble photosensitizers: namely, eosin Y, fluorescein, proflavine, flavin, and adenine dinucleotide, as well as by riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide, two compounds secreted by MR‐1. We show photoreduction of MtrC and OmcA adsorbed on RuII‐dye‐sensitized TiO2 nanoparticles and that these protein‐coated particles perform photocatalytic reduction of solutions of MtrC, OmcA, and MtrCAB. These findings provide a framework for informed development of strategies for using the outer‐membrane‐associated cytochromes of MR‐1 for solar‐driven microbial synthesis in natural and engineered bacteria. PMID:27685371

  7. Outer membrane-associated serine protease involved in adhesion of Shewanella oneidensis to Fe(III) oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Justin L; Ginn, Brian R; Bates, David J; Dublin, Steven N; Taylor, Jeanette V; Apkarian, Robert P; Amaro-Garcia, Samary; Neal, Andrew L; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2010-01-01

    The facultative anaerobe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 respires a variety of anaerobic electron acceptors, including insoluble Fe(III) oxides. S. oneidensis employs a number of novel strategies for respiration of insoluble Fe(III) oxides, including localization of respiratory proteins to the cell outer membrane (OM). The molecular mechanism by which S. oneidensis adheres to and respires Fe(III) oxides, however, remains poorly understood. In the present study, whole cell fractionation and MALDI-TOF-MS/MS techniques were combined to identify a serine protease (SO3800) associated with the S. oneidensis OM. SO3800 contained predicted structural motifs similar to cell surface-associated serine proteases that function as bacterial adhesins in other gram-negative bacteria. The gene encoding SO3800 was deleted from the S. oneidensis genome, and the resulting mutant strain (DeltaSO3800) was tested for its ability to adhere to and respire Fe(III) oxides. DeltaSO3800 was severely impaired in its ability to adhere to Fe(III) oxides, yet retained wild-type Fe(III) respiratory capability. Laser Doppler velocimetry and cryoetch high-resolution SEM experiments indicated that DeltaSO3800 displayed a lower cell surface charge and higher amount of surface-associated exopolysaccharides. Results of this study indicate that S. oneidensis may respire insoluble Fe(III) oxides at a distance, negating the requirement for attachment prior to electron transfer.

  8. Involvement of cytochrome c CymA in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX by Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Nancy N; Crocker, Fiona H; Indest, Karl J; Hawari, Jalal

    2012-02-01

    Hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX) is a cyclic nitramine explosive commonly used for military applications that is responsible for severe soil and groundwater contamination. In this study, Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was shown to efficiently degrade RDX anaerobically (3.5 µmol·h(-1)·(g protein)(-1)) via two initial routes: (1) sequential N-NO(2) reductions to the corresponding nitroso (N-NO) derivatives (94% of initial RDX degradation) and (2) denitration followed by ring cleavage. To identify genes involved in the anaerobic metabolism of RDX, a library of ~2500 mutants of MR-1 was constructed by random transposon mutagenesis and screened for mutants with a reduced ability to degrade RDX compared with the wild type. An RDX-defective mutant (C9) was isolated that had the transposon inserted in the c-type cytochrome gene cymA. C9 transformed RDX at ~10% of the wild-type rate, with degradation occurring mostly via early ring cleavage caused by initial denitration leading to the formation of methylenedinitramine, 4-nitro-2,4-diazabutanal, formaldehyde, nitrous oxide, and ammonia. Genetic complementation of mutant C9 restored the wild-type phenotype, providing evidence that electron transport components have a role in the anaerobic reduction of RDX by MR-1.

  9. Disruption of putrescine biosynthesis in Shewanella oneidensis enhances biofilm cohesiveness and performance in Cr(VI) immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yuanzhao; Peng, Ni; Du, Yonghua; Ji, Lianghui; Cao, Bin

    2014-02-01

    Although biofilm-based bioprocesses have been increasingly used in various applications, the long-term robust and efficient biofilm performance remains one of the main bottlenecks. In this study, we demonstrated that biofilm cohesiveness and performance of Shewanella oneidensis can be enhanced through disrupting putrescine biosynthesis. Through random transposon mutagenesis library screening, one hyperadherent mutant strain, CP2-1-S1, exhibiting an enhanced capability in biofilm formation, was obtained. Comparative analysis of the performance of biofilms formed by S. oneidensis MR-1 wild type (WT) and CP2-1-S1 in removing dichromate (Cr2O7(2-)), i.e., Cr(VI), from the aqueous phase showed that, compared with the WT biofilms, CP2-1-S1 biofilms displayed a substantially lower rate of cell detachment upon exposure to Cr(VI), suggesting a higher cohesiveness of the mutant biofilms. In addition, the amount of Cr(III) immobilized by CP2-1-S1 biofilms was much larger, indicating an enhanced performance in Cr(VI) bioremediation. We further showed that speF, a putrescine biosynthesis gene, was disrupted in CP2-1-S1 and that the biofilm phenotypes could be restored by both genetic and chemical complementations. Our results also demonstrated an important role of putrescine in mediating matrix disassembly in S. oneidensis biofilms.

  10. An iTRAQ characterisation of the role of TolC during electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Gregory J S; Pereira-Medrano, Ana G; Jaffe, Stephen; Pasternak, Grzegorz; Pham, Trong Khoa; Ledezma, Pablo; Hall, Simon T E; Ieropoulos, Ioannis A; Wright, Phillip C

    2016-11-01

    Anodophilic bacteria have the ability to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) by extracellular electron transfer to the anode. We investigated the anode-specific responses of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, an exoelectroactive Gammaproteobacterium, using for the first time iTRAQ and 2D-LC MS/MS driven membrane proteomics to compare protein abundances in S. oneidensis when generating power in MFCs, and growing in a continuous culture. The regulated dataset produced was enriched in membrane proteins. Proteins shown to be more abundant in anaerobic electroactive anodic cells included efflux pump TolC and an uncharacterised tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) protein, whilst the TonB2 system and associated uncharacterised proteins such as TtpC2 and DUF3450 were more abundant in microaerobic planktonic cells. In order to validate the iTRAQ data, the functional role for TolC was examined using a δTolC knockout mutant of S. oneidensis. Possible roles for the uncharacterised proteins were identified using comparative bioinformatics. We demonstrate that employing an insoluble extracellular electron acceptor requires multiple proteins involved in cell surface properties. All MS and processed data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD004090.

  11. Physiological and transcriptional approaches reveal connection between nitrogen and manganese cycles in Shewanella algae C6G3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigle, Axel; Bonin, Patricia; Iobbi-Nivol, Chantal; Méjean, Vincent; Michotey, Valérie

    2017-03-01

    To explain anaerobic nitrite/nitrate production at the expense of ammonium mediated by manganese oxide (Mn(IV)) in sediment, nitrate and manganese respirations were investigated in a strain (Shewanella algae C6G3) presenting these features. In contrast to S. oneidensis MR-1, a biotic transitory nitrite accumulation at the expense of ammonium was observed in S. algae during anaerobic growth with Mn(IV) under condition of limiting electron acceptor, concomitantly, with a higher electron donor stoichiometry than expected. This low and reproducible transitory accumulation is the result of production and consumption since the strain is able to dissimilative reduce nitrate into ammonium. Nitrite production in Mn(IV) condition is strengthened by comparative expression of the nitrate/nitrite reductase genes (napA, nrfA, nrfA-2), and rates of the nitrate/nitrite reductase activities under Mn(IV), nitrate or fumarate conditions. Compared with S. oneidensis MR-1, S. algae contains additional genes that encode nitrate and nitrite reductases (napA-α and nrfA-2) and an Outer Membrane Cytochrome (OMC)(mtrH). Different patterns of expression of the OMC genes (omcA, mtrF, mtrH and mtrC) were observed depending on the electron acceptor and growth phase. Only gene mtrF-2 (SO1659 homolog) was specifically expressed under the Mn(IV) condition. Nitrate and Mn(IV) respirations seem connected at the physiological and transcriptional levels.

  12. Cloning and characterization of the first polysaccharide lyase family 6 oligoalginate lyase from marine Shewanella sp. Kz7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shangyong; Wang, Linna; Han, Feng; Gong, Qianhong; Yu, Wengong

    2016-01-01

    Alginate, the most abundant carbohydrate in brown macroalgae, is widely used in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Recently, alginate has attracted increasing attention, as it may serve as an alternative biomass for the production of biofuel. The degradation of alginate into monomeric units is the prerequisite for bioethanol production. All known oligoalginate lyases belong to the polysaccharide lyase (PL) family 7, 14, 15 and 17, and most of them preferred to degrade the polyM blocks to yield 4-deoxy-l-erythro-5-hexoseulose uronic acid as the primary product. In this study, we cloned an oligoalginate lyase gene, oalS6, from Shewanella sp. Kz7 and expressed it in Escherichia coli. The PL family 6 oligoalginate lyase (OalS6) has no significant sequence similarity with other known oligoalginate lyases. OalS6 contains a chondroitinase-like domain and was assigned to the PL family 6. This lyase is an exo-type oligoalginate lyase and prefer to depolymerize polyG block into 2, 4, 5, 6-tetrahydroxytetrahydro-2H-pyran-2-carboxylic acid. All of these results indicate that OalS6 is a novel oligoalginate lyase that is structurally and functionally different from other known oligoalginate lyases. This finding provides new insights into the development of biofuel processing biotechnologies from seaweed.

  13. Effects of atmospheric air plasma treatment of graphite and carbon felt electrodes on the anodic current from Shewanella attached cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epifanio, Monica; Inguva, Saikumar; Kitching, Michael; Mosnier, Jean-Paul; Marsili, Enrico

    2015-12-01

    The attachment of electrochemically active microorganisms (EAM) on an electrode is determined by both the chemistry and topography of the electrode surface. Pre-treatment of the electrode surface by atmospheric air plasma introduces hydrophilic functional groups, thereby increasing cell attachment and electroactivity in short-term experiments. In this study, we use graphite and carbon felt electrodes to grow the model EAM Shewanella loihica PV-4 at oxidative potential (0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl). Cell attachment and electroactivity are measured through electrodynamic methods. Atmospheric air plasma pre-treatment increases cell attachment and current output at graphite electrodes by 25%, while it improves the electroactivity of the carbon felt electrodes by 450%. Air plasma pre-treatment decreased the coulombic efficiency on both carbon felt and graphite electrodes by 60% and 80%, respectively. Microbially produced flavins adsorb preferentially at the graphite electrode, and air plasma pre-treatment results in lower flavin adsorption at both graphite and carbon felt electrodes. Results show that air plasma pre-treatment is a feasible option to increase current output in bioelectrochemical systems.

  14. Integrating flux balance analysis into kinetic models to decipher the dynamic metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueyang Feng

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 sequentially utilizes lactate and its waste products (pyruvate and acetate during batch culture. To decipher MR-1 metabolism, we integrated genome-scale flux balance analysis (FBA into a multiple-substrate Monod model to perform the dynamic flux balance analysis (dFBA. The dFBA employed a static optimization approach (SOA by dividing the batch time into small intervals (i.e., ∼400 mini-FBAs, then the Monod model provided time-dependent inflow/outflow fluxes to constrain the mini-FBAs to profile the pseudo-steady-state fluxes in each time interval. The mini-FBAs used a dual-objective function (a weighted combination of "maximizing growth rate" and "minimizing overall flux" to capture trade-offs between optimal growth and minimal enzyme usage. By fitting the experimental data, a bi-level optimization of dFBA revealed that the optimal weight in the dual-objective function was time-dependent: the objective function was constant in the early growth stage, while the functional weight of minimal enzyme usage increased significantly when lactate became scarce. The dFBA profiled biologically meaningful dynamic MR-1 metabolisms: 1. the oxidative TCA cycle fluxes increased initially and then decreased in the late growth stage; 2. fluxes in the pentose phosphate pathway and gluconeogenesis were stable in the exponential growth period; and 3. the glyoxylate shunt was up-regulated when acetate became the main carbon source for MR-1 growth.

  15. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKouzuma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs, as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the extracellular electron-transfer processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extra-cellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological bases for MFCs.

  16. Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 Nanowires are Outer Membrane and Periplasmic Extensions of the Extracellular Electron Transport Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirbadian, S.; Barchinger, S. E.; Leung, K. M.; Byun, H. S.; Jangir, Y.; Bouhenni, Rachida; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad; Shi, Liang; Gorby, Yuri A.; Golbeck, J. H.; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-08-20

    Bacterial nanowires offer an extracellular electron transport (EET) pathway for linking the respiratory chain of bacteria to external surfaces, including oxidized metals in the environment and engineered electrodes in renewable energy devices. Despite the global, environmental, and technological consequences of this biotic-abiotic interaction, the composition, physiological relevance, and electron transport mechanisms of bacterial nanowires remain unclear. We report the first in vivo observations of the formation and respiratory impact of nanowires in the model metal-reducing microbe Shewanella neidensis MR-1. Using live fluorescence measurements, immunolabeling, and quantitative gene expression analysis, we report that S. oneidensis MR-1 nanowires are extensions of the outer membrane and periplasm that include the multiheme cytochromes responsible for EET, rather than pilin-based structures, as previously thought. These bacterial nanowires were also associated with outer membrane vesicles and vesicle chains, structures ubiquitous in gram-negative bacteria. Redoxfunctionalized membrane and vesicular extensions may represent a general microbial strategy for electron transport and energy distribution.

  17. Respiration of metal (hydr)oxides by Shewanella and Geobacter: a key role for multihaem c-type cytochromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Liang; Squier, Thomas C; Zachara, John M; Fredrickson, James K

    2007-07-01

    Dissimilatory reduction of metal (e.g. Fe, Mn) (hydr)oxides represents a challenge for microorganisms, as their cell envelopes are impermeable to metal (hydr)oxides that are poorly soluble in water. To overcome this physical barrier, the Gram-negative bacteria Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and Geobacter sulfurreducens have developed electron transfer (ET) strategies that require multihaem c-type cytochromes (c-Cyts). In S. oneidensis MR-1, multihaem c-Cyts CymA and MtrA are believed to transfer electrons from the inner membrane quinone/quinol pool through the periplasm to the outer membrane. The type II secretion system of S. oneidensis MR-1 has been implicated in the reduction of metal (hydr)oxides, most likely by translocating decahaem c-Cyts MtrC and OmcA across outer membrane to the surface of bacterial cells where they form a protein complex. The extracellular MtrC and OmcA can directly reduce solid metal (hydr)oxides. Likewise, outer membrane multihaem c-Cyts OmcE and OmcS of G. sulfurreducens are suggested to transfer electrons from outer membrane to type IV pili that are hypothesized to relay the electrons to solid metal (hydr)oxides. Thus, multihaem c-Cyts play critical roles in S. oneidensis MR-1- and G. sulfurreducens-mediated dissimilatory reduction of solid metal (hydr)oxides by facilitating ET across the bacterial cell envelope.

  18. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a

  19. Salt-inducible promoter derivable from a lactic acid bacterium, and its use in a lactic acid bacterium for production of a desired protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, Jan Willem; Kok, Jan; Venema, Gerard; Ledeboer, Adrianus Marinus

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides a salt-inducible promoter present in SEQ ID NO: 10 and derivable from a lactic acid bacterium in isolation from the coding sequence normally controlled by said promoter in a wild-type lactic acid bacterium, with modifications and important parts thereof. Also provided are a re

  20. Resolution of two native monomeric 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Philippa J L; McKinzie, Audra A; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  1. 植酸对腐败希瓦氏菌的抑菌机理%Antimicrobial mechanisms of phytic acid against Shewanella putrefacens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢晶; 侯伟峰; 汤毅; 蓝蔚青

    2011-01-01

    结合植酸对南美白对虾的保鲜,以虾体优势腐败菌一腐败希瓦氏菌为研究对象,利用植酸溶液处理后,通过对细菌的抑菌效果及最小抑菌浓度、细菌生长曲线、碱性磷酸酶(AKP)等的测定研究其抑菌机理。结果表明,植酸对腐败希瓦氏菌有较强的抑菌效果,最低抑菌浓度(体积分数)为0.2%。同对照组相比,植酸能够影响细菌的生长规律,使细胞破损。细胞壁和细胞膜遭到破坏,AKP及电导率均增大,初步阐述了植酸对腐败希瓦氏菌的抑菌机理。%Combined with phytic acid on the preservation of Penaeus Vanmarnei, advantage corruption bacteria of Penaeus Vanmamei - Shewanella putrefacens was selected as the sample to investigate the antimicrobial mechanisms of phytic acid by inhibition effects,minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC),bacterial curve,alkaline phosphatase (AKP) and so on. Results showed that phytic acid had a strong inhibition function against the bacteria,the MIC (volume fraction) of Shewanella putrefacens was 0.2%. Compared with the controlled,phytic acid can change bacterial curve,destroyed the cells. Cell membrane and wall were destroyed,then,AKP and electric conductivity were increased. The antimicrobial mechanisms of phytic acid against Shewanella putrefacens were proposed.

  2. A Novel Plasmid, pSx1, Harboring a New Tn1696 Derivative from Extensively Drug-Resistant Shewanella xiamenensis Encoding OXA-416.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi, Khadidja; Touati, Abdelaziz; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Fournier, Éric; Côté, Jean-Charles; Soualhine, Hafid; Walker, Matthew; Bougdour, Djamila; Tremblay, Cécile; Bekal, Sadjia

    2017-06-01

    The whole genome sequencing of extensively drug-resistant Shewanella xiamenensis T17 isolated from hospital effluents in Algeria revealed the presence of a novel 268.4 kb plasmid designated pSx1, which carries several antibiotic-resistance genes in the novel Tn1696 derivative (Tn6297), in addition to the chromosomal blaOXA-48-like gene (blaOXA-416). The presence of the plasmid was confirmed by nuclease S1-PFGE analysis and transformation by electroporation into Escherichia coli DH10B. Tn6297 contains an In27 class 1 integron harboring the dfrA12-orfF-aadA2 array, msr(E) and mph(E) associated with IS26; a new efflux pump multidrug resistance composite transposon delimited by two ISEc29s; Tn-tet harboring tetR and tetA(C); a class 1 integron with the qacG gene cassette; qnrVC6 and dfrA23 associated with ISCR1; and a complex class 1 integron In4-like containing aacC1, aadA1, blaVEB-16, catA2, sul1Δ, cmlA9, tetR, tetA(G), aac(6')-II, and blaPSE-1. Its mer operon carries merB, but lacks merC, in contrast to Tn1696 and Tn21. This study represents the first characterization of a multidrug-resistant transposon and multidrug resistance plasmid in Shewanella and is the first report of blaOXA-416 in Algeria, providing evidence that Shewanella spp. could be an important reservoir and vehicle for drug resistance genes.

  3. Regulation of cytochrome c- and quinol oxidases, and piezotolerance of their activities in the deep-sea piezophile Shewanella violacea DSS12 in response to growth conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohke, Yoshie; Sakoda, Ayaka; Kato, Chiaki; Sambongi, Yoshihiro; Kawamoto, Jun; Kurihara, Tatsuo; Tamegai, Hideyuki

    2013-01-01

    The facultative piezophile Shewanella violacea DSS12 is known to have respiratory components that alter under the influence of hydrostatic pressure during growth, suggesting that its respiratory system is adapted to high pressure. We analyzed the expression of the genes encoding terminal oxidases and some respiratory components of DSS12 under various growth conditions. The expression of some of the genes during growth was regulated by both the O2 concentration and hydrostatic pressure. Additionally, the activities of cytochrome c oxidase and quinol oxidase of the membrane fraction of DSS12 grown under various conditions were measured under high pressure. The piezotolerance of cytochrome c oxidase activity was dependent on the O2 concentration during growth, while that of quinol oxidase was influenced by pressure during growth. The activity of quinol oxidase was more piezotolerant than that of cytochrome c oxidase under all growth conditions. Even in the membranes of the non-piezophile Shewanella amazonensis, quinol oxidase was more piezotolerant than cytochrome c oxidase, although both were highly piezosensitive as compared to the activities in DSS12. By phylogenetic analysis, piezophile-specific cytochrome c oxidase, which is also found in the genome of DSS12, was identified in piezophilic Shewanella and related genera. Our observations suggest that DSS12 constitutively expresses piezotolerant respiratory terminal oxidases, and that lower O2 concentrations and higher hydrostatic pressures induce higher piezotolerance in both types of terminal oxidases. Quinol oxidase might be the dominant terminal oxidase in high-pressure environments, while cytochrome c oxidase might also contribute. These features should contribute to adaptation of DSS12 in deep-sea environments.

  4. Shewanella haliotis BP-1海藻酸裂解酶基因的克隆表达%Gene Cloning and Expression of Alginate Lyase from Shewanella haliotis BP-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄桂媛; 温顺华; 李锋; 卢明倩; 王巧贞; 廖威; 黄庶识

    2016-01-01

    Objective]Alginate lyase in Shewanella haliotis BP-1 strains was studied illustrate its biological activity of degrading alginate.[Methods]The gene cloning technology and the Escherichia coli heterologous expression technology were applied to overexpress the alginate lyase;And the enzyme activity was analyzed after the crude enzyme was separated and purified by DEAE Sepharose FF chromatogra-phy.[Results]The alginate lyase gene Alg 1 7S , with a size of 2 1 5 7 bp,was cloned from S. haliotis BP-1 strain genomic DNA and encoded an alginate lyase Alg17S,which belonged to pol-ysaccharide lyase(PL)1 7 family and had a size of 79 726 Da protein(including an N-terminal signal peptide of 26 amino acid signal peptide).Alg17S showed high sequence identity of 5 2% with PL-17 protein sequence Alg17C from Saccharophagus degradans 2-40.Both the purified recombi-nase Alg17S and the △snAlg17S(without the N-terminal signal peptide of 26 amino acids)can degrade alginate,but the enzymatic activity of △snAlg17S revealed a specific activity of 9 635 U/mg,which was more efficient than Alg17S.[Conclusion]The recombinant alginate lyase △s-nAlg17S that has both high-level expression and high enzymatic activity could be a potential en-zyme for further researching on the alginate saccharification and the biofuels production.%【目的】了解海洋细菌Shewanella haliotis B P-1中海藻酸裂解酶降解海藻酸钠的生物活性。【方法】应用基因克隆和大肠杆菌异源表达技术,过量表达海藻酸裂解酶,将粗酶液通过 DEAE Sepharose FF柱分离纯化后检测其酶活性。【结果】从S.haliotis BP-1菌株的基因组DNA中克隆得到一个大小为2157 bp的海藻酸裂解酶基因Alg17S ,该基因编码的海藻酸裂解酶 Alg17S属于PL17家族的蛋白,大小为79726 Da,其中包括N端26个氨基酸的信号肽,与Saccharophagus degradans 2-40菌株产生的海藻酸裂解酶 Alg17C 具有高度同源性,相似性为52%。

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Two Methods for Determining Spoilage Ability of Fish Spoilage Bacterium Shewanella putrefaciens%鱼类腐败菌腐败能力测定方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许振伟; 许钟; 杨宪时; 郭全友; 李学英

    2010-01-01

    通过分析比较接种腐败菌的大黄鱼无菌鱼块和灭菌鱼汁,在贮藏中感官、挥发性盐基氮(total volatile base nitrogen,TVBN)、三甲胺(trimethylamine,TMA)和腐败菌的变化,以及腐败菌生长动力学参数和腐败代谢产物的产量因子(YTVBN/CFU和YTMA/CFU),探讨无菌鱼块和灭菌鱼汁两种腐败能力的测定方法.结果表明:接种腐败希瓦氏菌的无菌鱼块和灭菌鱼汁的货架期分别为162h和132h,此时的TVBN含量分别为32.16mg/100g和29.64mg/100mL,TMA含量为9.31mg/100g和0.99mg/100mL,腐败希瓦氏菌菌数为8.67 lg(CFU/g)和8.561g(CFU/mL),产量因子YTVBN/CFU为2.58×10-10mg TVBN/CFU和1.98×10-10mL TVBN/CFU,产量因子YTMA/CFU为2.12×10-10mg TMA/CFU和1.27×10-11mL TMA/CFU.TMA作为接种鱼汁的理化指标是不可靠的,而TVBN可以作为接种鱼汁的理化指标.接种腐败希瓦氏菌的无菌鱼块和灭菌鱼汁产量因子YTVBN/CFU的相对误差为23.64%,因此灭菌鱼汁作为腐败菌腐败能力测定方法具有一定的可靠性.

  6. Binding of Shewanella FadR to the fabA fatty acid biosynthetic gene: implications for contraction of the fad regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huimin; Zheng, Beiwen; Gao, Rongsui; Feng, Youjun

    2015-09-01

    The Escherichia coli fadR protein product, a paradigm/prototypical FadR regulator, positively regulates fabA and fabB, the two critical genes for unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) biosynthesis. However the scenario in the other Ɣ-proteobacteria, such as Shewanella with the marine origin, is unusual in that Rodionov and coworkers predicted that only fabA (not fabB) has a binding site for FadR protein. It raised the possibility of fad regulon contraction. Here we report that this is the case. Sequence alignment of the FadR homologs revealed that the N-terminal DNA-binding domain exhibited remarkable similarity, whereas the ligand-accepting motif at C-terminus is relatively-less conserved. The FadR homologue of S. oneidensis (referred to FadR_she) was over-expressed and purified to homogeneity. Integrative evidence obtained by FPLC (fast protein liquid chromatography) and chemical cross-linking analyses elucidated that FadR_she protein can dimerize in solution, whose identity was determined by MALDI-TOF-MS. In vitro data from electrophoretic mobility shift assays suggested that FadR_she is almost functionally-exchangeable/equivalent to E. coli FadR (FadR_ec) in the ability of binding the E. coli fabA (and fabB) promoters. In an agreement with that of E. coli fabA, S. oneidensis fabA promoter bound both FadR_she and FadR_ec, and was disassociated specifically with the FadR regulatory protein upon the addition of long-chain acyl-CoA thioesters. To monitor in vivo effect exerted by FadR on Shewanella fabA expression, the native promoter of S. oneidensis fabA was fused to a LacZ reporter gene to engineer a chromosome fabA-lacZ transcriptional fusion in E. coli. As anticipated, the removal of fadR gene gave about 2-fold decrement of Shewanella fabA expression by β-gal activity, which is almost identical to the inhibitory level by the addition of oleate. Therefore, we concluded that fabA is contracted to be the only one member of fad regulon in the context of fatty acid

  7. Influence of plaque-forming bacterium, Rhodobacteraceae sp. on the growth of Chlorella vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhangran; Zhang, Jingyan; Lei, Xueqian; Zhang, Bangzhou; Cai, Guanjing; Zhang, Huajun; Li, Yi; Zheng, Wei; Tian, Yun; Xu, Hong; Zheng, Tianling

    2014-10-01

    Experiments were conducted to find out the molecular features, infection process of a special alga plaque-forming microorganism and its potential influence on the biomass of Chlorella vulgaris during the infection process. Direct contact between the algal cell and the bacterium may be the primary steps needed for the bacterium to lyse the alga. Addition of C. vulgaris cells into f/2 medium allowed us obtain the object bacterium. The 16S rRNA gene sequence comparisons results showed that the plaque-forming bacterium kept the closest relationship with Labrenzia aggregata IAM 12614(T) at 98.90%. The existence of the bacterium could influence both the dry weight and lipid content of C. vulgaris. This study demonstrated that direct cell wall disruption of C. vulgaris by the bacterium would be a potentially effective method to utilize the biomass of microalgae.

  8. Research Progress and Perspectives of Nitrogen Fixing Bacterium, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus, in Monocot Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Eskin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus is a nitrogen fixing bacterium originally found in monocotyledon sugarcane plants in which the bacterium actively fixes atmosphere nitrogen and provides significant amounts of nitrogen to plants. This bacterium mainly colonizes intercellular spaces within the roots and stems of plants and does not require the formation of the complex root organ like nodule. The bacterium is less plant/crop specific and indeed G. diazotrophicus has been found in a number of unrelated plant species. Importantly, as the bacterium was of monocot plant origin, there exists a possibility that the nitrogen fixation feature of the bacterium may be used in many other monocot crops. This paper reviews and updates the research progress of G. diazotrophicus for the past 25 years but focuses on the recent research development.

  9. Liver abscess associated with an oral flora bacterium Streptococcus anginosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hava Yılmaz

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Viridans group Streptococcus, a bacterium of the oral flora has a low-virulence and rarely causes liver abscess. A 40-yearoldmale patient was admitted to the hospital complaining of high fever and malaise. A physical examination revealedpoor oral hygiene; there were caries on many teeth, and he had hepatomegaly. A hepatic abscess was identified inhis abdominal tomography. Streptococcus anginosus was isolated from the drainage material, and the bile ducts werenormal in his MRI cholangiography. An immunocompetent case of liver abscess caused by Streptococcus anginosusoriginated most probably from oral flora is presented here. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2012; 2(1:33-35

  10. Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel P. Molloy

    2004-02-24

    The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

  11. Laue crystal structure of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase from a high-yield expression system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblut, Matthew; Judd, Evan T.; Srajer, Vukica; Sayyed, Bilal; Goelzer, Tyler; Elliott, Sean J.; Schmidt, Marius; Pacheco, A. Andrew (UW); (UC); (BU)

    2012-09-11

    The high-yield expression and purification of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (ccNiR) and its characterization by a variety of methods, notably Laue crystallography, are reported. A key component of the expression system is an artificial ccNiR gene in which the N-terminal signal peptide from the highly expressed S. oneidensis protein 'small tetraheme c' replaces the wild-type signal peptide. This gene, inserted into the plasmid pHSG298 and expressed in S. oneidensis TSP-1 strain, generated approximately 20 mg crude ccNiR per liter of culture, compared with 0.5-1 mg/L for untransformed cells. Purified ccNiR has nitrite and hydroxylamine reductase activities comparable to those previously reported for Escherichia coli ccNiR, and is stable for over 2 weeks in pH 7 solution at 4 C. UV/vis spectropotentiometric titrations and protein film voltammetry identified five independent one-electron reduction processes. Global analysis of the spectropotentiometric data also allowed determination of the extinction coefficient spectra for the five reduced ccNiR species. The characteristics of the individual extinction coefficient spectra suggest that, within each reduced species, the electrons are distributed among the various hemes, rather than being localized on specific heme centers. The purified ccNiR yielded good-quality crystals, with which the 2.59-{angstrom}-resolution structure was solved at room temperature using the Laue diffraction method. The structure is similar to that of E. coli ccNiR, except in the region where the enzyme interacts with its physiological electron donor (CymA in the case of S. oneidensis ccNiR, NrfB in the case of the E. coli protein).

  12. Directing the biosynthesis of putrebactin or desferrioxamine B in Shewanella putrefaciens through the upstream inhibition of ornithine decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Cho Z; Pakchung, Amalie A H; Codd, Rachel

    2012-09-01

    To manage iron acquisition in an oxic environment, Shewanella putrefaciens produces the macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid putrebactin (PB) as its native siderophore. In this work, we have established the siderophore profile of S. putrefaciens in cultures augmented with the native PB precursor putrescine and in putrescine-depleted cultures. Compared to base medium, PB increased by two-fold in cultures of S. putrefaciens with 10 mM NaCl and 20 mM exogenous putrescine. In cultures augmented with 1,4-diaminobutan-2-one (DAB), PB decreased with only 0.02-fold PB detectable at 10 mM DAB. As an ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) inhibitor, DAB depleted levels of endogenous putrescine which attenuated downstream PB assembly. Under putrescine-depleted conditions, S. putrefaciens produced as its replacement siderophore the cadaverine-based desferrioxamine B (DFO-B), as characterised by ESI-MS of the Fe(III)-loaded form (m/z(obs) 614.13; m/z(calc) 614.27). A third siderophore, independent of DAB, was observed in low levels. LC/MS Analysis of the Fe(III)-loaded extract gave m/z(obs) 440.93, which, formulated as a 1:1 Fe(III) complex with a macrocyclic dihydroxamic acid, comprising one putrescine- and one cadaverine-based precursor (m/z(calc) 440.14). These results show that the production of native PB or non-native DFO-B by S. putrefaciens can be directed though upstream inhibition of ODC. This approach could be used to increase the molecular diversity of siderophores produced by S. putrefaciens and to map alternative diamine-dependent metabolites. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  13. Simultaneous Release of Fe and As during the Reductive Dissolution of Pb-As Jarosite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smeaton, Christina M; Walshe, Gillian E; Smith, Adrian M.L.; Hudson-Edwards, Karen A; Dubbin, William E; Wright, Kate; Beale, Andrew M; Fryer, Brian J; Weisener, Christopher G [RIGB; (Windsor); (NHM); (UL)

    2012-11-05

    Jarosites are produced during metallurgical processing, on oxidized sulfide deposits, and in acid mine drainage environments. Despite the environmental relevance of jarosites, few studies have examined their biogeochemical stability. This study demonstrates the simultaneous reduction of structural Fe(III) and aqueous As(V) during the dissolution of synthetic Pb–As jarosite (PbFe3(SO4,AsO4)2(OH)6) by Shewanella putrefaciens using batch experiments under anaerobic circumneutral conditions. Fe(III) reduction occurred immediately in inoculated samples while As(V) reduction was observed after 72 h. XANES spectra showed As(III) (14.7%) in the solid phase at 168 h coincident with decreased aqueous As(V). At 336 h, XANES spectra and aqueous speciation analysis demonstrated 20.2% and 3.0% of total As was present as As(III) in the solid and aqueous phase, respectively. In contrast, 12.4% of total Fe was present as aqueous Fe(II) and was below the detection limits of XANES in the solid phase. TEM-EDS analysis at 336 h showed secondary precipitates enriched in Fe and O with minor amounts of As and Pb. Based on experimental data and thermodynamic modeling, we suggest that structural Fe(III) reduction was thermodynamically driven while aqueous As(V) reduction was triggered by detoxification induced to offset the high As(V) (328 μM) concentrations released during dissolution.

  14. Control of Proteobacterial Central Carbon Metabolism by the HexR Transcriptional Regulator. A Case Study in Shewanella oneidensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leyn, Semen; Li, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Qijing; Novichkov, Pavel; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Yang, Chen; Osterman, Andrei L.; Rodionov, Dmitry A.

    2011-08-17

    Bacteria exploit multiple mechanisms for controlling central carbon metabolism (CCM). Thus, a bioinformatic analysis together with some experimental data implicated HexR transcriptional factor as a global CCM regulator in some lineages of Gammaproteobacteria operating as a functional replacement of Cra regulator characteristic of Enterobacteriales. In this study we combined a large-scale comparative genomic reconstruction of HexRcontrolled regulons in 87 species of Proteobacteria with the detailed experimental analysis of HexR regulatory network in Shewanella oneidensis model system. Although nearly all of the HexR-controlled genes are associated with CCM, remarkable variations were revealed in the scale (from 1-2 target operons in Enterobacteriales up to 20 operons in Aeromonadales) and gene content of HexR regulons between 11 compared lineages. A predicted 17-bp pseudo-palindrome with a consensus tTGTAATwwwATTACa, was confirmed as HexR-binding motif for 15 target operons (comprising 30 genes) by in vitro binding assays. The negative effect of the key CCM intermediate, 2-keto-3-deoxy-6- phosphogluconate, on the DNA-regulator complex formation was verified. A dual mode of HexR action on various target promoters, repression of genes involved in catabolic pathways and activation of gluconeogenic genes, was for the first time predicted by the bioinformatc analysis and experimentally verified by changed gene expression pattern in S. oneidensis AhexR mutant. Phenotypic profiling revealed the inability of this mutant to grow on lactate or pyruvate as a single carbon source. A comparative metabolic flux analysis of wild-type and mutant strains of S. oneidensis using 13Clactate labeling and GC-MS analysis confirmed the hypothesized HexR role as a master regulator of gluconeogenic flux from pyruvate via the transcriptional activation of phosphoenolpyruvate synthase (PpsA).

  15. Biological Control of Meloidogyne hapla Using an Antagonistic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiyeong Park

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We examined the efficacy of a bacterium for biocontrol of the root-knot nematode (RKN Meloidogyne hapla in carrot (Daucus carota subsp. sativus and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum. Among 542 bacterial isolates from various soils and plants, the highest nematode mortality was observed for treatments with isolate C1-7, which was identified as Bacillus cereus based on cultural and morphological characteristics, the Biolog program, and 16S rRNA sequencing analyses. The population density and the nematicidal activity of B. cereus C1-7 remained high until the end of culture in brain heart infusion broth, suggesting that it may have sustainable biocontrol potential. In pot experiments, the biocontrol efficacy of B. cereus C1-7 was high, showing complete inhibition of root gall or egg mass formation by RKN in carrot and tomato plants, and subsequently reducing RKN damage and suppressing nematode population growth, respectively. Light microscopy of RKN-infected carrot root tissues treated with C1-7 showed reduced formation of gall cells and fully developed giant cells, while extensive gall cells and fully mature giant cells with prominent cell wall ingrowths formed in the untreated control plants infected with RKNs. These histopathological characteristics may be the result of residual or systemic biocontrol activity of the bacterium, which may coincide with the biocontrol efficacies of nematodes in pots. These results suggest that B. cereus C1-7 can be used as a biocontrol agent for M. hapla.

  16. Identification of phenolyl cobamide from the homoacetogenic bacterium Sporomusa ovata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stupperich, E; Eisinger, H J; Kräutler, B

    1989-12-22

    Phenolyl cobamide was isolated from cyanide extractions of the anaerobic eubacterium Sporomusa ovata. The proposed corrinoid structure [Co alpha,Co beta-(monocyano,monoaquo)-phenolyl cobamide] has been deduced from 1H NMR, fast-atom-bombardment mass spectroscopy and ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy data. The complete corrinoid resembled p-cresolyl cobamide [Co alpha,Co beta-(monocyano,monoaquo)-p-cresolyl cobamide], which recently has been obtained from cyanide extractions of the same bacterium. The structures and chemical properties of both cobamides with uncoordinated nucleotides differed significantly from those of vitamin B12 [Co alpha-[alpha-(5,6-dimethylbenzimidazolyl)]-Co beta-cyanocobamide]. Sporomusa synthesized coenzymes of phenolyl cobamide and p-cresolyl cobamide in considerable amounts of 400 nmol/g and 1700 nmol/g dry cells, respectively. More than 90% of the complete corrinoid pool of the homoacetogenic bacterium consisted of these two corrinoids, indicating that they are physiologically important coenzymes of the bacterial metabolism.

  17. Molybdate Reduction to Molybdenum Blue by an Antarctic Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo6+ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue. Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries.

  18. Molybdate reduction to molybdenum blue by an Antarctic bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S A; Shukor, M Y; Shamaan, N A; Mac Cormack, W P; Syed, M A

    2013-01-01

    A molybdenum-reducing bacterium from Antarctica has been isolated. The bacterium converts sodium molybdate or Mo⁶⁺ to molybdenum blue (Mo-blue). Electron donors such as glucose, sucrose, fructose, and lactose supported molybdate reduction. Ammonium sulphate was the best nitrogen source for molybdate reduction. Optimal conditions for molybdate reduction were between 30 and 50 mM molybdate, between 15 and 20°C, and initial pH between 6.5 and 7.5. The Mo-blue produced had a unique absorption spectrum with a peak maximum at 865 nm and a shoulder at 710 nm. Respiratory inhibitors such as antimycin A, sodium azide, potassium cyanide, and rotenone failed to inhibit the reducing activity. The Mo-reducing enzyme was partially purified using ion exchange and gel filtration chromatography. The partially purified enzyme showed optimal pH and temperature for activity at 6.0 and 20°C, respectively. Metal ions such as cadmium, chromium, copper, silver, lead, and mercury caused more than 95% inhibition of the molybdenum-reducing activity at 0.1 mM. The isolate was tentatively identified as Pseudomonas sp. strain DRY1 based on partial 16s rDNA molecular phylogenetic assessment and the Biolog microbial identification system. The characteristics of this strain would make it very useful in bioremediation works in the polar and temperate countries.

  19. Pathogenesis of helicobacter pylori infection: Bacterium and host relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sokić-Milutinović Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa of a half of the mankind. Duodenal ulcer is found in 15-25%, t gastric ulcer in 13%, while gastric adenocarcinoma develops in 1% of all infected individuals. Pathogenesis of H. pylori infection is related to the virulence factors of the bacterium, environmental (dietary habits, hygiene, stress and host factors (age, sex, blood type. Colonization of the gastric mucosa is related to the motility of the bacterium, presence of lipopolysacharide (LPS and various bacterial enzymes. Gastric mucosal injury is the result of H. pylori LPS, vacuolization cytotoxin (vacA, cytotoxin associated protein (cagA, heat shock proteins and factors responsible for neutrophil chemotaxis and activity. H. pylori colonizes the gastric mucosa and zones of ectopic gastric epithelium. H. pylori infection is transmitted via oral-oral, fecal-oral and iatrogenic way (during endoscopy. Higher prevalence of the infection is associated with lower socioeconomic level, lack of drinking water, and living in a community. Acute H. pylori gastritis is superficial pangastritis progressing into the chronic phase after 7-10 days. Gastric mucosal atrophy and intestinal metaplasia can develop during the course of H. pylori infection. Clearly defined factors that influence the outcome of H. pylori infection include bacterial strain, distribution of gastritis, acid secretion and gastric mucosal atrophy.

  20. Population Structure of the Fish-Pathogenic Bacterium Flavobacterium psychrophilum▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Pierre; Mondot, Stanislas; Achaz, Guillaume; Bouchenot, Catherine; Bernardet, Jean-François; Duchaud, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Flavobacterium psychrophilum is currently one of the main bacterial pathogens hampering the productivity of salmonid farming worldwide, and its control mainly relies on antibiotic treatments. To better understand the population structure of this bacterium and its mode of evolution, we have examined the nucleotide polymorphisms at 11 protein-coding loci of the core genome in a set of 50 isolates. These isolates were selected to represent the broadest possible diversity, originating from 10 different host fish species and four continents. The nucleotide diversity between pairs of sequences amounted to fewer than four differences per kilobase on average, corresponding to a particularly low level of diversity, possibly indicative of a small effective-population size. The recombination rate, however, seemed remarkably high, and as a consequence, most of the isolates harbored unique combinations of alleles (33 distinct sequence types were resolved). The analysis also showed the existence of several clonal complexes with worldwide geographic distribution but marked association with particular fish species. Such an association could reflect preferential routes of transmission and/or adaptive niche specialization. The analysis provided no clues that the initial range of the bacterium was originally limited to North America. Instead, the historical record of the expansion of the pathogen may reflect the spread of a few clonal complexes. As a resource for future epidemiological surveys, a multilocus sequence typing website based on seven highly informative loci is available. PMID:18424537

  1. Isolation and Identification of Psychrotrophic Bacteria in Normal Temperature Soils and Their Properties of Cold-Adapted Enzymes Production%常温土壤中耐冷茵的分离、鉴定及产酶分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易浪波; 舒琅; 唐云涛; 朱越; 杜次; 彭清忠

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To screen cold-adapted microorganisms from normal temperature soils,and identify the isolated strains preliminarily and assay their cold-active enzyme production. Methods: Cold-adapted microorganisms were isolated from normal temperature soils at the campus of Jishou university by enrichment culture at 2℃. The isolated strains were identified by bacterial morphological,physiological and biochemical characteristics,and using phylogenetic relationships based on 16S rRNA gene sequences. The cold-adapted enzyme production of these bacteria was analyzed by substrate hydrolysis experiments. Results: Six strains of psychrotrophic bacteria,named afterJSBP-1~JSBP-6,were isolated from the normal temperature soil samples,and identified as Pseudomonas sp.,Jan-thinobacterium sp. And Arthrobacter sp. Respectively by morphological,physiological and biochemical characteristics,and the phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene. JSBP-1 had the capability of producing more cold-adapted protease,JSBP-2 and JSBP-6 had the capability of producing more cold-adapted amylase at 5℃ and \\5℃ respectively,and JSBP-5 could produce more cold-active lipase only at 5℃. Conclusion: There are a certain amount of cold-adapted microorganisms in normal temperature soils,of which Pseudomonas sp. Is one of predominant populations. These microorganisms are potential resources of producing cold-adapted enzymes.%目的:从常温土壤中筛选冷适应微生物,并进行初步鉴定和产低温酶分析.方法:采集吉首大学校园内土壤样品,通过低温富集培养筛选冷适应微生物;通过形态观察、生理生化特性检测和基于16S rRNA基因序列的系统发育分析,对分离的菌株进行初步鉴定;利用平板筛选法检测其产低温酶特性.结果:分离获得6株耐冷细菌JSBP-1~JSBP-6,初步鉴定其分属假单胞菌属(Pseudomonas)、紫色杆菌属(Janthinobacterium)和节杆菌属(Arthrobacter);在5℃和15C培养条件下,菌株JSBP-1

  2. 一株耐冷反硝化菌的分离鉴定及其反硝化特性%Identification and Denitrification Characteristics of a Strain of Psychrotrophic Denitrifying Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军; 闫爽; 邓娴; 王立军; 张雅南; 杨宏宇

    2012-01-01

    A psychrotrophic denitrifying bacteria (designated Y2)with high efficiency degradation of nitrate nitrogen was isolated from the submerged mud in winter water at 151 which was used to treat high-nitrate wastewater at low temperature. According to the results of morphological observation,physiological and biochemical test .sequence analyses of the 16S rDNA, strain Y2 was identified as Brevibacterium. The NO," -N removal rate of Y2 can reach 51. 6% in denitrification medium at 151 in 3 days,and 99. 3% in 7 days. The optimum carbon source and the optimum nitrogen source of Y2 were sodium acetate and potassium nitrate. The suitable molar ratio of carbon/nitrogen for denitrification of the bacteria was 3= 1,the optimum pH value was 7.5, and the optimum temperature was 25 t. It showed Y2 was suitable for the nitrate elimination of ni-trates at low temperature.%目的 筛选分离出一株具有高效降解硝态氮的耐冷反硝化菌,以提高低温下硝酸盐废水处理的生物反硝化速率.方法 在15℃条件下从冬季淹水泥中分离纯化出一株耐冷反硝化细菌Y2,通过对该菌株的形态观察、生理生化试验以及16S rRNA序列分析,对菌株进行鉴定;通过批试验研究不同因素对菌株单位生物量脱氮率的影响.结果 初步确定Y2菌株为黄色短杆菌(Brevibacterium).该菌株能在15℃下在反硝化培养基中3d内对NO3- -N的去除率达到51.6%,7d能达到99.3%,该菌的最适碳源为乙酸钠、最适氮源为硝酸钾,最适碳氮比为3:1、最适pH值为7.5、最适温度25℃.结论 菌株Y2在低温下表现出良好的反硝化性能,NO3- -N质量浓度达300 mg/L时,去除率可达99.8%,适用于低温硝酸盐废水处理.

  3. A novel ICE in the genome of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1: comparison with the SXT/R391 ICE-like elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pembroke, J Tony; Piterina, Anna V

    2006-11-01

    A novel R391-like ICE (integrating conjugative element) has been detected in the 4.2 MB genome of Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 located on three different contigs. Assembly of the ICE encoding contigs based on similarity with R391 revealed a mosaic element of plasmid, phage and transposon-like sequences typical of SXT/R391 ICE-like elements. The element, which is 110 057 bp in length, was highly similar to R391 sequences, with most related ORFs showing >96% amino acid sequence identity. The element, designated ICESpuPO1, contained a number of inserts determining resistance to copper and other heavy metals and a broad-spectrum RND efflux pump similar to antibiotic efflux systems. The element was integrated into the Shewanella prfC gene in a manner similar to related ICE-like elements. The chromosomal element junctions contained a 17-bp SXT/R391-like attL and attR site and an unannotated ORF between attL and the ICE integrase encoding a putative recombinational directional factor necessary for excision, with 100% amino acid identity to the R391 ORF4 product.

  4. Improvement of power generation using Shewanella putrefaciens mediated bioanode in a single chambered microbial fuel cell: effect of different anodic operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Soumya; Khilari, Santimoy; Roy, Shantonu; Pradhan, Debabrata; Das, Debabrata

    2014-08-01

    Three different approaches were employed to improve single chambered microbial fuel cell (sMFC) performance using Shewanella putrefaciens as biocatalyst. Taguchi design was used to identify the key process parameter (anolyte concentration, CaCl₂ and initial anolyte pH) for maximization of volumetric power. Supplementation of CaCl₂ was found most significant and maximum power density of 4.92 W/m(3) was achieved. In subsequent approaches, effect on power output by riboflavin supplementation to anolyte and anode surface modification using nano-hematite (Fe₂O₃) was observed. Volumetric power density was increased by 44% with addition of 100 nM riboflavin to anolyte while with 0.8 mg/cm(2) nano-Fe₂O₃ impregnated anode power density and columbic efficiency increased by 40% and 33% respectively. Cyclic voltammetry revealed improvement in electrochemical activity of Shewanella with nano-Fe₂O₃ loading and electrochemical impedance depicted inverse relationship between charge transfer resistance and nano-Fe₂O₃ loading. This study suggests anodic improvement strategies for maximization of power output. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Structure and morphology of magnetite anaerobically-produced by a marine magnetotactic bacterium and a dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, N. H. C.; Mann, S.; Bazylinski, D. A.; Lovley, D. R.; Jannasch, H. W.; Frankel, R. B.

    1990-04-01

    Intracellular crystals of magnetite synthesized by cells of the magnetotactic vibroid organism, MV-1, and extracellular crystals of magnetite produced by the non-magnetotactic dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium strain GS-15, were examined using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron diffraction and 57Fe Mo¨ssbauer spectroscopy. The magnetotactic bacterium contained a single chain of approximately 10 crystals aligned along the long axis of the cell. The crystals were essentially pure stoichiometric magnetite. When viewed along the crystal long axis the particles had a hexagonal cross-section whereas side-on they appeared as rectangules or truncated rectangles of average dimension, 53 × 35 nm. These findings are explained in terms of a three-dimensional morphology comprising a hexagonal prism of 110 faces which are capped and truncated by 111 end faces. Electron diffraction and lattice imaging studies indicated that the particles were structurally well-defined single crystals. In contrast, magnetite particles produced by the strain, GS-15 were irregular in shape and had smaller mean dimensions (14 nm). Single crystals were imaged but these were not of high structural perfection. These results highlight the influence of intracellular control on the crystallochemical specificity of bacterial magnetites. The characterization of these crystals is important in aiding the identification of biogenic magnetic materials in paleomagnetism and in studies of sediment magnetization.

  6. Roseomonas gilardii subsp rosea, a pink bacterium associated with bacteremia: the first case in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srifuengfung, Somporn; Tharavichitkul, Prasit; Pumprueg, Satchana; Tribuddharat, Chanwit

    2007-09-01

    Roseomonas is a pink-pigmented, non-fermentative, gram-negative coccobacillus bacterium. Human infections caused by Roseomonas are very rare. We report the first case of bacteremia associated with Roseomonas gilardii subsp rosea in Thailand. The bacterium was isolated from blood culture and identified by cellular morphology, characteristics of colonies on blood agar, extensive biochemical tests and 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing.

  7. Dense populations of a giant sulfur bacterium in Namibian shelf sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Brinkhoff, T.; Ferdelman, TG

    1999-01-01

    A previously unknown giant sulfur bacterium is abundant in sediments underlying the oxygen minimum zone of the Benguela Current upwelling system. The bacterium has a spherical cell that exceeds by up to 100-fold the biovolume of the largest known prokaryotes. On the basis of 16S ribosomal DNA seq...

  8. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits.

  9. Genome Sequence of the Mycorrhizal Helper Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens BBc6R8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveau, A; Gross, H; Morin, E; Karpinets, T; Utturkar, S; Mehnaz, S; Martin, F; Frey-Klett, P; Labbé, J

    2014-01-09

    We report the draft genome sequence of the mycorrhizal helper bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens strain BBc6R8. This is the first genome of a mycorrhizal helper bacterium. The draft genome contains 6,952,353 bp and is predicted to encode 6,317 open reading frames. Comparative genomic analyses will help to identify helper traits.

  10. Hydrogen production by co-cultures of Lactobacillus and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asada, Yasuo; Ishimi, Katsuhiro [Department of General Education, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Narashinodai, Chiba 274-8501 (Japan); Tokumoto, Masaru; Aihara, Yasuyuki; Oku, Masayo; Kohno, Hideki [Department of Applied Molecular Chemistry, College of Industrial Technology, Nihon University, Izumi-cho, Chiba 275-8575 (Japan); Wakayama, Tatsuki; Miyake, Jun [Research Institute for Cell Engineering, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Nakoji, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0974 (Japan); Tomiyama, Masamitsu [Genetic Diversity Department, National Institute of Agrobiological Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    Hydrogen production with glucose by using co-immobilized cultures of a lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus delbrueckii NBRC13953, and a photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV, in agar gels was studied. Glucose was converted to hydrogen gas in a yield of 7.1mol of hydrogen per mole of glucose at a maximum under illuminated conditions. (author)

  11. Isolation of a bacterium that reductively dechlorinates tetrachloroethene to ethene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maymo-Gatell, X.; Chien, Yueh-tyng; Zinder, S.H. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-06-06

    Tetrachloroethene is a prominent groundwater pollutant that can be reductively dechlorinated by mixed anaerobic microbial populations to the nontoxic product ethene. Strain 195, a coccoid bacterium that dechlorinates tetrachlorethene to ethene, was isolated and characterized. Growth of strain 195 with H{sub 2} and tetrachloroethene as the electron donor and acceptor pair required extracts from mixed microbial cultures. Growth of strain 195 was resistant to ampicillin and vancomycin; its cell wall did not react with a peptidoglycan-specific lectin and its ultrastructure resembled S-layers of Archaea. Analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence of strain 195 indicated that it is a eubacterium without close affiliation to any known groups. 24 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Genome analysis of the Anerobic Thermohalophilic bacterium Halothermothrix orenii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Ivanova, Natalia; Anderson, Iain; Lykidis, Athanasios; Hooper, Sean D.; Sun, Hui; Kunin, Victor; Lapidus, Alla; Hugenholtz, Philip; Patel, Bharat; Kyrpides, Nikos C.

    2008-11-03

    Halothermothirx orenii is a strictly anaerobic thermohalophilic bacterium isolated from sediment of a Tunisian salt lake. It belongs to the order Halanaerobiales in the phylum Firmicutes. The complete sequence revealed that the genome consists of one circular chromosome of 2578146 bps encoding 2451 predicted genes. This is the first genome sequence of an organism belonging to the Haloanaerobiales. Features of both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria were identified with the presence of both a sporulating mechanism typical of Firmicutes and a characteristic Gram negative lipopolysaccharide being the most prominent. Protein sequence analyses and metabolic reconstruction reveal a unique combination of strategies for thermophilic and halophilic adaptation. H. orenii can serve as a model organism for the study of the evolution of the Gram negative phenotype as well as the adaptation under thermohalophilic conditions and the development of biotechnological applications under conditions that require high temperatures and high salt concentrations.

  13. Characterisation of an unusual bacterium isolated from genital ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursi, J P; van Dyck, E; Ballard, R C; Jacob, W; Piot, P; Meheus, A Z

    1982-02-01

    The preliminary characterisation of an unusual gram-negative bacillus isolated from genital ulcers in Swaziland is reported. Like Haemophilus ducreyi, it is an oxidase positive, nitrate-reductase-positive gram-negative rod that forms streptobacillary chains in some circumstances; it was therefore called the "ducreyi-like bacterium" (DLB). Distinguishing features of DLB are production of alpha-haemolysis on horse-blood agar, stimulation of growth by a microaerophilic atmosphere and by a factor produced by Staphylococcus aureus, a strongly positive porphyrin test, and a remarkable ability to undergo autolysis. DLB had a guanine + cytosine value of c. 50 mole% but it cannot be classified, even at the genus level, until more taxonomic data are obtained.

  14. The domestication of the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Matthew J; Jolley, Keith A; Bray, James E; Aerts, Maarten; Vandamme, Peter; Maiden, Martin C J; Marchesi, Julian R; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

    2014-11-26

    Lactobacillus acidophilus is a Gram-positive lactic acid bacterium that has had widespread historical use in the dairy industry and more recently as a probiotic. Although L. acidophilus has been designated as safe for human consumption, increasing commercial regulation and clinical demands for probiotic validation has resulted in a need to understand its genetic diversity. By drawing on large, well-characterised collections of lactic acid bacteria, we examined L. acidophilus isolates spanning 92 years and including multiple strains in current commercial use. Analysis of the whole genome sequence data set (34 isolate genomes) demonstrated L. acidophilus was a low diversity, monophyletic species with commercial isolates essentially identical at the sequence level. Our results indicate that commercial use has domesticated L. acidophilus with genetically stable, invariant strains being consumed globally by the human population.

  15. A bacterium that degrades and assimilates poly(ethylene terephthalate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shosuke; Hiraga, Kazumi; Takehana, Toshihiko; Taniguchi, Ikuo; Yamaji, Hironao; Maeda, Yasuhito; Toyohara, Kiyotsuna; Miyamoto, Kenji; Kimura, Yoshiharu; Oda, Kohei

    2016-03-11

    Poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) is used extensively worldwide in plastic products, and its accumulation in the environment has become a global concern. Because the ability to enzymatically degrade PET has been thought to be limited to a few fungal species, biodegradation is not yet a viable remediation or recycling strategy. By screening natural microbial communities exposed to PET in the environment, we isolated a novel bacterium, Ideonella sakaiensis 201-F6, that is able to use PET as its major energy and carbon source. When grown on PET, this strain produces two enzymes capable of hydrolyzing PET and the reaction intermediate, mono(2-hydroxyethyl) terephthalic acid. Both enzymes are required to enzymatically convert PET efficiently into its two environmentally benign monomers, terephthalic acid and ethylene glycol. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Endocytosis-like protein uptake in the bacterium Gemmata obscuriglobus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonhienne, Thierry G A; Sagulenko, Evgeny; Webb, Richard I; Lee, Kuo-Chang; Franke, Josef; Devos, Damien P; Nouwens, Amanda; Carroll, Bernard J; Fuerst, John A

    2010-07-20

    Endocytosis is a process by which extracellular material such as macromolecules can be incorporated into cells via a membrane-trafficking system. Although universal among eukaryotes, endocytosis has not been identified in Bacteria or Archaea. However, intracellular membranes are known to compartmentalize cells of bacteria in the phylum Planctomycetes, suggesting the potential for endocytosis and membrane trafficking in members of this phylum. Here we show that cells of the planctomycete Gemmata obscuriglobus have the ability to uptake proteins present in the external milieu in an energy-dependent process analogous to eukaryotic endocytosis, and that internalized proteins are associated with vesicle membranes. Occurrence of such ability in a bacterium is consistent with autogenous evolution of endocytosis and the endomembrane system in an ancestral noneukaryote cell.

  17. Transcriptome analysis reveals response regulator SO2426-mediated gene expression in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under chromate challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chourey Karuna

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 exhibits diverse metal ion-reducing capabilities and thus is of potential utility as a bioremediation agent. Knowledge of the molecular components and regulatory mechanisms dictating cellular responses to heavy metal stress, however, remains incomplete. In a previous work, the S. oneidensis so2426 gene, annotated as a DNA-binding response regulator, was demonstrated to be specifically responsive at both the transcript and protein levels to acute chromate [Cr(VI] challenge. To delineate the cellular function of SO2426 and its contribution to metal stress response, we integrated genetic and physiological approaches with a genome-wide screen for target gene candidates comprising the SO2426 regulon. Results Inactivation of so2426 by an in-frame deletion resulted in enhanced chromate sensitivity and a reduced capacity to remove extracellular Cr(VI relative to the parental strain. Time-resolved microarray analysis was used to compare transcriptomic profiles of wild-type and SO2426-deficient mutant S. oneidensis under conditions of chromate exposure. In total, 841 genes (18% of the arrayed genome were up- or downregulated at least twofold in the Δso2426 mutant for at least one of six time-point conditions. Hierarchical cluster analysis of temporal transcriptional profiles identified a distinct cluster (n = 46 comprised of co-ordinately regulated genes exhibiting significant downregulated expression (p e.g., siderophore biosynthetic enzymes, TonB-dependent receptors, and the iron-storage protein ferritin. A conserved hypothetical operon (so1188-so1189-so1190, previously identified as a potential target of Fur-mediated repression, as well as a putative bicyclomycin resistance gene (so2280 and cation efflux family protein gene (so2045 also were repressed in the so2426 deletion mutant. Furthermore, the temporal expression profiles of four regulatory genes including a cpxR homolog were perturbed in the

  18. Complete genome sequence of the photoautotrophic and bacteriochlorophyll e-synthesizing green sulfur bacterium Chlorobaculum limnaeum DSM 1677T

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tank, Marcus; Liu, Zhenfeng; Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    Chlorobaculum limnaeum DSM 1677T is a mesophilic, brown-colored, chlorophototrophic green sulfur bacterium that produces bacteriochlorophyll e and the carotenoid isorenieratene as major pigments. This bacterium serves as a model organism in molecular research on photosynthesis, sulfur metabolism...

  19. Identification and Characterization of MtoA: a Decaheme c-Type Cytochrome of the Neutrophilic Fe(II-oxidizing Bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eLiu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacterium Sideroxydans lithotrophicus ES-1 (ES-1 grows on FeCO3 or FeS at oxic-anoxic interfaces at circumneutral pH, and the ES-1-mediated Fe(II oxidation occurs extracellularly. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying ES-1’s ability to oxidize Fe(II remain unknown. Survey of the ES-1 genome for candidate genes for microbial extracellular Fe(II oxidation revealed that it contained a three-gene cluster encoding homologues of MtrA, MtrB and CymA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 (MR-1 that are involved in extracellular Fe(III reduction. Homologues of MtrA and MtrB were also involved in extracellular Fe(II oxidation by Rhodopseudomonas palustris TIE-1. To distinguish them from those found in MR-1, the identified homologues were named MtoAB and CymAES-1. Cloned mtoA partially complemented an MR-1 mutant without MtrA with regards to ferrihydrite reduction. Characterization of purified MtoA showed that it was a decaheme c-type cytochrome and oxidized soluble Fe(II. Oxidation of Fe(II by MtoA was pH- and Fe(II-complexing ligand-dependent. Under conditions tested, MtoA oxidized Fe(II from pH 7-9 with the optimal rate at pH 9. MtoA oxidized Fe(II complexed with different ligands at different rates. The reaction rates followed the order Fe(IICl2 > Fe(II-citrate > Fe(II-NTA > Fe(II-EDTA with the second-order rate constants ranging from 6.3 × 10-3 μM-1s-1 for oxidation of Fe(IICl2 to 1.0 × 10-3 μM-1s-1 for oxidation of Fe(II-EDTA. Thermodynamic modeling shows that redox reaction rates for the different Fe(II-complexes correlated with their respective estimated reaction-free energies. Collectively, these results demonstrate that MtoA is a functional Fe(II-oxidizing protein and, by working in concert with MtoB and CymAES 1, may oxidize Fe(II at the bacterial surface and transfer released electrons across the bacterial cell envelope to the quinone pool in the inner membrane during extracellular Fe(II oxidation by ES-1.

  20. In-vivo identification of direct electron transfer from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to electrodes via outer-membrane OmcA-MtrCAB protein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Akihiro [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nakamura, Ryuhei, E-mail: nakamura@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuhito, E-mail: hashimoto@light.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Applied Chemistry, School of Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); ERATO/JST, HASHIMOTO Light Energy Conversion Project (Japan)

    2011-06-30

    Graphical abstract: . Display Omitted Highlights: > Monolayer biofilm of Shewanella cells was prepared on an ITO electrode. > Extracellular electron transfer (EET) process was examined with series of mutants. > Direct ET was confirmed with outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB complex. > The EET process was not prominently influenced by capsular polysaccharide. - Abstract: The direct electron-transfer (DET) property of Shewanella bacteria has not been resolved in detail due to the complexity of in vivo electrochemistry in whole-cell systems. Here, we report the in vivo assignment of the redox signal indicative of the DET property in biofilms of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 by cyclic voltammetry (CV) with a series of mutants and a chemical marking technique. The CV measurements of monolayer biofilms formed by deletion mutants of c-type cytochromes ({Delta}mtrA, {Delta}mtrB, {Delta}mtrC/{Delta}omcA, and {Delta}cymA), and pilin ({Delta}pilD), capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) and menaquinone ({Delta}menD) biosynthetic proteins demonstrated that the electrochemical redox signal with a midpoint potential at 50 mV (vs. SHE) was due to an outer-membrane-bound OmcA-MtrCAB protein complex of decaheme cytochromes, and did not involve either inner-membrane-bound CymA protein or secreted menaquinone. Using the specific binding affinity of nitric monoxide for the heme groups of c-type cytochromes, we further confirmed this conclusion. The heterogeneous standard rate constant for the DET process was estimated to be 300 {+-} 10 s{sup -1}, which was two orders of magnitude higher than that previously reported for the electron shuttling process via riboflavin. Experiments using a mutant unable to produce capsular polysaccharide ({Delta}SO3177) revealed that the DET property of the OmcA-MtrCAB complex was not influenced by insulating and hydrophilic extracellular polysaccharide. Accordingly, under physiological conditions, S. oneidensis MR-1 utilizes a high density of outer

  1. The acid-tolerant L-arabinose isomerase from the mesophilic Shewanella sp. ANA-3 is highly active at low temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhimi Moez

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background L-arabinose isomerases catalyse the isomerization of L-arabinose into L-ribulose at insight biological systems. At industrial scale of this enzyme is used for the bioconversion of D-galactose into D-tagatose which has many applications in pharmaceutical and agro-food industries. The isomerization reaction is thermodynamically equilibrated, and therefore the bioconversion rates is shifted towards tagatose when the temperature is increased. Moreover, to prevent secondary reactions it will be of interest to operate at low pH. The profitability of this D-tagatose production process is mainly related to the use of lactose as cheaper raw material. In many dairy products it will be interesting to produce D-tagatose during storage. This requires an efficient L-arabinose isomerase acting at low temperature and pH values. Results The gene encoding the L-arabinose isomerase from Shewanella sp. ANA-3 was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified protein has a tetrameric arrangement composed by four identical 55 kDa subunits. The biochemical characterization of this enzyme showed that it was distinguishable by its maximal activity at low temperatures comprised between 15-35°C. Interestingly, this biocatalyst preserves more than 85% of its activity in a broad range of temperatures from 4.0 to 45°C. Shewanella sp. ANA-3 L-arabinose isomerase was also optimally active at pH 5.5-6.5 and maintained over 80% of its activity at large pH values from 4.0 to 8.5. Furthermore, this enzyme exhibited a weak requirement for metallic ions for its activity evaluated at 0.6 mM Mn2+. Stability studies showed that this protein is highly stable mainly at low temperature and pH values. Remarkably, T268K mutation clearly enhances the enzyme stability at low pH values. Use of this L-arabinose isomerase for D-tagatose production allows the achievement of attractive bioconversion rates of 16% at 4°C and 34% at 35°C. Conclusions Here we

  2. Differential Label-free Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Shewanella oneidensis Cultured under Aerobic and Suboxic Conditions by Accurate Mass and Time Tag Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Ruihua; Elias, Dwayne A.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Shen, Yufeng; McIntosh, Martin; Wang, Pei; Goddard, Carrie D.; Callister, Stephen J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Gorby, Yuri A.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Lipton, Mary S.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the application of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC/MS) without the use of stable isotope labeling for differential quantitative proteomics analysis of whole cell lysates of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 cultured under aerobic and sub-oxic conditions. Liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used to initially identify peptide sequences, and LC coupled to Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LC-FTICR) was used to confirm these identifications, as well as measure relative peptide abundances. 2343 peptides, covering 668 proteins were identified with high confidence and quantified. Among these proteins, a subset of 56 changed significantly using statistical approaches such as SAM, while another subset of 56 that were annotated as performing housekeeping functions remained essentially unchanged in relative abundance. Numerous proteins involved in anaerobic energy metabolism exhibited up to a 10-fold increase in relative abundance when S. oneidensis is transitioned from aerobic to sub-oxic conditions.

  3. Preparation and characterization of stable cross-linked enzyme aggregates of novel laccase enzyme from Shewanella putrefaciens and using malachite green decolorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinirlioglu, Zeynep Aydin; Sinirlioglu, Deniz; Akbas, Fahri

    2013-10-01

    A novel type laccase from Shewanella putrefaciens was identified, expressed in Escherichia coli, characterized, prepared in cross-linked enzyme aggregates (CLEA) for industrial applications and investigated of decolorization activity on malchite green dye. Enzyme characterization was investigated by enzyme assay, SDS-PAGE and other biochemical reactions. Moreover, cross-linked enzyme aggregates were prepared and characterized. Saturated ammonium sulphate solution was used as the precipitating agent and cross linked with glutaraldehyde. These CLEA-laccase aggregates showed more catalytic efficiency and more stabilities compared to free laccase against harsh conditions of thermal and chemical agents as well as high reusability. Also it showed more decolorization ability. These results suggest that this CLEA is potentially usable in industrial applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Modeling antimicrobial activity of lipopeptides from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ES-2 against Shewanella putrefaciens in shrimp meat using a response surface method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huanming; Sun, Lijun; Wang, Yaling; Lei, Xiaoling; Xu, Defeng

    2012-10-01

    Bacillus amyloliquefaciens ES-2 can produce antimicrobial lipopeptides, including surfactin and fengycin. In this study, the model of antimicrobial activity against Shewanella putrefaciens in shrimp meat by antimicrobial lipopeptides from B. amyloliquefaciens ES-2 was researched by response surface methodology. The results showed that S. putrefaciens had high sensitivity to antimicrobial lipopeptides, which had a MIC of 0.6 mg/ml. A quadratic mathematical model representative of the action of antimicrobial lipopeptides on S. putrefaciens in shrimp meat was developed as a function of concentration, time, and temperature. A reduction of S. putrefaciens cells of over 2 log cycles could be realized when the temperature was below 5.4°C, the time was over 6 h, and the concentration of the lipopeptides was over 0.3 mg/g.

  5. Functional roles of CymA and NapC in reduction of nitrate and nitrite by Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beliav, Alex; Qiu, Dongru; Fredrickson, James K.; Wei, Hehong; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Xia, Ming; Zhou, Jizhong; Dai, Jingcheng; Shi, Liang; Tiedje, James M.; Romine, Margaret F.

    2016-06-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 harbours two periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) gene clusters, NapC-associated nap-alpha (napEDABC) and CymA-dependent nap-beta (napDAGHB), for dissimilatory nitrate respiration. CymA is a member of the NapC/NirT quinol dehydrogenase family and acts as a hub to support different respiratory pathways, including those on iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(III, IV)] (hydr)oxide, nitrate, nitrite, fumarate and arsenate in Shewanella strains. However, in our analysis it was shown that another NapC/NirT family protein, NapC, was only involved in nitrate reduction, although both CymA and NapC can transfer quinol-derived electrons to a periplasmic terminal reductase or an electron acceptor. Furthermore, our results showed that NapC could only interact specifically with the Nap-alpha nitrate reductase while CymA could interact promiscuously with Nap-alpha, Nap-beta and the NrfA nitrite reductase for nitrate and nitrite reduction. To further explore the difference in specificity, site-directed mutagenesis on both CymA and NapC was conducted and the phenotypic changes in nitrate and nitrite reduction were tested. Our analyses demonstrated that the Lys-91 residue played a key role in nitrate reduction for quinol oxidation and the Asp-166 residue might influence the maturation of CymA. The Asp-97 residue might be one of the key factors that influence the interaction of CymA with the cytochromes NapB and NrfA.

  6. A Conserved Histidine in Cytochrome c Maturation Permease CcmB of Shewanella putrefaciens Is Required for Anaerobic Growth below a Threshold Standard Redox Potential▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jason R.; Wade, Roy; DiChristina, Thomas J.

    2007-01-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 respires a wide range of compounds as terminal electron acceptor. The respiratory versatility of Shewanella is attributed in part to a set of c-type cytochromes with widely varying midpoint redox potentials (E′0). A point mutant of S. putrefaciens, originally designated Urr14 and here renamed CCMB1, was found to grow at wild-type rates on electron acceptors with high E′0 [O2, NO3−, Fe(III) citrate, MnO2, and Mn(III) pyrophosphate] yet was severely impaired for growth on electron acceptors with low E′0 [NO2−, U(VI), dimethyl sulfoxide, TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide), fumarate, γ-FeOOH, SO32−, and S2O32−]. Genetic complementation and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that the CCMB1 respiratory mutant phenotype was due to mutation of a conserved histidine residue (H108Y) in a protein that displayed high homology to Escherichia coli CcmB, the permease subunit of an ABC transporter involved in cytochrome c maturation. Although CCMB1 retained the ability to grow on electron acceptors with high E′0, the cytochrome content of CCMB1 was <10% of that of the wild-type strain. Periplasmic extracts of CCMB1 contained slightly greater concentrations of the thiol functional group (-SH) than did the wild-type strain, an indication that the Eh of the CCMB1 periplasm was abnormally low. A ccmB deletion mutant was unable to respire anaerobically on any electron acceptor, yet retained aerobic respiratory capability. These results suggest that the mutation of a conserved histidine residue (H108) in CCMB1 alters the redox homeostasis of the periplasm during anaerobic growth on electron acceptors with low (but not high) E′0. This is the first report of the effects of Ccm deficiencies on bacterial respiration of electron acceptors whose E′0 nearly span the entire redox continuum. PMID:17142390

  7. Functional roles of CymA and NapC in reduction of nitrate and nitrite by Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hehong; Dai, Jingcheng; Xia, Ming; Romine, Margaret F; Shi, Liang; Beliav, Alex; Tiedje, James M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fredrickson, James K; Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru

    2016-06-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens W3-18-1 harbours two periplasmic nitrate reductase (Nap) gene clusters, NapC-associated nap-alpha (napEDABC) and CymA-dependent nap-beta (napDAGHB), for dissimilatory nitrate respiration. CymA is a member of the NapC/NirT quinol dehydrogenase family and acts as a hub to support different respiratory pathways, including those on iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(III, IV)] (hydr)oxide, nitrate, nitrite, fumarate and arsenate in Shewanella strains. However, in our analysis it was shown that another NapC/NirT family protein, NapC, was only involved in nitrate reduction, although both CymA and NapC can transfer quinol-derived electrons to a periplasmic terminal reductase or an electron acceptor. Furthermore, our results showed that NapC could only interact specifically with the Nap-alpha nitrate reductase while CymA could interact promiscuously with Nap-alpha, Nap-beta and the NrfA nitrite reductase for nitrate and nitrite reduction. To further explore the difference in specificity, site-directed mutagenesis on both CymA and NapC was conducted and the phenotypic changes in nitrate and nitrite reduction were tested. Our analyses demonstrated that the Lys-91 residue played a key role in nitrate reduction for quinol oxidation and the Asp-166 residue might influence the maturation of CymA. The Asp-97 residue might be one of the key factors that influence the interaction of CymA with the cytochromes NapB and NrfA.

  8. A conserved histidine in cytochrome c maturation permease CcmB of Shewanella putrefaciens is required for anaerobic growth below a threshold standard redox potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dale, Jason R; Wade, Roy; Dichristina, Thomas J

    2007-02-01

    Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 respires a wide range of compounds as terminal electron acceptor. The respiratory versatility of Shewanella is attributed in part to a set of c-type cytochromes with widely varying midpoint redox potentials (E'(0)). A point mutant of S. putrefaciens, originally designated Urr14 and here renamed CCMB1, was found to grow at wild-type rates on electron acceptors with high E'0 [O2, NO3-, Fe(III) citrate, MnO2, and Mn(III) pyrophosphate] yet was severely impaired for growth on electron acceptors with low E'0 [NO2-, U(VI), dimethyl sulfoxide, TMAO (trimethylamine N-oxide), fumarate, gamma-FeOOH, SO3(2-), and S2O3(2-)]. Genetic complementation and nucleotide sequence analyses indicated that the CCMB1 respiratory mutant phenotype was due to mutation of a conserved histidine residue (H108Y) in a protein that displayed high homology to Escherichia coli CcmB, the permease subunit of an ABC transporter involved in cytochrome c maturation. Although CCMB1 retained the ability to grow on electron acceptors with high E'(0), the cytochrome content of CCMB1 was <10% of that of the wild-type strain. Periplasmic extracts of CCMB1 contained slightly greater concentrations of the thiol functional group (-SH) than did the wild-type strain, an indication that the E(h) of the CCMB1 periplasm was abnormally low. A ccmB deletion mutant was unable to respire anaerobically on any electron acceptor, yet retained aerobic respiratory capability. These results suggest that the mutation of a conserved histidine residue (H108) in CCMB1 alters the redox homeostasis of the periplasm during anaerobic growth on electron acceptors with low (but not high) E'0. This is the first report of the effects of Ccm deficiencies on bacterial respiration of electron acceptors whose E'0 nearly span the entire redox continuum.

  9. High- and low-affinity binding sites for Cd on the bacterial cell walls of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim; Bunker, Bruce A.; Kelly, Shelly D.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2010-08-01

    Bulk Cd adsorption isotherm experiments, thermodynamic equilibrium modeling, and Cd K edge EXAFS were used to constrain the mechanisms of proton and Cd adsorption to bacterial cells of the commonly occurring Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella oneidensis, respectively. Potentiometric titrations were used to characterize the functional group reactivity of the S. oneidensis cells, and we model the titration data using the same type of non-electrostatic surface complexation approach as was applied to titrations of B. subtilis suspensions by Fein et al. (2005). Similar to the results for B. subtilis, the S. oneidensis cells exhibit buffering behavior from approximately pH 3-9 that requires the presence of four distinct sites, with p Ka values of 3.3 ± 0.2, 4.8 ± 0.2, 6.7 ± 0.4, and 9.4 ± 0.5, and site concentrations of 8.9(±2.6) × 10 -5, 1.3(±0.2) × 10 -4, 5.9(±3.3) × 10 -5, and 1.1(±0.6) × 10 -4 moles/g bacteria (wet mass), respectively. The bulk Cd isotherm adsorption data for both species, conducted at pH 5.9 as a function of Cd concentration at a fixed biomass concentration, were best modeled by reactions with a Cd:site stoichiometry of 1:1. EXAFS data were collected for both bacterial species as a function of Cd concentration at pH 5.9 and 10 g/L bacteria. The EXAFS results show that the same types of binding sites are responsible for Cd sorption to both bacterial species at all Cd loadings tested (1-200 ppm). Carboxyl sites are responsible for the binding at intermediate Cd loadings. Phosphoryl ligands are more important than carboxyl ligands for Cd binding at high Cd loadings. For the lowest Cd loadings studied here, a sulfhydryl site was found to dominate the bound Cd budgets for both species, in addition to the carboxyl and phosphoryl sites that dominate the higher loadings. The EXAFS results suggest that both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cell walls have a low concentration of very high

  10. Electromicrobiology of Dissimilatory Sulfur Reducing Bacterium Desulfuromonas acetexigens

    KAUST Repository

    Bin Bandar, Khaled

    2014-12-01

    Bioelectrochmical systems (BES) are engineered electrochemical devices that harness hidden chemical energy of the wastewater in to the form of electricity or hydrogen. Unique microbial communities enrich in these systems for oxidation of organic matter as well as transfer of resulted electron to anode, known them as “electricigens” communities. Exploring novel electricigenesis microbial communities in the nature and understanding their electromicrobiology is one the important aspect for BES systems scale up. Herein, we report first time the electricigenesis property of an anaerobic, fresh water sediment, sulfur reducing bacterium Desulfuromona acetexigens. The electrochemical behavior of D. acetexigens biofilms grown on graphite-rod electrodes in batch-fed mode under an applied potential was investigated with traditional electroanalytical tools, and correlate the electron transfer from biofilms to electrode with a model electricigen Geobacter sulfurreducens electrochemical behavior. Research findings suggest that D. acetexigens has the ability to use electrode as electron acceptor in BES systems through establishing the direct contact with anode by expressing the membrane bound redox proteins, but not due to the secretion of soluble redox mediators. Preliminary results revealed that D. acetexigens express three distinct redox proteins in their membranes for turnover of the electrons from biofilm to electrode, and the 4 whole electricigenesis process observed to be unique in the D. acetexigens compared to that of well-studied model organism G. sulfurreducens.

  11. Pandoraea sp. RB-44, A Novel Quorum Sensing Soil Bacterium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Ee Han-Jen

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Proteobacteria are known to communicate via signaling molecules and this process is known as quorum sensing. The most commonly studied quorum sensing molecules are N-acylhomoserine lactones (AHLs that consists of a homoserine lactone moiety and an N-acyl side chain with various chain lengths and degrees of saturation at the C-3 position. We have isolated a bacterium, RB-44, from a site which was formally a landfill dumping ground. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, this isolate was identified as a Pandoraea sp.which was then screened for AHL production using biosensors which indicated its quorum sensing properties. To identify the AHL profile of Pandoraea sp. RB-44, we used high resolution tandem mass spectrometry confirming that this isolate produced N-octanoylhomoserine lactone (C8-HSL. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that showed quorum sensing activity exhibited by Pandoraea sp. Our data add Pandoraea sp. to the growing number of bacteria that possess QS systems.

  12. Tracing the run-flip motion of an individual bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Morse, Michael; Tang, Jay; Powers, Thomas; Breuer, Kenneth S.

    2012-11-01

    We have developed a digital 3D tracking microscope in which the microscope stage follows the motion of an individual motile microorganism so that the target remains focused at the center of the view-field. The tracking mechanism is achieved by a high-speed feedback control through real-time image analysis and the trace of the microorganism is recorded with submicron accuracy. We apply this tracking microscope to a study of the motion of an individual Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium that moves up to 100 microns (or 50 body lengths) per second and reverses its direction of motion occasionally by switching the rotation direction of its single helical flagellum. By tracking the motion of a single cell over many seconds, we show how a flip event occurs with submicron resolution and how the speed of a single cell varies over time and with the rotational rate of the flagellum. We also present statistics for the run-reverse dynamics of an ensemble of cells.

  13. Presence of an unusual methanogenic bacterium in coal gasification waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomei, F A; Rouse, D; Maki, J S; Mitchell, R

    1988-12-01

    Methanogenic bacteria growing on a pilot-scale, anaerobic filter processing coal gasification waste were enriched in a mineral salts medium containing hydrogen and acetate as potential energy sources. Transfer of the enrichments to methanol medium resulted in the initial growth of a strain of Methanosarcina barkeri, but eventually small cocci became dominant. The cocci growing on methanol produced methane and exhibited the typical fluorescence of methanogenic bacteria. They grew in the presence of the cell wall synthesis-inhibiting antibiotics d-cycloserine, fosfomycin, penicillin G, and vancomycin as well as in the presence of kanamycin, an inhibitor of protein synthesis in eubacteria. The optimal growth temperature was 37 degrees C, and the doubling time was 7.5 h. The strain lysed after reaching stationary phase. The bacterium grew poorly with hydrogen as the energy source and failed to grow on acetate. Morphologically, the coccus shared similarities with Methanosarcina sp. Cells were 1 mum wide, exhibited the typical thick cell wall and cross-wall formation, and formed tetrads. Packets and cysts were not formed.

  14. Fungal lysis by a soil bacterium fermenting cellulose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolonen, Andrew C; Cerisy, Tristan; El-Sayyed, Hafez; Boutard, Magali; Salanoubat, Marcel; Church, George M

    2015-08-01

    Recycling of plant biomass by a community of bacteria and fungi is fundamental to carbon flow in terrestrial ecosystems. Here we report how the plant fermenting, soil bacterium Clostridium phytofermentans enhances growth on cellulose by simultaneously lysing and consuming model fungi from soil. We investigate the mechanism of fungal lysis to show that among the dozens of different glycoside hydrolases C. phytofermentans secretes on cellulose, the most highly expressed enzymes degrade fungi rather than plant substrates. These enzymes, the GH18 Cphy1799 and Cphy1800, synergize to hydrolyse chitin, a main component of the fungal cell wall. Purified enzymes inhibit fungal growth and mutants lacking either GH18 grow normally on cellulose and other plant substrates, but have a reduced ability to hydrolyse chitinous substrates and fungal hyphae. Thus, C. phytofermentans boosts growth on cellulose by lysing fungi with its most highly expressed hydrolases, highlighting the importance of fungal interactions to the ecology of cellulolytic bacteria. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisshaar, R; Lingens, F

    1983-12-01

    Lipopolysaccharide of a chloridazon-degrading bacterium was obtained by a two-stage extraction procedure with phenol/EDTA in a yield of 0.3% of dried bacteria. The carbohydrate moiety consisted of heptose, 3-deoxyoctulosonic acid and D-glucose in a molar ratio of 1:2:2 X 3. Lipid A was composed of 1 mol 2,3-diamino-2,3-dideoxy-D-glucose, 2 mol amide-bound and 2.6 mol ester-bound fatty acids/mol. Amide-bound fatty acids were 3-hydroxydodecanoic acid and 3-hydroxyhexadecanoic acid; dodecanoic acid and R-(-)-3-hydroxydodec-5-cis-enoic acid were found to be present in ester linkage. Under conditions of acidic hydrolysis, the latter was converted into the cis and trans isomers of 5-hexyltetrahydrofuran-2-acetic acid. Dodecanoic acid was demonstrated to be linked with the hydroxy groups of the amide-bound fatty acids. The taxonomic significance of these results, especially the demonstration of 2,3-diamino-2, 3-dideoxy-D-glucose, is discussed.

  16. Taxonomic status of the intracellular bacterium Wolbachia pipientis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, N; Paraskevopoulos, C; Bourtzis, K; O'Neill, S L; Werren, J H; Bordenstein, S R; Bandi, C

    2007-03-01

    Wolbachia pipientis is a maternally inherited, intracellular bacterium found in more than 20 % of all insects, as well as numerous other arthropods and filarial nematodes. It has been the subject of a growing number of studies in recent decades, because of the remarkable effects it has on its arthropod hosts, its potential as a tool for biological control of arthropods of agricultural and medical importance and its use as a target for treatment of filariasis. W. pipientis was originally discovered in cells of the mosquito Culex pipiens and is the only formally described member of the genus. Molecular sequence-based studies have revealed a number of phylogenetically diverse strains of W. pipientis. Owing to uncertainty about whether W. pipientis comprises more than one species, researchers in the field now commonly refer to W. pipientis simply as Wolbachia. In this note, we briefly review higher-level phylogenetic and recombination studies of W. pipientis and propose that all the intracellular symbionts known to cluster closely with the type strain of W. pipientis, including those in the currently recognized supergroups (A-H), are officially given this name.

  17. Yersinia ruckeri sp. nov., the redmouth (RM) bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, W.H.; Ross, A.J.; Brenner, Don J.; Fanning, G. R.

    1978-01-01

    Cultures of the redmouth (RM) bacterium, one of the etiological agents of redmouth disease in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) and certain other fishes, were characterized by means of their biochemical reactions, by deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) hybridization, and by determination of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) ratios in DNA. The DNA relatedness studies confirmed the fact that the RM bacteria are members of the family Enterobacteriaceae and that they comprise a single species that is not closely related to any other species of Enterobacteriaceae. They are about 30% related to species of both Serratia and Yersinia. A comparison of the biochemical reactions of RM bacteria and serratiae indicated that there are many differences between these organisms and that biochemically the RM bacteria are most closely related to yersiniae. The G+C ratios of RM bacteria were approximated to be between 47.5 and 48.5% These values are similar to those of yersiniae but markedly different from those of serratiae. On the basis of their biochemical reactions and their G+C ratios, the RM bacteria are considered to be a new species of Yersinia, for which the name Yersinia ruckeri is proposed. Strain 2396-61 (= ATCC 29473) is designated the type strain of the species.

  18. Novel Trypanosomatid-Bacterium Association: Evolution of Endosymbiosis in Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexei Y. Kostygov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel symbiotic association between a kinetoplastid protist, Novymonas esmeraldas gen. nov., sp. nov., and an intracytoplasmic bacterium, “Candidatus Pandoraea novymonadis” sp. nov., discovered as a result of a broad-scale survey of insect trypanosomatid biodiversity in Ecuador. We characterize this association by describing the morphology of both organisms, as well as their interactions, and by establishing their phylogenetic affinities. Importantly, neither partner is closely related to other known organisms previously implicated in eukaryote-bacterial symbiosis. This symbiotic association seems to be relatively recent, as the host does not exert a stringent control over the number of bacteria harbored in its cytoplasm. We argue that this unique relationship may represent a suitable model for studying the initial stages of establishment of endosymbiosis between a single-cellular eukaryote and a prokaryote. Based on phylogenetic analyses, Novymonas could be considered a proxy for the insect-only ancestor of the dixenous genus Leishmania and shed light on the origin of the two-host life cycle within the subfamily Leishmaniinae.

  19. Denitrification characteristics of a marine origin psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haiyan Zheng; Ying Liu; Guangdong Sun; Xiyan Gao; Qingling Zhang; Zhipei Liu

    2011-01-01

    A psychrophilic aerobic denitrifying bacterium,strain S1-1,was isolated from a biological aerated filter conducted for treatment of recirculating water in a marine aquaculture system.Strain S1-1 was preliminarily identified as Psychrobacter sp.based on the analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence,which showed 100% sequence similarity to that of Psychrobacter sp.TSBY-70.Strain S 1-1 grew well either in high nitrate or high nitrite conditions with a removal of 100% nitrate or 63.50% nitrite,and the total nitrogen removal rates could reach to 46.48% and 31.89%,respectively.The results indicated that nitrate was mainly reduced in its logarithmic growth phase with a very low leve 1 accumulation of nitrite,suggesting that the aerobic denitrification process of strain S l-1 occurred mainly in this phase.The GC-MS results showed that N2O was formed as the major intermediate during the aerobic denitrifying process of strain S1-1.Finally,factors affecting the growth of strain Sl-1 and its aerobic denitrifying ability were also investigated.Results showed that the optimum aerobic denitrification conditions for strain S1-1 were sodium succinate as carbon source,C/N ratio15,salinity 10 g/L NaCl,incubation temperature 20℃ and initial pH 6.5.

  20. IN SITU RT-PCR WITH A SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIUM ISOLATED FROM SEAGRASS ROOTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacteria considered to be obligate anaerobes internally colonize roots of the submerged macrophyte Halodule wrightii. A sulfate reducing bacterium, Summer lac 1, was isolated on lactate from H. wrightii roots. The isolate has physiological characteristics typical of Desulfovibri...

  1. The quantitative determination of the spectral distribution of phototactic sensitivity in the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milatz, J.M.W.; Manten, A.

    1953-01-01

    By using a compensation method, the action spectrum (spectral distribution of stimulating efficiency in a quantitative measure) of phototaxis in the purple bacterium Rhodospirillum rubrum (Esmarch) Molisch Strain 4 was determined. Two differently coloured adjacent small light fields were projected

  2. Effect of alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the growth of Laminaria japonica (Phaeophyceae)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG You; TANG Xue-xi; YANG Zhen; YU Zhi-ming

    2006-01-01

    We collected the diseased blades of Laminaria japonica from Yantai Sea Farm from October to December 2002, and the alginic acid decomposing bacterium on the diseased blade was isolated and purified, and was identified as Alteromonas espejiana. This bacterium was applied as the causative pathogen to infect the blades of L. japonica under laboratory conditions. The aim of the present study was to identify the effects of the bacterium on the growth of L. japonica, and to find the possibly effective mechanism. Results showed that: (1)The blades of L.japonica exhibited symptoms of lesion,bleaching and deterioration when infected by the bacterium,and their growth and photosynthesis were dramatically suppressed. At the same time, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation enhanced obviously, and the relative membrane permeability increased significantly. The contents of malonaldehyde (MDA) and free fatty acid in the microsomol membrane greatly elevated, but the phospholipid content decreased. Result suggested an obvious peroxidation and deesterrification in the blades of L. japonica when infected by the bacterium. (2) The simultaneous assay on the antioxidant enzyme activities demonstrated that superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) increased greatly when infected by the bacterium, but glutathione peroxidase (Gpx) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) did not exhibit active responses to the bacterium throughout the experiment. (3) The histomorphological observations gave a distinctive evidence of the severity of the lesions as well as the relative abundance in the bacterial population on the blades after infection. The bacterium firstly invaded into the endodermis of L. japonica and gathered around there, and then resulted in the membrane damage, cells corruption and ultimately, the death of L.japonica.

  3. Endohyphal bacterium enhances production of indole-3-acetic acid by a foliar fungal endophyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michele T; Gunatilaka, Malkanthi K; Wijeratne, Kithsiri; Gunatilaka, Leslie; Arnold, A Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Numerous plant pathogens, rhizosphere symbionts, and endophytic bacteria and yeasts produce the important phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), often with profound effects on host plants. However, to date IAA production has not been documented among foliar endophytes -- the diverse guild of primarily filamentous Ascomycota that live within healthy, above-ground tissues of all plant species studied thus far. Recently bacteria that live within hyphae of endophytes (endohyphal bacteria) have been detected, but their effects have not been studied previously. Here we show not only that IAA is produced in vitro by a foliar endophyte (here identified as Pestalotiopsis aff. neglecta, Xylariales), but that IAA production is enhanced significantly when the endophyte hosts an endohyphal bacterium (here identified as Luteibacter sp., Xanthomonadales). Both the endophyte and the endophyte/bacterium complex appear to rely on an L-tryptophan dependent pathway for IAA synthesis. The bacterium can be isolated from the fungus when the symbiotic complex is cultivated at 36°C. In pure culture the bacterium does not produce IAA. Culture filtrate from the endophyte-bacterium complex significantly enhances growth of tomato in vitro relative to controls and to filtrate from the endophyte alone. Together these results speak to a facultative symbiosis between an endophyte and endohyphal bacterium that strongly influences IAA production, providing a new framework in which to explore endophyte-plant interactions.

  4. Treatment of common warts with the immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Nilton

    2012-01-01

    Warts are epithelial proliferations in the skin and mucous membrane caused by various types of HPV. They can decrease spontaneously or increase in size and number according to the patient's immune status. The Propionium bacterium parvum is a strong immune stimulant and immune modulator and has important effects in the immune system and it is able to produce antibodies in the skin. To show the efficacy of the Propionium bacterium parvum in saline solution in the treatment of skin warts. A randomized double-blind study. Twenty patients with multiple warts were divided into two groups: one received 0,1 ml intradermal injection of placebo solution in just one of the warts and the other received 0,1 ml of saline solution of Propionium bacterium parvum, one dose a month, for 3 to 5 months. Among the 20 patients who participated in the study, ten received the placebo and ten received the saline solution with Propionium bacterium parvum. In 9 patients treated with the Propionium bacterium parvum solution the warts disappeared without scars and in 1 patient it decreased in size. In 9 patients who received the placebo no change to the warts was observed and in 1 it decreased in size. The immune modulator and immune stimulant Propionium bacterium parvum produced antibodies in the skin which destroyed the warts without scars, with statistically significant results (Pwarts.

  5. Impacts of Shewanella putrefaciens strain CN-32 cells and extracellular polymeric substances on the sorption of As(V) and As(III) on Fe(III)-(hydr)oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jen-How; Elzinga, Evert J; Brechbuehl, Yves; Voegelin, Andreas; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2011-04-01

    We investigated the effects of Shewanella putrefaciens cells and extracellular polymeric substances on the sorption of As(III) and As(V) to goethite, ferrihydrite, and hematite at pH 7.0. Adsorption of As(III) and As(V) at solution concentrations between 0.001 and 20 μM decreased by 10 to 45% in the presence of 0.3 g L(-1) EPS, with As(III) being affected more strongly than As(V). Also, inactivated Shewanella cells induced desorption of As(V) from the Fe(III)-(hydr)oxide mineral surfaces. ATR-FTIR studies of ternary As(V)-Shewanella-hematite systems indicated As(V) desorption concurrent with attachment of bacterial cells at the hematite surface, and showed evidence of inner-sphere coordination of bacterial phosphate and carboxylate groups at hematite surface sites. Competition between As(V) and bacterial phosphate and carboxylate groups for Fe(III)-(oxyhydr)oxide surface sites is proposed as an important factor leading to increased solubility of As(V). The results from this study have implications for the solubility of As(V) in the soil rhizosphere and in geochemical systems undergoing microbially mediated reduction and indicate that the presence of sorbed oxyanions may affect Fe-reduction and biofilm development at mineral surfaces.

  6. Phenotypic variation in the plant pathogenic bacterium Acidovorax citrulli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Kumar Shrestha

    Full Text Available Acidovorax citrulli causes bacterial fruit blotch (BFB of cucurbits, a disease that threatens the cucurbit industry worldwide. Despite the economic importance of BFB, little is known about pathogenicity and fitness strategies of the bacterium. We have observed the phenomenon of phenotypic variation in A. citrulli. Here we report the characterization of phenotypic variants (PVs of two strains, M6 and 7a1, isolated from melon and watermelon, respectively. Phenotypic variation was observed following growth in rich medium, as well as upon isolation of bacteria from inoculated plants or exposure to several stresses, including heat, salt and acidic conditions. When grown on nutrient agar, all PV colonies possessed a translucent appearance, in contrast to parental strain colonies that were opaque. After 72 h, PV colonies were bigger than parental colonies, and had a fuzzy appearance relative to parental strain colonies that are relatively smooth. A. citrulli colonies are generally surrounded by haloes detectable by the naked eye. These haloes are formed by type IV pilus (T4P-mediated twitching motility that occurs at the edge of the colony. No twitching haloes could be detected around colonies of both M6 and 7a1 PVs, and microscopy observations confirmed that indeed the PVs did not perform twitching motility. In agreement with these results, transmission electron microscopy revealed that M6 and 7a1 PVs do not produce T4P under tested conditions. PVs also differed from their parental strain in swimming motility and biofilm formation, and interestingly, all assessed variants were less virulent than their corresponding parental strains in seed transmission assays. Slight alterations could be detected in some DNA fingerprinting profiles of 7a1 variants relative to the parental strain, while no differences at all could be seen among M6 variants and parental strain, suggesting that, at least in the latter, phenotypic variation is mediated by slight genetic

  7. Bioreactor cultivation of a thermophilic bacterium capable of degrading BTEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C.; Taylor, R.T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The thermophillic bacterium, Thermus species ATCC 27978, which is capable iof degrading the fuel-spill contaminants benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the xylenes (BTEX) was cultured in 5-L-bioreactors. The goal was to optimize the production of Thermus sp. cells possessing maximal degradative activity for their subsequent potential application in a thermally-enhanced in situ BTEX bioremediation process. The effects of two bioreactor cultivation modes, batch and fed batch, on the generation of BTEX-active biomass were investigated. More biomass and more thermophillic BTEX-degrading activity were produced in the fed-batch cultures than in the batch cultures. Catabolite inhibition or repression is the cause for the limited growth of Thermus sp. in batch reactors. However, the addition to the medium of O-cresol, a possible intermediate in BTEX metabolism, stabilized the cellular BTEX-degrading activity in such cultures. The fed-batch mode of cultivations yielded a biomass concentration of 2.5 g/L and a catalytic specific activities of 7.6 {+-} 1.3, 10.1 {+-} 1.9. 9.8 {+-} 2.1, 2.3 {+-} 0.5, and 4.6 {+-} 0.9 nmol of compound degraded/mg of dry cell wt-min at 60{degrees}C for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m-xylene, and the o-plus p-xylenes (unresolved mixture), respectively. Although the formation of BTEX-degrading activity is growth associated, the prior rate of bioreactor growth affects the level of susequent washed, whole-cell BTEX-degrading activity. A slow to moderate specific growth rate (0.02-0.07 h{sup -1}) favors the formation of cellular BTEX-degrading activity, while a high specific growth rate ({approx}0.16 h{sup -1}) is detrimental to its production.

  8. Metabolic evolution of a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogier Braakman

    Full Text Available Aquifex aeolicus is a deep-branching hyperthermophilic chemoautotrophic bacterium restricted to hydrothermal vents and hot springs. These characteristics make it an excellent model system for studying the early evolution of metabolism. Here we present the whole-genome metabolic network of this organism and examine in detail the driving forces that have shaped it. We make extensive use of phylometabolic analysis, a method we recently introduced that generates trees of metabolic phenotypes by integrating phylogenetic and metabolic constraints. We reconstruct the evolution of a range of metabolic sub-systems, including the reductive citric acid (rTCA cycle, as well as the biosynthesis and functional roles of several amino acids and cofactors. We show that A. aeolicus uses the reconstructed ancestral pathways within many of these sub-systems, and highlight how the evolutionary interconnections between sub-systems facilitated several key innovations. Our analyses further highlight three general classes of driving forces in metabolic evolution. One is the duplication and divergence of genes for enzymes as these progress from lower to higher substrate specificity, improving the kinetics of certain sub-systems. A second is the kinetic optimization of established pathways through fusion of enzymes, or their organization into larger complexes. The third is the minimization of the ATP unit cost to synthesize biomass, improving thermodynamic efficiency. Quantifying the distribution of these classes of innovations across metabolic sub-systems and across the tree of life will allow us to assess how a tradeoff between maximizing growth rate and growth efficiency has shaped the long-term metabolic evolution of the biosphere.

  9. The Reductive Dissolution of Tl(I)-jarosite by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32: Providing new insight into Thallium(I) Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeaton, C. M.; Fryer, B. J.; Weisener, C. G.

    2010-12-01

    Jarosite minerals (MFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) are precipitated in the metallurgical industry to scavenge iron, alkali metals and sulfate ions from processing solutions and contain toxic metals such as Pb, Ag and Tl. During this process, large volumes of jarositic wastes are produced and often confined to large capped tailings ponds, thereby creating potential for anaerobic reductive dissolution by dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria. Despite the high toxicity of thallium, very few studies exist on the abiotic and biotic dissolution of thallium mineral phases. In this study we examined the short and long term reductive dissolution of synthetic Tl(I)-jarosite (TlFe3(SO4)2(OH)6) by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 using batch experiments under anaerobic circumneutral conditions. Cell viability and solution chemistry including pH, Eh, Fe speciation, Tl and S concentrations were measured over time and demonstrated a significant increase in both Fe(II) and Tl concentrations in samples inoculated with bacteria compared to control samples (Figure 1). Environmental scanning electron microscopy showed alteration of the Tl-jarosite and secondary Fe mineralization in both the control and inoculated samples. Moreover, in contrast to our previous studies with Pb-jarosite and Ag-jarosite, S. putrefaciens CN32 did not show precipitation of Tl nanoparticles associated with the cell surface thus suggesting a different mechanism for Tl detoxification (1,2). The results of this study provides new insight into the biogeochemical cycling and potential for increased mobility of Tl(I) in reducing environments. References: (1) Smeaton, C. M.; Fryer, B. J.; Weisener, C. G. Intracellular Precipitation of Pb by Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 during the Reductive Dissolution of Pb-Jarosite. Environ. Sci. Technol. 2009, 43,(21) 8091-8096. (2) Weisener, C. G.; Babechuk, M. G.; Fryer, B. J.; Maunder, C. Microbial Dissolution of Silver Jarosite: Examining Its Trace Metal Behaviour in Reduced Environments

  10. Characterization of an Endophytic Bacterium G062 Isolate with Beneficial Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALINA AKHDIYA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An endophytic bacterium isolate G062 was characterized base on its molecular genetic potents, morphology, physiology, and biochemistry reactions. Analysis of 16S rDNA sequences of G062 showed the highest similarity to Paracoccus halophilus (98%. Detection of the phlD and prnC genes occurrence indicated that the bacterium had this antibiotic-like genes of Diacethylphloroglucinol (DAPG and pyrrolnitrin. The cells are rod shaped (0.59-0.89 x 1.85-3.3 µm, aerobic, Gram negative, non motile, non spore forming, positive catalase, positive oxydase, could reduce NO3 to N2, nitrogen fixing, producing siderophore and plant growth hormones-like compounds (IAA, Gibberellin, and zeatin, and solubilizing phosphate. The G062 isolate could grow on media containing 2.5% NaCl. Range of the temperature and pH growth were 15-40 and 5.0-9.5 oC, respectively. The bacterium did not cause red blood cells lysis. There was no hypersensitive response when it was injected into tobacco leaves, and it was not pathogenic against potato plantlets. Moreover, the bacterium promoted the growth of the potato plant and had high colonization ability. These results suggested that the bacterium had beneficial and good traits as biological agent candidate to promote potato plant growth.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus coagulans is a ubiquitous soil bacterium that grows at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 and fer-ments various sugars that constitute plant biomass to L (+)-lactic acid. The ability of this sporogenic lactic acid bacterium to grow at 50-55 C and pH 5.0 makes this organism an attractive microbial biocatalyst for production of optically pure lactic acid at industrial scale not only from glucose derived from cellulose but also from xylose, a major constituent of hemi-cellulose. This bacterium is also considered as a potential probiotic. Complete genome squence of a representative strain, B. coagulans strain 36D1, is presented and discussed.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a thermotolerant sporogenic lactic acid bacterium, Bacillus coagulans strain 36D1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Mun Su [University of Florida, Gainesville; Moritz, Brelan E. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Xie, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Thomas S [ORNL; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Patel, Milind [University of Florida, Gainesville; Ou, Mark [University of Florida, Gainesville; Harbrucker,