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Sample records for psychotherapy cognitive-behavioural therapy

  1. Addressing Anger Using Sensorimotor Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Sarah M.

    2010-01-01

    A young woman initiated counselling services at a community agency to address her explosive anger that was a remnant of childhood physical and emotional abuse. Sensorimotor psychotherapy was used to help this client learn how to monitor and regulate her sensorimotor processes. In conjunction with this approach, Cognitive behavioural therapy was…

  2. Would Confucius benefit from psychotherapy? The compatibility of cognitive behaviour therapy and Chinese values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Julie; Oei, Tian P S

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of the present paper is to explore the conceptual compatibility between cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and the common values of Chinese Culture. In order to address such a question, the distinctive processes attributed to CBT (e.g., teaching of skills, emphasis on homework, cognitive processes, present/future focus), as summarized in the meta-analysis by Blagys and Hilsenroth [(2002). Distinctive activities of cognitive-behavioral therapy: A review of the comparative psychotherapy process literature. Clinical Psychology Review, 22, 671-706], and the core values of Chinese Culture, determined through an integration of The Hofstede Project, [Hofstede, G.H. (1980). Culture's consequences: International differences in work related values. Beverly Hills: Sage]. The Chinese Value Survey [Chinese Culture Connection (1987). Chinese values and the search for culture-free dimensions of culture. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 18, 143-164]. The Schwartz Value Survey [Schwartz, S.H. (1994). Cultural dimensions of values: Towards an understanding of national differences. In Kim, U., Trandis, H.C., Katiticibasi, C., Choi, S.C., & Yoon, G. (eds.), Individualism and collectivism: Theory, method and application (pp. 85-119). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage] were used. A strong degree of compatibility between the two was found and it is argued that rather than developing new indigenized therapies, with some structural changes to the processes of CBT, this therapy can be effective for Chinese clients. It is further proposed that Chinese clients may benefit from challenging their irrational cognitions that are bound up in their strict adherence to social norms. Future recommendations for increasing the compatibility of CBT to Chinese culture are discussed.

  3. Psychotherapy for transdiagnostic binge eating: A randomized controlled trial of cognitive-behavioural therapy, appetite-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy, and schema therapy.

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    McIntosh, Virginia V W; Jordan, Jennifer; Carter, Janet D; Frampton, Christopher M A; McKenzie, Janice M; Latner, Janet D; Joyce, Peter R

    2016-06-30

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is the recommended treatment for binge eating, yet many individuals do not recover, and innovative new treatments have been called for. The current study compares traditional CBT with two augmented versions of CBT; schema therapy, which focuses on early life experiences as pivotal in the history of the eating disorder; and appetite-focused CBT, which emphasises the role of recognising and responding to appetite in binge eating. 112 women with transdiagnostic DSM-IV binge eating were randomized to the three therapies. Therapy consisted of weekly sessions for six months, followed by monthly sessions for six months. Primary outcome was the frequency of binge eating. Secondary and tertiary outcomes were other behavioural and psychological aspects of the eating disorder, and other areas of functioning. No differences among the three therapy groups were found on primary or other outcomes. Across groups, large effect sizes were found for improvement in binge eating, other eating disorder symptoms and overall functioning. Schema therapy and appetite-focused CBT are likely to be suitable alternative treatments to traditional CBT for binge eating.

  4. A randomized clinical trial of cognitive behavioural therapy versus short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy versus no intervention for patients with hypochondriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per; Birket-Smith, M; Wattar, U

    2011-01-01

    Hypochondriasis is common in the clinic and in the community. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in previous trials. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a treatment routinely offered to patients with hypochondriasis in many countries, including Denmark. The aim of this ...

  5. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy & Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Gulbrandsen, Knut Arild

    coaching module in the graduate curriculum for students of psychology is a rewarding introduction to cognitive behavioural approaches, since it allows combination of traditional lectures with “action-reflection-learning” workshops, during which students train cognitive behavioural techniques in their own......Coaching is an expanding area of professional work, and recent years have brought forward the notion of cognitive coaching (Costa, 2006; Oestrich, 2005) which adapts theory and techniques from cognitive therapy to serve self-enhancement in non-clinical populations. We suggest that a cognitive...... repertoire. The skills needed for cognitive coaching reflect all therapeutic techniques but at a less advanced psychotherapeutic level, and still prepare for future clinical work and development. In the poster, we summarise a cognitive coaching course syllabus as well as results from data collected...

  6. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy & Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spaten, Ole Michael; Hansen, Tia G. B.; Gulbrandsen, Knut Arild

    Coaching is an expanding area of professional work, and recent years have brought forward the notion of cognitive coaching (Costa, 2006; Oestrich, 2005) which adapts theory and techniques from cognitive therapy to serve self-enhancement in non-clinical populations. We suggest that a cognitive...... coaching module in the graduate curriculum for students of psychology is a rewarding introduction to cognitive behavioural approaches, since it allows combination of traditional lectures with “action-reflection-learning” workshops, during which students train cognitive behavioural techniques in their own...... repertoire. The skills needed for cognitive coaching reflect all therapeutic techniques but at a less advanced psychotherapeutic level, and still prepare for future clinical work and development. In the poster, we summarise a cognitive coaching course syllabus as well as results from data collected...

  7. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT – case studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martyna Głuszek-Osuch

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to further elucitate the specifics cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT based on the treatment of 2 patients. The theoretical background of the therapy is based on the idea that the learning processes determine behaviour (behavioural therapy, acquisition and consolidation of beliefs and view of the world (cognitive therapy. The CBT is short-term (usually 12–20 weekly sessions. It assumes close links between the patient’s thoughts (about self, the world and the future and his/her emotions, behaviour and physiology. The patient’s work in between sessions consists in observation of their own thoughts, behaviours, and emotions, and introduction of changes within the scope of their thoughts and behaviours. The goal of cognitive behavioural therapy is autonomy and independence of a patient, attainment of the patient’s objectives, and remedying the most important problems of the patient. The therapist should be active, warm and empathic. Cognitive behavioural therapy is structured and active. Between sessions, the patient receives homework assignments to complete. During therapy, information is collected by experiments and verification of hypotheses. It should be emphasized that for changes to occur in the process of psychotherapy it is necessary to establish a strong therapeutic alliance.

  8. Expanding the Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Traditions: An Application of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Treatment in a Case Study of Depression

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    McClafferty, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    What can CBT therapists do when interpersonal issues are pertinent to therapeutic change and there is a deficit of CBT literature offering clinicians' guidance on how to address this as part of the therapy process? Do we say "clients are resistant?", "Not ready for change?", or "there is too much secondary gain?" As therapists we may not be…

  9. The ANTOP study: focal psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, and treatment-as-usual in outpatients with anorexia nervosa - a randomized controlled trial

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    Schauenburg Henning

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anorexia nervosa is a serious eating disorder leading to high morbidity and mortality as a result of both malnutrition and suicide. The seriousness of the disorder requires extensive knowledge of effective treatment options. However, evidence for treatment efficacy in this area is remarkably weak. A recent Cochrane review states that there is an urgent need for large, well-designed treatment studies for patients with anorexia nervosa. The aim of this particular multi-centre study is to evaluate the efficacy of two standardized outpatient treatments for patients with anorexia nervosa: focal psychodynamic (FPT and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT. Each therapeutic approach is compared to a "treatment-as-usual" control group. Methods/Design 237 patients meeting eligibility criteria are randomly and evenly assigned to the three groups – two intervention groups (CBT and FPT and one control group. The treatment period for each intervention group is 10 months, consisting of 40 sessions respectively. Body weight, eating disorder related symptoms, and variables of therapeutic alliance are measured during the course of treatment. Psychotherapy sessions are audiotaped for adherence monitoring. The treatment in the control group, both the dosage and type of therapy, is not regulated in the study protocol, but rather reflects the current practice of established outpatient care. The primary outcome measure is the body mass index (BMI at the end of the treatment (10 months after randomization. Discussion The study design surmounts the disadvantages of previous studies in that it provides a randomized controlled design, a large sample size, adequate inclusion criteria, an adequate treatment protocol, and a clear separation of the treatment conditions in order to avoid contamination. Nevertheless, the study has to deal with difficulties specific to the psychopathology of anorexia nervosa. The treatment protocol allows for dealing with the

  10. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvenegaard, Morten; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients...... of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more...... effective in treating depression and reducing relapse than standard cognitive behavioural therapy. METHOD/DESIGN: This study is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial comparing the effectiveness of group-based rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy with the effectiveness...

  11. A Comparison of Learning Outcomes in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Existential Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Dræby

    the lived experience of the learning outcomes of these approaches. The study also clarifies the differences between existential psychotherapy as an art of learning directed at existential learning of authenticity and cognitive- behavioural therapy as a learning-based medical treatment technology directed...... of the outcome of psychotherapy through qualitative research. The precise aim is to draw attention to the special characteristics of this outcome in terms of learning outcome. This regards both existential therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy and to clarify the possible differences and similarities between...

  12. After the Assessment: Introducing Adolescents to Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy

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    Cosgrave, Elizabeth; Keating, Vanessa

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this article is to describe the practical aspects involved in adapting cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) to an adolescent population in Australia. Some effective ways to use CBT with adolescents include preparing them for CBT by providing a thorough cognitive-behavioural formulation, describing the cognitive-behavioural approach…

  13. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Hvenegaard; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig;

    2015-01-01

    present with residual symptoms by the end of treatment. A common residual symptom is rumination, a process of recurrent negative thinking and dwelling on negative affect. Rumination has been demonstrated as a major factor in vulnerability to depression, predicting the onset, severity, and duration......BACKGROUND: Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients...... of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more...

  14. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvenegaard, Morten; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig;

    2015-01-01

    Scale for Depression) at completion of treatment. Secondary outcomes will be level of rumination, worry, anxiety, quality of life, behavioural activation, experimental measures of cognitive flexibility, and emotional attentional bias. A 6-month follow-up is planned and will include the primary outcome......BACKGROUND: Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients...... of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more...

  15. Comparison of brief dynamic and cognitive-behavioural therapies in avoidant personality disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emmelkamp, Paul M. G.; Benner, Ank; Kuipers, Antoinette; Feiertag, Guus A.; Koster, Harrie C.; van Apeldoorn, Franske J.

    2006-01-01

    Background There is a paucity of controlled trials examining the effectiveness of individual psychotherapy in personality disorders, especially in patients with cluster C disorders. Aims To compare the effectiveness of brief dynamic therapy and cognitive-behavioural therapy as out-patient treatment

  16. How Does Cognitive Behaviour Therapy Work with Opioid-Dependent Clients? Results of the UKCBTMM Study

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    Kouimtsidis, Christos; Reynolds, Martina; Coulton, Simon; Drummond, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Process research in psychotherapy is important to understand how treatment works. The National Institute of Clinical Excellence guidelines suggest that in methadone maintenance treatment (MMT) for opioid dependence, drug key-working should be based on cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) principles. This article reports the findings…

  17. A randomised comparison of cognitive behavioural therapy

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    Carlijn de Roos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background : Building on previous research with disaster-exposed children and adolescents, a randomised clinical trial was performed in the treatment of trauma-related symptoms. In the current study two active treatments were compared among children in a broad age range and from a wide diversity of ethnic populations. Objective : The primary aim was to compare the effectiveness and efficiency of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT and Eye Movement Desensitisation and Reprocessing (EMDR. Design : Children (n=52, aged 4–18 were randomly allocated to either CBT (n=26 or EMDR (n=26 in a disaster mental health after-care setting after an explosion of a fireworks factory. All children received up to four individual treatment sessions over a 4–8 week period along with up to four sessions of parent guidance. Blind assessment took place pre- and post-treatment and at 3 months follow-up on a variety of parent-rated and self-report measures of post-traumatic stress disorder symptomatology, depression, anxiety, and behaviour problems. Analyses of variance (general linear model repeated measures were conducted on the intention-to-treat sample and the completers. Results : Both treatment approaches produced significant reductions on all measures and results were maintained at follow-up. Treatment gains of EMDR were reached in fewer sessions. Conclusion : Standardised CBT and EMDR interventions can significantly improve functioning of disaster-exposed children.For the abstract in other languages, please see Supplementary files under Reading Tools online

  18. Exploring Learning Outcomes in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Existential Therapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Anders Dræby

    This is a presentation of a research project, which explores lived experience of psychotherapy in terms of learning outcomes. This includes both Existential therapy (ET) and Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and their possible differences and similarities. I can describe learning as any...... experiential change that occurs in the participants understanding as result of the therapy in which they participate. Learning outcomes are concerned with the achievements of the learner rather than the intentions of the educator, as expressed in the objectives of an educational effort. This research points...

  19. Stepping out of the box: broadening the dialogue around the organizational implementation of cognitive behavioural psychotherapy.

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    Poole, J; Grant, A

    2005-08-01

    The dissemination and uptake of cognitive behavioural interventions is central to the evidence-based mental health agenda in Britain. However, some policy and related literature, in and of itself social constructed, tends to display discursive naïvety in assuming a rational basis for the dissemination and organizational integration of cognitive behavioural approaches. Rational constructions fail to acknowledge that the practice settings of key stakeholders in the process are likely to be socially constructed fields of multiple meanings. Within these, the importance of evidence-based interventions may be variously contested or reworked. To illustrate this, a case example from the first author will discuss the hypothetical introduction of a cognitive behavioural group for voice hearers in a forensic mental health unit. This will highlight contradictions and local organizational problems around the effective utilization of postgraduate cognitive behavioural knowledge and skills. A synthesis of social constructionist with organizational theory will be used to make better sense of these actual and anticipated difficulties. From this basis, specific ways in which nurses and supportive stakeholders could move the implementation of cognitive behavioural psychotherapy agenda forward within a postmodern leadership context will be proposed.

  20. Cognitive behavioural therapies versus treatment as usual for depression.

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    Hunot, Vivien; Moore, Theresa Hm; Caldwell, Deborah; Davies, Philippa; Jones, Hannah; Furukawa, Toshi A; Lewis, Glyn; Churchill, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all cognitive behavioural therapies compared with treatment as usual/waiting list/attention placebo control conditions for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different cognitive behavioural therapy models (cognitive therapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy, problem-solving therapy, self-control therapy and the Coping with Depression course) compared with treatment as usual/waiting list/attention placebo control conditions for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all cognitive behavioural therapies compared with different types of comparator (standard care, no treatment, waiting list, attention placebo) for acute depression.

  1. The evolution of behaviour therapy and cognitive behaviour therapy.

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    Rachman, S

    2015-01-01

    The historical background of the development of behaviour therapy is described. It was based on the prevailing behaviourist psychology and constituted a fundamentally different approach to the causes and treatment of psychological disorders. It had a cold reception and the idea of treating the behaviour of neurotic and other patients was regarded as absurd. The opposition of the medical profession and psychoanalysts is explained. Parallel but different forms of behaviour therapy developed in the US and UK. The infusion of cognitive concepts and procedures generated a merger of behaviour therapy and cognitive therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). The strengths and limitations of the early and current approaches are evaluated.

  2. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy vs. cognitive behaviour therapy for depression: study protocol for a randomised controlled superiority trial.

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    Hvenegaard, Morten; Watkins, Ed R; Poulsen, Stig; Rosenberg, Nicole K; Gondan, Matthias; Grafton, Ben; Austin, Stephen F; Howard, Henriette; Moeller, Stine B

    2015-08-11

    Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment for depression. However, one third of the patients do not respond satisfactorily, and relapse rates of around 30 % within the first post-treatment year were reported in a recent meta-analysis. In total, 30-50 % of remitted patients present with residual symptoms by the end of treatment. A common residual symptom is rumination, a process of recurrent negative thinking and dwelling on negative affect. Rumination has been demonstrated as a major factor in vulnerability to depression, predicting the onset, severity, and duration of future depression. Rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy is a psychotherapeutic treatment targeting rumination. Because rumination plays a major role in the initiation and maintenance of depression, targeting rumination with rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy may be more effective in treating depression and reducing relapse than standard cognitive behavioural therapy. This study is a two-arm pragmatic randomised controlled superiority trial comparing the effectiveness of group-based rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy with the effectiveness of group-based cognitive behavioural therapy for treatment of depression. One hundred twenty-eight patients with depression will be recruited from and given treatment in an outpatient service at a psychiatric hospital in Denmark. Our primary outcome will be severity of depressive symptoms (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression) at completion of treatment. Secondary outcomes will be level of rumination, worry, anxiety, quality of life, behavioural activation, experimental measures of cognitive flexibility, and emotional attentional bias. A 6-month follow-up is planned and will include the primary outcome measure and assessment of relapse. The clinical outcome of this trial may guide clinicians to decide on the merits of including rumination-focused cognitive behavioural therapy in the treatment of depression in

  3. Cognitive behavioural therapy and short-term psychoanalytical psychotherapy versus a brief psychosocial intervention in adolescents with unipolar major depressive disorder (IMPACT): a multicentre, pragmatic, observer-blind, randomised controlled superiority trial.

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    Goodyer, Ian M; Reynolds, Shirley; Barrett, Barbara; Byford, Sarah; Dubicka, Bernadka; Hill, Jonathan; Holland, Fiona; Kelvin, Raphael; Midgley, Nick; Roberts, Chris; Senior, Rob; Target, Mary; Widmer, Barry; Wilkinson, Paul; Fonagy, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Psychological treatments for adolescents with unipolar major depressive disorder are associated with diagnostic remission within 28 weeks in 65-70% of patients. We aimed to assess the medium-term effects and costs of psychological therapies on maintenance of reduced depression symptoms 12 months after treatment. We did this multicentre, pragmatic, observer-blind, randomised controlled superiority trial (IMPACT) at 15 National Health Service child and adolescent mental health service (CAMHS) clinics in three regions in England. Adolescent patients (aged 11-17 years) with a diagnosis of DSM IV major depressive disorder were randomly assigned (1:1:1), via a web-based randomisation service, to receive cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) or short-term psychoanalytical therapy versus a reference brief psychological intervention. Randomisation was stochastically minimised by age, sex, self-reported depression sum score, and region. Patients and clinicians were aware of group allocation, but allocation was concealed from outcome assessors. Patients were followed up and reassessed at weeks 6, 12, 36, 52, and 86 post-randomisation. The primary outcome was self-reported depression symptoms at weeks 36, 52, and 86, as measured with the self-reported Mood and Feelings Questionnaire (MFQ). Because our aim was to compare the two psychological therapies with the brief psychosocial intervention, we first established whether CBT was inferior to short-term psychoanalytical psychotherapy for the same outcome. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN83033550. Between June 29, 2010, and Jan 17, 2013, we randomly assigned 470 patients to receive the brief psychosocial intervention (n=158), CBT (n=155), or short-term psychoanalytical therapy (n=157); 465 patients comprised the intention-to-treat population. 392 (84%) patients had available data for primary analysis by the end of follow-up. Treatment fidelity and

  4. Efficacy of transdiagnostic cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinholt, Nina; Krogh, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Transdiagnostic approaches to cognitive behaviour therapy (TCBT) of anxiety disorders have drawn increasing interest and empirical testing over the past decade. In this paper, we review evidence of the overall efficacy of TCBT for anxiety disorders, as well as TCBT efficacy compared with wait......-list, treatment-as-usual, and diagnosis-specific cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) controls. A total of 11 studies reporting 12 trials (n = 1933) were included in the systematic review. Results from the meta-analysis of 11 trials suggest that TCBT was generally associated with positive outcome; TCBT patients did...

  5. Cognitive-behavioural therapy v. usual care in recurrent depression

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    H.J. Conradi; P. de Jonge; J. Ormel

    2008-01-01

    We examined in a primary care sample whether acute-phase cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) would be more effective than usual care for patients with multiple prior episodes of depression. Depression outcome was based on a 3-monthly administered Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) during a 2-year follo

  6. Using cognitive behavioural therapy with complex cases: using the therapeutic relationship to change core beliefs.

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    Binnie, James

    2012-07-01

    Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is often perceived as a manualised, symptom focused, surface level approach. This article aims to reflect on working with complex clinical presentations and explore how third wave CBT can be effectively integrated into standard cognitive behavioural interventions. To achieve these aims, a case study of a CBT assessment and treatment is presented. The interventions used are described in detail. The focus changes from the more traditional symptom-led interventions to third wave approaches based on the therapeutic relationship. When the focus was redirected towards the therapeutic relationship then real change occurred, quickly and powerfully. Reflections on the process are discussed and the overall approach used was evaluated with an action plan developed to enhance future clinical practice. It is hoped that this study can help CBT be viewed as a comprehensive form of psychotherapy.

  7. Talking more about talking cures: cognitive behavioural therapy and informed consent.

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    Blease, C R

    2015-09-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has risen to prominence as an orthodox treatment option which is commonly recommended to patients with anxiety and depressive disorders. Mainstream healthcare institutions (including the National Health Service in the UK (NHS) and National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH)) assume that CBT works by helping patients to challenge and overcome 'faulty cognition'. Even if we accept the empirical evidence which shows that CBT (like other forms of psychotherapy) is a beneficial treatment there are still problems with this therapy: mainstream medicine and psychotherapy are continuing to ignore established research that CBT does not work according to its core theoretical tenets. This paper presents evidence that psychotherapy is entrenched in such conventional 'wisdom' and that practitioners are failing to meet their own codified requirement of informed consent. I examine ethical arguments for and against upholding current informed consent procedures and focus, in particular, on the relationship between respect for patient autonomy and the duty of beneficence. I argue that (so far) there are no strong grounds for the claim that patient autonomy undermines therapeutic outcome. The modest conclusion of this paper is that psychotherapy (including CBT) needs to begin to adapt informed consent procedures to comply with ongoing scientific research into its efficacy.

  8. Cognitive behavioural therapy and client-centred counselling.

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    Collins, Findlay; Deady, David

    This article reviews the potential for combining cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and client-centred counselling (CCC) in nurse education and practice. Currently, CBT and CCC are practiced independently of one another within mental health care. This project attempted to bring together the unique qualities of each intervention while encouraging a synergistic approach. This was undertaken by developing and delivering a three-day pilot study workshop. The experiential workshops were evaluated using two sets of structured questionnaires and six semi-structured interviews with randomly selected participants. A follow-up questionnaire was used to review the combined approach in practice.

  9. Intensive cognitive behavioural therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, H.; Kristensen, M.; Arendt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite promising results from intensive formats of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) the format is rarely used. The aim of the study was to systematically review the literature within this area of research and provide a meta-analysis of the effectiveness......-up, mainly due to slight deterioration among patients who had received intensive CBT while patients from weekly conditions changed little. In sum, the meta-analysis indicates that intensive CBT is an effective treatment for youths and adults with OCD, and could be a promising format to enhance immediate...

  10. Implementing multifactorial psychotherapy research in online virtual environments (IMPROVE-2: study protocol for a phase III trial of the MOST randomized component selection method for internet cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Watkins

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is a global health challenge. Although there are effective psychological and pharmaceutical interventions, our best treatments achieve remission rates less than 1/3 and limited sustained recovery. Underpinning this efficacy gap is limited understanding of how complex psychological interventions for depression work. Recent reviews have argued that the active ingredients of therapy need to be identified so that therapy can be made briefer, more potent, and to improve scalability. This in turn requires the use of rigorous study designs that test the presence or absence of individual therapeutic elements, rather than standard comparative randomised controlled trials. One such approach is the Multiphase Optimization Strategy, which uses efficient experimentation such as factorial designs to identify active factors in complex interventions. This approach has been successfully applied to behavioural health but not yet to mental health interventions. Methods/Design A Phase III randomised, single-blind balanced fractional factorial trial, based in England and conducted on the internet, randomized at the level of the patient, will investigate the active ingredients of internet cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT for depression. Adults with depression (operationalized as PHQ-9 score ≥ 10, recruited directly from the internet and from an UK National Health Service Improving Access to Psychological Therapies service, will be randomized across seven experimental factors, each reflecting the presence versus absence of specific treatment components (activity scheduling, functional analysis, thought challenging, relaxation, concreteness training, absorption, self-compassion training using a 32-condition balanced fractional factorial design (2IV 7-2. The primary outcome is symptoms of depression (PHQ-9 at 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes include symptoms of anxiety and process measures related to hypothesized mechanisms

  11. Riding the waves: A functional-cognitive perspective on the relations among behaviour therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy and acceptance and commitment therapy.

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    De Houwer, Jan; Barnes-Holmes, Yvonne; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot

    2016-02-01

    Different types of therapy explain psychopathology and the effects of psychotherapy differently. Different explanations are, however, not necessarily mutually exclusive. Based on the idea that functional and cognitive explanations are situated at different levels, we argue that functional therapies such as traditional Behaviour Therapy (BT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) are not necessarily incompatible with Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT). Whether a functional and a cognitive therapy actually align depends on whether they highlight the same type of environmental causes. This functional-cognitive perspective reveals various differences and communalities among BT, CBT and ACT. © 2015 International Union of Psychological Science.

  12. Psychologists experience of cognitive behaviour therapy in a developing country: a qualitative study from Pakistan

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    Ayub Muhammad

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychological therapies especially Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT are used widely in the West to help patients with psychiatric problems. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has an established evidence base for the treatment of different emotional disorders. In spite of these developments in the developed world, patients in most developing countries hardly benefit from non pharmacological interventions. Although a significant number of psychologists are trained in Pakistan each year, psychological interventions play only a minor role in treatment plans in Pakistan. We conducted interviews with psychologists in Pakistan, to explore their experiences and their views on "providing CBT in Pakistan". These interviews were conducted as part of a project whose focus was to try to develop culturally-sensitive CBT in Pakistan. Methods In depth semi structured interviews were conducted with 5 psychologists working in psychiatry departments in Lahore, Pakistan. Results All the psychologists reported that psychotherapies, including CBT, need adjustments for use in Pakistan, although they were not able to elicit on these in details. Four major themes were discovered, hurdles in therapy, therapy related issues, involvement of the family and modification in therapy. The biggest hurdles in therapy were described to be service and resource issues. Conclusions For CBT to be acceptable, accessible and effective in Non Western cultures numerous adjustments need to be made, taking into consideration; factors related to service structure and delivery, patient's knowledge and beliefs about health and the therapy itself. Interviews with the psychologists in these countries can give us insights which can guide development of therapy and manuals to support its delivery.

  13. Treating prolactinoma and psychosis: medication and cognitive behavioural therapy.

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    Nieman, D H; Sutterland, A L; Otten, J; Becker, H E; Drent, M L; van der Gaag, M; Birchwood, M; de Haan, L

    2011-02-09

    The patient in this case report had two severe medical conditions that require oppositional treatment: prolactinoma and psychosis. A prolactinoma is a benign tumour of the pituitary gland that produces prolactin. Dopamine agonist medication is the first-line treatment in patients with prolactinoma. The psychotic symptoms started after a dosage increase of a dopamine D2-receptor agonist. Several antipsychotic medications were tried with and without the dopamine D2-receptor agonist, but severe command hallucinations remained. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) was added which reduced the impact of the hallucinations to a great extent, indicating that CBT can have an additional positive effect in prolactinoma patients with psychosis that shows incomplete recovery after antipsychotic medication. Future research should be aimed at the severe and prolonged side effects of dopamine agonists in the treatment of prolactinoma patients with multiple risk factors for a psychotic decompensation.

  14. Group cognitive behaviour therapy for adults with Asperger syndrome and anxiety or mood disorder: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan A; Lunsky, Yona

    2010-01-01

    Individuals with Asperger syndrome are at increased risk for mental health problems compared with the general population, especially with regard to mood and anxiety disorders. Generic mental health services are often ill-equipped to offer psychotherapeutic treatments to this population, and specialized supports are difficult to find. This case series used a manualized cognitive behaviour therapy group programme (Mind Over Mood) with three adults diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, who were each unable to access psychotherapy through mainstream mental health services. This review highlights the benefits of a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) group approach for adults with Asperger syndrome and suggests some potential modifications to traditional CBT provision.  © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for anorexia nervosa: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galsworthy-Francis, Lisa; Allan, Steven

    2014-02-01

    Evidence for the effectiveness of psychological therapies for anorexia nervosa (AN) is inconsistent. There have been no systematic reviews solely on the effectiveness for Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for AN. This review aimed to synthesise and appraise the recent evidence for CBT as a treatment for AN. Using specific search criteria, 16 relevant articles were identified which evaluated CBT alone or as part of a broader randomised/non-randomised trial. Various formats of CBT were utilised in the reviewed papers. Studies were evaluated using established quality criteria. The evidence reviewed suggested that CBT demonstrated effectiveness as a means of improving treatment adherence and minimising dropout amongst patients with AN. While CBT appeared to demonstrate some improvements in key outcomes (body mass index, eating-disorder symptoms, broader psychopathology), it was not consistently superior to other treatments (including dietary counselling, non-specific supportive management, interpersonal therapy, behavioural family therapy). Numerous methodological limitations apply to the available evidence. Further research and ongoing review is needed to evaluate the settings, patient groups and formats in which CBT may be effective as a treatment for AN.

  16. Does emotional reasoning change during cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berle, David; Moulds, Michelle L; Starcevic, Vladan; Milicevic, Denise; Hannan, Anthony; Dale, Erin; Viswasam, Kirupamani; Brakoulias, Vlasios

    2016-01-01

    Emotional reasoning refers to the use of subjective emotions, rather than objective evidence, to form conclusions about oneself and the world. It is a key interpretative bias in cognitive models of anxiety disorders and appears to be especially evident in individuals with anxiety disorders. However, the amenability of emotional reasoning to change during treatment has not yet been investigated. We sought to determine whether emotional reasoning tendencies change during a course of routine cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT). Emotional reasoning tendencies were assessed in 36 individuals with a primary anxiety disorder who were seeking treatment at an outpatient clinic. Changes in anxiety and depressive symptoms as well as emotional reasoning tendencies after 12 sessions of CBT were examined in 25 individuals for whom there was complete data. Emotional reasoning tendencies were evident at pretreatment assessment. Although anxiety and depressive symptoms decreased during CBT, only one of six emotional reasoning interpretative styles (pertaining to conclusions that one is incompetent) changed significantly during the course of therapy. Attrition rates were high and there was not enough information regarding the extent to which therapy specifically focused on addressing emotional reasoning tendencies. Individuals seeking treatment for anxiety disorders appear to engage in emotional reasoning, however routine individual CBT does not appear to result in changes in emotional reasoning tendencies.

  17. Intensive Outpatient Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dalle Grave

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to describe a novel model of intensive outpatient cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT indicated for eating disorder patients who are having difficulty modifying their eating habits in response to conventional outpatient CBT. Intensive outpatient CBT is a manual based treatment derived by the CBT-Enhanced (CBT-E for eating disorders. The treatment has four features that distinguish it from the conventional outpatient CBT-E: (1 it is designed to be suitable for both adult and adolescent patients, (2 it is delivered by a multidisciplinary non-eclectic team trained in CBT, (3 there is assistance with eating, (4 there is a family therapy module for patients under the age of 18 years. Preliminary outcome of intensive outpatient CBT-E are encouraging. The treatment has been applied to 20 consecutive underweight eating disorder patients (age 18.2 ± 6.5 years; BMI 14.6 ± 1.5 kg/m2. Thirteen patients (65% concluded the treatment, five (25% were admitted at an eating disorder inpatient unit, and two (10% prematurely interrupted the treatment. Completers obtained significant weight regain and improvement of eating disorder and general psychopathology. Most of the improvements were maintained at six-month follow-up.

  18. Experiences of Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onslow, Louise; Woodward, Debbie; Hoefkens, Toni; Waddington, Louise

    2016-03-01

    Recent quantitative studies provide support for an "enhanced" transdiagnostic approach of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT-E) for eating disorders; however it is not yet known how recipients of CBT-E experience therapy. The current study used a qualitative approach to explore service users' experiences of CBT-E. Individuals with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa and who had completed CBT-E from one service in Wales were invited to participate. Semi-structured interviews were completed with eight individuals and analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Participants valued both specific and non-specific elements of CBT-E. Therapist specialism in eating disorders was considered to enhance therapist empathy. The most helpful aspects specific to CBT-E were gaining insight into maintenance cycles and experiential learning. The most challenging aspects of CBT-E were changing behaviours and cognitions "in the moment" and in the longer-term. The implication of therapist specialism and empathy is further discussed, as well as the difficulty for CBT-E in changing service users' long-standing core beliefs.

  19. Emotion awareness and cognitive behavioural therapy in young people with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts-Collins, Cara; Mahoney-Davies, Gerwyn; Russell, Ailsa; Booth, Anne; Loades, Maria

    2017-07-01

    Young people with autism spectrum disorder experience high levels of emotional problems, including anxiety and depression. Adapted cognitive behavioural therapy is recommended for such difficulties. However, no evidence suggests whether emotion awareness is important in treatment outcome for young people on the autism spectrum. This study aimed to investigate the potential differences in emotion awareness between (1) young people on the autism spectrum and typically developing youth and (2) young people on the autism spectrum with and without experience of cognitive behavioural therapy. Three groups (aged 11-20 years) participated: (1) typically developing young people ( n = 56); (2) young people on the autism spectrum with no experience of cognitive behavioural therapy ( n = 23); and (3) young people on the autism spectrum who had attended cognitive behavioural therapy ( n = 33). All participants completed the Emotion Awareness Questionnaire-30 item version. Young people on the autism spectrum differed significantly from typically developing young people on the emotional awareness measure. Young people on the autism spectrum who had attended cognitive behavioural therapy scored significantly lower on the Differentiating Emotions subscale, and significantly higher on the Attending to Others' Emotions subscale, compared to young people on the autism spectrum who had not attended cognitive behavioural therapy. This study highlights the importance of psycho-educational components of cognitive behavioural therapy when adapting for young people on the autism spectrum.

  20. Understanding process in group cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Leclerc, Claude; Wykes, Til; Nicole, Luc; Abdel Baki, Amal

    2015-06-01

    Group cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis (GCBTp) has shown to be effective in diminishing symptoms, as well as in improving other psychosocial dimensions such as self-esteem. But little is known regarding the processes that generate these therapeutic improvements and might be harnessed to further improve its effectiveness. The current study aimed at investigating these processes, particularly those linked to interpersonal relationships. The participants were all assessed at baseline, were given 24 sessions of GCBTp over the course of 3 months and were assessed again at post-treatment as well as 6 months later (9 months from baseline). Sixty-six individuals with early psychosis took part in a study of GCBTp where therapist alliance and group cohesion were assessed at three time points during the therapy, and punctual (each session) self-perceptions on symptoms and optimism were collected. Improvements in symptoms (BPRS), self-esteem (SERS-SF) and in self-perceived therapeutic improvements (CHOICE) were linked to specific aspects of the alliance, group cohesion, as well as optimism. The variables retained were not always overall scores, suggesting the importance of the variables at key moments during the therapy. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of the alliance and group cohesion, together significantly explaining improvements measured at post-therapy or follow-up. This study has attempted to focus mostly on relational aspects, as well as on self-perceptions, in the context of a GCBTp for individuals with early psychosis. This study also showed that these therapeutic relationships are especially useful when they are more stable and at specific moments during the therapy, namely when more difficult psychological work is done. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Cognitive behavioural therapy versus other psychosocial treatments for schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher; Hacker, David; Cormac, Irene; Meaden, Alan; Irving, Claire B

    2014-01-01

    Background Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is now a recommended treatment for people with schizophrenia. This approach helps to link the person’s distress and problem behaviours to underlying patterns of thinking. Objectives To review the effects of CBT for people with schizophrenia when compared with other psychological therapies. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (March 2010) which is based on regular searches of CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. We inspected all references of the selected articles for further relevant trials, and, where appropriate, contacted authors. Selection criteria All relevant randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of CBT for people with schizophrenia-like illnesses. Data collection and analysis Studies were reliably selected and assessed for methodological quality. Two review authors, working independently, extracted data. We analysed dichotomous data on an intention-to-treat basis and continuous data with 65% completion rate are presented. Where possible, for dichotomous outcomes, we estimated a risk ratio (RR) with the 95% confidence interval (CI) along with the number needed to treat/harm. Main results Thirty one papers described 20 trials. Trials were often small and of limited quality. When CBT was compared with other psychosocial therapies, no difference was found for outcomes relevant to adverse effect/events (2 RCTs, n = 202, RR death 0.57 CI 0.12 to 2.60). Relapse was not reduced over any time period (5 RCTs, n = 183, RR long-term 0.91 CI 0.63 to 1.32) nor was rehospitalisation (5 RCTs, n = 294, RR in longer term 0.86 CI 0.62 to 1.21). Various global mental state measures failed to show difference (4 RCTs, n = 244, RR no important change in mental state 0.84 CI 0.64 to 1.09). More specific measures of mental state failed to show differential effects on positive or negative symptoms of schizophrenia but there may be some longer term effect for affective symptoms (2 RCTs, n = 105

  2. Using cognitive behaviour therapy with South Asian Muslims: Findings from the culturally sensitive CBT project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naeem, Farooq; Phiri, Peter; Munshi, Tariq; Rathod, Shanaya; Ayub, Muhhhamad; Gobbi, Mary; Kingdon, David

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) needs adaptation for it to be effective for patients from collectivistic cultures, as currently CBT is underpinned by individualistic values. In prior studies we have demonstrated that CBT could be adapted for Pakistani patients in Southampton, UK, and for local populations in Pakistan. Findings from these studies suggest that CBT can be adapted for patients from collectivistic cultures using a series of steps. In this paper we focus on these steps, and the process of adapting CBT for specific groups. The adaptation process should focus on three major areas of therapy, rather than simple translation of therapy manuals. These include (1) awareness of relevant cultural issues and preparation for therapy, (2) assessment and engagement, and (3) adjustments in therapy. We also discuss the best practice guidelines that evolved from this work to help therapists working with this population. We reiterate that CBT can be adapted effectively for patients from traditional cultures. This is, however, an emerging area in psychotherapy, and further work is required to refine the methodology and to test adapted CBT.

  3. Discontinuation of hypnotics during cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brunovsky Martin

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In practical sleep medicine, therapists face the question of whether or not to discontinue the ongoing use of hypnotics in patients, as well as the possible effects of discontinuation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of discontinuing third-generation hypnotics on the results of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT for primary insomnia in patients after long-term abuse. Methods Twenty-eight outpatients were treated by CBT for 8 weeks. The treatment outcome was estimated by means of differences among subjective clinical scales and polysomnography variables assessed before and after the treatment period. The therapeutic effect in a subgroup of 15 patients who had previously received hypnotics and were successively withdrawn during weeks 2–6 was compared to the effect achieved in patients who had not used hypnotics before CBT. Results There were no significant differences in baseline subjective and objective sleep characteristics between the hypnotic abusers and non-abusers. According to clinical scales and most polysomnographic measures, CBT was highly effective in both groups of subjects; it produced the greatest changes in total sleep time, REM sleep and sleep efficiency. Unexpectedly, discontinuation of hypnotics, as a factor in the analysis, was followed by an additional improvement of sleep efficiency and wake after sleep onset parameters. Conclusion Our study confirmed the efficacy of CBT in both hypnotic-abusing and non-abusing patients with chronic insomnia. The results of this study suggest that tapered withdrawal of third-generation hypnotics during CBT therapy for chronic insomnia could be associated with improvement rather than worsening of sleep continuity.

  4. Tailored cognitive-behavioural therapy and exercise training improves the physical fitness of patients with fibromyalgia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spillekom-van Koulil, S.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Helmond, T. van; Vedder, A.; Hoorn, H. van; Donders, A.R.T.; Wirken, L.; Cats, H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Evers, A.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Patients with fibromyalgia have diminished levels of physical fitness, which may lead to functional disability and exacerbating complaints. Multidisciplinary treatment comprising cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and exercise training has been shown to be effective in improving physica

  5. Changes in illness perceptions mediated the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy in severe functional somatic syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sara Sletten; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Ørnbøl, Eva

    2014-01-01

    . Methods We analysed additional data from a randomised controlled trial comparing completers of cognitive behavioural group therapy (46 patients) to an enhanced usual care group (66 patients). Proposed mediators (illness perceptions) and primary (physical health) and secondary (somatic symptoms and illness......Objective Although there is substantial evidence that cognitive behavioural therapy alleviates symptoms in functional somatic syndromes, the mechanisms of change are less investigated. This study examined whether changes in illness perceptions mediated the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy...... worry) outcomes were assessed by means of questionnaires at referral, baseline, end of treatment, and 10 and 16 months after randomisation. Multiple mediation analysis determined whether (1) changes in specific illness perceptions during treatment mediated the effect of cognitive behavioural therapy...

  6. Art Therapy Verses Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giacco, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of my paper is to identify the difference between psychotherapy and art therapy. Then to introduce a technique within the field of art therapy that is relevant to neuro-plasticity Del Giacco Neuro Art Therapy. The paper identifies the importance of the amygdala and the hippocampus within the role of art therapy. Supporting…

  7. Cognitive behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchill, Rachel; Moore, Theresa Hm; Caldwell, Deborah; Davies, Philippa; Jones, Hannah; Furukawa, Toshi A; Lewis, Glyn; Hunot, Vivien

    2010-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all CBT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depressionTo examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different CBT approaches (cognitive therapy, rational emotive behaviour therapy, problem-solving therapy, self-control therapy and Coping with Depression course) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all CBT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, third wave CBT) for acute depression.

  8. Focal psychodynamic therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, and optimised treatment as usual in outpatients with anorexia nervosa (ANTOP study): randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipfel, Stephan; Wild, Beate; Groß, Gaby; Friederich, Hans-Christoph; Teufel, Martin; Schellberg, Dieter; Giel, Katrin E; de Zwaan, Martina; Dinkel, Andreas; Herpertz, Stephan; Burgmer, Markus; Löwe, Bernd; Tagay, Sefik; von Wietersheim, Jörn; Zeeck, Almut; Schade-Brittinger, Carmen; Schauenburg, Henning; Herzog, Wolfgang

    2014-01-11

    Psychotherapy is the treatment of choice for patients with anorexia nervosa, although evidence of efficacy is weak. The Anorexia Nervosa Treatment of OutPatients (ANTOP) study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of two manual-based outpatient treatments for anorexia nervosa--focal psychodynamic therapy and enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy--versus optimised treatment as usual. The ANTOP study is a multicentre, randomised controlled efficacy trial in adults with anorexia nervosa. We recruited patients from ten university hospitals in Germany. Participants were randomly allocated to 10 months of treatment with either focal psychodynamic therapy, enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy, or optimised treatment as usual (including outpatient psychotherapy and structured care from a family doctor). The primary outcome was weight gain, measured as increased body-mass index (BMI) at the end of treatment. A key secondary outcome was rate of recovery (based on a combination of weight gain and eating disorder-specific psychopathology). Analysis was by intention to treat. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org, number ISRCTN72809357. Of 727 adults screened for inclusion, 242 underwent randomisation: 80 to focal psychodynamic therapy, 80 to enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy, and 82 to optimised treatment as usual. At the end of treatment, 54 patients (22%) were lost to follow-up, and at 12-month follow-up a total of 73 (30%) had dropped out. At the end of treatment, BMI had increased in all study groups (focal psychodynamic therapy 0·73 kg/m(2), enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy 0·93 kg/m(2), optimised treatment as usual 0·69 kg/m(2)); no differences were noted between groups (mean difference between focal psychodynamic therapy and enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy -0·45, 95% CI -0·96 to 0·07; focal psychodynamic therapy vs optimised treatment as usual -0·14, -0·68 to 0·39; enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy vs optimised treatment as usual -0·30

  9. The efficacy of individual treatment of subjective tinnitus with cognitive behavioural therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canals, Pascual; Pérez Del Valle, Belén; Lopez, Francisco; Marco, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    It has been a long time since subjective tinnitus cases were described for the first time but they still lack a treatment with proven effectiveness. The main goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy in these patients. Between 2012 and 2013, 310 patients that suffered from subjective tinnitus were studied. Of these, 267 were included in treatment based on cognitive behavioural therapy. The monitoring period lasted 18 months for most cases, while it lasted 21 months for 11 patients. Considering patients that interrupted their treatment as failures, the percentage of recovery was 95.7%. Cognitive behavioural therapy should always be included in the treatment of people suffering from tinnitus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  10. Cognitive behaviour therapy and inflammation: A systematic review of its relationship and the potential implications for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopresti, Adrian L

    2017-06-01

    There is growing evidence confirming increased inflammation in a subset of adults with depression. The impact of this relationship has mostly been considered in biologically based interventions; however, it also has potential implications for psychological therapies. Cognitive behaviour therapy is the most commonly used psychological intervention for the treatment of depression with theories around its efficacy primarily based on psychological mechanisms. However, cognitive behaviour therapy may have an effect on, and its efficacy influenced by, physiological processes associated with depression. Accordingly, the purpose of this systematic review was to examine the relationship between cognitive behaviour therapy and inflammation. Studies examining the anti-inflammatory effects of cognitive behaviour therapy in people with depression and other medical conditions (e.g. cancer, diabetes and heart disease) were examined. In addition, the relationship between change in inflammatory markers and change in depressive symptoms following cognitive behaviour therapy, and the influence of pre-treatment inflammation on cognitive behaviour therapy treatment response were reviewed. A total of 23 studies investigating the anti-inflammatory effects of cognitive behaviour therapy were identified. In 14 of these studies, at least one reduction in an inflammatory marker was reported, increases were identified in three studies and no change was found in six studies. Three studies examined the relationship between change in inflammation and change in depressive symptoms following cognitive behaviour therapy. In two of these studies, change in depressive symptoms was associated with a change in at least one inflammatory marker. Finally, three studies examined the influence of pre-treatment inflammation on treatment outcome from cognitive behaviour therapy, and all indicated a poorer treatment response in people with higher premorbid inflammation. Preliminary evidence suggests

  11. Cognitive Behaviour Therapies and Their Implications for Applied Educational Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Shami; Monsen, Jeremy J.; Squires, Garry

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically considers the growing interest in the use of Cognitive Behaviour Therapies to support children and young people presenting with a wide range of social-emotional difficulties. This focus has emerged since the prevalence of such difficulties in children and young people has increased over the past four decades, and the…

  12. A Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Psychoeducational Group for Chinese People with Chronic Illnesses: An Evaluation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Daniel F. K.; Ip, Priscilla S. Y.; Lee, Kim Man

    2017-01-01

    This pilot study attempted to examine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) psychoeducational group for Chinese people with chronic illness in Hong Kong. It adopted a single group design, and 52 participants joined the group. A questionnaire with three outcome measures, measuring general mental health, quality of life…

  13. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Children with Behavioural Difficulties in the Singapore Mainstream School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Lay See; Choi, Pui Meng

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) programme delivered by a school psychologist for children with behavioural difficulties in Singapore elementary school classrooms. It examined the impact of a 12-session, psychoeducational group intervention in helping misbehaving pupils to control their…

  14. Cognitive Behaviour Therapies and Their Implications for Applied Educational Psychology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rait, Shami; Monsen, Jeremy J.; Squires, Garry

    2010-01-01

    This paper critically considers the growing interest in the use of Cognitive Behaviour Therapies to support children and young people presenting with a wide range of social-emotional difficulties. This focus has emerged since the prevalence of such difficulties in children and young people has increased over the past four decades, and the…

  15. Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Parkinson's Disease: A Pilot Study Using Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeney, Farah; Egan, Sarah; Gasson, Natalie

    2005-01-01

    Depression and anxiety affect up to 50% of people with Parkinson's Disease (PD) (Marsh, 2000; Murray, 1996), however, few studies have examined the effectiveness of psychological treatment. This study examined the effectiveness of group cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in treating depression and anxiety in PD. Four participants, aged between 56…

  16. Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Compared to Optimised General Practitioners? Care for Depression: A Randomised Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schene, A. H.; Baas, K. D.; Koeter, M.; Lucassen, P.; Bockting, C. L. H.; Wittkampf, K. F.; van Weert, H. C.; Huyser, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: How to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in primary care? Studies that compared (brief) Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) with care as usual by the General Practitioner (GP) found the first to be more effective. However, to make a fair comparison GP care should be optimised and pro

  17. Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy compared to optimised general practitioners’ care for depression : A randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schene, A.H.; Baas, K.D.; Koeter, M.W.J.; Lucassen, P.; Bockting, C.L.H.; Wittkampf, K.A.; Huyser, J.; van Weert, H.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: How to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in primary care? Studies that compared (brief) Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) with care as usual by the General Practitioner (GP) found the first to be more effective. However, to make a fair comparison GP care should be optimised and pro

  18. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for Non-Opioid Drug Use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Knudsen, Anne-Sofie Due; Svendsen, Majken

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Youth drug use is a severe problem worldwide. This review focuses on Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) as a treatment for young people who misuse non-opioid drugs, such as cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy and cocaine, which are strongly associated with a range of health and social pro...

  19. Predictors of outcome for cognitive behaviour therapy in binge eating disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammers, M.W.; Vroling, M.S.; Ouwens, M.A.; Engels, R.C.M.E.; Strien, T. van

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this naturalistic study was to identify pretreatment predictors of response to cognitive behaviour therapy in treatment-seeking patients with binge eating disorder (BED; N=304). Furthermore, we examined end-of-treatment factors that predict treatment outcome 6months later (N=190). We asse

  20. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.; Smits, P; Geurts, A.C.H.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. METHOD OF PROTOCOL DEVELOPMENT: This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was

  1. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: Description of a treatment protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.C.; Smits, P.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. Method of protocol development This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was sh

  2. Managing resistance in cognitive behavioural therapy: the application of motivational interviewing in mixed anxiety and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Henny A

    2004-01-01

    While cognitive behavioural therapy is highly effective in the treatment of anxiety and depression, a substantive number of individuals either refuse treatment, fail to respond to treatment or respond only partially. Arguably, ambivalence about change or about engaging in treatment tasks may in part be related to incomplete recovery rates in cognitive behavioural therapy. Motivational interviewing is a client-centred, directive treatment originally developed in the addictions domain whose goal is to enhance motivation for change by understanding and resolving ambivalence. This method has consistently received support for enhancing outcomes in the addictions domain, particularly when used as an adjunct to further treatment. As yet, motivational methods have not been generalized to the treatment of prevalent mental health problems, such as anxiety and depression. The present paper presents the application of a treatment targeting motivation (motivational interviewing adapted for anxiety and depression) to the management of resistance in cognitive behavioural therapy for 3 clients with mixed anxiety and depression. Motivational interviewing is conceived as an adjunct to highly effective traditional cognitive behavioural therapy methods, which is indicated for use with clients resistant to and significantly ambivalent about change-based techniques for managing anxiety or alleviating depression.

  3. Staff Expectations and Views of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) for Adults with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroese, Biza Stenfert; Jahoda, Andrew; Pert, Carol; Trower, Peter; Dagnan, Dave; Selkirk, Mhairi

    2014-01-01

    Background: The role of support workers and other professionals in the psychotherapeutic process has been commented upon but not as yet been systematically investigated. Method: To explore their views and expectations of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for adults with intellectual disabilities, eleven paid support workers and professionals were…

  4. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.C.; Smits, P.; Geurts, A.C.H.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. Method of protocol development This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was

  5. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kootker, J.A.; Rasquin, S.M.; Smits, P; Geurts, A.C.H.; Heugten, C.M. van; Fasotti, L.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. METHOD OF PROTOCOL DEVELOPMENT: This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was

  6. Language and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Practice Paper-Literature Review and Case Example

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satwant Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the impact of language on cognitive behavioural therapy. Language is emotive and studies carried out in the linguistic field have shown second language is less emotive when describing events occuring in the first language. This paper has been written based on the experiences of a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT service providing therapy to patients from a diverse cultural and ethnic population. Patients whose first language is not English often receive therapy in their second language. Global migration is a common phenomenon and mainly occurs for economic reasons or threat of violence. This paper has been drawn from the results of a literature review on first and second languages and therapy. Despite being an area that is extremely relevant to therapy, there is an apparent lack of literature in relation to cognitive behavioural therapy for depression and other disorders. CBT is one of the recommended therapies by National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE for the treatment of depression and anxiety disorders. Findings from the linguistic field highlight the potential short comings providing therapy in a patient’s second language. The aim of this paper is to highlight the importance that therapists working in this field have an understanding of how first and second languages function and the role they play in maintaining patients’ psychological problems. This practice paper discusses measures that can be used in cognitive behavioural therapy to deal with this using a case example.

  7. The Use of Group Therapy as a Means of Facilitating Cognitive-Behavioural Instruction for Adolescents with Disruptive Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larmar, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on the findings of an action research enquiry examining the efficacy of group therapy as a means of facilitating cognitive-behavioural instruction for students who exhibit disruptive behaviours. A curriculum comprising the key tenets of cognitive-behaviour modification was developed and taught over a 9-week period to a group…

  8. Unique and shared techniques in cognitive-behavioural and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy: a content analysis of randomised trials on depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Jürgen; Michlig, Nadja; Munder, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of psychotherapeutic interventions assume that specific techniques are used in treatments, which are responsible for changes in the client's symptoms. This assumption also holds true for meta-analyses, where evidence for specific interventions and techniques is compiled. However, it has also been argued that different treatments share important techniques and that an upcoming consensus about useful treatment strategies is leading to a greater integration of treatments. This makes assumptions about the effectiveness of specific interventions ingredients questionable if the shared (common) techniques are more often used in interventions than are the unique techniques. This study investigated the unique or shared techniques in RCTs of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP). Psychotherapeutic techniques were coded from 42 masked treatment descriptions of RCTs in the field of depression (1979–2010). CBT techniques were often used in studies identified as either CBT or STPP. However, STPP techniques were only used in STPP-identified studies. Empirical clustering of treatment descriptions did not confirm the original distinction of CBT versus STPP, but instead showed substantial heterogeneity within both approaches. Extraction of psychotherapeutic techniques from the treatment descriptions is feasible and could be used as a content-based approach to classify treatments in systematic reviews and meta-analyses. PMID:25750827

  9. Symptom fluctuations, self-esteem, and cohesion during group cognitive behaviour therapy for early psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Tania; Leclerc, Claude; Wykes, Til

    2017-07-14

    Group cohesion has been linked to positive changes in self-esteem and in symptoms during group psychotherapy in people with psychosis. These changes may be linked to changes in symptoms as fluctuations in self-esteem have been linked to symptom fluctuations. We aimed to determine the relationship between these three factors - group cohesion, self-esteem, and symptoms - during group cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis (GCBTp). We hypothesized that group cohesion would precede changes in symptoms and self-esteem and that improvements in self-esteem would precede improvements in symptoms. This is an uncontrolled longitudinal study recruiting from a convenience sample within two early psychosis clinics. Sixty-six individuals from first episode of psychosis treatment programmes participated in this study and received 24 sessions of a validated GCBTp protocol. Participants answered a brief questionnaire at the end of each session, measuring their group cohesion, self-esteem, and perception of their symptoms as worse, same, or better than usual. Orthogonal polynomial contrasts for time effects were estimated with a mixed model for repeated measures with a random cluster effect and revealed a quartic trend regarding changes in symptoms over the 24 sessions. Self-esteem, symptoms, and group cohesion were strongly linked during a given session. Also, self-esteem changes predicted changes in symptoms up to two sessions later, and symptoms changes predicted self-esteem changes at the next session. Group cohesion preceded improvements in both self-esteem and symptoms; self-esteem also predicted improvements in group cohesion. These results suggest that self-esteem and symptoms influence each other during therapy, with improvements in one leading to improvements in the other. Group cohesion also appears to be an essential prerequisite to positive changes in self-esteem and symptoms during GCBTp. This study emphasizes the interrelation between self-esteem improvements and

  10. Does motivational interviewing improve retention or outcome in cognitive behaviour therapy for overweight and obese adolescents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Leah

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine whether motivational interviewing improved retention and/or outcome in cognitive behaviour therapy for overweight and obese adolescents (M=14.4, SD=2.0; 52% female). The first 23 participants were allocated to a standard semi-structure assessment interview, the remaining 19 to a motivational interview, prior to commencing the intervention. The groups did not differ at baseline or on anthropometric (weight, BMI, BMI-z-score, waist circumference, waist-hip or waist-height ratio), body composition (percent body fat, fat mass, lean mass) or attrition measures post-treatment or post-maintenance (p>.01). MI did not improve retention or outcome of cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescent overweight and obesity.

  11. Brief Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Compared to Optimised General Practitioners? Care for Depression: A Randomised Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Schene, A.H.; Baas, K.D.; Koeter, M; Lucassen, P.; Bockting, C.L.H.; Wittkampf, K. F.; van Weert, H.C.; Huyser, J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: How to treat Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in primary care? Studies that compared (brief) Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) with care as usual by the General Practitioner (GP) found the first to be more effective. However, to make a fair comparison GP care should be optimised and protocolised according to current evidence based guidelines for depression. So far this has not been the case. We studied whether a protocolised 8 session CBT is more effective than optimised and prot...

  12. Structural but not functional neuroplasticity one year after effective cognitive behaviour therapy for social anxiety disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Månsson, Kristoffer N T; Salami, Alireza; Carlbring, Per

    2017-01-01

    , and studies of treatment-induced long-term neuroplasticity are rare. Functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (using 3T MRI) was performed in 13 subjects with social anxiety disorder on 3 occasions over 1year. All subjects underwent 9 weeks of Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy...... of social anxiety disorder, but only reduced amygdala GM volume, and not functional activity, is associated with a clinical response 1year after CBT....

  13. Dealing with Emotional Problems Using Rational-Emotive Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: A Client's Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Dryden, Windy

    2012-01-01

    Dealing with Emotional Problems offers clear, practical advice on how to deal with some of the most common emotional difficulties.\\ud \\ud Rational-Emotive Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (RECBT) is a technique that encourages a direct focus on emotional problems, helping you to understand the thoughts, beliefs and behaviours that cause you to maintain these problems. This understanding will enable you to overcome problems and lead a happier and more fulfilling life.\\ud \\ud The book begins by outl...

  14. Dealing with Emotional Problems Using Rational-Emotive Cognitive Behaviour Therapy: A Practitioner's Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Dryden, Windy

    2012-01-01

    In this practical companion to the client manual, Windy Dryden draws on Rational-Emotive Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (RECBT) – a form of CBT that focuses on challenging and changing the irrational beliefs that largely determine emotional and behavioural issues – to encourage people to deal with their emotional problems.\\ud \\ud This Practitioner's Guide includes all of the information presented in the Client’s Guide with the addition of helpful hints and tips for the therapist, making it strai...

  15. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia : How, for Whom and What about Acceptance?

    OpenAIRE

    Bothelius, Kristoffer

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is essential for survival but a significant minority of the adult population are dissatisfied with their sleep, and 6-10% meet the criteria for insomnia disorder, characterised by difficulties falling asleep at bedtime, waking up in the middle of the night or too early in the morning, and daytime symptoms. Cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I), an evidence-based sleep-focused intervention, has been suggested as the treatment of choice for chronic insomnia. However, access t...

  16. CHAMP: Cognitive behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients, a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murphy David

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal health anxiety, also called hypochondriasis, has been successfully treated by cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT in patients recruited from primary care, but only one pilot trial has been carried out among those attending secondary medical clinics where health anxiety is likely to be more common and have a greater impact on services. The CHAMP study extends this work to examine both the clinical and cost effectiveness of CBT in this population. Method/Design The study is a randomized controlled trial with two parallel arms and equal randomization of 466 eligible patients (assuming a 20% drop-out to an active treatment group of 5-10 sessions of cognitive behaviour therapy and to a control group. The aim at baseline, after completion of all assessments but before randomization, was to give a standard simple explanation of the nature of health anxiety for all participants. Subsequently the control group was to receive whatever care might usually be available in the clinics, which is normally a combination of clinical assessment, appropriate tests and reassurance. Those allocated to the active treatment group were planned to receive between 5 and 10 sessions of an adapted form of cognitive behaviour therapy based on the Salkovskis/Warwick model, in which a set of treatment strategies are chosen aimed at helping patients understand the factors that drive and maintain health anxiety. The therapy was planned to be given by graduate research workers, nurses or other health professionals trained for this intervention whom would also have their competence assessed independently during the course of treatment. The primary outcome is reduction in health anxiety symptoms after one year and the main secondary outcome is the cost of care after two years. Discussion This represents the first trial of adapted cognitive behaviour therapy in health anxiety that is large enough to test not only the clinical benefits of treatment but also

  17. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy in a community-based pulmonary rehabilitation programme: A controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Edwin K; Gorelik, Alexandra; Irving, Louis; Khan, Fary

    2017-03-06

    To investigate whether the use of cognitive behavioural therapy in pulmonary rehabilitation addresses the depression and anxiety burden and thereby improves rehabilitation outcomes. Prospective controlled clinical trial. A total of 70 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who were referred to a community centre for pulmonary rehabilitation. Patients were allocated to either the control group, consisting of pulmonary rehabilitation alone, or to the treatment group, receiving pulmonary rehabilitation and an additional 6 sessions of group-based cognitive behavioural therapy. Assessments consisting of questionnaires and walk tests were conducted pre- and post-pulmonary rehabilitation. A total of 28 patients were enrolled. The cognitive behavioural therapy group had significant improvements in exercise capacity following pulmonary rehabilitation (mean change 32.9 m, p = 0.043), which was maintained at 3 months post-pulmonary rehabilitation (mean change 23.4 m, p = 0.045). Patients in the cognitive behavioural therapy group showed significant short-term improvements in fatigue, stress and depression (mean change 2.4, p = 0.016, 3.9, p = 0.024 and 4.3, p = 0.047, respectively) and a 3-month post-pulmonary rehabilitation improvement in anxiety score (mean change 3.1, p = 0.01). No significant changes were seen in the control group. The addition of cognitive behavioural therapy improved patients' physical, psychological and quality of life results. Cognitive behavioural therapy should be considered for inclusion in a pulmonary rehabilitation programme to enhance outcomes.

  18. Efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy delivered over the Internet for depressive symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztein, Dina M; Koransky, Charles E; Fegan, Leah; Himelhoch, Seth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cognitive behavioural therapy has been shown to improve depressive symptoms in adults with mild to moderate depression. To overcome many of the barriers associated with delivering this treatment, attempts have been made to deliver cognitive behavioural therapy via the Internet. The objective of this meta-analysis is to assess whether Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy delivered to adults with depressive symptoms leads to a reduction in these symptoms as compared to those who receive no therapy. Methods In September 2015, the Cochrane, PubMed and PsycInfo databases were searched; studies were also found through bibliography searches. Studies were included if they were randomized controlled trials published in English between 2005-2015 conducted with adults >18 years of age experiencing mild to moderate depression where study subjects received Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy, and the control group was placed on a wait-list. The search yielded 257 articles; 14 of these were included in the meta-analysis. Results Internet delivered cognitive behavioural therapy had a medium effect on reducing depressive symptoms at the end of the study period (standardized mean difference: 0.74, confidence interval: 0.62-0.86, p cognitive behavioural therapy also has a large sustained effect in maintaining reduction of depressive symptoms in follow-up measures done 3-6 months after the conclusion of the therapy (standardized mean difference: 0.83, confidence interval: 0.69-0.99, p Cognitive behavioural therapy delivered over the Internet leads to immediate and sustained reduction in depressive symptoms; thus, it may be a good treatment modality for individuals unable or unwilling to access traditional face-to-face therapy.

  19. Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety among University Students: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Fiorella; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Ricci Bitti, Pio Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies in the treatment of anxiety among university students. To this aim, the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) was completed by 30 students assigned to CBT and by 24 students assigned to PDT, both at the beginning and at the end of…

  20. Comparison of Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Psychodynamic Therapy in the Treatment of Anxiety among University Students: An Effectiveness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monti, Fiorella; Tonetti, Lorenzo; Ricci Bitti, Pio Enrico

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural (CBT) and psychodynamic (PDT) therapies in the treatment of anxiety among university students. To this aim, the Symptom Questionnaire (SQ) was completed by 30 students assigned to CBT and by 24 students assigned to PDT, both at the beginning and at the end of…

  1. An augmented cognitive behavioural therapy for treating post-stroke depression: description of a treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kootker, Joyce A; Rasquin, Sascha M C; Smits, Peter; Geurts, Alexander C; van Heugten, Caroline M; Fasotti, Luciano

    2015-09-01

    Currently, no evidence-based treatment is available for mood problems after stroke. We present a new psychological intervention designed to reduce depressive complaints after stroke. This intervention was based on cognitive behavioural therapy principles and was shown feasible in a pilot study. In order to meet the specific needs of stroke patients (concerning both sensori-motor, cognitive, and behavioural problems), we incorporated motivational interviewing, grief resolution, and psycho-education. We emphasised for each session to take into account the cognitive deficits of the patients (i.e. be concrete, accessible, structured, specific, and repeat information). Moreover, we augmented the psychologist-administered therapy with the contribution of an occupational or movement therapist aimed at facilitating patients' goal-setting and attainment. The intervention consisted of 12 one-hour sessions with a psychologist and three or four one-hour sessions with an occupational or movement therapist. Currently, the effectiveness of the intervention is evaluated in a randomised controlled trial. The proposed psychological treatment protocol is innovative, as it applies cognitive behavioural therapy in a stroke-specific manner; moreover, it supports goal attainment by incorporating occupational or movement therapy sessions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Measures of readiness for cognitive behavioural therapy in people with intellectual disability: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, Joshua; Charlesworth, Georgina; Scior, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a promising treatment for mental health problems in people with intellectual disabilities but some may not be suited or ready. This review critically evaluates the quality and utility of measures of CBT readiness in people with intellectual disabilities. Twelve studies of six measures based on three aspects of CBT readiness were identified through systematic review. Across measures, measurement quality was largely poor or un-assessed. Only one study evaluated measurement change over the course of CBT. Not all participants with intellectual disabilities could 'pass' readiness measures and performance may be affected by levels of language and cognitive functioning. There was some evidence that CBT readiness is trainable with brief interventions. Before using readiness measures in a clinical context, further work is needed to extend initial evidence on recognising cognitive mediation as a CBT readiness ability. Given the lack of consensus as to the definition of CBT readiness and the heterogeneity of CBT interventions, future research could also focus on developing readiness measures using a bottom up approach, developing measures within the context of CBT interventions themselves, before further refining and establishing their psychometric properties. This paper is the first to systematically review measures of skills thought necessary to be ready for cognitive behavioural therapy in intellectual disabilities. The findings suggest that while readiness skills may be trainable with brief interventions, the available measures of these skills have not been fully evaluated for quality. Levels of functioning on these measures have yet to be established relative to those without intellectual disabilities and critically, there is very little evidence as to whether these skills are important in cognitive behavioural therapy process and outcome. We suggest that future research could focus on those constructs where there is preliminary

  3. Reduced 5-HT(1B) receptor binding in the dorsal brain stem after cognitive behavioural therapy of major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiger, Mikael; Rück, Christian; Forsberg, Anton; Varrone, Andrea; Lindefors, Nils; Halldin, Christer; Farde, Lars; Lundberg, Johan

    2014-08-30

    Major depression is a significant contributor to the global burden of disease, and its pathophysiology is largely unknown. The serotonin hypothesis is, however, the model with most supporting data, although the details are only worked out to some extent. Recent clinical imaging measurements indeed imply a role in major depressive disorder (MDD) for the inhibitory serotonin autoreceptor 5-hydroxytryptamine1B (5-HT1B). The aim of the current study was to examine 5-HT1B receptor binding in the brain of MDD patients before and after psychotherapy. Ten patients with an ongoing untreated moderate depressive episode were examined with positron emission tomography (PET) and the 5-HT1B receptor selective radioligand [(11)C]AZ10419369, before and after treatment with internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy. All of the patients examined responded to treatment, and 70% were in remission by the time of the second PET measurement. A statistically significant 33% reduction of binding potential (BPND) was found in the dorsal brain stem (DBS) after treatment. No other significant changes in BPND were found. The DBS contains the raphe nuclei, which regulate the serotonin system. This study gives support for the importance of serotonin and the 5-HT1B receptor in the biological response to psychological treatment of MDD.

  4. Cognitive behavioural therapy versus supportive therapy for persistent positive symptoms in psychotic disorders: The POSITIVE Study, a multicenter, prospective, single-blind, randomised controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sartory Gudrun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been demonstrated that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT has a moderate effect on symptom reduction and on general well being of patients suffering from psychosis. However, questions regarding the specific efficacy of CBT, the treatment safety, the cost-effectiveness, and the moderators and mediators of treatment effects are still a major issue. The major objective of this trial is to investigate whether CBT is specifically efficacious in reducing positive symptoms when compared with non-specific supportive therapy (ST which does not implement CBT-techniques but provides comparable therapeutic attention. Methods/Design The POSITIVE study is a multicenter, prospective, single-blind, parallel group, randomised clinical trial, comparing CBT and ST with respect to the efficacy in reducing positive symptoms in psychotic disorders. CBT as well as ST consist of 20 sessions altogether, 165 participants receiving CBT and 165 participants receiving ST. Major methodological aspects of the study are systematic recruitment, explicit inclusion criteria, reliability checks of assessments with control for rater shift, analysis by intention to treat, data management using remote data entry, measures of quality assurance (e.g. on-site monitoring with source data verification, regular query process, advanced statistical analysis, manualized treatment, checks of adherence and competence of therapists. Research relating the psychotherapy process with outcome, neurobiological research addressing basic questions of delusion formation using fMRI and neuropsychological assessment and treatment research investigating adaptations of CBT for adolescents is combined in this network. Problems of transfer into routine clinical care will be identified and addressed by a project focusing on cost efficiency. Discussion This clinical trial is part of efforts to intensify psychotherapy research in the field of psychosis in Germany, to contribute to the

  5. Temporal patterns of change in panic disorder during cognitive behaviour therapy: an Indian study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjula, M; Prasadarao, P S D V; Kumaraiah, V; Raguram, R

    2014-09-01

    CBT has been proven to be effective in the treatment of panic disorder; however, attempts to study the process of change are limited. The study evaluated the temporal patterns of change in the panic symptoms, cognitions, behaviours, and anxiety sensitivity in subjects with panic disorder being treated with CBT. Thirty subjects with panic disorder were allocated to two groups: Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT, n = 15) and Behaviour Therapy (BT, n = 15). Assessments were carried out weekly for five consecutive weeks using the Semi-Structured Interview Schedule, the Anxiety Sensitivity Index, the Agoraphobic Cognitions Questionnaire, and the Texas Panic Attack Record Form. The CBT group received comprehensive CBT and the BT group received psycho-education and Applied Relaxation. Following intervention the change was continuous and gradual on all the variables in the CBT group and the scores reduced to a functional range after 4-5 weeks of therapy. Such a change was not evident in the BT group. Significant change was evident in cognitive domains following the introduction of the exposure and cognitive restructuring within the CBT group. Both cognitive and behavioural techniques contributed to the overall change. CBT had an impact on the cognitive domains and significant changes were evident corresponding to the addition of cognitive restructuring and exposure techniques in the 3rd to 5th week. Both cognitive and behavioural components are therefore crucial for overall improvement to occur.

  6. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care: Design of a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severens Johan L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a common mental health problem in the general population, associated with a substantial impact on quality of life and societal costs. However, many depressed patients in primary care do not receive the care they need. Reason for this is that pharmacotherapy is only effective in severely depressed patients and psychological treatments in primary care are scarce and costly. A more feasible treatment in primary care might be computerised cognitive behavioural therapy. This can be a self-help computer program based on the principles of cognitive behavioural therapy. Although previous studies suggest that computerised cognitive behavioural therapy is effective, more research is necessary. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to evaluate the (cost- effectiveness of online computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care. Methods/Design In a randomised trial we will compare (a computerised cognitive behavioural therapy with (b treatment as usual by a GP, and (c computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in combination with usual GP care. Three hundred mild to moderately depressed patients (aged 18–65 will be recruited in the general population by means of a large-scale Internet-based screening (N = 200,000. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three treatment groups. Primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is the severity of depression. Other outcomes include psychological distress, social functioning, and dysfunctional beliefs. The economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective, in which all costs will be related to clinical effectiveness and health-related quality of life. All outcome assessments will take place on the Internet at baseline, two, three, six, nine, and twelve months. Costs are measured on a monthly basis. A time horizon of one year will be used without long-term extrapolation of either costs or quality of life

  7. Terapia cognitivo-comportamental dos transtornos alimentares Cognitive-behavioural therapy of eating disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Duchesne

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available A terapia cognitivo-comportamental é uma intervenção breve, semi-estruturada e orientada para metas, que tem sido amplamente utilizada nos centros de pesquisa e tratamento de transtornos alimentares. O presente artigo tem por objetivo descrever as principais estratégias cognitivas e comportamentais utilizadas no tratamento ambulatorial dos transtornos alimentares. Vários ensaios clínicos avaliaram a eficácia da terapia cognitivo-comportamental, indicando que ela favorece a remissão ou diminuição da freqüência de episódios de compulsão alimentar, dos comportamentos purgativos e da restrição alimentar. Tem sido relatada também melhora do humor, do funcionamento social, e diminuição da preocupação com peso e formato corporal.The cognitive-behavioural therapy is a brief, semi-structured and goal oriented intervention, which has been largely used in research and treatment centers specialized on eating disorders. The present article describes the main cognitive and behavioral strategies used in the outpatient treatment of eating disorders. Several clinical studies assessed the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy, indicating the remission or the reduction of the frequency of binge eating episodes, purgative behaviours and food restriction. Social and mood improvement, as well as reduction of weight and body shape concerns, have also been reported.

  8. Yoga-enhanced cognitive behavioural therapy (Y-CBT) for anxiety management: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalsa, Manjit K; Greiner-Ferris, Julie M; Hofmann, Stefan G; Khalsa, Sat Bir S

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for generalized anxiety disorder, but there is still room for improvement. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential benefit of enriching CBT with kundalini yoga (Y-CBT). Participants consisted of treatment resistant clients at a community mental health clinic. A total of 32 participants enrolled in the study and 22 completed the programme. After the Y-CBT intervention, pre-post comparisons showed statistically significant improvements in state and trait anxiety, depression, panic, sleep and quality of life. Results from this preliminary study suggest that Y-CBT may have potential as a promising treatment for those suffering from generalized anxiety disorder. Yoga-enhanced cognitive behavioural therapy (Y-CBT) may be a promising new treatment for those suffering from generalized anxiety disorder. Y-CBT may also reduce depression in those suffering from generalized anxiety. Y-CBT may reduce depression and anxiety in a clinic population where clients suffer from multiple diagnoses including generalized anxiety disorder. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Cognitive-behavioural therapy and recovery of a delusional dysmorphophobia case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas-Yust, Carlos; Delgado-Ríos, Patricia; Escudero-Pérez, Silvia

    2017-02-01

    We present the application of cognitive-behavioural therapy in a clinical case diagnosed with delusional dysmorphophobia. The psychometric scales used for evaluation were the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia, Beck Anxiety and Depression inventories, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale along with the degree of conviction in the delusional belief and in alternative explanations, and social functioning measured by patient reporting. The therapy included cognitive and behavioural techniques: evidence analysis, search for alternative explanations, logical and functional analysis, reality testing, progressive relaxation techniques, in vivo and imaginal exposure therapy. Evaluations were performed before and after the treatment and then at follow-up after 12 and 24 months. Progressively, the delusional conviction disappeared. There were significant improvements at an emotional level and the patient recovered social and work  functioning. The need to use psychological treatments for people with delusional disorder as first choice treatment must be considered.

  10. Process analysis of trauma-focused cognitive behavioural therapy for individuals with schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    O Driscoll, C.; Mason, O.; Brady, F; Smith, B.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Therapeutic alliance, modality, and ability to engage with the process of therapy have been the main focus of research into what makes psychotherapy successful. Individuals with complex trauma histories or schizophrenia are suggested to be more difficult to engage and may be less likely to benefit from therapy. This study aimed to track the in-session 'process' of working alliance and emotional processing of trauma memories for individuals with schizophrenia. DESIGN: The study util...

  11. Predictors of outcome for cognitive behaviour therapy in binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Mirjam W; Vroling, Maartje S; Ouwens, Machteld A; Engels, Rutger C M E; van Strien, Tatjana

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this naturalistic study was to identify pretreatment predictors of response to cognitive behaviour therapy in treatment-seeking patients with binge eating disorder (BED; N = 304). Furthermore, we examined end-of-treatment factors that predict treatment outcome 6 months later (N = 190). We assessed eating disorder psychopathology, general psychopathology, personality characteristics and demographic variables using self-report questionnaires. Treatment outcome was measured using the bulimia subscale of the Eating Disorder Inventory 1. Predictors were determined using hierarchical linear regression analyses. Several variables significantly predicted outcome, four of which were found to be both baseline predictors of treatment outcome and end-of-treatment predictors of follow-up: Higher levels of drive for thinness, higher levels of interoceptive awareness, lower levels of binge eating pathology and, in women, lower levels of body dissatisfaction predicted better outcome in the short and longer term. Based on these results, several suggestions are made to improve treatment outcome for BED patients.

  12. Inpatient cognitive behaviour therapy for adolescents with anorexia nervosa: immediate and longer-term effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo eDalle Grave

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa is often successful in restoring body weight, but a high percentage of patients relapse following discharge. The aim of the present study was to establish the immediate and longer-term effects of a novel inpatient program for adolescents that was designed to produce enduring change. Method: Twenty-seven consecutive patients with severe anorexia nervosa were admitted to a 20-week inpatient treatment program based upon enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E. The patients were assessed before and after hospitalization, and six and 12 months later. Results: Twenty-six patients (96% completed the program. In these patients there was a substantial improvement in weight, eating disorder features and general psychopathology that was well maintained at 12-month follow-up. Conclusions: These findings suggest that inpatient CBT-E is a promising approach to the treatment of adolescents with severe anorexia nervosa.

  13. Comparison of the effects of cognitive behavioural therapy and inhalation sedation on child dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebriaee, F; Sarraf Shirazi, A; Fani, K; Moharreri, F; Soltanifar, A; Khaksar, Y; Mazhari, F

    2015-04-01

    To compare the effectiveness of inhalation sedation with nitrous oxide/oxygen (N2O/O2) and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in reducing dental anxiety in preschool children. Randomised controlled clinical trial. This study was conducted on 45 preschoolers with moderate to severe dental anxiety (determined by the Children's Fear Survey Schedule Dental Subscale), who required pulp treatment of at least one primary mandibular molar. Baseline anxiety and cooperation levels were determined using Venham Clinical Anxiety and Cooperation Scales (VCAS and VCCS) and Venham Picture Test (VPT) at the first dental visit (dental prophylaxis and fluoride treatment). Before the second dental visit (pulp treatment), the children were randomly assigned to one of three groups--1: control, 2: N(2)O/O(2) and 3: CBT. In group 1, the usual behaviour management techniques were used, in group 2, nitrous oxide/oxygen gas was used and in group 3, unrelated play, Benson's breathing and positive self-talk and modelling were used. Anxiety and cooperation levels were determined at three periods: injection, rubber dam placement and the application of a high-speed handpiece with VCAS and VCCS and VPT. Finally, anxiety and cooperation differences between the two dental visits were compared within the three groups. Chi square, ANOVA and Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests were used. N(2)O/O(2) and CBT significantly resulted in lower anxiety and higher cooperation in the second visit (at all three periods) compared to the control, although there was no significant difference between these two treatment methods. Both test methods were effective in reducing dental anxiety in preschoolers. Considering the adverse effects and necessity of equipment and trained personnel when using nitrous oxide and oxygen inhalation sedation, cognitive behavioural therapy is preferable because of its better applicability.

  14. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  15. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive-behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Lester, Kathryn J; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A; Heiervang, Einar R; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J; Marin, Carla E; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. AIMS: To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of

  16. Do People with Intellectual Disabilities and Psychosis Have the Cognitive Skills Required to Undertake Cognitive Behavioural Therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oathamshaw, Stephen C.; Haddock, Gillian

    2006-01-01

    Background: Cognitive skills thought to be necessary to undertake cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) include the ability to recognize emotions, link events and emotions, and recognize cognitive mediation. These skills have been assessed in people with intellectual disabilities, but not in those who also have psychosis. Materials and methods:…

  17. Predicting Outcomes Following Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Child Anxiety Disorders: The Influence of Genetic, Demographic and Clinical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jennifer L.; Lester, Kathryn J.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Tropeano, Maria; Creswell, Cathy; Collier, David A.; Cooper, Peter; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Morris, Talia; Rapee, Ronald M.; Roberts, Susanna; Donald, Jennifer A.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Within a therapeutic gene by environment (G × E) framework, we recently demonstrated that variation in the Serotonin Transporter Promoter Polymorphism; "5HTTLPR" and marker rs6330 in Nerve Growth Factor gene; "NGF" is associated with poorer outcomes following cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for child anxiety…

  18. Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program Shows Potential in Reducing Symptoms of Depression and Stress among Young People with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, J. A.; Evert, H. T.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) delivered in groups on the reduction of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress in young people on the autism spectrum. Utilising a quasi-experimental design, comparisons were made between individuals allocated to a group intervention program and individuals allocated to a…

  19. Trauma-focused cognitive behaviour therapy and exercise for chronic whiplash: protocol of a randomised, controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letitia Campbell

    2015-10-01

    Discussion: This study will provide a definitive evaluation of the effects of adding trauma-focused cognitive behaviour therapy to physiotherapy exercise for individuals with chronic WAD and PTSD. This study is likely to influence the clinical management of whiplash injury and will have immediate clinical applicability in Australia, Denmark and the wider international community. The

  20. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive-behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Lester, Kathryn J; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A; Heiervang, Einar R; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J; Marin, Carla E; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. AIMS: To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychologi

  1. Computerised Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for the Prevention and Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Thomas; Stallard, Paul; Velleman, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) can be effective in the treatment of depression and anxiety in adults, although the outcomes with children and adolescents are unclear. The aim of the study is to systematically review the literature on the effectiveness of cCBT for the prevention and treatment of depression…

  2. Predicting dropout from intensive outpatient cognitive behavioural therapy for binge eating disorder using pre-treatment characteristics: A naturalistic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroling, M.S.; Wiersma, F.E.; Lammers, M.W.; Noorthoorn, E.O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dropout rates in binge eating disorder (BED) treatment are high (17-30%), and predictors of dropout are unknown. Method: Participants were 376 patients following an intensive outpatient cognitive behavioural therapy programme for BED, 82 of whom (21.8%) dropped out of treatment. An explo

  3. Cognitive-behavioural therapies and exercise programmes for patients with fibromyalgia: state of the art and future directions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koulil, S. van; Effting, M.; Kraaimaat, F.W.; Lankveld, W.G.J.M. van; Helmond, T. van; Cats, H.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Jong, A.J.L. de; Haverman, J.F.; Evers, A.W.M.

    2007-01-01

    This review provides an overview of the effects of non-pharmacological treatments for patients with fibromyalgia (FM), including cognitive-behavioural therapy, exercise training programmes, or a combination of the two. After summarising and discussing preliminary evidence of the rationale of non-pha

  4. Predicting Outcomes Following Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Child Anxiety Disorders: The Influence of Genetic, Demographic and Clinical Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jennifer L.; Lester, Kathryn J.; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Tropeano, Maria; Creswell, Cathy; Collier, David A.; Cooper, Peter; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Morris, Talia; Rapee, Ronald M.; Roberts, Susanna; Donald, Jennifer A.; Eley, Thalia C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Within a therapeutic gene by environment (G × E) framework, we recently demonstrated that variation in the Serotonin Transporter Promoter Polymorphism; "5HTTLPR" and marker rs6330 in Nerve Growth Factor gene; "NGF" is associated with poorer outcomes following cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for child anxiety…

  5. Predicting dropout from intensive outpatient cognitive behavioural therapy for binge eating disorder using pre-treatment characteristics: A naturalistic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroling, M.S.; Wiersma, F.E.; Lammers, M.W.; Noorthoorn, E.O.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Dropout rates in binge eating disorder (BED) treatment are high (17-30%), and predictors of dropout are unknown. Method: Participants were 376 patients following an intensive outpatient cognitive behavioural therapy programme for BED, 82 of whom (21.8%) dropped out of treatment. An

  6. Cognitive behavioural therapy for psychopathology in relatives of missing persons : Study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenferink, Lonneke I.M.; Wessel, Ineke; de Keijser, Jos; Boelen, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Background It is hypothesized that the grieving process of relatives of missing persons is complicated by having to deal with uncertainty about the fate of their loved one. We developed a cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) with mindfulness that focuses on dealing with this uncertainty. In this arti

  7. Cognitive behavioural therapy for psychopathology in relatives of missing persons: study protocol for a pilot randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenferink, L.I.M.; Wessel, Ineke; de Keijser, Jos; Boelen, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Background It is hypothesized that the grieving process of relatives of missing persons is complicated by having to deal with uncertainty about the fate of their loved one. We developed a cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) with mindfulness that focuses on dealing with this uncertainty. In this arti

  8. Computerised Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for the Prevention and Treatment of Depression and Anxiety in Children and Adolescents: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Thomas; Stallard, Paul; Velleman, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) can be effective in the treatment of depression and anxiety in adults, although the outcomes with children and adolescents are unclear. The aim of the study is to systematically review the literature on the effectiveness of cCBT for the prevention and treatment of depression…

  9. Cognitive and Emotion Regulation Change Processes in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Mia S; Mennin, Douglas S; Hougaard, Esben; Zachariae, Robert; Rosenberg, Nicole K

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate variables, derived from both cognitive and emotion regulation conceptualizations of social anxiety disorder (SAD), as possible change processes in cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for SAD. Several proposed change processes were investigated: estimated probability, estimated cost, safety behaviours, acceptance of emotions, cognitive reappraisal and expressive suppression. Participants were 50 patients with SAD, receiving a standard manualized CBT program, conducted in groups or individually. All variables were measured pre-therapy, mid-therapy and post-therapy. Lower level mediation models revealed that while a change in most process measures significantly predicted clinical improvement, only changes in estimated probability and cost and acceptance of emotions showed significant indirect effects of CBT for SAD. The results are in accordance with previous studies supporting the mediating role of changes in cognitive distortions in CBT for SAD. In addition, acceptance of emotions may also be a critical component to clinical improvement in SAD during CBT, although more research is needed on which elements of acceptance are most helpful for individuals with SAD. The study's lack of a control condition limits any conclusion regarding the specificity of the findings to CBT. Change in estimated probability and cost, and acceptance of emotions showed an indirect effect of CBT for SAD. Cognitive distortions appear relevant to target with cognitive restructuring techniques. Finding acceptance to have an indirect effect could be interpreted as support for contemporary CBT approaches that include acceptance-based strategies. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Serotonin transporter [corrected] methylation and response to cognitive behaviour therapy in children with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, S; Lester, K J; Hudson, J L; Rapee, R M; Creswell, C; Cooper, P J; Thirlwall, K J; Coleman, J R I; Breen, G; Wong, C C Y; Eley, T C

    2014-09-16

    Anxiety disorders that are the most commonly occurring psychiatric disorders in childhood, are associated with a range of social and educational impairments and often continue into adulthood. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment option for the majority of cases, although up to 35-45% of children do not achieve remission. Recent research suggests that some genetic variants may be associated with a more beneficial response to psychological therapy. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation work at the interface between genetic and environmental influences. Furthermore, epigenetic alterations at the serotonin transporter (SERT) promoter region have been associated with environmental influences such as stressful life experiences. In this study, we measured DNA methylation upstream of SERT in 116 children with an anxiety disorder, before and after receiving CBT. Change during treatment in percentage DNA methylation was significantly different in treatment responders vs nonresponders. This effect was driven by one CpG site in particular, at which responders increased in methylation, whereas nonresponders showed a decrease in DNA methylation. This is the first study to demonstrate differences in SERT methylation change in association with response to a purely psychological therapy. These findings confirm that biological changes occur alongside changes in symptomatology following a psychological therapy such as CBT.

  11. Cognitive-behavioural therapy effects on employment-related outcomes for individuals with mental illness: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Minjoo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: To identify the effects of interventions in cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT on employment-related outcomes world-wide for individuals with mental illness.Research purpose: A search of the relevant literature was conducted through PsychInfo, Medline, Scopus and Google Scholar™, covering the period between 1995 and August 2011. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the criteria from Evidence Based Library and Information Practice (EBLIP. Eleven studies met the inclusion criteria.Motivation for the study: Evidence is needed on best practices to support work participation by people with mental illness. Effective cognitive-behavioural intervention might enhance their personal control over participation in employment aside from systemic or policy-oriented interventions.Research approach, design and method: A scoping review was done to map trends in the evidence for CBT as an intervention to support employment participation by people with mental illness. A scoping review is exploratory, the evidence of which lays the basis for subsequent studies. The methodological quality of included studies was assessed using the EBLIP Critical Appraisal Checklist.Main findings: Cognitive-behaviour therapy was an effective intervention approach for better work productivity, longer work hours, higher re-employment rate and enhanced mental health for individuals with mental illness.Practical/managerial implications: Cognitive-behaviour therapy is a promising strategy for industrial and organisational psychologists dealing with people who have a mental illness. It enhances employment and maintains work adjustment. Additional clinical trials in diverse populations and contexts will further establish its efficacy.Contribution/value-add: This scoping review aggregated the preliminary evidence for the efficacy of cognitive-behaviour therapy as a work-participation intervention for people with mental illness.

  12. Increasing access to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Low and Middle Income Countries: A strategic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Andrew; Nadkarni, Abhijit; Calam, Rachel; Naeem, Farooq; Husain, Nusrat

    2016-08-01

    Cognitive Behaviour Therapy has been demonstrated to be an effective intervention in outpatient and inpatient settings for a wide range of presenting mental health problems including depression, Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, Post traumatic Stress Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Panic Disorder and Somatorform Disorder. There is likely to be an unmet need for this therapeutic approach in most Low and Middle Income Countries (LMIC). However, the training of therapists to deliver this intervention has historically been a lengthy and expensive process, with already highly trained staff such as psychiatrists and psychologists undertaking additional training of up to one year duration in order to develop expertise in this area. This paper proposes that a model where training, supervision, leadership and service evaluation is provided by a small number of highly trained staff to front-line non-specialist staff who will then deliver manualised therapy. These front-line staff may also be conceptualised as part of a stepped care model where self-help and manualised therapy approaches are used in the first instance. Where patient functioning does not improve there is then the possibility of being stepped-up for treatment by a more specialised and highly trained therapist. This approach may help in meeting the huge mental health treatment gap in LMIC. This paper also suggests that lessons learnt from the dissemination of behaviourally informed parenting interventions internationally can be applied to the dissemination of this therapeutic approach.

  13. Neural correlation of successful cognitive behaviour therapy for spider phobia: a magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Barry; Alderson-Day, Ben; Prendergast, Garreth; Kennedy, Juliette; Bennett, Sophie; Docherty, Mary; Whitton, Clare; Manea, Laura; Gouws, Andre; Tomlinson, Heather; Green, Gary

    2013-12-30

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can be an effective treatment for spider phobia, but the underlying neural correlates of therapeutic change are yet to be specified. The present study used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to study responses within the first half second, to phobogenic stimuli in a group of individuals with spider phobia prior to treatment (n=12) and then in nine of them following successful CBT (where they could touch and manage live large common house spiders) at least 9 months later. We also compared responses to a group of age-matched healthy control participants (n=11). Participants viewed static photographs of real spiders, other fear-inducing images (e.g. snakes, sharks) and neutral stimuli (e.g. kittens). Beamforming methods were used to localise sources of significant power changes in response to stimuli. Prior to treatment, participants with spider phobia showed a significant maximum response in the right frontal pole when viewing images of real spiders specifically. No significant frontal response was observed for either control participants or participants with spider phobia post-treatment. In addition, participants' subjective ratings of spider stimuli significantly predicted peak responses in right frontal regions. The implications for understanding brain-based effects of cognitive therapies are discussed.

  14. Adolescent and Family-focused Cognitive-behavioural Therapy for Paediatric Bipolar Disorders: A Case Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knutsson, Jens; Bäckström, Beata; Daukantaitė, Daiva; Lecerof, Fredrik

    2017-05-01

    Although pharmacological treatments can help alleviate mood symptoms in youth with paediatric bipolar disorder (PBD), residual symptoms still commonly persist. In many cases, these symptoms seriously affect the social and psychological development of children and adolescents suffering from PBD. Complementary interventions, such as psychosocial and psychoeducational treatments, can help children and their families manage mood regulation and other challenges throughout childhood and adolescence. However, most research on such interventions has focused on children, single-family psychoeducation, and individual cognitive behavioural therapy. The present study, conducted in Sweden, used a case-series design to explore whether child- and family-focused cognitive behavioural therapy (CFF-CBT) for PBD, adapted from children (8-12 years) to adolescents (13-18 years) and applied in a multi-family format, could help reduce symptoms, improve psychosocial functioning, increase parents' knowledge of and skills for coping with the disorder, and improve family expressed emotion for adolescents with PBD. Furthermore, we aimed to assess whether the effects of such CFF-CBT are maintained at a one-year follow-up. Seven adolescents and 11 parents in two multi-family groups received twelve sessions of CFF-CBT. Self-rating questionnaires and clinical observations were used to evaluate clinically significant changes for individual cases. The results suggest that CFF-CBT is feasible to deliver in an outpatient psychiatric setting and may be effective for developing parents' skills and knowledge for coping with PBD, increasing adolescents' psychosocial functioning, and improving family climate. The results are in line with previous findings on CFF-CBT for children with PBD, suggesting that CFF-CBT is a valuable adjunctive treatment for adolescents with PBD. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Preliminary evidence indicates that CFF-CBT (RAINBOW) is both acceptable and an important

  15. Does enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy for eating disorders improve quality of life?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Hunna J; Allen, Karina; Fursland, Anthea; Byrne, Susan M; Nathan, Paula R

    2012-09-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is the degree of enjoyment and satisfaction experienced in life, and embraces emotional well-being, physical health, economic and living circumstances, and work satisfaction. QOL recovery with eating disorder treatment has received sparse attention, and until now, no study has investigated QOL recovery with enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E). Patients (n = 196) admitted to a specialist eating disorders outpatient programme and receiving CBT-E completed measures of QOL, eating disorder psychopathology, depression, anxiety and self-esteem, before and after treatment. QOL at intake was compared with community norms, and QOL below the norm was predicted from sociodemographic and clinical correlates with logistic regression. Baseline QOL below the norm was associated with depression and anxiety Axis I comorbidity, and severity of depressive symptoms. Predictors of post-treatment QOL were baseline QOL and level of depressive symptoms and self-esteem at post-treatment. CBT-E was associated with gains in QOL over the course of treatment, in addition to eating disorder symptom relief. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association.

  16. Model for implementing cognitive behavioural therapy for smartphone app based smoking cessation program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Alsharif

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Smoking cessation programs are widely implemented to assist smokers in the process of quitting smoking. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT is a psychological approach that is increasingly used in smoking cessation programs. CBT has also been implemented for smoking cessation programs and has been successful in helping smokers to quit. Another advantage of CBT is that it can be combined with different tools and technologies and hence made to deliver effective health intervention programs. The recent advancements in smartphone technologies have been widely explored to develop smoking cessation apps as tools to assist with quitting smoking. However, most existing smartphone apps lack follow-up and adherence to clinical guidelines for treatment. To date, there are no studies which have explored implementing CBT modules into smoking cessation apps. Therefore, there is a need for implementing behavioural change mechanisms in smoking cessation apps to help smokers quit effectively. In this study, we propose a new approach that combines mobile health technology and CBT methods to provide an effective smoking cessation program. The ubiquitous presence of smartphones and the various communication benefits they provide are utilized by our proposed system to provide a CBT paradigm into smoking cessation app systems and hence enhance their success potential. Currently, the proposed system is at the implementation stage, which is soon to be followed by a clinical trial to study the impact of this system on smoking cessation.

  17. A randomised controlled trial of group cognitive behavioural therapy for perfectionism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Alicia K; Egan, Sarah J; Kane, Robert T; Rees, Clare S

    2015-05-01

    Perfectionism is associated with symptoms of anxiety disorders, eating disorders and mood disorders. Treatments targeting perfectionism may reduce the symptoms of these disorders (Egan, Wade, & Shafran, 2011). This study is the first randomised controlled trial to investigate the efficacy of group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for perfectionism. Forty-two participants with elevated perfectionism and a range of anxiety, eating and mood disorders were randomised to group CBT for perfectionism or a waitlist control. The treatment group reported significantly greater pre-post reductions in perfectionism, symptoms of depression, eating disorders, social anxiety, anxiety sensitivity and rumination, as well as significantly greater pre-post increases in self-esteem and quality of life compared to the waitlist control group. The impact of treatment on most of these outcomes was mediated by pre-post change in perfectionism (Concern over Mistakes). Treatment gains were reliable and clinically significant, and were maintained at 6-month follow-up. Findings support group CBT for perfectionism being an efficacious treatment for perfectionism and related psychopathology, as well as increasing self-esteem and quality of life.

  18. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Mothers of Children with Food Allergy: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca C. Knibb

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Food allergy affects quality of life in patients and parents and mothers report high levels of anxiety and stress. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT may be helpful in reducing the psychological impact of food allergy. The aim of this study was to examine the appropriateness and effectiveness of CBT to improve psychological outcomes in parents of children with food allergy. Methods: Five parents (all mothers from a local allergy clinic requested to have CBT; six mothers acted as controls and completed questionnaires only. CBT was individual and face-to face and lasted 12 weeks. All participants completed measures of anxiety and depression, worry, stress, general mental health, generic and food allergy specific quality of life at baseline and at 12 weeks. Results: Anxiety, depression and worry in the CBT group significantly reduced and overall mental health and QoL significantly improved from baseline to 12 weeks (all p < 0.05 in mothers in the CBT group; control group scores remained stable. Conclusions: CBT appears to be appropriate and effective in mothers of children with food allergy and a larger randomised control trial now needs to be conducted. Ways in which aspects of CBT can be incorporated into allergy clinic visits need investigation.

  19. Cardio-respiratory symptoms in panic disorder: a contribution from cognitive-behaviour therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lucia Spear King

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare patients with panic disorder with agoraphobia treated with cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT associated with the medication with patients treated only with medication and verify the behaviour of the cardio-respiratory symptoms of both groups. Methods: Randomized sample in the Psychiatry Institute of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, divided in two groups of 25 participants each. Group 1 undertook 10 weekly sessions of CBT with one hour of duration each together with medication. Group 2, Control, were administered medication that only consisted of tricyclic anti-depressants and selective inhibitors of the re-uptake of serotonin. Evaluation instruments were applied at the beginning and to the end of the interventions. Results: According to the applied scales, group 1 showed statistically more significant results than group 2, with: reduction of panic attacks, cardio-respiratory symptoms, anticipatory anxiety, agoraphobia avoidance and fear of bodily sensations. Conclusion: Exposures (in vivo and interoceptive, especially for induction symptom exercises and relaxation, were considered essential to prepare patients with panic disorder to handle future cardio-respiratory symptoms and panic attacks with agoraphobia.

  20. Rumination-focused cognitive behaviour therapy for residual depression: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ed; Scott, Jan; Wingrove, Janet; Rimes, Katharine; Bathurst, Neil; Steiner, Herbert; Kennell-Webb, Sandra; Moulds, Michelle; Malliaris, Yanni

    2007-09-01

    The treatment of chronic and recurrent depression is a priority for the development of new interventions. The maintenance of residual symptoms following acute treatment for depression is a risk factor for both chronic depression and further relapse/recurrence. This open case series provides the first data on a cognitive-behavioural treatment for residual depression that explicitly targets depressive rumination. Rumination has been identified as a key factor in the onset and maintenance of depression, which is found to remain elevated following remission from depression. Fourteen consecutively recruited participants meeting criteria for medication--refractory residual depression [Paykel, E.S., Scott, J., Teasdale, J.D., Johnson, A.L., Garland, A., Moore, R. et al., 1999. Prevention of relapse in residual depression by cognitive therapy--a controlled trial. Archives of General Psychiatry 56, 829-835] were treated individually for up to 12 weekly 60-min sessions. Treatment specifically focused on switching patients from less helpful to more helpful styles of thinking through the use of functional analysis, experiential/imagery exercises and behavioural experiments. Treatment produced significant improvements in depressive symptoms, rumination and co-morbid disorders: 71% responded (50% reduction on Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) and 50% achieved full remission. Treating depressive rumination appears to yield generalised improvement in depression and co-morbidity. This study provides preliminary evidence that rumination-focused CBT may be an efficacious treatment for medication--refractory residual depression.

  1. Efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy for children and adolescents with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastore, Valentina; Colombo, Katia; Liscio, Mariarosaria; Galbiati, Susanna; Adduci, Anna; Villa, Federica; Strazzer, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Behavioural and psychological disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are very common. The purposes of this study were to estimate the frequency of these problems in our sample, to evaluate the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and to assess the predictive value of important clinical variables for the treatment outcome. Forty patients aged 4-18 years were included in this study. Twenty-eight patients received CBT at our Institute (clinical group), while 12 patients did not receive any treatment at all (control group). The CBCL/4-18 and the VABS were administered to parents at the beginning of the study and after 12 months. A high frequency of psychological and behavioural problems was found in both groups of patients. After CBT, the clinical group showed a significant advantage on several CBCL scales and a greater increase in adaptive behaviour on the VABS Socialisation domain. The Glasgow Coma Scale score, days of unconsciousness and age at injury were not predictors of the severity of psychological problems at the follow-up for the patients of the clinical group. Our results suggest that CBT is an effective intervention for young patients with psychological problems after TBI.

  2. The role of perfectionism in cognitive behaviour therapy outcomes for clinically anxious children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Jennifer H; Newall, Carol; Broeren, Suzanne; Hudson, Jennifer L

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine whether pre-treatment levels of child perfectionism impacted on anxiety treatment outcomes for school-aged children. In addition, it was investigated whether child perfectionism decreased following treatment for anxiety. Participants were sixty-seven clinically anxious children aged 6-13 years (female = 34; majority Caucasian) who were enrolled in a group-based cognitive behaviour therapy program, and their parents. They completed self-report questionnaires on anxiety and depressive symptoms and were administered a diagnostic interview to determine the type and clinician rated severity of anxiety and related disorders pre- and post-treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Self- and parent-rated perfectionism were also measured pre-treatment, while a subset of children completed perfectionism measures post-treatment as well. Self-Oriented Perfectionism, but not Socially Prescribed Perfectionism, predicted poorer self-reported treatment outcome (higher levels of anxiety symptoms) immediately following treatment and at 6-month follow-up when using a multi-informant approach. Additionally, both Self-Oriented and Socially Prescribed child perfectionism significantly reduced immediately following treatment. Despite reductions in child perfectionism following anxiety treatment, higher Self-Oriented Perfectionism may impact negatively on child anxiety treatment outcome.

  3. Group cognitive behavioural therapy for stroke survivors with depression and their carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K Ward, Susan; Turner, Alyna; A Hambridge, John; A Halpin, Sean; E Valentine, Megan; L Sweetapple, Anne; H White, Jennifer; Hackett, Maree L

    2016-10-01

    Depression in stroke survivors is common, leads to poorer outcomes and often not treated. A group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) program (Brainstorm) for stroke survivors with depression, and their carers has been running as part of usual care since 2007. To evaluate the implementation and acceptability of Brainstorm, a closed group intervention consisting of up to 10 sessions of education, activity planning, problem solving and thought challenging. Participating stroke survivors and their carers complete assessment measures at baseline, post-treatment and 1-month and 6-months follow-up. A mixed models for repeated measures data was conducted with depression and anxiety scores for stroke survivors (Beck Depression Inventory-II; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and the assessment of depression, anxiety and carer burden for carers. Acceptability was assessed by session attendance and written and open participant feedback upon completion of the program. Forty-eight community dwelling stroke survivors and 34 carers attended Brainstorm, with a median attendance of 88% of sessions. Follow-up assessments were completed by 77% (post-treatment), 46% (1-month) and 38% (6-month) of stroke survivors. Stroke survivors' depression scores decreased from baseline to post-treatment (pBrainstorm group intervention for depression in stroke survivors appears to have been effectively implemented and is acceptable to stroke survivors and carers.

  4. A Qualitative Process Evaluation of Classroom-Based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy to Reduce Adolescent Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John A. Taylor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Small scale trials indicate that classroom-based Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT for adolescents has good reach and can help prevent depression. However, under more diverse everyday conditions, such programmes tend not to show such positive effects. This study examined the process of implementing a classroom-based CBT depression prevention programme as part of a large (n = 5,030 randomised controlled trial across eight UK secondary schools which was not found to be effective (PROMISE, ISRCTN19083628. The views of young people (n = 42, teachers (n = 12 and facilitators (n = 16 involved in the Resourceful Adolescent Programme (RAP were obtained via focus groups and interviews which were thematically analysed. The programme was considered to be well structured and contain useful content, particularly for younger pupils. However, challenges associated with implementation were its age appropriateness for all year groups, its perceived lack of flexibility, the consistency of quality of delivery, the competing demands for teacher time and a culture where academic targets were prioritised over personal, social and health education. Whilst schools are convenient locations for introducing such programmes and allow good reach, the culture around improving well-being of young people in schools, increasing engagement with teachers and young people and sustaining such programmes are issues that need addressing.

  5. The Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioural Couple Therapy on Marital Stress and Emotional Skills of Infidel Couples in Shiraz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aida Honari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at investigating the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural couple therapy on marital stress and emotional skills of infidel couples. Methods: A pre-test, post-test methodology with one control group is used. Forty couples were chosen purposefully from the statistical population of all infidel couples who referred to psychological clinics in Shiraz. The samples of 40 couples were put in to two groups consisting of a control group and experimental group. The measuring tools were Stockholm marital stress scale (SMSS and Toronto alexithymia scale. The data and hypothesis were analyzed via SPSS-22, using multivariable analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Result: The results of the study show that cognitive behavioural couple therapy has a meaningful effect on marital stress and emotional skills of infidel couples.

  6. Cost-effectiveness of blended vs. face-to-face cognitive behavioural therapy for severe anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Romijn, Geke; Riper, Heleen; Kok, Robin

    2015-01-01

    trial 156 patients will be included (n = 78 in blended cognitive behavioural therapy, n = 78 in face-to-face cognitive behavioural therapy) based on a power of 0.80, calculated by using a formula to estimate the power of a cost-effectiveness analysis: [Formula: see text]. Measurements will take place...... at baseline, midway treatment (7 weeks), immediately after treatment (15 weeks) and 12-month follow-up. At baseline a diagnostic interview will be administered. Primary clinical outcomes are changes in anxiety symptom severity as measured with the Beck Anxiety Inventory. An incremental cost......-effectiveness ratio will be calculated to obtain the costs per quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) measured by the EQ-5D (5-level version). Health-economic outcomes will be explored from a societal and health care perspective. DISCUSSION: This trial will be one of the first to provide information on the cost...

  7. Service user satisfaction with cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis: Associations with therapy outcomes and perceptions of the therapist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlor, Caroline; Sharma, Bina; Khondoker, Mizanur; Peters, Emmanuelle; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Johns, Louise

    2017-03-01

    Few studies have investigated service user satisfaction with cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis (CBTp). This study explored its associations with clinical presentation and outcomes, retrospective expectations of progress, perceptions of the therapist, and demographic variables. One hundred and sixty-five service users completed self-report questionnaires pre- and post-CBTp in relation to the constructs of interest. Regression analyses explored associations with (1) overall satisfaction with therapy and (2) perceived progress, skills, and knowledge gained. Ninety-six per cent of service users reported satisfaction with therapy. Higher levels of overall satisfaction with, and perceived benefit from, therapy were associated with positive therapy expectations, positive ratings of therapist's personal qualities, competence and trustworthiness, lower pre-therapy depression, and improvements in quality of life. Symptom improvements were not related to overall satisfaction with therapy; however, with the exception of voices, better clinical outcomes were associated with subjective ratings of having made more progress and gained more CBT skills and knowledge. Demographic factors were not associated with satisfaction or perceived progress. In multiple regression analyses, expectations of progress showed the strongest associations with both satisfaction and perceived benefits. Other remaining significant associations consisted of perceptions of the therapist for satisfaction, and both pre-therapy levels of, and changes in, depression for perceived benefits. Qualitative feedback emphasized the importance of the therapeutic relationship and developing new coping strategies. The findings provide preliminary evidence that high levels of satisfaction with therapy are not contingent on good clinical outcomes and are instead associated with positive therapy expectations and perceptions of the therapist. Therapy expectations represent a neglected area of research and may

  8. Therapy-relevant factors in adult ADHD from a cognitive behavioural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newark, Patricia Elizabeth; Stieglitz, Rolf-Dieter

    2010-06-01

    Adult individuals with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have been suffering from this neurobiological and highly heritable disorder chronically since childhood. Resulting from their longstanding neuropsychological impairments, such as attentional problems, emotional instability, and disinhibition, they are familiar to a multiplicity of negative life outcomes and underachievement. Furthermore, a large part of this population suffers from psychiatric comorbidity. This accumulation of negative experiences has an impact on therapy-relevant factors such as the individual's self-esteem, self-efficacy, development of core beliefs/schemas, and coping strategies. Based on negative beliefs about the self, individuals confronted with difficult situations develop maladaptive coping strategies, for instance avoidance and procrastination. These strategies lead to maintenance and reinforcement of maladaptive beliefs, and as such they acquit themselves as schema-confirming. Captured in this vicious cycle, the individual sees her negative view of the self confirmed. The purpose of this paper is to illuminate these interactive factors that influence the aforementioned cycle in order to emphasize the cognitive behavioural interventions tailored to those factors on the basis of latest research. Furthermore, the authors want to attract notice to the resources people with ADHD are said to have, namely creativity and resilience. These postulated resources could be therapy-relevant by creating positive beliefs about the self, hence improving coping skills and breaking the vicious circle of negative appraisal. Taking into account personal resources and their fostering may be an important fundament for the treatment plan of adult ADHD. Information on the current state of research and theoretical approaches concerning the below-mentioned key words was gathered through MEDLINE, PsycINFO, PSYNDEXplus, and PubMed databases.

  9. Comparing the acceptability of a positive psychology intervention versus a cognitive behavioural therapy for clinical depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Gomez, Irene; Chaves, Covadonga; Hervas, Gonzalo; Vazquez, Carmelo

    2017-09-01

    There is growing evidence on the efficacy of positive psychology interventions (PPI) to treat clinical disorders. However, very few studies have addressed their acceptability. The present study aimed to analyse 2 key components of acceptability (i.e., client satisfaction and adherence to treatment) of a new PPI programme, the Integrative Positive Psychological Intervention for Depression (IPPI-D), in comparison to a standard cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme in the treatment of clinical depression. One hundred twenty-eight women with a DSM-IV diagnosis of major depression or dysthymia were allocated to a 10-session IPPI-D or CBT group intervention condition. Results showed that both interventions were highly acceptable for participants. Attendance rates were high, and there were no significant differences between conditions. However, the IPPI-D condition showed significantly higher client satisfaction than the CBT condition. Moreover, acceptability did not differ based on participants' severity of symptoms, regardless of condition. These findings encourage further investigations of the applicability of PPI in clinical settings in order to broaden the range of acceptable and suitable therapies for depressed patients. Key Practitioner Message This study sheds light on the client satisfaction and adherence to a positive intervention. For participants, positive psychology interventions (PPI) may be more satisfactory than CBT as PPI are framed within a positive mental health model and, consequently, may reduce the risk of stigmatization Because acceptability of treatments and preferences may affect the efficacy of treatments, this study provides an excellent opportunity to offer professionals more therapeutic options to tailor treatments to clients' needs and expectations. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. The effects of brief cognitive-behaviour therapy for pathological skin picking: A randomized comparison to wait-list control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuck, Kathrin; Keijsers, Ger P J; Rinck, Mike

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-four college students suffering from pathological skin picking were randomly assigned to a four-session cognitive-behavioural treatment (n=17) or a waiting-list condition (n=17). Severity of skin picking, psycho-social impact of skin picking, strength of skin-picking-related dysfunctional cognitions, and severity of skin injury were measured at pre-, post-, and two-months follow-up assessment. Participants in the treatment condition showed a significantly larger reduction on all measured variables in comparison to the waiting-list condition. The obtained effect sizes for the outcome measures were large, ranging from .90 to 1.89. Treatment effects were maintained at follow-up. In conclusion, cognitive-behavioural therapy, even in brief form, constitutes an adequate treatment option for pathological skin-picking behaviour.

  11. Auricular Acupuncture and Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia: A Randomised Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bergdahl

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The most effective nonpharmacological treatment for insomnia disorder is cognitive behavioural therapy-insomnia (CBT-i. However CBT-i may not suit everyone. Auricular acupuncture (AA is a complementary treatment. Studies show that it may alleviate insomnia symptoms. The aim of this randomised controlled study was to compare treatment effects of AA with CBT-i and evaluate symptoms of insomnia severity, anxiety, and depression. Method. Fifty-nine participants, mean age 60.5 years (SD 9.4, with insomnia disorder were randomised to group treatment with AA or CBT-i. Self-report questionnaires, the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI, Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep scale (DBAS-16, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HAD, were collected at baseline, after treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. A series of linear mixed models were performed to examine treatment effect over time between and within the groups. Results. Significant between-group improvements were seen in favour of CBT-i in ISI after treatment and at the 6-month follow-up and in DBAS-16 after treatment. Both groups showed significant within-group postintervention improvements in ISI, and these changes were maintained six months later. The CBT-i group also showed a significant reduction in DBAS-16 after treatment and six months later. Conclusions. Compared to CBT-i, AA, as offered in this study, cannot be considered an effective stand-alone treatment for insomnia disorder. The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01765959.

  12. Treating Problem Gambling Samples with Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and Mindfulness-Based Interventions: A Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntosh, C C; Crino, R D; O'Neill, K

    2016-12-01

    The problem gambling (PG) intervention literature is characterised by a variety of psychological treatments and approaches, with varying levels of evidence (PGRTC in Guideline for screening, assessment and treatment in problem and pathological gambling. Monash University, Melbourne, 2011). A recent PG systematic review (Maynard et al. in Res Soc Work Pract, 2015. doi: 10.1177/1049731515606977 ) and the success of mindfulness-based interventions to effectively treat disorders commonly comorbid with PG suggested mindfulness-based interventions may be effective for treating PG. The current study tested the effectiveness of three interventions to treat PGs: 1. case formulation driven Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT); 2. manualised CBT; and 3. mindfulness-based treatment. All three interventions tested returned large effect size improvements in PG behaviour after seven sessions (Cohen's d range 1.46-2.01), at post-treatment and at 3 and 6-month follow-up. All of the interventions were rated as acceptable by participants at post-treatment. This study suggests that the mindfulness-based and TAU interventions used in the current study appear to be effective at reducing PG behavior and associated distress and they also appear to generalise to improvements in other measures such as quality of life-mental functioning and certain mindfulness facets more effectively than the manualised form of CBT utilised used here. Secondly, a brief mindfulness intervention delivered after psycho-education and a brief CBT intervention may be a useful supplement to traditional CBT treatments by addressing transdiagnostic processes such as rumination and thought suppression. Thirdly, CBT interventions continue to report effectiveness in reducing PG behaviour and associated distress consistent with the prevailing literature and clinical direction.

  13. Enhanced effects of combined cognitive bias modification and computerised cognitive behaviour therapy on social anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Butler

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines whether combined cognitive bias modification for interpretative biases (CBM-I and computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (C-CBT can produce enhanced positive effects on interpretation biases and social anxiety. Forty socially anxious students were randomly assigned into two conditions, an intervention group (positive CBM-I + C-CBT or an active control (neutral CBM-I + C-CBT. At pre-test, participants completed measures of social anxiety, interpretative bias, cognitive distortions, and social and work adjustment. They were exposed to 6 × 30 min sessions of web-based interventions including three sessions of either positive or neutral CBM-I and three sessions of C-CBT, one session per day. At post-test and two-week follow-up, participants completed the baseline measures. A combined positive CBM-I + C-CBT produced less negative interpretations of ambiguous situations than neutral CBM-I + C-CBT. The results also showed that both positive CBM-I + C-CBT and neutral CBM-I + C-CBT reduced social anxiety and cognitive distortions as well as improving work and social adjustment. However, greater effect sizes were observed in the positive CBM-I + C-CBT condition than the control. This indicates that adding positive CBM-I to C-CBT enhanced the training effects on social anxiety, cognitive distortions, and social and work adjustment compared to the neutral CBM-I + C-CBT condition.

  14. Cognitive behavioural therapy for obesity: one-year follow-up in a clinical setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchionda, N; Besteghi, L; Di Domizio, S; Pasqui, F; Nuccitelli, C; Migliorini, S; Baraldi, L; Natale, S; Manini, R; Bellini, M; Belsito, C; Forlani, G; Marchesini, G

    2003-09-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is the most comprehensive means of medically treating obesity, but only few data have so far been published concerning its long-term effectiveness. We here report our experience of 1068 consecutive patients (868 females) treated with CBT at a university-based obesity centre. The patients were enrolled into three different programmes: a 14-week LEARN programme (672 patients), a 16-week MOB programme for the morbidly obese (259 patients), or a 20-week BINGE programme for subjects affected by binge eating (137 patients). Eighty-five percent of the subjects completed the weekly programmes. The percentage of patients attending the scheduled control visits during the 1-year follow-up gradually decreased, being very low in the BINGE group (10%). The percentage weight loss was an average of 6% during the weekly courses, being higher in the MOB programme; by the end of the weekly sessions, it exceeded 10% of initial body weight in 22% of cases and increased to 36% during the follow-up. The cumulative probability of follow-up was higher among the patients undergoing the MOB and LEARN programmes than among the BINGE patients (p obesity. Female gender and a weight loss of > 10% i.b.w. increased compliance to follow-up. The study further demonstrates the difficulty of achieving compliance to chronic management of obesity and the critical role of binge eating disorder in the medium-term treatment of obesity. Strategies are needed to improve adherence to a follow-up protocol.

  15. Mirror box therapy added to cognitive behavioural therapy in three chronic complex regional pain syndrome type I patients : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tichelaar, Y. I. G. Vladimir; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Keizer, Doeke; van Wilgen, C. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I is a disorder of the extremities with disability and pain as the most prominent features. This paper describes the results of cognitive behavioural therapy combined with mirror box therapy in three patients with chronic complex regional pain syndrome type I. Bef

  16. Mirror box therapy added to cognitive behavioural therapy in three chronic complex regional pain syndrome type I patients : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tichelaar, Y. I. G. Vladimir; Geertzen, Jan H. B.; Keizer, Doeke; van Wilgen, C. Paul

    Complex regional pain syndrome type I is a disorder of the extremities with disability and pain as the most prominent features. This paper describes the results of cognitive behavioural therapy combined with mirror box therapy in three patients with chronic complex regional pain syndrome type I.

  17. What are People's Experiences of a Novel Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Bipolar Disorders? A Qualitative Investigation with Participants on the TEAMS Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Emmeline; Tai, Sara; Gebbia, Piersanti; Mansell, Warren

    2017-05-01

    Background Psychological interventions for bipolar disorders typically produce mixed outcomes and modest effects. The need for a more effective intervention prompted the development of a new cognitive behavioural therapy, based on an integrative cognitive model ('Think Effectively About Mood Swings' [TEAMS] therapy). Unlike previous interventions, TEAMS addresses current symptoms and comorbidities, and helps clients achieve long-term goals. A pilot randomized controlled trial (the TEAMS trial) of the therapy has recently concluded. This study explored participants' experiences of TEAMS, recommendations for improvement and experiences of useful changes post-therapy. Methods Fourteen TEAMS therapy participants took part in semi-structured interviews. Their accounts were analysed using interpretative thematic analysis. Two researchers coded the dataset independently. Member checks were conducted of the preliminary themes. Results Two overarching themes; 'useful elements of therapy' and 'changes from therapy' encompassed 12 emerging subthemes. Participants appreciated having opportunities to talk and described the therapy as person-centred and delivered by caring, approachable and skilled therapists. Some recommended more sessions than the 16 provided. Helpful therapeutic techniques were reported to be, normalization about moods, methods to increase understanding of moods, relapse-prevention, reappraisal techniques and metaphors. However, some did not find therapeutic techniques helpful. Post-therapy, many reported changes in managing mood swings more effectively and in their thinking (although some participants reported changes in neither). Many described increased acceptance of themselves and of having bipolar disorder, increased productivity and reduced anxiety in social situations. Conclusions The present study evaluates participants' therapy experiences in detail, including aspects of therapy viewed as helpful, and meaningful post-therapy outcomes. Copyright

  18. Guided self-help cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care: a randomised controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Williams

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Access to Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT for depression is limited. One solution is CBT self-help books. Trial Objectives: To assess the impact of a guided self-help CBT book (GSH-CBT on mood, compared to treatment as usual (TAU. HYPOTHESES: GSH-CBT will have improved mood and knowledge of the causes and treatment of depression compared to the control receiving TAUGuided self-help will be acceptable to patients and staff. METHODS AND FINDINGS: PARTICIPANTS: Adults attending seven general practices in Glasgow, UK with a BDI-II score of ≥14. 141 randomised to GSH-CBT and 140 to TAU. INTERVENTIONS: RCT comparing 'Overcoming Depression: A Five Areas Approach' book plus 3-4 short face to face support appointments totalling up to 2 hours of guided support, compared with general practitioner TAU. PRIMARY OUTCOME: The BDI (II score at 4 months. Numbers analysed: 281 at baseline, 203 at 4 months (primary outcome, 117 at 12 months. OUTCOME: Mean BDI-II scores were lower in the GSH-CBT group at 4 months by 5.3 points (2.6 to 7.9, p<0.001. At 4 and 12 months there were also significantly higher proportions of participants achieving a 50% reduction in BDI-II in the GSH-CBT arm. The mean support was 2 sessions with 42.7 minutes for session 1, 41.4 minutes for session 2 and 40.2 minutes of support for session 3. Adverse effects/Harms: Significantly less deterioration in mood in GSH-CBT (2.0% compared to 9.8% in the TAU group for BDI-II category change. LIMITATIONS: Weaknesses: Our follow-up rate of 72.2% at 4 months is better than predicted but is poorer at 12 months (41.6%. In the GSH-CBT arm, around 50% of people attended 2 or fewer sessions. 22% failed to take up treatment. CONCLUSIONS: GSH-CBT is substantially more effective than TAU. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN13475030.

  19. Therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: single blind randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Erik; Mataix-Cols, David; Lichtenstein, Linn; Alström, Katarina; Andersson, Gerhard; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Rück, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of therapist guided internet based cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programme for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET) compared with online supportive therapy. Design A 12 week single blind parallel group randomised controlled trial. Setting Academic medical centre. Participants 94 self referred adult outpatients with a diagnosis of body dysmorphic disorder and a modified Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (BDD-YBOCS) score of ≥20. Concurrent psychotropic drug treatment was permitted if the dose had been stable for at least two months before enrolment and remained unchanged during the trial. Interventions Participants received either BDD-NET (n=47) or supportive therapy (n=47) delivered via the internet for 12 weeks. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the BDD-YBOCS score after treatment and follow-up (three and six months from baseline) as evaluated by a masked assessor. Responder status was defined as a ≥30% reduction in symptoms on the scale. Secondary outcomes were measures of depression (MADRS-S), global functioning (GAF), clinical global improvement (CGI-I), and quality of life (EQ5D). The six month follow-up time and all outcomes other than BDD-YBOCS and MADRS-S at 3 months were not pre-specified in the registration at clinicaltrials.gov because of an administrative error but were included in the original trial protocol approved by the regional ethics committee before the start of the trial. Results BDD-NET was superior to supportive therapy and was associated with significant improvements in severity of symptoms of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-YBOCS group difference −7.1 points, 95% confidence interval −9.8 to −4.4), depression (MADRS-S group difference −4.5 points, −7.5 to −1.4), and other secondary measures. At follow-up, 56% of those receiving BDD-NET were classed as responders, compared with 13% receiving supportive therapy. The number needed to treat was 2.34 (1.71 to 4.35). Self

  20. The Psychotherapy Process with Adolescents: A First Pilot Study and Preliminary Comparisons between Different Therapeutic Modalities Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkova, Tetyana; Hillman, Saul; Midgley, Nick; Schneider, Celeste

    2011-01-01

    An innovative methodology is presented for describing the therapeutic processes involved in five types of adolescent treatments: psychoanalysis, psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive-behavioural therapy, mentalisation-based treatment and interpersonal psychotherapy. Using the "Adolescent Psychotherapy Q-Set" (APQ), 18 experienced clinicians…

  1. A Complex Interplay: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Severe Health Anxiety in Addison's Disease to Reduce Emergency Department Admissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Jo; Sheils, Elizabeth

    2017-07-01

    Addison's disease (AD) is a rare chronic illness caused by adrenocortical insufficiency. Due to the pivotal role of the regulating hormone cortisol in AD, there is a common symptom overlap between the presentation of anxiety and adrenal crisis. Previous literature has identified the prevalence of anxiety in endocrinological disorders, however there is a paucity of research examining the complex interplay between AD and anxiety. This paper describes a single case study of a patient with severe health anxiety and co-morbid AD. The aims of the study were to establish if standard cognitive behavioural therapy for health anxiety in AD can lead to a reduction in psychological distress, and whether this approach is an effective intervention for the reduction of Emergency Department admissions. A single case design was used, with pre- and post-measures of health anxiety, general anxiety and depression. Data on Emergency Department admissions prior to and following treatment were used to assess change in this domain. Reliable and clinically significant reductions were seen across all measures, from severe to sub-clinical levels. There was a complete amelioration of Emergency Department admissions in the 12 months following completion of treatment. This preliminary study provides a sound rationale for further research into AD complicated by anxiety. Findings support the clinical utility of the cognitive behavioural therapy model for complex presentations of AD, offering a potential treatment option where anxiety is elevated and interfering with self-management and leading to high levels of health service use.

  2. Comparing cognitive behavioural therapy for eating disorders integrated with behavioural weight loss therapy to cognitive behavioural therapy-enhanced alone in overweight or obese people with bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palavras, Marly Amorim; Hay, Phillipa; Touyz, Stephen; Sainsbury, Amanda; da Luz, Felipe; Swinbourne, Jessica; Estella, Nara Mendes; Claudino, Angélica

    2015-12-18

    Around 40 % of individuals with eating disorders of recurrent binge eating, namely bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder, are obese. In contrast to binge eating disorder, currently there is no evidence base for weight management or weight loss psychological therapies in the treatment of bulimia nervosa despite their efficacy in binge eating disorder. Thus, a manualised therapy called HAPIFED (Healthy APproach to weIght management and Food in Eating Disorders) has been developed. HAPIFED integrates the leading evidence-based psychological therapies, cognitive behavioural therapy-enhanced (CBT-E) and behavioural weight loss treatment (BWLT) for binge eating disorder and obesity respectively. The aim of the present study is to detail the protocol for a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of HAPIFED versus CBT-E for people with bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder who are overweight/obese. A single-blind superiority RCT is proposed. One hundred Brazilian participants aged ≥ 18 years, with a diagnosis of bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder, BMI > 27 to bulimia nervosa as well as with binge eating disorder. It will have the potential to improve health outcomes for the rapidly increasing number of adults with co-morbid obesity and binge eating disorder or bulimia nervosa. US National Institutes of Health clinical trial registration number NCT02464345 , date of registration 1 June 2015.

  3. Cognitive behavioural therapy in multiple sclerosis: a randomized controlled pilot study of acceptance and commitment therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordin, Linda; Rorsman, Ia

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to design a trial that could evaluate the effect of acceptance and commitment therapy as a group-intervention for multiple sclerosis patients with psychological distress. Randomized controlled trial with assessment at pretreatment, end of treatment, and at 3-month follow-up. Multiple sclerosis outpatients with elevated symptoms of anxiety and/or depression (n = 21). Patients were randomly assigned to acceptance and commitment therapy or relaxation training. Both treatments consisted of 5 sessions over 15 weeks containing didactic sessions, group discussions, and exercises. Outcome was assessed by self-rated symptoms of anxiety, depression, and a measure of acceptance. At 3-month follow-up, the relaxation training group had a significant decline in anxiety symptoms whereas the acceptance and commitment therapy group showed a maintained improvement in rated acceptance at follow-up. The results reflect the different emphases of the therapies. Acceptance and commitment therapy is aimed at living an active, valued life and increasing acceptance, while relaxation training focuses directly on coping strategies to handle emotional symptoms. The results are preliminary, but supportive of further study of brief group interventions for reducing psychological distress in patients with multiple sclerosis.

  4. The effect of Korean-group cognitive behavioural therapy among patients with panic disorder in clinic settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Y S; Lee, E J; Cho, Y

    2017-02-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Panic disorder patients display various panic-related physical symptoms and catastrophic misinterpretation of bodily sensations, which lower their quality of life by interfering with daily activities. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a useful strategy for panic disorder patients to manage symptoms associated with inaccurate cognitive interpretation of situations resulting from the patient's cognitive vulnerability. In South Korea, however, despite the increasing prevalence of panic disorder, CBT is not a common element of nursing care plans for panic disorder patients. Moreover, few Korean researchers have attempted to assess the effects of CBT on such patients. WHAT THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In a strategy combining CBT and routine treatments, patients with panic disorder can experience greater positive effects in the acute treatment phase than those they experience when receiving only routine treatment. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Mental health professionals, especially psychiatric nurses in local clinics who operate most special mental health programmes for panic disorder patients, should apply a panic disorder management programme that integrates CBT and routine treatments. The integrated approach is more effective for reducing the number of panic attacks and cognitive misinterpretation in patients than providing routine treatment alone. For patients with panic disorder, the objective of CBT is to understand the relationship between psychological panic disorder sensations, emotions, thoughts and behaviours. Therefore, nurses can help patients address and improve biological, social and psychological aspects of physical health problems as well as help them improve their coping skills in general. Introduction In panic disorder, sensitivity to bodily sensations increases due to the patient's cognitive vulnerability. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help to decrease sensitivity to bodily sensations

  5. Effectiveness of Transdiagnostic Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Anxiety and Depression in Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Philip; Toner, Paul; Bland, Martin; McMillan, Dean

    2016-11-01

    Transdiagnostic Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) seeks to identify core cognitive-behavioural processes hypothesized to be important across a range of disorders and to develop a treatment that targets these. This contrasts with standard CBT approaches that are disorder-specific. Proponents of transdiagnostic CBT suggest that it may offer advantages over disorder-specific CBT, but little is known about the effectiveness of this approach. The review aimed to summarize trial-based clinical and cost-effectiveness data on transdiagnostic CBT for anxiety and depression. A systematic review of electronic databases, including peer-reviewed and grey literature sources, was conducted (n = 1167 unique citations). Eight trials were eligible for inclusion in the review. There was evidence of an effect for transdiagnostic CBT when compared to a control condition. There were no differences between transdiagnostic CBT and active treatments in two studies. We found no evidence of cost-effectiveness data. Quality assessment of the primary studies indicated a number of methodological concerns that may serve to inflate the observed effects of transdiagnostic approaches. Although there are positive signs of the value of transdiagnostic CBT, there is as yet insufficient evidence to recommend its use in place of disorder-specific CBT.

  6. Effect of combined cognitive-behavioural therapy and endurance training on cortisol and salivary alpha-amylase in panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plag, Jens; Gaudlitz, Katharina; Schumacher, Sarah; Dimeo, Fernando; Bobbert, Thomas; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Ströhle, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Current data point to an alteration of both the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-system and the peripheral transmission of catecholamines in anxiety disorders. There is also some evidence for the effect of several components of cognitive-behavioural interventions such as coping and control and for an effect of exercise training on the neuroendocrine stress response in healthy subjects as well as patients suffering from distinct (mental) disorders. This double-blind, controlled study investigated the effect of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) in combination with either high-level endurance training or low-level exercise on salivary cortisol (sC) and on levels of salivary alpha-amylase (sAA) in patients suffering from panic disorder (PD) with and without agoraphobia. In comparison to the low-level exercise condition, there were significantly lower sC-levels in the experimental group performing high-level endurance training at a 7-month follow-up. In contrast, there were no group differences in sAA levels during the study period. In this trial, we found evidence for a decelerated effect of endurance-training on HPA-system's functioning in PD. Further studies addressing the alteration of sAA levels in this population might investigate physical exercise different in intensity and duration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Randomized controlled trial of cognitive behaviour therapy for comorbid post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannibale, Claudia; Teesson, Maree; Creamer, Mark; Sitharthan, Thiagarajan; Bryant, Richard A; Sutherland, Kylie; Taylor, Kirsten; Bostock-Matusko, Delphine; Visser, Alicia; Peek-O'Leary, Marie

    2013-08-01

    Aims This study aimed to test the efficacy of integrated cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for coexisting post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD). Setting Clinics across Sydney, Australia.Design Randomized controlled trial of 12 once-weekly individual sessions of either integrated CBT for PTSD and AUD(integrated therapy, IT; n = 33) or CBT for AUD plus supportive counselling (alcohol-support, AS; n = 29). Blind assessments were conducted at baseline and post-treatment and at 5 [standard deviation (SD) = 2.25] and 9.16(SD = 3.45) months post-treatment. Participants Sixty-two adults with concurrent PTSD and AUD. Measurements Outcomes included changes in alcohol consumption (time-line follow-back), PTSD severity [clinician-administered PTSD scale (CAPS)], alcohol dependence and problems, and depression and anxiety. Findings Reductions in PTSD severity were evident in both groups. IT participants who had received one or more sessions of exposure therapy exhibited a twofold greater rate of clinically significant change in CAPS severity at follow-up than AS participants [IT60%, AS 39%, odds ratio (OR): 2.31, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 5.01]. AS participants exhibited larger reductions than IT participants in alcohol consumption, dependence and problems within the context of greater treatment from other services during follow-up. Results lend support to a mutually maintaining effect between AUD and PTSD. Conclusions Individuals with severe and complex presentations of coexisting post-traumatic stress disorder(PTSD) and alcohol use disorders (AUD) can derive substantial benefit from cognitive behaviour therapy targeting AUD, with greater benefits associated with exposure for PTSD. Among individuals with dual disorders, these therapies can generate significant, well-maintained treatment effects on PTSD, AUD and psychopathology.

  8. Treating women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs) with a hybrid cognitive behavioural and art therapy treatment (CB-ART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, Orly; Cwikel, Julie; Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna; Huss, Ephrat

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents an overview of a combined, evaluated protocol, cognitive behavioural and art therapy treatment (CB-ART), for the treatment of women with perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs). The protocol integrates cognitive behavioural interventions and art therapy. CB-ART focuses on changing distressing image, symptom or memory (ISM) that interferes with functioning. The method directs clients to identify compositional elements that characterize their stressful ISM and to alter the element in their imagination, in bodily sensations and on the page. Examples are provided to illustrate the therapeutic process.

  9. The clinical practice of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for children and young people with a diagnosis of Asperger's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Kate; Stallard, Paul; Kucia, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Children and young people diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome (AS) have significant social-communication difficulties and impaired empathy and theory of mind skills. These difficulties place them at risk of developing mental health problems, particularly anxiety, depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. Although Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is recognised as an effective intervention for these problems in both child and adult populations, little research has specifically looked at the use of CBT with children and young people with an AS diagnosis. However, limited evidence suggests that CBT, if suitably adapted, is a feasible and potentially helpful treatment option. This paper focuses on the clinical practice of CBT and explores how the underpinning therapeutic relationship can be modified to meet the cognitive needs of this particular group of young clients.

  10. Remote treatment of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder: a randomized trial of Internet-assisted cognitive behavioural therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljotsson, B; Lundin, C; Mitsell, K; Carlbring, P; Ramklint, M; Ghaderi, A

    2007-04-01

    The present study investigated the efficacy of self-help based on cognitive behaviour therapy in combination with Internet support in the treatment of bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder. After confirming the diagnosis with an in-person interview, 73 patients were randomly allocated to treatment or a waiting list control group. Treated individuals showed marked improvement after 12 weeks of self-help compared to the control group on both primary and secondary outcome measures. Intent-to-treat analyses revealed that 37% (46% among completers) had no binge eating or purging at the end of the treatment and a considerable number of patients achieved clinically significant improvement on most of the other measures as well. The results were maintained at the 6-month follow-up, and provide evidence to support the continued use and development of self-help programmes.

  11. Pre-treatment child and family characteristics as predictors of outcome in cognitive behavioural therapy for youth anxiety disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundkvist-Houndoumadi, Irene; Hougaard, Esben; Thastum, Mikael

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective for children and adolescents (6-18 years) with anxiety disorders, but the non-response rate is high-a fact that may argue for the importance of studies on pre-treatment characteristics of children and their families...... that predict treatment outcome. AIMS: To provide a systematic review of clinical and demographic pre-treatment child and family predictors of treatment outcome in CBT for anxiety disorders in youth. METHOD: A systematic literature search was conducted based on electronic databases (PsycINFO, Embase and Pub......-treatment child and family predictors of outcome in CBT for youth anxiety disorders have until now resulted in few findings of clinical or theoretical significance....

  12. Cost-effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy versus talking and usual care for depressed older people in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leurent Baptiste E

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Whilst evidence suggests cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT may be effective for depressed older people in a primary care setting, few studies have examined its cost-effectiveness. The aim of this study was to compare the cost-effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT, a talking control (TC and treatment as usual (TAU, delivered in a primary care setting, for older people with depression. Methods Cost data generated from a single blind randomised controlled trial of 204 people aged 65 years or more were offered only Treatment as Usual, or TAU plus up to twelve sessions of CBT or a talking control is presented. The Beck Depression Inventory II (BDI-II was the main outcome measure for depression. Direct treatment costs were compared with reductions in depression scores. Cost-effectiveness analysis was conducted using non-parametric bootstrapping. The primary analysis focussed on the cost-effectiveness of CBT compared with TAU at 10 months follow up. Results Complete cost data were available for 198 patients at 4 and 10 month follow up. There were no significant differences between groups in baseline costs. The majority of health service contacts at follow up were made with general practitioners. Fewer contacts with mental health services were recorded in patients allocated to CBT, though these differences were not significant. Overall total per patient costs (including intervention costs were significantly higher in the CBT group compared with the TAU group at 10 month follow up (difference £427, 95% CI: £56 - £787, p Conclusions CBT is significantly more costly than TAU alone or TAU plus TC, but more clinically effective. Based on current estimates, CBT is likely to be recommended as a cost-effective treatment option for this patient group if the value placed on a unit reduction in BDI-II is greater than £115. Trial Registration isrctn.org Identifier: ISRCTN18271323

  13. Computerized cognitive behavioural therapy at work: a randomized controlled trial in employees with recent stress-related absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grime, Paul R

    2004-08-01

    Emotional distress has major implications for employees and employers. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a recommended treatment, but demand outstrips supply. CBT is well suited to computerization. Most employee assistance programmes have not been systematically evaluated and computerized CBT has not previously been studied in the workplace. To evaluate the effect of an 8 week computerized cognitive behavioural therapy programme, 'Beating The Blues', on emotional distress in employees with recent stress-related absenteeism, and to explore the reasons for non-participation. An open, randomized trial in a London NHS occupational health department. Forty-eight public sector employees, with 10 or more cumulative days stress-related absenteeism in the last 6 months, randomized equally to 'Beating The Blues' plus conventional care, or conventional care alone. Main outcome measures were Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and Attributional Style Questionnaire scores at end of treatment and 1, 3 and 6 months later; and reasons for non-participation. At end of treatment and 1 month later, adjusted mean depression scores and adjusted mean negative attributional style scores were significantly lower in the intervention group. One month post-treatment, adjusted mean anxiety scores were also significantly lower in the intervention group. The differences were not statistically significant at 3 and 6 months post-treatment. Non-participation was common and related to access problems, preference for other treatments, time commitment, scepticism about the intervention and the employer connection. 'Beating The Blues' may accelerate psychological recovery in employees with recent stress-related absenteeism. Greater flexibility and accessibility might improve uptake.

  14. Cognitive-behavioural therapy for obsessive-compulsive disorder co-occurring with psychosis: Systematic review of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tundo, Antonio; Necci, Roberta

    2016-12-22

    To review available evidence on the use of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for treating obsessive compulsive disorder co-occurring with psychosis. In this paper we present a detailed and comprehensive review of the current literature focusing on CBT treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) co-occurring with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. We identified relevant literature published between 2001 and May 2016 through MEDLINE/PubMed search using as search string ("obsessive compulsive disorders" or "obsessive compulsive symptoms") and ("schizophrenia" or "schizoaffective disorder" or "psychosis") and ("cognitive behavioural therapy"). Other citations of interest were further identified from references reported in the accessed articles. The search was limited to studies written in English and carried out in adult patients. A total of 9 studies, 8 case reports and 1 case series, were found. The reviewed evidence indicates that CBT is: (1) safe, i.e., does not worsen psychotic symptoms; (2) well accepted, with a discontinuation rate quite similar to that reported for patients with OCD without psychosis comorbidity; (3) effective, with a symptom reduction quite similar to that reported for patients with OCD without psychosis and for SRIs treatment of OCD co-occurring with psychosis; and (4) effective in patients with OCD induced by second-generation antipsychotic as well as in patients with OCD not induced by second-generation antipsychotic. Alcohol/substance use disorder comorbidity and OCD onset preceding that of SCH/SA was predictors of poor outcome. These results are derived only by additional studies with adequate sample size. Our results support the use of CBT for OCD in patients with psychosis.

  15. Changes in the self during cognitive behavioural therapy for social anxiety disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Bree; Peters, Lorna

    2017-03-01

    A consistent feature across cognitive-behavioural models of social anxiety disorder (SAD) is the central role of the self in the emergence and maintenance of the disorder. The strong emphasis placed on the self in these models and related empirical research has also been reflected in evidence-based treatments for the disorder. This systematic review provides an overview of the empirical literature investigating the role of self-related constructs (e.g., self-beliefs, self-images, self-focused attention) proposed in cognitive models of SAD, before examining how these constructs are modified during and following CBT for SAD. Forty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. Guided by Stopa's (2009a, b) model of self, most studies examined change in self-related content, followed by change in self-related processing. No study examined change in self-structure. Pre- to post-treatment reductions were observed in self-related thoughts and beliefs, self-esteem, self-schema, self-focused attention, and self-evaluation. Change in self-related constructs predicted and/or mediated social anxiety reduction, however relatively few studies examined this. Papers were limited by small sample sizes, failure to control for depression symptoms, lack of waitlist, and some measurement concerns. Future research directions are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measuring psychological change during cognitive behaviour therapy in primary care: a Polish study using 'PSYCHLOPS' (Psychological Outcome Profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Czachowski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Psychological outcome measures are evolving into measures that depict progress over time. Interval measurement during therapy has not previously been reported for a patient-generated measure in primary care. We aimed to determine the sensitivity to change throughout therapy, using 'PSYCHLOPS' (Psychological Outcome Profiles, and to determine if new problems appearing during therapy diminish overall improvement. METHODS: Responses to PSYCHLOPS, pre-, during- and post-therapy were compared. SETTING: patients offered brief cognitive behaviour therapy in primary care in Poland. RESULTS: 238 patients completed the pre-therapy questionnaire, 194 (81.5% the during-therapy questionnaire and 142 the post-therapy questionnaire (59.7%. For those completing all three questionnaires (n = 135, improvement in total scores produced an overall Effect Size of 3.1 (2.7 to 3.4. We estimated change using three methods for dealing with missing values. Single and multiple imputation did not significantly change the Effect Size; 'Last Value Carried Forward', the most conservative method, produced an overall Effect Size of 2.3 (1.9 to 2.6. New problems during therapy were reported by 81 patients (60.0%: new problem and original problem scores were of similar magnitude and change scores were not significantly different when compared to patients who did not report new problems. CONCLUSION: A large proportion of outcome data is lost when outcome measures depend upon completed end of therapy questionnaires. The use of a during-therapy measure increases data capture. Missing data still produce difficulties in interpreting overall effect sizes for change. We found no evidence that new problems appearing during therapy hampered overall recovery.

  17. Reductions in negative repetitive thinking and metacognitive beliefs during transdiagnostic internet cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for mixed anxiety and depression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Newby, Jill M; Williams, Alishia D; Andrews, Gavin

    2014-01-01

    We explored whether transdiagnostic internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for mixed anxiety and depression effectively reduces repetitive negative thinking (RNT), and whether reductions in RNT and positive metacognitive beliefs mediate symptom improvement during iCBT. Participants

  18. The process of cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome: which changes in perpetuating cognitions and behaviour are related to a reduction in fatigue?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Knoop, H.; Burk, W.J.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) can significantly reduce fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but little is known about the process of change taking place during CBT. Based on a recent treatment model (Wiborg et al. J Psych Res 2012), we examined how (changes in) cognitions and be

  19. Randomized Controlled Trial of Full and Brief Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy and Wait-List for Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Derek; Williams, Tim; Perrin, Sean; Atkinson, Linda; Gallop, Catherine; Waite, Polly; Salkovskis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reviews and practice guidelines for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) recommend cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) as the psychological treatment of choice, but note that it has not been sufficiently evaluated for children and adolescents and that more randomized controlled trials are needed. The aim of this trial was to…

  20. The process of cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome: Which changes in perpetuating cognitions and behaviour are related to a reduction in fatigue?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Knoop, H.; Burk, W.J.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) can significantly reduce fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but little is known about the process of change taking place during CBT. Based on a recent treatment model (Wiborg et al. J Psych Res 2012), we examined how (changes in) cognitions and

  1. The process of cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome: which changes in perpetuating cognitions and behaviour are related to a reduction in fatigue?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Knoop, H.; Burk, W.J.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) can significantly reduce fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but little is known about the process of change taking place during CBT. Based on a recent treatment model (Wiborg et al. J Psych Res 2012), we examined how (changes in) cognitions and

  2. The process of cognitive behaviour therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome: Which changes in perpetuating cognitions and behaviour are related to a reduction in fatigue?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Knoop, H.; Burk, W.J.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) can significantly reduce fatigue in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but little is known about the process of change taking place during CBT. Based on a recent treatment model (Wiborg et al. J Psych Res 2012), we examined how (changes in) cognitions and

  3. Cost-effectiveness of blended vs. face-to-face cognitive behavioural therapy for severe anxiety disorders: study protocol of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.A. Romijn (Geke); H. Riper (Heleen); R. Kok (Robin); T. Donker (Tara); M. Goorden (Maartje); L. van Hakkaart-van Roijen (Leona); L. Kooistra (Libbe); A.J.L.M. van Balkom (Anton); J. Koning (Jeroen)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractBackground: Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent psychiatric conditions, and are associated with poor quality of life and substantial economic burden. Cognitive behavioural therapy is an effective treatment to reduce anxiety symptoms, but is also costly and labour intensive

  4. Does cognitive behaviour therapy have an enduring effect that is superior to keeping patients on continuation pharmacotherapy? : A meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuijpers, P.; Hollon, S.D.; van Straten, A.; Bockting, Claudi; Berking, Matthias; Andersson, G.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Although cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and pharmacotherapy are equally effective in the acute treatment of adult depression, it is not known how they compare across the longer term. In this meta-analysis, we compared the effects of acute phase CBT without any subsequent treatment wit

  5. Randomized Controlled Trial of Full and Brief Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy and Wait-List for Paediatric Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Derek; Williams, Tim; Perrin, Sean; Atkinson, Linda; Gallop, Catherine; Waite, Polly; Salkovskis, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Background: Reviews and practice guidelines for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) recommend cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) as the psychological treatment of choice, but note that it has not been sufficiently evaluated for children and adolescents and that more randomized controlled trials are needed. The aim of this trial was to…

  6. Cell phone-supported cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders: a protocol for effectiveness studies in frontline settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröberg Anders

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reviews of randomized controlled trials (RCTs of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT for anxiety disorders have reported large pre- to post-treatment within-group effect sizes on measures of anxiety when supplied in therapist consultations and in technology-supported settings. However, the stringent experimental control of RCTs results in a lack of external validity, which limits the generalizability of findings to real-world frontline clinical practice. We set out to examine the specification of a protocol for study of the effectiveness of cell phone-supported CBT for in situ management of anxiety disorders. Methods and design Nominal group methods were used for requirements analysis and protocol design. Making a distinction between different forms of technology-supported therapy, examination of therapists' role, and implementing trials in existing organizational and community contexts were found to be the central requirements in the protocol. Discussion The resulting protocol (NCT01205191 at clinicaltrials.gov for use in frontline clinical practice in which effectiveness, adherence, and the role of the therapists are analyzed, provides evidence for what are truly valuable cell phone-supported CBT treatments and guidance for the broader introduction of CBT in health services.

  7. Help-seeking characteristics of Chinese- and English-speaking Australians accessing Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Isabella; Andrews, Gavin; Sharpe, Louise; Hunt, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Internet treatments may overcome barriers and improve access to mental health services for people who do not access professional help. It may be particularly beneficial for Chinese Australians, a group that tends to delay and underutilize face-to-face treatments. This study explored the appeal of Internet therapy to Chinese- and English-speaking Australians with depression who accessed Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) programs. Data collected from previous randomised controlled trials of iCBT depression programs were used. Using a matched samples design, 55 Chinese- and 55 English-speaking iCBT participants with depression were matched on age, gender, and depression screener scores. They were compared on their symptom severity, previous help-seeking patterns, and reasons for seeking Internet treatment. The Chinese-speaking participants had significantly milder depressive symptoms and were less likely to have previously sought professional help compared to the English-speaking participants (all ps speaking participants were more likely to seek iCBT due to lack of knowledge about face-to-face treatment (p = 0.005), while the English-speaking participants were more likely to report not benefiting from traditional help (p = 0.030). The attraction of iCBT appears to be the reduction of structural barriers to treatment. iCBT may reduce treatment delay and increase access to Chinese Australians who have not sought professional help. English-speaking Australians are seeking iCBT as an additional means of getting help.

  8. From traditional cognitive-behavioural therapy to acceptance and commitment therapy for chronic pain: a mixed-methods study of staff experiences of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Estelle; McCracken, Lance M

    2014-08-01

    Health care organizations, both large and small, frequently undergo processes of change. In fact, if health care organizations are to improve over time, they must change; this includes pain services. The purpose of the present study was to examine a process of change in treatment model within a specialty interdisciplinary pain service in the UK. This change entailed a switch from traditional cognitive-behavioural therapy to a form of cognitive-behavioural therapy called acceptance and commitment therapy. An anonymous online survey, including qualitative and quantitative components, was carried out approximately 15 months after the initial introduction of the new treatment model and methods. Fourteen out of 16 current clinical staff responded to the survey. Three themes emerged in qualitative analyses: positive engagement in change; uncertainty and discomfort; and group cohesion versus discord. Quantitative results from closed questions showed a pattern of uncertainty about the superiority of one model over the other, combined with more positive views on progress reflected, and the experience of personal benefits, from adopting the new model. The psychological flexibility model, the model behind acceptance and commitment therapy, may clarify both processes in patient behaviour and processes of staff experience and skilful treatment delivery. This integration of processes on both sides of treatment delivery may be a strength of acceptance and commitment therapy.

  9. The Importance of Emotional Insight in Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Anorexia Nervosa: An Adolescent Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupa, Megha; Girimaji, Satish; Muthuswamy, Selvi; Jacob, Preeti; Ravi, Malavika

    2013-01-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a rare but sever psychiatric disorder in adolescence, with chronicity and death being the most feared consequence. Emotional Insight into one's problem is considered a key determinant of success in therapy. The following case study of a 14-year-old client, describes the process of therapy as it unfolded across 45 sessions. An…

  10. Feasibility of guided cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) self-help for childhood anxiety disorders in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Hentges, Francoise; Parkinson, Monika; Sheffield, Paul; Willetts, Lucy; Cooper, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Anxiety disorders in childhood are common, disabling and run a chronic course. Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is effective but expensive and trained therapists are scarce. Guided self-help treatments may be a means of widening access to treatment. This study aimed to examine the feasibility of guided CBT self-help in primary care for childhood anxiety disorders, specifically in terms of therapist adherence, patient and therapist satisfaction and clinical gain.Participants were children aged between five and 12 years referred to two primary child and adolescent mental health services (PCAMHSs) in Oxfordshire, UK, who met diagnostic criteria for a primary anxiety disorder. Of the 52 eligible children, 41 anxious children were assessed for anxiety severity and interference before and after receiving CBT self-help delivered via a parent (total therapy time = five hours) by primary mental health workers (PMHWs). Therapy sessions were rated for treatment adherence and parents and PMHWs completed satisfaction questionnaires after treatment completion. Over 80% of therapy sessions were rated at a high level of treatment adherence. Parents and PMHWs reported high satisfaction with the treatment. Sixty-one percent of the children assessed no longer met the criteria for their primary anxiety disorder diagnosis following treatment, and 76% were rated as 'much'/'very much' improved on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I) scale. There were significant reductions on parent and child report measures of anxiety symptoms, interference and depression. Preliminary exploration indicated that parental anxiety was associated with child treatment outcome. The findings suggest that guided CBT self-help represents a promising treatment for childhood anxiety in primary care.

  11. Motivational interviewing and cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety following traumatic brain injury: a pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Yun; Ponsford, Jennie; Wong, Dana; Schönberger, Michael; Taffe, John; McKay, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Although cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for anxiety, its delivery needs to be adapted for individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It also requires clients' active engagement for maximum benefit. This study was a pilot randomised controlled trial involving an anxiety treatment programme adapted for people with TBI, based on CBT and motivational interviewing (MI). Twenty-seven participants with moderate/severe TBI (aged 21-73 years, 78% males) recruited from a brain injury rehabilitation hospital were randomly allocated to receive MI + CBT (n = 9), non-directive counselling (NDC) + CBT (n = 10) and treatment-as-usual (TAU) (n = 8). CBT and MI were manualised and delivered in 12 weekly individual sessions. Primary outcome was self-reported anxiety symptoms assessed at baseline, at the end of NDC/MI and immediately following CBT. Assessment was conducted by assessors blinded to group assignment. Intention-to-treat analyses showed that the two active treatment groups demonstrated significantly greater anxiety reduction than TAU. Participants receiving MI showed greater response to CBT, in terms of reduction in anxiety, stress and non-productive coping, compared to participants who received NDC. The results provided preliminary support for the adapted CBT programme, and the potential utility of MI as treatment prelude. Longer follow-up data are required to evaluate the maintenance of treatment effects.

  12. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive-behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jonathan R I; Lester, Kathryn J; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A; Heiervang, Einar R; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J; Marin, Carla E; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H; Rapee, Ronald M; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C; Silverman, Wendy K; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C

    2016-09-01

    Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychological treatment response in children with anxiety disorders (n = 980). Presence and severity of anxiety was assessed using semi-structured interview at baseline, on completion of treatment (post-treatment), and 3 to 12 months after treatment completion (follow-up). DNA was genotyped using the Illumina Human Core Exome-12v1.0 array. Linear mixed models were used to test associations between genetic variants and response (change in symptom severity) immediately post-treatment and at 6-month follow-up. No variants passed a genome-wide significance threshold (P = 5 × 10(-8)) in either analysis. Four variants met criteria for suggestive significance (P<5 × 10(-6)) in association with response post-treatment, and three variants in the 6-month follow-up analysis. This is the first genome-wide therapygenetic study. It suggests no common variants of very high effect underlie response to CBT. Future investigations should maximise power to detect single-variant and polygenic effects by using larger, more homogeneous cohorts. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  13. Early improvement in eating attitudes during cognitive behavioural therapy for eating disorders: the impact of personality disorder cognitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Emma C; Waller, Glenn; Gannon, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    The personality disorders are commonly comorbid with the eating disorders. Personality disorder pathology is often suggested to impair the treatment of axis 1 disorders, including the eating disorders. This study examined whether personality disorder cognitions reduce the impact of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for eating disorders, in terms of treatment dropout and change in eating disorder attitudes in the early stages of treatment. Participants were individuals with a diagnosed eating disorder, presenting for individual outpatient CBT. They completed measures of personality disorder cognitions and eating disorder attitudes at sessions one and six of CBT. Drop-out rates prior to session six were recorded. CBT had a relatively rapid onset of action, with a significant reduction in eating disorder attitudes over the first six sessions. Eating disorder attitudes were most strongly associated with cognitions related to anxiety-based personality disorders (avoidant, obsessive-compulsive and dependent). Individuals who dropped out of treatment prematurely had significantly higher levels of dependent personality disorder cognitions than those who remained in treatment. For those who remained in treatment, higher levels of avoidant, histrionic and borderline personality disorder cognitions were associated with a greater change in global eating disorder attitudes. CBT's action and retention of patients might be improved by consideration of such personality disorder cognitions when formulating and treating the eating disorders.

  14. Are there reliable changes in memory and executive functions after cognitive behavioural therapy in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandborg, Sanne Kjær; Hartmann, Tue Borst; Bennedsen, Birgit Egedal; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Thomsen, Per Hove

    2015-01-01

    Patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have impaired memory and executive functions, but it is unclear whether these functions improve after cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) of OCD symptoms. The primary aim of this study was to investigate whether memory and executive functions change after CBT in patients with OCD. We assessed 39 patients with OCD before and after CBT with neuropsychological tests of memory and executive functions. To correct for practice effects, 39 healthy controls (HCs) were assessed at two parallel time intervals with the neuropsychological tests. There were no changes in memory and executive functions after CBT in patients with OCD when results were corrected for practice effects. Patients performed worse on a test of visuospatial memory and organisational skills (Rey complex figure test [RCFT]) compared to HCs both before and after CBT (ps = .002-.036). The finding of persistent poor RCFT performances indicates that patients with OCD have impaired visuospatial memory and organisational skills that may be trait-related rather than state-dependent. These impairments may need to be considered in treatment. Our findings underline the importance of correcting for practice effects when investigating changes in cognitive functions.

  15. Cognitive behaviour therapy in medication-treated adults with ADHD and persistent Symptoms: A randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Einarsson Emil

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD in adulthood is not fully treated by psychopharmacological treatment alone. The main aim of the current study was to evaluate a newly developed cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT based group programme, the Reasoning and Rehabilitation for ADHD Youths and Adults (R&R2ADHD, using a randomized controlled trial. Methods 54 adults with ADHD already receiving psychopharmacological treatment were randomly allocated to an experimental (CBT/MED treatment condition (n = 27 and a 'treatment as usual' (TAU/MED control condition (n = 27 that did not receive the CBT intervention. The outcome measures were obtained before treatment (baseline, after treatment and at three month follow-up and included ADHD symptoms and impairments rated by independent assessors, self-reported current ADHD symptoms, and comorbid problems. Results The findings suggested medium to large treatment effects for ADHD symptoms, which increased further at three month follow-up. Additionally, comorbid problems also improved at follow-up with large effect sizes. Conclusions The findings give support for the effectiveness of R&R2ADHD in reducing ADHD symptoms and comorbid problems, an improving functions associated with impairment. The implications are that the benefits of R&R2ADHD are multifaceted and that combined psychopharmacological and CBT based treatments may add to and improve pharmacological interventions. Trial registration ACTRN12611000533998 (http://www.ANZCTR.org.au/ACTRN12611000533998.aspx

  16. Prediction of outcome in internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: A machine learning approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhard, Fabian; Sauer, Sebastian; Andersson, Erik; Månsson, Kristoffer Nt; Mataix-Cols, David; Rück, Christian; Serlachius, Eva

    2017-07-28

    There are no consistent predictors of treatment outcome in paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). One reason for this might be the use of suboptimal statistical methodology. Machine learning is an approach to efficiently analyse complex data. Machine learning has been widely used within other fields, but has rarely been tested in the prediction of paediatric mental health treatment outcomes. To test four different machine learning methods in the prediction of treatment response in a sample of paediatric OCD patients who had received Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT). Participants were 61 adolescents (12-17 years) who enrolled in a randomized controlled trial and received ICBT. All clinical baseline variables were used to predict strictly defined treatment response status three months after ICBT. Four machine learning algorithms were implemented. For comparison, we also employed a traditional logistic regression approach. Multivariate logistic regression could not detect any significant predictors. In contrast, all four machine learning algorithms performed well in the prediction of treatment response, with 75 to 83% accuracy. The results suggest that machine learning algorithms can successfully be applied to predict paediatric OCD treatment outcome. Validation studies and studies in other disorders are warranted. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Predicting Response Trajectories during Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: No Association with the BDNF Gene or Childhood Maltreatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santacana, Martí; Arias, Bárbara; Mitjans, Marina; Bonillo, Albert; Montoro, María; Rosado, Sílvia; Guillamat, Roser; Vallès, Vicenç; Pérez, Víctor; Forero, Carlos G.; Fullana, Miquel A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and result in low quality of life and a high social and economic cost. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders is well established, but a substantial proportion of patients do not respond to this treatment. Understanding which genetic and environmental factors are responsible for this differential response to treatment is a key step towards “personalized medicine”. Based on previous research, our objective was to test whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and/or childhood maltreatment are associated with response trajectories during exposure-based CBT for panic disorder (PD). Method We used Growth Mixture Modeling to identify latent classes of change (response trajectories) in patients with PD (N = 97) who underwent group manualized exposure-based CBT. We conducted logistic regression to investigate the effect on these trajectories of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and two different types of childhood maltreatment, abuse and neglect. Results We identified two response trajectories (“high response” and “low response”), and found that they were not significantly associated with either the genetic (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism) or childhood trauma-related variables of interest, nor with an interaction between these variables. Conclusions We found no evidence to support an effect of the BDNF gene or childhood trauma-related variables on CBT outcome in PD. Future studies in this field may benefit from looking at other genotypes or using different (e.g. whole-genome) approaches. PMID:27355213

  18. Predicting Response Trajectories during Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Panic Disorder: No Association with the BDNF Gene or Childhood Maltreatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Santacana

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are highly prevalent and result in low quality of life and a high social and economic cost. The efficacy of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT for anxiety disorders is well established, but a substantial proportion of patients do not respond to this treatment. Understanding which genetic and environmental factors are responsible for this differential response to treatment is a key step towards "personalized medicine". Based on previous research, our objective was to test whether the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and/or childhood maltreatment are associated with response trajectories during exposure-based CBT for panic disorder (PD.We used Growth Mixture Modeling to identify latent classes of change (response trajectories in patients with PD (N = 97 who underwent group manualized exposure-based CBT. We conducted logistic regression to investigate the effect on these trajectories of the BDNF Val66Met polymorphism and two different types of childhood maltreatment, abuse and neglect.We identified two response trajectories ("high response" and "low response", and found that they were not significantly associated with either the genetic (BDNF Val66Met polymorphism or childhood trauma-related variables of interest, nor with an interaction between these variables.We found no evidence to support an effect of the BDNF gene or childhood trauma-related variables on CBT outcome in PD. Future studies in this field may benefit from looking at other genotypes or using different (e.g. whole-genome approaches.

  19. Increased wait-list time predicts dropout from outpatient enhanced cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-E) for eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Olivia; Pannekoek, Louise; Fursland, Anthea; Allen, Karina L; Lampard, Amy M; Byrne, Susan M

    2012-08-01

    Between 30 and 70% of patients with eating disorders drop out from outpatient treatment. However, research has been unable to identify factors that consistently predict dropout from eating disorder treatment. Most studies have exclusively investigated the role that individual patient characteristics play in dropout and have ignored more process-based factors such as expectations about treatment, the therapeutic alliance, or time spent on a treatment waiting list. This study aimed to investigate the roles of both individual patient characteristics and process-based factors in dropout from outpatient treatment for eating disorders. The study involved data collected from consecutive eating disorder referrals to the only public specialist eating disorder service for youth and adults in Perth, Western Australia. The standard treatment provided at this service is Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy on an individual basis. The study involved 189 patients referred to the service between 2005 and 2010. Forty five percent of this sample dropped out of treatment. Results showed that, in this sample, two individual factors, lowest reported weight and the tendency to avoid affect, and one process-based factor, time spent on the wait list for treatment, were significant predictors of dropout. These findings are valuable because a process-based factor, such as wait-list time, may be easier to address and modify than a patient's weight history or the trait of mood intolerance. Increased resources for eating disorder services may reduce waiting list times which would help to reduce dropout and maximize treatment outcomes.

  20. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy with people who have autistic spectrum disorders: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weston, Lisa; Hodgekins, Joanne; Langdon, Peter E

    2016-11-01

    The aims of this study were to undertake a meta-analytic and systematic appraisal of the literature investigating the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) when used with individuals who have autistic spectrum disorders (ASDs) for either a) affective disorders, or b) the symptoms of ASDs. Following a systematic search, 48 studies were included. CBT, used for affective disorders, was associated with a non-significant small to medium effect size, g=0.24, for self-report measures, a significant medium effect size, g=0.66, for informant-report measures, and a significant medium effect size, g=0.73, for clinician-report measures. CBT, used as a treatment for symptoms of ASDs, was associated with a small to medium non-significant effect size, g=0.25, for self-report measures, a significant small to medium effect size, g=0.48, for informant-report measures, a significant medium effect size, g=0.65, for clinician-report measures, and a significant small to medium effect size, g=0.35, for task-based measures. Sensitivity analyses reduced effect size magnitude, with the exception of that based on informant-report measures for the symptoms of ASDs, which increased, g=0.52. Definitive trials are needed to demonstrate that CBT is an empirically validated treatment for use with people who have ASDs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Exploring the Use of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT for Reducing Rider Stress and Stress-Related Anxiety, Anger, and Worry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Fernández-Medina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stress can have serious implications on road safety and evidence suggests that it could lead to increases in driving errors, lapses, and even crashes. Motorcyclists are a vulnerable road user group, and lapses in attention and risky behaviours resulting from stress could increase the risk of collision. However, few safety interventions for reducing stress have been developed and evaluated, especially in motorcyclists. The purpose of this research was to develop and pilot a Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT course for the treatment of rider stress. Five motorcyclists experiencing a range of life and work stressors completed the CBT course between January and March 2015. Findings from the Driver Stress Inventory and Driver Behaviour Questionnaire showed positive trends in the overall reduction of rider stress traits, such as aggression, thrill seeking, and dislike of riding. Qualitative data showed that participants engaged well with the intervention and believed it had aided them in their riding-related stress. Although these results are promising, the results warrant further investigation in order to validate CBT as a viable means of reducing the collision risk both for this already vulnerable road user group and other driver categories.

  2. Cognitive-behavioural group therapy versus guided self-help for compulsive buying disorder: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, A; Arikian, A; de Zwaan, M; Mitchell, J E

    2013-01-01

    Compulsive buying (CB) is defined as extreme preoccupation with buying/shopping and frequent buying that causes substantial negative psychological, social, occupational and financial consequences. There exists preliminary evidence that group cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of CB. The present pilot study made a first attempt to compare group CBT for CB with telephone-guided self-help (GSH). Fifty-six patients were allocated randomly to one of the three conditions: (1) group CBT (n = 22); (2) GSH (n = 20); and (3) a waiting list condition (n = 14). The results indicate that face-to-face group CBT is superior not only to the waiting list condition but also to GSH. Patients who received GSH tended to have more success in overcoming CB compared with the waiting list controls. Given the sample size, the results must be considered as preliminary and further research is needed to address the topic whether GSH also could be a helpful intervention in reducing CB. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Becoming Therapeutic Agents: A Grounded Theory of Mothers' Process When Implementing Cognitive Behavioural Therapy at Home with an Anxious Child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pishva, Rana

    2016-09-29

    The premise of parent-centred programmes for parents of anxious children is to educate and train caregivers in the sustainable implementation of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) in the home. The existing operationalization of parent involvement, however, does not address the systemic, parent or child factors that could influence this process. The qualitative approach of grounded theory was employed to examine patterns of action and interaction involved in the complex process of carrying out CBT with one's child in one's home. A grounded theory goes beyond the description of a process, offering an explanatory theory that brings taken-for-granted meanings and processes to the surface. The theory that emerged from the analysis suggests that CBT implementation by mothers of anxious children is characterized by the evolution of mothers' perception of their child and mothers' perception of their role as well as a shift from reacting with emotion to responding pragmatically to the child. Changes occur as mothers recognize the crisis, make links between the treatment rationale, child's symptoms and their own parenting strategies, integrate tenets of CBT for anxiety and eventually focus on sustaining therapeutic gains through natural life transitions. The theory widens our understanding of mothers' role, therapeutic engagement, process, and decision-making. The theory also generates new hypotheses regarding parent involvement in the treatment of paediatric anxiety disorders and proposes novel research avenues that aim to maximize the benefits of parental involvement in the treatment of paediatric anxiety disorders. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The effects of cognitive-behavioural therapy on mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goodyer Ian M

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A mood-related ruminative response style increases the risk of onset and persistence of depression. This preliminary study investigated whether, in depressed adolescents, cognitive-behaviour therapy reduces mood-related ruminative response style. Whether specific factors within the rumination scale were differentially affected by CBT is also reported. Methods 26 depressed adolescents were randomised to receiving serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants (SSRI plus psychosocial treatment as usual or SSRI and psychosocial treatment as usual plus CBT. Ruminative response style and depressive symptoms were measured at baseline and after 30 weeks of treatment, with the Responses to Depression Questionnaire and Mood and Feelings Questionnaire. Results There were significantly greater reductions in ruminations in the CBT group compared to the non-CBT group (p = .002. There was no significant difference in the reduction in self-reported depressive symptoms between the groups. Rumination was reduced to levels of never-depressed controls in adolescents who had recovered from depression and received CBT. There were greater falls in the CBT group in the more pathological 'brooding' factor of rumination. Conclusion These findings suggest that adding CBT to SSRI medication in the presence of active clinical care causes a greater reduction in mood-related ruminative response style in depressed adolescents. This may reduce the risk of future relapse. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials ISRCNT83809224.

  5. Within-trial economic evaluation of diabetes-specific cognitive behaviour therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes and subthreshold depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ohmann Christian

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the high prevalence of subthreshold depression in patients with type 2 diabetes, evidence on cost-effectiveness of different therapy options for these patients is currently lacking. Methods/Design Within-trial economic evaluation of the diabetes-specific cognitive behaviour therapy for subthreshold depression. Patients with diabetes and subthreshold depression are randomly assigned to either 2 weeks of diabetes-specific cognitive behaviour group therapy (n = 104 or to standard diabetes education programme only (n = 104. Patients are followed for 12 months. During this period data on total health sector costs, patient costs and societal productivity costs are collected in addition to clinical data. Health related quality of life (the SF-36 and the EQ-5D is measured at baseline, immediately after the intervention, at 6 and at 12 months after the intervention. Quality adjusted life years (QALYs, and cumulative costs will be estimated for each arm of the trial. Cost-effectiveness of the diabetes-specific cognitive behaviour group therapy will be analysed from the perspective of the German statutory health insurance and from the societal perspective. To this end, incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER in terms of cost per QALY gained will be calculated. Discussion Some methodological issues of the described economic evaluation are discussed. Trial registration The trial has been registered at the Clinical Trials Register (NCT01009138.

  6. Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for posttraumatic stress disorder versus waitlist control: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Adrian R; Jill M. Newby; Smith, Jessica; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Background This randomised controlled trial (RCT) with two parallel arms will evaluate the efficacy of an internet-delivered six-lesson 10-week cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It will also investigate the association between changes in PTSD symptoms, intolerance of uncertainty (IU) and emotion regulation. Methods/Design Patients with PTSD will be recruited via the research arm of a not-for-profit clinical and research unit in Austral...

  7. Controlled-release melatonin, singly and combined with cognitive behavioural therapy, for persistent insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorders: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, Flavia; Giannotti, Flavia; Sebastiani, Teresa; Panunzi, Sara; Valente, Donatella

    2012-12-01

    Although melatonin and cognitive-behavioural therapy have shown efficacy in treating sleep disorders in children with autism spectrum disorders, little is known about their relative or combined efficacy. One hundred and sixty children with autism spectrum disorders, aged 4-10 years, suffering from sleep onset insomnia and impaired sleep maintenance, were assigned randomly to either (1) combination of controlled-release melatonin and cognitive-behavioural therapy; (2) controlled-release melatonin; (3) four sessions of cognitive-behavioural therapy; or (4) placebo drug treatment condition for 12 weeks in a 1 : 1 : 1 : 1 ratio. Children were studied at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Treatment response was assessed with 1-week actigraphic monitoring, sleep diary and sleep questionnaire. Main outcome measures, derived actigraphically, were sleep latency, total sleep time, wake after sleep onset and number of awakenings. The active treatment groups all resulted in improvements across all outcome measures, with moderate-to-large effect sizes from baseline to a 12-week assessment. Melatonin treatment was mainly effective in reducing insomnia symptoms, while cognitive-behavioural therapy had a light positive impact mainly on sleep latency, suggesting that some behavioural aspects might play a role in determining initial insomnia. The combination treatment group showed a trend to outperform other active treatment groups, with fewer dropouts and a greater proportion of treatment responders achieving clinically significant changes (63.38% normative sleep efficiency criterion of >85% and 84.62%, sleep onset latency melatonin treatment seems to result in a better treatment response, at least in the short term.

  8. Efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy for sleep improvement in patients with persistent delusions and hallucinations (BEST): A prospective, assessor-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, D; Waite, F.; Startup, H; Myers, E; Lister, R.; McInerney, J; Harvey, AG; Geddes, J.; Zaiwalla, Z; Luengo-Fernandez, R.; Foster, R.; Clifton, L; Yu, LM

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Sleep disturbance occurs in most patients with delusions or hallucinations and should be treated as a clinical problem in its own right. However, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)—the best evidence-based treatment for insomnia—has not been tested in this patient population. We aimed to pilot procedures for a randomised trial testing CBT for sleep problems in patients with current psychotic experiences, and to provide a preliminary assessment of potential benefit. Methods ...

  9. Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder in children using cognitive behavioural writing therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. van der Oord; S. Lucassen; A.A.P. van Emmerik; P.M.G. Emmelkamp

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study evaluated the effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Writing Therapy (CBWT) in 23 children (age 8-18 years) in the Netherlands, who experienced a range of single and recurrent traumatic experiences. CBWT uses exposure, cognitive restructuring and social sharing. Methods: At pre

  10. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapies for Young People in Outpatient Treatment for NonOpioid Drug Use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filges, Trine; Jørgensen, Anne-Marie Klint

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This review evaluates the evidence on the effects of cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) on drug use reduction for young people in treatment for nonopioid drug use. Method: We followed Campbell Collaboration guidelines to conduct a systematic review of randomized and nonrandomized tria...

  11. Cost and outcome of behavioural activation versus cognitive behaviour therapy for depression (COBRA): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Shelley; Richards, David A; Ekers, David; McMillan, Dean; Byford, Sarah; Farrand, Paul A; Gilbody, Simon; Hollon, Steven D; Kuyken, Willem; Martell, Christopher; O'Mahen, Heather A; O'Neill, Emer; Reed, Nigel; Taylor, Rod S; Watkins, Ed R; Wright, Kim A

    2014-01-21

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for depression. However, CBT is a complex therapy that requires highly trained and qualified practitioners, and its scalability is therefore limited by the costs of training and employing sufficient therapists to meet demand. Behavioural activation (BA) is a psychological treatment for depression that may be an effective alternative to CBT and, because it is simpler, might also be delivered by less highly trained and specialised mental health workers. COBRA is a two-arm, non-inferiority, patient-level randomised controlled trial, including clinical, economic, and process evaluations comparing CBT delivered by highly trained professional therapists to BA delivered by junior professional or para-professional mental health workers to establish whether the clinical effectiveness of BA is non-inferior to CBT and if BA is cost effective compared to CBT. Four hundred and forty patients with major depressive disorder will be recruited through screening in primary care. We will analyse for non-inferiority in per-protocol and intention-to-treat populations. Our primary outcome will be severity of depression symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9) at 12 months follow-up. Secondary outcomes will be clinically significant change and severity of depression at 18 months, and anxiety (General Anxiety Disorder-7 questionnaire) and health-related quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey-36) at 12 and 18 months. Our economic evaluation will take the United Kingdom National Health Service/Personal Social Services perspective to include costs of the interventions, health and social care services used, plus productivity losses. Cost-effectiveness will explored in terms of quality-adjusted life years using the EuroQol-5D measure of health-related quality of life. The clinical and economic outcomes of this trial will provide the evidence to help policy makers, clinicians and guideline developers decide on the merits of

  12. Investigation of consumer satisfaction with cognitive-behaviour therapy and sertraline in the treatment of adolescent depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Amanda L; Melvin, Glenn A; Williams, Nicola J; Tonge, Bruce J; King, Neville J

    2005-06-01

    A new instrument, the Adolescent Depression Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (ADTSQ) was devised to measure the consumer satisfaction of depressed adolescents and their parents. The objectives of the paper were to present the psychometric properties of the ADTSQ and to investigate the relative consumer satisfaction with cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), sertraline (SRT) and a combined treatment of CBT and SRT (COMBINED) for the treatment of adolescent depression. In addition, participants were asked to rank their most preferred treatment from the following approaches: medication, individual counselling, group program and family therapy. Thirty-eight adolescents with a unipolar depressive disorder and 37 parents who participated in a randomized clinical trial of CBT versus SRT versus COMBINED completed the ADTSQ following the completion of acute treatment. The ADTSQ was found to have high internal consistency and exploratory factor analysis detected three underlying factors. High levels of consumer satisfaction were reported by both adolescents and parents in all three treatments. Those treated with CBT treatments reported higher levels of skill acquisition than those treated with SRT. Of the four treatment approaches, most parents and adolescents rated individual counselling as their first preference. The ADTSQ is a useful measure of consumer satisfaction for depressed adolescents and their parents. CBT, SRT and COMBINED were shown to have high consumer satisfaction with CBT's higher skills training content reflected in the participants' reports. Individual counselling was perceived as the most favourable choice of treatment for adolescent depression. Although limitations associated with the measurement of consumer satisfaction and of the study are acknowledged, it is recommended that the inclusion of consumer satisfaction measures be considered in clinical trials that examine treatment efficacy.

  13. A systematic review of the evidence regarding cognitive therapy skills that assist cognitive behavioural therapy in adults who have an intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooney, Patricia; Tunney, Conall; O'Reilly, Gary

    2017-05-24

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is being increasingly adapted for use with people who have an intellectual disability. However, it remains unclear whether inherent cognitive deficits that are present in adults who have an intellectual disability preclude the use of cognitive-based therapies. This review aims to systematically examine "cognitive therapy skills" in adults who have an intellectual disability that assist engagement in CBT. Two authors independently reviewed titles and abstracts of articles located through electronic database searching. Outcomes of the 18 studies selected for full-text review are mixed and limited by a moderately high risk of bias. The authors suggest eleven findings from research areas of emotion recognition, cognitive mediation, discriminating between thoughts, feelings and behaviours, linking events and emotions that have implications for the design of CBT programmes and future research for this population. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Changes in neuronal correlates of body image processing by means of cognitive-behavioural body image therapy for eating disorders: a randomized controlled fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vocks, S; Schulte, D; Busch, M; Grönemeyer, D; Herpertz, S; Suchan, B

    2011-08-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies have demonstrated abnormalities in visual body image processing in anorexia and bulimia nervosa, possibly underlying body image disturbance in these disorders. Although cognitive behavioural interventions have been shown to be successful in improving body image disturbance in eating disorders, no randomized controlled study has yet analysed treatment-induced changes in neuronal correlates of visual body image processing. Altogether, 32 females with eating disorders were randomly assigned either to a manualized cognitive behavioural body image therapy consisting of 10 group sessions, or to a waiting list control condition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, brain responses to viewing photographs of one's own and another female's body taken from 16 standardized perspectives while participants were wearing a uniform bikini were acquired before and after the intervention and the waiting time, respectively. Data indicate a general blood oxygen level dependent signal enhancement in response to looking at photographs of one's own body from pre- to post-treatment, whereas exclusively in the control group activation decreases from pre- to post-waiting time were observed. Focused activation increases from pre- to post-treatment were found in the left middle temporal gyrus covering the coordinates of the extrastriate body area and in bilateral frontal structures including the middle frontal gyrus. Results point to a more intense neuronal processing of one's own body after the cognitive behavioural body image therapy in cortical regions that are responsible for the visual processing of the human body and for self-awareness. © Cambridge University Press 2010

  15. Making sense of a cognitive behavioural therapy intervention for fear of falling: qualitative study of intervention development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, Tracy L; Bamford, Claire; Deary, Vincent; Sabin, Neil; Parry, Steve W

    2014-09-25

    Fear of Falling (FoF) is commonly reported among older adults (up to 50%) and can impact negatively on physical and social activities, mood and quality of life. This paper explores the development, acceptability and feasibility of a cognitive behavioural therapy intervention (CBTi) for FoF. The process evaluation of the CBTi development phase of an RCT (conducted in the UK) reported here, used ethnographic methods. Data included: interviews with patients and carers (n = 16), clinic staff (n = 6) and the psychologists developing the CBTi (n = 3); observational field notes and transcripts of intervention development meetings (n = 9) and stakeholder engagement meetings (n = 2); and informal discussions with staff developing the CBTi (n = 8). Data collection and thematic analysis were guided by Normalisation Process Theory (NPT). The process evaluation showed two domains of work necessary to develop a CBTi that made sense to stakeholders, and that could be delivered as part of an RCT. For the psychologists developing the content of the CBTi, a growing understanding of the complexity of FoF highlighted the need for an individualised rather than a manualised intervention. For the research team, the work involved adapting the structures and processes of the RCT to address preliminary concerns over the acceptability and feasibility of the proposed CBTi. Theory-based approaches to process evaluation can sensitise researchers to contested understandings about proposed interventions that could undermine implementation. Drawing on the coherence construct of NPT, this study emphasises the nature and extent of work required to ensure an intervention makes sufficient sense to key stakeholders in order to maximise chances of successful implementation.

  16. A feasibility open trial of guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety and depression amongst Arab Australians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony Kayrouz

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the preliminary efficacy and acceptability of a culturally modified therapist-guided cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT treatment for Arab Australians, aged 18 years and over with symptoms of depression and anxiety. To facilitate ease of use, the treatment was delivered via the Internet (Internet CBT; iCBT. Eleven participants with at least mild symptoms of depression (Patient Health Questionnaire 9-item (PHQ-9 total scores  > 4  or anxiety (Generalised Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7 total scores > 4  accessed the online Arab Wellbeing Course, which consisted of five online lessons delivered over 8 weeks. Measures of depression, anxiety, distress and disability were gathered at pre-treatment, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. Data were analysed using mixed-linear model analyses. Ninety-one percent (10/11 of participants completed the five lessons over 8 weeks, with 10/11 providing post-treatment and 3-month follow-up data. Participants improved significantly across all outcome measures, with large within-group effect sizes based on estimated marginal means (Cohen's d at post-treatment (d = 1.08 to 1.74 and 3-month follow-up (d = 1.53 to 2.00. The therapist spent an average of 90.72 min (SD = 28.98 in contact, in total, with participants during the trial. Participants rated the Arab Wellbeing Course as acceptable. Caution is needed in interpreting the results of the current study given the small sample size employed, raising questions about the impact of levels of acculturation and the absence of a control group. However, the results are encouraging and indicate that, with minor modifications, western psychological interventions have the potential to be of benefit to English speaking Arab immigrants.

  17. Internet-provided cognitive behaviour therapy of posttraumatic stress symptoms following childbirth-a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, Katri; Berg, Ida; Frankenstein, Katri; Viita, Lina; Larsson, Kamilla; Persson, Ulrika; Spånberger, Loviisa; Wretman, Anna; Silfvernagel, Kristin; Andersson, Gerhard; Wijma, Klaas

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyse the effects of trauma-focused guided Internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy for relieving posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms following childbirth, a problem that about 3% women encounter postpartum. Following inclusion, 56 traumatized women were randomized to either treatment or to a waiting list control group. Primary outcome measures were the Traumatic Event Scale (TES) and Impact of Event Scale-Reversed (IES-R). Secondary measures were Beck depression inventory II, Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), Beck Anxiety Inventory, Quality Of Life Inventory and the EuroQol 5 Dimensions. The treatment was guided by a clinician and lasted eight weeks and comprised eight modules of written text. The between-group effect size (ES) was d = .82 (p < .0001) for the IES-R. The ES for the TES was small (d = .36) and not statistically significant (p = .09). A small between-group ES (d = .20; p = .02) was found for the PHQ-9. The results from pre- to post-treatment showed large within-group ESs for PTSD symptoms in the treatment group both on the TES (d = 1.42) and the IES-R (d = 1.30), but smaller ESs in the control group from inclusion to after deferred treatment (TES, d = .80; IES-R d = .45). In both groups, the treatment had positive effects on comorbid depression and anxiety, and in the treatment group also on quality of life. The results need to be verified in larger trials. Further studies are also needed to examine long-term effects.

  18. Transdiagnostic versus disorder-specific internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for anxiety and depression in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Jill M; Mewton, Louise; Andrews, Gavin

    2017-03-01

    Disorder-specific and transdiagnostic internet cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) programs are effective for anxiety and depression, but no studies have compared their effectiveness in primary care. Patient characteristics, adherence and effectiveness of Transdiagnostic iCBT (n=1005) were compared to disorder-specific programs for generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) (n=738) and depression (n=366) in a naturalistic non-randomised comparison study. Patients completed their iCBT program in primary care. The PHQ-9 (depression), GAD-7 (generalized anxiety), K-10 (distress), and the WHODAS-II (disability) were measured at pre- and post-treatment. Patients in the Transdiagnostic program had higher comorbidity rates and baseline distress. All programs were associated with medium to large within-group effect sizes for improving anxiety, depression and distress between pre- and post-treatment (d's=0.64-1.39). Controlling for baseline group differences in severity, we found small effect sizes favoring the Transdiagnostic program over the GAD program in reducing PHQ-9 (d=0.44, 95%CI: 0.34-0.53), K-10 (d=0.21, 95%CI: 0.16-0.35) and WHODAS scores (d=0.20, 95%CI: 0.10-0.29), and small effect sizes favoring the Transdiagnostic program over the Depression program in reducing GAD-7 scores (d=0.48, 95%CI: 0.36-0.60). A smaller proportion of patients completed the Transdiagnostic program (44.9%) compared to the depression (51.6%) and GAD (49.2%) programs, which was attributable to baseline differences in age and symptom severity. Both Transdiagnostic iCBT and disorder-specific iCBT programs are effective in primary care, but there appears to be small effects favoring Transdiagnostic iCBT. Methods to increase adherence are needed to optimize the benefits to patients, and these findings await replication in a RCT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The effects of brief individual cognitive behavioural therapy for depression and homesickness among international students in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravanan, Coumaravelou; Alias, Alizi; Mohamad, Mardiana

    2017-10-01

    Students who go to other countries for higher education face various psychological problems, particularly homesickness and depression. The objectives of this study were to: (a) identify differences between students who did and did not receive brief individual cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for depression to reduce homesickness; (b) identify whether brief individual CBT for depression reduces the level of homesickness in students between pre-, post- and follow-up assessment; and (c) compare the scores of students experiencing only homesickness and those experiencing both homesickness and depression. The sample consisted of 520 first-year undergraduate international students. The experimental group contained students who were diagnosed with depression and homesickness and received seven sessions of brief individual CBT for depression to reduce homesickness. The control group contained students who were diagnosed with depression and homesickness and received one session of advice and suggestions. The comparison group contained students who experienced only homesickness and did not receive any interventions. The study used the comparison group to determine if an interaction effect existed between students experiencing only homesickness and students experiencing both homesickness and depression. Students who received brief individual CBT displayed a significant reduction in their homesickness and depression scores compared to the scores of students in the control group. Students who experienced only homesickness exhibited a significant reduction in the scores on homesickness in the post-assessment compared to the control group's post-assessment homesickness scores. The results of this study cannot be generalized as data were collected from three universities in Malaysia. The follow-up assessment was conducted six months after the post-assessment, which also limits generalizability beyond six months. Overall, homesickness is considered a normal reaction. Brief

  20. Examining internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for patients with chronic kidney disease on haemodialysis: A feasibility open trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ramony; Dear, Blake F; Titov, Nick; Chow, Josephine; Suranyi, Michael

    2016-10-01

    Treating depression among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is imperative because of its high prevalence and health-related costs. However, many patients with CKD experience significant barriers to effective face-to-face psychological treatments. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) may help overcome the treatment barriers. The aim of the present study was to explore the acceptability and preliminary efficacy of iCBT for depression and anxiety among patients with CKD on haemodialysis. A single-group open trial design involving 22 patients on dialysis and an established iCBT treatment for anxiety and depression was employed. The primary outcomes were symptoms of depression, anxiety and general psychological distress. The secondary and tertiary outcomes were disability, quality of life, kidney disease-related loss and kidney disease burden. A generalised estimation equation modelling technique was employed. Clinically significant improvements (avg. % of improvement) were observed in the primary outcomes of depression (34%), anxiety (31%) and general distress (26%), which were maintained or further improved to 3-month follow-up. Improvements were also observed for quality of life (12%) and kidney disease-related loss (30%). However, no improvements in disability and kidney disease burden were found. High levels of acceptability were reported and relatively little clinician time (99.45min; SD=14.61) was needed to provide the treatment. The present results provide encouraging support for the potential of iCBT as an innovative way of increasing access to effective psychological treatment for CKD patients. These results provide much needed support for further research in this area. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN12613000103763. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for depression in people with diabetes: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Lisa; Newby, Jill; Wilhelm, Kay; Smith, Jessica; Fletcher, Therese; Ma, Trevor; Finch, Adam; Campbell, Lesley; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-01-01

    Depression substantially contributes to the personal burden and healthcare costs of living with diabetes mellitus (DM). Comorbid depression and DM are associated with poorer quality of life, poorer self-management and glycemic control, increased risk for DM complications and higher mortality rates, and higher health service utilization. Depression remains under-recognized and undertreated in people with DM, which may, in part, result from barriers associated with accessing face-to-face treatment. This study will examine the efficacy of an internet-based cognitive behaviour therapy programme for major depressive disorder (iCBT-MDD) in people with DM. A CONSORT 2010 compliant, registered randomised controlled trial of the intervention (iCBT-MDD) versus a treatment as usual control group will be conducted. The study will include 100 adults aged 18 years and over with a diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 DM and self-reported symptoms that satisfy MDD which will enable us to detect a statistically significant difference with a group effect size of 0.6 at a power of 80% and significance level of p=0.05. Participants will be randomised to receive the iCBT-MDD programme immediately, or to wait 10 weeks before accessing the programme. Primary outcomes will be self-reported depression severity, DM-related distress, and glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin). Secondary outcomes will be general distress and disability, generalized anxiety, lifestyle behaviours, somatization, eating habits, alcohol use, and acceptability of the iCBT programme to participants, and practicality for clinicians. Data will be analyzed with linear mixed models for each outcome measure. The Human Research Ethics Committee of St Vincent's Hospital Australia have given ethics approval (HREC/13/SVH/291). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed publication and social media channels of Australian Diabetes Consumer Representative Bodies. The trial is registered with the Australian and New Zealand

  2. Therapist-guided, Internet-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD-NET): a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enander, Jesper; Ivanov, Volen Z; Andersson, Erik; Mataix-Cols, David; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Rück, Christian

    2014-09-25

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for body dysmorphic disorder (BDD). However, most sufferers do not have access to this treatment. One way to increase access to CBT is to administer treatment remotely via the Internet. This study piloted a novel therapist-supported, Internet-based CBT program for BDD (BDD-NET). Uncontrolled clinical trial. Patients (N=23) were recruited through self-referral and assessed face to face at a clinic specialising in obsessive-compulsive and related disorders. Suitable patients were offered secure access to BDD-NET. BDD-NET is a 12-week treatment program based on current psychological models of BDD that includes psychoeducation, functional analysis, cognitive restructuring, exposure and response prevention, and relapse prevention modules. A dedicated therapist provides active guidance and feedback throughout the entire process. The clinician-administered Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale for BDD (BDD-YBOCS). Symptom severity was assessed pretreatment, post-treatment and at the 3-month follow-up. BDD-NET was deemed highly acceptable by patients and led to significant improvements on the BDD-YBOCS (p=BDD-YBOCS). These gains were maintained at the 3-month follow-up. Secondary outcome measures of depression, global functioning and quality of life also showed significant improvements with moderate to large effect sizes. On average, therapists spent 10 min per patient per week providing support. The results suggest that BDD-NET has the potential to greatly increase access to CBT, at least for low-risk individuals with moderately severe BDD symptoms and reasonably good insight. A randomised controlled trial of BDD-NET is warranted. Clinicaltrials.gov registration ID NCT01850433. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  3. Cognitive behaviour therapy for postnatal post-traumatic stress disorder: case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, Susan; McKenzie-McHarg, Kirstie; Eagle, Andrew

    2007-09-01

    Background. Approximately 1-2% of women suffer from postnatal post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) with wide ranging consequences for these women and their families 1. Appropriate treatment of women who have difficult or traumatic births is not yet established. Evidence in other populations shows that cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is effective for PTSD and it is therefore the recommended treatment 2. However, a recent review of treatments for postnatal distress concluded that descriptions of postnatal counseling are largely generalized and non-specific, which makes them difficult to assess or replicate 3. Aims and method. The current paper therefore aims to describe the use of CBT interventions to treat postnatal distress, and to illustrate common themes or issues that occur in postnatal PTSD. This paper reports two case studies of women with postnatal PTSD and their treatment using CBT. Conclusions. In these cases, CBT was an effective treatment for postnatal PTSD. A number of implications are explored for the management of pregnancy and labor.

  4. Beyond dopamine: functional MRI predictors of responsiveness to cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Kumari

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Table Normal; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Times New Roman; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Times New Roman; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Despite the favourable effects of antipsychotics on positive symptoms of schizophrenia, many patients continue to suffer from distressing symptoms. Additional benefi ts of cognitive behavior therapy for psychosis (CBTp have been reported for approximately 50% of such patients. Given the role of left hemisphere-based language processes in responsiveness to CBT for depression, and language pathway abnormalities in psychosis, this study examined whether pre-therapy brain activity during a verbal monitoring task predicts CBTp responsiveness in schizophrenia. Fifty-two outpatients, stable on antipsychotics with at least one persistent distressing positive symptom and wishing to receive CBTp adjunctive to their treatment-as-usual, and 20 healthy participants underwent fMRI during monitoring of self- and externally-generated (normal and distorted speech. Subsequently, 26 patients received CBTp for 6-8 months adjunctive to their treatment-as-usual (CBTp + TAU, 20 completers, and 26 continued with their treatment-as-usual (TAU-alone, 18 completers. Symptoms were assessed (blindly at entry and follow-up. The CBTp + TAU and TAU-alone groups had comparable

  5. The effects of brief cognitive-behaviour therapy for pathological skin picking: A randomized comparison to wait-list control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuck, K.; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Rinck, M.

    2011-01-01

    Thirty-four college students suffering from pathological skin picking were randomly assigned to a four-session cognitive-behavioural treatment (n = 17) or a waiting-list condition (n = 17). Severity of skin picking, psycho-social impact of skin picking, strength of skin-picking-related dysfunctional

  6. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy from the Perspective of Clients with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: A Qualitative Investigation of Process Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pert, C.; Jahoda, A.; Stenfert Kroese, B.; Trower, P.; Dagnan, D.; Selkirk, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinicians working with clients who have mild intellectual disabilities (IDs) have shown growing enthusiasm for using a cognitive behavioural approach, amid increasing evidence of good treatment outcomes for this client group. However, very little is known about the views and experiences of clients with IDs who have undergone cognitive…

  7. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy from the Perspective of Clients with Mild Intellectual Disabilities: A Qualitative Investigation of Process Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pert, C.; Jahoda, A.; Stenfert Kroese, B.; Trower, P.; Dagnan, D.; Selkirk, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Clinicians working with clients who have mild intellectual disabilities (IDs) have shown growing enthusiasm for using a cognitive behavioural approach, amid increasing evidence of good treatment outcomes for this client group. However, very little is known about the views and experiences of clients with IDs who have undergone cognitive…

  8. Challenged by cognition : toward optimal measurement and greater understanding of youth cognition in school refusal and cognitive behavioural therapy outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maric, Marija

    2010-01-01

    The main purpose of this dissertation was to highlight and address seven challenges related to the measurement of youth cognition, understanding the role of cognitive constructs in anxiety and school refusal, and the examination of cognitive mediators of cognitive-behavioural treatment outcomes. The

  9. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy augmentation in major depression treatment (ECAM study): study protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Atsuo; Sado, Mitsuhiro; Mitsuda, Dai; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; Abe, Takayuki; Sato, Yuji; Iwashita, Satoru; Mimura, Masaru; Ono, Yutaka

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Major depression is a serious mental disorder that causes substantial distress and impairment in individuals and places an enormous burden on society. Although antidepressant treatment is the most common therapy provided in routine practice, there is little evidence to guide second-line therapy for patients who have failed to respond to antidepressants. The aim of this paper is to describe the study protocol for a randomised controlled trial that measures the clinical effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as an augmentation strategy to treat patients with non-psychotic major depression identified as suboptimal responders to usual depression care. Methods and analysis The current study is a 16-week assessor-blinded randomised, parallel-groups superiority trial with 12-month follow-up at an outpatient clinic as part of usual depression care. Patients aged 20–65 years with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) Major Depressive Disorder who have experienced at least one failed trial of antidepressants as part of usual depression care, will be randomly assigned to receive CBT plus treatment as usual, or treatment as usual alone. The primary outcome is the change in clinician-rated 17-item GRID-Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (GRID-HAMD) score at 16 weeks, and secondary outcomes include severity and change in scores of subjective depression symptoms, proportion of responders and remitters, safety and quality of life. The primary population will be the intention-to-treat patients. Ethics and dissemination All protocols and the informed consent form comply with the Ethics Guideline for Clinical Research (Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare). Ethics review committees at the Keio University School of Medicine and the Sakuragaoka Memorial Hospital approved the study protocol. The results of the study will be disseminated at several research conferences and as published articles in peer

  10. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-20

    May 20, 2003 ... no evidence, e.g.” no one will ever want to be with me”. A more complete list ..... earth, was the centre of the universe, or Galileo's assertion that the earth was .... alone versus in combination with fluvoxamine, in the treatment of.

  11. Cost and Outcome of Behavioural Activation versus Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Depression (COBRA): a randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David A; Ekers, David; McMillan, Dean; Taylor, Rod S; Byford, Sarah; Warren, Fiona C; Barrett, Barbara; Farrand, Paul A; Gilbody, Simon; Kuyken, Willem; O'Mahen, Heather; Watkins, Ed R; Wright, Kim A; Hollon, Steven D; Reed, Nigel; Rhodes, Shelley; Fletcher, Emily; Finning, Katie

    2016-08-27

    Depression is a common, debilitating, and costly disorder. Many patients request psychological therapy, but the best-evidenced therapy-cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-is complex and costly. A simpler therapy-behavioural activation (BA)-might be as effective and cheaper than is CBT. We aimed to establish the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of BA compared with CBT for adults with depression. In this randomised, controlled, non-inferiority trial, we recruited adults aged 18 years or older meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV criteria for major depressive disorder from primary care and psychological therapy services in Devon, Durham, and Leeds (UK). We excluded people who were receiving psychological therapy, were alcohol or drug dependent, were acutely suicidal or had attempted suicide in the previous 2 months, or were cognitively impaired, or who had bipolar disorder or psychosis or psychotic symptoms. We randomly assigned participants (1:1) remotely using computer-generated allocation (minimisation used; stratified by depression severity [Patient Health Questionnaire 9 (PHQ-9) score of inferiority margin was 1·9 PHQ-9 points. This trial is registered with the ISCRTN registry, number ISRCTN27473954. Between Sept 26, 2012, and April 3, 2014, we randomly allocated 221 (50%) participants to BA and 219 (50%) to CBT. 175 (79%) participants were assessable for the primary outcome in the mITT population in the BA group compared with 189 (86%) in the CBT group, whereas 135 (61%) were assessable in the PP population in the BA group compared with 151 (69%) in the CBT group. BA was non-inferior to CBT (mITT: CBT 8·4 PHQ-9 points [SD 7·5], BA 8·4 PHQ-9 points [7·0], mean difference 0·1 PHQ-9 points [95% CI -1·3 to 1·5], p=0·89; PP: CBT 7·9 PHQ-9 points [7·3]; BA 7·8 [6·5], mean difference 0·0 PHQ-9 points [-1·5 to 1·6], p=0·99). Two (1%) non-trial-related deaths (one [1%] multidrug toxicity in the BA group and one [1

  12. Cognitive behavioural therapy versus multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (FatiGo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vos-Vromans Desirée CWM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome experience extreme fatigue, which often leads to substantial limitations of occupational, educational, social and personal activities. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the treatment. Patients try many different therapies to overcome their fatigue. Although there is no consensus, cognitive behavioural therapy is seen as one of the most effective treatments. Little is known about multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment, a combination of cognitive behavioural therapy with principles of mindfulness, gradual increase of activities, body awareness therapy and pacing. The difference in effectiveness and cost-effectiveness between multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment and cognitive behavioural therapy is as yet unknown. The FatiGo (Fatigue-Go trial aims to compare the effects of both treatment approaches in outpatient rehabilitation on fatigue severity and quality of life in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome. Methods One hundred twenty patients who meet the criteria of chronic fatigue syndrome, fulfil the inclusion criteria and sign the informed consent form will be recruited. Both treatments take 6 months to complete. The outcome will be assessed at 6 and 12 months after the start of treatment. Two weeks after the start of treatment, expectancy and credibility will be measured, and patients will be asked to write down their personal goals and score their current performance on these goals on a visual analogue scale. At 6 and 14 weeks after the start of treatment, the primary outcome and three potential mediators—self-efficacy, causal attributions and present-centred attention-awareness—will be measured. Primary outcomes are fatigue severity and quality of life. Secondary outcomes are physical activity, psychological symptoms, self-efficacy, causal attributions, impact of disease on emotional and physical functioning, present-centred attention-awareness, life

  13. Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for the treatment of depression in people with multiple sclerosis: external pilot trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooper Cindy L

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background People with multiple sclerosis (MS are at high risk of depression. We undertook a pilot trial of computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT for the treatment of depression in people with MS to test the feasibility of undertaking a full trial. Methods Participants with a diagnosis of MS and clinical levels of depression were recruited through out-patient clinics and postal screening questionnaires at two UK centres and randomised to CCBT or usual care. Clinical outcomes included the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and Multiple Sclerosis Impact Scale (MSIS-29 at baseline, 8 and 21 weeks. Feasibility outcomes included: recruitment rate; reasons for refusal, withdrawal and dropout; feasibility and acceptability of the proposed outcome measures; sample size estimation and variation in and preferences for service delivery. Results Twenty-four participants were recruited. The recruitment rate, calculated as the proportion of those invited to fill in a screening questionnaire who were consented into the trial, was 4.1%. Recruitment through out-patient clinics was somewhat slower than through screening questionnaire mail-out but the overall recruitment yield was similar. Of the 12 patients in the CCBT arm, 9 (75% completed at least four, and 6 completed all 8 CCBT sessions. For completers, the median time (IQR to complete all eight CCBT sessions was 15 (13 to 20 weeks. Participants expressed concern about the face validity of the Beck Depression Inventory II for the measurement of self-reported depression in people with MS. The MSIS-29 was the patient-reported outcome measure which participants felt best reflected their concerns. The estimated sample size for a full trial is between 180 and 390 participants. NHS partners were not delivering CCBT in community facilities and participants preferred to access CCBT at home, with no one expressing a preference for use of CCBT in an alternative location. Conclusions A definitive

  14. Adherence to Internet-based and face-to-face cognitive behavioural therapy for depression: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter van Ballegooijen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT is an effective and acceptable treatment for depression, especially when it includes guidance, but its treatment adherence has not yet been systematically studied. We conducted a meta-analysis, comparing the adherence to guided iCBT with the adherence to individual face-to-face CBT. METHODS: Studies were selected from a database of trials that investigate treatment for adult depression (see www.evidencebasedpsychotherapies.org, updated to January 2013. We identified 24 studies describing 26 treatment conditions (14 face-to-face CBT, 12 guided iCBT, by means of these inclusion criteria: targeting depressed adults, no comorbid somatic disorder or substance abuse, community recruitment, published in the year 2000 or later. The main outcome measure was the percentage of completed sessions. We also coded the percentage of treatment completers (separately coding for 100% or at least 80% of treatment completed. RESULTS: We did not find studies that compared guided iCBT and face-to-face CBT in a single trial that met our inclusion criteria. Face-to-face CBT treatments ranged from 12 to 28 sessions, guided iCBT interventions consisted of 5 to 9 sessions. Participants in face-to-face CBT completed on average 83.9% of their treatment, which did not differ significantly from participants in guided iCBT (80.8%, P  =  .59. The percentage of completers (total intervention was significantly higher in face-to-face CBT (84.7% than in guided iCBT (65.1%, P < .001, as was the percentage of completers of 80% or more of the intervention (face-to-face CBT: 85.2%, guided iCBT: 67.5%, P  =  .003. Non-completers of face-to-face CBT completed on average 24.5% of their treatment, while non-completers of guided iCBT completed on average 42.1% of their treatment. CONCLUSION: We did not find studies that compared guided iCBT and face-to-face CBT in a single trial. Adherence to guided iCBT appears to be

  15. Internet-versus group-administered cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder in a psychiatric setting: a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlsson Andreas

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Internet administered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT is a promising new way to deliver psychological treatment, but its effectiveness in regular care settings and in relation to more traditional CBT group treatment has not yet been determined. The primary aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of Internet-and group administered CBT for panic disorder (with or without agoraphobia in a randomised trial within a regular psychiatric care setting. The second aim of the study was to establish the cost-effectiveness of these interventions. Methods Patients referred for treatment by their physician, or self-referred, were telephone-screened by a psychiatric nurse. Patients fulfilling screening criteria underwent an in-person structured clinical interview carried out by a psychiatrist. A total of 113 consecutive patients were then randomly assigned to 10 weeks of either guided Internet delivered CBT (n = 53 or group CBT (n = 60. After treatment, and at a 6-month follow-up, patients were again assessed by the psychiatrist, blind to treatment condition. Results Immediately after randomization 9 patients dropped out, leaving 104 patients who started treatment. Patients in both treatment conditions showed significant improvement on the main outcome measure, the Panic Disorder Severity Scale (PDSS after treatment. For the Internet treatment the within-group effect size (pre-post on the PDSS was Cohen's d = 1.73, and for the group treatment it was d = 1.63. Between group effect sizes were low and treatment effects were maintained at 6-months follow-up. We found no statistically significant differences between the two treatment conditions using a mixed models approach to account for missing data. Group CBT utilised considerably more therapist time than did Internet CBT. Defining effect as proportion of PDSS responders, the cost-effectiveness analysis concerning therapist time showed that Internet treatment had superior cost

  16. Economic evaluation of multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment versus cognitive behavioural therapy for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos-Vromans, Desirée; Evers, Silvia; Huijnen, Ivan; Köke, Albère; Hitters, Minou; Rijnders, Nieke; Pont, Menno; Knottnerus, André; Smeets, Rob

    2017-01-01

    A multi-centre RCT has shown that multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment (MRT) is more effective in reducing fatigue over the long-term in comparison with cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), but evidence on its cost-effectiveness is lacking. To compare the cost-effectiveness of MRT versus CBT for patients with CFS from a societal perspective. A multi-centre randomized controlled trial comparing MRT with CBT was conducted among 122 patients with CFS diagnosed using the 1994 criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and aged between 18 and 60 years. The societal costs (healthcare costs, patient and family costs, and costs for loss of productivity), fatigue severity, quality of life, quality-adjusted life-year (QALY), and cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were measured over a follow-up period of one year. The main outcome of the cost-effectiveness analysis was fatigue measured by the Checklist Individual Strength (CIS). The main outcome of the cost-utility analysis was the QALY based on the EuroQol-5D-3L utilities. Sensitivity analyses were performed, and uncertainty was calculated using the cost-effectiveness acceptability curves and cost-effectiveness planes. The data of 109 patients (57 MRT and 52 CBT) were analyzed. MRT was significantly more effective in reducing fatigue at 52 weeks. The mean difference in QALY between the treatments was not significant (0.09, 95% CI: -0.02 to 0.19). The total societal costs were significantly higher for patients allocated to MRT (a difference of €5,389, 95% CI: 2,488 to 8,091). MRT has a high probability of being the most cost effective, using fatigue as the primary outcome. The ICER is €856 per unit of the CIS fatigue subscale. The results of the cost-utility analysis, using the QALY, indicate that the CBT had a higher likelihood of being more cost-effective. The probability of being more cost-effective is higher for MRT when using fatigue as primary

  17. Exploring Psychotherapy Clients' Independent Strategies for Change While in Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackrill, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Psychotherapy research usually describes how client change is caused by therapist interventions. This article describes how clients change by continuing to use and revising the strategies for change that they bring with them when they first enter therapy. This article presents data from a qualitative diary study of psychotherapy. Three cases…

  18. Low-intensity cognitive-behaviour therapy interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder compared to waiting list for therapist-led cognitive-behaviour therapy: 3-arm randomised controlled trial of clinical effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Karina; Bower, Peter; Gellatly, Judith; Byford, Sarah; Bee, Penny; McMillan, Dean; Arundel, Catherine; Gilbody, Simon; Gega, Lina; Hardy, Gillian; Reynolds, Shirley; Barkham, Michael; Mottram, Patricia; Lidbetter, Nicola; Pedley, Rebecca; Molle, Jo; Peckham, Emily; Knopp-Hoffer, Jasmin; Price, Owen; Connell, Janice; Heslin, Margaret; Foley, Christopher; Plummer, Faye; Roberts, Christopher

    2017-06-01

    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is prevalent and without adequate treatment usually follows a chronic course. "High-intensity" cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) from a specialist therapist is current "best practice." However, access is difficult because of limited numbers of therapists and because of the disabling effects of OCD symptoms. There is a potential role for "low-intensity" interventions as part of a stepped care model. Low-intensity interventions (written or web-based materials with limited therapist support) can be provided remotely, which has the potential to increase access. However, current evidence concerning low-intensity interventions is insufficient. We aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness of 2 forms of low-intensity CBT prior to high-intensity CBT, in adults meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria for OCD. This study was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee North West-Lancaster (reference number 11/NW/0276). All participants provided informed consent to take part in the trial. We conducted a 3-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial in primary- and secondary-care United Kingdom mental health services. All patients were on a waiting list for therapist-led CBT (treatment as usual). Four hundred and seventy-three eligible patients were recruited and randomised. Patients had a median age of 33 years, and 60% were female. The majority were experiencing severe OCD. Patients received 1 of 2 low-intensity interventions: computerised CBT (cCBT; web-based CBT materials and limited telephone support) through "OCFighter" or guided self-help (written CBT materials with limited telephone or face-to-face support). Primary comparisons concerned OCD symptoms, measured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Observer-Rated (Y-BOCS-OR) at 3, 6, and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety, and functioning. At

  19. Low-intensity cognitive-behaviour therapy interventions for obsessive-compulsive disorder compared to waiting list for therapist-led cognitive-behaviour therapy: 3-arm randomised controlled trial of clinical effectiveness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Lovell

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD is prevalent and without adequate treatment usually follows a chronic course. "High-intensity" cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT from a specialist therapist is current "best practice." However, access is difficult because of limited numbers of therapists and because of the disabling effects of OCD symptoms. There is a potential role for "low-intensity" interventions as part of a stepped care model. Low-intensity interventions (written or web-based materials with limited therapist support can be provided remotely, which has the potential to increase access. However, current evidence concerning low-intensity interventions is insufficient. We aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness of 2 forms of low-intensity CBT prior to high-intensity CBT, in adults meeting the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV criteria for OCD.This study was approved by the National Research Ethics Service Committee North West-Lancaster (reference number 11/NW/0276. All participants provided informed consent to take part in the trial. We conducted a 3-arm, multicentre randomised controlled trial in primary- and secondary-care United Kingdom mental health services. All patients were on a waiting list for therapist-led CBT (treatment as usual. Four hundred and seventy-three eligible patients were recruited and randomised. Patients had a median age of 33 years, and 60% were female. The majority were experiencing severe OCD. Patients received 1 of 2 low-intensity interventions: computerised CBT (cCBT; web-based CBT materials and limited telephone support through "OCFighter" or guided self-help (written CBT materials with limited telephone or face-to-face support. Primary comparisons concerned OCD symptoms, measured using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale-Observer-Rated (Y-BOCS-OR at 3, 6, and 12 months. Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, depression, anxiety, and

  20. Treatment acceptability and preferences for managing severe health anxiety: Perceptions of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy among primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soucy, Joelle N; Hadjistavropoulos, Heather D

    2017-12-01

    While cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is an established treatment for health anxiety, there are barriers to service access. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) has demonstrated effectiveness and has the potential to improve access to treatment. Nevertheless, it is unknown how patients perceive ICBT relative to other interventions for health anxiety and what factors predict ICBT acceptability. This study investigated these questions. Primary care patients (N = 116) who reported elevated levels of health anxiety were presented three treatment vignettes that each described a different protocol for health anxiety (i.e., medication, CBT, ICBT). Acceptability and credibility of the treatments were assessed following the presentation of each vignette. Participants then ranked the three treatments and provided a rational for their preferences. The treatments were similarly rated as moderately acceptable. Relative to medication and ICBT, CBT was perceived as the most credible treatment for health anxiety. The highest preference ranks were for CBT and medication. Regression analyses indicated that lower computer anxiety, past medication use, and lower ratings of negative cognitions about difficulty coping with an illness significantly predicted greater ICBT acceptability. Health anxiety was not assessed with a diagnostic interview. Primary care patients were recruited through a Qualtrics panel. Patients did not have direct experience with treatment but learned about treatment options through vignettes. Medication and CBT are preferred over ICBT. If ICBT is to increase treatment access, methods of improving perceptions of this treatment option are needed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Sign and Symptom and Ability to Control Violent Behaviour with Music Therapy and Rational Emotive Cognitive Behaviour Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heri Setiawan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prevalence of violence is highly occur in mental disorders clients at psychiatric hospitals. The impact is injure to others. This research aims to examine the effectiveness of music therapy and RECBT to sign and symptom and ability to control violent behaviour. Methods: Quasi-experimental research design with a sample of 64 respondents. Result: The study found a decrease symptoms of violent behaviour, ability to control violent behavior include relaxation, change negative thingking, irational belief, and negative behavior have increased significantly than the clients that did not receiving therapy. Discussion: Music therapy and RECBT is recommended as a therapeutic nursing at the client’s violent behaviour. Key Word: violent, sign and simptom, ability, music therapy, RECBT

  2. Cultural adaptation of a cognitive-behavioural intervention to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy among people living with HIV/AIDS in Zimbabwe: Nzira Itsva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bere, Tarisai; Nyamayaro, Primrose; Magidson, Jessica F; Chibanda, Dixon; Chingono, Alfred; Munjoma, Ronald; Macpherson, Kirsty; Ndhlovu, Chiratidzo Ellen; O'Cleirigh, Conall; Kidia, Khameer; Safren, Steven A; Abas, Melanie

    2016-02-18

    Few evidence-based interventions to improve adherence to antiretroviral therapy have been adapted for use in Africa. We selected, culturally adapted and tested the feasibility of a cognitive-behavioural intervention for adherence and for delivery in a clinic setting in Harare, Zimbabwe. The intervention consisted of a single, 50-minute problem-solving cognitive-behavioural intervention session with four skill-based booster sessions, delivered by four lay adherence counsellors in the context of HIV care. Adaptation followed a theoretically driven approach to intervention adaptation, Assessment-Decision-Administration-Production-Topical Experts-Integration-Training-Testing (ADAPT-ITT), and included modifications to language, session length, tailoring content for delivery by lay counsellors and inclusion of culturally competent probes. The feasibility of the intervention was evaluated using a mixed-methods assessment, including ratings of provider fidelity of intervention delivery, and qualitative assessments of feasibility using individual semi-structured interviews with counsellors (n = 4) and patients (n = 15). The intervention was feasible and acceptable when administered to 42 patients and resulted in improved self-reported adherence in a subset of 15 patients who were followed up after 6 months. Next steps from this study include conducting a randomised control trial to evaluate the adapted intervention compared to standard of care in a larger sample over a long-term follow-up.

  3. The long-term effectiveness of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Psychosis (CBTp within a routine psychological therapies service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle ePeters

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs have shown the efficacy of CBTp, however few studies have considered its long-term effectiveness in routine services. This study reports the outcomes of clients seen in a psychological therapies clinic, set up following positive results obtained from an RCT (Peters et al. 2010. The aims were to evaluate the effectiveness of CBTp, using data from the service’s routine assessments for consecutive referrals over a 12 year period, and assess whether gains were maintained at a 6+ months’ follow-up. Of the 476 consenting referrals, all clients (N=358 who received ≥5 therapy sessions were offered an assessment at 4 time points (baseline, pre-, mid- and end of therapy on measures assessing current psychosis symptoms, emotional problems, general well-being and life satisfaction. A sub-set (N=113 was assessed at a median of 12 months after finishing therapy. Following the waiting list (median of 3 months clients received individualised, formulation-based CBTp for a median number of 19 sessions from 121 therapists with a range of experience receiving regular supervision. Clients showed no meaningful change on any measure while on the waiting list (Cohen’s d<=0.23. In contrast, highly significant improvements following therapy, all of which were significantly greater than changes during the waiting list, were found on all domains assessed (Cohen’s d: 0.44-0.75. All gains were maintained at follow-up (Cohen’s d: 0.29-0.82, with little change between end of therapy and follow-up (Cohen’s d<=0.18. Drop-out rate from therapy was low (13%. These results demonstrate the positive and potentially enduring impact of psychological therapy on a range of meaningful outcomes for clients with psychosis. The follow-up assessments were conducted on only a sub-set, which may not generalise to the full sample. Nevertheless this study is the largest of its kind in psychosis, and has important implications for the practice of

  4. A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The publication of protocols by medical journals is increasingly becoming an accepted means for promoting good quality research and maximising transparency. Recently, Finfer and Bellomo have suggested the publication of statistical analysis plans (SAPs).The aim of this paper is to make public and to report in detail the planned analyses that were approved by the Trial Steering Committee in May 2010 for the principal papers of the PACE (Pacing, graded Activity, and Cognitive behaviour therapy: a randomised Evaluation) trial, a treatment trial for chronic fatigue syndrome. It illustrates planned analyses of a complex intervention trial that allows for the impact of clustering by care providers, where multiple care-providers are present for each patient in some but not all arms of the trial. Results The trial design, objectives and data collection are reported. Considerations relating to blinding, samples, adherence to the protocol, stratification, centre and other clustering effects, missing data, multiplicity and compliance are described. Descriptive, interim and final analyses of the primary and secondary outcomes are then outlined. Conclusions This SAP maximises transparency, providing a record of all planned analyses, and it may be a resource for those who are developing SAPs, acting as an illustrative example for teaching and methodological research. It is not the sum of the statistical analysis sections of the principal papers, being completed well before individual papers were drafted. Trial registration ISRCTN54285094 assigned 22 May 2003; First participant was randomised on 18 March 2005. PMID:24225069

  5. A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walwyn, Rebecca; Potts, Laura; McCrone, Paul; Johnson, Anthony L; DeCesare, Julia C; Baber, Hannah; Goldsmith, Kimberley; Sharpe, Michael; Chalder, Trudie; White, Peter D

    2013-11-13

    The publication of protocols by medical journals is increasingly becoming an accepted means for promoting good quality research and maximising transparency. Recently, Finfer and Bellomo have suggested the publication of statistical analysis plans (SAPs).The aim of this paper is to make public and to report in detail the planned analyses that were approved by the Trial Steering Committee in May 2010 for the principal papers of the PACE (Pacing, graded Activity, and Cognitive behaviour therapy: a randomised Evaluation) trial, a treatment trial for chronic fatigue syndrome. It illustrates planned analyses of a complex intervention trial that allows for the impact of clustering by care providers, where multiple care-providers are present for each patient in some but not all arms of the trial. The trial design, objectives and data collection are reported. Considerations relating to blinding, samples, adherence to the protocol, stratification, centre and other clustering effects, missing data, multiplicity and compliance are described. Descriptive, interim and final analyses of the primary and secondary outcomes are then outlined. This SAP maximises transparency, providing a record of all planned analyses, and it may be a resource for those who are developing SAPs, acting as an illustrative example for teaching and methodological research. It is not the sum of the statistical analysis sections of the principal papers, being completed well before individual papers were drafted. ISRCTN54285094 assigned 22 May 2003; First participant was randomised on 18 March 2005.

  6. Cost and Outcome of BehaviouRal Activation (COBRA): a randomised controlled trial of behavioural activation versus cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, David A; Rhodes, Shelley; Ekers, David; McMillan, Dean; Taylor, Rod S; Byford, Sarah; Barrett, Barbara; Finning, Katie; Ganguli, Poushali; Warren, Fiona; Farrand, Paul; Gilbody, Simon; Kuyken, Willem; O'Mahen, Heather; Watkins, Ed; Wright, Kim; Reed, Nigel; Fletcher, Emily; Hollon, Steven D; Moore, Lucy; Backhouse, Amy; Farrow, Claire; Garry, Julie; Kemp, Deborah; Plummer, Faye; Warner, Faith; Woodhouse, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Depression is a common, debilitating and costly disorder. The best-evidenced psychological therapy - cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) - is complex and costly. A simpler therapy, behavioural activation (BA), may be an effective alternative. To determine the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of BA compared with CBT for depressed adults at 12 and 18 months' follow-up, and to investigate the processes of treatments. Randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial stratified by depression severity, antidepressant use and recruitment site, with embedded process evaluation; and randomisation by remote computer-generated allocation. Three community mental health services in England. Adults aged ≥ 18 years with major depressive disorder (MDD) recruited from primary care and psychological therapy services. BA delivered by NHS junior mental health workers (MHWs); CBT by NHS psychological therapists. Primary: depression severity (as measured via the Patient Health Questionnaire-9; PHQ-9) at 12 months. Secondary: MDD status; number of depression-free days; anxiety (as measured via the Generalised Anxiety Disorder-7); health-related quality of life (as measured via the Short Form questionnaire-36 items) at 6, 12 and 18 months; and PHQ-9 at 6 and 18 months, all collected by assessors blinded to treatment allocation. Non-inferiority margin was 1.9 PHQ-9 points. We undertook intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses. We explored cost-effectiveness by collecting direct treatment and other health- and social-care costs and calculating quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) using the EuroQol-5 Dimensions, three-level version, at 18 months. We recruited 440 participants (BA, n = 221; CBT, n = 219); 175 (79%) BA and 189 (86%) CBT participants provided ITT data and 135 (61%) BA and 151 (69%) CBT participants provided PP data. At 12 months we found that BA was non-inferior to CBT {ITT: CBT 8.4 PHQ-9 points [standard deviation (SD) 7.5 PHQ-9 points], BA 8

  7. Cognitive-behaviour therapy for patients with Abridged Somatization Disorder (SSI 4,6 in primary care: a randomized, controlled study

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    Andrés Eva

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Somatoform disorders are characterized by the presence of multiple somatic symptoms without an organic cause that completely explains their symptoms. These patients generate a high cost in health services. We aim to evaluate the effectiveness and feasibility of a cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT programme, administered in group and individual formats in primary care for patients who are diagnosed with abridged somatization disorder. Method/design Design: Multicentre, randomized, controlled trial involving 3 groups, one of which is the control group consisting of standardized recommended treatment for somatization disorder in primary care (Smith's norms and the 2 others, the intervention groups, consisting of cognitive-behavioural therapy (10 sessions administered in individual format (intervention group 1 or in group format (intervention group 2. Setting: 29 primary care health centres in the province of Zaragoza and 3 primary care health centres in the province of Mallorca, Spain. Sample: N = 204 patients, (68 in each of the three groups, aged 18–65 years, able to understand and read Spanish, who fulfil Escobar's criteria of Abridgged Somatization Disorder (SSI 4,6, stable with pharmacotherapy over the previous month, and who will remain stable for the next 3 months in the doctor's opinion, having signed informed consent. Intervention: Control group: Standardized recommended treatment for somatization disorder in primary care (Smith's norms. Intervention group: 10 weekly sessions of CBT, following a protocol designed by Prof. Escobar's group at UMDNJ, USA. There are 2 different treatment conditions: individual and group format. Measurements: Survey on the use of health services, number and severity of somatic symptoms, anxiety, depression, quality of life and clinical global impression. The interviewers will not know which group the patient belongs to (blind. The assessments will be carried out at baseline, post

  8. Religious Cognitive-Emotional Therapy :A New Form of Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Rajaei

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available "nFrom the ancient times up to this date, it has been thought that religion and spirituality have important effects on human being's mental life. However, some psychologists and psychotherapists have ignored this role ,and thus neglected to study the effects of applying religion and spirituality in psychotherapy. However, many psychologists and psychotherapists have recently studied the relationship between religion or spirituality and mental health ; or used religious interventions in psychotherapies . Although different kinds of religious psychotherapies have been proposed, no comprehensive theory has been presented in this area. In this article a scientific ,comprehensive and applied spiritual method of psychotherapy is suggested . Religious Cognitive- Emotional Therapy (RCET is a new form of cognitive therapy that uses the basic religious beliefs and insights in psychotherapy. RCET is a new integration of cognitive, humanistic, and existential psychotherapies that takes into account religious beliefs and insights of the clients. RCET is an effective method of psychotherapy for the treatment of those who suffer from identity crisis , depression , and anxiety ; and it can be developed to address other psychological disorders as well . Because RCET is a new approach, practically is needed to do further theoretical research in this area.

  9. Religious cognitive-emotional therapy: a new form of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaei, Ali Reza

    2010-01-01

    From the ancient times up to this date, it has been thought that religion and spirituality have important effects on human being's mental life. However, some psychologists and psychotherapists have ignored this role, and thus neglected to study the effects of applying religion and spirituality in psychotherapy. However, many psychologists and psychotherapists have recently studied the relationship between religion or spirituality and mental health; or used religious interventions in psychotherapies. Although different kinds of religious psychotherapies have been proposed, no comprehensive theory has been presented in this area. In this article a scientific, comprehensive and applied spiritual method of psychotherapy is suggested. Religious Cognitive- Emotional Therapy (RCET) is a new form of cognitive therapy that uses the basic religious beliefs and insights in psychotherapy. RCET is a new integration of cognitive, humanistic, and existential psychotherapies that takes into account religious beliefs and insights of the clients. RCET is an effective method of psychotherapy for the treatment of those who suffer from identity crisis, depression, and anxiety; and it can be developed to address other psychological disorders as well. Because RCET is a new approach, practically is needed to do further theoretical research in this area.

  10. Religious Cognitive–Emotional Therapy: A New Form of Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    From the ancient times up to this date, it has been thought that religion and spirituality have important effects on human being's mental life. However, some psychologists and psychotherapists have ignored this role, and thus neglected to study the effects of applying religion and spirituality in psychotherapy. However, many psychologists and psychotherapists have recently studied the relationship between religion or spirituality and mental health; or used religious interventions in psychotherapies. Although different kinds of religious psychotherapies have been proposed, no comprehensive theory has been presented in this area. In this article a scientific, comprehensive and applied spiritual method of psychotherapy is suggested. Religious Cognitive- Emotional Therapy (RCET) is a new form of cognitive therapy that uses the basic religious beliefs and insights in psychotherapy. RCET is a new integration of cognitive, humanistic, and existential psychotherapies that takes into account religious beliefs and insights of the clients. RCET is an effective method of psychotherapy for the treatment of those who suffer from identity crisis, depression, and anxiety; and it can be developed to address other psychological disorders as well. Because RCET is a new approach, practically is needed to do further theoretical research in this area. PMID:22952497

  11. The influence of cognitive-behavioural stress management therapy on self-concept personality trait and negative emotions in women with Bulimia nervosa disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masiha Eskandari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The etiology of Bulimia nervosa disorder has not been determined yet. The somatic psychological problems need to be addressed in the treatment of these patients. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of cognitive-behavioural stress management training on self-concept personality trait and negative emotions in women with Bulimia nervosa disorder. Methods: The subjects consisted of 50 patients with Bulimia nervosa disorder that were randomly assigned to experimental (25 and control (25 groups. The experimental group received group cognitive behavioural therapy. The BSCT and DASS tests were performed on both groups before and after treatment. The results were analysed by MANCOVA. Results: In terms of self-concept, the results of pre-test and post-test in experimental group were (M: 53.44 and SD: 12.62 and (M:10.48 and SD:14.21, respectively, but for control group, the results of pre-test and post-test were (M: 50.64 and SD: 13.72 and (M: 49.56 and SD:13.75, respectively. In the case of negative emotions; the findings of pre-test and post-test for experimental group were (M: 12.76 and SD: 4.06 and (M:12.08 and SD: 4.06, respectively. However, the results of pre-test and post-test for control group were (M: 27.24 and SD: 4.17, and (M: 26.36 and SD: 4.09, respectively. Within-group comparisons indicated, the pre-test results of self-concept (M: 53.44 and SD: 12.62 were higher than those of the post-test (M: 10.48 and SD:14.21, and the pre-test results of negative emotions in experimental group (M:12.76 and SD:4.06 indicated a little change in the post-test (M:12.08 and SD: 4.06. Conclusion: This study showed that cognitive-behavioural therapy is effective for increasing the self-concept and decreasing negative emotions in patients with Bulimia nervosa disorder (P<0.000.

  12. Comparison of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise therapy, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, P D; Goldsmith, K A; Johnson, A L; Potts, L; Walwyn, R; DeCesare, J C; Baber, H L; Burgess, M; Clark, L V; Cox, D L; Bavinton, J; Angus, B J; Murphy, G; Murphy, M; O'Dowd, H; Wilks, D; McCrone, P; Chalder, T; Sharpe, M

    2011-03-05

    Trial findings show cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) can be effective treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome, but patients' organisations have reported that these treatments can be harmful and favour pacing and specialist health care. We aimed to assess effectiveness and safety of all four treatments. In our parallel-group randomised trial, patients meeting Oxford criteria for chronic fatigue syndrome were recruited from six secondary-care clinics in the UK and randomly allocated by computer-generated sequence to receive specialist medical care (SMC) alone or with adaptive pacing therapy (APT), CBT, or GET. Primary outcomes were fatigue (measured by Chalder fatigue questionnaire score) and physical function (measured by short form-36 subscale score) up to 52 weeks after randomisation, and safety was assessed primarily by recording all serious adverse events, including serious adverse reactions to trial treatments. Primary outcomes were rated by participants, who were necessarily unmasked to treatment assignment; the statistician was masked to treatment assignment for the analysis of primary outcomes. We used longitudinal regression models to compare SMC alone with other treatments, APT with CBT, and APT with GET. The final analysis included all participants for whom we had data for primary outcomes. This trial is registered at http://isrctn.org, number ISRCTN54285094. We recruited 641 eligible patients, of whom 160 were assigned to the APT group, 161 to the CBT group, 160 to the GET group, and 160 to the SMC-alone group. Compared with SMC alone, mean fatigue scores at 52 weeks were 3·4 (95% CI 1·8 to 5·0) points lower for CBT (p = 0·0001) and 3·2 (1·7 to 4·8) points lower for GET (p = 0·0003), but did not differ for APT (0·7 [-0·9 to 2·3] points lower; p = 0·38). Compared with SMC alone, mean physical function scores were 7·1 (2·0 to 12·1) points higher for CBT (p = 0·0068) and 9·4 (4·4 to 14·4) points higher

  13. The experiences of staff taking on the role of lay therapist in a group-based cognitive behavioural therapy anger management intervention for people with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stimpson, Aimée; Kroese, Biza Stenfert; MacMahon, Pamela; Rose, Nicola; Townson, Julia; Felce, David; Hood, Kerenza; Jahoda, Andrew; Rose, John; Willner, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To explore the experience of 'lay therapists' of a group-based cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) anger management intervention. Staff employed in daytime opportunity services for adults with intellectual disabilities took on the role of 'lay therapist' to facilitate CBT groups. They were trained and supervised by clinical psychologists and interviewed 2-6 weeks after the last group session. Their experiences were explored by means of a qualitative approach, interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA). Several key themes emerged from the interview data such as 'hopes and fears', 'having a framework', 'making it work', 'observing progress', 'ingredients of success', 'the therapist role' and 'taking the group forward'. These themes indicate that participants' experiences had been perceived as positive for themselves, the service users as well as the relevant organization although initially the therapist role had appeared daunting. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Cognitive-behavioural therapy with post-session D-cycloserine augmentation for paediatric obsessive-compulsive disorder: pilot randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataix-Cols, David; Turner, Cynthia; Monzani, Benedetta; Isomura, Kayoko; Murphy, Caroline; Krebs, Georgina; Heyman, Isobel

    2014-01-01

    A partial N-methyl-D-aspartate agonist, D-cycloserine, enhances fear extinction when given before or shortly after exposure to feared stimuli in animals. In this pilot double-blind placebo-controlled trial (trial number: ISRCTN70977225), 27 youth with obsessive-compulsive disorder were randomised to either 50 mg D-cycloserine or placebo administered immediately after each of ten cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) sessions, primarily consisting of exposure and ritual prevention. Both groups improved significantly and maintained their gains at 1-year follow-up, with no significant advantage of D-cycloserine over placebo at any time point. The effects of CBT may not be augmented or accelerated when D-cycloserine is administered after sessions.

  15. School based cognitive behavioural therapy targeting anxiety in children with autistic spectrum disorder: a quasi-experimental randomised controlled trail incorporating a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Chris; Hill, Vivian; Charman, Tony

    2016-04-30

    Children with a diagnosis of autism are more likely to experience anxiety than their typically developing peers. Research suggests that Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) could offer a way to help children with autism manage their anxiety but most evidence is based on clinical trials. This study investigated a school-based CBT programme using a quasi-experimental design incorporating the child and parent versions of the Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (Spence, J Abnorm Psy 106(2):280-297, 1997) and the Coping Scale for Children and Youth (Brodzinsky et al., J Appl Dev Psychol 13:195-214, 1992). Interview data was incorporated to help understand the process of change further. Children in the experimental condition had lower levels of anxiety, maintained at follow-up and changes were found in coping behaviours such as lower behavioural avoidance strategies but increased problem solving strategies at follow-up. Limitations of the research together with future directions are also discussed.

  16. A pilot evaluation on a stress management programme using a combined approach of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for elementary school teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Hector W H; Cheung, W M; Chan, Alan H L; Fung, Kelvin M T; Leung, Ada Y; Au, Doreen W H

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the efficacy of implementing a stress management programme based on a combined approach using cognitive behavioural therapy and complementary and alternative medicine for elementary school teachers who experienced mild level of stress, anxiety and/or depressive symptoms in Hong Kong. A 12-h programme involving cognitive behavioural therapy, self-management, relaxation techniques (diaphragmatic breathing and progressive muscle relaxation), mindful exercises (qigong and yoga), aromatherapy and acupressure was conducted. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare the intervention groups (n = 47) with the wait-list control groups (n = 46). The primary outcome measures were depression, anxiety and stress. Results indicated that the intervention group had significant reduction in depression [(F = 3.93; degrees of freedom (df) = 2.90; p = 0.023)], anxiety (F = 3.37; df = 2.90; p = 0.039) and stress (F = 3.63; df = 2.89; p = 0.031) when compared with the control group. Participants in both groups demonstrated lowered level of salivary cortisol at the post-assessment. The pilot results provided preliminary support to the multi-component stress management programme in relieving affective symptoms of teachers. The programme may be considered as an initial strategy to empower teachers with the abilities to cope with their affective symptoms. Further evaluation using a better designed randomized study with a larger sample size is warranted. (word: 198; max.: 200).

  17. Efficacy of technology-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for OCD versus control conditions, and in comparison with therapist-administered CBT: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dèttore, Davide; Pozza, Andrea; Andersson, Gerhard

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is a well-established treatment for obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, few patients receive CBT, due to factors such as geographic limitations, perceived stigmatization, and lack of CBT services. Technology-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (T-CBT) could be an effective strategy to improve patients' access to CBT. To date, a meta-analysis on the effectiveness of T-CBT for OCD has not been conducted. This study used meta-analytic techniques to summarize evidence on the efficacy of T-CBT for OCD versus control conditions and therapist-administered CBT. A meta-analysis according to Prisma guidelines was conducted on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of T-CBT for OCD. Treatment was classified as T-CBT if evidence-based CBT active ingredients for OCD were included (psychoeducation, ERP, and cognitive restructuring), delivered through health technologies (e.g. self-help books, leaflets, and other forms of bibliotherapy) or remote communication technologies (e.g. the Internet, web-cameras, telephones, telephone-interactive voice response systems, and CD-ROMS). Studies using validated outcomes for OCD or depression were included. Eight trials were included (N = 420). Two trials were classified as at high risk of bias. T-CBT seemed to be superior to control conditions on OCD symptom outcomes at post-treatment (d = 0.82, 99% CI = 0.55-1.08, p = 0.001), but not on comorbid depression (d = 0.33, 99% CI = - 0.01-0.67, p = 0.020). Difference in the efficacy on OCD symptoms between T-CBT and therapist-administered CBT was not significant, despite a trend favouring therapist-administered CBT emerged (d = 0.45, 95% CI = 0.03-0.87, p = 0.033). Directions for research are discussed. Further RCTs are warranted to examine the efficacy of T-CBT for OCD.

  18. The question of representation in the psychoanalytical and cognitive-behavioural approaches. Some theoretical aspects and therapy considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eDe Timary

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the cognitive-behavioural and psychoanalytical approaches with respect to the way in which each of them conceives of representation and deals with the issues that this involves. In both of them conscious and latent (unconscious representations play a crucial role. Highlighting similarities and differences facilitate communication on a theoretical level but also prove helpful to the clinical practitioners involved. We try to put forward an attempt at comparison, with the idea of going beyond the -- obviously important -- differences in vocabulary. In this attempt at comparison, we have successively compared the definitions of representation and the respective therapeutic interventions proposed by each approach. There are no doubt many overlapping elements in the way in which the workings of the mind are conceived of in these approaches, particularly as regards their links with affects. We next developed the implications of representation deficits in pathology, suggesting the important role played by elements that are avoided, suppressed from memory or repressed, and with respect to the need to treat such material in a specific manner so as to ensure some progress as to the symptoms presented. We finally summarized common and distinct aspects of the two perspectives. The very fact that two approaches that follow very distinct methodologies reach the same conclusion concerning the importance of distortions and failures of representation in generating mental distress strengthens, in our view, the epistemological reliability of the role of representation in psychopathology.

  19. "I've Lost My Husband, My House and I Need a New Knee...Why Should I Smile?": Action Research Evaluation of a Group Cognitive Behavioural Therapy Program for Older Adults with Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Lisa; Reid, Corinne

    2006-01-01

    The current paper details an action research approach to developing and evaluating a group cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) program for older adults (65+ years) experiencing depression. This approach allowed the development of a novel program and for each component of the program to be evaluated and modified in an iterative, developmental…

  20. Fatigue In Teenagers on the interNET--the FITNET Trial. A randomized clinical trial of web-based cognitive behavioural therapy for adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome: study protocol. [ISRCTN59878666

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, S.L.; Bleijenberg, G.; Uiterwaal, C.S.; Kimpen, J.L.L.; Putte, E.M. van de

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is increasingly recognized as a cause of disability and inactivity in adolescents in the Netherlands. CFS is characterized by unexplained fatigue lasting more than 6 months. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) has proven to be effective. However, CBT availa

  1. Introducing an alternative drug-free technique for pain and anxiety control into a clinical environment cognitive behavioural therapy: a discussion on implementation into dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Elin

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacological methods of pain and anxiety control include local anaesthesia and conscious sedation techniques. On occasion the anxiety levels of some patients are so extreme that alternative methods of pain and anxiety control are required.The provision of conscious sedation and even in extreme cases general anesthetic can be useful. These methods are usually very effective in treating nervous patients and offering sedation services helps patients seek dental treatment more readily. However, by decreasing the demand for conscious sedation and certainly the demand for general anaesthetics the risks associated, waiting lists and costs incurred will also be diminished. Despite recent advances in dental techniques and the provision of sedation services there has not been a marked decrease in dental anxiety within the general population.This could be because the anxieties are not being dealt with; they are just being managed by these techniques and patients still cannot cope with having dental treatment without these pharmacological methods. Cognitive behavioural therapy is a non-invasive psychological intervention therapy. Psychological therapies have been shown to decrease dental anxiety.Therefore this therapy could be used to potentially decrease the demand for sedation. Implementing this into a general practice setting could certainly help a number of nervous but motivated patients. It also may improve waiting lists and costs from sedation procedures.The end goal is to help patients receive routine dental care with decreased pharmacological support. It is, however, important for dentists providing this to have sufficient and appropriate training.

  2. Effect of aerobic exercise training and cognitive behavioural therapy on reduction of chronic fatigue in patients with facioscapulohumeral dystrophy: protocol of the FACTS-2-FSHD trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Engelen Baziel GM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In facioscapulohumeral dystrophy (FSHD muscle function is impaired and declines over time. Currently there is no effective treatment available to slow down this decline. We have previously reported that loss of muscle strength contributes to chronic fatigue through a decreased level of physical activity, while fatigue and physical inactivity both determine loss of societal participation. To decrease chronic fatigue, two distinctly different therapeutic approaches can be proposed: aerobic exercise training (AET to improve physical capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT to stimulate an active life-style yet avoiding excessive physical strain. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-FSHD (acronym for Fitness And Cognitive behavioural TherapieS/for Fatigue and ACTivitieS in FSHD trial is to study the effect of AET and CBT on the reduction of chronic fatigue as assessed with the Checklist Individual Strength subscale fatigue (CIS-fatigue in patients with FSHD. Additionally, possible working mechanisms and the effects on various secondary outcome measures at all levels of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF are evaluated. Methods/Design A multi-centre, assessor-blinded, randomized controlled trial is conducted. A sample of 75 FSHD patients with severe chronic fatigue (CIS-fatigue ≥ 35 will be recruited and randomized to one of three groups: (1 AET + usual care, (2 CBT + usual care or (3 usual care alone, which consists of no therapy at all or occasional (conventional physical therapy. After an intervention period of 16 weeks and a follow-up of 3 months, the third (control group will as yet be randomized to either AET or CBT (approximately 7 months after inclusion. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 3 and 6 months follow up. Discussion The FACTS-2-FSHD study is the first theory-based randomized clinical trial which evaluates the effect and the

  3. Effects of aerobic exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy on functioning and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: protocol of the FACTS-2-ALS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van de Weerd Margreet GH

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex, leading to muscle weakness. Muscle weakness may result in the avoidance of physical activity, which exacerbates disuse weakness and cardiovascular deconditioning. The impact of the grave prognosis may result in depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Since there is no cure for ALS, optimal treatment is based on symptom management and preservation of quality of life (QoL, provided in a multidisciplinary setting. Two distinctly different therapeutic interventions may be effective to improve or preserve daily functioning and QoL at the highest achievable level: aerobic exercise therapy (AET to maintain or enhance functional capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT to improve coping style and cognitions in patients with ALS. However, evidence to support either approach is still insufficient, and the underlying mechanisms of the approaches remain poorly understood. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-ALS trial is to study the effects of AET and CBT, in addition to usual care, compared to usual care alone, on functioning and QoL in patients with ALS. Methods / Design A multicentre, single-blinded, randomized controlled trial with a postponed information model will be conducted. A sample of 120 patients with ALS (1 month post diagnosis will be recruited from 3 university hospitals and 1 rehabilitation centre. Patients will be randomized to one of three groups i.e. (1 AET + usual care, (2 CBT + usual care, (3 Usual care. AET consists of a 16-week aerobic exercise programme, on 3 days a week. CBT consists of individual psychological support of patients in 5 to 10 sessions over a 16-week period. QoL, functioning and secondary outcome measures will be assessed at baseline, immediately post intervention and at 3- and 6-months follow-up. Discussion The FACTS-2-ALS study is the first

  4. The People with Asperger syndrome and anxiety disorders (PAsSA) trial: a pilot multicentre, single-blind randomised trial of group cognitive-behavioural therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Peter E; Murphy, Glynis H; Shepstone, Lee; Wilson, Edward C F; Fowler, David; Heavens, David; Malovic, Aida; Russell, Alexandra; Rose, Alice; Mullineaux, Louise

    2016-03-01

    There is a growing interest in using cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) with people who have Asperger syndrome and comorbid mental health problems. To examine whether modified group CBT for clinically significant anxiety in an Asperger syndrome population is feasible and likely to be efficacious. Using a randomised assessor-blind trial, 52 individuals with Asperger syndrome were randomised into a treatment arm or a waiting-list control arm. After 24 weeks, those in the waiting-list control arm received treatment, while those initially randomised to treatment were followed up for 24 weeks. The conversion rate for this trial was high (1.6:1), while attrition was 13%. After 24 weeks, there was no significant difference between those randomised to the treatment arm compared with those randomised to the waiting-list control arm on the primary outcome measure, the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety. Trials of psychological therapies with this population are feasible. Larger definitive trials are now needed. None. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC BY) licence.

  5. Caring For Me and You: the co-production of a computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (cCBT) package for carers of people with dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Susie A; Fossey, Jane

    2017-07-10

    Carers of people with dementia face barriers in accessing therapy for mental health difficulties. Computerised cognitive behavioural therapy (cCBT) packages can be effective in treating a range of presentations; however, tailored packages for carers' unique needs are lacking. Our aim was to design a cCBT package for carers to address the limitations of previous online interventions, by including users and experts as consultants and collaborators throughout the project. We adopted a three-phase approach to the development process. Firstly, a data-gathering phase in which current literature and best practice was reviewed, and semi-structured interviews conducted with service users, academic and clinical experts. Secondly, a co-production and refinement phase with carers testing materials and providing feedback. Thirdly, a pilot field testing phase of service users and the research team testing the package. The 'Caring For Me and You' package adopted a transdiagnostic approach to take account of the range of difficulties that carers face. The package consisted of 20 short sessions with features built in to engage users and personalise content to meet individuals' needs. User involvement was central to the design of the 'Caring For Me and You' package which is currently being evaluated in a three-arm randomised controlled trial.

  6. Guided parent-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for children with anxiety disorders: Outcomes at 3- to 5-year follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Alexandra; Creswell, Cathy; Barker, Chris; Butler, Stephen; Cooper, Peter; Hobbs, Catherine; Thirlwall, Kerstin

    2017-06-01

    Brief guided parent-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) has been developed to meet the demand for non-intensive interventions for children with anxiety disorders, and initial trials have shown it to be effective for children with a range of anxiety disorders. This study examined outcomes 3-5 years post-treatment. A long-term follow-up (LTFU) cohort study. Families who (1) completed at least 50% of allocated treatment sessions of guided parent-delivered CBT for childhood anxiety as part of a randomized control trial (RCT), (2) provided consent to be recontacted, (3) had not received further mental health interventions, and (4) were contactable were invited to take part. Fifty-seven families (29% of the original sample) completed structured diagnostic interviews on average 50 months after treatment (39-61 months). At LTFU, 79% of the assessed children who had received the treatment no longer met criteria for their primary diagnosis, 63% did not meet criteria for any anxiety disorder, and 61% did not meet criteria for any DSM-IV disorder. Treatment gains were mostly maintained (60%), and some children went on to recover during the follow-up period without additional input from mental health services (19%). Few young people had relapsed since their last assessment (12%). Mean scores on standardized symptom questionnaires were within the normal range. Children who recovered from anxiety disorders following brief guided parent-delivered CBT typically maintained good outcomes and few relapsed. These findings suggest that this is a viable first-line, low-intensity treatment approach. This study only included a small subsample of those in the original RCT (29%), and more information is required about those who dropped out of treatment and those who required further intervention immediately after treatment. Treatment gains from brief guided parent-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for children with anxiety are maintained for most children 3-5 years later. The

  7. Using mobile technology to deliver a cognitive behaviour therapy-informed intervention in early psychosis (Actissist): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, Sandra; Barrowclough, Christine; Ainsworth, John; Morris, Rohan; Berry, Katherine; Machin, Matthew; Emsley, Richard; Lewis, Shon; Edge, Dawn; Buchan, Iain; Haddock, Gillian

    2015-09-10

    Cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) is recommended for the treatment of psychosis; however, only a small proportion of service users have access to this intervention. Smartphone technology using software applications (apps) could increase access to psychological approaches for psychosis. This paper reports the protocol development for a clinical trial of smartphone-based CBT. We present a study protocol that describes a single-blind randomised controlled trial comparing a cognitive behaviour therapy-informed software application (Actissist) plus Treatment As Usual (TAU) with a symptom monitoring software application (ClinTouch) plus TAU in early psychosis. The study consists of a 12-week intervention period. We aim to recruit and randomly assign 36 participants registered with early intervention services (EIS) across the North West of England, UK in a 2:1 ratio to each arm of the trial. Our primary objective is to determine whether in people with early psychosis the Actissist app is feasible to deliver and acceptable to use. Secondary aims are to determine whether Actissist impacts on predictors of first episode psychosis (FEP) relapse and enhances user empowerment, functioning and quality of life. Assessments will take place at baseline, 12 weeks (post-treatment) and 22-weeks (10 weeks post-treatment) by assessors blind to treatment condition. The trial will report on the feasibility and acceptability of Actissist and compare outcomes between the randomised arms. The study also incorporates semi-structured interviews about the experience of participating in the Actissist trial that will be qualitatively analysed to inform future developments of the Actissist protocol and app. To our knowledge, this is the first controlled trial to test the feasibility, acceptability, uptake, attrition and potential efficacy of a CBT-informed smartphone app for early psychosis. Mobile applications designed to deliver a psychologically-informed intervention offer new possibilities to

  8. Online group-based cognitive-behavioural therapy for adolescents and young adults after cancer treatment: A multicenter randomised controlled trial of Recapture Life-AYA

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    Sansom-Daly Ursula M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cancer diagnosis is 2.9 times more likely to occur during the adolescent and young adult years than in younger children. This spike in incidence coincides with a life stage characterised by psychological vulnerability as young people strive to attain numerous, critical developmental milestones. The distress young people experience after cancer treatment seriously jeopardises their ability to move into well-functioning adulthood. Methods/Design This article presents the protocol of the Recapture Life study, a phase II three-arm randomised controlled trial designed to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of a new intervention in reducing distress and improving quality of life for adolescent and young adult cancer survivors. The novel intervention, “ReCaPTure LiFe” will be compared to a both a wait-list, and a peer-support group control. Ninety young people aged 15–25 years who have completed cancer treatment in the past 1–6 months will be recruited from hospitals around Australia. Those randomised to receive Recapture Life will participate in six, weekly, 90-minute online group sessions led by a psychologist, involving peer-discussion around cognitive-behavioural coping skills (including: behavioural activation, thought challenging, communication and assertiveness skills training, problem-solving and goal-setting. Participants randomised to the peer-support group control will receive non-directive peer support delivered in an identical manner. Participants will complete psychosocial measures at baseline, post-intervention, and 12-months post-intervention. The primary outcome will be quality of life. Secondary outcomes will include depression, anxiety, stress, family functioning, coping, and cancer-related identity. Discussion This article reviews the empirical rationale for using group-based, online cognitive-behavioural therapy in young people after cancer treatment. The potential challenges of delivering skills

  9. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Schools: The Role of Educational Psychology in the Dissemination of Empirically Supported Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, John

    2010-01-01

    Educational psychology has recently experienced something of a revival in the provision of psychological therapy. This revival has aligned with general developments in evidence-based psychology. A product of this has been more frequent delivery of empirically supported therapies in practice settings, for example, anxiety reduction programmes in…

  10. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Schools: The Role of Educational Psychology in the Dissemination of Empirically Supported Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, John

    2010-01-01

    Educational psychology has recently experienced something of a revival in the provision of psychological therapy. This revival has aligned with general developments in evidence-based psychology. A product of this has been more frequent delivery of empirically supported therapies in practice settings, for example, anxiety reduction programmes in…

  11. Emotional impact in β-thalassaemia major children following cognitive-behavioural family therapy and quality of life of caregiving mothers

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    Romeo Maria

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cognitive-Behavioural Family Therapy (CBFT can be an effective psychological approach for children with β-thalassaemia major, increasing compliance to treatment, lessening the emotional burden of disease, and improving the quality of life of caregivers. Design and methods Twenty-eight β-thalassaemic major children that followed CBFT for one year were compared with twenty-eight age-matched healthy children, focusing particularly on behavioural, mood, and temperamental characteristics as well as compliance with chelation, assessed using the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL, Children's Depression Inventory (CDI, Multidimensional Anxiety Scale for Children (MASC, and Emotionality, Activity, Sociability and Shyness Scale (EAS. We also monitored the quality of life of caregiving mothers using the World Health Organization Quality Of Life (WHOQOL-BREF questionnaire. Data were analysed with non-parametric standard descriptive statistics. Results 90% of β-Thalassaemic children showed good compliance with chelation therapy; however they had significantly increased somatic complains, physical symptoms and separation panic. Moreover, temperamental assessment revealed high emotionality and poor sociability in treated thalassaemic children and in their mothers. Physical and psychological domains concerning individual's overall perception of quality of life resulted impaired in mothers of β-thalassaemic children. Conclusion CBFT can be a valid tool to increase the compliance with chelation therapy in β-thalassaemic children; however, treated children continue to show an important emotional burden; moreover, CBFT therapy seems not to have any positive impact on the quality of life of caregiving mothers, who may therefore need additional psychological support.

  12. Research Protocol: Development, implementation and evaluation of a cognitive behavioural therapy-based intervention programme for the management of anxiety symptoms in South African children with visual impairments

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    Lisa Visagie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Childhood anxiety presents a serious mental health problem, and it is one of the most common forms of psychological distress reported by youth worldwide. The prevalence of anxiety symptoms amongst South African youth is reported to be significantly higher than in other parts of the world. These high prevalence rates become even more significant when viewed in terms of children with visual impairments, as it is suggested that children with physical disabilities may be more prone, than their non-disabled peers, for the development of psychological difficulties. Objectives: The main aim of this study is to develop, implement and evaluate a specifically tailored anxiety intervention programme for use with South African children with visual impairments. Method: A specifically tailored cognitive-behavioural therapy-based anxiety intervention, for 9–13 year old South African children with visual impairments, will be evaluated in two special schools. The study will employ a randomised wait-list control group design with pre- postand follow-up intervention measures, with two groups each receiving a 10 session anxiety intervention programme. The main outcome measure relates to the participants’ symptoms of anxiety as indicated on the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale. Conclusion: If the anxiety intervention programme is found to be effective in reducing symptoms of anxiety, this universal intervention will lay down the foundation upon which future contextually sensitive (South African anxiety intervention programmes can be built.

  13. Neurorehabilitation and cognitive-behaviour therapy of anxiety disorders after brain injury: An overview and a case illustration of obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, W H; Evans, J J; Fleminger, S

    2003-01-01

    Survivors of acquired and traumatic brain injuries may often experience anxiety states. Psychological reactions to neurological trauma may be caused by a complex interaction of a host of factors. We explore how anxiety states may be understood in terms of a biopsychosocial formulation of such factors. We also review the current evidence for the presence of specific anxiety disorders after brain injury. We then describe how cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT), a treatment of choice for many anxiety disorders, may be integrated with cognitive rehabilitation (CR), for the management of anxiety disorders in brain injury. We illustrate how CBT and CR may be delivered with a case of a survivor of traumatic brain injury (TBI) who had developed obsessive compulsive disorder and health anxiety. We show how CBT plus CR allows a biopsychosocial formulation to be developed of the survivor's concerns for guiding a goal-based intervention. The survivor made significant gains from intervention in terms of goals achieved and changes on clinical measures. We argue that large-scale research is needed for developing an evidence base for managing emotional disorders in brain injury.

  14. Increased skills usage statistically mediates symptom reduction in self-guided internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for depression and anxiety: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terides, Matthew D; Dear, Blake F; Fogliati, Vincent J; Gandy, Milena; Karin, Eyal; Jones, Michael P; Titov, Nickolai

    2017-07-20

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for clinical and subclinical symptoms of depression and general anxiety, and increases life satisfaction. Patients' usage of CBT skills is a core aspect of treatment but there is insufficient empirical evidence suggesting that skills usage behaviours are a mechanism of clinical change. This study investigated if an internet-delivered CBT (iCBT) intervention increased the frequency of CBT skills usage behaviours and if this statistically mediated reductions in symptoms and increased life satisfaction. A two-group randomised controlled trial was conducted comparing internet-delivered CBT (n = 65) with a waitlist control group (n = 75). Participants were individuals experiencing clinically significant symptoms of depression or general anxiety. Mixed-linear models analyses revealed that the treatment group reported a significantly higher frequency of skills usage, lower symptoms, and higher life satisfaction by the end of treatment compared with the control group. Results from bootstrapping mediation analyses revealed that the increased skills usage behaviours statistically mediated symptom reductions and increased life satisfaction. Although skills usage and symptom outcomes were assessed concurrently, these findings support the notion that iCBT increases the frequency of skills usage behaviours and suggest that this may be an important mechanism of change.

  15. A critique of the representation of human suffering in the cognitive behavioural therapy literature with implications for mental health nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, A

    2011-02-01

    This paper is informed by interpretivist understandings and practices, and the author's own conversion to interpretivist writing practice. The aim of the paper is to critique the ways in which suffering people are represented in the mainstream cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) literature with a view to identifying some implications for mental health nursing practice. It will begin by identifying key assumptions governing the textual portrayal of human experience, and will argue that the language used to describe human suffering is a potential site for struggles over meaning and more adequate representation. However, reductionist portrayals of individuals and their problems have largely gone unchallenged in much of the CBT literature since its early development in the 1970s. This is arguably because of the socialization of new members of the CBT community into established cultural and textual practices. A comparison of reductionist CBT writing with more fleshed out, more fully human possibilities will further clarify that forms of representation are never neutral, given the danger of reductionist representations facilitating reductionist interventions. The paper will end with the following emerging implications for mental health nursing practice: the therapeutic power of self-narratives, narrative research and the recovery movement, and the promising possibilities for autoethnographic research for mental health nurses and for day to day interactions between nurses and service users. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing.

  16. Family-focused cognitive behaviour therapy versus psycho-education for chronic fatigue syndrome in 11- to 18-year-olds: a randomized controlled treatment trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalder, T; Deary, V; Husain, K; Walwyn, R

    2010-08-01

    Only one previous randomized controlled trial (RCT) has examined the efficacy of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in children. The aim of this study was to compare family-focused CBT with psycho-education for CFS in adolescents. Sixty-three 11- to 18-year-olds (43 girls, 20 boys) with CFS were randomly assigned to either family-focused CBT or psycho-education delivered over 6 months. School attendance was the main outcome, which was assessed at the end of treatment and at 3, 6 and 12 months follow-up. At the main outcome point (the 6-month follow-up) both groups had improved similarly. However, although those who received family-focused CBT were attending school for longer than those who received psycho-education, at discharge from treatment and at 3 months follow-up, they improved less quickly across the follow-up period. Adolescents with CFS get back to school more quickly after family-focused CBT. This is important as they are at a crucial stage of their development. However, the finding that psycho-education was as effective as family-focused CBT at 6 and 12 months follow-up has important implications for health service delivery.

  17. Reducing therapist contact in cognitive behaviour therapy for panic disorder and agoraphobia in primary care: global measures of outcome in a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D M; Power, K G; Swanson, V

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Panic disorder, with and without agoraphobia, is a prevalent condition presenting in general practice. Psychological treatments are effective but are limited by restricted availability. Interest has grown in methods by which the efficiency and thus availability of psychological treatments can be improved, with particular emphasis on reduced therapist contact formats. AIM: To evaluate the relative efficacy in a primary care setting of a cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) delivered at three levels of therapist contact: standard contact, minimum contact, and bibliotherapy. METHOD: A total of 104 patients were randomly allocated to receive standard therapist contact, minimum therapist contact or bibliotherapy, with 91 patients completing treatment. All patients received an identical treatment manual and were seen by the same psychologist therapist. Outcome was reported in terms of brief global ratings of severity of illness, change in symptoms, and levels of social disruption. These brief measures were chosen to be suitable for use in general practice and were used at treatment entry and endpoint. RESULTS: The standard therapist contact group had the strongest and most comprehensive treatment response, showing significant differences from the bibliotherapy group on all, and the minimum therapist contact group on some, endpoint measures. Some reduction in efficacy was therefore found for the reduced therapist contact groups. CONCLUSION: The standard therapist contact group showed the greatest treatment efficacy in the present study. As it was of notably shorter duration than many other current formulations of CBT, it represents a useful and efficient treatment for panic disorder and agoraphobia in primary care. PMID:11224967

  18. Evaluation of the effects of individual and group cognitive behavioural therapy and of psychiatric rehabilitation on hopelessness of depressed adults: a comparative analysis.

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    Gudmundsdottir, R M; Thome, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of individual and group cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and of psychiatric rehabilitation (PR) on hopelessness for depressed patients in a rehabilitation setting. Three groups of patients who underwent PR were allocated to individual CBT combined with PR (n = 43), group CBT combined with PR (n = 52) or PR only (n = 22). Hopelessness was assessed by the Beck Hopelessness Scale (BHS). The majority of the patients (68.4%) suffered from moderate to severe hopelessness before treatment (score ≥ 9-20). Results showed that the pretest mean score on the BHS decreased from 11. 57 (SD = 5.58) to 7.46 (SD = 5.20) at posttest. The mean scores on the BHS decreased in all groups under nine. The combination of individual CBT and PR was significantly more effective in reducing hopelessness than group CBT with PR or PR only. Group CBT combined with PR was not significantly more effective than PR only. It is concluded that individual CBT combined with PR is more effective in alleviating hopelessness among depressed patients than group CBT with PR or PR only. CBT can be delivered by an interdisciplinary team including advanced psychiatric nurses.

  19. Food for thought: a pilot study of the pros and cons of changing eating patterns within cognitive-behavioural therapy for the eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Glenn; Evans, Jane; Pugh, Matthew

    2013-09-01

    Evidence-based cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for the eating disorders has an early focus on behavioural changes around food intake. However, patients' anxiety around such change might account for why they often seem unmotivated in treatment. In order to determine the impact of changing intake, this pilot study of patients with bulimic disorders (N = 19) or anorexia nervosa (N = 9) used a mixed quantitative and qualitative design to retrospectively examine their perspectives of the short- and long-term pros and cons of such change. As expected, change was seen negatively in the short-term (with particularly high numbers reporting anxiety), but there were few reports of long-term negative outcomes. In contrast, there were both short- and long-term benefits of changing eating. The patients described what was helpful in making changes and what they had learned as a result. In both cases, their descriptions mapped closely onto the content and process of evidence-based CBT for the eating disorders. Although there is a need for more extensive research, these findings suggest that patients (and therapists) might benefit from being aware of the contrast between the short- and the long-term pros and cons of changing eating within CBT for the eating disorders.

  20. Manual-guided cognitive-behavioural therapy for insomnia delivered by ordinary primary care personnel in general medical practice: a randomized controlled effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bothelius, Kristoffer; Kyhle, Kicki; Espie, Colin A; Broman, Jan-Erik

    2013-12-01

    Chronic insomnia is a prevalent problem in primary health care and tends to be more serious than insomnia in the general population. These patients often obtain little benefit from hypnotics, and are frequently open to exploring various options for medical treatment. However, most general practitioners (GPs) are unable to provide such options. Several meta-analyses have shown that cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia results in solid improvements on sleep parameters, and a few studies have demonstrated promising results for nurse-administered CBT in primary care. The aim of this randomized controlled study was to investigate the clinical effectiveness of manual-guided CBT for insomnia delivered by ordinary primary care personnel in general medical practice with unselected patients. Sixty-six primary care patients with insomnia were randomized to CBT or a waiting-list control group. The CBT group improved significantly more than the control group using the Insomnia Severity Index as the outcome. The effect size was high. Sleep diaries showed a significant, medium-sized treatment effect for sleep onset latency and wake time after sleep onset. However, for all measures there is a marked deterioration at follow-up assessments. Almost half of the treated subjects (47%) reported a clinically relevant treatment effect directly after treatment. It is concluded that this way of delivering treatment may be cost-effective.

  1. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Bulimia Nervosa and Eating Disorders Not Otherwise Specified: Translation from Randomized Controlled Trial to a Clinical Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Sarah; Woodward, Debbie; Hoefkens, Antonia; Limbert, Caroline

    2015-11-01

    Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT-E) (Fairburn, Cooper and Shafran, 2003) was developed as a treatment approach for eating disorders focusing on both core psychopathology and additional maintenance mechanisms. To evaluate treatment outcomes associated with CBT-E in a NHS Eating Disorders Service for adults with bulimia and atypical eating disorders and to make comparisons with a previously published randomized controlled trial (Fairburn et al., 2009) and "real world" evaluation (Byrne, Fursland, Allen and Watson, 2011). Participants were referred to the eating disorder service between 2002 and 2011. They were aged between 18-65 years, registered with a General Practitioner within the catchment area, and had experienced symptoms fulfilling criteria for BN or EDNOS for a minimum of 6 months. CBT-E was commenced by 272 patients, with 135 completing treatment. Overall, treatment was associated with significant improvements in eating disorder and associated psychopathology, for both treatment completers and the intention to treat sample. Findings support dissemination of CBT-E in this context, with significant improvements in eating disorder psychopathology. Improvements to global EDE-Q scores were higher for treatment completers and lower for the intention to treat sample, compared to previous studies (Fairburn et al., 2009; Byrne et al., 2011). Level of attrition was found at 40.8% and non-completion of treatment was associated with higher levels of anxiety. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed.

  2. Internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy v. conventional guided self-help for bulimia nervosa: long-term evaluation of a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Gudrun; Penelo, Eva; Wanner, Christian; Gwinner, Paulina; Trofaier, Marie-Louise; Imgart, Hartmut; Waldherr, Karin; Wöber-Bingöl, Ciçek; Karwautz, Andreas F K

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT)-based guided self-help is recommended as a first step in the treatment of bulimia nervosa. To evaluate in a randomised controlled trial (Clinicaltrials.gov registration number: NCT00461071) the long-term effectiveness of internet-based guided self-help (INT-GSH) compared with conventional guided bibliotherapy (BIB-GSH) in females with bulimia nervosa. A total of 155 participants were randomly assigned to INT-GSH or BIB-GSH for 7 months. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, month 4, month 7 and month 18. The greatest improvement was reported after 4 months with a continued reduction in eating disorder symptomatology reported at month 7 and 18. After 18 months, 14.6% (n = 7/48) of the participants in the INT-GSH group and 25% (n = 7/28) in the BIB-GSH group were abstinent from binge eating and compensatory measures, 43.8% (n = 21/48) and 39.2% (n = 11/28) respectively were in remission. No differences regarding outcome between the two groups were found. Internet-based guided self-help for bulimia nervosa was not superior compared with bibliotherapy, the gold standard of self-help. Improvements remain stable in the long term.

  3. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) programmes for anxiety or depression in adults with intellectual disabilities: A review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Gemma; Tsimopoulou, Ioanna; Kroese, Biza Stenfert; Azmi, Sabiha

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the application of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to people with intellectual disabilities (ID). This review sought to synthesise available evidence on the effectiveness of CBT for anxiety or depression to assess the current level of evidence and make recommendations for future research. A comprehensive systematic literature search was conducted to identify qualitative and quantitative studies. Robust criteria were applied to select papers that were relevant to the review. Included papers were subject to quality appraisal. Eleven out of the 223 studies considered met our inclusion criteria and were included in the review in which CBT was used with participants with ID and anxiety (n=3), depression (n=4) or a mixed clinical presentation (n=4). There remains a paucity of evidence of effectiveness, however, the studies indicate that CBT is feasible and well-tolerated and may be effective in reducing symptoms of depression among adults with mild ID. Qualitative data reflect a positive perception of CBT amongst clients and carers. Further research is required to investigate the components of CBT, suitability for CBT, and requisite skills for CBT, which uses valid, sensitive and more holistic outcome measures.

  4. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of a school based cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT intervention to prevent depression in high risk adolescents (PROMISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayal Kapil

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression in adolescents is a significant problem that impairs everyday functioning and increases the risk of severe mental health disorders in adulthood. Relatively few adolescents with depression are identified and referred for treatment indicating the need to investigate alternative preventive approaches. Study Design A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of a school based prevention programme on symptoms of depression in "high risk" adolescents (aged 12-16. The unit of allocation is year groups (n = 28 which are assigned to one of three conditions: an active intervention based upon cognitive behaviour therapy, attention control or treatment as usual. Assessments will be undertaken at screening, baseline, 6 months and 12 months. The primary outcome measure is change on the Short Mood and Feeling Questionnaire at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures will assess changes in negative thoughts, self esteem, anxiety, school connectedness, peer attachment, alcohol and substance misuse, bullying and self harm. Discussion As of August 2010, all 28 year groups (n = 5023 had been recruited and the assigned interventions delivered. Final 12 month assessments are scheduled to be completed by March 2011. Trial Registration ISRCTN19083628

  5. Principles and Practice of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy in Working with Parents of Young Children with Behavior Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, Mani; Smith, Marita

    1996-01-01

    Describes a pragmatic approach using cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) to help correct parents' dysfunctional cognitions and strengthen confidence in parenting. Details three components of CBT: (1) focusing on positive behavior; (2) ignoring negative behavior if not dangerous; and (3) using special time. Notes that positive reinforcement is key to…

  6. The STRIDE (Strategies to Increase confidence, InDependence and Energy) study: cognitive behavioural therapy-based intervention to reduce fear of falling in older fallers living in the community - study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Steve W; Deary, Vincent; Finch, Tracy; Bamford, Claire; Sabin, Neil; McMeekin, Peter; O'Brien, John; Caldwell, Alma; Steen, Nick; Whitney, Susan L; Macdonald, Claire; McColl, Elaine

    2014-06-06

    Around 30% to 62% of older individuals fall each year, with adverse consequences of falls being by no means limited to physical injury and escalating levels of dependence. Many older individuals suffer from a variety of adverse psychosocial difficulties related to falling including fear, anxiety, loss of confidence and subsequent increasing activity avoidance, social isolation and frailty. Such 'fear of falling' is common and disabling, but definitive studies examining the effective management of the syndrome are lacking. Cognitive behavioural therapy has been trialed with some success in a group setting, but there is no adequately powered randomised controlled study of an individually based cognitive behavioural therapy intervention, and none using non-mental health professionals to deliver the intervention. We are conducting a two-phase study examining the role of individual cognitive behavioural therapy delivered by healthcare assistants in improving fear of falling in older adults. In Phase I, the intervention was developed and taught to healthcare assistants, while Phase II is the pragmatic randomised controlled study examining the efficacy of the intervention in improving fear of falling in community-dwelling elders attending falls services. A qualitative process evaluation study informed by Normalization Process Theory is being conducted throughout to examine the potential promoters and inhibitors of introducing such an intervention into routine clinical practice, while a health economic sub-study running alongside the trial is examining the costs and benefits of such an approach to the wider health economy. Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN78396615.

  7. Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy for post-disaster distress in post-traumatic stress symptoms after Chilean earthquake and tsunami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Bianchi, Marcelo; Cornejo, Felipe; Fresno, Andrés; Rojas, Carolina; Serrano, Camila

    2017-10-05

    This is the first time that the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural therapy for post-disaster stress (CBT-PD) in symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been tested outside the United States of America. Quasi-experiment with three groups. In the quasi-control group, complete CBT-PD was applied even though its members did not have PTSD; in quasi-experimental conditions, participants received complete treatment because they had this diagnosis; and in the third group, participants with PTSD received an abbreviated treatment (double sessions) due to organisational requirements. Primary health care workers in Constitución (Chile), city exposed to earthquake and tsunami; public department workers in Talca (city exposed only to earthquake) and teachers from a school (Constitución). A total of 13 of the 91 people diagnosed with PTSD participated. In addition, 16 people without diagnosis voluntarily participated. The treatment was completed by 29 participants. There were no dropouts. Only 1 of the 9 participants in the quasi-experimental group did not respond to treatment. CBT-PD is a group therapy (10-12 sessions) that includes psychoeducation, breathing retraining, behavioural activation and cognitive restructuring. CBT-PD (complete and abbreviated) was applied between September and December 2010. Short Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Rating Interview (SPRINT-E) was used to measure PTSD symptoms before and after treatment. The group that received the complete treatment and was diagnosed with PTSD showed a significant decrease in the total symptoms to below dangerous levels (IGAAB: 31.556; p<0.01; 95%CI: 0.21-2.01]; η(2)=0.709). The effectiveness and benefits of incorporating CBT-PD in the health network after events like disasters were discussed. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. The Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy Strategies Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, Bryce D.; Weisz, John R.

    2010-01-01

    Most everyday child and adolescent psychotherapy does not follow manuals that document the procedures. Consequently, usual clinical care has remained poorly understood and rarely studied. The Therapy Process Observational Coding System for Child Psychotherapy-Strategies scale (TPOCS-S) is an observational measure of youth psychotherapy procedures…

  9. Asperger syndrome and anxiety disorders (PAsSA) treatment trial: a study protocol of a pilot, multicentre, single-blind, randomised crossover trial of group cognitive behavioural therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langdon, Peter E; Murphy, Glynis H; Wilson, Edward; Shepstone, Lee; Fowler, David; Heavens, David; Malovic, Aida; Russell, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A number of studies have established that children, adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome (AS) and high functioning autism (HFA) have significant problems with anxiety. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective treatment for anxiety in a variety of clinical populations. There is a growing interest in exploring the effectiveness of CBT for people with AS who have mental health problems, but currently there are no known clinical trials involving adults with AS or HFA. Studies with children who have AS have reported some success. The current study aims to examine whether modified group CBT for clinically significant anxiety in an AS population is likely to be efficacious. Methods and analysis This study is a randomised, single-blind crossover trial. At least 36 individuals will be recruited and randomised into a treatment arm or a waiting-list control arm. During treatment, individuals will receive 3 sessions of individual CBT, followed by 21 sessions of group CBT. Primary outcome measures focus on anxiety. Secondary outcome measures focus on everyday social and psychiatric functioning, additional measures of anxiety and fear, depression, health-related quality of life and treatment cost. Assessments will be administered at pregroup and postgroup and at follow-up by researchers who are blinded to group allocation. The trial aims to find out whether or not psychological treatments for anxiety can be adapted and used to successfully treat the anxiety experienced by people with AS. Furthermore, we aim to determine whether this intervention represents good value for money. Ethics and dissemination The trial received a favourable ethical opinion from a National Health Service (NHS) Research Ethics Committee. All participants provided written informed consent. Findings will be shared with all trial participants, and the general public, as well as the scientific community. Trial Registration ISRCTN 30265294 (DOI: 10.1186/ISRCTN30265294), UKCRN

  10. Preventing anxiety and depression in adolescents: A randomised controlled trial of two school based Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Wong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the current study were to 1 establish the efficacy of two Internet-based prevention programmes to reduce anxiety and depressive symptoms in adolescents; and 2 investigate the distribution of psychological symptoms in a large sample of Australian adolescents prior to the implementation of the intervention. A cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted with 976 Year 9–10 students from twelve Australian secondary schools in 2009. Four schools were randomly allocated to the Anxiety Internet-based prevention programme (n = 372, five schools to the Depression Internet-based prevention programme (n = 380 and three to their usual health classes (n = 224. The Thiswayup Schools for Anxiety and Depression prevention courses were presented over the Internet and consist of 6–7 evidence-based, curriculum consistent lessons to improve the ability to manage anxiety and depressive symptoms. Participants were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Data analysis was constrained by both study attrition and data corruption. Thus post-intervention data were only available for 265/976 students. Compared to the control group, students in the depression intervention group showed a significant improvement in anxiety and depressive symptoms at the end of the course, whilst students in the anxiety intervention demonstrated a reduction in symptoms of anxiety. No significant differences were found in psychological distress. The Thiswayup Schools Depression and Anxiety interventions appear to reduce anxiety and depressive symptoms in adolescents using a curriculum based, blended online and offline cognitive behavioural therapy programme that was implemented by classroom teachers. Given the study limitations, particularly the loss of post-intervention data, these findings can only be considered preliminary and need to be replicated in future research.

  11. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with mild to moderate depression and high cardiovascular disease risks: a randomised attention-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glozier, Nicholas; Christensen, Helen; Naismith, Sharon; Cockayne, Nicole; Donkin, Liesje; Neal, Bruce; Mackinnon, Andrew; Hickie, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Mild to moderate depression is common in those with cardiovascular disease and undertreated. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (iCBT) on depressive symptom severity and adherence to medical advice and lifestyle interventions in adults with mild to moderate depression and high cardiovascular disease (CVD) risks. Randomised double-blind, 12 week attention-controlled trial comparing an iCBT programme (E-couch) with an internet-delivered attention control health information package (HealthWatch, n = 282). The primary outcome was depression symptom level on the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) (trial registration: ACTRN12610000085077). 487/562 (88%) participants completed the endpoint assessment. 383/562 (70%) were currently treated for cardiovascular disease and 314/562 (56%) had at least one other comorbid condition. In ITT analysis of 562 participants iCBT produced a greater decline in the mean PHQ-9 score compared to the attention control of 1.06 (95% CI: 0.23-1.89) points, with differences between the two arms increasing over the intervention period (time by treatment effect interaction p = .012). There were also larger improvements in adherence (2.16 points; 95% CI: 0.33-3.99), reductions in anxiety (0.96 points; 95% CI: 0.19-1.73), and a greater proportion engaging in beneficial physical activity (Odds Ratio 1.91, 95%CI: 1.01-3.61) in the iCBT participants but no effect upon disability, or walking time/day. There were no withdrawals due to study related adverse events. In people with mild to moderate depression and high levels of CVD risk factors, a freely accessible iCBT programme (http://www.ecouch.anu.edu.au) produced a small, but robust, improvement in depressive symptoms, adherence and some health behaviours. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000085077.

  12. Occupational impact of internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy for depression and anxiety: reanalysis of data from five Australian randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Anna; Harvey, Samuel; Mewton, Louise; Andrews, Gavin

    2014-10-06

    To determine whether internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (iCBT) for depression and anxiety reduces self-reported absenteeism in employed individuals. We reanalysed data from five randomised controlled trials of iCBT: two for depression (conducted from September 2008 to February 2009 and from June 2009 to January 2010), two for generalised anxiety disorder (conducted from March 2009 to June 2009 and from July 2009 to January 2010) and one for social phobia (conducted from May 2008 to July 2008). Participants across Australia were recruited via a website. The inclusion criteria were: (i) meets criteria for the disorder of interest; (ii) aged 18 years or over; (iii) no previous history of a psychotic disorder or drug or alcohol misuse; (iv) not actively suicidal. The iCBT courses each consisted of six online lessons (to be completed within 11 weeks), homework assignments, automatic emails and resource documents. The number of days absent (self-reported absenteeism) in the previous week. We included 284 participants in our analysis. When data for the three disorders were combined, participants who received iCBT had significant reductions in self-reported absenteeism compared with those in the control groups (who were on a waitlist) (P = 0.03). When data for the three disorders were analysed separately, reductions in self-reported absenteeism for participants who received iCBT were not significantly different to those for participants in the control groups. Using data from five RCTs, we showed that iCBT was associated with reductions in self-reported absenteeism. Future research should focus on replicating these findings in other contexts, such as other disorders and other iCBT courses.

  13. Study protocol of a multicentre randomised controlled trial of self-help cognitive behaviour therapy for working women with menopausal symptoms (MENOS@Work).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Myra S; Hardy, Claire; Norton, Sam; Griffiths, Amanda

    2016-10-01

    Hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS) - the main symptoms of the menopause transition - can reduce quality of life and are particularly difficult to manage at work. A cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) intervention has been developed specifically for HFNS that is theoretically based and shown to reduce significantly the impact of HFNS in several randomised controlled trials (RCTs). Self-help CBT has been found to be as effective as group CBT for these symptoms, but these interventions are not widely available in the workplace. This paper describes the protocol of an RCT aiming to assess the efficacy of CBT for menopausal symptoms implemented in the workplace, with a nested qualitative study to examine acceptability and feasibility. One hundred menopausal working women, aged 45-60 years, experiencing bothersome HFNS for two months will be recruited from several (2-10) large organisations into a multicentre randomised controlled trial. Women will be randomly assigned to either treatment (a self-help CBT intervention lasting 4 weeks) or to a no treatment-wait control condition (NTWC), following a screening interview, consent, and completion of a baseline questionnaire. All participants will complete follow-up questionnaires at 6 weeks and 20 weeks post-randomisation. The primary outcome is the rating of HFNS; secondary measures include HFNS frequency, mood, quality of life, attitudes to menopause, HFNS beliefs and behaviours, work absence and presenteeism, job satisfaction, job stress, job performance, disclosure to managers and turnover intention. Adherence, acceptability and feasibility will be assessed at 20 weeks post-randomisation in questionnaires and qualitative interviews. Upon trial completion, the control group will also be offered the intervention. This is the first randomised controlled trial of a self-management intervention tailored for working women who have troublesome menopausal symptoms. Clin.Gov NCT02623374. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All

  14. Child Involvement, Alliance, and Therapist Flexibility: Process Variables in Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Anxiety Disorders in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Jennifer L.; Kendall, Philip C.; Chu, Brian C.; Gosch, Elizabeth; Martin, Erin; Taylor, Alan; Knight, Ashleigh

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examined the relations between treatment process variables and child anxiety outcomes. Method Independent raters watched/listened to taped therapy sessions of 151 anxiety-disordered (6 -14 yr-old; M = 10.71) children (43% boys) and assessed process variables (child alliance, therapist alliance, child involvement, therapist flexibility and therapist functionality) within a manual-based cognitive-behavioral treatment. Latent growth modelling examined three latent variables (intercept, slope, and quadratic) for each process variable. Child age, gender, family income and ethnicity were examined as potential antecedents. Outcome was analyzed using factorially derived clinician, mother, father, child and teacher scores from questionnaire and structured diagnostic interviews at pretreatment, posttreatment and 12-month follow-up. Results Latent growth models demonstrated a concave quadratic curve for child involvement and therapist flexibility over time. A predominantly linear, downward slope was observed for alliance, and functional flexibility remained consistent over time. Increased alliance, child involvement and therapist flexibility showed some albeit inconsistent, associations with positive treatment outcome. Conclusion Findings support the notion that maintaining the initial high level of alliance or involvement is important for clinical improvement. There is some support that progressively increasing alliance/involvement also positively impacts on treatment outcome. These findings were not consistent across outcome measurement points or reporters. PMID:24246476

  15. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in a Person with an Autism Spectrum Condition and Intellectual Disability: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Neil; Allez, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Background: One of the difficulties in assessing and treating PTSD in people with intellectual disability is that it may not present with the typical symptoms associated with the disorder. This may be why there is a dearth of literature on the treatment of PTSD using cognitive behavioural approaches for people with intellectual disability (e.g.…

  16. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in a Person with an Autism Spectrum Condition and Intellectual Disability: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrigan, Neil; Allez, Kate

    2017-01-01

    Background: One of the difficulties in assessing and treating PTSD in people with intellectual disability is that it may not present with the typical symptoms associated with the disorder. This may be why there is a dearth of literature on the treatment of PTSD using cognitive behavioural approaches for people with intellectual disability (e.g.…

  17. Gestalt Therapy: Student Perceptions of Fritz Perls in "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Joe; Jacobus, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy" ("TAP") videotape series introduces students to three major schools of psychotherapy: client-centered therapy, Gestalt therapy, and rational-emotive therapy. A sample of undergraduate students viewed the "TAP" series. The students were surveyed about their observations of…

  18. Gestalt Therapy: Student Perceptions of Fritz Perls in "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Joe; Jacobus, Veronica

    2009-01-01

    The "Three Approaches to Psychotherapy" ("TAP") videotape series introduces students to three major schools of psychotherapy: client-centered therapy, Gestalt therapy, and rational-emotive therapy. A sample of undergraduate students viewed the "TAP" series. The students were surveyed about their observations of…

  19. Feasibility randomised controlled trial of Recovery-focused Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Older Adults with bipolar disorder (RfCBT-OA): study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Elizabeth; Lobban, Fiona; Sutton, Chris; Depp, Colin; Johnson, Sheri; Laidlaw, Ken; Jones, Steven H

    2016-03-03

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and chronic mental health problem that persists into older adulthood. The number of people living with this condition is set to rise as the UK experiences a rapid ageing of its population. To date, there has been very little research or service development with respect to psychological therapies for this group of people. A parallel two-arm randomised controlled trial comparing a 14-session, 6-month Recovery-focused Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy for Older Adults with bipolar disorder (RfCBT-OA) plus treatment as usual (TAU) versus TAU alone. Participants will be recruited in the North-West of England via primary and secondary mental health services and through self-referral. The primary objective of the study is to evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of RfCBT-OA; therefore, a formal power calculation is not appropriate. It has been estimated that randomising 25 participants per group will be sufficient to be able to reliably determine the primary feasibility outcomes (eg, recruitment and retention rates), in line with recommendations for sample sizes for feasibility/pilot trials. Participants in both arms will complete assessments at baseline and then every 3 months, over the 12-month follow-up period. We will gain an estimate of the likely effect size of RfCBT-OA on a range of clinical outcomes and estimate parameters needed to determine the appropriate sample size for a definitive, larger trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of RfCBT-OA. Data analysis is discussed further in the Analysis section in the main paper. This protocol was approved by the UK National Health Service (NHS) Ethics Committee process (REC ref: 15/NW/0330). The findings of the trial will be disseminated through peer-reviewed journals, national and international conference presentations and local, participating NHS trusts. ISRCTN13875321; Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already

  20. Cognitive behaviour therapy for older adults experiencing insomnia and depression in a community mental health setting: Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Paul; McLaren, Suzanne; Klein, Britt; Jenkins, Megan; Harvey, Jack

    2015-11-27

    Cognitive behaviour therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is a well-established treatment; however, the evidence is largely limited to homogenous samples. Although emerging research has indicated that CBT-I is also effective for comorbid insomnia, CBT-I has not been tested among a complex sample of older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression. Furthermore, no study has explored whether modifying CBT-I to target associated depressive symptoms could potentially enhance sleep and mood outcomes. Therefore, this study aims to report a protocol designed to test whether an advanced form of CBT for insomnia and depression (CBT-I-D) is more effective at reducing insomnia and depressive symptoms compared to a standard CBT-I and psychoeducation control group (PCG) for older adults in a community mental health setting. We aim to recruit 150 older adults with comorbid insomnia who have presented to community mental health services for depression. Eligible participants will be randomly allocated via block/cluster randomisation to one of three group therapy conditions: CBT-I, CBT-I-D, or PCG. Participants who receive CBT-I will only practice strategies designed to improve their sleep, whereas participants who receive CBT-I-D will practice additional strategies designed to also improve their mood. This trial will implement a mixed-methods design involving quantitative outcome measures and qualitative focus groups. The primary outcome measures are insomnia and depression severity, and secondary outcomes are anxiety, hopelessness, beliefs about sleep, comorbid sleep conditions, and health. Outcomes will be assessed at pre-intervention (week 0), post-intervention (week 8), and 3-month follow-up (week 20). This CBT study protocol has been designed to address comorbid insomnia and depression for older adults receiving community mental health services. The proposed trial will determine whether CBT-I is more effective for older adults with comorbid insomnia and depression compared to a PCG

  1. Family-focused cognitive behaviour therapy versus psycho-education for adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome: long-term follow-up of an RCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Samantha; Chalder, Trudie; Rimes, Katharine A

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the long term efficacy of family-focused cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) compared with psycho-education in improving school attendance and other secondary outcomes in adolescents with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). A 24 month follow-up of a randomised controlled trial was carried out. Participants received either 13 one-hour sessions of family-focused CBT or four one-hour sessions of psycho-education. Forty-four participants took part in the follow-up study. The proportion of participants reporting at least 70% school attendance (the primary outcome) at 24 months was 90% in CBT group and 84% in psycho-education group; the difference between the groups was not statistically significant (OR = 1.29, p = 0.80). The proportion of adolescents who had recovered in the family-focused CBT group was 79% compared with 64% in the psycho-education, according to a definition including fatigue and school attendance. This difference was not statistically significant (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.34). Family-focused CBT was associated with significantly better emotional and behavioural adjustment at 24 month follow-up compared to psycho-education, as reported by both adolescents (F = 6.49, p = 0.02) and parents (F = 4.52, P = 0.04). Impairment significantly decreased in both groups between six and 24 month follow-ups, with no significant group difference in improvement over this period. Gains previously observed for other secondary outcomes at six month follow-up were maintained at 24 month follow-up with no further significant improvement or group differences in improvement. In conclusion, gains achieved by adolescents with CFS who had undertaken family-focused CBT and psycho-education generally continued or were maintained at two-year follow-up. The exception was that family-focused CBT was associated with maintained improvements in emotional and behavioural difficulties whereas psycho-education was associated with

  2. Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) for posttraumatic stress disorder versus waitlist control: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Adrian R; Newby, Jill M; Smith, Jessica; Andrews, Gavin

    2015-12-01

    This randomised controlled trial (RCT) with two parallel arms will evaluate the efficacy of an internet-delivered six-lesson 10-week cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT) intervention for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It will also investigate the association between changes in PTSD symptoms, intolerance of uncertainty (IU) and emotion regulation. Patients with PTSD will be recruited via the research arm of a not-for-profit clinical and research unit in Australia and randomised to a treatment group or waitlist control group. The minimum sample size for each group (alpha 0.05, power 0.80 for a g of 0.47) was identified as 72, but 10 % more will be recruited to hedge against expected attrition. PTSD diagnosis will be determined using the PTSD module from the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview version 5.0.0. The PTSD Checklist - Civilian version (PCL-C) will be used to measure PTSD symptoms (the primary outcome measure), with the Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale 12-item version (IUS-12) and the Emotion Regulation Questionnaire (ERQ) used to measure intolerance of uncertainty and emotion regulation, respectively. The PCL-C will be administered to the treatment group before each lesson of the PTSD program and at 3-month follow-up. The IUS-12 and ERQ will be administered before lessons 1 and 4, at post-treatment and at 3-month follow-up. The waitlist control group will complete these measures at week 1, week 5 and week 11 of the waitlist period. PTSD program efficacy will be determined using intent-to-treat mixed models. Maintenance of gains will be assessed at 3-month follow-up. Mediation analyses using PROCESS will be used to examine the association between change in PTSD symptoms over treatment and change in each of IU and emotion regulation ability in separate analyses. The current RCT seeks to replicate previous efficacy findings of iCBT for PTSD in a formally assessed PTSD sample from the general population. Findings may point to future lines of

  3. Protocol for a feasibility study of a self-help cognitive behavioural therapy resource for the reduction of dental anxiety in young people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshman, Zoe; Morgan, Annie; Porritt, Jenny; Gupta, Ekta; Baker, Sarah; Creswell, Cathy; Newton, Tim; Stevens, Katherine; Williams, Christopher; Prasad, Suneeta; Kirby, Jennifer; Rodd, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Childhood dental anxiety is very common, with 10-20 % of children and young people reporting high levels of dental anxiety. It is distressing and has a negative impact on the quality of life of young people and their parents as well as being associated with poor oral health. Affected individuals may develop a lifelong reliance on general anaesthetic or sedation for necessary dental treatment thus requiring the support of specialist dental services. Children and young people with dental anxiety therefore require additional clinical time and can be costly to treat in the long term. The reduction of dental anxiety through the use of effective psychological techniques is, therefore, of high importance. However, there is a lack of high-quality research investigating the impact of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) approaches when applied to young people's dental anxiety. The first part of the study will develop a profile of dentally anxious young people using a prospective questionnaire sent to a consecutive sample of 100 young people referred to the Paediatric Dentistry Department, Charles Clifford Dental Hospital, in Sheffield. The second part will involve interviewing a purposive sample of 15-20 dental team members on their perceptions of a CBT self-help resource for dental anxiety, their opinions on whether they might use such a resource with patients, and their willingness to recruit participants to a future randomised controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the resource. The third part of the study will investigate the most appropriate outcome measures to include in a trial, the acceptability of the resource, and retention and completion rates of treatment with a sample of 60 dentally anxious young people using the CBT resource. This study will provide information on the profile of dentally anxious young people who could potentially be helped by a guided self-help CBT resource. It will gain the perceptions of dental care team members of guided self-help CBT for

  4. Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for adults with mild to moderate depression and high cardiovascular disease risks: a randomised attention-controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Glozier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Mild to moderate depression is common in those with cardiovascular disease and undertreated. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of internet-delivered Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (iCBT on depressive symptom severity and adherence to medical advice and lifestyle interventions in adults with mild to moderate depression and high cardiovascular disease (CVD risks. METHODS: Randomised double-blind, 12 week attention-controlled trial comparing an iCBT programme (E-couch with an internet-delivered attention control health information package (HealthWatch, n = 282. The primary outcome was depression symptom level on the nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 (trial registration: ACTRN12610000085077. RESULTS: 487/562 (88% participants completed the endpoint assessment. 383/562 (70% were currently treated for cardiovascular disease and 314/562 (56% had at least one other comorbid condition. In ITT analysis of 562 participants iCBT produced a greater decline in the mean PHQ-9 score compared to the attention control of 1.06 (95% CI: 0.23-1.89 points, with differences between the two arms increasing over the intervention period (time by treatment effect interaction p = .012. There were also larger improvements in adherence (2.16 points; 95% CI: 0.33-3.99, reductions in anxiety (0.96 points; 95% CI: 0.19-1.73, and a greater proportion engaging in beneficial physical activity (Odds Ratio 1.91, 95%CI: 1.01-3.61 in the iCBT participants but no effect upon disability, or walking time/day. There were no withdrawals due to study related adverse events. CONCLUSIONS: In people with mild to moderate depression and high levels of CVD risk factors, a freely accessible iCBT programme (http://www.ecouch.anu.edu.au produced a small, but robust, improvement in depressive symptoms, adherence and some health behaviours. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12610000085077.

  5. The effects of using cognitive behavioural therapy to improve sleep for patients with delusions and hallucinations (the BEST study): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Startup, Helen; Myers, Elissa; Harvey, Allison; Geddes, John; Yu, Ly-Mee; Zaiwalla, Zenobia; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Foster, Russell; Lister, Rachel

    2013-07-11

    Patients with psychosis frequently report difficulties getting or staying asleep (insomnia). Dissatisfaction with sleep is high. Insomnia should be treated in this group, but typically it is not even assessed. Importantly, recent evidence indicates that insomnia triggers and exacerbates delusions and hallucinations. The clinical implication is that if the insomnia is treated then the psychotic symptoms will significantly lessen. In a case series with 15 patients with persecutory delusions resistant to previous treatment this is exactly what we found: cognitive behavioural therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) led to large reductions in both the insomnia and delusions. The clear next step is a pilot randomized controlled test. The clinical aim is to test whether CBT-I can reduce both insomnia and psychotic symptoms. The trial will inform decisions for a definitive large-scale evaluation. We will carry out a randomized controlled trial (the Better Sleep Trial, or the BEST study) with 60 patients with distressing delusions or hallucinations in the context of a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis. Half of the participants will be randomized to receive CBT-I, in addition to their standard treatment, for up to eight sessions over 12 weeks. The other half will continue with treatment as usual. Blind assessments will take place at 0 weeks, 12 weeks (post-treatment) and 24 weeks (follow-up). The primary outcome hypotheses are that CBT-I added to treatment as usual will improve sleep, delusions and hallucinations compared with only treatment as usual. All main analyses will be carried out at the end of the last follow-up assessments and will be based on the intention-to-treat principle. The trial is funded by the NHS National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research for Patient Benefit Programme. Data collection will be complete by the end of 2014. This will be the first controlled test of CBT-I for patients with delusions and hallucinations. It will provide significant evidence

  6. Young people at risk of psychosis: their subjective experiences of monitoring and cognitive behaviour therapy in the early detection and intervention evaluation 2 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Rory E; Morrison, Anthony P

    2014-09-01

    To explore participants' experiences of 'enhanced monitoring' and cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) within a randomized controlled trial evaluating early detection and prevention of psychosis ('early detection and intervention evaluation [EDIE] 2'). Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with a sample of participants at the end of their involvement with the trial. Ten young people were interviewed; six males and four females, with a mean age of 27.5. Nine participants identified themselves as White British and one Black British. All participants had received 'enhanced monitoring' during the trial, and 8 of 10 also received CBT. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using thematic analysis to identify central themes within and among participants' accounts. Three super-ordinate thematic areas were identified: 'a chance to talk', monitoring-specific themes, and CBT-specific themes. The central theme ('a chance to talk') was drawn from across all participants' accounts and represents the most consistently valued attribute of participants' experiences of the EDIE 2 trial. Sub-themes of this topic were identified as follows: interpersonal engagement, informality and normalization, and 'opening up'. Sub-themes related to monitoring include the following: clarity and reassurance, 'a therapeutic process', and challenges. CBT experience was most consistently conceptualized as 'rethinking things', and two additional CBT-specific sub-themes were identified: hard work and moving forward. Our findings suggest that for young people at risk of psychosis, a normalizing psychosocially oriented assessment and monitoring process may have benefits for many, while CBT may help to reduce the negative impact of unusual psychological experiences for both the short- and long term. Young people considered at risk of psychosis highly value normalizing, collaborative, and flexible approaches when engaging with research or clinical staff. All of our participants

  7. A naturalistic study of the acceptability and effectiveness of internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy for psychiatric disorders in older australians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Mewton

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The current study investigates the acceptability, effectiveness and uptake of internet-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (iCBT amongst older individuals (>60 years seeking psychiatric treatment in general practice. METHODS: The sample consisted of 2413 (mean age 39.5; range 18-83 years patients prescribed iCBT through This Way Up clinic by their primary care clinician. The intervention consisted of six fully automated, unassisted online lessons specific to four disorders major depression, generalised anxiety disorder, panic disorder or social phobia. Patients were categorised into five age groups (18-29 years, 30-39 years, 40-49 years, 50-59 years, 60 years and above. 225 (9.3% patients were aged over 60 years. Analyses were conducted across the four disorders to ensure sufficient sample sizes in the 60 years and older age group. Age differences in adherence to the six lesson courses were assessed to demonstrate acceptability. Age-based reductions in psychological distress (Kessler Psychological Distress Scale; K10 and disability (the World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Schedule; WHODAS-II were compared to demonstrate effectiveness. To evaluate the uptake of iCBT, the age distribution of those commencing iCBT was compared with the prevalence of these disorders in the 2007 Australian National Survey of Mental Health and Well-Being. RESULTS: Older adults were more likely to complete all six lessons when compared with their younger counterparts. Marginal model analyses indicated that there were significant reductions in the K10 and WHODAS-II from baseline to post-intervention, regardless of age (p<0.001. The measurement occasion by age interactions were not significant, indicating that individuals showed similar reductions in the K10 and WHODAS-II regardless of age. In general, the age distribution of individuals commencing the iCBT courses matched the age distribution of the four diagnoses in the Australian general

  8. Early trauma-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy to prevent chronic post-traumatic stress disorder and related symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirkehei Ingvild

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early trauma-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy (TFCBT holds promise as a preventive intervention for people at risk of developing chronic post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The aim of this review was to provide an updated evaluation of the effectiveness of early TFCBT on the prevention of PTSD in high risk populations. Methods We performed a systematic literature search in international electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CENTRAL, CINAHL, ISI and PILOTS and included randomised controlled trials comparing TFCBT delivered within 3 months of trauma, to alternative interventions. All included studies were critically appraised using a standardised checklist. Two independent reviewers selected studies for inclusion and assessed study quality. Data extraction was performed by one reviewer and controlled by another. Where appropriate, we entered study results into meta-analyses. Results Seven articles reporting the results of five RCTs were included. All compared TFCBT to supportive counselling (SC. The study population was patients with acute stress disorder (ASD in four trials, and with a PTSD diagnosis disregarding the duration criterion in the fifth trial. The overall relative risk (RR for a PTSD diagnosis was 0.56 (95% CI 0.42 to 0.76, 1.09 (95% CI 0.46 to 2.61 and 0.73 (95% CI 0.51 to 1.04 at 3–6 months, 9 months and 3–4 years post treatment, respectively. A subgroup analysis of the four ASD studies only resulted in RR = 0.36 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.78 for PTSD at 3–6 months. Anxiety and depression scores were generally lower in the TFCBT groups than in the SC groups. Conclusion There is evidence for the effectiveness of TFCBT compared to SC in preventing chronic PTSD in patients with an initial ASD diagnosis. As this evidence originates from one research team replications are necessary to assess generalisability. The evidence about the effectiveness of TFCBT in traumatised populations without an ASD

  9. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy for treatment-resistant depression in primary care: the CoBalT randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Nicola; Thomas, Laura; Abel, Anna; Barnes, Maria; Carroll, Fran; Ridgway, Nicola; Sherlock, Sofie; Turner, Nicholas; Button, Katherine; Odondi, Lang'o; Metcalfe, Chris; Owen-Smith, Amanda; Campbell, John; Garland, Anne; Hollinghurst, Sandra; Jerrom, Bill; Kessler, David; Kuyken, Willem; Morrison, Jill; Turner, Katrina; Williams, Chris; Peters, Tim; Lewis, Glyn

    2014-05-01

    Only one-third of patients with depression respond fully to treatment with antidepressant medication. However, there is little robust evidence to guide the management of those whose symptoms are 'treatment resistant'. The CoBalT trial examined the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) as an adjunct to usual care (including pharmacotherapy) for primary care patients with treatment-resistant depression (TRD) compared with usual care alone. Pragmatic, multicentre individually randomised controlled trial with follow-up at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months. A subset took part in a qualitative study investigating views and experiences of CBT, reasons for completing/not completing therapy, and usual care for TRD. General practices in Bristol, Exeter and Glasgow, and surrounding areas. Patients aged 18-75 years who had TRD [on antidepressants for ≥ 6 weeks, had adhered to medication, Beck Depression Inventory, 2nd version (BDI-II) score of ≥ 14 and fulfilled the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth edition criteria for depression]. Individuals were excluded who (1) had bipolar disorder/psychosis or major alcohol/substance abuse problems; (2) were unable to complete the questionnaires; or (3) were pregnant, as were those currently receiving CBT/other psychotherapy/secondary care for depression, or who had received CBT in the past 3 years. Participants were randomised, using a computer-generated code, to usual care or CBT (12-18 sessions) in addition to usual care. The primary outcome was 'response', defined as ≥ 50% reduction in depressive symptoms (BDI-II score) at 6 months compared with baseline. Secondary outcomes included BDI-II score as a continuous variable, remission of symptoms (BDI-II score of anxiety and antidepressant use at 6 and 12 months. Data on health and social care use, personal costs, and time off work were collected at 6 and 12 months. Costs from these three perspectives were

  10. Efficacy of cognitive behavioural therapy for sleep improvement in patients with persistent delusions and hallucinations (BEST): a prospective, assessor-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Daniel; Waite, Felicity; Startup, Helen; Myers, Elissa; Lister, Rachel; McInerney, Josephine; Harvey, Allison G; Geddes, John; Zaiwalla, Zenobia; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Foster, Russell; Clifton, Lei; Yu, Ly-Mee

    2015-11-01

    Sleep disturbance occurs in most patients with delusions or hallucinations and should be treated as a clinical problem in its own right. However, cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT)-the best evidence-based treatment for insomnia-has not been tested in this patient population. We aimed to pilot procedures for a randomised trial testing CBT for sleep problems in patients with current psychotic experiences, and to provide a preliminary assessment of potential benefit. We did this prospective, assessor-blind, randomised controlled pilot trial (Better Sleep Trial [BEST]) at two mental health centres in the UK. Patients (aged 18-65 years) with persistent distressing delusions or hallucinations in the context of insomnia and a schizophrenia spectrum diagnosis were randomly assigned (1:1), via a web-based randomisation system with minimisation to balance for sex, insomnia severity, and psychotic experiences, to receive either eight sessions of CBT plus standard care (medication and contact with the local clinical team) or standard care alone. Research assessors were masked to group allocation. Assessment of outcome was done at weeks 0, 12 (post-treatment), and 24 (follow-up). The primary efficacy outcomes were insomnia assessed by the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) and delusions and hallucinations assessed by the Psychotic Symptoms Rating Scale (PSYRATS) at week 12. We did analysis by intention to treat, with an aim to provide confidence interval estimation of treatment effects. This study is registered with ISRCTN, number 33695128. Between Dec 14, 2012, and May 22, 2013, and Nov 7, 2013, and Aug 26, 2014, we randomly assigned 50 patients to receive CBT plus standard care (n=24) or standard care alone (n=26). The last assessments were completed on Feb 10, 2015. 48 (96%) patients provided follow-up data. 23 (96%) patients offered CBT took up the intervention. Compared with standard care, CBT led to reductions in insomnia in the large effect size range at week 12 (adjusted

  11. Using Animal-assisted Therapy to Enrich Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Jeanne Louise; Hubbard, Grace B

    2016-01-01

    Animal-assisted therapy (AAT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of many psychological disorders, including autism spectrum disorders, depression, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). AAT can be used as an adjunct to other forms of psychotherapy. With AAT, the animal becomes a part of the treatment plan. Outcomes for clients that are associated with the use of AAT include (1) increased sense of comfort and safety, (2) increased motivation, (3) enhanced self-esteem, (4) increased prosocial behaviors, and (5) decreased behavioral problems. AAT provides a bridge for the therapist to develop a therapeutic relationship with a client, and the animal can provide supportive reassurance for the therapist. The amount of data that supports the benefits of AAT for the treatment of those with mental illnesses is growing, but evidence-based research that supports its use is lacking. Further research is needed.

  12. A Systematic Review of the Combined Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy and Psychotherapy for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintock, Shawn M.; Brandon, Anna R.; Husain, Mustafa M.; Jarrett, Robin B.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). However, after acute phase treatment and initial remission, relapse rates are significant. Strategies to prolong remission include continuation phase ECT, pharmacotherapy, psychotherapy, or their combinations. This systematic review synthesizes extant data regarding the combined use of psychotherapy with ECT for the treatment of patients with severe MDD and offers the hypothesis that augmenting ECT with depression-specific psychotherapy represents a promising strategy for future investigation. Methods The authors performed two independent searches in PsychInfo (1806 – 2009) and MEDLINE (1948 – 2009) using combinations of the following search terms: Electroconvulsive Therapy (including ECT, ECT therapy, electroshock therapy, EST, shock therapy) and Psychotherapy (including cognitive behavioral, interpersonal, group, psychodynamic, psychoanalytic, individual, eclectic, and supportive). We included in this review a total of six articles (English language) that mentioned ECT and psychotherapy in the abstract, and provided a case report, series, or clinical trial. We examined the articles for data related to ECT and psychotherapy treatment characteristics, cohort characteristics, and therapeutic outcome. Results Although research over the past seven decades documenting the combined use of ECT and psychotherapy is limited, the available evidence suggests that testing this combination has promise and may confer additional, positive functional outcomes. Conclusions Significant methodological variability in ECT and psychotherapy procedures, heterogeneous patient cohorts, and inconsistent outcome measures prevent strong conclusions; however, existing research supports the need for future investigations of combined ECT and psychotherapy in well-designed, controlled clinical studies. Depression-specific psychotherapy approaches may need special

  13. A Randomized Trial of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Children with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder following Single-Incident Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Reginald David Vandervord; Sterk, Jisca; Pearce, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The present study compared the efficacy of trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with trauma-focused cognitive therapy (without exposure; CT) for children and youth with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Children and youth who had experienced single-incident trauma (N = 33; 7-17 years old) were randomly assigned to receive 9 weeks of…

  14. A Randomized Trial of Cognitive Behaviour Therapy and Cognitive Therapy for Children with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder following Single-Incident Trauma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Reginald David Vandervord; Sterk, Jisca; Pearce, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    The present study compared the efficacy of trauma-focused cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) with trauma-focused cognitive therapy (without exposure; CT) for children and youth with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Children and youth who had experienced single-incident trauma (N = 33; 7-17 years old) were randomly assigned to receive 9 weeks of…

  15. Stabilizing group treatment for complex posttraumatic stress disorder related to child abuse based on psychoeducation and cognitive behavioural therapy: a multisite randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorrepaal, Ethy; Thomaes, Kathleen; Smit, Johannes H; van Balkom, Anton J L M; Veltman, Dick J; Hoogendoorn, Adriaan W; Draijer, Nel

    2012-01-01

    Evidence-based treatments for complex posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) related to childhood abuse are scarce. This is the first randomized controlled trial to test the efficacy of psycho-educational and cognitive behavioural stabilizing group treatment in terms of both PTSD and complex PTSD symptom severity. Seventy-one patients with complex PTSD and severe comorbidity (e.g., 74% axis II comorbidity) were randomly assigned to either a 20-week group treatment in addition to treatment as usual or to treatment as usual only. Primary outcome measures were the Davidson trauma scale (DTS) for PTSD and the structured interview for disorders of extreme stress (SIDES) for complex PTSD symptoms. Statistical analysis was conducted in the intention-to-treat (ITT) and in the completer sample. Subjects were considered responders when scoring at 20 weeks at least 1 standard deviation below pretest findings. The 16% attrition was relatively low. After 20 weeks, the experimental condition (large effect sizes) and control condition (medium effect sizes) both showed significant decreases on the DTS and SIDES, but differences between the conditions were not significant. The secondary responder analysis (ITT) revealed significantly more responders on the DTS (45 vs. 21%), but not on the SIDES (61 vs. 42%). Adding psycho-educational and cognitive behavioural stabilizing group treatment for complex PTSD related to child abuse to treatment as usual showed an equivocal outcome. Patients in both conditions improved substantially during stabilizing treatment, and while significant superiority on change scores was absent, responder analysis suggested clinical meaningfulness of adding group treatment. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Brief eclectic psychotherapy v. eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing therapy for post-traumatic stress disorder: randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijdam, M.J.; Gersons, B.P.R.; Reitsma, J.B.; de Jongh, A.; Ollf, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background Trauma-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) and eye movement desensitisation and reprocessing therapy (EMDR) are efficacious treatments for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but few studies have directly compared them using well-powered designs and few have investigated respon

  17. Therapy 101: A Psychotherapy Curriculum for Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboul-Fotouh, Frieda; Asghar-Ali, Ali Abbas

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This pilot project, designed and taught by a resident, created a curriculum to introduce medical students to the practice of psychotherapy. Medical students who are knowledgeable about psychotherapy can become physicians who are able to refer patients to psychotherapeutic treatments. A search of the literature did not identify a…

  18. Cognitive behavioural therapy and mindfulness for stress and burnout: a waiting list controlled pilot study comparing treatments for parents of children with chronic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anclair, Malin; Lappalainen, Raimo; Muotka, Joona; Hiltunen, Arto J

    2017-08-29

    Parents of children with chronic conditions often experience a crisis with serious mental health problems for themselves as a consequence. The healthcare focus is on the children; however, the parents often worry about their children's health and future but are seldom offered any counselling or guidance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of two group-based behavioural interventions on stress and burnout among parents of children with chronic conditions. After a waiting list control period (n = 28), parents were offered either a cognitive behavioural (CBT, n = 10) or a mindfulness program (MF, n = 9). Both interventions decreased significantly stress and burnout. The within-group effect sizes were large in both interventions (CBT, g = 1.28-1.64; MF, g = 1.25-2.20). Hence, the results of this pilot study show that treating a group using either CBT or mindfulness can be an efficient intervention for reducing stress levels and burnout in parents of children with chronic conditions. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  19. Coming out of the sex therapy closet: using experiential psychotherapy with sexual problems and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinplatz, Peggy J

    2007-01-01

    Mahrer's Experiential Psychotherapy provides a valuable alternative to conventional sex therapy with individuals and couples. Experiential Psychotherapy uses the sexual complaint as it would any situation or scene described at the outset of therapy, as an entry point to the client's deeper experiencing. Several of the advantages of the methods employed are listed. Specifically, the ways in which Experiential Psychotherapy is ideally suited to dealing with forbidden, haunting, and disturbing sexual feelings, fantasies, and urges are highlighted. Clinical illustrations are presented of experiential dream work with a sexual assault survivor and of a couple referred for treatment of his erectile dysfunction and her low sexual desire. Experiential Psychotherapy effects profound changes in the person(s), connections within and with others, and in bodily phenomena. These outcomes, including freer choices, heightened pleasure and embodiment, extend beyond the predominant treatment paradigm's amelioration of sexual symptoms and disorder.

  20. Acceptability of psychotherapy, pharmacotherapy, and self-directed therapies in Australians living with chronic hepatitis C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Benjamin J R; Turnbull, Deborah; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina A; Harley, Hugh A J; Andrews, Jane M

    2013-12-01

    Despite the prevalence of psychiatric co-morbidity in chronic hepatitis C (CHC), treatment is under-researched. Patient preferences are likely to affect treatment uptake, adherence, and success. Thus, the acceptability of psychological supports was explored. A postal survey of Australian CHC outpatients of the Royal Adelaide Hospital and online survey of Australians living with CHC was conducted, assessing demographic and disease-related variables, psychosocial characteristics, past experience with psychological support, and psychological support acceptability. The final sample of 156 patients (58 % male) had significantly worse depression, anxiety, stress, and social support than norms. The most acceptable support type was individual psychotherapy (83 %), followed by bibliotherapy (61 %), pharmacotherapy (56 %), online therapy (45 %), and group psychotherapy (37 %). The most prominent predictor of support acceptability was satisfaction with past use. While individual psychotherapy acceptability was encouragingly high, potentially less costly modalities including group psychotherapy or online therapy may be hampered by low acceptability, the reasons for which need to be further explored.

  1. A feasibility open trial of internet-delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (iCBT among consumers of a non-governmental mental health organisation with anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Kirkpatrick

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. To date the efficacy and acceptability of internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatments (iCBT has been examined in clinical trials and specialist facilities. The present study reports the acceptability, feasibility and preliminary efficacy of an established iCBT treatment course (the Wellbeing Course administered by a not-for-profit non-governmental organisation, the Mental Health Association (MHA of New South Wales, to consumers with symptoms of anxiety.Methods. Ten individuals who contacted the MHA’s telephone support line or visited the MHA’s website and reported at least mild symptoms of anxiety (GAD-7 total scores ≥5 were admitted to the study. Participants were provided access to the Wellbeing Course, which comprises five online lessons and homework assignments, and brief weekly support from an MHA staff member via telephone and email. The MHA staff member was an experienced mental health professional and received minimal training in administering the intervention.Results. All 10 participants completed the course within the 8 weeks. Post-treatment and two month follow-up questionnaires were completed by all participants. Mean within-group effect sizes (Cohen’s d for the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 Item (GAD-7 and Patient Health Questionnaire 9 Item (PHQ-9 were large (i.e., > .80 and consistent with previous controlled research. The Course was also rated as highly acceptable with all 10 participants reporting it was worth their time and they would recommend it to a friend.Conclusions. These results provide support for the potential clinical utility of iCBT interventions and the acceptability and feasibility of employing non-governmental mental health organisations to deliver these treatments. However, further research is needed to examine the clinical efficacy and cost-effectiveness of delivering iCBT via such organisations.

  2. Concurrent sex therapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy by separate therapists: effectiveness and implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levay, A; Weissberg, J; Blaustein, A

    1976-11-01

    Since the publication of Masters and Johnson's Human Sexual Inadequacy in 1970, sex therapy has become an established, though controversial, new approach to the treatment of sexual disorders. Masters and Johnson adopted the position that any other form of psychotherapy should be avoided or suspended during the two- or three-week period of sex therapy. Helen Kaplan, in considering sex therapy to be a type of psychotherapy, has stressed that the skillful trained psychotherapist uses his awareness of the psychodynamics and unconscious conflicts of the couple in modifying and tailoring the sex therapy program to their individual needs. In the present study, sex therapy, utilizing a second therapist, was introduced into an ongoing psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

  3. [Easily implemented cognitive behaviour techniques in primary care (part 2)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibáñez-Tarín, C; Manzanera-Escartí, R

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy has shown to be very effective for treating the vast majority of mental health disorders. In this second part of the article, we continue commenting on those techniques that can be easily used in the Primary Care setting. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparative Psychotherapy: Rational-Emotive Therapy Versus Systematic Desensitization in the Treatment of Stuttering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moleski, Richard; Tosi, Donald J.

    1976-01-01

    The present study examined the efficacy of rational-emotive psychotherapy and systematic desensitization in the treatment of stuttering. Both therapies, making extensive use of in vivo behavioral assignments, were examined under the presence and absence of in vivo tasks. Results show that rational-emotive therapy was more effective in reducing…

  5. Clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of brief guided parent-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy and solution-focused brief therapy for treatment of childhood anxiety disorders: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, Cathy; Violato, Mara; Fairbanks, Hannah; White, Elizabeth; Parkinson, Monika; Abitabile, Gemma; Leidi, Alessandro; Cooper, Peter J

    2017-07-01

    Half of all lifetime anxiety disorders emerge before age 12 years; however, access to evidence-based psychological therapies for affected children is poor. We aimed to compare the clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness of two brief psychological treatments for children with anxiety referred to routine child mental health settings. We hypothesised that brief guided parent-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) would be associated with better clinical outcomes than solution-focused brief therapy and would be cost-effective. We did this randomised controlled trial at four National Health Service primary child and mental health services in Oxfordshire, UK. Children aged 5-12 years referred for anxiety difficulties were randomly allocated (1:1), via a secure online minimisation tool, to receive brief guided parent-delivered CBT or solution-focused brief therapy, with minimisation for age, sex, anxiety severity, and level of parental anxiety. The allocation sequence was not accessible to the researcher enrolling participants or to study assessors. Research staff who obtained outcome measurements were masked to group allocation and clinical staff who delivered the intervention did not measure outcomes. The primary outcome was recovery, on the basis of Clinical Global Impressions of Improvement (CGI-I). Parents recorded patient-level resource use. Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) for use in cost-utility analysis were derived from the Child Health Utility 9D. Assessments were done at baseline (before randomisation), after treatment (primary endpoint), and 6 months after treatment completion. We did analysis by intention to treat. This trial is registered with the ISCRTN registry, number ISRCTN07627865. Between March 23, 2012, and March 31, 2014, we randomly assigned 136 patients to receive brief guided parent-delivered CBT (n=68) or solution-focused brief therapy (n=68). At the primary endpoint assessment (June, 2012, to September, 2014), 40 (59%) children in

  6. The second Randomised Evaluation of the Effectiveness, cost-effectiveness and Acceptability of Computerised Therapy (REEACT-2) trial: does the provision of telephone support enhance the effectiveness of computer-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy? A randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabyn, Sally; Araya, Ricardo; Barkham, Michael; Bower, Peter; Cooper, Cindy; Duarte, Ana; Kessler, David; Knowles, Sarah; Lovell, Karina; Littlewood, Elizabeth; Mattock, Richard; Palmer, Stephen; Pervin, Jodi; Richards, David; Tallon, Debbie; White, David; Walker, Simon; Worthy, Gillian; Gilbody, Simon

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Computerised cognitive behaviour therapy (cCBT) is an efficient form of therapy potentially improving access to psychological care. Indirect evidence suggests that the uptake and effectiveness of cCBT can be increased if facilitated by telephone, but this is not routinely offered in the NHS. OBJECTIVES To compare the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of telephone-facilitated free-to-use cCBT [e.g. MoodGYM (National Institute for Mental Health Research, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia)] with minimally supported cCBT. DESIGN This study was a multisite, pragmatic, open, two-arm, parallel-group randomised controlled trial with a concurrent economic evaluation. SETTING Participants were recruited from GP practices in Bristol, Manchester, Sheffield, Hull and the north-east of England. PARTICIPANTS Potential participants were eligible to participate in the trial if they were adults with depression scoring ≥ 10 on the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). INTERVENTIONS Participants were randomised using a computer-generated random number sequence to receive minimally supported cCBT or telephone-facilitated cCBT. Participants continued with usual general practitioner care. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES The primary outcome was self-reported symptoms of depression, as assessed by the PHQ-9 at 4 months post randomisation. SECONDARY OUTCOMES Secondary outcomes were depression at 12 months and anxiety, somatoform complaints, health utility (as assessed by the European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions questionnaire) and resource use at 4 and 12 months. RESULTS Clinical effectiveness: 182 participants were randomised to minimally supported cCBT and 187 participants to telephone-facilitated cCBT. There was a difference in the severity of depression at 4 and 12 months, with lower levels in the telephone-facilitated group. The odds of no longer being depressed (defined as a PHQ-9 score of bibliotherapy and telephone-based interventions are

  7. Effects of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, J L; Simonsen, Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetime at tremendous suffering and cost. Cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy are treatment options, but their effects have only been limitedly compared in systematic reviews. METHOD: Using...... Cochrane systematic review methodology we compared the benefits and harm of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, Psychlit, PsycInfo, and Science Citation Index...... trials with low risk of bias and low risk of random errors are needed, although the effects of cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy do not seem to differ significantly regarding depressive symptoms. Future trials should report on adverse events....

  8. Protocol for a randomised controlled trial of risk screening and early intervention comparing child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy for PTSD in children following accidental injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nixon Reginald DV

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accidental injury represents the most common type of traumatic event to which a child or adolescent may be exposed, with a significant number of these children going on to experience posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD. However, very little research has examined potential interventions for the treatment of PTSD in these children. The present trial aims to evaluate and compare child- and family-focused versions of a cognitive-behavioural early intervention for PTSD following accidental injury. Methods/Design The principal clinical question under investigation is the efficacy of an early, trauma-focused cognitive-behavioural intervention for the treatment of PTSD in children following accidental injury. Specifically, we compare the efficacy of two active treatments (child-focused and family-focused CBT and a waitlist control (no therapy to determine which is associated with greater reductions in psychological and health-related outcome measures over time. The primary outcome will be a reduction in trauma symptoms on a diagnostic interview in the active treatments compared to the waitlist control and greater reductions in the family-compared to the child-focused condition. In doing so, this project will also trial a method of stepped screening and assessment to determine those children requiring early intervention for PTSD following accidental injury. Discussion The present trial will be one of the first controlled trials to examine a trauma-focused CBT, early intervention for children experiencing PTSD following accidental injury (as opposed to other types of traumatic events and the first within a stepped care approach. In addition, it will provide the first evidence comparing the efficacy of child and family-focused interventions for this target group. Given the significant number of children and adolescents exposed to accidental injury, the successful implementation of this protocol has considerable implications. If

  9. Cognitive behavioural therapy versus multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (FatiGo)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos-Vromans, D.C.; Smeets, R.J.P.; Rijnders, L.J.; Gorrissen, R.R.; Pont, M.; Koke, A.J.; Hitters, M.W.; Evers, S.M.; Knottnerus, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome experience extreme fatigue, which often leads to substantial limitations of occupational, educational, social and personal activities. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the treatment. Patients try many different therapies to overc

  10. Cognitive behavioural therapy versus multidisciplinary rehabilitation treatment for patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial (FatiGo)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos-Vromans, D.C.; Smeets, R.J.P.; Rijnders, L.J.; Gorrissen, R.R.; Pont, M.; Koke, A.J.; Hitters, M.W.; Evers, S.M.; Knottnerus, A.J.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome experience extreme fatigue, which often leads to substantial limitations of occupational, educational, social and personal activities. Currently, there is no consensus regarding the treatment. Patients try many different therapies to

  11. Cuento Therapy. Folktales as a Culturally Sensitive Psychotherapy for Puerto Rican Children. Monograph No. 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantino, Giuseppe; And Others

    A seven-year project developing and testing cuento therapy, a form of child psychotherapy in which Puerto Rican mothers recount to their children folktales taken from Puerto Rican culture, is described and evaluated in this monograph. Chapter 1 explains how the research presented in later chapters fits into substantially broader patterns of…

  12. Psychodynamic psychotherapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: An efficacy and partial effectiveness trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Bögels; P. Wijts; F.J. Oort; S.J.M. Sallaerts

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Comparing the overall and differential effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Design: Patients with a primary SAD (N = 47) were randomly assigned to PDT (N = 22) or CBT (N = 27). Both PDT and CBT consisted o

  13. Music Therapy as Psychotherapy in Psychiatry at all Levels of the GAF Scale

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Presentation and disussion on how to apply different music therapy methods and techniques in psychiatry at different levels of the GAF (Global Functioning Scoring system) scale described in combination with McGlashan's relational process levels and other therapeutic principles as illustrated in 5...... books on 'relational treatment in psychiatry' by Lars Thorgaard (DK) and Ejvind Haga (N). Is music therapy as psychotherapy applicable also at the lower GAF scorings? Which methods/techniques?...

  14. Cognitive-behavioural therapy-based intervention to reduce fear of falling in older people: therapy development and randomised controlled trial - the Strategies for Increasing Independence, Confidence and Energy (STRIDE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Steve W; Bamford, Claire; Deary, Vincent; Finch, Tracy L; Gray, Jo; MacDonald, Claire; McMeekin, Peter; Sabin, Neil J; Steen, I Nick; Whitney, Sue L; McColl, Elaine M

    2016-07-01

    Falls cause fear, anxiety and loss of confidence, resulting in activity avoidance, social isolation and increasing frailty. The umbrella term for these problems is 'fear of falling', seen in up to 85% of older adults who fall. Evidence of effectiveness of physical and psychological interventions is limited, with no previous studies examining the role of an individually delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) approach. Primary objective To develop and then determine the effectiveness of a new CBT intervention (CBTi) delivered by health-care assistants (HCAs) plus usual care compared with usual care alone in reducing fear of falling. Secondary objectives To measure the impact of the intervention on falls, injuries, functional abilities, anxiety/depression, quality of life, social participation and loneliness; investigate the acceptability of the intervention for patients, family members and professionals and factors that promote or inhibit its implementation; and measure the costs and benefits of the intervention. Phase I CBTi development. Phase II Parallel-group patient randomised controlled trial (RCT) of the new CBTi plus usual care compared with usual care alone. Multidisciplinary falls services. Consecutive community-dwelling older adults, both sexes, aged ≥ 60 years, with excessive or undue fear of falling per Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I) score of > 23. Phase I Development of the CBTi. The CBTi was developed following patient interviews and taught to HCAs to maximise the potential for uptake and generalisability to a UK NHS setting. Phase II RCT. The CBTi was delivered by HCAs weekly for 8 weeks, with a 6-month booster session plus usual care. These were assessed at baseline, 8 weeks, 6 months and 12 months. Primary outcome measure Fear of falling measured by change in FES-I scores at 12 months. Secondary outcome measures These comprised falls, injuries, anxiety/depression [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS

  15. AN INTEGRATIVE GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY PROGRAM FOR CHILDREN. THE WIZARDING SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Maria Popescu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important tendencies in child psychotherapy is the integration of various psychotherapeutic approaches and technical interventions belonging to different orientations. Based on the Harry Potter stories, the „Wizarding School” structured group therapy program is a 12-step integratively oriented program applicable in personal development, individual and group therapy for children aged 6 to 13 (at present being adapted for adult psychotherapy. The program takes place within a fairy tale, being therefore a type of informal hypnotic trance. The interventions are drawn from the lessons described in Harry Potter’s story at Hogwarts, based on the fundamental principles of child psychotherapy and including elements of play therapy, art therapy, hypnotherapy, cognitive- behavioural therapy, transactional analysis, supportive therapy, family therapy and person centred therapy. From a theoretical point of view the program is based on elements from a number of psychotherapeutic approaches, the main concept being that we need to create a therapeutic myth that is acceptable to a child. The program is not suitable for children with structural deficits, who have difficulties in making the difference between fantasy and reality.

  16. Assessing Attachment in Psychotherapy: Validation of the Patient Attachment Coding System (PACS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talia, Alessandro; Miller-Bottome, Madeleine; Daniel, Sarah I F

    2017-01-01

    The authors present and validate the Patient Attachment Coding System (PACS), a transcript-based instrument that assesses clients' in-session attachment based on any session of psychotherapy, in multiple treatment modalities. One-hundred and sixty clients in different types of psychotherapy (cognitive-behavioural, cognitive-behavioural-enhanced, psychodynamic, relational, supportive) and from three different countries were administered the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) prior to treatment, and one session for each client was rated with the PACS by independent coders. Results indicate strong inter-rater reliability, and high convergent validity of the PACS scales and classifications with the AAI. These results present the PACS as a practical alternative to the AAI in psychotherapy research and suggest that clinicians using the PACS can assess clients' attachment status on an ongoing basis by monitoring clients' verbal activity. These results also provide information regarding the ways in which differences in attachment status play out in therapy sessions and further the study of attachment in psychotherapy from a pre-treatment client factor to a process variable. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Web-based cognitive behavioural therapy (W-CBT for diabetes patients with co-morbid depression: Design of a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouwer Frans

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression is common among people with diabetes, negatively affecting quality of life, treatment adherence and diabetes outcomes. In routine clinical care, diabetes patients have limited access to mental health services and depression therefore often remains untreated. Web-based therapy could potentially be an effective way to improve the reach of psychological care for diabetes patients, at relatively low costs. This study seeks to test the effectiveness of a web-based self-help depression programme for people with diabetes and co-morbid depression. Methods/Design The effectiveness of a web-based self-help course for adults with diabetes with co-morbid depression will be tested in a randomised trial, using a wait-list controlled design. The intervention consists of an 8-week, moderated self-help course that is tailored to the needs of persons living with diabetes and is offered on an individual basis. Participants receive feedback on their homework assignments by e-mail from their coach. We aim to include 286 patients (143/143, as power analyses showed that this number is needed to detect an effect size of 0.35, with measurements at baseline, directly after completing the web-based intervention and at 1, 3, 4 and 6 months follow-up. Patients in the control condition are placed on a waiting list, and follow the course 12 weeks after randomisation. Primary outcomes are depressive symptoms and diabetes-specific emotional distress. Secondary outcomes are satisfaction with the course, perceived health status, self-care behaviours, glycaemic control, and days in bed/absence from work. Questionnaires are administered via the Internet. Discussion The intervention being trialled is expected to help improve mood and reduce diabetes-specific emotional distress in diabetes patients with depression, with subsequent beneficial effects on diabetes self-care and glycaemic outcomes. When proven efficacious, the intervention could be

  18. Management of irritable bowel syndrome in primary care: feasibility randomised controlled trial of mebeverine, methylcellulose, placebo and a patient self-management cognitive behavioural therapy website. (MIBS trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardley Lucy

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background IBS affects 10-22% of the UK population. Abdominal pain, bloating and altered bowel habit affect quality of life, social functioning and time off work. Current GP treatment relies on a positive diagnosis, reassurance, lifestyle advice and drug therapies, but many suffer ongoing symptoms. A recent Cochrane review highlighted the lack of research evidence for IBS drugs. Neither GPs, nor patients have good evidence to inform prescribing decisions. However, IBS drugs are widely used: In 2005 the NHS costs were nearly £10 million for mebeverine and over £8 million for fibre-based bulking agents. CBT and self-management can be helpful, but poor availability in the NHS restricts their use. We have developed a web-based CBT self-management programme, Regul8, based on an existing evidence based self-management manual and in partnership with patients. This could increase access with minimal increased costs. Methods/Design The aim is to undertake a feasibility factorial RCT to assess the effectiveness of the commonly prescribed medications in UK general practice for IBS: mebeverine (anti-spasmodic and methylcellulose (bulking-agent and Regul8, the CBT based self-management website. 135 patients aged 16 to 60 years with IBS symptoms fulfilling Rome III criteria, recruited via GP practices, will be randomised to 1 of 3 levels of the drug condition: mebeverine, methylcellulose or placebo for 6 weeks and to 1 of 3 levels of the website condition, Regul8 with a nurse telephone session and email support, Regul8 with minimal email support, or no website, thus creating 9 groups. Outcomes: Irritable bowel symptom severity scale and IBS-QOL will be measured at baseline, 6 and 12 weeks as the primary outcomes. An intention to treat analysis will be undertaken by ANCOVA for a factorial trial. Discussion This pilot will provide valuable information for a larger trial. Determining the effectiveness of commonly used drug treatments will help

  19. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) clinical guidelines for the management of major depressive disorder in adults. II. Psychotherapy alone or in combination with antidepressant medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sagar V; Segal, Zindel V; Grigoriadis, Sophie; Ravindran, Arun V; Kennedy, Sidney H; Lam, Raymond W; Patten, Scott B

    2009-10-01

    In 2001, the Canadian Psychiatric Association and the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) partnered to produce evidence-based clinical guidelines for the treatment of depressive disorders. A revision of these guidelines was undertaken by CANMAT in 2008-2009 to reflect advances in the field. This article, one of five in the series, reviews new studies of psychotherapy in the acute and maintenance phase of MDD, including computer-based and telephone-delivered psychotherapy. The CANMAT guidelines are based on a question-answer format to enhance accessibility to clinicians. Evidence-based responses are based on updated systematic reviews of the literature and recommendations are graded according to the Level of Evidence, using pre-defined criteria. Lines of Treatment are identified based on criteria that included evidence and expert clinical support. Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Interpersonal Therapy (IPT) continue to have the most evidence for efficacy, both in acute and maintenance phases of MDD, and have been studied in combination with antidepressants. CBT is well studied in conjunction with computer-delivered methods and bibliotherapy. Behavioural Activation and Cognitive-Behavioural Analysis System of Psychotherapy have significant evidence, but need replication. Newer psychotherapies including Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Motivational Interviewing, and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy do not yet have significant evidence as acute treatments; nor does psychodynamic therapy. Although many forms of psychotherapy have been studied, relatively few types have been evaluated for MDD in randomized controlled trials. Evidence about the combination of different types of psychotherapy and antidepressant medication is also limited despite widespread use of these therapies concomitantly. CBT and IPT are the only first-line treatment recommendations for acute MDD and remain highly recommended for maintenance. Both computer-based and

  20. Predicting optimal outcomes in cognitive therapy or interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed individuals using the personalized advantage index approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J.H. Huibers; Z.D. Cohen; L.H.J.M. Lemmens; A. Arntz; F.P.M.L. Peeters; P. Cuijpers; R.J. DeRubeis

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works b

  1. Cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosomatic disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Repro

    ... behavioural model. (Modified from 5-Factor Model of Padesky & Mooney.7 .... sound therapeutic relationship .6 ... by the term collaborativ e .... short-term benefit is, however, like- ... child is ill, have a major impact in .... been cared for by his mother before dying, when Mr Q was 8 years old. ... the memories which are uncov-.

  2. Cognitive behavioural therapy for ADHD in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christina Mohr; Amdisen, Birgitte Lind; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2016-01-01

    Systematically review and analyse the efficacy of CBT versus treatment as usual in adults with ADHD. The literature was systematically searched ending the 28 March 2014. Standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. CBT was efficacious in reducing symptoms...... of ADHD (SDM -1.0, 95% CI -1.5 to -0.5) when evaluated by the patients, but not when evaluated by a clinician. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were significantly reduced when self-reported (SMD -1.0, 95% CI -1.6 to -0.5 and -1.0, 95% CI -1.3 to -0.3, respectively) and evaluated by a clinician (SMD -0.......9, 95% CI -1.7 to -0.2 and -0.9, 95% CI -1.6 to -0.1). The clinical global impression scores improved more in the group randomised to CBT (-1.0; 95% CI -1.6 to -0.4). CBT seems efficacious in some domains affecting adult patients with ADHD, but needs further evaluation....

  3. Is group psychotherapy effective in older adults with depression? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Murali; Jauhari, Archana; Lepping, Peter; Turner, Jim; Crossley, David; Krishnamoorthy, Ashok

    2011-04-01

    Earlier reviews and meta-analyses have consistently concluded that psychological treatment of depression is effective in older adults. We conducted a systematic review randomised controlled trials of group psychotherapy to present the best available evidence in relation to its effectiveness in older adults with depressive disorders. Electronic databases were searched to identify randomised controlled trials. Selected studies were quality assessed and data extracted by two reviewers. Six trials met the inclusion criteria. The trials included in the review examined group interventions based on the cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) model with active therapeutic interventions or waiting list controls. Group psychotherapy is an effective intervention in older adults with depression in comparison to waiting list controls, the overall effect size is very modest (MD = -3.92, 95%CI: -6.18, -1.67). The reported benefits of group intervention in comparison to other active interventions did not reach statistical significance. The benefits of group psychotherapy were maintained at follow-up. The quality of the studies varied and studies were heterogeneous. Although quality of many studies was not optimal, the results of this meta analysis support the results of earlier meta analyses. Group cognitive behavioural therapy is effective in older adults with depression. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. A single blind randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioural therapy in a help-seeking population with an At Risk Mental State for psychosis: the Dutch Early Detection and Intervention Evaluation (EDIE-NL trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delespaul Philippe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Psychotic disorders are a serious mental health problem. Intervention before the onset of psychosis might result in delaying the onset, reducing the impact or even preventing the first episode of psychosis. This study explores the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT in targeting cognitive biases that are involved in the formation of delusions in persons with an ultra-high risk for developing psychosis. A single blind randomised controlled trial compares CBT with treatment as usual in preventing or delaying the onset of psychosis. Method/design All help seeking patients aged 14 to 35 years referred to the mental health services in three regions in the Netherlands are pre-screened with the Prodromal Questionnaire during a period of two years. Patients with a score of 18 or more on the sub-clinical positive symptoms items (45 items in total will be assessed with the Comprehensive Assessment of At Risk Mental State (CAARMS. In a different pathway to care model all referrals from the mental health services in Amsterdam to the specialized psychosis clinic of the Academic Medical Centre in Amsterdam are also assessed with the CAARMS. The primary outcome is the transition rate to psychosis according to the CAARMS-criteria. Group differences will be analysed with chi-square tests and survival analyses. Discussion CBT is a highly tolerated treatment. The psycho-educational CBT approach may prove to be a successful strategy since most people with an At Risk Mental State (ARMS are distressed by odd disturbing experiences. Giving explanations for and normalising these experiences may reduce the arousal (distress and therefore may prevent people from developing a catastrophic delusional explanation for their odd experiences and thus prevent them from developing psychosis. Screening the entire help-seeking population referred to community mental health services with a two-stage strategy, as compared with traditional referral

  5. Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment for Men with Intellectual Disabilities and Sexually Abusive Behaviour: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Glynis; Powell, Simon; Guzman, Ana-Maria; Hays, Sarah-Jane

    2007-01-01

    Background: Cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) seems to be becoming the treatment of choice for non-disabled sex offenders. Nevertheless, there have been relatively few evaluations of such treatment for men with intellectual disabilities (ID) and sexually abusive behaviour. Method: A pilot study providing CBT for two groups of men with ID is…

  6. Guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A.; Emmelkamp, J.; de Wit, J.; Lancee, J.; Andersson, G.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Cuijpers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insomnia is a prevalent problem with a high burden of disease (e.g. reduced quality of life, reduced work capacity) and a high co-morbidity with other mental and somatic disorders. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of insomnia but is seldom offered. CBT de

  7. Guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A; Emmelkamp, J; de Wit, J; Lancee, J; Andersson, G; van Someren, E J W; Cuijpers, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a prevalent problem with a high burden of disease (e.g. reduced quality of life, reduced work capacity) and a high co-morbidity with other mental and somatic disorders. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of insomnia but is seldom offered. CBT de

  8. Guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A; Emmelkamp, J; de Wit, J; Lancee, J; Andersson, G; van Someren, E J W; Cuijpers, P

    BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a prevalent problem with a high burden of disease (e.g. reduced quality of life, reduced work capacity) and a high co-morbidity with other mental and somatic disorders. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of insomnia but is seldom offered. CBT

  9. Guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A.; Emmelkamp, J.; de Wit, J.; Lancee, J.; Andersson, G.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Cuijpers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insomnia is a prevalent problem with a high burden of disease (e.g. reduced quality of life, reduced work capacity) and a high co-morbidity with other mental and somatic disorders. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of insomnia but is seldom offered. CBT

  10. Guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia : a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A; Emmelkamp, J; de Wit, J; Lancee, J; Andersson, G; van Someren, E J W; Cuijpers, P

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Insomnia is a prevalent problem with a high burden of disease (e.g. reduced quality of life, reduced work capacity) and a high co-morbidity with other mental and somatic disorders. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of insomnia but is seldom offered. CBT de

  11. Guided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia: a randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, A.; Emmelkamp, J.; de Wit, J.; Lancee, J.; Andersson, G.; van Someren, E.J.W.; Cuijpers, P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insomnia is a prevalent problem with a high burden of disease (e.g. reduced quality of life, reduced work capacity) and a high co-morbidity with other mental and somatic disorders. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is effective in the treatment of insomnia but is seldom offered. CBT de

  12. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... options exist. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Other forms of therapy for BPD include: ... than acting out these emotions impulsively. Schema-Focused Therapy (SFT) This type of therapy focuses on reframing “ ...

  13. Predicting Psychotherapy Dropouts: A Multilevel Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Alexander F; Flückiger, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The role of therapeutic processes in predicting premature termination of psychotherapy has been a particular focus of recent research. The purpose of this study was to contrast outpatients who completed therapy and those who dropped out with respect to their self-reported in-session experiences of self-esteem, mastery, clarification and the therapeutic alliance. The 296 patients with mixed disorders were treated with an integrative form of cognitive-behavioural therapy without pre-determined time limit (M = 20.2 sessions). Multilevel analyses indicated that patients who did not completetreatment reported, on average, lower levels of self-esteem, mastery and clarification and lower ratings of their therapeutic alliance in treatment in contrast to patients who completed therapy. Patient-reported change in self-esteem experiences over the course of treatment turned out to be the strongest predictor of dropout from psychotherapy or successful completion. When dropout occurred before the average treatment length was reached, patients reported fewer clarifying experiences as early as the first session and their ratings of the therapeutic alliance were characterized by an absence of positive development. Both of these aspects seem to be involved in patients' decisions to leave treatment early. The findings underscore the importance of the therapeutic process in understanding the mechanisms behind treatment dropout. Analyses data from 296 patients at a private outpatient clinic in a routine practice setting (CBT). Completer/dropout definition: presence or absence of measurement battery at post-assessment. Focuses on change in therapy processes by investigating post-session reports. Finds that positive changes in self-esteem experiences is the most robust predictor of dropout, followed by ratings of clarification experiences and the global alliance. In line with recent dropout research, these process indicators might help to detect therapeutic situations that are

  14. [Functional Analytic Psychotherapy: Approaches and scope of behavior therapy based on changes in the therapeutic context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, Amanda M; Coletti, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is a therapeutic approach developed in 'third wave therapies' context. FAP is characterized by use therapeutic relationship and the behaviors emit into it to improve clients daily life functioning. This therapeutic model is supported in behavior analysis principles and contextual functionalism philosophy. FAP proposes that clients behavior in session are functional equivalent with those out of session; therefore, when therapists respond to clients behaviors in session contingently, they promote and increase improvements in the natural setting. This article poses main features of FAP, its philosophical roots, achievements and research challenges to establish FAP as an independent treatment based on the evidence.

  15. Measuring Patients’ Attachment Avoidance in Psychotherapy: Development of the Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale (AATS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    András Láng

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A new scale measuring patient-therapist attachment avoidance was developed. Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale is a new measure based on the Bartholomew model of adult attachment (Bartholomew & Horowitz, 1991 and the Experience in Close Relationships Scale (Brennan, Clark, & Shaver, 1998 to measure patients’ attachment avoidance towards therapists. With 112 patient-therapist dyads participating in the study, validation of a preliminary scale – measuring both attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance in therapy – took place using therapists’ evaluations of patients’ relational behavior and patients’ self-reports about their attitude toward psychotherapy. Analysis of the data revealed six underlying scales. Results showed all six scales to be reliable. Validation of scales measuring attachment anxiety failed. The importance of Attachment Avoidance in Therapy Scale and its subscales is discussed.

  16. [General psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vymetal, J

    2003-01-01

    Nowadays a theoretical psychotherapeutical thinking develops from the eclectic practice and uses particularly the research of the effective factors of the therapy. Best they can be characterized as differentiate, synthetic, integrative and exceeding other approaches. The development in question goes on with attempts of creating a general model of the psychotherapy that could be a basis for models of special psychotherapies. The aim of such a model is to describe all that is present as important factor for inducing a desirable change of a human in all psychotherapeutical approaches. Among general models we can mention the generic model of D. E. Orlinski and K. I. Howard, Grawe's cube (the author is K. Grawe) and the equation of the psychotherapy.

  17. Combination of psychotherapy and benzodiazepines versus either therapy alone for panic disorder: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Furukawa Toshi A

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: The efficacy of combined psychotherapy and benzodiazepine treatment for panic disorder is still unclear despite its widespread use. The present systematic review aims to examine its efficacy compared with either monotherapy alone. Methods: All randomised trials comparing combined psychotherapy and benzodiazepine for panic disorder with either therapy alone were identified by comprehensive electronic search on the Cochrane Registers, by checking references of relevant studies and of other reviews, and by contacting experts in the field. Two reviewers independently checked eligibility of trials, assessed quality of trials and extracted data from eligible trials using a standardized data extraction form. Our primary outcome was "response" defined by global judgement. Authors of the original trials were contacted for further unpublished data. Meta-analyses were undertaken synthesizing data from all relevant trials. Results: Only two studies, which compared the combination with behaviour (exposure therapy, met our eligibility criteria. Both studies had a 16-week intervention. Unpublished data were retrieved for one study. The relative risk for response for the combination was 1.25 (95%CI: 0.78 to 2.03 during acute phase treatment, 0.78 (0.45 to 1.35 at the end of treatment, and 0.62 (0.36 to 1.07 at 6–12 months follow-up. Some secondary outcomes hinted at superiority of the combination during acute phase treatment. One study was identified comparing the combination to benzodiazepine. The relative risk for response was 1.57 (0.83 to 2.98, 3.39 (1.03 to 11.21, statistically significant and 2.31 (0.79 to 6.74 respectively. The superiority of the combination was observed on secondary outcomes at all the time points. No sub-group analyses were conducted due to the limited number of included trials. Conclusion: Unlike some narrative reviews in the literature, our systematic search established the paucity of high quality evidence for

  18. How treatment affects the brain: meta-analysis evidence of neural substrates underpinning drug therapy and psychotherapy in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccia, Maddalena; Piccardi, Laura; Guariglia, Paola

    2016-06-01

    The idea that modifications of affect, behavior and cognition produced by psychotherapy are mediated by biological underpinnings predates the advent of the modern neurosciences. Recently, several studies demonstrated that psychotherapy outcomes are linked to modifications in specific brain regions. This opened the debate over the similarities and dissimilarities between psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy. In this study, we used activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis to investigate the effects of psychotherapy (PsyTh) and pharmacotherapy (DrugTh) on brain functioning in Major Depression (MD). Our results demonstrate that the two therapies modify different neural circuits. Specifically, PsyTh induces selective modifications in the left inferior and superior frontal gyri, middle temporal gyrus, lingual gyrus and middle cingulate cortex, as well as in the right middle frontal gyrus and precentral gyrus. Otherwise, DrugTh selectively affected brain activation in the right insula in MD patients. These results are in line with previous evidence of the synergy between psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy but they also demonstrate that the two therapies have different neural underpinnings.

  19. Mindfulness-based 'third wave' cognitive and behavioural therapies versus other psychological therapies for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunot, Vivien; Moore, Theresa Hm; Caldwell, Deborah; Davies, Philippa; Jones, Hannah; Lewis, Glyn; Churchill, Rachel

    2010-09-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all third wave CBT approaches compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of different third wave CBT approaches (ACT,compassionate mind training, functional analytic psychotherapy, extended behavioural activation and meta-cognitive therapy) compared with all other psychological therapy approaches for acute depression.To examine the effectiveness and acceptability of all third wave CBT approaches compared with different psychological therapy approaches (psychodynamic, behavioural, humanistic, integrative, cognitive-behavioural) for acute depression.

  20. The effect of interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies versus 'treatment as usual' in patients with major depressive disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus Christian; Hansen, Jane Lindschou; Simonsen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetimes at tremendous suffering and costs. Interpersonal psychotherapy and other psychodynamic therapies may be effective interventions for major depressive disorder, but the effects have only had limited assessment...... in systematic reviews....

  1. Attachment as Moderator of Treatment Outcome in Major Depression: A Randomized Control Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy versus Cognitive Behavior Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Carolina; Atkinson, Leslie; Quilty, Lena C.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Anxiety and avoidance dimensions of adult attachment insecurity were tested as moderators of treatment outcome for interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Fifty-six participants with major depression were randomly assigned to these treatment conditions. Beck Depression Inventory-II, Six-Item Hamilton Rating Scale…

  2. Economic evaluation of schema therapy and clarification-oriented psychotherapy for personality disorders: A multicenter, randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bamelis, L.L.M.; Arntz, A.; Wetzelaer, P.; Verdoorn, R.; Evers, S.M.A.A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare from a societal perspective the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of schema therapy, clarification-oriented psychotherapy, and treatment as usual for patients with avoidant, dependent, obsessive-compulsive, paranoid, histrionic, and/or narcissistic personality disorder. Method:

  3. The Therapeutic Alliance in Schema-Focused Therapy and Transference-Focused Psychotherapy for Borderline Personality Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinhoven, Philip; Giesen-Bloo, Josephine; van Dyck, Richard; Kooiman, Kees; Arntz, Arnoud

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the quality and development of the therapeutic alliance as a mediator of change in schema-focused therapy (SFT) and transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP) for borderline personality disorder. Seventy-eight patients were randomly allocated to 3 years of biweekly SFT or TFP. Scores of both therapists and patients for the…

  4. Psychotherapies for Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Facts for Families Guide Psychotherapy for Children and Adolescents: Different Types No. 86; updated February 2017 Psychotherapy ... Therapy (DBT) can be used to treat older adolescents who have chronic suicidal feelings/thoughts, engage in ...

  5. Compulsive buying: a cognitive-behavioural model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, Stephen; Bolton, Jessica V

    2009-01-01

    Compulsive buying (CB) has only relatively recently become a topic of interest for researchers and clinicians alike. This hiatus means that (unlike other impulse control disorders) there is currently little theoretical guidance for clinicians attempting to intervene with CB clients and no established model for researchers to evaluate, distil and refine. The current paper summarizes and organizes the main extant identified factors in the CB literature into four distinct phases: (1) antecedents; (2) internal/external triggers; (3) the act of buying; and finally, (4) post-purchase. The relationships and interactions between the identified phases are then hypothesized, within the proposed cognitive-behavioural model. The model distinguishes the key cognitive, affective and behavioural factors within each phase and identifies how CB can become self-reinforcing over time. The over-arching treatment implication is that CB can be re-conceptualized as chronic and repetitive failure in self-regulation efforts, and that psychological interventions can accommodate this in attempting to facilitate change. A successful case example is provided of a 'co-dependent compulsive buyer' using the model, with psychometric evaluation of key aspects of CB and mental health at assessment, termination and 6-month follow-up. The research and clinical implications of the proposed model are discussed, alongside identified short-comings and the need for psychological services to respond appropriately to CB clients seeking help.

  6. The center core in ego state therapy and other hypnotically facilitated psychotherapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, Claire

    2013-07-01

    Center core phenomena have been utilized in the practice of ego state therapy and other forms of hypnotically facilitated psychotherapy for nearly 40 years. Despite the frequency with which they are employed, many confusions, contradictions, and questions remain concerning them. In this article relevant center core phenomena literature is reviewed and an essential differentiation between two different kinds of center core phenomena is clarified. Psychodynamic explanations are offered for the therapeutic benefits of archetypal center core experiences such as inner strength and inner wisdom. The information provided offers clinicians a sturdier platform from which to decide whether to incorporate center core experiences into clinical practice. The persistent question of whether center core phenomena are ego states is revisited and addressed.

  7. Protocol for the PACE trial: a randomised controlled trial of adaptive pacing, cognitive behaviour therapy, and graded exercise, as supplements to standardised specialist medical care versus standardised specialist medical care alone for patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis or encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Peter D; Sharpe, Michael C; Chalder, Trudie; DeCesare, Julia C; Walwyn, Rebecca

    2007-03-08

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, also called myalgic encephalomyelitis /encephalopathy or ME) is a debilitating condition with no known cause or cure. Improvement may occur with medical care and additional therapies of pacing, cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy. The latter two therapies have been found to be efficacious in small trials, but patient organisations surveys have reported adverse effects. Although pacing has been advocated by patient organisations, it lacks empirical support. Specialist medical care is commonly provided but its efficacy when given alone is not established. This trial compares the efficacy of the additional therapies when added to specialist medical care against specialist medical care alone. 600 patients, who meet operationalised diagnostic criteria for CFS, will be recruited from secondary care into a randomised trial of four treatments, stratified by current co morbid depressive episode and different CFS/ME criteria. The four treatments are standardised specialist medical care either given alone, or with adaptive pacing therapy or cognitive behaviour therapy or graded exercise therapy. Supplementary therapies will involve fourteen sessions over 23 weeks and a booster session at 36 weeks. Outcome will be assessed at 12, 24, and 52 weeks after randomisation. Two primary outcomes of self-rated fatigue and physical function will assess differential effects of each treatment on these measures. Secondary outcomes include adverse events and reactions, subjective measures of symptoms, mood, sleep and function and objective measures of physical activity, fitness, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility. The primary analysis will be based on intention to treat and will use logistic regression models to compare treatments. Secondary outcomes will be analysed by repeated measures analysis of variance with a linear mixed model. All analyses will allow for stratification factors. Mediators and moderators will be explored using

  8. Protocol for the PACE trial: A randomised controlled trial of adaptive pacing, cognitive behaviour therapy, and graded exercise as supplements to standardised specialist medical care versus standardised specialist medical care alone for patients with the chronic fatigue syndrome/myalgic encephalomyelitis or encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeCesare Julia C

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS, also called myalgic encephalomyelitis/encephalopathy or ME is a debilitating condition with no known cause or cure. Improvement may occur with medical care and additional therapies of pacing, cognitive behavioural therapy and graded exercise therapy. The latter two therapies have been found to be efficacious in small trials, but patient organisations' surveys have reported adverse effects. Although pacing has been advocated by patient organisations, it lacks empirical support. Specialist medical care is commonly provided but its efficacy when given alone is not established. This trial compares the efficacy of the additional therapies when added to specialist medical care against specialist medical care alone. Methods/Design 600 patients, who meet operationalised diagnostic criteria for CFS, will be recruited from secondary care into a randomised trial of four treatments, stratified by current comorbid depressive episode and different CFS/ME criteria. The four treatments are standardised specialist medical care either given alone, or with adaptive pacing therapy or cognitive behaviour therapy or graded exercise therapy. Supplementary therapies will involve fourteen sessions over 23 weeks and a 'booster session' at 36 weeks. Outcome will be assessed at 12, 24, and 52 weeks after randomisation. Two primary outcomes of self-rated fatigue and physical function will assess differential effects of each treatment on these measures. Secondary outcomes include adverse events and reactions, subjective measures of symptoms, mood, sleep and function and objective measures of physical activity, fitness, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility. The primary analysis will be based on intention to treat and will use logistic regression models to compare treatments. Secondary outcomes will be analysed by repeated measures analysis of variance with a linear mixed model. All analyses will allow for stratification

  9. Out-Patient Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment of Fibromyalgia: Impact on Pain Response and Health Status

    OpenAIRE

    Warren R Nielson; Manfred Harth; Bell, David A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate a cognitive-behavioural out-patient program for patients with fibromyalgia syndrome.PATIENTS AND METHODS: A quasi-experimental design was used to evaluate 101 patients who participated in a four-week program that included psychological, family educational, occupational therapy and physiotherapy interventions. After discharge, patients were seen four times over one year for day-long review sessions. Five pain response scales from the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI)...

  10. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... treatment options exist. Transference-Focused Psychotherapy (TFP) Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) Other forms of therapy for BPD ... STEPPS can help reduce symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve symptoms of depression, and improve quality of ...

  11. Prediction of treatment discontinuation and recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder: Results from an RCT comparing Schema Therapy and Transference Focused Psychotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Arntz; S. Stupar-Rutenfrans; J. Bloo; R. van Dyck; P. Spinhoven

    2015-01-01

    Knowing what predicts discontinuation or success of psychotherapies for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is important to improve treatments. Many variables have been reported in the literature, but replication is needed and investigating what therapy process underlies the findings is necessary

  12. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Patients Receiving Disability Benefits: A Systematic Review and Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    textabstractObjectives: To systematically summarize the randomized trial evidence regarding the relative effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) in patients with depression in receipt of disability benefits in comparison to those not receiving disability benefits. Data Sources: All relevant RCTs from a database of randomized controlled and comparative studies examining the effects of psychotherapy for adult depression (http://www.evidencebasedpsychotherapies.org), electronic data...

  13. Psychotherapy: A 40-Year Appraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfield, Sol L.

    1981-01-01

    Appraises selected issues and developments in the field of psychotherapy since 1940. Discusses increased participation of clinical psychologists in the area of psychotherapy, increased popularity of psychotherapy, declining influence of psychoanalysis and related views, emergence of behavioral and cognitive therapies, and recent emphasis on…

  14. Effectiveness of Group Cognitive-Behavioural Treatment for Men with Intellectual Disabilities at Risk of Sexual Offending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Background: For non-disabled men, group cognitive-behaviour therapy is a successful form of treatment when men have committed sexual offences. However, men with intellectual disabilities and sexually abusive behaviour are rarely offered treatment for their sexual behaviour and little research data on the effectiveness of such treatment has been…

  15. Cognitive-Behaviour Formulation for Three Men with Learning Disabilities Who Experience Psychosis: How Do We Make It Make Sense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkland, Jamie

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive-behaviour therapy (CBT) is increasingly being used with people with learning disabilities. One of the challenges in working this way is effectively sharing and understanding the formulation of the client's problem. One could argue that only with a shared understanding can there be collaboration between the therapist and the client. By…

  16. Satisfaction with Therapist-Delivered vs. Self-Administered Online Cognitive Behavioural Treatments for Depression Symptoms in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek; Timulak, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Participants with symptoms of depression received either eight sessions of therapist-delivered email cognitive behaviour therapy (eCBT; n = 37), or eight sessions of computerised CBT self-administered treatment (cCBT; n = 43). At post-treatment participants completed a questionnaire to determine what they found satisfying about their online…

  17. Satisfaction with Therapist-Delivered vs. Self-Administered Online Cognitive Behavioural Treatments for Depression Symptoms in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Derek; Timulak, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Participants with symptoms of depression received either eight sessions of therapist-delivered email cognitive behaviour therapy (eCBT; n = 37), or eight sessions of computerised CBT self-administered treatment (cCBT; n = 43). At post-treatment participants completed a questionnaire to determine what they found satisfying about their online…

  18. The Play of Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks-Tarlow, Terry

    2012-01-01

    The author reviews the role of play within psychotherapy. She does not discuss the formal play therapy especially popular for young children, nor play from the Jungian perspective that encourages the use of the sand tray with adults. Instead, she focuses on the informal use of play during psychotherapy as it is orchestrated intuitively. Because…

  19. Adult attachment insecurity and narrative processes in psychotherapy: an exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Sarah I F

    2011-01-01

    Different types of client attachment insecurity may affect the psychotherapeutic process in distinct ways. This exploratory study compared the in-session discourse of clients with dismissing and preoccupied attachment states of mind on Adult Attachment Interviews conducted prior to therapy in the context of a randomized clinical trial of psychoanalytic and cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy for bulimia nervosa. In a subsample of six sessions from each of eight therapy dyads, preoccupied clients were found to talk more and have longer speaking turns than dismissing clients, who in turn generated more pauses. Using the Narrative Processes Coding System, preoccupied clients were found to show more narrative initiative; whereas, differences in terms of narrative process modes were not as clearly interpretable. Contrary to expectations, the two insecure states of mind were equally different in the relationship-focused psychoanalytic therapy and in the symptom-focused cognitive-behavioural therapy. Suggestions for further investigations of the in-session discourse of clients with different attachment states of mind are given. 

  20. Breathing exercise combined with cognitive behavioural intervention improves sleep quality and heart rate variability in major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hui-Ching; Chung, Yu-Chu; Yeh, Mei-Ling; Lee, Jia-Fu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise on sleep quality and heart rate variability in patients with major depression. Depression is a long-lasting illness with significant effects not only in individuals themselves, but on their family, work and social relationships as well. Cognitive behavioural therapy is considered to be an effective treatment for major depression. Breathing relaxation may improve heart rate variability, but few studies have comprehensively examined the effect of a cognitive behavioural intervention combined with relaxing breathing on patients with major depression. An experimental research design with a repeated measure was used. Eighty-nine participants completed this study and entered data analysed. The experimental group (n = 43) received the cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise for four weeks, whereas the control group (n = 46) did not. Sleep quality and heart rate variability were measured at baseline, posttest1, posttest2 and follow-up. Data were examined by chi-square tests, t-tests and generalised estimating equations. After adjusting for age, socioeconomic status, severity of disease and psychiatric history, the quality of sleep of the experimental group improved, with the results at posttest achieving significance. Heart rate variability parameters were also significantly improved. This study supported the hypothesis that the cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise could improve sleep quality and heart rate variability in patients with major depression, and the effectiveness was lasting. The cognitive behavioural intervention combined with a breathing relaxation exercise that included muscle relaxation, deep breathing and sleep hygiene could be provided with major depression during hospitalisation. Through group practice and experience sharing

  1. Psychotherapy for Suicidal Clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lester, David

    1994-01-01

    Reviews various systems of psychotherapy for suitability for suicidal clients. Discusses psychoanalysis, cognitive therapy, primal therapy, transactional analysis, Gestalt therapy, reality therapy, person-centered therapy, existential analysis, and Jungian analysis in light of available treatment options. Includes 36 citations. (Author/CRR)

  2. Psychotherapy and distributive justice: a Rawlsian analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmot, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    In this paper I outline an approach to the distribution of resources between psychotherapy modalities in the context of the UK's health care system, using recent discussions of Cognitive Behavioural Psychotherapy as a way of highlighting resourcing issues. My main goal is to offer an approach that is just, and that accommodates the diversity of different schools of psychotherapy. In order to do this I draw extensively on the theories of Justice and of Political Liberalism developed by the late John Rawls, and adapt these to the particular requirements of psychotherapy resourcing. I explore some of the implications of this particular analysis, and consider how the principles of Rawlsian justice might translate into ground rules for deliberation and decision-making.

  3. Psychodynamic psychotherapy versus cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder: an efficacy and partial effectiveness trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bögels, Susan M; Wijts, Paul; Oort, Frans J; Sallaerts, Steph J M

    2014-05-01

    Comparing the overall and differential effects of psychodynamic psychotherapy (PDT) versus cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for social anxiety disorder (SAD). Patients with a primary SAD (N = 47) were randomly assigned to PDT (N = 22) or CBT (N = 27). Both PDT and CBT consisted of up to 36 sessions (average PDT 31.4 and CBT 19.8 sessions). Assessments took place at waitlist: pretest, after 12 and 24 weeks for those who received longer treatment: posttest, 3-month and 1-year follow-up. Changes in the main outcome measure self-reported social anxiety composite, as well as in other psychopathology, social skills, negative social beliefs, public self-consciousness, defense mechanisms, personal goals, independent rater's judgments of SAD and general improvement, and approach behavior during an objective test, were analyzed using multilevel analysis. No improvement occurred during waitlist. Treatments were highly efficacious, with large within-subject effect sizes for social anxiety, but no differences between PDT and CBT on general and treatment-specific measures occurred. Remission rates were over 50% and similar for PDT and CBT. Personality disorders did not influence the effects of PDT or CBT. PDT and CBT are both effective approaches for SAD. Further research is needed on the cost-effectiveness of PDT versus CBT, on different lengths PDT, and on patient preferences and their relationship to outcome of PDT versus CBT. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cognitive behaviour therapy for treatment of minor or mild-major depression in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes: study protocol for the economic evaluation alongside the MIND-DIA randomized controlled trial (MIND-DIA CEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Matthias J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Depression and elevated depression symptoms are more prevalent in patients with type 2 diabetes than in those without diabetes and are associated with adverse health outcomes and increased total healthcare utilization. This suggests that more effective depression treatment might not only improve health outcome, but also reduce costs. However, there is a lack of evidence on (cost- effectiveness of treatment options for minor and mild-major depression in patients with type 2 diabetes. In this paper we describe the design and methods of the economic evaluation, which will be conducted alongside the MIND-DIA trial (Cognitive behaviour therapy in elderly type 2 diabetes patients with minor or mild-major depression. The objective of the economic evaluation (MIND-DIA CEA is to examine incremental cost-effectiveness of a diabetes specific cognitive behaviour group therapy (CBT as compared to intensified treatment as usual (TAU and to a guided self-help group intervention (SH. Methods/Design Patients will be followed for 15 months. During this period data on health sector costs, patient costs and societal productivity/time costs will be collected in addition to clinical data. Person-years free of moderate/severe major depression, quality adjusted life years (QALYs, and cumulative costs will be estimated for each arm of the trial (CBT, TAU and SH. To determine cost-effectiveness of the CBT, differences in costs and effects between the CBT group and TAU/SH group will be calculated. Discussion CBT is a potentially effective treatment option to improve quality of life and to avoid the onset of a moderate/severe major depression in elderly patients with type 2 diabetes and minor or mild-major depression. This hypothesis will be evaluated in the MIND-DIA trial. Based on these results the associated economic evaluation will provide additional evidence on the cost-effectiveness of CBT in this target population. Methodological strengths and

  5. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Psychotherapy (TFP) This form of therapy is rooted in the patient’s confused and contradictory sense of identity ... person to another person, such as the therapist. In that moment, the therapist talks with the patient ...

  6. Cognitive behavioural treatment for women who have menopausal symptoms after breast cancer treatment (MENOS 1): a randomised controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, Eleanor; Smith, Melanie J; Hellier, Jennifer; Balabanovic, Janet A; Hamed, Hisham; Grunfeld, Elizabeth A; Hunter, Myra S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background Hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS) affect 65–85% of women after breast cancer treatment; they are distressing, causing sleep problems and decreased quality of life. Hormone replacement therapy is often either undesirable or contraindicated. Safe, effective non-hormonal treatments are needed. We investigated whether cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help breast cancer survivors to effectively manage HFNS. Methods In this randomised controlled trial, we recruited women...

  7. Cognitive-Behavioural Bibliotherapy for Hypochondriasis : A Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, Femke M.; Bouman, Theo K.

    2009-01-01

    Aims: The present study aims to determine whether cognitive-behavioural minimal contact bibliotherapy is acceptable to participants suffering from DSM-IV-TR hypochondriasis, and whether this intervention is able to reduce hypochondriacal complaints, as well as comorbid depressive complaints and trai

  8. The effect of Group Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy in combination with Pharmacotherapy on Mania and Depression Symptoms and Awareness of warming signs of relapse in patients with Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Ali Ghanbari Hashemabadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: This research has been done according to the cognitivebehavioral theories and biochemical model in order to evaluate the efficiency of Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy in combination with Pharmacotherapy on Mania and Depression Symptoms and Awareness of warning signs of relapse in patients with Bipolar Disorder. "n "nMethods:In this study with the experimental pretest- posttest- follow up plan , 30 women suffering from bipolar disorder, randomly assigned to receive either the group cognitive-behavior therapy (experimental group, n=15 or usual treatment (control group, n=15;and were follow-up for a six months. patients in both groups were prescribed standard Pharmacotherapy. First all subjects were put to a pretest in equal conditions with measures of scale 2 and 9 of MMPI Test, and warning signs checklist. Then the experimental group received group cognitive-behavior therapy for 8 sessions in addition to their medication therapy. The control group only received medicine. At the end of the experiment, all subjects were tested under equal conditions. After completion of the treatment process, the subjects of both groups were supervised for 6 months. The findings of the study were analyzed by the statistical method of Multi-variable analysis of variance with repetitive measurements. "nResults:The findings showed that the group cognitive-behavior therapy had been significantly more efficient in reduction of mania symptoms {p=0/03} and increment of awareness of warning signs of relapse {p=0/00} in comparison with control group; but there is no significantly differences in depression symptoms between two groups. "nConclusion: The findings of this study suggest the beneficial effect of Group cognitive-behavior therapy in reducing of mania symptoms and increment of awareness of warning signs of relapse. Therefore, it can be used as a complementary treatment by clinicians

  9. Clinical and no-clinical setting specificities in first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakulić, Aleksandra Mindoljević

    2011-03-01

    Modern history of short-term group psychotherapy dates back to the late 1950-ies. From then to present day, this psychotherapeutic method has been used in various forms, from dynamic-oriented to cognitive behavioural psychotherapies. Although it has always been considered rather controversial, due its cost-effectiveness, it has been capturing more and more popularity. This paper presents the specificities of first session short-term psychotherapy psychodrama group through session work with two examined groups: a group of 20 adult women who suffer from mild or moderate forms of unipolar depression and a group of 20 students of the School of Medicine in Zagreb without any psychiatric symptomatology. The results indicate the high importance of having structure in first psychodrama session, of relating it with the previously thoroughly conducted, initial, clinical, interviews, and of the clarity and focus in terms of determining the goals of therapy, especially in a clinical context. This study also confirmed assumptions regarding the need for different approaches of warming-up in psychodrama, both in the clinical and in non-clinical samples. A psychodrama psychotherapist should have good time managing skills and capability to convert the time available into an opportunity for directly boosting the group energy and work on therapeutic alliance.

  10. PSYCHOTHERAPY SUPPORT ON SCIZOPHRENIA

    OpenAIRE

    Widyawati Suhendro

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a disease that causes varying descriptions. The symptoms of schizophrenia are divided into two groups, the primary and secondary symptoms. Treatment should be done as soon as possible, because a state of psychotic periods raises the possibility to suffer mental decline. The treatment is carried out must be comprehensive, multimodal, empirically and can be applied to the patient. One therapy that is given is psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is usually combined with pharmacologica...

  11. Cognitive Therapy for Depression: A Comparison of Individual Psychotherapy and Bibliotherapy for Depressed Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Mark; Scogin, Forrest; McKendree-Smith, Nancy L.; Floyd, Donna L.; Rokke, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one community-residing older adults age 60 or over either received 16 sessions of individual cognitive psychotherapy (Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979) or read Feeling Good (Burns, 1980) for bibliotherapy. Posttreatment comparisons with the delayed-treatment control indicated that both treatments were superior to a delayed-treatment control.…

  12. Cognitive Therapy for Depression: A Comparison of Individual Psychotherapy and Bibliotherapy for Depressed Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Mark; Scogin, Forrest; McKendree-Smith, Nancy L.; Floyd, Donna L.; Rokke, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Thirty-one community-residing older adults age 60 or over either received 16 sessions of individual cognitive psychotherapy (Beck, Rush, Shaw, & Emery, 1979) or read Feeling Good (Burns, 1980) for bibliotherapy. Posttreatment comparisons with the delayed-treatment control indicated that both treatments were superior to a delayed-treatment control.…

  13. Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Treatments of Parasomnias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbiati, Andrea; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Giora, Enrico; Ferini-Strambi, Luigi; Marelli, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Parasomnias are unpleasant or undesirable behaviours or experiences that occur predominantly during or within close proximity to sleep. Pharmacological treatments of parasomnias are available, but their efficacy is established only for few disorders. Furthermore, most of these disorders tend spontaneously to remit with development. Nonpharmacological treatments therefore represent valid therapeutic choices. This paper reviews behavioural and cognitive-behavioural managements employed for parasomnias. Referring to the ICSD-3 nosology we consider, respectively, NREM parasomnias, REM parasomnias, and other parasomnias. Although the efficacy of some of these treatments is proved, in other cases their clinical evidence cannot be provided because of the small size of the samples. Due to the rarity of some parasomnias, further multicentric researches are needed in order to offer a more complete account of behavioural and cognitive-behavioural treatments efficacy.

  14. Behavioural and Cognitive-Behavioural Treatments of Parasomnias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Galbiati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parasomnias are unpleasant or undesirable behaviours or experiences that occur predominantly during or within close proximity to sleep. Pharmacological treatments of parasomnias are available, but their efficacy is established only for few disorders. Furthermore, most of these disorders tend spontaneously to remit with development. Nonpharmacological treatments therefore represent valid therapeutic choices. This paper reviews behavioural and cognitive-behavioural managements employed for parasomnias. Referring to the ICSD-3 nosology we consider, respectively, NREM parasomnias, REM parasomnias, and other parasomnias. Although the efficacy of some of these treatments is proved, in other cases their clinical evidence cannot be provided because of the small size of the samples. Due to the rarity of some parasomnias, further multicentric researches are needed in order to offer a more complete account of behavioural and cognitive-behavioural treatments efficacy.

  15. Group Psychotherapy in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ívarsson, Ómar

    2015-10-01

    In this overview of group psychotherapy in Iceland, an attempt will be made to describe how it is practiced today, give some glimpses into its earlier history, and clarify seven issues: (1) the standing of group psychotherapy in Iceland, its previous history, and the theoretical orientation of dynamic group therapy in the country; (2) the role of group therapy in the health care system; (3) how training in group therapy is organized; (4) the relationship between group psychotherapy research and clinical practice; (5) which issues/processes can be identified as unique to therapy groups in Iceland; and (6) how important are group-related issues within the social background of the country; and (7) what group work holds for the future.

  16. 基于认知行为疗法的自助干预在抑郁患者中的应用%Efficacy of self-help interventions based on cognitive behavioural therapy on depression: a systematic review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王霞; 杨敏

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been proved to be an effective psychological treatment method for depression,especially for mild-to-moderate depression,however,due to the influence of various factors,its application in patients with depression is limited.Studies abroad have confirmed self-help intervention based on CBT has good effects on patients with depression.By reviewing efficacy of self-help interventions based on CBT on depression,it can be known that most of the literatures support that self-help interventions based on CBT has good effects on depression.Related researches abroad have been more mature,but few similar studies have been conducted in our country.So self-help CBT for depression has broad prospects in our country,which can play an important role in the prevention and therapy of depression,alleviating the shortage of medical resources,and reducing the patients' medical expenses,etc.Based on bibliotherapy (a major form of self-help interventions based on CBT),future studies need to learn from foreign practice to expand the audience to the clinic,community and non-clinical patients,in order to provide advice for interventions for depression in China.%认知行为疗法(cognitive-behavioral therapy,CBT)已被证实是抑郁症特别是轻中度抑郁症的一种有效心理治疗方法,然而由于受到各种因素的影响,其在抑郁患者中的应用受到限制.国外研究已证实基于CBT的自助干预对抑郁患者有较好的效果.通过综述基于CBT的自助干预在抑郁患者中的应用现状,提出大部分文献支持基于CBT的自助干预在对抑郁患者有较好的效果,国外的相关研究已比较成熟,但国内类似的研究还为数不多,其在我国具有广泛的应用前景,可以在抑郁症的防治、缓解医疗资源的短缺、减少患者的医疗支出等方面发挥重要作用.未来国内的研究需在阅读疗法(基于CBT的自助干预的一种主要形式)的基础上借鉴国外的做

  17. The individual therapy process questionnaire: development and validation of a revised measure to evaluate general change mechanisms in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mander, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    There is a dearth of measures specifically designed to assess empirically validated mechanisms of therapeutic change. To fill in this research gap, the aim of the current study was to develop a measure that covers a large variety of empirically validated mechanisms of change with corresponding versions for the patient and therapist. To develop an instrument that is based on several important change process frameworks, we combined two established change mechanisms instruments: the Scale for the Multiperspective Assessment of General Change Mechanisms in Psychotherapy (SACiP) and the Scale of the Therapeutic Alliance-Revised (STA-R). In our study, 457 psychosomatic inpatients completed the SACiP and the STA-R and diverse outcome measures in early, middle and late stages of psychotherapy. Data analyses were conducted using factor analyses and multilevel modelling. The psychometric properties of the resulting Individual Therapy Process Questionnaire were generally good to excellent, as demonstrated by (a) exploratory factor analyses on both patient and therapist ratings, (b) CFA on later measuring times, (c) high internal consistencies and (d) significant outcome predictive effects. The parallel forms of the ITPQ deliver opportunities to compare the patient and therapist perspectives for a broader range of facets of change mechanisms than was hitherto possible. Consequently, the measure can be applied in future research to more specifically analyse different change mechanism profiles in session-to-session development and outcome prediction. Key Practitioner Message This article describes the development of an instrument that measures general mechanisms of change in psychotherapy from both the patient and therapist perspectives. Post-session item ratings from both the patient and therapist can be used as feedback to optimize therapeutic processes. We provide a detailed discussion of measures developed to evaluate therapeutic change mechanisms.

  18. Digital Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for Insomnia versus sleep hygiene education: the impact of improved sleep on functional health, quality of life and psychological well-being. Study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espie, Colin A; Luik, Annemarie I; Cape, John; Drake, Christopher L; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Ong, Jason C; Gordon, Christopher; Bostock, Sophie; Hames, Peter; Nisbet, Mhairi; Sheaves, Bryony; G Foster, Russell; Freeman, Daniel; Costa-Font, Joan; Emsley, Richard; Kyle, Simon D

    2016-05-23

    Previous research has demonstrated that digital CBT (dCBT), delivered via the Internet, is a scalable and effective intervention for treating insomnia in otherwise healthy adults and leads to significant improvements in primary outcomes relating to sleep. The majority of people with insomnia, however, seek help because of the functional impact and daytime consequences of poor sleep, not because of sleep discontinuity per se. Although some secondary analyses suggest that dCBT may have wider health benefits, no adequately powered study has investigated these as a primary endpoint. This study specifically aims to investigate the impact of dCBT for insomnia upon health and well-being, and will investigate sleep-related changes as mediating factors. We propose a pragmatic, parallel-group, randomised controlled trial of 1000 community participants meeting criteria for insomnia disorder. In the DIALS trial (Digital Insomnia therapy to Assist your Life as well as your Sleep), participants will be randomised to dCBT delivered using web and/or mobile channels (in addition to treatment as usual (TAU)) or to sleep hygiene education (SHE), comprising a website plus a downloadable booklet (in addition to TAU). Online assessments will take place at 0 (baseline), 4 (mid-treatment), 8 (post-treatment), and 24 (follow-up) weeks. At week 25 all participants allocated to SHE will be offered dCBT, at which point the controlled element of the trial will be complete. Naturalistic follow-up will be invited at weeks 36 and 48. Primary outcomes are functional health and well-being at 8 weeks. Secondary outcomes are mood, fatigue, sleepiness, cognitive function, productivity and social functioning. All main analyses will be carried out at the end of the final controlled follow-up assessments and will be based on the intention-to-treat principle. Further analyses will determine whether observed changes in functional health and well-being are mediated by changes in sleep. The trial is funded

  19. Personality Theory and Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Joen; And Others

    1974-01-01

    This group of articles discusses various aspects of Gestalt Therapy including its major contributions, role in psychotherapy, and contributions of Gestalt psychology in general. There is some discussion of the philosophical background of Gestalt therapy along with Gestalt theory of emotion. A case study and an annotated bibliography are included…

  20. A abordagem Cognitivo-Comportamental dos sonhos de alcoolistas El abordage Cognitivo-Comportamental de los sueños de alcoholicos Dreams of alcoholics according to Cognitive-Behavioural therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Brasil Araujo

    2004-04-01

    ón del sueño no puede ser desconsiderada por los profesionales durante el tratamiento de estos pacientes. El relato de los sueños, a su vez, puede ser un instrumento terapéutico muy valioso por ofrecer pistas a respecto de cuanto el "craving" existe en aquellos que están intentando mantenerse em abstinencia. Identificando situaciones de riesgo como el "craving", los profesionales podrían ser más efectivos en la prevención de la recaída. Se concluye que existe la necesidad de realizar nuevos estudios teóricos a respecto de los sueños con este mismo abordaje teórico, así como evaluar su aplicación en el área de la dependencia química.This work is aimed to carry out a theoretical review of sleep and dreams of alcoholics according to cognitive-behavioral therapy, and focusing on cognitive and neuroligical aspects. Considering that this approach is more indicated to chemical dependency, dreams, which are frequently used in Psychoanalytic Therapy, have to be studied under a cognitive-behavioral approach, so they could be used in clinics with these patients. The alterations in sleep of alcoholics, for example, could be taken as an alert about the risk of relapse, which indicate that sleep evaluation can not be disregarded by professionals, during the treatment of these patients. The reporting of dreams, by itself, can be a therapeutic instrument, very valuable at offering clues in respect of how much cravings are present in those who are trying to keep clean. If the professionals are successful about early identification of a risk situation as a craving, they could be more effective about the prevention of relapse. We concluded about the necessity of new researches on dreams according to this theoretical approach, as well as to evaluate their application in the chemical dependency field.

  1. The Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale: Interrater Reliability and Sensitivity to Change in Short-Term Dynamic Psychotherapy and Cognitive Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valen, Jakob; Ryum, Truls; Svartberg, Martin; Stiles, Tore C.; McCullough, Leigh

    2011-01-01

    This study examined interrater reliability and sensitivity to change of the Achievement of Therapeutic Objectives Scale (ATOS; McCullough, Larsen, et al., 2003) in short-term dynamic psychotherapy (STDP) and cognitive therapy (CT). The ATOS is a process scale originally developed to assess patients' achievements of treatment objectives in STDP,…

  2. E-mailed standardized cognitive behavioural treatment of work-related stress: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruwaard, Jeroen; Lange, Alfred; Bouwman, Manon; Broeksteeg, Janneke; Schrieken, Bart

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the effects of a 7-week standardized cognitive behavioural treatment of work-related stress conducted via e-mail. A total of 342 people applied for treatment in reaction to a newspaper article. Initial screening reduced the sample to a heterogeneous (sub)clinical group of 239 participants. Participants were assigned randomly to a waiting list condition (n = 62), or to immediate treatment (n = 177). A follow-up was conducted 3 years after inception of the treatment. The outcome measures used were the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-42) and the Emotional Exhaustion scale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory - General Survey (MBI-GS). Fifty participants (21%) dropped out. Both groups showed statistically significant improvements. Intention-to-treat analysis of covariance (ANCOVAs) revealed that participants in the treatment condition improved significantly more than those in the waiting control condition (0.001 or = d > or = 0.5 (anxiety)). The between-group effects ranged from d = 0.6 (stress) to d = 0.1 (anxiety). At follow-up, the effects were more pronounced, but this result requires replication in view of high attrition at follow-up. The results warrant further research on Internet-driven standardized cognitive behavioural therapy for work-related stress. Such research should include the direct comparison of this treatment with face-to-face treatment, and should address the optimal level of therapist contact in Internet-driven treatment.

  3. Return to work: A comparison of two cognitive behavioural interventions in cases of work-related psychological complaints among the self-employed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blonk, R.W.B.; Brenninkmeijer, V.; Lagerveld, S.E.; Houtman, I.L.D.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and a combined intervention of workplace- and individual-focused techniques among self-employed people on sick leave owing to work-related psychological complaints (such as anxiety, depression, and burnout). Both interventions

  4. Smartphone applications for immersive virtual reality therapy for internet addiction and internet gaming disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn W B; Ho, Roger C M

    2017-01-01

    There have been rapid advances in technologies over the past decade and virtual reality technology is an area which is increasingly utilized as a healthcare intervention in many disciplines including that of Medicine, Surgery and Psychiatry. In Psychiatry, most of the current interventions involving the usage of virtual reality technology is limited to its application for anxiety disorders. With the advances in technology, Internet addiction and Internet gaming disorders are increasingly prevalent. To date, these disorders are still being treated using conventional psychotherapy methods such as cognitive behavioural therapy. However, there is an increasing number of research combining various other therapies alongside with cognitive behavioural therapy, as an attempt possibly to reduce the drop-out rates and to make such interventions more relevant to the targeted group of addicts, who are mostly adolescents. To date, there has been a prior study done in Korea that has demonstrated the comparable efficacy of virtual reality therapy with that of cognitive behavioural therapy. However, the intervention requires the usage of specialized screens and devices. It is thus the objective of the current article to highlight how smartphone applications could be designed and be utilized for immersive virtual reality treatment, alongside low cost wearables.

  5. Forensic psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Daniel

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the role forensic psychotherapy has in the assessment and treatment of mentally disordered offender patients, and its role in the supervision of individual therapists, staff groups or whole organisations which contain and manage this patient population. Forensic psychotherapy has a valuable role to play in the management of mentally disordered forensic patients. As forensic services continue to develop in Australia and New Zealand and interest in this field continues to grow, then the future of forensic psychotherapy looks bright.

  6. Cognitive behavioural therapy for anxiety disorders in later life (Protocol)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Hendriks, G.J.; Keijsers, G.P.J.; Balkom, A.J.L.M. van

    2009-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: 1. To assess the efficacy and feasability of CBT (CT, BT, CBT and third wave CBT interventions) for different anxiety disorders in older adults aged 55 years or over compared with minimal management 2. To asse

  7. Cognitive behaviour therapy territory model: effective disputing approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, D

    1997-06-01

    This paper proposes a disputing model (territory model) which is particularly useful and effective for disputing clients who persistently hold on to their dysfunctional thinking and/or core irrational beliefs. Their 'stubbornness' to change is compounded by unhealthy negative emotions during sessions. The intense emotion makes it difficult to access the belief system, and therefore any attempt to dispute it often proves futile. This model advocates the shift of disputing onto a different 'territory/ground' where the client can be facilitated to acquire higher, abstract and objective thinking, and at the same time his/her emotional level is susceptible to rational and logical arguments. The new thinking would act as a catalyst for the client to reflect on his/her dysfunctional thought/irrational beliefs. In this paper, the author uses a case example to illustrate and discuss the ineffectiveness of the 'traditional' way of disputing the dysfunctional thinking/core beliefs of a difficult and emotional client. This is contrasted with the 'territory' model.

  8. [FUNCTIONAL ANALYTIC PSYCHOTHERAPY: APPROACHES AND SCOPE OF BEHAVIOR THERAPY BASED ON CHANGES IN THE THERAPEUTIC CONTEXT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Martínez, Amanda M; Coletti, Juan Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is a therapeutic approach developed in context. FAP is characterized by use therapeutic relationship and the behaviors emit into it to improve clients daily life functioning. This therapeutic model is supported in behavior analysis principles and contextual functionalism philosophy. FAP proposes that clients behavior in session are functional equivalent with those out of session; therefore, when therapists respond to clients behaviors in session contingently, they promote and increase improvements in the natural setting. This article poses main features of FAP, its philosophical roots, achievements and research challenges to establish FAP as an independent treatment based on the evidence.

  9. Changes in prefrontal-limbic function in major depression after 15 months of long-term psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchheim, Anna; Viviani, Roberto; Kessler, Henrik; Kächele, Horst; Cierpka, Manfred; Roth, Gerhard; George, Carol; Kernberg, Otto F; Bruns, Georg; Taubner, Svenja

    2012-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies of depression have demonstrated treatment-specific changes involving the limbic system and regulatory regions in the prefrontal cortex. While these studies have examined the effect of short-term, interpersonal or cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy, the effect of long-term, psychodynamic intervention has never been assessed. Here, we investigated recurrently depressed (DSM-IV) unmedicated outpatients (N = 16) and control participants matched for sex, age, and education (N = 17) before and after 15 months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Participants were scanned at two time points, during which presentations of attachment-related scenes with neutral descriptions alternated with descriptions containing personal core sentences previously extracted from an attachment interview. Outcome measure was the interaction of the signal difference between personal and neutral presentations with group and time, and its association with symptom improvement during therapy. Signal associated with processing personalized attachment material varied in patients from baseline to endpoint, but not in healthy controls. Patients showed a higher activation in the left anterior hippocampus/amygdala, subgenual cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex before treatment and a reduction in these areas after 15 months. This reduction was associated with improvement in depressiveness specifically, and in the medial prefrontal cortex with symptom improvement more generally. This is the first study documenting neurobiological changes in circuits implicated in emotional reactivity and control after long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

  10. Changes in prefrontal-limbic function in major depression after 15 months of long-term psychotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Buchheim

    Full Text Available Neuroimaging studies of depression have demonstrated treatment-specific changes involving the limbic system and regulatory regions in the prefrontal cortex. While these studies have examined the effect of short-term, interpersonal or cognitive-behavioural psychotherapy, the effect of long-term, psychodynamic intervention has never been assessed. Here, we investigated recurrently depressed (DSM-IV unmedicated outpatients (N = 16 and control participants matched for sex, age, and education (N = 17 before and after 15 months of psychodynamic psychotherapy. Participants were scanned at two time points, during which presentations of attachment-related scenes with neutral descriptions alternated with descriptions containing personal core sentences previously extracted from an attachment interview. Outcome measure was the interaction of the signal difference between personal and neutral presentations with group and time, and its association with symptom improvement during therapy. Signal associated with processing personalized attachment material varied in patients from baseline to endpoint, but not in healthy controls. Patients showed a higher activation in the left anterior hippocampus/amygdala, subgenual cingulate, and medial prefrontal cortex before treatment and a reduction in these areas after 15 months. This reduction was associated with improvement in depressiveness specifically, and in the medial prefrontal cortex with symptom improvement more generally. This is the first study documenting neurobiological changes in circuits implicated in emotional reactivity and control after long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy.

  11. Piaget and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, T L

    1978-04-01

    It is difficult to apply Piaget's theory to psychotherapy because the place of affect in it is ambiguous. When the alternatives are considered, it seems most consistent with Piaget's ideas to regard both cognitive and affective phenomena as problem-solving organizations. Piaget's remarkable discoveries in the cognitive sphere are a consequence of the easy access in that sphere to the kind of problems that need solving, and the phasic development of solutions. But the nature of the problems to be solved or the values to be guarded by a patient in psychotherapy are not knowable independently of the patient's actual behavior. In one respect all that is left from Piaget's approach for psychotherapy generally is the truism that therapy fosters differentiation and integration. However, even if we cannot frame a peculiarly Piagetian paradigm of psychotherapy, Piaget is valuable in posing a subsidiary question, namely, what in therapy fosters problem-solving activity. A reading of Piaget suggests that a patient learns by acting on his therapist and tacitly interpreting the results of his actions, that difficulties in therapy are the material from which therapy proceeds, and that in order to grasp the situation of the patient, the therapist himself may need to act on him and not just think about him. An implied lesson for training would be that supervision should instill a professional identity that is reinforced rather than challenged by therapy difficulties, and does not rely solely on theoretical categorizing.

  12. Predicting Optimal Outcomes in Cognitive Therapy or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Individuals Using the Personalized Advantage Index Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus J H Huibers

    Full Text Available Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works best for the depressed individual. In this paper, we aim to replicate a recently developed treatment selection method, using data from an RCT comparing the effects of cognitive therapy (CT and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT.134 depressed patients completed the pre- and post-treatment BDI-II assessment. First, we identified baseline predictors and moderators. Second, individual treatment recommendations were generated by combining the identified predictors and moderators in an algorithm that produces the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI, a measure of the predicted advantage in one therapy compared to the other, using standard regression analyses and the leave-one-out cross-validation approach.We found five predictors (gender, employment status, anxiety, personality disorder and quality of life and six moderators (somatic complaints, cognitive problems, paranoid symptoms, interpersonal self-sacrificing, attributional style and number of life events of treatment outcome. The mean average PAI value was 8.9 BDI points, and 63% of the sample was predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the therapies. Those who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment (either CT or IPT had an observed mean end-BDI of 11.8, while those who received their predicted non-optimal treatment had an end-BDI of 17.8 (effect size for the difference = 0.51.Depressed patients who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment fared much better than those randomized to their predicted non-optimal treatment. The PAI provides a great opportunity for formal decision-making to improve individual patient outcomes in depression. Although the utility of the PAI

  13. Predicting Optimal Outcomes in Cognitive Therapy or Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Individuals Using the Personalized Advantage Index Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibers, Marcus J. H.; Cohen, Zachary D.; Lemmens, Lotte H. J. M.; Arntz, Arnoud; Peeters, Frenk P. M. L.; Cuijpers, Pim; DeRubeis, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although psychotherapies for depression produce equivalent outcomes, individual patients respond differently to different therapies. Predictors of outcome have been identified in the context of randomized trials, but this information has not been used to predict which treatment works best for the depressed individual. In this paper, we aim to replicate a recently developed treatment selection method, using data from an RCT comparing the effects of cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT). Methods 134 depressed patients completed the pre- and post-treatment BDI-II assessment. First, we identified baseline predictors and moderators. Second, individual treatment recommendations were generated by combining the identified predictors and moderators in an algorithm that produces the Personalized Advantage Index (PAI), a measure of the predicted advantage in one therapy compared to the other, using standard regression analyses and the leave-one-out cross-validation approach. Results We found five predictors (gender, employment status, anxiety, personality disorder and quality of life) and six moderators (somatic complaints, cognitive problems, paranoid symptoms, interpersonal self-sacrificing, attributional style and number of life events) of treatment outcome. The mean average PAI value was 8.9 BDI points, and 63% of the sample was predicted to have a clinically meaningful advantage in one of the therapies. Those who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment (either CT or IPT) had an observed mean end-BDI of 11.8, while those who received their predicted non-optimal treatment had an end-BDI of 17.8 (effect size for the difference = 0.51). Discussion Depressed patients who were randomized to their predicted optimal treatment fared much better than those randomized to their predicted non-optimal treatment. The PAI provides a great opportunity for formal decision-making to improve individual patient outcomes in depression. Although

  14. The (dramatic) process of psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeig, Jeffrey K

    2008-07-01

    Psychotherapy can be conceived as a symbolic drama in which patients can experientially realize their capacity to change. Methods derived from hypnosis can empower therapy without the use of formal trance. A case conducted by Milton Erickson is presented and deconstructed in order to illuminate Erickson's therapeutic patterns. A model is offered for adding drama to therapy, and the model is placed into a larger model of choice points in psychotherapy.

  15. Groups as a part of integrated treatment plans : Inpatient psychotherapy for outpatients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staats, H

    2005-01-01

    Group psychotherapy in Germany is well established as part of an integrative treatment plan in inpatient treatment. Outpatient group psychotherapy, however, is conceptualized as a separate treatment option in competition with individual therapy. German guidelines for outpatient psychotherapy exclude

  16. Ethical reflection and psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyskocilová, Jana; Prasko, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Theories of ethics and ethical reflection may be applied to both theory and practice in psychotherapy. There is a natural affinity between ethics and psychotherapy. Psychotherapy practice is concerned with human problems, dilemmas and emotions related to both one's own and other people's values. Ethics is also concerned with dilemmas in human thinking and with how these dilemmas reflect other individuals' values. Philosophical reflection itself is not a sufficient basis for the ethics of psychotherapy but it may aid in exploring attitudes related to psychotherapy, psychiatry and health care. PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus databases were searched for articles containing the keywords "psychotherapy", "ethics", "therapeutic relationship" and "supervision". The search was conducted by repeating the terms in various combinations without language or time restrictions. Also included were data from monographs cited in reviews. The resulting text is a review with conclusions concerning ethical aspects of psychotherapy. The ability to behave altruistically, sense for justice and reciprocity and mutual help are likely to be genetically determined as dispositions to be later developed by upbringing or to be formed or deformed by upbringing. Early experiences lead to formation of ethical attitudes which are internalized and then applied to both one's own and other people's behavior. Altruistic behavior has a strong impact on an individual's health and its acceptance may positively influence the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying numerous diseases. Ethical theory and reflection, however, may be applied to both theory and practice of psychotherapy in a conscious, targeted and thoughtful manner. In everyday practice, psychotherapists and organizations must necessarily deal with conscious conflicts between therapeutic possibilities, clients' wishes, their own as well as clients' ideas and the real world. Understanding one's own motives in therapy is one of the aims of a

  17. Humanism as a common factor in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wampold, Bruce E

    2012-12-01

    There are many forms of psychotherapies, each distinctive in its own way. From the origins of psychotherapy, it has been suggested that psychotherapy is effective through factors that are common to all therapies. In this article, I suggest that the commonalities that are at the core of psychotherapy are related to evolved human characteristics, which include (a) making sense of the world, (b) influencing through social means, and (c) connectedness, expectation, and mastery. In this way, all psychotherapies are humanistic. (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Does interpersonal behaviour of psychotherapy trainees differ in private and professional relationships?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janna Ida Fincke

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of trainees' interpersonal behaviour on Work Involvement (WI and compared their social behaviour within professional and private relationships as well as between different psychotherapeutic orientations. Methods: The interpersonal scales of the Intrex short-form questionnaire and the Work Involvement Scale (WIS were used to evaluate two samples of German psychotherapy trainees in psychoanalytic (PA, psychodynamic (PD and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT training. Trainees from sample 1 (N = 184 were asked to describe their interpersonal behaviour in relation to their patients when filling out the Intrex, whereas trainees from sample 2 (N = 135 were asked to describe the private relationship with a significant other. Results: Interpersonal affiliation in professional relationships significantly predicted the level of Healing Involvement (HI, while Stress Involvement (SI was predicted by interpersonal affiliation and interdependence in trainees' relationships with their patients. Social behaviour within professional relationships provided higher correlations with WI than private interpersonal behaviour. Significant differences were found between private and professional relation settings in trainees’ interpersonal behaviour with higher levels of affiliation and interdependence with significant others. Differences between therapeutic orientation and social behaviour could only be found when comparing trainees' level of interdependence with the particular relationship setting. Conclusion: Trainees' interpersonal level of affiliation in professional relationships is a predictor for a successful psychotherapeutic development. Vice versa, controlling behaviour in professional settings can be understood as a risk factor against psychotherapeutic growth. Both results strengthen an evidence-based approach for competence development during psychotherapy training.

  19. Group Psychotherapy in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Francesca; Giordano, Cecilia; Di Blasi, Maria

    2015-10-01

    This article describes the history and the prevailing orientations of group psychotherapy in Italy (psychoanalytically oriented, psychodrama, CBT groups) and particularly group analysis. Provided free of charge by the Italian health system, group psychotherapy is growing, but its expansion is patchy. The main pathways of Italian training in the different group psychotherapy orientations are also presented. Clinical-theoretical elaboration on self development, psychopathology related to group experiences, and the methodological attention paid to objectives and methods in different clinical groups are issues related to group therapy in Italy. Difficulties in the relationship between research and clinical practice are discussed, as well as the empirical research network that tries to bridge the gap between research and clinical work in group psychotherapy. The economic crisis in Italy has led to massive cuts in health care and to an increasing demand for some forms of psychological treatment. For these reasons, and because of its positive cost-benefit ratio, group psychotherapy is now considered an important tool in the national health care system to expand the clinical response to different forms of psychological distress.

  20. A Cognitive Behavioural Group Approach for Adolescents with Disruptive Behaviour in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttledge, Richard A.; Petrides, K. V.

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural approaches emphasize the links between thoughts, feelings and behaviour (Greig, 2007). Previous research has indicated that these approaches are efficacious in reducing disruptive behaviour in adolescents. The aim of the current study was to provide further evaluation of cognitive behavioural group work to reduce disruptive…

  1. A randomised controlled trial of a brief cognitive behavioural intervention for men who have hot flushes following prostate cancer treatment (MANCAN)†

    OpenAIRE

    Stefanopoulou, Evgenia; Yousaf, Omar; Grunfeld, Elizabeth A; Hunter, Myra S

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective Hot flushes and night sweats (HFNS) are experienced by up to 80% of prostate cancer patients undergoing androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). This study evaluates the effects of a guided self‐help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention on HFNS problem‐rating (primary outcome), HFNS frequency, mood and health‐related quality of life (secondary outcomes) in patients undergoing ADT. Methods Patients reporting treatment‐induced HFNS were randomly assigned to CBT (n = 33...

  2. Analyzing pictorial artifacts from psychotherapy and art therapy when overcoming stress and trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerge, Anna; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    to look for in pictorial artifacts related overcome traumatization and dissociation. After an introduction to psychotraumatology and it’s adaptions to creative arts therapy and art therapy, a literature review on assessment tools in art therapy, which can be applicable for measuring overcome...... traumatization, will be addressed. The need of a multi-dimensional tool for analysis of pictorial artifacts done in therapy is asked for and the needed components are briefly sketched. Finally the value of pictorial artifacts, made by clients in psycho-social interventions, as valid “windows” of implicit change...

  3. Cognitive behavior therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for social anxiety disorder delivered via smartphone and computer: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagöö, Jesper; Asplund, Robert Persson; Bsenko, Helene Andersson; Hjerling, Sofia; Holmberg, Anna; Westh, Susanne; Öberg, Louise; Ljótsson, Brjánn; Carlbring, Per; Furmark, Tomas; Andersson, Gerhard

    2014-05-01

    In this study, a previously evaluated guided Internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for social anxiety disorder (SAD) was adapted for mobile phone administration (mCBT). The treatment was compared with a guided self-help treatment based on interpersonal psychotherapy (mIPT). The treatment platform could be accessed through smartphones, tablet computers, and standard computers. A total of 52 participants were diagnosed with SAD and randomized to either mCBT (n=27) or mIPT (n=25). Measures were collected at pre-treatment, during the treatment, post-treatment and 3-month follow-up. On the primary outcome measure, the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale - self-rated, both groups showed statistically significant improvements. However, mCBT performed significantly better than mIPT (between group Cohen's d=0.64 in favor of mCBT). A larger proportion of the mCBT group was classified as responders at post-treatment (55.6% versus 8.0% in the mIPT group). We conclude that CBT for SAD can be delivered using modern information technology. IPT delivered as a guided self-help treatment may be less effective in this format.

  4. Influence of Cognitive Behavioural Therapy on Depression, Medication Adherence and Quality of Life in People Living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV): A Systematic Review%认知行为疗法对HIV感染者和AIDS患者抑郁、服药依从性和生活质量影响的系统评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅亮; 吴密彬; 胡雁

    2014-01-01

    目的 系统评价认知行为疗法对改善HIV感染者和AIDS患者抑郁,提高服药依从性和生活质量的效果.方法 计算机检索The Cochrane Library(2013年第4期)、Ovid-JBI、PubMed、EMbase、PsycARTICLES、CBM 和CNKI数据库,收集关于认知行为疗法对改善HIV感染者和AIDS患者抑郁,提高服药依从性和生活质量的随机对照试验,检索时限均为建库至2013年4月30日.由2名研究者按照纳入与排除标准筛选文献、提取资料并评价质量后,采用RevMan 5.2软件进行Meta分析.结果 共纳入17个研究,2 163例患者.Meta分析结果显示,认知行为疗法在6个月内能够改善HIV感染者和AIDS患者的抑郁[SMD=-0.26,95%CI(-0.41,-0.10),P=0.001]和提高患者生活质量[SMD=-0.57,95%CI(-1.04,-0.11),P=0.02],也能提高患者长期服药依从性[WMD=3.98,95%CI(1.67,6.30),P=0.000 8].结论 认知行为疗法对改善HIV感染者和AIDS患者的抑郁和提高生活质量具有较好的短期效果,对提高服药依从性具有长期效果.%Objective To systematically evaluate the effects of cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) on improving depression,medication adherence and quality of life in people living with HIV/AIDS (PLHIV).Methods We searched The Cochrane Library (Issue 4,2013),Ovid-JBI,PubMed,EMbase,PsycARTICLES,CBM and CNKI to collect randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on improving depression,medication adherence and quality of life in PLHIV from the establishment dates to April 30th 2013.Two reviewers independently screened literature according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria,extracted data,and assessed methodological quality.Meta-analysis was conducted using RevMan 5.2.Results A total of 17 RCTs were included,involving 2 163 patients.The results of meta-analysis showed that CBT sig nificantly improved PLHIV's depression (SMD=-0.26,95%CI-0A1 to-0.10,P=0.001),and quality of life (SMD=-0.57,95%CI-1.04 to-0.11,P=0.02) in 6 months.Meanwhile,CBT significantly

  5. Effectiveness of short-term psychodynamic group therapy in a public outpatient psychotherapy unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Hans Henrik; Mortensen, Erik Lykke; Lotz, Martin

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Short-term psychodynamic group therapy in heterogeneous patient groups is common in the public Danish psychiatric system but is in need of evaluation. AIM: To investigate improvement in 39-session psychodynamic group therapy using three criteria: 1) effect size (Cohen's d), 2) statist...

  6. A comparative study on the effectiveness of positive psychotherapy and group cognitive-behavioral therapy for the patients suffering from major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgharipoor, Negar; Asgharnejad Farid, Aliasghar; Arshadi, Hamidreza; Sahebi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Aim of this experimental study is evaluating the effectiveness of two different approaches towards the treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD): Positive-oriented psychotherapy and group cognitive-behavior therapy. Eighteen out-patients suffering from major depression were randomly divided into two groups to be treated according to either of these two approaches. Both groups undertook the treatments for 12 weeks. All the subjects were tested by Beck Depression Inventory, Subjective Wellbeing Scale, Oxford test of Happiness, and the scale of Subjective Units of Distress before and after the treatments. The results show significant differences between the two groups in terms of the variables of happiness and mental distress, suggesting that effectiveness of positive psychotherapy is more than cognitive-behavioral therapy in increasing happiness. These two approaches were significantly different in neither decreasing the acuteness of depression symptoms nor increasing subjective wellbeing. As a whole, the results of this comparative study indicate that positive psychotherapy is more effective in increasing happiness among MDD patients.

  7. [The various facets of psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Mathias

    2013-01-01

    In the last decades, psychotherapy has gained increasing importance in the field of psychiatric treatment. Notably, disorder-specific and evidence-based psychotherapeutic strategies now dominate the field as compared to traditional schools of psychotherapy. It should not be neglected that patients, besides being offered a specifically tailored psychological therapy for their disorder, are also in need of reliable moral support and help. Therapeutic creativity frequently is an important skill to gain access to patients.

  8. Analyzing Pictorial Artifacts from Psychotherapy and Art Therapy Oelated to overcoming Stress and Trauma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerge, Anna; Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2017-01-01

    Abstract This process based article tries to zoom into the need for assessment tools from a wider perspective to come to a preliminary understanding of what to analyze in relation to overcome traumatization and dissociation. The article wants to discuss and build understanding on what we ought...... to look for in pictorial artifacts related overcome traumatization and dissociation. After an introduction to psychotraumatology and it’s adaptions to creative arts therapy and art therapy, a literature review on assessment tools in art therapy, which can be applicable for measuring overcome...... traumatization, will be addressed. The need of a multi-dimensional tool for analysis of pictorial artifacts done in therapy is asked for and the needed components are briefly sketched. Finally the value of pictorial artifacts, made by clients in psycho-social interventions, as valid “windows” of implicit change...

  9. Transpersonal psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boorstein, S

    2000-01-01

    The history, theory, and practice of Transpersonal (or Spiritual) Psychotherapy are presented. The author describes his own evolution from a traditional psychoanalyst to a psychotherapist who uses the tools and wisdom from spiritual traditions to enhance traditional psychotherapy while, at the same time, improving the self system of the therapist. Dangers as well as benefits of the spiritual approach are outlined. The creation and holding of a spiritual or transpersonal context is described and ways to ascertain, in the clinical situation, the appropriateness of such an approach are explained. The use of bibliotherapy to help transform and expand the worldview of the patient is outlined. Prayer and meditational systems also have a healing role in this approach. To illustrate the uses of Transpersonal Psychotherapy in practice, four cases are presented: 1) a paranoid schizophrenic man, 2) a well-functioning borderline person, 3) a very poorly functioning borderline person, and 4) a high-functioning neurotic man who had been in psychoanalysis.

  10. Integrating self-help books into psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Linda F; Smith, Thomas P

    2003-02-01

    This article describes a systematic and integral method of incorporating self-help books into psychotherapy as a collaborative function. We address the distinctions between self-help and bibliotherapy, consider bibliotherapy as adjunctive or integrative to psychotherapy, and outline the multiple uses of bibliotherapy for clinical purposes. How to apply self-help books in psychotherapy and ways to select books are illustrated by a case example. Indications and contraindications for bibliotherapy in therapy are outlined.

  11. Sleep quality changes in chronically depressed patients treated with Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy or the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Preetam J; Zobel, Ingo; Mönch, Kathrin; Schramm, Elisabeth; Michalak, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    To capture any sleep quality changes associated with group psychotherapy. Physician-referred, chronically depressed patients (n = 25) were randomized to either eight group sessions of Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT, n = 9) plus Treatment As Usual (TAU), or the Cognitive Behavioral Analysis System of Psychotherapy (CBASP, n = 8) plus TAU, or to TAU only (control group, n = 8). Participants recorded their sleep at home. The primary outcome variables were: stable and unstable sleep, which were assessed using cardiopulmonary coupling (CPC) analysis, and estimated total sleep and wake time (minutes). Cardiopulmonary coupling measures heart rate variability and the electrocardiogram's R-wave amplitude fluctuations associated with respiration. By post-treatment night 6, the CBASP group had more stable sleep (p= 0.044) and less wake (p = 0.004) compared with TAU, and less wake vs MBCT (p = 0.039). The CBASP group psychotherapy treatment improved sleep quality compared with Treatment As Usual. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Comparsion of the Efficacy of Group Psychotherapy Based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and Mindfulness on Craving and Cognitive Emotion Regulation in Methamphetamine Addicts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadreza Kiani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Today, third wave therapies in psychotherapy shift their attention from challenging cognitions to awareness and acceptance of feelings, emotions, cognitions and behaviors. Therefore, this research aimed to compare of efficacy of group psychotherapy based on acceptance and commitment therapy, with mindfulness on craving and cognitive emotion regulation in methamphetamine addicts. Method: Research method was semi experimental research design with pre-post test and follow up. The population of research was included all of methamphetamine addicts in baharestan, Isfahan. Drug abusers was 34 participants that refered to addiction rehabilitation centers and selected by snowball sampling and finaly divided to 2groups by radomization (acceptance and commitment therapy group and mindfulness groups. Each groups recieved treatment in 12 sessions (At First 2 sessions per week and at last 1 session per week. Two groups assessed by craving test (Ekhtiary, 1387 and cognitive emotion regulation (garnefski et al, 2002, in pretest, post test and follow up. Results: The results showed that two treatment groups had significant effect on craving intensity in post test and follow up. In addition, there was no significant difference in comparing of the efficacy of these two treatments on cognitive emotion regulation and it means that both two traetments had same effect on cognitive emotion regulatin. Conclusion: we can say that acceptance and commitmet therapy and mindfulnesshave effect on reduction psychopathology from using amphetamines due to same theraputic factors.

  13. Positive Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seligman, Martin E. P.; Rashid, Tayyab; Parks, Acacia C.

    2006-01-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) contrasts with standard interventions for depression by increasing positive emotion, engagement, and meaning rather than directly targeting depressive symptoms. The authors have tested the effects of these interventions in a variety of settings. In informal student and clinical settings, people not uncommonly reported…

  14. Iatrogenic symptoms associated with a therapy cult: examination of an extinct "new psychotherapy" with respect to psychiatric deterioration and "brainwashing".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochman, J

    1984-11-01

    In 1982, the first and only discussion of psychotherapy cults appeared in the literature. Temerlin and Temerlin (1982) studied five "bizarre" groups which were formed when five practitioners of psychotherapy simultaneously served as friends, lovers, relatives, employers, colleagues, and teachers, all to patients who were themselves mental health professionals. In choosing the term "psychotherapy cult," the authors have noted similarities of the groups they reviewed to some religious cults, citing the three definitions of the "cult" in Webster's 1966 Third New International Dictionary: (1) a system for the cure of disease based on the dogma, tenets or principles set forth by its promulgator to the exclusion of scientific experience or demonstration, (2) great or excessive dedication to some person, idea or organization, (3) a religion or mystic regarded as mysterious or unorthodox. The psychotherapy cults studied by Temerlin and Temerlin varied from 15 to 75 mental health professionals held together by their idealization of a shared therapist and the activities which they conducted jointly: workshops, seminars, courses, businesses, professional ventures, and social life. As patients became more involved in the social and personal life of their therapists, they gradually withdrew from all friends and family, becoming increasingly dependent on the therapist and their new "siblings." Upon joining the group, many patients felt a sense of being loved and belongingness. The authors described the "cognitive pathology" of idiosyncratic group jargon which served to maintain an illusion of knowledge, sophistication, and personal growth, while removing all ambivalence and uncertainty. The authors concluded that psychotherapy cult membership is an iatrogenically determined negative effect of psychotherapy. Of the former cult members they interviewed, most had perceived themselves as deteriorating or at an impasse, or had experienced disillusionment with their therapists

  15. ["Treasure Hunt"--a cognitive-behavioural computer game].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinka, Veronika

    2011-01-01

    The development of video games promoting health related behaviour is increasing. This holds not only for chronic diseases like asthma and diabetes, but also for the field of child psychotherapy. At the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry of Zürich University, the video game Treasure Hunt was developed to support psychotherapeutic treatment of children between eight and thirteen years of age. Treasure Hunt does not replace the therapist but supports treatment by offering attractive electronic work assignments. The scope of this article is an overview on health games for children and a description of Treasure Hunt. After the explanation of its therapeutic potentials, an evaluation based on questionnaires for therapists and children will be presented. 124 therapists answered a questionnaire on their impression of the game three months after download. 41 therapists were willing to participate in the further evaluation and sent questionnaires of 200 children with whom Treasure Hunt had been used. A limitation of these data is that a positive bias can not be excluded, as therapists with a positive attitude towards psychotherapeutic computer games were more likely to answer the questionnaire. 118 therapists (95.2%) considered Treasure Hunt a useful tool in child psychotherapy. 197 children (98.5%) report being satisfied with the use of the game during treatment. Treasure Hunt was predominantly used for the age group it is designed for and both, by very experienced and by young therapists. Eleven diagnostic categories reflect a broader range of indications than expected.

  16. Neck exercises, physical and cognitive behavioural-graded activity as a treatment for adult whiplash patients with chronic neck pain: Design of a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ris Hansen, Inge; Christensen, Robin Daniel Kjersgaard; Thomsen, Bente

    2011-01-01

    is to present the design of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of a combined individual physical and cognitive behavioural-graded activity program on self-reported general physical function, in addition to neck function, pain, disability and quality of life in patients......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Many patients suffer from chronic neck pain following a whiplash injury. A combination of cognitive, behavioural therapy with physiotherapy interventions has been indicated to be effective in the management of patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorders. The objective...... with chronic neck pain following whiplash injury compared with a matched control group measured at baseline and 4 and 12 months after baseline. METHODS: The design is a two-centre, RCT-study with a parallel group design. Included are whiplash patients with chronic neck pain for more than 6 months, recruited...

  17. Effect of a vocationally-focused brief cognitive behavioural intervention on employment-related outcomes for individuals with mood and anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Sean A; Boyd, Geoffrey M; Bieling, Peter; Pike, Shannon; Kazarian-Keith, Dawnna

    2008-01-01

    Despite an increasing emphasis on the importance of vocational success to the quality of life of individuals with mental illness (Bond, Drake, & Becker, 2008), minimal work has examined the impact of cognitive behavioural interventions that focus on vocational stressors. Vocational stressors commonly faced by persons with mental illness include difficulties with work task completion, obtaining employment, and coping with interpersonal stressors (Becker et al., 1998). The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural therapy group intervention that targets vocational stressors for individuals whose vocational functioning had been significantly impacted by mental illness. Participants included 16 individuals with mood and anxiety disorder diagnoses. After this intervention, it was found that employed persons reported an improved sense of mastery in the completion of work tasks, improved satisfaction with work supervision, and decreased satisfaction with advancement and job security. Unemployed participants reported improved expectancy for employment success.

  18. A Functional Analytic Approach to Group Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenberghe, Luc

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a particular view on the use of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy (FAP) in a group therapy format. This view is based on the author's experiences as a supervisor of Functional Analytical Psychotherapy Groups, including groups for women with depression and groups for chronic pain patients. The contexts in which this approach…

  19. Promoting Efficacy Research on Functional Analytic Psychotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitland, Daniel W. M.; Gaynor, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is a form of therapy grounded in behavioral principles that utilizes therapist reactions to shape target behavior. Despite a growing literature base, there is a paucity of research to establish the efficacy of FAP. As a general approach to psychotherapy, and how the therapeutic relationship produces change,…

  20. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Treatment Psychotherapy ...

  1. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Search About Us Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) Treatment Resources For Professionals Contact Us NYP.org Borderline Personality Disorder Resource Center Treatment Psychotherapy Psychotherapy Treatment Psychotherapy Taking Care of Yourself Questions About ...

  2. A randomised controlled trial of a cognitive behavioural intervention for women who have menopausal symptoms following breast cancer treatment (MENOS 1: Trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellier Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This trial aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a group cognitive behavioural intervention to alleviate menopausal symptoms (hot flushes and night sweats in women who have had breast cancer treatment. Hot flushes and night sweats are highly prevalent but challenging to treat in this population. Cognitive behaviour therapy has been found to reduce these symptoms in well women and results of an exploratory trial suggest that it might be effective for breast cancer patients. Two hypotheses are tested: Compared to usual care, group cognitive behavioural therapy will: 1. Significantly reduce the problem rating and frequency of hot flushes and nights sweats after six weeks of treatment and at six months post-randomisation. 2. Improve mood and quality of life after six weeks of treatment and at six months post-randomisation. Methods/Design Ninety-six women who have completed their main treatment for breast cancer and who have been experiencing problematic hot flushes and night sweats for over two months are recruited into the trial from oncology and breast clinics in South East London. They are randomised to either six weekly group cognitive behavioural therapy (Group CBT sessions or to usual care. Group CBT includes information and discussion about hot flushes and night sweats in the context of breast cancer, monitoring and modifying precipitants, relaxation and paced respiration, stress management, cognitive therapy for unhelpful thoughts and beliefs, managing sleep and night sweats and maintaining changes. Prior to randomisation women attend a clinical interview, undergo 24-hour sternal skin conductance monitoring, and complete questionnaire measures of hot flushes and night sweats, mood, quality of life, hot flush beliefs and behaviours, optimism and somatic amplification. Post-treatment measures (sternal skin conductance and questionnaires are collected six to eight weeks later and follow-up measures (questionnaires and a use

  3. Using cognitive-behavioural techniques to improve exclusive breastfeeding in a low-literacy disadvantaged population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Atif; Haq, Zaeem; Sikander, Siham; Ahmad, Ikhlaq; Ahmad, Mansoor; Hafeez, Assad

    2012-01-01

    Despite being an important component of Pakistan's primary health care programme, the rates of exclusive breastfeeding at 6 months remain among the lowest in the world. Low levels of literacy in women and deeply held cultural beliefs and practices have been found to contribute to the ineffectiveness of routine counselling delivered universally by community health workers in Pakistan. We aimed to address this by incorporating techniques of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) into the routine counselling process. We conducted qualitative studies of stakeholders' opinions (mothers, community health workers, their trainers and programme managers) and used this data to develop a psycho-educational approach that combined education with techniques of CBT that could be integrated into the health workers' routine work. The workers were trained to use this approach and feedback was obtained after implementation. The new intervention was successfully integrated into the community health worker programme and found to be culturally acceptable, feasible and useful. Incorporating techniques of CBT into routine counselling may be useful to promote health behaviours in traditional societies with low literacy rates.

  4. Group cognitive behavioural treatment for insomnia in primary care: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, J; Leibowitz, J; Whittington, C; Espie, C A; Pilling, S

    2016-04-01

    Insomnia disorder is common and often co-morbid with mental health conditions. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia is effective, but is rarely implemented as a discrete treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of brief CBT groups for insomnia compared to treatment as usual (TAU) for insomnia delivered by mental health practitioners in a primary-care mental health service. A total of 239 participants were randomized to either a five-session CBT group or to TAU. Assessments of sleep and of symptoms of depression and anxiety were carried out at baseline, post-treatment and at 20 weeks. Primary outcome was sleep efficiency post-treatment. Group CBT participants had better sleep outcomes post-treatment than those receiving TAU [sleep efficiency standardized mean difference 0.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.34-0.92]. The effect at 20 weeks was smaller with a wide confidence interval (0.27, 95% CI -0.03 to 0.56). There were no important differences between groups at either follow-up period in symptoms of anxiety or depression. Dedicated CBT group treatment for insomnia improves sleep more than treating sleep as an adjunct to other mental health treatment.

  5. Mind, brain and psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheth Hitesh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is long-standing debate about superiority of mind over brain, in other words about superiority of mind over matter. And outcome of this debate is going to decide future of psychiatry. The psychiatrists believing in materialism may say that brain is all and by changing neurotransmitters level with new molecules of drugs would cure all illnesses. On the other hand, antipsychiatry activists and some psychotherapists oppose all types of treatment despite of convincing evidence that drug therapy is effective (although sometimes it is not as effective as it claims to be. However, truth lies somewhere in between. Pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy are like two legs of psychiatry and psychiatry cannot walk into a future on one leg. The studies have shown that judicious use of pharmacotherapy along with psychotherapy gives better outcome than any one of them used alone. We must heal dichotomy between mind and brain before we heal the patients.

  6. The Sociology of Regulation: The Case of Psychotherapy and Counselling and the Experience of the Arts Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Diane; Guthrie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on insights from the sociology of professions to explore the regulatory debate in the psychotherapy and counselling field contrasted with the regulation of arts therapists (art, drama and music therapists). A partial explanation is offered, illustrating the applicability of theory to these groups, but with adaptations to reflect…

  7. The Sociology of Regulation: The Case of Psychotherapy and Counselling and the Experience of the Arts Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Diane; Guthrie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This article draws on insights from the sociology of professions to explore the regulatory debate in the psychotherapy and counselling field contrasted with the regulation of arts therapists (art, drama and music therapists). A partial explanation is offered, illustrating the applicability of theory to these groups, but with adaptations to reflect…

  8. Prediction of treatment discontinuation and recovery from Borderline Personality Disorder: Results from an RCT comparing Schema Therapy and Transference Focused Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arntz, Arnoud; Stupar-Rutenfrans, Snežana; Bloo, Josephine; van Dyck, Richard; Spinhoven, Philip

    2015-11-01

    Knowing what predicts discontinuation or success of psychotherapies for Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) is important to improve treatments. Many variables have been reported in the literature, but replication is needed and investigating what therapy process underlies the findings is necessary to understand why variables predict outcome. Using data of an RCT comparing Schema Therapy and Transference Focused Psychotherapy as treatments for BPD, variables derived from the literature were tested as predictors of discontinuation and treatment success. Participants were 86 adult outpatients (80 women, mean age 30.5 years) with a primary diagnosis of BPD who had on average received 3 previous treatment modalities. First, single predictors were tested with logistic regression, controlling for treatment type (and medication use in case of treatment success). Next, with multivariate backward logistic regression essential predictors were detected. Baseline hostility and childhood physical abuse predicted treatment discontinuation. Baseline subjective burden of dissociation predicted a smaller chance of recovery. A second study demonstrated that in-session dissociation, assessed from session audiotapes, mediated the observed effects of baseline dissociation on recovery, indicating that dissociation during sessions interferes with treatment effectiveness. The results suggest that specifically addressing high hostility, childhood abuse, and in-session dissociation might reduce dropout and lack of effectiveness of treatment.

  9. Developing a Compassionate Internal Supervisor: Compassion-Focused Therapy for Trainee Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Tobyn; Dixon, Alison; Kolts, Russell

    2016-07-25

    The concept of an 'internal supervisor' has been used in psychotherapy to describe the way in which the supervisory relationship is internalized and utilized by the supervisee. This research explores the possibility, and potential benefit, of training therapists to develop a 'compassionate internal supervisor'. A training programme was developed for trainee cognitive-behavioural therapists using adapted versions of compassion-focused therapy interventions. The training focused on guided imagery exercises and reflective practices undertaken for a 4-week period. Seven trainee cognitive-behavioural therapists were interviewed, utilizing a semi-structured format, regarding their experience of the training programme. The resulting transcriptions were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). The analysis identified six super-ordinate themes: (1) the varied nature of the supervisor image, (2) blocks and their overcoming, (3) increased compassion and regulation of emotion, (4) impact on cognitive processes, (5) internalization and integration, and (6) professional and personal benefit. The themes describe the varied ways in which participants created and experienced their compassionate supervisor imagery. Working with the personal blocks encountered in the process provided participants with a deeper understanding of the nature of compassion and its potential to support them in their training, practice and personal lives. The process and impact of 'internalizing' a compassionate supervisory relationship is described by participants and then discussed for potential implications for psychotherapy training and self-practice. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Long-term effects of psychotherapy on moderate depression: a comparative study of narrative therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Rodrigo T; Gonçalves, Miguel M; Fassnacht, Daniel B; Machado, Paulo P P; Sousa, Inês

    2014-01-01

    In a previous clinical controlled trial (Lopes et al., 2014), narrative therapy (NT) showed promising results in ameliorating depressive symptoms with comparable outcomes to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) when patients completed treatment. This paper aims to assess depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems in this clinical sample at follow-up. Using the Beck Depression Inventory-II and Outcome Questionnaire-45.2 Interpersonal Relations Scale, naturalistic prospective follow-up assessment was conducted at 21 and 31 months after the last treatment session. At follow-up, patients kept improving in terms of depressive symptoms and interpersonal problems. The odds that a patient maintained recovery from depressive symptoms at follow-up were five times higher than the odds that a patient maintained recovery from interpersonal problems. In the same way, the odds of a patient never recovering from interpersonal problems were five times higher than the odds of never recovering from depressive symptoms. The study did not control for the natural course of depression or treatment continuation. For depressed patients with greater interpersonal disabilities, longer treatment plans and alternative continuation treatments should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Baseline training in cognitive and psychodynamic psychotherapy during a psychologist training program. Exploring client outcomes in therapies of one or two semesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennhag, Inga; Armelius, Bengt-Åke

    2012-01-01

    This effectiveness study explored the outcomes of 187 clients seen by 187 students undergoing baseline training in psychotherapy. Clients reduced their symptoms (SCL-90) and increased their positive self-image (SASB introject) during the therapy. Multiple regression analyses showed no differences between the cognitive and the psychodynamic training approaches and no differences between one and two semesters duration of the therapies. However, 2-3% of variance in end states was accounted for by the interaction between the variables, indicating a moderating effect of duration in the two approaches. Outcomes for clients in the cognitive training approach were significantly better with two semesters than with one semester, while there was no such difference in the psychodynamic approach. Consequences for baseline training are discussed.

  12. The current status of psychotherapy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    is as old as human culture'. However, the latter is now ... evolved to three main types as a result of these influ- .... tive by demonstrating a mean effect size for psychotherapy of 0.85 (that ... therapy that makes a difference changes brain function.

  13. 阿德勒心理治疗方法与当代心理治疗整合精神的契合%Adler Psychological Therapy's Link with the Spirit of Contemporary Psychotherapy Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    励骅; 郭本禹

    2012-01-01

    It is true that no single method of treatment from any schools can satisfy the needs of all ehents and apply to all psychological problems and situations. The rise of the integrative movement, to some extent, broke the individualistic manacles of the fractions, elimi- nated the discrimination among different schools, promoted their communications and dialogues. The study of Adler~ psychotherapy can help us discover those important contributions overlooked in the past that there has been a close relationship between Adler~ psychother- apy and contemporary practice. Adlerb psychotherapy, cognitive therapy and cognitive-behavioral therapy share a great deal of common ground, such as attention to the conceptual framework of the client, with the present - -oriented method. All Adler~ psychotherapy and cognitive therapy lay great emphasis on it. It is important to understand the patients within their own conceptual framework. The view of Adler is that expectations and aspirations of future as a current center to a large extent determine the way people recall the past and act in the present. Cognitive therapy also concerns the feelings of the client. Adlerb psychotherapy, constructivist psychotherapy and social constructivist psychotherapy all have achieved apparent resonance in such aspects as view of reality, principles of treatment, and social cultural origin of psychological development. The Adlerian and the constructivist theories agree that human perception renders external reality or truth subjective and only approximately knowable. The Adler theory and constructivist theory assert that humans are to con- struct their own personality and subsequently the creative motivation for themselves and others and the perception and interpretation of the world. Adler and constructivism emphasize that it is important that a person, as an active and motivated agent, creatively and rou- tinely participates in the construction of her own psychological world. In addition, Adler is

  14. Treating panic symptoms within everyday clinical settings: the feasibility of a group cognitive behavioural intervention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Austin, S.F.; Sumbundu, A.D.; Lykke, J.

    2008-01-01

    , anxiety and depressive symptoms and marked improvement in mobility. These improvements were maintained at 12-month follow-up. Outcomes supported the feasibility of a brief group cognitive-behavioural intervention for GP-referred patients. Implications of these results are discussed in terms...... implemented in everyday clinical settings. The aim of the following pilot study was to examine the feasibility of a brief group cognitive-behavioural intervention carried out in a clinical setting. Salient issues in determining feasibility include: representativeness of patient group treated, amount...

  15. An evaluation of the effects of diagnostic composition on individual treatment outcome within transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral group therapy for anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Lance D; Norton, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Recently, studies have supported the efficacy of treating anxiety disorders utilizing a transdiagnostic, or non-diagnosis-specific, framework (Erickson, D. H. (2003). Group cognitive behavioural therapy for heterogeneous anxiety disorders. Cognitive Behaviour Therapy, 32, 179-186; Garcia, M. S. (2004). Effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural group therapy in patients with anxiety disorders. Psychology in Spain, 8, 89-97; Norton, P. J., & Hope, D. A. (2005). Preliminary evaluation of a broad-spectrum cognitive-behavioral group therapy for anxiety. Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry, 36, 79-97). Transdiagnostic group treatment packages focus on the common aspects inherent across the anxiety disorders such as behavioral and cognitive avoidance, and faulty cognitive appraisals of threat potential or meaning (Barlow, D. H., Allen, L. B., & Choate, M. L. (2004). Toward a unified treatment for emotional disorders. Behavior Therapy, 35, 205-230). Although research supports the overall efficacy of transdiagnostic cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders (Norton, P. J., & Philipp, L. M. (2008). Transdiagnostic approaches to the treatment of anxiety disorders: A quantitative review. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice and Training, 45, 214-226), the effect of diagnostically mixed group composition on individual outcomes is less clear. This study investigated the relationship between group composition and treatment outcome within diagnostically heterogeneous groups with the purpose of determining if diagnostic heterogeneity differentially impacted treatment outcome for 84 individuals during a 12-week transdiagnostic cognitive-behavioral group anxiety treatment program (Norton, P. J. (2012a). Group cognitive-behavioral therapy of anxiety: A transdiagnostic treatment manual. New York: Guilford). The diagnostic makeup of the treatment group was examined at the beginning of treatment and at the end of treatment, and the results indicated

  16. The impact on sleep of a multidisciplinary cognitive behavioural pain management programme: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horan Sheila

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reduced sleep quality is a common complaint among patients with chronic pain, with 50-80% of patients reporting sleep disturbance. Improvements in pain and quality of life measures have been achieved using a multidisciplinary cognitive behavioural therapy pain management programme (CBT-PMP that aims to recondition attitudes to pain, and improve patients' self-management of their condition. Despite its high prevalence in patients with chronic pain, there is very limited objective evidence for the effect of this intervention on sleep quality. The primary research objective is to investigate the short-term effect of a multidisciplinary CBT-PMP on subjective (measured by Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and objective sleep quality (measured by Actigraphy in patients with chronic pain by comparison with a control group. The secondary objectives will investigate changes in function and mood, and then explore the relationship between objective and subjective sleep quality and physical and psychological outcome measures. Methods/Design Patients who fulfil the inclusion criteria for attendance on the multidisciplinary CBT-PMP in the Adelaide and Meath Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin and are currently listed on the PMP waiting list will be invited to participate in this pilot study. Potential patients will be screened for sleep disturbance [determined by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI]. Those patients with a sleep disturbance (PSQI >5 will be assigned to either the intervention group (immediate treatment, or control group (deferred treatment, i.e. the PMP they are listed for is more than six months away based on where they appear on the waiting list. Baseline measures of sleep, function, and mood will be obtained using a combination of self-report questionnaires (the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Short Form 36 health survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, and functional outcome

  17. [New Developments in Video Games for Psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brezinka, Veronika

    2016-01-01

    A literature survey on new developments in the area of video games and psychotherapy of children and adolescents was conducted. Despite the omnipresence of computers and the internet, development of therapeutic games seems rather slow. The video game Treasure Hunt was introduced in 2008 to support treatment of children with internalizing and externalizing disorders. Camp Cope-A-Lot was developed for treatment of anxious children, whereas the self-help game SPARX is directed at depressed adolescents. Rage-Control is a biofeedback game for children with anger problems. The game Zoo U aims to assess and train social skills of primary school children. Ricky and the Spider for young children with obsessive compulsive disorder is meant to support the cognitive-behavioural treatment of these patients. Clash- Back is a French game for adolescents with externalizing problems. Possible reasons for the relatively slow development of therapeutic games are the high methodological demands concerning an evaluation as well as the high costs of game development. Nonetheless, computers and the internet are bound to influence psychotherapy with children and adolescents in the long run.

  18. Client attachment security predicts alliance in a randomized controlled trial of two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folke, Sofie; Daniel, Sarah Ingrid Franksdatter; Poulsen, Stig Bernt

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the relation between clients’ attachment patterns and the therapeutic alliance in two psychotherapies for bulimia nervosa. Method: Data derive from a randomized clinical trial comparing cognitive-behavioral therapy and psychoanalytic psychotherapy for bulimia...

  19. [Publicly funded programs of psychotherapy in Australia and England].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria; Dezetter, Anne

    2015-01-01

    depression and anxiety. In October 2007, the Secretary of State for Health announced additional funds totalling £173 million between 2008 and 2011 that would be used to deliver a major training program that would build a skilled workforce of qualified psychological therapists in 4 therapy areas for adults and children: cognitive behaviour therapy; psychodynamic psychoanalytic therapy; systemic and family therapy; humanistic therapy. The main goals of the program were to have: (i) 3,600 newly trained therapists with an appropriate skill mix and supervision arrangements; (ii) 900,000 more people treated; (iii) 50% of people who leave treatment are recovered; (iv) 25,000 fewer people on sick pay and benefits.Conclusion To date, the results in both countries have shown clinical improvements in symptoms associated with depression and anxiety for people entering the programs and at a population level, decreasing the unmet mental health needs of the population by allowing self-referrals to the program, and therefore rendering access to services to populations otherwise not reached.

  20. A randomised controlled trial of a cognitive behavioural intervention for men who have hot flushes following prostate cancer treatment (MANCAN: trial protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousaf Omar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This randomised controlled trial (RCT aims to evaluate the effectiveness of a guided self-help cognitive behavioural intervention to alleviate problematic hot flushes (HF and night sweats (NS in men who are undergoing prostate cancer treatment. The trial and the self-help materials have been adapted from a previous RCT, which showed that a cognitive behavioural intervention reduced the self-reported problem-rating of hot flushes in women with menopausal symptoms, and in women undergoing breast cancer treatment. We hypothesize that guided self-help will be more effective than usual care in reducing HF/NS problem-rating at post treatment assessment. Methods/Design Seventy men who are undergoing treatment for prostate cancer and who have been experiencing more than ten HF/NS weekly for over a month are recruited into the trial from urology clinics in London. They are randomly allocated to either a four-week self-help cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT treatment or to their usual care (control group. The treatment includes information and discussion about hot flushes and night sweats in the context of prostate cancer, monitoring and modifying precipitants, relaxation and paced respiration, stress management, cognitive therapy for unhelpful thoughts and beliefs, managing sleep and night sweats, and advice on maintaining these changes. Prior to randomisation, men attend a clinical interview, undergo 24-48-hour sternal skin conductance monitoring, and complete pre-treatment questionnaires (e.g., problem-rating and frequency of hot flushes and night sweats; quality of life; mood; hot flush beliefs and behaviours. Post-treatment measures (sternal skin conductance and the above questionnaires are collected four-six weeks later, and again at a six-month follow-up. Discussion MANCAN is the first randomised controlled trial of cognitive behavioural therapy for HF/NS for men that measures both self-reported and physiologically indexed

  1. Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy with Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Knight, Bob G.; Satre, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Cognitive behavioral psychotherapy is readily adaptable to use with older adults. This review integrates discussion of cognitive and behavioral intervention techniques with recent research and clinical observations in the field of gerontology. Cognitive changes with aging, personality and emotional development, cohort effects, and the social environment of older adults are discussed in relation to psychotherapy. Applications of cognitive behaivor therapy to specific late life problems such as...

  2. Psychotherapy and Psychosocial Treatment: Recent Advances and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plakun, Eric M

    2015-09-01

    Psychotherapy and psychosocial treatment have been shown to be effective forms of treatment of a range of individual and complex comorbid disorders. The future role of psychotherapy and psychosocial treatment depends on several factors, including full implementation of mental health parity, correction of underlying false assumptions that shape treatment, payment priorities and research, identification and teaching of common factors or elements shared by effective psychosocial therapies, and adequate teaching of psychotherapy and psychosocial treatment.

  3. Psychotherapies for adult depression: recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuijpers, Pim

    2015-01-01

    Much has been learned from the 400 randomized trials on psychotherapies for adult depression that have been conducted, but much is also still unknown. In this study some recent attempts to further reduce the disease burden of depression through psychotherapies are reviewed. In the past, many new psychotherapies have promised to be more effective than existing treatments, usually without success. We describe recent research on two new therapies, acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive bias modification, and conclude that both have also not shown to be more effective than existing therapies. A growing number of studies have also focused on therapies that may be successful in further reducing the disease burden, such as treatments for chronic depression and relapse prevention. Other studies are aimed at scaling up psychological services, such as the training of lay health counselors in low-income and middle-income countries, telephone-based, and internet-based therapies. Psychotherapies are essential tools in the treatment of adult depression. Randomized trials have shown that these treatments are effective, and by focusing on key issues, such as chronic depression, relapse, and scaling them up, psychotherapies contribute more and more to the reduction of the disease burden of depression.

  4. A cognitive behavioural intervention to reduce sexually transmitted infections among gay men: randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Imrie, J.; Stephenson, J R; Cowan, F. M.; Wanigaratne, S; Billington, A. J. P.; Copas, A. J.; French, L.; French, P D; Johnson, A. M.; Behav Intervention Gay Men Project

    2001-01-01

    Objective To determine the effectiveness of a brief cognitive behavioural intervention in reducing the incidence of sexually transmitted infections among gay men.Design Randomised controlled trial with 12 months' follow up.Setting Sexual health clinic in London.Participants 343 gay men with an acute sexually transmitted infection or who reported having had unprotected anal intercourse in the past year.Main outcome measures Number of new sexually transmitted infections diagnosed during follow ...

  5. Clinical outcomes of a new cognitive-behaviour bibliotherapy for premature ejaculation

    OpenAIRE

    Kempeneers, Philippe; Andrianne, Robert; Bauwens, Sabrina; Blairy, Sylvie; Georis, Isabelle; Pairoux, Jean-françois

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION. Premature ejaculation (PE) is a common sexual disorder. However, only few affected people consult clinicians in order to overcome this problem. Although no definitive consensus about its aetiology emerges, some mechanisms of PE are now well known. This allows more precise and efficient treatments, both at pharmacological as well as cognitive-behavioural levels. Further, studies have shown that reading didactical documents about their PE problem might be useful to men. Such appro...

  6. Internet-based self-help therapy with FearFighter™ versus no intervention for anxiety disorders in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Morten; Lindschou, Jane; Gluud, Christian

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internet-based self-help psychotherapy (IBT) could be an important alternative or supplement to ordinary face-to-face therapy. The findings of randomised controlled trials indicate that the effects of various IBT programmes for anxiety disorders seem better than no intervention...... of the Internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (ICBT) programme FearFighter™ versus no intervention for anxiety disorders in adults. METHODS AND DESIGN: We will conduct an investigator-initiated, feasibility randomised controlled trial. Sixty-four participants are expected to be recruited via...... an advertisement posted on the homepage of the Student Counselling Service in Denmark. The inclusion criterion for participation in the trial will be the presence of anxiety disorder as assessed with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. The exclusion criteria will be suicidal risk, an ongoing episode...

  7. Psychotherapy Outcome Research: Issues and Questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shean, Glenn

    2016-03-01

    Emphasis on identifying evidence-based therapies (EBTs) has increased markedly. Lists of EBTs are the rationale for recommendations for how psychotherapy provider training programs should be evaluated, professional competence assessed, and licensure and reimbursement policies structured. There are however methodological concerns that limit the external validity of EBTs. Among the most salient is the circularity inherent in randomized control trials (RCTs) of psychotherapy that constrains the manner in which the psychological problems are defined, psychotherapy can be practiced, and change evaluated. RCT studies favor therapies that focus of specific symptoms and can be described in a manual, administered reliably across patients, completed in relatively few sessions, and involve short-term evaluations of outcome. The epistemological assumptions of a natural science approach to psychotherapy research limit how studies are conducted and assessed in ways that that advantage symptom-focused approaches and disadvantage those approaches that seek to bring broad recovery-based changes. Research methods that are not limited to RCTs and include methodology to minimize the effects of "therapist allegiance" are necessary for valid evaluations of therapeutic approaches that seek to facilitate changes that are broader than symptom reduction. Recent proposals to adopt policies that dictate training, credentialing, and reimbursement based on lists of EBTs unduly limit how psychotherapy can be conceptualized and practiced, and are not in the best interests of the profession or of individuals seeking psychotherapy services.

  8. Ayurvedic concepts related to psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behere, Prakash B; Das, Anweshak; Yadav, Richa; Behere, Aniruddh P

    2013-01-01

    The perfect balance of mind, body and soul is considered as complete health in Ayurveda. Ayurveda has its own identity as most ancient and traditional System of Medicine in India. Even Ayurveda emphasizes its treatment modalities into three parts viz. Satwawajay Chikitsa, Yuktivyapashray and Daivyapashray Chikitsa. Sattvavajaya therapy mentioned in Charakasamhita and it used as new concept of psychotherapy in Ayurveda. The effectiveness of "traditional mental health promoting practices" was identified as health regimens (swasthvrtt), correct behavior (sadvrtt), and yoga. Sattvavajaya as psychotherapy, is the mental restraint, or a "mind control" as referred by Caraka, is achieved through "spiritual knowledge, philosophy, fortitude, remembrance and concentration. Ayurvedic psychotherapy would play a dual role: First, as a revival of authentic medical culture, the exercise of a practice with an assumed primordial dimension, and second as a discovery of authentic subjectivity, the revelation of a self with an assumed interior depth. When we integrate the contemporary art of psychotherapy with the ancient science of Ayurveda, it becomes a powerful combination that is called Psycho Veda. The integration of Psycho and Veda is motivated by the complete integration of the immense but fairly contemporary view of the mind, emotions and psyche and how this performs in our lives. Integrating Psychotherapy and Vedic principles teaches us how to rediscover critical knowledge and awareness of the natural forces and rhythms that compliment and strengthen our human experience, through the understanding of the psyche and what our inner experiences are and also involving practical daily activities with thorough attention to our total environment to bring about radical changes in our mental outlook and in physical health.

  9. INTEGRATIVE PSYCHOTHERAPY AND MINDFULNESS: THE CASE OF SARA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihael Černetič

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the relationship between Integrative Psychotherapy and mindfulness on a theoretical as well as practical level. Although mindfulness is not an explicit constituent of Integrative Psychotherapy, the two are arguably a natural fit. Mindfulness has the potential to enhance internal and external contact, a central concept in Integrative Psychotherapy, as well as strengthen a client’s Adult ego state. This article presents a case study whereby Integrative Psychotherapy is analysed from the perspective of mindfulness. Within the course of therapy, parallels were observed between the client's increased mindfulness, improved internal and external contact, strengthened Adult ego state, mastery of introjections, as well as diminished feelings of guilt, improved mood, self care and ability to engage in appropriate separation and individuation. These gains support the conclusion that Integrative Psychotherapy and mindfulness are inherently related and that explicit incorporation of mindfulness may enhance the therapeutic process of Integrative Psychotherapy.

  10. Teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to psychiatric residents: an integrated approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastelum, Emily; Douglas, Carolyn J; Cabaniss, Deborah L

    2013-03-01

    There is enduring controversy in our field regarding the place for supportive interventions in psychodynamic psychotherapy. This controversy is reflected in the differing ways in which psychodynamic psychotherapy has been conceptualized and taught in psychiatric residency training programs. The authors propose an "integrated" approach for teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to trainees. In the integrated model, psychodynamic psychotherapy is conceptualized as a form of therapy designed to (a) uncover unconscious elements that influence thoughts, feelings, and behavior, and (b) support weakened psychological function. Using this model, residents learning psychodynamic psychotherapy are taught both uncovering and supporting techniques side by side in one course with specific guidelines for assessing when to use one set of interventions or the other. Teaching psychodynamic psychotherapy to residents in this integrated way prepares them to become skilled clinicians who are able to move fluidly from supporting to uncovering in a pragmatic and flexible manner, matched to the particular moment-to-moment needs of the individual patient.

  11. Is There Room for Criticism of Studies of Psychodynamic Psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thombs, Brett D.; Jewett, Lisa R.; Bassel, Marielle

    2011-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "The efficacy of psychodynamic psychotherapy," by J. Shedler. Shedler declared unequivocally that "empirical evidence supports the efficacy of psychodynamic therapy" (p. 98). He did not mention any specific criticisms that have been made of evidence on psychodynamic psychotherapies or address possible distinctions…

  12. Randomized Trial of Interpersonal Psychotherapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder in a Community-Based Psychiatric Outpatient Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekeblad, Annika; Falkenström, Fredrik; Andersson, Gerhard; Vestberg, Robert; Holmqvist, Rolf

    2016-12-01

    Interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are both evidence-based treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD). Several head-to-head comparisons have been made, mostly in the United States. In this trial, we compared the two treatments in a small-town outpatient psychiatric clinic in Sweden. The patients had failed previous primary care treatment and had extensive Axis-II comorbidity. Outcome measures were reduction of depressive symptoms and attrition rate. Ninety-six psychiatric patients with MDD (DSM-IV) were randomized to 14 sessions of CBT (n = 48) or IPT (n = 48). A noninferiority design was used with the hypothesis that IPT would be noninferior to CBT. A three-point difference on the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II) was used as noninferiority margin. IPT passed the noninferiority test. In the ITT group, 53.5% (23/43) of the IPT patients and 51.0% (24/47) of the CBT patients were reliably improved, and 20.9% (9/43) and 19.1% (9/47), respectively, were recovered (last BDI score depressed psychiatric patients in a community-based outpatient clinic. CBT had significantly more dropouts than IPT, indicating that CBT may be experienced as too demanding. Since about half the patients did not recover, there is a need for further treatment development for these patients. The study should be considered an effectiveness trial, with strong external validity but some limitations in internal validity. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Supporting cancer patients and their carers: the contribution of art therapy and clinical psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gudrun; Browning, Mary

    2009-11-01

    The value of various types of psychosocial support for people with cancer is now becoming well established. Typically the term 'psychosocial' includes: counselling and psychotherapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, education and information, and social support. The research literature sometimes fails to clarify the exact nature of the different approaches and their relative efficacy. Inevitably, even within a specific type of therapeutic approach, there is variation owing to the professional background and skills of different practitioners. This article describes the relative contributions made by an art psychotherapist and a clinical psychologist working together in a cancer and palliative care service in Wales. The referrals come from the same sources and tend to be for similar types of problem. The assessment and formulation processes are also broadly similar. Interventions, however, are markedly different. These are described in some detail through case study examples.

  14. Grundprinzipien der existenziellen Psychotherapie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Längle A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Die existenzielle Psychotherapie hat mit der humanistischen Psychotherapie zentrale Themen gemeinsam: personale Freiheit, Verantwortung, Sinnsuche, Authentizität. Die therapeutische Vorgangsweise ist primär phänomenologisch, d. h. auf den Einzelnen und die Einmaligkeit der Situation ausgerichtet. Begegnung der Person und Interesse an dem, was sie bewegt, steht vor der Anwendung von allgemeinen Techniken. Damit kommt die Person mit ihrer zentralen Fähigkeit, das für sie Wesentliche zu erfassen und der Entscheidung zuzuführen, in den Mittelpunkt des Geschehens. Das Auffinden der inneren Zustimmung zu dem, was man tut oder unterlässt, gilt als zentral in der Vorgangsweise der existenziellen Psychotherapie. So liegt das Interesse weniger in der Symptomfreiheit als im Erreichen persönlicher Erfüllung im Leben. Die Therapie beginnt darum meist mit der Arbeit an der Annahme, am Verstehen und an der Stellungnahme zu den Problemen und Erfahrungen, die das Leid verursachen. Diese dialogische Haltung ist auch bei chronischen Krankheiten von grundlegender Bedeutung. Psychische Störungen bzw. Krankheiten wirken sich hemmend auf den Vollzug dieser Fähigkeiten der authentischen Person aus, mit Auswirkungen vor allem auf die Qualität des (inneren und äußeren Dialogs. Dadurch entsteht neben dem spezifischen Leiden, das Bezug auf die jeweils gestörte existenzielle Struktur nimmt, ein Mangel an innerer Erfüllung im Leben, der als existenzielles Hauptsymptom gilt. Dem erfüllenden Dialog geht eine Offenheit des Menschen voraus, in der er sich vom Leben und von der Lebenssituation befragen lässt hinsichtlich dessen, was seine geeignete Antwort auf die Situation wäre. Nicht ausreichend gelebte Pflege und Sorge um die Grundstrukturen der Existenz wirken sich hemmend auf die Voraussetzungen für erfüllendes Leben aus: auf die personalen Fähigkeiten der Wahrnehmung, des Fühlens, Entscheidens und sich mit den Kontexten Abstimmens. Ein verminderter

  15. [Summary: Scientific evaluation of EMDR psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haour, F; de Beaurepaire, C

    2016-06-01

    The evaluation of psychotherapy methods is made difficult by their practical and theoretical diversities as well as the increasing number of available therapies. Evaluation based on scientific criteria in randomized control trials is providing the highest level of proof and recognition by Health Agencies. A recently described integrative psychotherapy, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), developed by F. Shapiro since 1989, has been confronted with the validation procedure used in pharmacological treatment. It was of interest to review the scientific validation steps carried out for this EMDR psychotherapy and for its mechanisms of action. The practical and methodological protocol of the EMDR psychotherapy for trauma integration is reviewed as well as clinical results and mechanisms. This EMDR therapy, focused on the resolutions of traumas, was started by treating patients with post-traumatic stress disorders (PTSD). The integrative EMDR protocol obtained the highest level of efficiency, for PTSD treatment, twenty years after its first publication. The efficiency of the protocol is now under study and scientific evaluation for troubles in which the trauma experiences are triggers or factors of maintenance of the troubles: anxiety, depression, phobia, sexual troubles, schizophrenia, etc. This new integrative psychotherapy follows the pathways and the timing observed for the evaluation and the validation of other therapies. Copyright © 2016 L'Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. PSYCHOTHERAPY SUPPORT ON SCIZOPHRENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widyawati Suhendro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE Schizophrenia is a disease that causes varying descriptions. The symptoms of schizophrenia are divided into two groups, the primary and secondary symptoms. Treatment should be done as soon as possible, because a state of psychotic periods raises the possibility to suffer mental decline. The treatment is carried out must be comprehensive, multimodal, empirically and can be applied to the patient. One therapy that is given is psychotherapy. Psychotherapy is usually combined with pharmacological actions in order to increase the level of maximum healing. /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

  17. Predicting rapid response to cognitive-behavioural treatment for panic disorder: the role of hippocampus, insula, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, Andrea; Thilo, Kai; Filippini, Nicola; Croft, Alison; Harmer, Catherine J

    2014-11-01

    Although cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) is an effective first-line intervention for anxiety disorders, treatments remain long and cost-intensive, difficult to access, and a subgroup of patients fails to show any benefits at all. This study aimed to identify functional and structural brain markers that predict a rapid response to CBT. Such knowledge will be important to establish the mechanisms underlying successful treatment and to develop more effective, shorter interventions. Fourteen unmedicated patients with panic disorder underwent 3 T functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before receiving four sessions of exposure-based CBT. Symptom severity was measured before and after treatment. During functional MRI, patients performed an emotion regulation task, either viewing negative images naturally, or intentionally down-regulating negative affect by using previously taught strategies of cognitive reappraisal. Structural MRI images were analysed including left and right segmentation and volume estimation. Improved response to brief CBT was predicted by increased pre-treatment activation in bilateral insula and left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during threat processing, as well as increased right hippocampal gray matter volume. Previous work links these regions to improved threat processing and fear memory activation, suggesting that the activation of such mechanisms is crucial for exposure-based CBT to be effective.

  18. An open trial of 'grief-help': a cognitive-behavioural treatment for prolonged grief in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spuij, Mariken; Dekovic, Maja; Boelen, Paul A

    2015-01-01

    In the past years, there is growing recognition of a syndrome of disturbed grief referred to as prolonged grief disorder (PGD). Although mostly studied in adults, clinically significant PGD symptoms have also been observed in children and adolescents. To date, no effective treatment for childhood PGD yet exists. We recently developed a nine-session cognitive-behavioural treatment for childhood PGD combined with five sessions of parental counselling. In the current article, we present outcomes of treatment of 10 consecutive children and adolescents turning to our university clinic with elevated PGD symptoms as their primary problem and main reason to seek therapy. Patients were significantly improved at post-treatment, with large improvements in self-rated PGD and post-traumatic stress (effect sizes > 0.8) and small to moderate improvement in depression and parent-rated internalizing and externalizing problems (0.2 < effect sizes < 0.8). Additional predictor analysis of outcomes suggested that, among other things, this treatment approach is less efficacious for children and adolescents further removed from loss and those confronted with suicidal loss. That said, the treatment appears promising, and controlled evaluation is clearly indicated.

  19. Threat-based cognitive biases in anxious children: comparison with non-anxious children before and after cognitive behavioural treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Allison M; Wharton, Trisha A; Zimmer-Gembeck, Melanie J; Craske, Michelle G

    2008-03-01

    Attention and interpretation biases for threat stimuli were assessed in 19 anxious (ANX) children before and after cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT), and compared with responses from 19 non-anxious (NA) control children collected over the same period. Attentional bias was assessed using a picture version of the visual probe task with threat, neutral and pleasant pictures. Threat interpretation bias was assessed using both a homographs task in which children used homograph words in a sentence and their neutral or threatening meaning was assessed, and a stories task in which children rated their negative emotion, danger judgments, and influencing ability in ambiguous situations. ANX children showed attention biases towards threat on the visual probe task and threat interpretation biases on the stories task but not the homographs task at pre-treatment in comparison with NA children. Following treatment, ANX children's threat interpretation biases as assessed on the stories task reduced significantly to within levels comparable to NA children. However, ANX children continued to show larger attentional biases towards threat than pleasant pictures on the visual probe task at post-treatment, whereas NA children did not show attentional biases. Moreover, a residual threat interpretation style on the stories task at post-treatment was associated with higher anxiety symptoms in both ANX and NA children.

  20. Alleviating distressing intrusive memories in depression: a comparison between computerised cognitive bias modification and cognitive behavioural education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newby, Jill M; Lang, Tamara; Werner-Seidler, Aliza; Holmes, Emily; Moulds, Michelle L

    2014-05-01

    Negative appraisals maintain intrusive memories and intrusion-distress in depression, but treatment is underdeveloped. This study compared the efficacy of computerised bias modification positive appraisal training (CBM) versus a therapist-delivered cognitive behavioural therapy session (CB-Education) that both aimed to target and alter negative appraisals of a negative intrusive autobiographical memory. Dysphoric participants (Mean BDI-II = 27.85; N = 60) completed baseline ratings of a negative intrusive memory, negative appraisals and the Impact of Event Scale, and were randomly allocated either one session of CBM, CB-Education, or a no intervention monitoring control condition (Control). Mood and intrusion symptoms were assessed at one week follow-up. For all groups, there were significant reductions over one week in mood (depression and anxiety), memory intrusiveness and negative appraisals. Groups differed in terms of intrusion-related distress, with the CB-Education group showing greatest reduction, followed by the CBM group. The study provides evidence for the link between maladaptive appraisals of intrusive memories and distress in depressed mood. Further, both a single session of CB-Education and (to a lesser degree) CBM are useful in reducing intrusion-related distress. This study may have been underpowered to detect differences and replication is needed with larger samples.

  1. 从认知行为治疗的发展看心理治疗的疗效评估%Evaluation of psychotherapy outcome: A perspective from cognitive behavioral therapy development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建平; 王晓菁; 唐苏勤

    2011-01-01

    Whether the outcome of psychological counseling and psychotherapy can be evaluated or not has always been a controversial debate among psychological scholars. Being able to evaluate the outcome is also the aim of different psychotherapy schools. In all schools of psychological counseling and therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is considered to be the only evidence-based psychotherapy. The author, being a CBT therapist herself, combined with her many years of practical experience of psychotherapy, as well as a lot of literature review, put forward her opinions on the origin, development and characteristics of CBT. The author believed that CBT follows the real " scientist-practitioner" model, and the effect of CBT can be evaluated with evidence support.%心理咨询与治疗的效果能否评估以及如何评估一直是学者们争议的话题,也是各心理咨询治疗流派努力的方向.在心理咨询与治疗各流派中,认知行为治疗(CBT)被认为是唯一循证的心理咨询治疗方法.本文作者是CBT治疗师,结合自己多年心理咨询治疗的实践经验和回顾相关文献,从CBT的起源、发展和特点,提出了自己的观点和看法,认为CBT是真正遵循和体现了“科学家-实践家”的模式,其效果是可以评价的,是有证据支持的.

  2. An evaluation of the effect of an educational intervention for Australian social workers on competence in delivering brief cognitive behavioural strategies: A randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moulding R

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad community access to high quality evidence-based primary mental health care is an ongoing challenge around the world. In Australia one approach has been to broaden access to care by funding psychologists and other allied health care professionals to deliver brief psychological treatments to general practitioners' patients. To date, there has been a scarcity of studies assessing the efficacy of social worker delivered psychological strategies. This study aims to build the evidence base by evaluating the impact of a brief educational intervention on social workers' competence in delivering cognitive behavioural strategies (strategies derived from cognitive behavioural therapy. Methods A randomised controlled trial design was undertaken with baseline and one-week follow-up measurement of both objective and self-perceived competence. Simulated consultations with standardised depressed patients were recorded on videotape and objective competence was assessed by blinded reviewers using the Cognitive Therapy Scale. Questionnaires completed by participants were used to measure self-perceived competence. The training intervention was a 15 hour face-to-face course involving presentations, video example consultations, written materials and rehearsal of skills in pairs. Results 40 Melbourne-based (Australia social workers enrolled and were randomised and 9 of these withdrew from the study before the pre training simulated consultation. 30 of the remaining 31 social workers (97% completed all phases of the intervention and evaluation protocol (16 from intervention and 14 from control group. The intervention group showed significantly greater improvements than the control group in objective competence (mean improvement of 14.2 (7.38-21.02 on the 66 point Cognitive Therapy Scale and in subjective confidence (mean improvement of 1.28 (0.84-1.72 on a 5 point Likert scale. On average, the intervention group improved from below to above

  3. Is Rational and Emotive Behavior Therapy a Scientific Psychotherapy?%理性情绪行为疗法理论之科学方法论分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚艳

    2013-01-01

      理性情绪行为疗法(REBT)是当代认知心理治疗理论的重要分支。该理论先后将方法论建立在逻辑经验主义和批判理性主义之上并最终在批判理性主义的视野下找到了其理论科学性之立足点——可证伪性。但由于REBT理论是心理治疗理论,它与经验科学毕竟存在着一定的区别,有学者对该理论以科学的心理治疗理论自居提出了质疑。文章认为,在波普的划界标准下,REBT理论是一种科学的心理治疗理论,它的基本概念具有逻辑一致性,其核心假设也具有可证伪性,它在经验的检验中不断修正与重构自身的理论体系,以开放、严谨的理论态度为其科学地位奠定了基础。%Rational and emotive behavior therapy (REBT) is an important branch of contemporary psychotherapy. Its methodology was first built on logical empiricism, and then critical rationalism. In this article, it is held that REBT is a scientific therapy under Popper’s standard of demarcation. Its basic concepts are consistent with each other and its core hypotheses are falsifiable. The system of REBT has been kept modifying and reconstructing during empirical testing. The opening and rigorous theory attitude has set a strong foundation for its scientific status.

  4. A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and a group version of cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy for chronically depressed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalak, Johannes; Schultze, Martin; Heidenreich, Thomas; Schramm, Elisabeth

    2015-10-01

    Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) has recently been proposed as a treatment option for chronic depression. The cognitive behavioral analysis system of psychotherapy (CBASP) is the only approach specifically developed to date for the treatment of chronically depressed patients. The efficacy of MBCT plus treatment-as-usual (TAU), and CBASP (group version) plus TAU, was compared to TAU alone in a prospective, bicenter, randomized controlled trial. One hundred and six patients with a current DSM-IV defined major depressive episode and persistent depressive symptoms for more than 2 years were randomized to TAU only (N = 35), or to TAU with additional 8-week group therapy of either 8 sessions of MBCT (n = 36) or CBASP (n = 35). The primary outcome measure was the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (24-item HAM-D, Hamilton, 1967) at the end of treatment. Secondary outcome measures were the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, Steer, & Brown, 1996) and measures of social functioning and quality of life. In the overall sample as well as at 1 treatment site, MBCT was no more effective than TAU in reducing depressive symptoms, although it was significantly superior to TAU at the other treatment site. CBASP was significantly more effective than TAU in reducing depressive symptoms in the overall sample and at both treatment sites. Both treatments had only small to medium effects on social functioning and quality of life. Further studies should inquire whether the superiority of CBASP in this trial might be explained by the more active, problem-solving, and interpersonal focus of CBASP. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. [Cognitive-behavioral therapy in obesity and activities of the STOB (Stop to Obesity) society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Málková, I

    2002-01-01

    STOB Society (STop to OBesity) was founded in the Czech Republic in 1991. It joins together psychologists, medical doctors, instructors of appropriate physical exercises and other professionals whose aim is to help obese people in the struggle with their excess weight. Activities of STOB Society are based on the method of cognitive behavioural psychotherapy, it proceeds from the assumption that inappropriate habits are learnt and so with a help of various techniques they can be also unlearnt. The aim is to induce desirable changes in behaviour, that is in eating and physical activity habits, and at the same time to get rid of the emotions and thoughts that lead to an inappropriate behaviour. The basis of cognitive-behavioural therapy is described. STOB Society popularizes appropriate and healthy way of weight reduction through articles in newspapers and journals, through programmes in radio and television and through brochure, audio and wide tapes, calendar etc. STOB Society organizes national campaigns in which it prompts thousands of obese people in the Czech Republic to appropriate eating and physical activity habits. It organizes "Weight reduction courses" in 70 towns in the Czech Republic.

  6. Cognitive-behavioural emotion writing tasks: a controlled trial of multiple processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Adam J; Dadds, Mark R

    2008-12-01

    We report on a controlled trial of three structured writing paradigms that engage the writer with cognitive-behavioural emotion-processes: exposure, devaluation, and benefit-finding. University students (N=198) wrote once a week for three weeks about their most upsetting experience. The long-term effects of these structured writing procedures were compared to an unstructured emotion writing condition and control. Outcomes indicated that exposure writing sped the reduction of intrusive and avoidant symptoms, while benefit-finding writing increased reports of positive growth. Results suggest the use of these paradigms to study emotion-processing mechanisms and, potentially, in practice to enhance coping in process-specific ways.

  7. Meaning-centered psychotherapy: a form of psychotherapy for patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lori P Montross; Meier, Emily A; Irwin, Scott A

    2014-10-01

    Caring for patients with cancer involves addressing their myriad physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. Although many cancer treatments focus on physical or psychological needs, few treatments specifically target the basic need for meaning and spiritual well-being in this population. This article describes the creation and evolution of a new psychotherapy devoted to these needs, a therapy termed "meaning-centered psychotherapy." In this article, a detailed description of meaning-centered psychotherapy is provided. An explanation of the current research findings related to this treatment are also offered, with information about the various group and individual treatments as well as the new expansions for use with cancer survivors or nursing staff. Overall, meaning-centered psychotherapy shows promise for enhancing meaning and spiritual well-being among patients with cancer and offers exciting possibilities for future research in other areas.

  8. Psychotherapy for Delinquents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Ian; Sullivan, Ann

    1996-01-01

    Presents the results of a psychotherapy consultation service for delinquents (n=47). Based on data obtained from this program and a review of relevant literature, a working model of individual psychotherapy related to attachment theory as it applies to this population is presented. Discusses difficulties that warrant resolution. (JPS)

  9. PSYCHOPATHOLOGY AND PSYCHOTHERAPY IN ISLAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amiruddin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychopathology is mental illness that has often suffered by human being. There are several factors that causes this illness, some of which are modern life characterized by materialistic, hedonistic and egoistic lives. In Islam, psychopathology which is described as a form of deviation from norms or moral values, spiritual and religion. Psychopathology is divided into three parts, namely those associated with faith, humanity and psychopathology which is associated with combination of faith and human being.Meanwhile psychotherapy is an effort to cure mental and psychiatric disorders suffered by individuals. Psychotherapy is a solution to cure various problems of mental disorders. Al-Qur’an, as the principles of Islamic teachings, contain information about psychotherapy for those who suffer from mental disorders. Religious approach is completely needed for therapy and it helps the psychopath recover from his/her mental disorders.TheQur’an could be used as a treatment as well as a preventive step, so that all human being will not suffer from mental disorders, and religious approach can bring the psychopaths closer to God, theAlmighty.

  10. [Psychotherapy with the unwilling patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madert, K K

    1984-05-01

    By means of the residential motivation therapy of addicts we discuss ways of dealing with the specific problems, that arise in psychotherapy of character disordered, who are not suffering psychically. The - in the view of the addict patient - often unvoluntary referral to the hospital provokes the patient's refusal of cooperation. The greatest therapeutic challenge is the ego-syntonicity of the character disorder and the rigid defense structure of overcompensation, projection and denial, covered up by rationalizations. This defense system serves to avoid closeness and contact with the original emotions. In our group setting we use mini-contracts, reality-oriented confrontation of behavioral issues in order to make the addict aware of his desperation and lack of fullfilment in life, and offer attractive models of living and the experience of warmth and bondedness in the group. Our main techniques are non-verbal. Body experience and full-body-expression of emotions mediate self-experience which is then integrated verbally. The goal of this psychoanalytically based psychotherapy is to bring about by working through resistances, the attitudes which are a precondition for continuing with a personality-changing psychotherapy.

  11. Psychotherapy, Pharmacotherapy, and Their Combination for Adolescents with Major Depressive Disorder: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nikita; Reece, John

    2014-01-01

    This meta-analysis aims to inform clinical practice of treatment strategies for adolescents with major depressive disorder (MDD). The efficacy of three empirically validated treatments was compared to determine the most effective treatment. These were: cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT), selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI)…

  12. The Subject in Cognitive Psychotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Caro-Gabalda

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the various subjects embedded in cognitive psychotherapy. The cognitive model developed by Beck, considered as a rationalist and modernist model, will exemplify these subjects. Cognitive therapy should be placed in the modernist historical context and related to a subject characterized as having rationality and the ability to observe and detect cognitions, emotions and behaviors. The paper develops this background introducing three main subject types. The first is the introspective and conscious subject, who is able to observe what is within oneself, has free access, and is conscious of one's cognitive world. The second is the cognitive miser that describes the subject who enters into therapy. The final subject identified, is the trained scientist who is able to develop a more objective knowledge, changing faulty schemas and cognitive distortions. This subject is the one most looked for in cognitive therapy. We could connect these subjects to some of the main elements of cognitive therapy such as the concept of ABC, assessment procedures, cognitive techniques or the relevance of schemas. Finally, the paper suggests some issues for study that could contribute to the theoretical and clinical evolution of cognitive psychotherapy.

  13. College Psychotherapy at a Hong Kong Counseling Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Eugenie Y.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents an online interview about college psychotherapy at a Hong Kong counseling center. The interview discusses how students generally feel about going for counseling or therapy and how common it is in Hong Kong.

  14. Grupoterapia cognitivo-comportamental para meninas vítimas de abuso sexual: descrição de um modelo de intervenção Cognitive-behavioural group therapy for sexual abused girls: description of an intervention model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luísa F. Habigzang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O abuso sexual contra crianças e adolescentes é uma forma de violência que pode desencadear disfunções cognitivas, emocionais e comportamentais que necessitam intervenção psicológica. O tratamento das vítimas e suas famílias é um desafio para a prática de psicólogos, devido à complexidade do fenômeno. O presente trabalho tem como objetivo descrever um processo de grupoterapia cognitivo-comportamental desenvolvido para casos de abuso sexual. As técnicas utilizadas são apresentadas a partir da experiência das autoras em uma pesquisa que objetivou avaliar a efetividade deste modelo. Participaram do estudo 10 meninas vítimas de abuso sexual intrafamiliar com idade entre 9 e 13 anos. Os resultados apontaram que o processo de grupoterapia contribui para a reestruturação de crenças, reações emocionais e comportamentais disfuncionais. O grupo representou um elo na rede de apoio social e afetiva das meninas e promoveu melhoras na qualidade de vida.The sexual abuse against children and adolescents is a violence form that can unchain cognitive, emotional, and behavioural dysfunctions that will need psychological intervention. The victim’ and families’ treatment are a challenge for the psychologists’ practice, due to the complexity of the phenomenon. The present study aims to describe a cognitive behavioral group therapy process developed for cases of sexual abuse. The techniques are based on previous experiences in a research that aimed at to evaluate the effectiveness of the model. Ten 9 to 13 year old girls, victims of intrafamilial sexual abuse participate in the study. The results pointed out to the contribution of the group therapy process to the restructuring of faiths, emotional reactions, and behavioral dysfunctions. The group represented a link in the girls’ social and emotional support network and improved their life quality.

  15. Individual psychotherapy as an adjunct to group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaranto, E A; Bender, S S

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a form of combined psychotherapy in which the individual sessions are used as an adjunct to group therapy. Each group member is seen regularly in individual sessions to focus primarily on the member's ongoing group work. The individual sessions are scheduled on a rotating basis. Typically, each group member is seen in an individual session once every four weeks. Additional individual sessions are available only when immediate attention is appropriate and necessary. The group is viewed as the primary therapeutic component. A cost-effective therapeutic approach that uses both individual and group methods, this modality lends itself well to a clinic and to a private practice setting.

  16. THERAPEUTIC EFFECTS OF A COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOURAL TREATMENT WITH JUVENILE OFFENDERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Andrés-Pueyo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Several treatment evaluations have highlighted the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioural programmes with both youth and adult offenders. This paper describes the application and assessment of a cognitive-behavioural treatment (adapted to Spanish from Ross and Fabiano’s Reasoning & Rehabilitation Programme with juvenile offenders serving community orders in an educational measure called in Spanish ‘libertad vigilada’ (similar to parole. The intervention comprised six different therapeutic components: self-control, cognitive restructuring, problem solving, social skills/assertiveness, values/empathy, and relapse prevention. Treatment effectiveness was tested using a quasi-experimental design involving two groups and pre/post evaluation. The results show that the programme was effective (with low to moderate effect sizes in improving participants’ social skills and self-esteem, as well as in reducing their aggressiveness. However, the intervention had no positive influence on empathy, cognitive distortions or impulsiveness. These results are in line with those of many other correctional studies, in which the treatment applied had a significant but partial effect on participants.

  17. Remote psychotherapy for terminally ill cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluver, Jeffrey S; Schuyler, Dean; Frueh, B Christopher; Brescia, Frank; Arana, George W

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a feasibility study of remote psychotherapy in 10 terminally ill cancer patients with diagnoses of adjustment disorder or major depression. Subjects received six sessions of individual cognitive therapy with the same therapist. Sessions alternated between face-to-face sessions and remote sessions delivered by analogue videophone. After each therapy session, a brief questionnaire was used to evaluate the subjects' level of satisfaction with the session, sense of connectedness to the therapist and overall progress being made in the therapy. Nine patients completed the study. Of 53 completed therapy sessions, 21 were by videophone and 32 were conducted face to face. Participants reported strong positive perceptions and acceptance after almost all therapy sessions, regardless of service delivery mode. The study suggests that there may be a role for the delivery of psychotherapy using low-bandwidth videophones.

  18. Innovative uses of psychodynamic group psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchele, B J

    1994-01-01

    Psychodynamic group psychotherapy is gaining renewed attention as an effective form of treatment, due in part to increasing economic constraints that make other forms of treatment less accessible. The author highlights some innovative applications of both extended and time-limited groups. She also describes specific issues that can be addressed effectively in homogeneous time-limited group therapy.

  19. Dialectical behaviour therapy and an added cognitive behavioural treatment module for eating disorders in women with borderline personality disorder and anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa who failed to respond to previous treatments. An open trial with a 15-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Christoph; Schweiger, Ulrich; Sipos, Valerija; Kliem, Sören; Arnold, Ruediger; Schunert, Tanja; Reinecker, Hans

    2010-12-01

    There is evidence from case studies suggesting that adapted dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) for borderline personality disorder (BPD) and eating disorders (ED) might improve disorder related complaints. Twenty-four women with BPD (9 with comorbid anorexia nervosa [AN] and 15 with bulimia nervosa [BN]), who already had failed to respond to previous eating-disorder related inpatient treatments were consecutively admitted to an adapted inpatient DBT program. Assessment points were at pre-treatment, post-treatment, and 15-month follow-up. At follow-up, the remission rate was 54% for BN, and 33% for AN. Yet 44% of women with AN crossed over to BN and one woman additionally met the criteria of AN. For women with AN, the mean weight was not significantly increased at post-treatment, but had improved at follow-up. For women with BN, the frequency of binge-eating episodes was reduced at post-treatment as well as at follow-up. Self-rated eating-related complaints and general psychopathology, as well as ratings on global psychosocial functioning, were significantly improved at post-treatment and at follow-up. Although these findings support the assumption that the adapted DBT inpatient program is a potentially efficacious treatment for those who failed to respond to previous eating-disorder related inpatient treatments, remission rates and maintained eating-related psychopathology also suggest that this treatment needs further improvement.

  20. Teaching focus in psychotherapy: a training essential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Richard F; Xuan, Yan; Tavakoli, Donald N

    2013-03-01

    Practical application of psychodynamic therapy technique requires that the therapist focus the treatment. The authors review the current evidence about focus in psychotherapy, which suggests that it has a beneficial impact on outcome and patient satisfaction. The core psychodynamic problem is proposed as a valuable conceptual model for providing focus for patient, psychotherapist, and supervisor. The authors narrate a case history from the perspective of both the psychotherapist and the supervisor to demonstrate the opportunities and challenges in using this concept. Finally, the authors suggest that a focus on focus is desirable in residency psychotherapy training programs, and they make suggestions for educational methods that enhance resident training in this area.

  1. Intensive psychotherapy for the psychiatrist's family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chessick, R D

    1977-10-01

    A series of intensive psychotherapy cases of wives and children of psychiatrists reveals that the special problems they present may be divided into those at the onset of treatment, those in the process of the treatment, and special countertransference problems. Paradoxically, early recognition and acceptance of psychotherapy are a foremost problem involving the psychiatrist as father or spouse. During therapy, narcissistic injuries to the psychiatrist father or spouse and loyalty problems in the patient emerge as special problems. Countertransference revolves around peer relationships and "psychopolitics," as well as referrals of other patients.

  2. WELLFOCUS PPT: Modifying positive psychotherapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riches, Simon; Schrank, Beate; Rashid, Tayyab; Slade, Mike

    2016-03-01

    Positive psychotherapy (PPT) is an established psychological intervention initially validated with people experiencing symptoms of depression. PPT is a positive psychology intervention, an academic discipline that has developed somewhat separately from psychotherapy and focuses on amplifying well-being rather than ameliorating deficit. The processes targeted in PPT (e.g., strengths, forgiveness, gratitude, savoring) are not emphasized in traditional psychotherapy approaches to psychosis. The goal in modifying PPT is to develop a new clinical approach to helping people experiencing psychosis. An evidence-based theoretical framework was therefore used to modify 14-session standard PPT into a manualized intervention, called WELLFOCUS PPT, which aims to improve well-being for people with psychosis. Informed by a systematic review and qualitative research, modification was undertaken in 4 stages: qualitative study, expert consultation, manualization, and stake-holder review. The resulting WELLFOCUS PPT is a theory-based 11-session manualized group therapy. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. The influence of psychotherapy on marriage typology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staniszewski Mirosław

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the influence of psychotherapeutic group work on matrimonial relations. Such questions are put up in the research as if participating of one of the married couples in a group psychotherapy could indirectly influence the other partner, and also if the type of matrimony could change under the influence of psychotherapy, for example from hierarchical to the partner’s. The article generalizes the classification of marriage types and pays special attention on the types that can be subject to the positive changes as a result of psychotherapeutic influence. Actuality and value of this research lay in estimation of the ability of psychotherapy to influence the matrimony on the whole in case when only one of the partners takes part in the therapy.

  4. Ancient Greek psychotherapy for contemporary nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkouta, Lambrini

    2002-08-01

    Ancient Greek physicians as well as philosophers were fully cognizant of a human being's psychological function and used their particular art to influence individual or social behavior in accordance with their pursuit. This art or technique favorably compares with several of the methods currently called supportive psychotherapy. This psychotherapy was the first form of care for people with mental health problems. Nurses who base their practice on ancient Greek psychotherapy see the patient as a whole, a person who creates meaning in life. Applying the philosophical principles of ancient Greeks helps nurses understand the behavior of people with mental health problems and recognize and facilitate adaptive satisfaction of these psychological needs. In addition, psychiatric nurses are able to help distressed individuals understand their fears and anxieties, so they are freed from the causes of their symptoms that led them to seek therapy in the first place. Consequently, this understanding can make psychiatric nurses' work a living experience and add meaning to their work.

  5. [Body-centered psychotherapy IKP (Institute of Body-Centered Psychotherapy): holistic psychotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Groeli, Y

    1996-03-01

    Body centered Psychotherapy IKP is treated in this article under the aspect of a holistic approach. First the theory and the system of science are summarised and shown as to which amount they are changing concerning knowledge of details and wholeness. It is pointed out that the actual paradigma "to the depth" has to be completed by that of "wideness". The way of holistic-multirelational thinking, stating a diagnosis and doing therapy is demonstrated along a case study going on at the background of a therapeutic encounter-relationship which is emotionally warm (Gestalt-approach).

  6. Aaron Temkin BECK: After Cricitical Thinking to A Creative Psychotherapy Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Mehmet DİNÇ

    2012-01-01

    There is growing interest in the cognitive psychotherapy all around the world including Turkey. According to American Institute of Cognitive Therapy; cognitive psychotherapy is the fastest growing and most rigorously studied kind of talk therapy and it is practiced around the world, taking hold in places from the Middle East to Japan. Cognitive psychotherapy was designed first by Aaron Temkin Beck in 1950’s. He has published over 450 articles and authored or co-authored sevent...

  7. Rates and predictors of referral for individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, and medications among Iraq and Afghanistan veterans with PTSD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mott, Juliette M; Barrera, Terri L; Hernandez, Caitlin; Graham, David P; Teng, Ellen J

    2014-04-01

    This study examined rates of referral for medication, individual psychotherapy, and group psychotherapy within a Veterans Affairs (VA) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) specialty mental health clinic. Participants were 388 Iraq and Afghanistan veterans who were referred for PTSD treatment following a mental health evaluation required for all new VA enrollees. The majority of the sample was referred for medication (79 %), with comparatively fewer referrals for individual (39 %) or group psychotherapy (24 %). Forty percent of participants were referred for combined medication and psychotherapy. Patient demographic and clinical characteristics were examined to determine whether these variables predicted referral type. Female veterans and those with lower clinician ratings of overall functioning were more likely to be referred for individual therapy. Group psychotherapy referrals were more common in veterans who were older, unemployed, identified as an ethnic minority, and had a comorbid anxiety disorder. There were no significant predictors of medication referral.

  8. New parity, same old attitude towards psychotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Norman A

    2010-03-01

    Full parity of health insurance benefits for treatment of mental illness, including substance use disorders, is a major achievement. However, the newly-published regulations implementing the legislation strongly endorse aggressive managed care as a way of containing costs for the new equality of coverage. Reductions in "very long episodes of out-patient care," hospitalization, and provider fees, along with increased utilization, are singled out as achievements of managed care. Medical appropriateness as defined by expert medical panels is to be the basis of authorizing care, though clinicians are familiar with a history of insurance companies' application of "medical necessity" to their own advantage. The regulations do not single out psychotherapy for attention, but long-term psychotherapy geared to the needs of each patient appears to be at risk. The author recommends that the mental health professions strongly advocate for the growing evidence base for psychotherapy including long-term therapy for complex mental disorders; respect for the structure and process of psychotherapy individualized to patients' needs; awareness of the costs of aggressive managed care in terms of money, time, administrative burden, and interference with the therapy; and recognition of the extensive training and experience required to provide psychotherapy as well as the stresses and demands of the work. Parity in out-of-network benefits could lead to aggressive management of care given by non-network practitioners. Since a large percentage of psychiatrists and other mental health professionals stay out of networks, implementation of parity for out-of-network providers will have to be done in a way that respects the conditions under which they would be willing and able to provide services, especially psychotherapy, to insured patients. The shortage of psychiatrists makes this an important access issue for the insured population in need of care.

  9. A three-component cognitive behavioural lifestyle program for preconceptional weight-loss in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): a protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiskoot, G; Benneheij, S H; Beerthuizen, A; de Niet, J E; de Klerk, C; Timman, R; Busschbach, J J; Laven, J S E

    2017-03-06

    Obesity in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) negatively affects all clinical features, and a 5 to 10% weight loss has shown promising results on reproductive, metabolic and psychological level. Incorporating a healthy diet, increasing physical activity and changing dysfunctional thought patterns in women with PCOS are key points in losing weight. The biggest challenge in weight management programs is to achieve a reasonable and sustainable weight loss. The aim of this study is to explore whether Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) by a mental health professional, working in a multidisciplinary team with a dietician and a physical therapist (a three-component intervention), is more effective for weight loss in the long term, within 12 months. We will also explore whether mobile phone applications are effective in supporting behavioural change and sustainable weight loss. The present study is a longitudinal randomized controlled trial (RCT) to study the effectiveness of a three-component 1-year cognitive-behavioural lifestyle intervention in overweight/obese women with PCOS. A total of 210 participants are randomly assigned to three groups: 1) CBT provided by the multidisciplinary team or; 2) CBT provided by the multidisciplinary team and Short Message Service (SMS) or; 3) usual care: encourage weight loss through publicly available services (control group). The primary aim of the 12-month intervention is to explore whether a three-component 1-year cognitive-behavioural lifestyle intervention is effective to decrease weight, when compared to usual care. Secondary outcomes include: the effect of the intervention on the PCOS phenotype, waist circumference, waist to hip ratio, ovulation rates, total testosterone, SHBG, free androgen index (FAI), AMH, hirsutism, acne, fasting glucose, blood pressure and all psychological parameters. Additionally, we assessed time to pregnancy, ongoing pregnancies, clinical pregnancies, miscarriages and birth weight. All

  10. Cognitive behavioural group treatment for Chinese parents with children with developmental disabilities in Melbourne, Australia: an efficacy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fu Keung Daniel; Poon, Ada

    2010-08-01

    This study attempted to test the efficacy of a culturally attuned cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) group for Chinese parents with children with developmental disabilities at risk of developing mental health problems in Melbourne, Australia. It was hypothesized that the participants in the experimental group would have less parenting stress and fewer dysfunctional attitudes, rules, and values, and better mental health and quality of life than the participants in the control group post-test. A total of 58 participants were randomly assigned into CBT and waiting list control groups. While ANCOVAs were used to compare the differences in General Health Questionnaires-12 (GHQ-12), Parenting Stress Index- Parent Domain (PSI-PD), Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnnaire-18 (Q-LES-Q-18) and Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS) between participants of the experiemental and control groups, effect size statistics were performed to measure the magnitude of changes in the above instruments at post treatment. After ten weeks of treatment, the participants in the CBT group showed significant improvement in GHQ-12, Parenting Stress Index (PSI)-Parent Domain and Q-LES-Q-18 scores, but not in DAS scores. The effect size statistics revealed large differences in GHQ-12, PSI-Parent Domain and Q-LES-Q-18 scores between the participants in the experimental and control groups at post-treatment. When a GHQ score of 4 or greater was used as the recommended cut-off score, about 89% and 10% of the participants in the experimental and control groups, respectively, were classified as not at-risk cases at post-treatment. The initial findings suggest that a culturally attuned CBT group may help Chinese parents with children with developmental disabilities to reduce their parenting stress and improve their general mental health and quality of life.

  11. Facing the fear--clinical and neural effects of cognitive behavioural and pharmacotherapy in panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebscher, Carolin; Wittmann, André; Gechter, Johanna; Schlagenhauf, Florian; Lueken, Ulrike; Plag, Jens; Straube, Benjamin; Pfleiderer, Bettina; Fehm, Lydia; Gerlach, Alexander L; Kircher, Tilo; Fydrich, Thomas; Deckert, Jürgen; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich; Heinz, Andreas; Arolt, Volker; Ströhle, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and pharmacological treatment with selective serotonin or serotonin-noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI/SSNRI) are regarded as efficacious treatments for panic disorder with agoraphobia (PD/AG). However, little is known about treatment-specific effects on symptoms and neurofunctional correlates. We used a comparative design with PD/AG patients receiving either two types of CBT (therapist-guided (n=29) or non-guided exposure (n=22)) or pharmacological treatment (SSRI/SSNRI; n=28) as well as a wait-list control group (WL; n=15) to investigate differential treatment effects in general aspects of fear and depression (Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale HAM-A and Beck Depression Inventory BDI), disorder-specific symptoms (Mobility Inventory MI, Panic and Agoraphobia Scale subscale panic attacks PAS-panic, Anxiety Sensitivity Index ASI, rating of agoraphobic stimuli) and neurofunctional substrates during symptom provocation (Westphal-Paradigm) using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Comparisons of neural activation patterns also included healthy controls (n=29). Both treatments led to a significantly greater reduction in panic attacks, depression and general anxiety than the WL group. The CBT groups, in particular, the therapist-guided arm, had a significantly greater decrease in avoidance, fear of phobic situations and anxiety symptoms and reduction in bilateral amygdala activation while the processing of agoraphobia-related pictures compared to the SSRI/SSNRI and WL groups. This study demonstrates that therapist-guided CBT leads to a more pronounced short-term impact on agoraphobic psychopathology and supports the assumption of the amygdala as a central structure in a complex fear processing system as well as the amygdala's involvement in the fear system's sensitivity to treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  12. Group-based cognitive-behavioural anger management for people with mild to moderate intellectual disabilities: cluster randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willner, Paul; Rose, John; Jahoda, Andrew; Kroese, Biza Stenfert; Felce, David; Cohen, David; Macmahon, Pamela; Stimpson, Aimee; Rose, Nicola; Gillespie, David; Shead, Jennifer; Lammie, Claire; Woodgate, Christopher; Townson, Julia; Nuttall, Jacqueline; Hood, Kerenza

    2013-09-01

    Many people with intellectual disabilities find it hard to control their anger and this often leads to aggression which can have serious consequences, such as exclusion from mainstream services and the need for potentially more expensive emergency placements. To evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) intervention for anger management in people with intellectual disabilities. A cluster-randomised trial of group-based 12-week CBT, which took place in day services for people with intellectual disabilities and was delivered by care staff using a treatment manual. Participants were 179 service users identified as having problems with anger control randomly assigned to either anger management or treatment as usual. Assessments were conducted before the intervention, and at 16 weeks and 10 months after randomisation (trial registration: ISRCTN37509773). The intervention had only a small, and non-significant, effect on participants' reports of anger on the Provocation Index, the primary outcome measure (mean difference 2.8, 95% CI -1.7 to 7.4 at 10 months). However, keyworker Provocation Index ratings were significantly lower in both follow-up assessments, as were service-user ratings on another self-report anger measure based on personally salient triggers. Both service users and their keyworkers reported greater usage of anger coping skills at both follow-up assessments and keyworkers and home carers reported lower levels of challenging behaviour. The intervention was effective in improving anger control by people with intellectual disabilities. It provides evidence of the effectiveness of a CBT intervention for this client group and demonstrates that the staff who work with them can be trained and supervised to deliver such an intervention with reasonable fidelity.

  13. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people learn tools, exercises, and concrete things they can do to manage their emotions when certain challenging ... treatment (such as medications or individual psychotherapy), STEPPS can help reduce symptoms and problem BPD behaviors, relieve ...

  14. Values in psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, J

    1996-01-01

    There is a tension between those who hold that psychotherapy is a scientific discipline and therefore "value-free," and those who believe that values are inherent in the nature of psychotherapy. Psychoanalysis has moved from a science-based ideology, through the ethical concerns of Melanie Klein, to a recognition of the "aesthetic" dimension--the creation of suitable forms that can contain psychological distress. From this latter perspective, the antagonism between religion and psychotherapy, initiated by Freud, becomes less acute. Action-based ethical systems, which ignore the inner world, are critically scrutinized. The evidence suggesting there is a relationship between good outcome in psychotherapy and shared values between therapist and client is reviewed. It is posited that through examination of the "ethical countertransference," therapists should become aware of their own value systems and how they influence practice.

  15. Borderline Personality Disorder: Psychotherapy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... identify and verbally express their emotions, describe their interactions with other people, and talk about themselves and ... stress (particularly the stress of rejection or disappointing interactions with other people). Supportive Psychotherapy A form of ...

  16. Introduction: Psychotherapy for Psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Beginning with Paul Federn--a contemporary of Sigmund Freud--every generation of psychotherapists for the past hundred years has included a small number of determined clinicians who have worked psychotherapeutically with psychotic patients, and written about their work. This special issue of the American Journal of Psychotherapy contains seven papers by clinicians in this generation who are using psychotherapy in the treatment of psychosis.

  17. A COGNITIVE-BEHAVIOURAL GROUP TREATMENT IMPROVED WORK ABILITY IN PATIENTS WITH SEVERE FUNCTIONAL SOMATIC SYNDROMES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schröder, Andreas; Ørnbøl, Eva; Jensen, Jens Søndergaard

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Functional somatic syndromes (FSS) such as fibromyalgia, irritable bowel and chronic fatigue syndrome often disrupt employment and may lead to long-term dependence on social benefits and permanently reduced work ability. Cognitive-behavioural treatments (CBT) relief symptoms and improve...... functioning in FSS, but their effect on work ability is unclear. The aim of this study was to estimate the long-term effect of group CBT on work ability in patients with severe FSS. Methods: 120 Patients from a recently published randomised controlled trial comparing group CBT with enhanced usual care (EUC...... before to 3 years after treatment by means of random effects modelling allowing individual levels and slopes. Results: Compared with the general population, FSS patients showed a continuous decline in self-support, leading to markedly reduced work ability at trial entry. In the following years, EUC...

  18. 论低阻抗意念导入疗法与叙事疗法之异同%The similarities and differences between thought imprint psychotherapy under hypnosis and narrative therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张锦花; 吕学玉; 杜辉; 汪卫东

    2014-01-01

    Thought Imprint Psychotherapy under Hypnosis(TIP)and Narrative Therapy are two different kinds of psychotherapy, both with the characteristic of story treatment. The psychotherapist uses re-growth means in TIP treatment, and Narrative Therapy uses means such as externalizing problems, reconstructing story, and so on. This article chiefly discusses two treatments, to confirm some similarities and differences between them and provide guidance for the actual treatment.%低阻抗意念导入疗法(TIP技术)与叙事疗法是两种不同的心理疗法,二者均具有运用故事治疗的特点。其中,TIP技术在治疗中运用故事进行再成长治疗,叙事疗法则是通过问题外化、故事重构等手段进行治疗。本文就两种疗法展开简要探讨,明确两种治疗方法的异同以指导治疗。

  19. Improved physical fitness of cancer survivors : A randomised controlled trial comparing physical training with physical and cognitive-behavioural training

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    May, Anne M.; Van Weert, Ellen; Korstjens, Irene; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E. H. M.; Van Der Schans, Cees P.; Zonderland, Maria L.; Mesters, Ilse; Van Den Borne, Bart; Ros, Wynand J. G.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the effect of a group-based 12-week supervised exercise programme, i.e. aerobic and resistance exercise, and group sports, with that of the same programme combined with cognitive-behavioural training on physical fitness and activity of cancer survivors. One hundred and forty seven cancer

  20. Evidence-Based Training in Cognitive-Behavioural Coaching: Can Personal Development Bring Less Distress and Better Performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Oana A.; Cobeanu, Oana

    2016-01-01

    Coaching has become during the past years an emergent guidance profession. Cognitive-behavioural coaching (CBC) emphasises the importance of enhancing the emotion-regulation abilities of clients and replacing their non-productive behaviours. Qualified professionals are needed in order to effectively facilitate the desired changes in their clients.…